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Sample records for human cannabinoid pharmacokinetics

  1. [Tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics; new synthetic cannabinoids; road safety and cannabis].

    PubMed

    Goullé, Jean-Perre; Guerbet, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, a drug which is commonly smoked This paper focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The average THC content in cannabis plant material has risen by a factor offour over the past 20 years, from 4% to 16%. This increase has important implications not only for the pharmacokinetics but also for the pharmacology of THC The mean bioavailability of THC in smoked cannabis is about 25%. In a cigarette containing 3.55% of THC, a peak plasma level of about 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is quickly cleared from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, leading to its pharmacologic effects. Body fat is a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetic behavior explains the lack of correlation between the THC blood level and clinical effects, contrary to ethanol. The main THC metabolites are 11-OH-THC (the only active metabolite) and THC-COOH, which is eliminated in feces and urine over several weeks. Therefore, abstinence can be established by analyzing THC-COOH in urine, while blood THC analysis is used to confirm recent exposure. Cannabis is the main illicit drug found among vehicle drivers. Various traffic safety studies indicate that recent use of this drug at least doubles the risk of causing an accident, and that simultaneous alcohol consumption multiplies this risk by afactor of 14. Since 2009, synthetic cannabinoids have emerged on the illicit drug market. These substances act on the same CB1 receptors as THC, but with higher afinity. Their pharmacokinetics differs from that of THC, as they are metabolized into multiple derivatives, most of which are more active than THC itself.

  2. Influence of ethanol on cannabinoid pharmacokinetic parameters in chronic users.

    PubMed

    Toennes, Stefan W; Schneider, Kirsten; Kauert, Gerold F; Wunder, Cora; Moeller, Manfred R; Theunissen, Eef L; Ramaekers, Johannes G

    2011-04-01

    Cannabis is not only the most widely used illicit drug worldwide but is also regularly consumed along with ethanol. In previous studies, it was assumed that cannabis users develop cross-tolerance to ethanol effects. The present study was designed to compare the effects of ethanol in comparison to and in combination with a cannabis joint and investigate changes in pharmacokinetics. In this study, 19 heavy cannabis users participated and received three alcohol dosing conditions that were calculated to achieve steady blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) of about 0, 0.5 and 0.7 g/l during a 5-h time window. Subjects smoked a Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) cigarette (400 μg/kg) 3 h post-onset of alcohol dosing. Blood samples were taken between 0 and 4 h after smoking. During the first hour, samples were collected every 15 min and every 30 min thereafter. Mean steady-state BACs reached 0, 0.36 and 0.5 g/l. The apparent elimination half-life of THC was slightly prolonged (1.59 vs. 1.93 h, p < 0.05) and the concentration 1 h after smoking was slightly lower (24 vs. 17 ng/ml, p < 0.05) with the higher ethanol dose. The prolonged THC elimination might be explained by a small ethanol-mediated change in distribution to and from deep compartments. Concentrations and pharmacokinetics of 11-hydroxy-THC and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCA) were not significantly influenced by ethanol. However, THCA concentrations appeared lower in both ethanol conditions, which might also be attributable to changes in distribution. Though not significant in the present study, this might be relevant in the interpretation of cannabinoid concentrations in blood.

  3. Human Laboratory Studies on Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Mohamed; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Ranganathan, Mohini

    2016-04-01

    Some of the most compelling evidence supporting an association between cannabinoid agonists and psychosis comes from controlled laboratory studies in humans. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover laboratory studies demonstrate that cannabinoid agonists, including phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids, produce a wide range of positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms and psychophysiologic deficits in healthy human subjects that resemble the phenomenology of schizophrenia. These effects are time locked to drug administration, are dose related, and are transient and rarely necessitate intervention. The magnitude of effects is similar to the effects of ketamine but qualitatively distinct from other psychotomimetic drugs, including ketamine, amphetamine, and salvinorin A. Cannabinoid agonists have also been shown to transiently exacerbate symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia in laboratory studies. Patients with schizophrenia are more vulnerable than healthy control subjects to the acute behavioral and cognitive effects of cannabinoid agonists and experience transient exacerbation of symptoms despite treatment with antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, laboratory studies have failed to demonstrate any "beneficial" effects of cannabinoid agonists in individuals with schizophrenia-challenging the cannabis self-medication hypothesis. Emerging evidence suggests that polymorphisms of several genes related to dopamine metabolism (e.g., COMT, DAT1, and AKT1) may moderate the effects of cannabinoid agonists in laboratory studies. Cannabinoid agonists induce dopamine release, although the magnitude of release does not appear to be commensurate to the magnitude and spectrum of their acute psychotomimetic effects. Interactions between the endocannabinoid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and glutamate systems and their individual and interactive effects on neural oscillations provide a plausible mechanism underlying the psychotomimetic effects of

  4. Human studies of cannabinoids and medicinal cannabis.

    PubMed

    Robson, P

    2005-01-01

    Cannabis has been known as a medicine for several thousand years across many cultures. It reached a position of prominence within Western medicine in the nineteenth century but became mired in disrepute and legal controls early in the twentieth century. Despite unremitting world-wide suppression, recreational cannabis exploded into popular culture in the 1960s and has remained easily obtainable on the black market in most countries ever since. This ready availability has allowed many thousands of patients to rediscover the apparent power of the drug to alleviate symptoms of some of the most cruel and refractory diseases known to humankind. Pioneering clinical research in the last quarter of the twentieth century has given some support to these anecdotal reports, but the methodological challenges to human research involving a pariah drug are formidable. Studies have tended to be small, imperfectly controlled, and have often incorporated unsatisfactory synthetic cannabinoid analogues or smoked herbal material of uncertain composition and irregular bioavailability. As a result, the scientific evaluation of medicinal cannabis in humans is still in its infancy. New possibilities in human research have been opened up by the discovery of the endocannabinoid system, a rapidly expanding knowledge of cannabinoid pharmacology, and a more sympathetic political environment in several countries. More and more scientists and clinicians are becoming interested in exploring the potential of cannabis-based medicines. Future targets will extend beyond symptom relief into disease modification, and already cannabinoids seem to offer particular promise in the treatment of certain inflammatory and neurodegenerative conditions. This chapter will begin with an outline of the development and current status of legal controls pertaining to cannabis, following which the existing human research will be reviewed. Some key safety issues will then be considered, and the chapter will conclude with

  5. Identification of Recent Cannabis Use: Whole-Blood and Plasma Free and Glucuronidated Cannabinoid Pharmacokinetics following Controlled Smoked Cannabis Administration

    PubMed Central

    Schwope, David M.; Karschner, Erin L.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the most frequently observed illicit drug in investigations of accidents and driving under the influence of drugs. THC-glucuronide has been suggested as a marker of recent cannabis use, but there are no blood data following controlled THC administration to test this hypothesis. Furthermore, there are no studies directly examining whole-blood cannabinoid pharmacokinetics, although this matrix is often the only available specimen. METHODS Participants (9 men, 1 woman) resided on a closed research unit and smoked one 6.8% THC cannabis cigarette ad libitum. We quantified THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), THC-glucuronide and THCCOOH-glucuronide directly in whole blood and plasma by liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry within 24 h of collection to obviate stability issues. RESULTS Median whole blood (plasma) observed maximum concentrations (Cmax) were 50 (76), 6.4 (10), 41 (67), 1.3 (2.0), 2.4 (3.6), 89 (190), and 0.7 (1.4) μg/L 0.25 h after starting smoking for THC, 11-OH-THC, THCCOOH, CBD, CBN, and THCCOOH-glucuronide, respectively, and 0.5 h for THC-glucuronide. At observed Cmax, whole-blood (plasma) detection rates were 60% (80%), 80% (90%), and 50% (80%) for CBD, CBN, and THC-glucuronide, respectively. CBD and CBN were not detectable after 1 h in either matrix (LOQ 1.0 μg/L). CONCLUSIONS Human whole-blood cannabinoid data following cannabis smoking will assist whole blood and plasma cannabinoid interpretation, while furthering identification of recent cannabis intake. PMID:21836075

  6. Pharmacokinetic properties of the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and of its metabolites in serum after inhalation.

    PubMed

    Toennes, Stefan W; Geraths, Anna; Pogoda, Werner; Paulke, Alexander; Wunder, Cora; Theunissen, Eef L; Ramaekers, Johannes G

    2017-03-24

    Each year, synthetic cannabinoids are occurring in high numbers in the illicit drug market, but data on their pharmacology and toxicology are scarcely available. Therefore, a pilot study was performed to assess adverse effects of JWH-018, which is one of the oldest and best known synthetic cannabinoids. Six subjects inhaled smoke from 2 and 3mg JWH-018. The drug and nine of its metabolites were analyzed in their blood samples taken during the following 12h by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS). The maximum concentration of JWH-018 reached 2.9-9.9ng/ml after inhalation and markedly decreased during the next 1.5h, followed by a multiexponential decline (t1/2 in median 1.3h and 5.7h). The concentration of the pentanoic acid metabolite was slightly higher than that of the 3-, 4- and 5-hydroxypentyl metabolites and of the 6-hydroxyindol metabolite. The data also suggest a multiexponential decline and slow terminal elimination of JWH-018 and all metabolites. The detection of JWH-018 and of its metabolites in serum requires high analytical sensitivity. The pharmacokinetic properties of inhaled JWH-018 are similar to that of THC. A slow terminal elimination of drug and metabolites may lead to accumulation in chronic users.

  7. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Melck, Dominique; Palmisano, Antonella; Bisogno, Tiziana; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of “central” CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 μM and 83–92% maximal inhibition at 5–10 μM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 μM anandamide. The anti-proliferative effect of anandamide was not due to toxicity or to apoptosis of cells but was accompanied by a reduction of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. A stable analogue of anandamide (R)-methanandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 also inhibited EFM-19 cell proliferation, whereas arachidonic acid was much less effective. These cannabimimetic substances displaced the binding of the selective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP 55,940 to EFM-19 membranes with an order of potency identical to that observed for the inhibition of EFM-19 cell proliferation. Moreover, anandamide cytostatic effect was inhibited by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Cell proliferation was arrested by a prolactin mAb and enhanced by exogenous human prolactin, whose mitogenic action was reverted by very low (0.1–0.5 μM) doses of anandamide. Anandamide suppressed the levels of the long form of the prolactin receptor in both EFM-19 and MCF-7 cells, as well as a typical prolactin-induced response, i.e., the expression of the breast cancer cell susceptibility gene brca1. These data suggest that anandamide blocks human breast cancer cell proliferation through CB1-like receptor-mediated inhibition of endogenous prolactin action at the level of prolactin receptor. PMID:9653194

  8. Exogenous delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol influences circulating endogenous cannabinoids in humans.

    PubMed

    Walter, Carmen; Ferreirós, Nerea; Bishay, Philipp; Geisslinger, Gerd; Tegeder, Irmgard; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-10-01

    Delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) competes with the endogenous cannabinoids arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) at cannabinoid receptors. This may cause adaptive changes in the endocannabinoid signaling cascade with possible consequences for the biological functions of the endocannabinoid system. We show that administration of a single oral dose of 20 mg THC to 30 healthy volunteers resulted in higher circulating concentrations of anandamide, 2-AG, palmitoyl ethanolamide, and oleoylethanolamide at 2 and 3 hours after administration as compared with placebo. At 2 hours after THC administration, changes in oleoylethanolamide plasma concentrations from baseline were linearly related to the THC plasma concentrations. In rats, treatment with the CB₁/CB₂ agonist WIN 55,212 also increased plasma endocannabinoid concentrations. However, this was associated with a decrease of ethanolamide endocannabinoids in specific brain regions including spinal cord, cortex, and hypothalamus; whereas 2-arachidonoyl glycerol increased in the cortex. Thus, administration of THC to human volunteers influenced the concentrations of circulating endocannabinoids, which was mimicked by WIN-55,212 in rats, suggesting that exogenous cannabinoids may lead to changes in the endocannabinoid system that can be detected in plasma.

  9. The future of cannabinoids as analgesic agents: a pharmacologic, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic overview.

    PubMed

    McCarberg, Bill H; Barkin, Robert L

    2007-01-01

    For thousands of years, physicians and their patients employed cannabis as a therapeutic agent. Despite this extensive historical usage, in the Western world, cannabis fell into disfavor among medical professionals because the technology available in the 1800s and early 1900s did not permit reliable, standardized preparations to be developed. However, since the discovery and cloning of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) in the 1990s, scientific interest in the area has burgeoned, and the complexities of this fascinating receptor system, and its endogenous ligands, have been actively explored. Recent studies reveal that cannabinoids have a rich pharmacology and may interact with a number of other receptor systems-as well as with other cannabinoids-to produce potential synergies. Cannabinoids-endocannabinoids, phytocannabinoids, and synthetic cannabinoids-affect numerous bodily functions and have indicated efficacy of varying degrees in a number of serious medical conditions. Nevertheless, despite promising preclinical and early clinical data, particularly in the areas of inflammation and nociception, development challenges abound. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other CB1 receptor agonists can have an undesirable CNS impact, and, in many cases, dose optimization may not be realizable before onset of excessive side effects. In addition, complex botanically derived cannabinoid products must satisfy the demanding criteria of the U.S. Food and Drug Association's approval process. Recent agency guidance suggests that these obstacles are not insurmountable, although cannabis herbal material ("medical marijuana") may present fatal uncertainties of quality control and dosage standardization. Therefore, formulation, composition, and delivery system issues will affect the extent to which a particular cannabinoid product may have a desirable risk-benefit profile and acceptable abuse liability potential. Cannabinoid receptor agonists and/or molecules that affect the modulation

  10. Cannabinoids: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Le Foll, B; Tyndale, R F

    2015-06-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on cannabinoids. Our understanding of these interesting endogenous and synthetic compounds, and their role in the cannabinoid system, has evolved dramatically, in part because of the acquisition of new research tools. Cannabis has been used for centuries by humans for recreational and medicinal purposes, however, there is substantial evidence that cannabis use can expose people to varying complications (e.g., risk of addiction, cognitive impairment), thus, it is important to determine the benefit/risk of cannabis with precision and to implement policy measures based on evidence to maximize the benefits and minimize the harm. Novel cannabinoid drugs are emerging for medicinal use (e.g., dronabinol, nabiximols) and as illicit drugs (e.g., Spice, K2) perpetuating the perception that cannabinoid drugs can be a friend or foe. This special issue will cover these various aspects of cannabinoid pharmacology and therapeutics ranging from basic chemistry, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical trial results, to policy and education efforts in this area.

  11. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  12. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  13. Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1.

    PubMed

    Hua, Tian; Vemuri, Kiran; Pu, Mengchen; Qu, Lu; Han, Gye Won; Wu, Yiran; Zhao, Suwen; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Shanshan; Korde, Anisha; Laprairie, Robert B; Stahl, Edward L; Ho, Jo-Hao; Zvonok, Nikolai; Zhou, Han; Kufareva, Irina; Wu, Beili; Zhao, Qiang; Hanson, Michael A; Bohn, Laura M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Stevens, Raymond C; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2016-10-20

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive chemical from Cannabis sativa with a wide range of therapeutic applications and a long history of recreational use. CB1 is activated by endocannabinoids and is a promising therapeutic target for pain management, inflammation, obesity, and substance abuse disorders. Here, we present the 2.8 Å crystal structure of human CB1 in complex with AM6538, a stabilizing antagonist, synthesized and characterized for this structural study. The structure of the CB1-AM6538 complex reveals key features of the receptor and critical interactions for antagonist binding. In combination with functional studies and molecular modeling, the structure provides insight into the binding mode of naturally occurring CB1 ligands, such as THC, and synthetic cannabinoids. This enhances our understanding of the molecular basis for the physiological functions of CB1 and provides new opportunities for the design of next-generation CB1-targeting pharmaceuticals.

  14. Plasma Cannabinoid Pharmacokinetics After Controlled Smoking and Ad libitum Cannabis Smoking in Chronic Frequent Users

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dayong; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J.; Queiroz, Regina H.C.; Vandrey, Ryan; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    More Americans are dependent on cannabis than any other illicit drug. The main analytes for cannabis testing include the primary psychoactive constituent, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), equipotent 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and inactive 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). Eleven adult chronic frequent cannabis smokers resided on a closed research unit with unlimited access to 5.9% THC cannabis cigarettes from 12:00 to 23:00 during two ad libitum smoking phases, followed by a 5-day abstinence period in seven participants. A single cigarette was smoked under controlled topography on the last day of the smoking and abstinence phases. Plasma cannabinoids were quantified by two-dimensional gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Median plasma maximum concentrations (Cmax) were 28.3 (THC), 3.9 (11-OH-THC) and 47.0 μg/L (THCCOOH) 0.5 h after controlled single cannabis smoking. Median Cmax 0.2–0.5 h after ad libitum smoking was higher for all analytes: 83.5 (THC), 14.2 (11-OH-THC) and 155 μg/L (THCCOOH). All 11 participants' plasma samples were THC and THCCOOH-positive, 58.3% had THC ≥5 μg/L and 79.2% were 11-OH-THC-positive 8.1–14 h after last cannabis smoking. Cannabinoid detection rates in seven participants 106–112 h (4–5 days) after last smoking were 92.9 (THC), 35.7 (11-OH-THC) and 100% (THCCOOH), with limits of quantification of 0.5 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH, and 1.0 μg/L for 11-OH-THC. These data greatly expand prior research findings on cannabinoid excretion profiles in chronic frequent cannabis smokers during ad libitum smoking. Smoking multiple cannabis cigarettes led to higher Cmax and AUC compared with smoking a single cigarette. The chronic frequent cannabis smokers exhibited extended detection windows for plasma cannabinoids, reflecting a large cannabinoid body burden. PMID:26378131

  15. Cannabinoid facilitation of fear extinction memory recall in humans.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Sripada, Chandra S; Abelson, James L; Liberzon, Israel; Milad, Mohammed R; Phan, K Luan

    2013-01-01

    A first-line approach to treat anxiety disorders is exposure-based therapy, which relies on extinction processes such as repeatedly exposing the patient to stimuli (conditioned stimuli; CS) associated with the traumatic, fear-related memory. However, a significant number of patients fail to maintain their gains, partly attributed to the fact that this inhibitory learning and its maintenance is temporary and conditioned fear responses can return. Animal studies have shown that activation of the cannabinoid system during extinction learning enhances fear extinction and its retention. Specifically, CB1 receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC), can facilitate extinction recall by preventing recovery of extinguished fear in rats. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in humans. We conducted a study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design, coupling a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and simultaneous skin conductance response (SCR) recording with an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) or placebo (PBO) 2 h prior to extinction learning in 29 healthy adult volunteers (THC = 14; PBO = 15) and tested extinction retention 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects that received PBO, subjects that received THC showed low SCR to a previously extinguished CS when extinction memory recall was tested 24 h after extinction learning, suggesting that THC prevented the recovery of fear. These results provide the first evidence that pharmacological enhancement of extinction learning is feasible in humans using cannabinoid system modulators, which may thus warrant further development and clinical testing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'.

  16. Genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG theta power in humans.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Kenemans, J L; Böcker, K B E; Baas, J M P

    2014-11-01

    It has long been postulated that exogenous cannabinoids have a profound effect on human cognitive functioning. These cannabinoid effects are thought to depend, at least in parts, on alterations of phase-locking of local field potential neuronal firing. The latter can be measured as activity in the theta frequency band (4-7Hz) by electroencephalogram. Theta oscillations are supposed to serve as a mechanism in neural representations of behaviorally relevant information. However, it remains unknown whether variability in endogenous cannabinoid activity is involved in theta rhythms and therefore, may serve as an individual differences index of human cognitive functioning. To clarify this issue, we recorded resting state EEG activity in 164 healthy human subjects and extracted EEG power across frequency bands (δ, θ, α, and β). To assess variability in the endocannabinoid system, two genetic polymorphisms (rs1049353, rs2180619) within the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) were determined in all participants. As expected, we observed significant effects of rs1049353 on EEG power in the theta band at frontal, central and parietal electrode regions. Crucially, these effects were specific for the theta band, with no effects on activity in the other frequency bands. Rs2180619 showed no significant associations with theta power after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, we provide novel evidence in humans showing that genetic variability in the cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG power in the theta frequency band. This extends prior findings of exogenous cannabinoid effects on theta power to the endogenous cannabinoid system.

  17. Self-Administration of Cannabinoids by Experimental Animals and Human Marijuana Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Justinova, Zuzana; Goldberg, Steven R.; Heishman, Stephen J.; Tanda, Gianluigi

    2009-01-01

    Drug self-administration behavior has been one of the most direct and productive approaches for studying the reinforcing effects of psychoactive drugs, which are critical in determining their abuse potential. Cannabinoids, which are usually abused by humans in the form of marijuana, have become the most frequently abused illicit class of drugs in the United States. The early elucidation of the structure and stereochemistry of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in 1964, which is now recognized as the principal psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, activated cannabinoid research worldwide. This review examines advances in research on cannabinoid self-administration behavior by humans and laboratory animals. There have been numerous laboratory demonstrations of the reinforcing effects of cannabinoids in human subjects, but reliable self-administration of cannabinoids by laboratory animals has only recently been demonstrated. It has now been shown that strong and persistent self-administration behavior can be maintained in experimentally and drug-naïve squirrel monkeys by doses of THC comparable to those in marijuana smoke inhaled by humans. Furthermore, reinforcing effects of some synthetic CB1 cannabinoid agonists have been recently reported using intravenous and intracerebroventricular self-administration procedures in rats and mice. These findings support previous conclusions that THC has a pronounced abuse liability comparable to other drugs of abuse under certain experimental conditions. Self-administration of THC by squirrel monkeys provides the most reliable animal model for human marijuana abuse available to date. This animal model now makes it possible to study the relative abuse liability of other natural and synthetic cannabinoids and to preclinically assess new therapeutic strategies for the treatment or prevention of marijuana abuse in humans. PMID:15932767

  18. Ontogenetic development of cannabinoid receptor expression and signal transduction functionality in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Mato, Susana; Del Olmo, Elena; Pazos, Angel

    2003-05-01

    Previous evidence suggests that the endogenous cannabinoid system emerges relatively early during brain development in the rat. However, the pre- and postnatal pattern of appearance of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in humans has not been analysed in detail. Furthermore, there is a complete lack of information about the functional ability of these proteins to activate signal transduction mechanisms during human development. In the present study we have explored CB1 receptor expression throughout the different areas of the developing human brain by [3H]CP55 940 autoradiography. We have also assessed CB1 functional coupling to G proteins during brain development by agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS autoradiography in the same cases. Our results indicate a significant density of cannabinoid receptors at 19 weeks' gestation in the same areas that contain these receptors in the adult human brain. Autoradiographic levels of CB1 receptors in these structures seem to increase progressively from early prenatal stages to adulthood. Interestingly, high densities of cannabinoid receptors have also been detected during prenatal development in fibre-enriched areas that are practically devoid of them in the adult brain. In parallel with these data, we have found that brain cannabinoid receptors are functionally coupled to signal transduction mechanisms from early prenatal stages. This early pattern of expression of functionally active cannabinoid receptors, along with the transient and atypical localization of these proteins in white matter areas during the prenatal stages, suggest an specific role of the endocannabinoid system in the events related to human neural development.

  19. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K Luan

    2014-09-01

    Pre-extinction administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely occurs via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders.

  20. Genetic variations in the human cannabinoid receptor gene are associated with happiness.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  1. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  2. Co-expression of the human cannabinoid receptor coding region splice variants (hCB₁) affects the function of hCB₁ receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Bagher, Amina M; Laprairie, Robert B; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2013-12-05

    The human type 1 cannabinoid (hCB1) receptor is expressed at high levels in the central nervous system. mRNA variants of the coding region of this receptor, human cannabinoid hCB1a and hCB1b receptors, have been identified, their biological function remains unclear. The present study demonstrated that the three human cannabinoid hCB1 coding region variants are expressed in the human and monkey (Macaca fascicularis) brain. Western blot analyses of homogenates from different regions of the monkey brain demonstrated that proteins with the expected molecular weights of the cannabinoid CB1, CB1a and CB1b receptors were co-expressed throughout the brain. Given the co-localization of these receptors, we hypothesized that physical interactions between the three splice variants may affect cannabinoid pharmacology. The human cannabinoid hCB1, hCB1a, and hCB1b receptors formed homodimers and heterodimers, as determined by BRET in transiently transfected HEK 293A cells. We found that the co-expression of the human cannabinoid hCB1 and each of the splice variants increased cell surface expression of the human cannabinoid hCB1 receptor and increased Gi/o-dependent ERK phosphorylation in response to cannabinoid agonists. Therefore, the human cannabinoid hCB1 coding region splice variants play an important physiological role in the activity of the endocannabinoid system.

  3. The effects of cannabinoids on serum cortisol and prolactin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Braley, Gabriel; Pittman, Brian; Cooper, Thomas; Perry, Edward; Krystal, John; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2010-01-01

    Background Cannabis is one of the most widely used illicit substances, and there is growing interest in the therapeutic applications of cannabinoids. While known to modulate neuroendocrine function, the precise acute and chronic dose-related effects of cannabinoids in humans are not well-known. Furthermore, the existing literature on the neuroendocrine effects of cannabinoids is limited by small sample sizes (n=6–22), heterogeneous samples with regard to cannabis exposure (lumping users and nonusers), lack of controlling for chronic cannabis exposure, differing methodologies, and limited dose–response data. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC) was hypothesized to produce dose-related increases in plasma cortisol levels and decreases in plasma prolactin levels. Furthermore, relative to controls, frequent users of cannabis were hypothesized to show altered baseline levels of these hormones and blunted Δ-9-THC-induced changes of these hormones. Materials and methods Pooled data from a series of laboratory studies with multiple doses of intravenous Δ-9-THC in healthy control subjects (n=36) and frequent users of cannabis (n=40) was examined to characterize the acute, chronic, and acute on chronic effects of cannabinoids on plasma cortisol and prolactin levels. Hormone levels were measured before (baseline) and 70 min after administration of each dose of Δ-9-THC. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models with +70 min hormonal levels as the dependant variable and baseline hormonal level as the covariate. Results At socially relevant doses, Δ-9-THC raised plasma cortisol levels in a dose-dependent manner but frequent users showed blunted increases relative to healthy controls. Frequent users also had lower baseline plasma prolactin levels relative to healthy controls. Conclusions These group differences may be related to the development of tolerance to the neuroendocrine effects of cannabinoids. Alternatively, these results may reflect inherent differences

  4. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems.

  5. Failure to extinguish fear and genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Klumpers, F; Oosting, R S; Evers, D J J; Leon Kenemans, J; Baas, J M P

    2012-09-25

    Failure to extinguish fear can lead to persevering anxiety and has been postulated as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of human anxiety disorders. In animals, it is well documented that the endogenous cannabinoid system has a pivotal role in the successful extinction of fear, most importantly through the cannabinoid receptor 1. However, no human studies have reported a translation of this preclinical evidence yet. Healthy medication-free human subjects (N=150) underwent a fear conditioning and extinction procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex was measured to assess fear-conditioned responding, and subjective fear ratings were collected. Participants were genotyped for two polymorphisms located within the promoter region (rs2180619) and the coding region (rs1049353) of cannabinoid receptor 1. As predicted from the preclinical literature, acquisition and expression of conditioned fear did not differ between genotypes. Crucially, whereas both homozygote (G/G, N=23) and heterozygote (A/G, N=68) G-allele carriers of rs2180619 displayed robust extinction of fear, extinction of fear-potentiated startle was absent in A/A homozygotes (N=51). Additionally, this resistance to extinguish fear left A/A carriers of rs2180619 with significantly higher levels of fear-potentiated startle at the end of the extinction training. No effects of rs1049353 genotype were observed regarding fear acquisition and extinction. These results suggest for the first time involvement of the human endocannabinoid system in fear extinction. Implications are that genetic variability in this system may underlie individual differences in anxiety, rendering cannabinoid receptor 1 a potential target for novel pharmacological treatments of anxiety disorders.

  6. Cannabinoid receptor-independent cytotoxic effects of cannabinoids in human colorectal carcinoma cells: synergism with 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Sofia B; Lindgren, Theres; Jonsson, Maria; Jacobsson, Stig O P

    2009-03-01

    Cannabinoids (CBs) have been found to exert antiproliferative effects upon a variety of cancer cells, including colorectal carcinoma cells. However, little is known about the signalling mechanisms behind the antitumoural effect in these cells, whether the effects are shared by endogenous lipids related to endocannabinoids, or whether such effects are synergistic with treatment paradigms currently used in the clinic. The aim of this preclinical study was to investigate the effect of synthetic and endogenous CBs and their related fatty acids on the viability of human colorectal carcinoma Caco-2 cells, and to determine whether CB effects are synergistic with those seen with the pyrimidine antagonist 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The synthetic CB HU 210, the endogenous CB anandamide, the endogenous structural analogue of anandamide, N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly), as well as the related polyunsaturated fatty acids arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid showed antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects in the Caco-2 cells, as measured by using [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation assay, the CyQUANT proliferation assay and calcein-AM fluorescence. HU 210 was the most potent compound examined, followed by anandamide, whereas NAGly showed equal potency and efficacy as the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, HU 210 and 5-FU produced synergistic effects in the Caco-2 cells, but not in the human colorectal carcinoma cell lines HCT116 or HT29. The compounds examined produced cytotoxic, rather than antiproliferative effects, by a mechanism not involving CB receptors, since the CB receptor antagonists AM251 and AM630 did not attenuate the effects, nor did pertussis toxin. However, alpha-tocopherol and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME attenuated the CB toxicity, suggesting involvement of oxidative stress. It is concluded that the CB system may provide new targets for the development of drugs to treat colorectal cancer.

  7. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R.; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K. Luan

    2013-01-01

    Pre-extinction administration of ∆9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely involves via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 hours after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders. PMID:24055595

  8. TOLUENE EXPERIMENTAL EXPOSURES IN HUMANS: PHARMACOKINETICS AND BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene Experimental Exposures in Humans:
    Pharmacokinetics and Behavioral Effects
    (Ongoing Research)

    Vernon A. Benignus1, Philip J. Bushnell2 and William K. Boyes2

    Human subjects will be exposed to 250 and 500 ppm toluene for one hour in the Human St...

  9. Antitumor activity of plant cannabinoids with emphasis on the effect of cannabidiol on human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ligresti, Alessia; Moriello, Aniello Schiano; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Matias, Isabel; Pisanti, Simona; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Laezza, Chiara; Portella, Giuseppe; Bifulco, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2006-09-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exhibits antitumor effects on various cancer cell types, but its use in chemotherapy is limited by its psychotropic activity. We investigated the antitumor activities of other plant cannabinoids, i.e., cannabidiol, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, cannabidiol acid and THC acid, and assessed whether there is any advantage in using Cannabis extracts (enriched in either cannabidiol or THC) over pure cannabinoids. Results obtained in a panel of tumor cell lines clearly indicate that, of the five natural compounds tested, cannabidiol is the most potent inhibitor of cancer cell growth (IC(50) between 6.0 and 10.6 microM), with significantly lower potency in noncancer cells. The cannabidiol-rich extract was equipotent to cannabidiol, whereas cannabigerol and cannabichromene followed in the rank of potency. Both cannabidiol and the cannabidiol-rich extract inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors obtained by s.c. injection into athymic mice of human MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma or rat v-K-ras-transformed thyroid epithelial cells and reduced lung metastases deriving from intrapaw injection of MDA-MB-231 cells. Judging from several experiments on its possible cellular and molecular mechanisms of action, we propose that cannabidiol lacks a unique mode of action in the cell lines investigated. At least for MDA-MB-231 cells, however, our experiments indicate that cannabidiol effect is due to its capability of inducing apoptosis via: direct or indirect activation of cannabinoid CB(2) and vanilloid transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 receptors and cannabinoid/vanilloid receptor-independent elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species. Our data support the further testing of cannabidiol and cannabidiol-rich extracts for the potential treatment of cancer.

  10. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of drotaverine in humans.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, O O; Onyeji, C O; Ogundaini, A O; Olugbade, T A; Ogunbona, F A

    1996-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of drotaverine was studied in 10 healthy volunteers after administration of single 80 mg oral and intravenous doses of the HCl salt of the drug, in a crossover fashion. Plasma and urine samples were analyzed for the unchanged drug by HPLC. The pharmacokinetic parameters, such as elimination half-life, plasma clearance, renal clearance and apparent volume of distribution, were not influenced by the route of drug administration. The drug was mainly eliminated by non-renal routes since renal clearance accounted for only 0.31 +/- 0.13% of the total plasma clearance. The absolute bioavailability was variable and ranged from 24.5-91% with a mean of 58.2 +/- 18.2% (mean +/- SD). It is suggested that the high variation in the bioavailability of drotaverine HCl after oral administration may result in significant interindividual differences in therapeutic response.

  11. A comparison of pharmacokinetics between humans and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Akabane, Takafumi; Tabata, Kenji; Kadono, Keitaro; Sakuda, Shuichi; Terashita, Shigeyuki; Teramura, Toshio

    2010-02-01

    To verify the availability of pharmacokinetic parameters in cynomolgus monkeys, hepatic availability (Fh) and the fraction absorbed multiplied by intestinal availability (FaFg) were evaluated to determine their contributions to absolute bioavailability (F) after intravenous and oral administrations. These results were compared with those for humans using 13 commercial drugs for which human pharmacokinetic parameters have been reported. In addition, in vitro studies of these drugs, including membrane permeability, intrinsic clearance, and p-glycoprotein affinity, were performed to classify the drugs on the basis of their pharmacokinetic properties. In the present study, monkeys had a markedly lower F than humans for 8 of 13 drugs. Although there were no obvious differences in Fh between humans and monkeys, a remarkable species difference in FaFg was observed. Subsequently, we compared the FaFg values for monkeys with the in vitro pharmacokinetic properties of each drug. No obvious FaFg differences were observed between humans and monkeys for drugs that undergo almost no in vivo metabolism. In contrast, low FaFg were observed in monkeys for drugs that undergo relatively high metabolism in monkeys. These results suggest that first-pass intestinal metabolism is greater in cynomolgus monkeys than in humans, and that bioavailability in cynomolgus monkeys after oral administration is unsuitable for predicting pharmacokinetics in humans. In addition, a rough correlation was also observed between in vitro metabolic stability and Fg in humans, possibly indicating the potential for Fg prediction in humans using only in vitro parameters after slight modification of the evaluation system for in vitro intestinal metabolism.

  12. Pharmacokinetic/pharmaco–dynamic modelling and simulation of the effects of different cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonists on Δ9‐tetrahydrocannabinol challenge tests

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Linda E.; Oyetayo, Olubukayo‐Opeyemi; Heuberger, Jules; van Gerven, Joop M. A.; Stevens, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    Aim The severe psychiatric side effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists hampered their wide development but this might be overcome by careful management of drug development with pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analyses. PK/PD models suitable for direct comparison of different CB1 antagonists in Δ9‐tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) challenge tests in healthy volunteer were constructed. Methods The pharmacokinetic models of THC and four CB1 antagonists were built separately. THC‐induced effects on heart rate and the visual analogue scale of feeling high in healthy volunteers and inhibitive effects of CB1 antagonists on THC‐induced effects were modelled in PD models linked to the PK models. Simulations were then applied to evaluate the reduction rate of each antagonist on the reversal of the THC‐induced effect in a unified simulation scenario. Results The final PK model of THC and antagonists was a two compartment model. An Emax model and logistic regression model were used for effect measures and the antagonist effect was added in these models in a competitive binding manner. t 1/2ke0 ranged from 0.00462 to 63.7 h for heart rate and from 0.964 to 150 h for VAS. IC 50 ranged from 6.42 to 202 ng ml−1 for heart rate and from 12.1 to 376 ng ml−1 for VAS. Benchmark simulation showed different dose–efficacy profiles of two efficacy measures for each CB1 antagonist. Conclusions PK/PD modelling and simulation approach was suitable for describing and predicting heart rate and feeling high for CB1 antagonists in THC challenge tests. Direct comparison of four antagonists based on simulated efficacy profiles might be of benefit to guide future studies. PMID:26617196

  13. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1HIGH cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1HIGH cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions. PMID:26634814

  14. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-12-04

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1(HIGH) cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1(HIGH) cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions.

  15. Pharmacological actions and therapeutic uses of cannabis and cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R N; Chambers, W A; Pertwee, R G

    2001-11-01

    This review highlights the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacological actions, therapeutic uses and adverse effects of cannabinoids. The effect of cannabinoids on anaesthesia is mentioned briefly. Important advances have taken place in cannabinoid research over the last few years and have led to the discovery of novel ligands. The possible clinical applications of these ligands and the direction of future research are discussed.

  16. The Effect of Chronic Cannabinoids on Broadband EEG Neural Oscillations in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Skosnik, Patrick D; D'Souza, Deepak C; Steinmetz, Adam B; Edwards, Chad R; Vollmer, Jennifer M; Hetrick, William P; O'Donnell, Brian F

    2012-01-01

    Animal and cellular work has shown that central cannabinoid-1 receptors modulate neural oscillations in the gamma range (40 Hz), which may be important for normal perceptual and cognitive processes. In order to assess the effect of cannabinoids on broadband-frequency neural oscillations in humans, the current study examined the effect of chronic cannabis use on auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) utilizing electroencephalography (EEG). Passive ASSRs were assessed using varying rates of binaural stimulation (auditory click-trains; 10–50 Hz in increments of 5 Hz; 80 dB SPL) in carefully screened cannabis users and controls. Chronic cannabis users (n=22; 12 h abstinence before study; positive 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol urine levels) and cannabis naïve controls (n=24) were evaluated. Time X frequency analyses on EEG data were performed using Fourier-based mean trial power (MTP) and phase-locking (inter-trial coherence; ITC). Transient ERPs to stimulus onset (auditory N100 components) were also evaluated. As predicted, a decrease in spectral power (MTP) at 40 Hz was observed in the cannabis group (p<0.018). No effects on phase-locking (ITC) or the N100 were observed. Further, within the cannabis group, lower 40 Hz power correlated with an earlier age of onset of cannabis use (p<0.04). These data suggest that chronic exposure to exogenous cannabinoids can alter the ability to generate neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma range. This is consistent with preclinical animal and cellular data, which may have implications for understanding the short- and long-term psychopharmacological effects of cannabis. PMID:22713908

  17. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of brotizolam in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    1 Pharmacokinetic studies were performed in healthy young volunteers and in elderly patients after oral administration of single doses (0.5 mg), increasing doses (0.5-1.5 mg), and multiple doses (1.0 mg) of brotizolam. 2 Brotizolam was absorbed quickly from the gastro-intestinal tract. Elimination half-lives were in the range of 3.6-7.9 h. 3 In healthy young volunteers as well as in elderly patients, there was neither a tendency for brotizolam to accumulate nor was there any indication of enzyme induction. 4 Brotizolam was metabolized almost completely into hydroxylated compounds which were conjugated prior to renal excretion. 5 After oral administration of [14C]-brotizolam, two-thirds of excretion of radioactivity was renal and was completed within 4 days. PMID:6661373

  18. 76 FR 71351 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Cannabinoid(s) and Cannabidiol(s) Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... Cannabinoid(s) and Cannabidiol(s) Based Therapeutics To Treat Hepatic Encephalopathy in Humans. AGENCY... be limited to: The development and sale of cannabinoid(s) and cannabidiol(s) based therapeutics as... chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Nonpsychoactive cannabinoids, such as Cannabidiol (CBD),...

  19. Spicing thing up: Synthetic cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. Objectives The availability, acute subjective effects—including self-reports posted on Erowid—laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Results Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike THC, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid-receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. Conclusions There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug-detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available. PMID:23836028

  20. Astrocytic expression of cannabinoid type 1 receptor in rat and human sclerotic hippocampi

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xian-Dong; Wei, Dong; Li, Juan; Kang, Jun-Jun; Wu, Chen; Ma, Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhu, Ge-Min; Ou-Yang, Tang-Peng; Liu, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), which is traditionally located on axon terminals, plays an important role in the pathology of epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases by modulating synaptic transmission. Using the pilocarpine model of chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures, which mimics the main features of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) in humans, we examined the expression of CB1R in hippocampal astrocytes of epileptic rats. Furthermore, we also examined the expression of astrocytic CB1R in the resected hippocampi from patients with medically refractory mesial TLE. Using immunofluorescent double labeling, we found increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in hippocampi of epileptic rats, whereas expression of astrocytic CB1R was not detectable in hippocampi of saline treated animals. Furthermore, CB1R was also found in some astrocytes in sclerotic hippocampi in a subset of patients with intractable mesial TLE. Detection with immune electron microscopy showed that the expression of CB1R was increased in astrocytes of epileptic rats and modest levels of CB1R were also found on the astrocytic membrane of sclerotic hippocampi. These results suggest that increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in sclerotic hippocampi might be involved in the cellular basis of the effects of cannabinoids on epilepsy. PMID:25031702

  1. Human Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Ligand-Interaction Motif: Transmembrane Helix 2 Cysteine, C2.59(89), as Determinant of Classical Cannabinoid Agonist Activity and Binding Pose.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Peng, Yan; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Fan, Pusheng; Janero, David R; Thakur, Ganesh A; Mercier, Richard W; Sun, Xin; Ma, Xiaoyu; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2017-03-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R)-dependent signaling is implicated in neuronal physiology and immune surveillance by brain microglia. Selective CB2R agonists hold therapeutic promise for inflammatory and other neurological disorders. Information on human CB2R (hCB2R) ligand-binding and functional domains is needed to inform the rational design and optimization of candidate druglike hCB2R agonists. Prior demonstration that hCB2R transmembrane helix 2 (TMH2) cysteine C2.59(89) reacts with small-molecule methanethiosulfonates showed that this cysteine residue is accessible to sulfhydryl derivatization reagents. We now report the design and application of two novel, pharmacologically active, high-affinity molecular probes, AM4073 and AM4099, as chemical reporters to interrogate directly the interaction of classical cannabinoid agonists with hCB2R cysteine residues. AM4073 has one electrophilic isothiocyanate (NCS) functionality at the C9 position of its cyclohexenyl C-ring, whereas AM4099 has NCS groups at that position and at the terminus of its aromatic A-ring C3 side chain. Pretreatment of wild-type hCB2R with either probe reduced subsequent [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by ∼60%. Conservative serine substitution of any hCB2R TMH cysteine residue except C2.59(89) did not affect the reduction of [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by either probe, suggesting that AM4073 and AM4099 interact irreversibly with this TMH2 cysteine. In contrast, AM841, an exceptionally potent hCB2R megagonist and direct AM4073/4099 congener bearing a single electrophilic NCS group at the terminus of its C3 side chain, had been demonstrated to bind covalently to TMH6 cysteine C6.47(257) and not C2.59(89). Molecular modeling indicates that the AM4073-hCB2R* interaction at C2.59(89) orients this classical cannabinoid away from TMH6 and toward the TMH2-TMH3 interface in the receptor's hydrophobic binding pocket, whereas the AM841-hCB2R* interaction at C6.47(257) favors agonist orientation toward

  2. Simultaneous Quantification of Free and Glucuronidated Cannabinoids in Human Urine by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cannabis is the most commonly abused drug of abuse and is commonly quantified during urine drug testing. We conducted a controlled drug administration studies investigating efficacy of urinary cannabinoid glucuronide metabolites for documenting recency of cannabis intake and for determining stability of urinary cannabinoids. Methods A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated quantifying Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), cannabidiol, cannabinol, THC-glucuronide and THCCOOH-glucuronide in 0.5 ml human urine via supported-liquid extraction. Chromatography was performed on an Ultra Biphenyl column with a gradient of 10 mmol/l ammonium acetate, pH 6.15 and 15% methanol in acetonitrile at 0. 4ml/min. Analytes were monitored by positive and negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. Results Linear ranges were 0.5–50 ng/ml for THC-glucuronide, 1–100 ng/ml for THCCOOH, 11-OH-THC and cannabidiol, 2–100 ng/ml for THC and cannabinol, and 5–500 ng/ml for THCCOOH-glucuronide (R2>0.99). Mean extraction efficiencies were 34–73% with analytical recovery (bias) 80.5–118.0% and total imprecision 3.0–10.2% coefficient of variation. Conclusion This method simultaneously quantifies urinary cannabinoids and phase II glucuronide metabolites, and enables evaluation of urinary cannabinoid glucuronides for documenting recency of cannabis intake and cannabinoid stability. The assay is applicable for routine urine cannabinoid testing. PMID:22771478

  3. Functional effects of cannabinoids during dopaminergic specification of human neural precursors derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Stanslowsky, Nancy; Jahn, Kirsten; Venneri, Anna; Naujock, Maximilian; Haase, Alexandra; Martin, Ulrich; Frieling, Helge; Wegner, Florian

    2016-03-30

    Among adolescents cannabis is one of the most widely used illicit drugs. In adolescence brain development continues, characterized by neuronal maturation and synaptic plasticity. The endocannabinoid system plays an important role during brain development by modulating neuronal function and neurogenesis. Changes in endocannabinoid signaling by Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of cannabis, might therefore lead to neurobiological changes influencing brain function and behavior. We investigated the functional maturation and dopaminergic specification of human cord blood-derived induced pluripotent stem cell (hCBiPSC)-derived small molecule neural precursor cells (smNPCs) after cultivation with the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and the exogenous THC, both potent agonists at the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1 R). Higher dosages of 10-μM AEA or THC significantly decreased functionality of neurons, indicated by reduced ion currents and synaptic activity. A lower concentration of 1-μM THC had no marked effect on neuronal and dopaminergic maturation, while 1-μM AEA significantly enhanced the frequency of synaptic activity. As there were no significant effects on DNA methylation in promotor regions of genes important for neuronal function, these cannabinoid actions seem to be mediated by another than this epigenetic mechanism. Our data suggest that there are concentration-dependent actions of cannabinoids on neuronal function in vitro indicating neurotoxic, dysfunctional effects of 10-μM AEA and THC during human neurogenesis.

  4. Species differences in cannabinoid receptor 2 (CNR2 gene): identification of novel human and rodent CB2 isoforms, differential tissue expression, and regulation by cannabinoid receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing-Rong; Pan, Chun-Hung; Hishimoto, Akitoyo; Li, Chuan-Yun; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Llorente-Berzal, Alvaro; Viveros, Maria-Paz; Ishiguro, Hiroki; Arinami, Tadao; Onaivi, Emmanuel Shan; Uhl, George R.

    2009-01-01

    Cannabinoids, endocannabinoids and marijuana activate two well-characterized cannabinoid receptors (CBRs), CB1-Rs and CB2-Rs. The expression of CB1-Rs in the brain and periphery has been well studied but neuronal CB2-Rs have received much less attention than CB1-Rs. Many studies have now identified and characterized functional glial and neuronal CB2-Rs in the central nervous system. However, many features of CB2-R gene structure, regulation and variation remain poorly characterized in comparison to the CB1-R. Here, we report on the discovery of a novel human CB2 gene promoter encoding testis (CB2A) isoform with starting exon located ca 45 kb upstream from the previously identified promoter encoding the spleen isoform (CB2B). The 5′ exons of both CB2 isoforms are untranslated 5′UTRs and alternatively spliced to the major protein coding exon of the CB2 gene. CB2A is expressed higher in testis and brain than CB2B that is expressed higher in other peripheral tissues than CB2A. Species comparison found that the CB2 gene of human, rat and mouse genomes deviated in their gene structures and isoform expression patterns. mCB2A expression was increased significantly in the cerebellum of mice treated with the CB-R mixed agonist, WIN55212-2. These results provide much improved information about CB2 gene structure and its human and rodent variants that should be considered in developing CB2-R-based therapeutic agents. PMID:19496827

  5. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of Soy Isoflavone Extracts in Human Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Morató, Jose; Farré, Magí; Pérez-Mañá, Clara; Papaseit, Esther; Martínez-Riera, Roser; de la Torre, Rafael; Pizarro, Nieves

    2015-08-12

    The soy isoflavones daidzein and genistein produce several biological activities related to health benefits. A number of isoflavone extracts are commercially available, but there is little information concerning the specific isoflavone content of these products or differences in their bioavailability and pharmacokinetics. This study describes the development and validation of an analytical method to detect and quantify daidzein, genistein, and equol in human plasma using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The method was applied in a crossover, randomized, bioavailability study. Twelve healthy volunteers were administered the same total isoflavones dose from two isoflavone supplement preparations (Super-Absorbable Soy Isoflavones (Life Extension, USA) and Fitoladius (Merck, Spain)). The pharmacokinetic parameters (AUC0-24/dose and Cmax/dose) of the isoflavones from the two preparations differed significantly. Such differences in bioavailability and kinetics may have relevant effects on the health benefits derived from their intake.

  6. Agonist-dependent cannabinoid receptor signalling in human trabecular meshwork cells

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, B T; Hudson, B; Yegorova, S; Jollimore, C A B; Kelly, M E M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Trabecular meshwork (TM) is an ocular tissue involved in the regulation of aqueous humour outflow and intraocular pressure (IOP). CB1 receptors (CB1) are present in TM and cannabinoid administration decreases IOP. CB1 signalling was investigated in a cell line derived from human TM (hTM). Experimental approach: CB1 signalling was investigated using ratiometric Ca2+ imaging, western blotting and infrared In-Cell Western analysis. Key results: WIN55212-2, a synthetic aminoalkylindole cannabinoid receptor agonist (10–100 μM) increased intracellular Ca2+ in hTM cells. WIN55,212-2-mediated Ca2+ increases were blocked by AM251, a CB1 antagonist, but were unaffected by the CB2 antagonist, AM630. The WIN55,212-2-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i was pertussis toxin (PTX)-insensitive, therefore, independent of Gi/o coupling, but was attenuated by a dominant negative Gαq/11 subunit, implicating a Gq/11 signalling pathway. The increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent upon PLC activation and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores. A PTX-sensitive increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation was also observed in response to WIN55,212-2, indicative of a Gi/o signalling pathway. CB1-Gq/11 coupling to activate PLC-dependent increases in Ca2+ appeared to be specific to WIN55,212-2 and were not observed with other CB1 agonists, including CP55,940 and methanandamide. CP55940 produced PTX-sensitive increases in [Ca2+]i at concentrations ≥15 μM, and PTX-sensitive increases in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Conclusions and implications: This study demonstrates that endogenous CB1 couples to both Gq/11 and Gi/o in hTM cells in an agonist-dependent manner. Cannabinoid activation of multiple CB1 signalling pathways in TM tissue could lead to differential changes in aqueous humour outflow and IOP. PMID:17922024

  7. Pharmacokinetics of mitomycin C in rabbit and human.

    PubMed

    van Hazel, G A; Kovach, J S

    1982-01-01

    A sensitive and specific high-pressure liquid chromatographic assay was developed to characterize the plasma elimination and urinary excretion of mitomycin C in humans. Extraction of mitomycin C and an internal standard, porfiromycin, from plasma by chromatography over a non-ionic resin, Porapak Q, yields high recovery of both compounds and facilitates measurement of as little as 5 ng mitomycin C by reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography. The assay was used to characterize the plasma elimination of mitomycin C in rabbits and was shown to be applicable to the characterization of the pharmacokinetics of mitomycin C in humans receiving as little as 8 mg/m2.

  8. Disposition pathways and pharmacokinetics of herbal medicines in humans.

    PubMed

    He, S-M; Li, C G; Liu, J-P; Chan, E; Duan, W; Zhou, S-F

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies have become an integral part of modern drug development, but these studies are not regulatory needs for herbal remedies. This paper updates our current knowledge on the disposition pathways and pharmacokinetic properties of commonly used herbal medicines in humans. To retrieve relevant data, the authors have searched through computer-based literatures by full text search in Medline (via Pubmed), ScienceDirect, Current Contents Connect (ISI), Cochrance Library, CINAHL (EBSCO), CrossRef Search and Embase (all from inception to May 2010). Many herbal compounds undergo Phase I and/or Phase II metabolism in vivo, with cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) playing a major role. Some herbal ingredients are substrates of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) which is highly expressed in the intestine, liver, brain and kidney. As such, the activities of these drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters are determining factors for the in vivo bioavailability, disposition and distribution of herbal remedies. There are increasing pharmacokinetic studies of herbal remedies, but these studies are mainly focused on a small number of herbal remedies including St John's wort, milk thistle, sculcap, curcumin, echinacea, ginseng, ginkgo, and ginger. The pharmacokinetic data of a small number of purified herbal ingredients, including anthocyanins, berberine, catechins, curcumin, lutein and quercetin, are available. For the majority of herbal remedies used in folk medicines, data on their disposition and biological fate in humans are lacking or in paucity. For a herbal medicine, the pharmacological effect is achieved when the bioactive agents or the metabolites reach and sustain proper levels at their sites of action. Both the dose levels and fates of active components in the body govern their target-site concentrations after administration of an herbal remedy. In this regard, a safe and optimal use of herbal medicines requires a

  9. Screening for the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and its major metabolites in human doping controls.

    PubMed

    Möller, Ines; Wintermeyer, Annette; Bender, Katja; Jübner, Martin; Thomas, Andreas; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2011-09-01

    Referred to as 'spice', several new drugs, advertised as herbal blends, have appeared on the market in the last few years, in which the synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and a C(8) homologue of CP 47,497 were identified as major active ingredients. Due to their reported cannabis-like effects, many European countries have banned these substances. The World Anti-Doping Agency has also explicitly prohibited synthetic cannabinoids in elite sport in-competition. Since urine specimens have been the preferred doping control samples, the elucidation of the metabolic pathways of these substances is of particular importance to implement them in sports drug testing programmes. In a recent report, an in vitro phase-I metabolism study of JWH-018 was presented yielding mainly hydroxylated and N-dealkylated metabolites. Due to these findings, a urine sample of a healthy man declaring to have smoked a 'spice' product was screened for potential phase-I and -II metabolites by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry in the present report. The majority of the phase-I metabolites observed in earlier in vitro studies of JWH-018 were detected in this urine specimen and furthermore most of their respective monoglucuronides. As no intact JWH-018 was detectable, the monohydroxylated metabolite being the most abundant one was chosen as a target analyte for sports drug testing purposes; a detection method was subsequently developed and validated in accordance to conventional screening protocols based on enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The method was applied to approximately 7500 urine doping control samples yielding two JWH-018 findings and demonstrated its capability for a sensitive and selective identification of JWH-018 and its metabolites in human urine.

  10. Tumor-promoting effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Sara; Fogli, Stefano; Polini, Beatrice; Montagnani, Valentina; Podestà, Adriano; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Romanini, Antonella; Stecca, Barbara; Nieri, Paola

    2017-04-01

    The role of endocannabinoid system in melanoma development and progression is actually not fully understood. This study was aimed at clarifying whether cannabinoid-type 1 (CB1) receptor may function as tumor-promoting or -suppressing signal in human cutaneous melanoma. CB1 receptor expression was measured in human melanoma cell lines by real-time PCR. A genetic deletion of CB1 receptors in selected melanoma cells was carried out by using three different short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). Performance of target gene silencing was verified by real-time PCR and Western blot. The effects of CB1 receptor silencing on cell growth, clonogenicity, migration capability, cell cycle progression, and activation of mitogenic signals was tested. Lentiviral shRNAs vectors targeting different regions of the human CB1 gene led to a significant reduction in CB1 receptor mRNA and a near complete loss of CB1 receptor protein, compared to control vector (LV-c). The number of viable cells, the colony-forming ability and cell migration were significantly reduced in cells transduced with CB1 lentiviral shRNAs compared to LV-c. Cell cycle analyses showed arrest at G1/S phase. p-Akt and p-ERK expression were decreased in transduced versus control cells. Findings of this study suggest that CB1 receptor might function as tumor-promoting signal in human cutaneous melanoma.

  11. Human plasma concentrations of cytochrome P450 probe cocktails extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in mice transplanted with human hepatocytes and from pharmacokinetics in common marmosets using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Utoh, Masahiro; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Mitsui, Marina; Kawano, Mirai; Toda, Akiko; Uehara, Shotaro; Uno, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Makiko; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    1. The pharmacokinetic data of cytochrome P450 probes in humans can be extrapolated from corresponding data in cynomolgus monkeys, dogs and minipigs using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. In this study, the modeling methodology was further adapted to estimate human plasma concentrations of P450 probes based on data from mice transplanted with human hepatocytes or based on data from marmosets. 2. Using known species allometric scaling factors, the observed plasma concentrations of caffeine, warfarin, omeprazole, metoprolol, and midazolam in chimeric TK-NOG mice with humanized liver were scaled to human oral monitoring equivalents. Using the same approach, the previously reported pharmacokinetics of the five P450 probes in marmosets were also scaled to reported equivalents in humans using in vitro metabolic clearance data. 3. Human plasma concentration profiles of the five P450 probes estimated by simplified human PBPK models based on the observed pharmacokinetics in mice with humanized liver and on the reported pharmacokinetics in marmosets were consistent with previously published pharmacokinetic data in Caucasians. 4. These results suggest that mice with humanized liver and/or marmosets could be suitable pharmacokinetic models for humans during research into new drugs, especially when used in combination with simple PBPK models.

  12. Cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors and tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    One hypothesis suggests that tinnitus is a form of sensory epilepsy, arising partly from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory regions of the brain such as the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus. Although there is currently no effective drug treatment for tinnitus, anti-epileptic drugs are used in some cases as a potential treatment option. There is increasing evidence to suggest that cannabinoid drugs, i.e. cannabinoid receptor agonists, can also have anti-epileptic effects, at least in some cases and in some parts of the brain. It has been reported that cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and that they are involved in the regulation of plasticity. This review explores the question of whether cannabinoid receptor agonists are likely to be pro- or anti-epileptic in the cochlear nucleus and therefore whether cannabinoids and Cannabis itself are likely to make tinnitus better or worse.

  13. Dynamic of expression and localization of cannabinoid-degrading enzymes FAAH and MGLL in relation to CB1 during meiotic maturation of human oocytes.

    PubMed

    Agirregoitia, Ekaitz; Totorikaguena, Lide; Expósito, Antonia; Mendoza, Rosario; Matorras, Roberto; Agirregoitia, Naiara

    2016-08-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid system has been characterized in some female reproductive organs but little is known about the expression and localization pattern of cannabinoid-degrading enzymes in relation to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in human oocytes. In this study, we focus on the investigation of the presence and differential distribution of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) in relation to CB1 during the maturation of human oocytes. We used a total of 290 human oocytes not suitable for in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI): germinal-vesicle (GV) and metaphase-I (MI) stages and metaphase-II (MII) oocytes that had not developed into an embryo after ICSI. Cannabinoid-degrading enzymes and the cannabinoid CB1 receptor were present in human oocytes. Specifically, FAAH was detected in the periphery of the oocyte from the GV to MI stage and co-localized with CB1. Later, by the MII stage, FAAH was spread within the oocyte, whereas MGLL immunostaining was homogeneous across the oocyte at all stages of maturation and only overlapped with CB1 at the GV stage. This coordinated redistribution of cannabinoid system proteins suggests a role for this system in the maturation of the female gamete.

  14. Cannabis in the arm: what can we learn from intravenous cannabinoid studies?

    PubMed

    Englund, Amir; Stone, James M; Morrison, Paul D

    2012-01-01

    Cannabis is widely used recreationally and for symptomatic relief in a number of ailments. However, cannabis has been implicated as a risk factor for the development of psychotic illness. For forty years researchers have utilised intravenous preparations of Δ(9)-THC, as well as several other phytocannabinoids, in a laboratory setting. The intravenous route has the most reliable pharmacokinetics, reducing inter-individual variation in bioavailability and is well suited for the delivery of synthetic compounds containing a sole pharmacological moiety. Given the association between cannabinoids and psychotic illness, there has been a resurgence of interest in experimental studies of cannabinoids in humans, and the intravenous route has been employed. Here in a critical review, we appraise the major findings from recent intravenous cannabinoid studies in humans and trace the historical roots of this work back to the 1970's.

  15. Differential expression of intracellular and extracellular CB(2) cannabinoid receptor protein by human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Julie T; Harui, Airi; Kiertscher, Sylvia M; Roth, Jeffrey D; Roth, Michael D

    2013-03-01

    mRNA encoding for the CB(2) cannabinoid receptor is expressed by many subsets of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), but little is known about the resulting protein expression and function. Employing clones from the A549 and 293T cell lines that were constructed to express both full-length human CB(2) and GFP, we developed a flow cytometry assay for characterizing CB(2) protein expression. A monoclonal antibody directed against human CB(2) selectively stained the surface of transduced but not parental cell lines. When cells were fixed and permeabilized, imaging flow cytometry identified large stores of intracellular protein. Total cellular staining for CB(2) corresponded closely with the level of GFP expression. When exposed to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, CB(2)-expressing cells internalized cell surface CB(2) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Applying these approaches to human PBL, CB(2) protein was identified on the surface of human B cells but not on T cells or monocytes. In contrast, when PBL were fixed and permeabilized, intracellular CB(2) expression was readily detected in all three subsets by both conventional and imaging flow cytometry. Similar to the protein expression pattern observed in fixed and permeabilized PBL, purified B cells, T cells, and monocytes expressed relatively equal levels of CB(2) mRNA by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our findings confirm that human PBL express CB(2) protein but that its distribution is predominantly intracellular with only B cells expressing CB(2) protein at the extracellular membrane. The differential role of intracellular and extracellular CB(2) receptors in mediating ligand signaling and immune function remains to be determined.

  16. Metabolite profiling of RCS-4, a novel synthetic cannabinoid designer drug, using human hepatocyte metabolism and TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Adarsh S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2009, scheduling legislation of synthetic cannabinoids prompted new compound emergence to circumvent legal restrictions. 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-indol-3-yl)methanone (RCS-4) is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist sold in herbal smoking blends. Absence of parent synthetic cannabinoids in urine suggests the importance of metabolite identification for detecting RCS-4 consumption in clinical and forensic investigations. Materials & methods & Results With 1 h human hepatocyte incubation and TOF high-resolution MS, we identified 18 RCS-4 metabolites, many not yet reported. Most metabolites were hydroxylated with or without demethylation, carboxylation and dealkylation followed by glucuronidation. One additional sulfated metabolite was also observed. O-demethylation was the most common biotransformation and generated the major metabolite. Conclusion For the first time, we present a metabolic scheme of RCS-4 obtained from human hepatocytes, including Phase I and II metabolites. Metabolite structural information and associated high-resolution mass spectra can be employed for developing clinical and forensic laboratory RCS-4 urine screening methods. PMID:25046048

  17. R(+)-methanandamide induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human neuroglioma cells via a non-cannabinoid receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ramer, R; Brune, K; Pahl, A; Hinz, B

    2001-09-07

    Cannabinoids affect prostaglandin (PG) formation in the central nervous system through as yet unidentified mechanisms. Using H4 human neuroglioma cells, the present study investigates the effect of R(+)-methanandamide (metabolically stable analogue of the endocannabinoid anandamide) on the expression of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme. Incubation of cells with R(+)-methanandamide was accompanied by concentration-dependent increases in COX-2 mRNA, COX-2 protein, and COX-2-dependent PGE(2) synthesis. Moreover, treatment of cells with R(+)-methanandamide in the presence of interleukin-1beta led to an overadditive induction of COX-2 expression. The stimulatory effect of R(+)-methanandamide on COX-2 expression was mimicked by the structurally unrelated cannabinoid Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol. Stimulation of both COX-2 mRNA expression and subsequent PGE(2) synthesis by R(+)-methanandamide was not affected by the selective CB(1) receptor antagonist AM-251 or the G(i/o) protein inactivator pertussis toxin. Enhancement of COX-2 expression by R(+)-methanandamide was paralleled by time-dependent phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and p42/44 MAPK. Consistent with the activation of both kinases, R(+)-methanandamide-induced COX-2 mRNA expression and PGE(2) formation were abrogated in the presence of specific inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580) and p42/44 MAPK activation (PD98059). Together, our results demonstrate that R(+)-methanandamide induces COX-2 expression in human neuroglioma cells via a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism involving activation of the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, induction of COX-2 expression may represent a novel mechanism by which cannabinoids mediate PG-dependent effects within the central nervous system.

  18. Eravacycline Pharmacokinetics and Challenges in Defining Humanized Exposure In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Monogue, Marguerite L.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the pharmacokinetic profile of eravacycline, a novel antibiotic of the tetracycline class, and determined the dose in an immunocompetent murine thigh infection model that would provide free-drug exposure similar to that observed in humans after the administration of 1 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.) every 12 h (q12h). Eravacycline demonstrated a nonlinear protein-binding profile. The 2.5-mg/kg i.v. q12h dose in mice resulted in an area under the concentration-time curve for the free, unbound fraction of the drug of 1.64 mg · h/liter, which closely resembles the human exposure level. PMID:27353264

  19. Suppression of human monocyte interleukin-1beta production by ajulemic acid, a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid.

    PubMed

    Zurier, Robert B; Rossetti, Ronald G; Burstein, Sumner H; Bidinger, Bonnie

    2003-02-15

    Oral administration of ajulemic acid (AjA), a cannabinoid acid devoid of psychoactivity, reduces joint tissue damage in rats with adjuvant arthritis. Because interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) are central to the progression of inflammation and joint tissue injury in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, we investigated human monocyte IL-1beta and TNFalpha responses after the addition of AjA to cells in vitro. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid monocytes (PBM and SFM) were isolated from healthy subjects and patients with inflammatory arthritis, respectively, treated with AjA (0-30 microM) in vitro, and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Cells were harvested for mRNA, and supernatants were collected for cytokine assay. Addition of AjA to PBM and SFM in vitro reduced both steady-state levels of IL-1beta mRNA and secretion of IL-1beta in a concentration-dependent manner. Suppression was maximal (50.4%) at 10 microM AjA (P<0.05 vs untreated controls, N=7). AjA did not influence TNFalpha gene expression in or secretion from PBM. Reduction of IL-1beta by AjA may help explain the therapeutic effects of AjA in the animal model of arthritis. Development of nonpsychoactive therapeutically useful synthetic analogs of Cannabis constituents, such as AjA, may help resolve the ongoing debate about the use of marijuana as medicine.

  20. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics (PBPK) Model For Dermal Permeability for Lindane

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficient...

  1. In vitro and in vivo human metabolism of the synthetic cannabinoid AB-CHMINACA.

    PubMed

    Erratico, Claudio; Negreira, Noelia; Norouzizadeh, Helia; Covaci, Adrian; Neels, Hugo; Maudens, Kristof; van Nuijs, Alexander L N

    2015-10-01

    N-[(1S)-1-(aminocarbonyl)-2-methylpropyl]-1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (AB-CHMINACA) is a recently introduced synthetic cannabinoid. At present, no information is available about in vitro or in vivo human metabolism of AB-CHMINACA. Therefore, biomonitoring studies to screen AB-CHMINACA consumption lack any information about the potential biomarkers (e.g. metabolites) to target. To bridge this gap, we investigated the in vitro metabolism of AB-CHMINACA using human liver microsomes (HLMs). Formation of AB-CHMINACA metabolites was monitored using liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Twenty-six metabolites of AB-CHMINACA were detected including seven mono-hydroxylated and six di-hydroxylated metabolites and a metabolite resulting from N-dealkylation of AB-CHMINACA, all produced by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Two carboxylated metabolites, likely produced by amidase enzymes, and five glucuronidated metabolites were also formed. Five mono-hydroxylated and one carboxylated metabolite were likely the major metabolites detected. The involvement of individual CYPs in the formation of AB-CHMINACA metabolites was tested using a panel of seven human recombinant CYPs (rCYPs). All the hydroxylated AB-CHMINACA metabolites produced by HLMs were also produced by the rCYPs tested, among which rCYP3A4 was the most active enzyme. Most of the in vitro metabolites of AB-CHMINACA were also present in urine obtained from an AB-CHMINACA user, therefore showing the reliability of the results obtained using the in vitro metabolism experiments conducted to predict AB-CHMINACA in vivo metabolism. The AB-CHMINACA metabolites to target in biomonitoring studies using urine samples are now reliably identified and can be used for routine analysis.

  2. Conjugation of Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073, Metabolites by Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chimalakonda, Krishna C.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Le, Vi-Huyen; Yiew, Kan Hui; Dineva, Anna; Moran, Cindy L.; James, Laura P.; Moran, Jeffery H.

    2011-01-01

    K2, a synthetic cannabinoid (SC), is an emerging drug of abuse touted as “legal marijuana” and marketed to young teens and first-time drug users. Symptoms associated with K2 use include extreme agitation, syncope, tachycardia, and visual and auditory hallucinations. One major challenge to clinicians is the lack of clinical, pharmacological, and metabolic information for the detection and characterization of K2 and its metabolites in human samples. Information on the metabolic pathway of SCs is very limited. However, previous reports have shown the metabolites of these compounds are excreted primarily as glucuronic acid conjugates. Based on this information, this study evaluates nine human recombinant uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms and human liver and intestinal microsomes for their ability to glucuronidate hydroxylated metabolites of 1-naphthalenyl-1(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-methanone (JWH-018) and (1-butyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (JWH-073), the two most common SCs found in K2 products. Conjugates were identified and characterized using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, whereas kinetic parameters were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-UV-visible methods. UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A9, UGT1A10, and UGT2B7 were shown to be the major enzymes involved, showing relatively high affinity with Km ranging from 12 to 18 μM for some hydroxylated K2s. These UGTs also exhibited a high metabolic capacity for these compounds, which indicates that K2 metabolites may be rapidly glucuronidated and eliminated from the body. Studies of K2 metabolites will help future development and validation of a specific assay for K2 and its metabolites and will allow researchers to fully explore their pharmacological actions. PMID:21746969

  3. Characterization of human hepatic and extrahepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes involved in the metabolism of classic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Anna; Lichti, Cheryl F; Prather, Paul L; Zielinska, Agnieszka K; Bratton, Stacie M; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Finel, Moshe; Miller, Grover P; Radomińska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H

    2009-07-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is subject to cytochrome P450 oxidation and subsequent UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-dependent glucuronidation. Many studies have shown that CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are the primary enzymes responsible for these cytochrome P450-dependent oxidations, but little work has been done to characterize phase II metabolic pathways. In this study, we test the hypothesis that there are specific human UGTs responsible for classic cannabinoid metabolism. The activities of 12 human recombinant UGTs toward classic cannabinoids [cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), (-)-Delta(8)-THC, (-)-Delta(9)-THC, (+/-)-11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-THC (THC-OH), and (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-THC (THC-COOH)] were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and labeling assays. Despite activity by UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, and 2B7 toward CBN, CBD, THC-OH, and THC-COOH, only selected UGTs demonstrate sufficient activity for further characterization of steady-state kinetics. CBN was the most recognized substrate as evidenced by activities from hepatic UGT1A9 and extrahepatic UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10. These results may reflect the introduction of an aromatic ring to Delta(9)-THC, leading to favorable pi stacking with phenylalanines in the UGT active site. Likewise, oxidation of Delta(9)-THC to THC-OH results in UGT1A9 and UGT1A10 activity toward the cannabinoid. Further oxidation to THC-COOH surprisingly leads to a loss in metabolism by UGT1A9 and UGT1A10, while creating a substrate recognized by UGT1A1 and UGT1A3. The resulting glucuronide of THC-COOH is the main metabolite found in urine, and thus these hepatic enzymes play a critical role in the metabolic clearance of cannabinoids. Taken together, glucuronidation of cannabinoids depends on upstream processing including enzymes such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4.

  4. Characterization of Human Hepatic and Extrahepatic UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzymes Involved in the Metabolism of Classic Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Anna; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Prather, Paul L.; Zielinska, Agnieszka K.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Finel, Moshe; Miller, Grover P.; Radomińska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H.

    2009-01-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is subject to cytochrome P450 oxidation and subsequent UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-dependent glucuronidation. Many studies have shown that CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are the primary enzymes responsible for these cytochrome P450-dependent oxidations, but little work has been done to characterize phase II metabolic pathways. In this study, we test the hypothesis that there are specific human UGTs responsible for classic cannabinoid metabolism. The activities of 12 human recombinant UGTs toward classic cannabinoids [cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), (–)-Δ8-THC, (–)-Δ9-THC, (±)-11-hydroxy-Δ9-THC (THC-OH), and (–)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-THC (THC-COOH)] were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and labeling assays. Despite activity by UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, and 2B7 toward CBN, CBD, THC-OH, and THC-COOH, only selected UGTs demonstrate sufficient activity for further characterization of steady-state kinetics. CBN was the most recognized substrate as evidenced by activities from hepatic UGT1A9 and extrahepatic UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10. These results may reflect the introduction of an aromatic ring to Δ9-THC, leading to favorable π stacking with phenylalanines in the UGT active site. Likewise, oxidation of Δ9-THC to THC-OH results in UGT1A9 and UGT1A10 activity toward the cannabinoid. Further oxidation to THC-COOH surprisingly leads to a loss in metabolism by UGT1A9 and UGT1A10, while creating a substrate recognized by UGT1A1 and UGT1A3. The resulting glucuronide of THC-COOH is the main metabolite found in urine, and thus these hepatic enzymes play a critical role in the metabolic clearance of cannabinoids. Taken together, glucuronidation of cannabinoids depends on upstream processing including enzymes such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4. PMID:19339377

  5. Cannabidiol inhibits human glioma cell migration through a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vaccani, Angelo; Massi, Paola; Colombo, Arianna; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of cannabidiol (CBD) to impair the migration of tumor cells stimulated by conditioned medium. CBD caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the migration of U87 glioma cells, quantified in a Boyden chamber. Since these cells express both cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the membrane, we also evaluated their engagement in the antimigratory effect of CBD. The inhibition of cell was not antagonized either by the selective cannabinoid receptor antagonists SR141716 (CB1) and SR144528 (CB2) or by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, indicating no involvement of classical cannabinoid receptors and/or receptors coupled to Gi/o proteins. These results reinforce the evidence of antitumoral properties of CBD, demonstrating its ability to limit tumor invasion, although the mechanism of its pharmacological effects remains to be clarified. PMID:15700028

  6. The Synthetic Cannabinoids Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Benyamina, Amine; Blecha, Lisa; Cottencin, Olivier; Billieux, Joël

    2016-01-01

    « Spice » is generally used to describe the diverse types of herbal blends that encompass synthetic cannabinoids on the market. The emergence of smokable herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids, which mimic the effects of cannabis, appears to become increasingly popular, in the new psychoactive substances landscape. In 2014, the existence of 134 different types of synthetic cannabinoids were reported by the European Union Early Warning System. These drugs are mainly sold online as an alternative to controlled and regulated psychoactive substances. They appear to have a life cycle of about 1-2 years before being replaced by a next wave of products. Legislation controlling these designer drugs has been introduced in many countries with the objective to limit the spread of existing drugs and control potential new analogs. The majority of the synthetic cannabinoids are full agonists at the CB1 receptor and do not contain tobacco or cannabis. They are becoming increasingly popular in adolescents, students and clubbers as an abused substance. Relatively high incidence of adverse effects associated with synthetic cannabinoids use has been documented in the literature. Numerous fatalities linked with their use and abuse have been reported. In this paper, we will review the available data regarding the use and effects of synthetic cannabinoids in humans in order to highlight their impact on public health. To reach this objective, a literature search was performed on two representative databases (Pubmed, Google Scholar), the Erowid Center website (a US non-profit educational organization that provides information about psychoactive plants and chemicals), and various governmental websites. The terms used for the database search were: "synthetic cannabinoids", "spice", "new psychoactive substances", and/or "substance use disorder", and/or "adverse effects", and/or "fatalities". The search was limited to years 2005 to 2016 due to emerging scientific literature at

  7. Simultaneous determination of five naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites and their deposition in human and rat hair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Park, Yuran; Park, Meejung; Kim, Eunmi; Yang, Wonkyung; Baeck, Seungkyung; Lee, Sooyeun; Han, Sangbeom

    2015-01-01

    The continuing appearance of new synthetic cannabinoids has been a major issue in the field of forensic and clinical toxicology. In response to that, analytical methods for synthetic cannabinoids have been increasingly established in a variety of biological matrices. Since most of synthetic cannabinoids with structure similarity share some enzymatic metabolites, making the interpretation of analytical results and the discovery of the parent drug actually ingested very complicated, the investigation on metabolites of the first generation of synthetic cannabinoids with their relatively short side chains in chemical structure could be more important. Therefore, in the present study, we developed the analytical method for AM-2201, JWH-122 and MAM-2201 with JWH-018 as a precursor and their monohydroxylated metabolites in hair matrix. Also, using a rat model, AM-2201 and its monohydroxylated metabolites were identified and then the ratios of metabolite-to-parent drug were estimated to be used as criteria on external contamination. All analytes were extracted with methanol from washed and cut hair samples and the extracts were injected into LC-MS/MS with electrospray ion source in the positive ionization mode. Matrix effect and recovery were evaluated in hair matrices and no significant variations were observed. The validation results for precision and accuracy were satisfactory in both human and rat hair. The LOD and LOQ were 0.5 pg/10mg and 1.0 pg/10mg in human hair and 0.5 pg/20mg and 1.0 pg/20mg in pigmented and non-pigmented rat hair, respectively. Additionally, as a result of the animal study, there were not significant differences in the effect of pigmentation on the distribution of AM-2201 and its monohydroxylated metabolites in hair. Wide variations were observed for the concentrations of the naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites in authentic hair samples from nine cases; those were 0.4-59.2 pg/mg for JWH-018, 0.1-0.8 pg/mg for JWH-073, 1

  8. Pitfall in cannabinoid analysis--detection of a previously unrecognized interfering compound in human serum.

    PubMed

    Toennes, Stefan W; Hanisch, Stephanie; Pogoda, Werner; Wunder, Cora; Paulke, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In clinical and forensic toxicology, high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is increasingly used since it allows the development of sensitive and fast drug analysis procedures. During development of a LC-MS/MS method for determination of the psychoactive cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and of its two metabolites 11-hydroxy-THC (THCOH) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in serum, a previously unrecognized interfering compound was detected. Extending the fast gradient elution program by an isocratic phase leads to sufficient separation of the interfering compound, initially co-eluting with THCCOOH and exhibiting the same fragments. For characterization, product ion scans and precursor ion scans were performed. Samples from cannabis users were analyzed to estimate the abundance of the interfering compound. The mass spectrometric experiments showed that the interfering compound exhibited the same molecular mass as THCCOOH and a similar fragmentation pattern except for relative fragment intensities. This compound was exclusively detectable in authentic samples. Concentrations were in the range of 4.5 to 51 % (median 14.6 %, n = 73) of those of THCCOOH. After further optimization of the gradient, the method was sufficiently selective and sensitive and validation parameters were within acceptance limits. A new compound related to cannabis use was detected in human serum, and data suggest an isomeric structure to THCCOOH. Considering the rather high amounts observed, it was surprising that this compound had not been detected previously. Further studies on its structure and origin are necessary.

  9. Human plasma concentrations of cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Shida, Satomi; Utoh, Masahiro; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    1. Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in preclinical studies as non-human primate species. Pharmacokinetics of human cytochrome P450 probes determined in cynomolgus monkeys after single oral or intravenous administrations were extrapolated to give human plasma concentrations. 2. Plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and R-/S-warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole and midazolam previously observed in cynomolgus monkeys were scaled to human oral biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Results of the simplified human PBPK models were consistent with reported experimental PK data in humans or with values simulated by a fully constructed population-based simulator (Simcyp). 3. Oral administrations of metoprolol and dextromethorphan (human P450 2D probes) in monkeys reportedly yielded plasma concentrations similar to their quantitative detection limits. Consequently, ratios of in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearances of metoprolol and dextromethorphan determined in monkeys and humans were used with simplified PBPK models to extrapolate intravenous PK in monkeys to oral PK in humans. 4. These results suggest that cynomolgus monkeys, despite their rapid clearance of some human P450 substrates, could be a suitable model for humans, especially when used in conjunction with simple PBPK models.

  10. Human urine and plasma concentrations of bisphenol A extrapolated from pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Miyaguchi, Takamori; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Makiko; Shida, Satomi; Nishiyama, Sayako; Takano, Ryohji; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to extrapolate to humans the pharmacokinetics of estrogen analog bisphenol A determined in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Higher plasma concentrations and urinary excretions of bisphenol A glucuronide (a primary metabolite of bisphenol A) were observed in chimeric mice than in control mice after oral administrations, presumably because of enterohepatic circulation of bisphenol A glucuronide in control mice. Bisphenol A glucuronidation was faster in mouse liver microsomes than in human liver microsomes. These findings suggest a predominantly urinary excretion route of bisphenol A glucuronide in chimeric mice with humanized liver. Reported human plasma and urine data for bisphenol A glucuronide after single oral administration of 0.1mg/kg bisphenol A were reasonably estimated using the current semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model extrapolated from humanized mice data using algometric scaling. The reported geometric mean urinary bisphenol A concentration in the U.S. population of 2.64μg/L underwent reverse dosimetry modeling with the current human semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model. This yielded an estimated exposure of 0.024μg/kg/day, which was less than the daily tolerable intake of bisphenol A (50μg/kg/day), implying little risk to humans. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling will likely prove useful for determining the species-dependent toxicological risk of bisphenol A.

  11. Cannabinoids in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Natalya M; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds. In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable--instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and--in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity--just to monitor these side effects carefully.

  12. Cannabinoids in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Natalya M.; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds. In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable - instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and - in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity - just to monitor these side effects carefully. PMID:18286801

  13. Methamphetamine blood concentrations in human abusers: application to pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Melega, William P; Cho, Arthur K; Harvey, Dennis; Laćan, Goran

    2007-04-01

    Characterization of methamphetamine's (METH) dose-dependent effects on brain neurochemistry may represent a critical component for better understanding the range of resultant behavioral pathologies. Most human studies, however, have assessed only the effects of long term, high dose METH abuse (e.g., greater than 1000 mg/day) in individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for METH dependence. Yet, for the majority of METH abusers, their patterns of METH exposure that consist of lower doses remain less well-characterized. In this study, blood samples were obtained from 105 individuals detained by police for possible criminal activity and testing positive for stimulants by EMIT assay. METH blood concentrations were subsequently quantified by GC-MS and were predominantly in the low micromolar range (0.1-11.1 microM), with median and mean values of 1.3 microM (0.19 mg/l) and 2 microM (0.3 mg/l), respectively. Pharmacokinetic calculations based on these measured values were used to estimate initial METH body burdens, the median value being 52 mg. Modeling a 52 mg dose for a 4 day-METH maintenance exposure pattern of 4 doses/day at 4 h intervals showed that blood concentrations remained between 1 and 4 microM during this period. Collectively, these data present evidence for a METH exposure pattern distinct from high dose-METH abuse and provide the rationale for assessing potential brain pathology associated with such lower dose-METH exposure.

  14. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    PubMed

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects.

  15. The endocannabinoid/endovanilloid N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) and synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 abate the inflammatory activation of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Khakpour, Samira; Tran, Alphonso; Sheehan, Kayla; Schumacher, Mark; Xu, Fengyun; Hellman, Judith

    2014-05-09

    Although cannabinoids, such as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, have been studied extensively for their psychoactive effects, it has become apparent that certain cannabinoids possess immunomodulatory activity. Endothelial cells (ECs) are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of organ injury in acute inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, because they express cytokines and chemokines, which facilitate the trafficking of leukocytes to organs, and they modulate vascular barrier function. In this study, we find that primary human ECs from multiple organs express the cannabinoid receptors CB1R, GPR18, and GPR55, as well as the ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1. In contrast to leukocytes, CB2R is only minimally expressed in some EC populations. Furthermore, we show that ECs express all of the known endocannabinoid (eCB) metabolic enzymes. Examining a panel of cannabinoids, we demonstrate that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 and the eCB N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA), but neither anandamide nor 2-arachidonoylglycerol, reduce EC inflammatory responses induced by bacterial lipopeptide, LPS, and TNFα. We find that endothelial CB1R/CB2R are necessary for the effects of NADA, but not those of WIN55,212-2. Furthermore, transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1 appears to counter the anti-inflammatory properties of WIN55,212-2 and NADA, but conversely, in the absence of these cannabinoids, its inhibition exacerbates the inflammatory response in ECs activated with LPS. These data indicate that the eCB system can modulate inflammatory activation of the endothelium and may have important implications for a variety of acute inflammatory disorders that are characterized by EC activation.

  16. Cannabinoids in postmortem toxicology.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Nikolas P; Ingle, Eric A

    2011-09-01

    Cannabinoids are often excluded from postmortem toxicology screens due to their ubiquitous nature, interpretative difficulties and unanswered questions regarding their postmortem redistribution. In this study, we review 30 postmortem cases where a drug screen gave a positive cannabinoids result and a confirmation identified Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC), and/or 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in peripheral (BL-P) or cardiac/central blood (BL-C) and/or urine (UR). Had cannabinoids not been included in these toxicologic evaluations, incomplete or erroneous inferences would have been drawn in a substantial number of cases regarding cause/manner of death. THC was detected in 28 BL-C and in all 30 BL-P. THC and THC-COOH were confirmed present in 2 and 23 UR, respectively. 11-OH-THC was detected in 4 BL-C, 6 BL-P, and 0 UR. The mean THC concentrations in BL-C and BL-P were 8.0 and 15.8 ng/mL, respectively. The mean THC-COOH concentrations in BL-C and BL-P were 55.2 and 60.6 ng/mL, respectively. The mean 11-OH-THC concentrations in BL-C and BL-P were 17.0 and 12.5 ng/mL, respectively. Postmortem interval (PMI) for each case was determined and evaluated in relation to BL-C/BL-P concentration ratios with THC-COOH exhibiting a possible trend. This study is the first of its kind and demonstrates the usefulness of cannabinoid analyses as part of death investigations. Furthermore, it provides distribution data that will improve the ability of toxicologists and pathologists to evaluate cannabinoid concentrations in human postmortem specimens.

  17. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of phentermine in healthy participants receiving taranabant, a novel cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Addy, Carol; Jumes, Patricia; Rosko, Kimberly; Li, Susie; Li, Hankun; Maes, Andrea; Johnson-Levonas, Amy O; Chodakewitz, Jeffrey; Stoch, S Aubrey; Wagner, John A

    2009-10-01

    This study assessed the potential pharmacokinetic interaction and safety/tolerability of taranabant and phentermine coadministration. This was a randomized, double-blind, 3-panel, fixed-sequence study in healthy participants. Panels A, B, and C evaluated the safety/tolerability of phentermine 15 mg coadministered with taranabant 0.5, 1, and 2 mg for 7 days (panel A) and 28 days (panels B and C). In panels A and C, phentermine 15 mg was administered both with (7 days, panel A; 28 days, panel C) and without (7 days) taranabant 0.5 mg or 2 mg to evaluate pharmacokinetics. The primary endpoint was phentermine AUC(0-24 h) in panels A and C. Secondary endpoints were changes from baseline in blood pressure and heart rate for all panels. The geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals for phentermine AUC(0-24 h) in the presence/absence of taranabant 0.5 mg and 2 mg were 1.08 (0.99, 1.17) and 1.04 (0.98, 1.10), respectively. No significant differences in blood pressure and heart rate were observed with any treatment versus placebo. Coadministration of taranabant 0.5 mg, 1 mg, and 2 mg with phentermine was well tolerated with no pharmacokinetic interaction and did not result in meaningful changes in blood pressure or heart rate versus placebo.

  18. Pharmacokinetic study of lipoic acid in multiple sclerosis: comparing mice and human pharmacokinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vijayshree; Marracci, Gail H; Munar, Myrna Y; Cherala, Ganesh; Stuber, Lauren E; Alvarez, Lilia; Shinto, Lynne; Koop, Dennis R; Bourdette, Dennis N

    2010-04-01

    Lipoic acid is a natural antioxidant available as an oral supplement from a number of different manufacturers. Lipoic acid administered subcutaneously is an effective therapy for murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to compare serum lipoic acid levels with oral dosing in patients with multiple sclerosis with serum levels in mice receiving subcutaneous doses of lipoic acid. We performed serum pharmacokinetic studies in patients with multiple sclerosis after a single oral dose of 1200 mg lipoic acid. Patients received one of the three different racemic formulations randomly: tablet (Formulation A) and capsules (Formulations B and C). Mice pharmacokinetic studies were performed with three different subcutaneous doses (20, 50 and 100 mg/kg racemic lipoic acid). The pharmacokinetic parameters included Maximum Serum Concentrations (C(max) in microg/ml) and area under the curve (0-infinity) (AUC ( 0-infinity) in microg*min/ml). We found mean C(max) and AUC (0-infinity) in patients with multiple sclerosis as follows: group A (N = 7) 3.8 +/- 2.6 and 443.1 +/- 283.9; group B (N = 8) 9.9 +/- 4.5 and 745.2 +/- 308.7 and group C (N = 8) 10.3 +/- 3.8 and 848.8 +/- 360.5, respectively. Mean C(max) and AUC (0-infinity) in the mice were: 100 mg/kg lipoic acid: 30.9 +/- 2.9 and 998 +/- 245; 50 mg/kg lipoic acid: 7.6 +/- 1.4 and 223 +/- 20; 20 mg/kg lipoic acid: 2.7 +/- 0.7 and 119 +/- 33. We conclude that patients taking 1200 mg of lipoic acid from two of the three oral formulations achieved serum C(max) and AUC levels comparable to that observed in mice receiving 50 mg/kg subcutaneous dose of lipoic acid, which is a highly therapeutic dose in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. A dose of 1200 mg oral lipoic acid can achieve therapeutic serum levels in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  19. PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans can be exposed by inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an oxygenated fuel additive, from contaminated water sources. The purpose of this research was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model describing in human...

  20. Cannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    PERTWEE, R

    2001-01-01

    The enteric nervous system of several species, including the mouse, rat, guinea pig and humans, contains cannabinoid CB1 receptors that depress gastrointestinal motility, mainly by inhibiting ongoing contractile transmitter release. Signs of this depressant effect are, in the whole organism, delayed gastric emptying and inhibition of the transit of non-absorbable markers through the small intestine and, in isolated strips of ileal tissue, inhibition of evoked acetylcholine release, peristalsis, and cholinergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) contractions of longitudinal or circular smooth muscle. These are contractions evoked electrically or by agents that are thought to stimulate contractile transmitter release either in tissue taken from morphine pretreated animals (naloxone) or in unpretreated tissue (γ-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine). The inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastric emptying and intestinal transit are mediated to some extent by CB1 receptors in the brain as well as by enteric CB1 receptors. Gastric acid secretion is also inhibited in response to CB1 receptor activation, although the detailed underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Cannabinoid receptor agonists delay gastric emptying in humans as well as in rodents and probably also inhibit human gastric acid secretion. Cannabinoid pretreatment induces tolerance to the inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastrointestinal motility. Findings that the CB1 selective antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A produces in vivo and in vitro signs of increased motility of rodent small intestine probably reflect the presence in the enteric nervous system of a population of CB1 receptors that are precoupled to their effector mechanisms. SR141716A has been reported not to behave in this manner in the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparation (MPLM) of human ileum unless this has first been rendered cannabinoid tolerant. Nor has it been

  1. Enantioselective pharmacokinetics of dl-threo-methylphenidate in humans.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, N R; Hubbard, J W; Korchinski, E D; Midha, K K

    1993-01-01

    A definitive enantioselective pharmacokinetic evaluation of dl-threo-methylphenidate (MPH) was carried out in 11 healthy volunteers, all of whom received, in a randomized crossover design, three oral administrations of MPH: immediate release (IR), slow release (SR), and SR chewed before swallowing (CH). In addition, all subjects received MPH intravenously (IV) on a separate occasion. Both plasma and urine samples were collected for up to 16 hr after each drug administration. Significant enantioselective differences were found in pharmacokinetic parameters such as CL, MRT, Vdss, AUC infinity 0, and t1/2. A profound distortion of the enantiomeric ratio for MPH (d > 1) was evident in all plasma samples harvested after oral administration. After IV MPH, however, there was no significant distortion in the plasma d/l ratio until 1.5 hr after dosing, whereafter there was a divergence of the plasma levels of the enantiomers. After oral administration of dl-MPH, the absolute bioavailability (F) of d-MPH was 0.23 and that of l-MPH was 0.05. There were no significant differences in renal clearance for d- or l-MPH after oral or IV administration, although the fraction of the dose excreted unchanged in the urine was significantly greater after IV MPH. These data suggest that enantioselective differences in the pharmacokinetics of oral MPH are the result of enantioselectivity in presystemic metabolism rather than in renal excretion, such that l-MPH is preferentially converted into l-ritalinic acid. Finally, it was found that chewing the slow release formulation led to a pharmacokinetic profile very similar to that of MPH-IR, suggesting that MPH-SR should not be prescribed for children who chew tablets.

  2. Pharmacokinetic profiles of anticancer herbal medicines in humans and the clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Chen, X-W; Sneed, K B; Zhou, S-F

    2011-01-01

    A number of herbal medicines are increasingly used by cancer patients worldwide, despite the fact that the clinical evidence that supports their use to fight cancer is weak or lacking. Pharmacokinetic studies have been integrated into modern drug development, but they are generally not needed for herbal remedies. To update our knowledge in this field, this paper highlights the pharmacokinetic properties of anticancer herbal medicines and the clinical relevance. To retrieve relevant data, the authors have searched through computer-based literatures by full text search in Medline (via Pubmed), ScienceDirect, Current Contents Connect (ISI), Cochrance Library, CINAHL (EBSCO), CrossRef Search and Embase ((all from inception to May 2011). An extensive literature search indicatesthat there are limited data on the pharmacokinetic properties of anticancer herbal medicines in humans. There are increasing pharmacokinetic studies of anticancer herbal remedies, but these studies are mainly focused on a small number of herbal medicines including curcumin, ginseng, ginkgo, ginger and milk thistle. For an anticancer herbal medicine, the pharmacological activity is gained when the active agents or the active metabolites reach and sustain proper levels at their sites of action. Both the dose levels and pharmacokinetic processes of active herbal components in the body determine their target-site concentrations and thus the anticancer effect. In this regard, a safe and optimal use of anticancer herbal medicines requires a full understanding of their pharmacokinetic profiles. To optimize the use of anticancer herbal remedies, further studies to explore their pharmacokinetic properties and the relevance to pharmacodynamics and toxicity in humans are certainly warranted.

  3. Simulation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics in humans using a minimal physiologically based model.

    PubMed

    Li, Linzhong; Gardner, Iain; Dostalek, Miroslav; Jamei, Masoud

    2014-09-01

    Compared to small chemical molecules, monoclonal antibodies and Fc-containing derivatives (mAbs) have unique pharmacokinetic behaviour characterised by relatively poor cellular permeability, minimal renal filtration, binding to FcRn, target-mediated drug disposition, and disposition via lymph. A minimal physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe the pharmacokinetics of mAbs in humans was developed. Within the model, the body is divided into three physiological compartments; plasma, a single tissue compartment and lymph. The tissue compartment is further sub-divided into vascular, endothelial and interstitial spaces. The model simultaneously describes the levels of endogenous IgG and exogenous mAbs in each compartment and sub-compartment and, in particular, considers the competition of these two species for FcRn binding in the endothelial space. A Monte-Carlo sampling approach is used to simulate the concentrations of endogenous IgG and mAb in a human population. Existing targeted-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models are coupled with the minimal PBPK model to provide a general platform for simulating the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic antibodies using primarily pre-clinical data inputs. The feasibility of utilising pre-clinical data to parameterise the model and to simulate the pharmacokinetics of adalimumab and an anti-ALK1 antibody (PF-03446962) in a population of individuals was investigated and results were compared to published clinical data.

  4. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jäntti, Maria H.; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  5. Upregulation of the expression of inflammatory and angiogenic markers in human adipocytes by a synthetic cannabinoid, JTE-907.

    PubMed

    González-Muniesa, P; Bing, C; Trayhurn, P

    2010-09-01

    Inflammation in adipose tissue is a characteristic of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. It is suggested that the endocannabinoid system is involved in the regulation of inflammatory and angiogenic processes within the tissue. Human subcutaneous preadipocytes (Zen Bio) were used as the source of human preadipocytes or adipocytes. Gene expression was examined by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. The secretion of inflammation-related proteins was determined by an ELISA array. In experiments on adipocytes treated at day 14 post-differentiation, JTE-907, a synthetic cannabinoid, upregulated the expression of key inflammatory markers - IL-6, MCP-1 and IL-1 beta - and angiogenic factors - VEGF and ANGPTL4 - at 10 microM after 20 h of treatment, having also increased the expression of TRPV1 at 10 microM. JTE-907 showed no effect after 4 h. The ELISA array showed a 2.6-fold increase in IL-6 protein release. The effect of JTE-907 was inhibited by AM251 (CB1 antagonist), and partially by arachidonyl serotonin (TRPV1 and FAAH antagonist). The CB2 antagonist, AM630, partially upregulated the effect of JTE-907. Preadipocytes fed 14 days after 100% confluence exhibited downregulation of CB1, MCP-1, and IL-1 beta, 20 h after having been exposed to JTE-907. CB1 and TRPV1 receptors participate in the regulation of several inflammatory and angiogenic factors in human adipocytes, indicating their potential value as targets for the treatment of disorders related to obesity.

  6. New ursane triterpenoids from Ficus pandurata and their binding affinity for human cannabinoid and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Amgad I M; Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A; Ahmed, Hany E A; Ahmad, Amany S; Ramadan, Mahmoud A; El-Baky, Atef E Abd; Yamada, Koji; Ross, Samir A

    2016-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Ficus pandurata Hance (Moraceae) fruits has led to the isolation of two new triterpenoids, ficupanduratin A [1β-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (11) and ficupanduratin B [21α-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (17), along with 20 known compounds: α-amyrin acetate (1), α-amyrin (2), 3β-acetoxy-20-taraxasten-22-one (3), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (4), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-12-ursene (5), 11-oxo-α-amyrin acetate (6), 11-oxo-β-amyrin acetate (7), palmitic acid (8), stigmast-4,22-diene-3,6-dione (9), stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione (10), stigmasterol (12), β-sitosterol (13), stigmast-22-ene-3,6-dione (14), stigmastane-3,6-dione (15), 3β,21β-dihydroxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (16), 3β-hydroxy-11α-methoxyurs-12-ene (18), 6-hydroxystigmast-4,22-diene-3-one (19), 6-hydroxystigmast-4-ene-3-one (20), 11α,21α-dihydroxy-3β-acetoxy-urs-12-ene (21), and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22). Compound 21 is reported for the first time from a natural source. The structures of the 20 compounds were elucidated on the basis of IR, 1D ((1)H and (13)C), 2D ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY) NMR and MS spectroscopic data, in addition to comparison with literature data. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-leishmanial, and cytotoxic activities. In addition, their radioligand displacement affinity on opioid and cannabinoid receptors was assessed. Compounds 4, 11, and 15 exhibited good affinity towards the CB2 receptor, with displacement values of 69.7, 62.5 and 86.5 %, respectively. Furthermore, the binding mode of the active compounds in the active site of the CB2 cannabinoid receptors was investigated through molecular modelling.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose intravenous melatonin in humans.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Fenger, Andreas Q; Petersen, Marian C; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2016-03-01

    This crossover study investigated the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of high-dose intravenous melatonin. Volunteers participated in 3 identical study sessions, receiving an intravenous bolus of 10 mg melatonin, 100 mg melatonin, and placebo. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 0, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Quantitative determination of plasma melatonin concentrations was performed using a radioimmunoassay technique. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by a compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. Adverse effects included assessments of sedation and registration of other symptoms. Sedation, evaluated as simple reaction times, was measured at baseline and 120, 180, 300, and 420 minutes after the bolus. Twelve male volunteers completed the study. Median (IQR) Cmax after the bolus injections of 10 mg and 100 mg of melatonin were 221,500.0 (185,637.5-326,175.0) pg/mL and 1,251,500.0 (864,375.0-1,770,500.0) pg/mL, respectively; mean (SD) t1/2 was 42.3 (5.6) minutes and 46.2 (6.2) minutes; mean (SD) Vd was 1.6 (0.9) L/kg and 2.0 (0.8) L/kg; mean (SD) CL was 0.0253 (0.0096) L/min · kg and 0.0300 (0.0120) L/min · kg; and median (IQR) AUC0- ∞ , 8,997,633.0 (6,071,696.2-11,602,811.9) pg · min/mL and 54,685,979.4 (36,028,638.6-105,779,612.0) pg · min/mL. High-dose intravenous melatonin did not induce sedation, evaluated as simple reaction times. No adverse effects were reported in the study.

  8. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Broyd, Samantha J; van Hell, Hendrika H; Beale, Camilla; Yücel, Murat; Solowij, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    Cannabis use has been associated with impaired cognition during acute intoxication as well as in the unintoxicated state in long-term users. However, the evidence has been mixed and contested, and no systematic reviews of the literature on neuropsychological task-based measures of cognition have been conducted in an attempt to synthesize the findings. We systematically review the empirical research published in the past decade (from January 2004 to February 2015) on acute and chronic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids and on persistence or recovery after abstinence. We summarize the findings into the major categories of the cognitive domains investigated, considering sample characteristics and associations with various cannabis use parameters. Verbal learning and memory and attention are most consistently impaired by acute and chronic exposure to cannabis. Psychomotor function is most affected during acute intoxication, with some evidence for persistence in chronic users and after cessation of use. Impaired verbal memory, attention, and some executive functions may persist after prolonged abstinence, but persistence or recovery across all cognitive domains remains underresearched. Associations between poorer performance and a range of cannabis use parameters, including a younger age of onset, are frequently reported. Little further evidence has emerged for the development of tolerance to the acutely impairing effects of cannabis. Evidence for potential protection from harmful effects by cannabidiol continues to increase but is not definitive. In light of increasing trends toward legalization of cannabis, the knowledge gained from this body of research needs to be incorporated into strategies to minimize harm.

  9. Modulation of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Signaling by Medicinal Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Utomo, Wesley K.; de Vries, Marjan; Braat, Henri; Bruno, Marco J.; Parikh, Kaushal; Comalada, Mònica; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van Goor, Harry; Fuhler, Gwenny M.

    2017-01-01

    Medical marijuana is increasingly prescribed as an analgesic for a growing number of indications, amongst which terminal cancer and multiple sclerosis. However, the mechanistic aspects and properties of cannabis remain remarkably poorly characterized. In this study we aimed to investigate the immune-cell modulatory properties of medical cannabis. Healthy volunteers were asked to ingest medical cannabis, and kinome profiling was used to generate comprehensive descriptions of the cannabis challenge on inflammatory signal transduction in the peripheral blood of these volunteers. Results were related to both short term and long term effects in patients experimentally treated with a medical marijuana preparation for suffering from abdominal pain as a result of chronic pancreatitis or other causes. The results reveal an immunosuppressive effect of cannabinoid preparations via deactivation of signaling through the pro-inflammatory p38 MAP kinase and mTOR pathways and a concomitant deactivation of the pro-mitogenic ERK pathway. However, long term cannabis exposure in two patients resulted in reversal of this effect. While these data provide a powerful mechanistic rationale for the clinical use of medical marijuana in inflammatory and oncological disease, caution may be advised with sustained use of such preparations. PMID:28174520

  10. Oral and dermal pharmacokinetics of triclopyr in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, N G; Nolan, R J; Perkins, J M; Davies, R; Warrington, S J

    1989-11-01

    Blood levels and urinary excretion of triclopyr, the active ingredient in Garlon herbicides, were followed in six volunteers given single oral doses of 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg body weight. Five of these volunteers later received dermal applications of Garlon 4 herbicide formulation equivalent to 3.7 mg triclopyr/kg body weight applied to the forearm. Following oral administration blood levels peaked at 2-3 h and declined to undetectable levels within 48 h; more than 80% of the dose was found as unchanged triclopyr in the urine. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to describe the time-course of triclopyr clearance; half-lives for the rapid initial and slower terminal phases were 1.3 h and 5.1 h respectively, and were independent of dose. Due to the slow half-life for dermal absorption (t1/2 = 16.8 h) the rapid initial elimination phase was obscured and the pharmacokinetics could be simplified by a one-compartment model. An average of 1.37% of the applied dose was recovered in the urine; when corrected for recovery after oral administration this was equivalent to an absorption of 1.65%. Triclopyr is slowly absorbed through skin and is rapidly eliminated. It has very low potential to accumulate in man or to be absorbed through the skin in acutely toxic amounts.

  11. Human pharmacokinetics of iohexol. A new nonionic contrast medium

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, B.; Aulie, A.; Sveen, K.; Andrew, E.

    1983-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of iohexol, a new nonionic, water-soluble contrast medium, have been determined after intravenous injection in 20 healthy volunteers, at four different dose levels (125-500 mg I/kg). The apparent volume of distribution was 0.27 1/kg, indicating distribution in the extracellular water. The biologic half-life was 121 minutes, comparable with that of other intravascular contrast media. Iohexol was excreted completely unmetabolized in the urine, with a 100% recovery 24 hours after injection. A comparison of iohexol and chromium-51 (/sup 51/Cr)-EDTA clearances indicates that iohexol is mainly excreted by glomerular filtration. The /sup 51/Cr-EDTA clearance was the same when injected separately and concomitantly with iohexol, indicating that glomerular filtration rate is not affected by iohexol. No dose dependency was observed in the investigated parameters t1/2 alpha, t1/2 beta, Vd, ClT or ClR. Iohexol pharmacokinetics are in correspondence with previously reported data on intravascular contrast media.

  12. In Vitro and In Vivo Human Metabolism of Synthetic Cannabinoids FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Kronstrand, Robert; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22, two novel synthetic cannabinoids, were detected in herbal blends in Japan, Russia, and Germany and were quickly added to their scheduled drugs list. Unfortunately, no human metabolism data are currently available, making it challenging to confirm their intake. The present study aims to identify appropriate analytical markers by investigating FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 metabolism in human hepatocytes and confirm the results in authentic urine specimens. For metabolic stability, 1 μM FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 was incubated with human liver microsomes for up to 1 h; for metabolite profiling, 10 μM was incubated with human hepatocytes for 3 h. Two authentic urine specimens from FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 positive cases were analyzed after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. Metabolite identification in hepatocyte samples and urine specimens was accomplished by high-resolution mass spectrometry using information-dependent acquisition. Both FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 were rapidly metabolized in HLM with half-lives of 12.4 and 11.5 min, respectively. In human hepatocyte samples, we identified seven metabolites for both compounds, generated by ester hydrolysis and further hydroxylation and/or glucuronidation. After ester hydrolysis, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 yielded the same metabolite M7, fluorobenzylindole-3-carboxylic acid (FBI-COOH). M7 and M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) were the major metabolites. In authentic urine specimens after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis, M6 and M7 also were the predominant metabolites. Based on our study, we recommend M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) and M7 (FBI-COOH) as suitable urinary markers for documenting FDU-PB-22 and/or FUB-PB-22 intake.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of thiocolchicoside in humans using a specific radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Sandouk, P; Chappey, O; d'Yvoire, M B; Scherrmann, J M

    1995-10-01

    The myorelaxant thiocolchicoside (TC), an analogue of colchicine (COL), was assayed in plasma and urine by a radioimmunoassay (RIA) using a cross-reacting COL-specific polyclonal antibody. Cross-reactivity was 56% for TC, giving a limit of quantification of 0.5 ng/ml and a linear response from 0.5 to 100 ng/ml. Specificity was checked by cross-reactivity studies with COL analogues and by using liquid chromatography and RIA in tandem on urine samples. Two immunoreactive peaks were detected, but the nonspecific peak represented < 2% of the total urine concentration of TC. Pharmacokinetics of TC following infusion of 4 mg in two subjects revealed a moderate distribution (Vss from 31 to 35 L) and mainly extrarenal elimination (75% of the total body clearance). Terminal half-lives ranged from 2.4 to 2.7 h in plasma and from 3.2 to 3.7 h in urine.

  14. Repeated dose pharmacokinetics of pancopride in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Salva, P; Costa, J; Pérez-Campos, A; Martínez-Tobed, A

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of pancopride after repeated oral dose administration of 20 mg pancopride in tablet form once a day for 5 d in 12 healthy male volunteers. Plasma levels were measured by HPLC using a solid phase extraction method and automated injection. The minimum quantification limit of pancopride in plasma was 2 ng mL-1. The maximum plasma concentration (mean +/- SD) after the first dose was 92.5 +/- 41.5 ng ML-1 and tmax was 1.7 +/- 0.9 h. The elimination half-life (t1/2) was 14.3 +/- 6.9 h. The area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC) was 997 +/- 396 ng h mL-1. The maximum plasma concentration (mean +/- SD) at steady state (day 5) was 101.8 +/- 36.9 ng mL-1 and tmax was 2.2 +/- 1.2 h. The elimination half-life (t1/2) was 16.3 +/- 2.7 h and the minimum plasma concentration (Cssmin) was 16.6 +/- 6.9 ng mL-1. The area under the concentration-time curve during the dosing interval (AUCss tau) was 995 +/- 389 ng h mL-1. The average plasma concentration at steady state (Cssav) was 43.3 +/- 16.1 ng mL-1 and the experimental accumulation ratio (RAUC) was 1.34 +/- 0.19, whereas the mean theoretical value (R) was 1.40 +/- 0.29. The results obtained showed a good correlation between the experimental plasma levels and the expected values calculated using a repeated dose two-compartment model assessed by means of the Akaike value. It is concluded that the pharmacokinetics of pancopride are not modified after repeated dose administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. The effects of synthetic cannabinoid UR-144 on the human body-A review of 39 cases.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Piotr; Gieroń, Joanna; Gil, Dominika; Lechowicz, Wojciech; Skulska, Agnieszka; Tokarczyk, Bogdan

    2017-03-07

    UR-144 [(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone] is a synthetic cannabinoid, which has been detected in many 'legal highs', seized from the global drug market since the beginning of 2012. It has gained popularity as a 'legal' alternative to classic cannabis in countries where it was not controlled. Despite the widespread distribution of this substance, the data on its effects on the human body are scarce. Therefore, this paper describes the results of analysis and observed effects in 39 cases in which UR-144 was determined in blood. Symptoms were noted from the blood sampling forms filled out by the representative doctor. The determined concentrations of UR-144 were in the range of trace amounts (LOD-0.15ng/mL; LOQ-0.5ng/mL) up to 17ng/mL. The most common observed effects included slurred speech, dilated pupils, sluggish and abnormal pupillary reaction, cheerful behaviour, poor coordination, and staggering. Less frequently observed were: verbosity, narrow pupils, loss of consciousness, pale or reddened facial skin, blackout, euphoria, agitation, hallucinations, hindered communication, shaking hands, seizures, convulsions, somnolence, delayed movements, redness of the conjunctiva, and tachycardia. The discussed cases show the effects observed after UR-144 use. This study can assist in the recognition of possible effects caused by this substance.

  16. Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorobutyrate in Rats, Mice,Monkeys, and Humans and Relevance to Human Exposurevia Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorobutyrate (PFBA) has been detected in precipitation, surface waters, water treatment effluent, and in public and private wells in Minnesota at up to low mg/l concentrations. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of PFBA in rats, mice, monkeys, and humans to provide a rati...

  17. Mixed-effects modelling of the interspecies pharmacokinetic scaling of pegylated human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Jolling, Koen; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose; Hemeryck, Alex; Vermeulen, An; Greway, Tony

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for interspecies allometric scaling of pegylated r-HuEPO (PEG-EPO) pharmacokinetics to man. A total of 927 serum concentrations from 193 rats, 6 rabbits, 34 monkeys, and 9 dogs obtained after a single dose of PEG-EPO, administered by the i.v. (dose range: 12.5-550 microg/kg) and s.c. (dose range: 12.5-500 microg/kg) routes, were pooled in this analysis. An open two-compartment model with first-order absorption and lag time (Tlag) and linear elimination from the central compartment was fitted to the data using the NONMEM V software. Body weight (WT) was used as a scaling factor and the effect of brain weight (BW), sex, and pregnancy status on the pharmacokinetic parameters was investigated. The final model was evaluated by means of a non-parametric bootstrap analysis and used to predict the PEG-EPO pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects. The systemic clearance (CL) in males was estimated to be 4.08WT1.030xBW-0.345 ml/h. In females, the CL was 90.7% of the CL in males. The volumes of the central (Vc) and the peripheral (Vp) compartment were characterized as 57.8WT0.959 ml, and 48.1WT1.150 ml, respectively. Intercompartmental flow was estimated at 2.32WT0.930 ml/h. Absorption rate constant (Ka) was estimated at 0.0538WT-0.149. The absolute s.c. bioavailability F was calculated at 52.5, 80.2, and 49.4% in rat, monkey, and dog, respectively. The interindividual variability in the population pharmacokinetic parameters was fairly low (<35%). Non-parametric bootstrap confirmed the accuracy of the NONMEM estimates. The mean model predicted pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects of 70 kg were estimated at: CL: 26.2 ml/h; Vc: 3.6l; Q: 286 l/h; Vp: 6.9l, and Ka: 0.031 h-1. The population pharmacokinetic model developed was appropriate to describe the time course of PEG-EPO serum concentrations and their variability in different species. The model predicted pharmacokinetics of PEG

  18. Emerging Insights for Translational Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Studies: Towards Prediction of Nose-to-Brain Transport in Humans.

    PubMed

    Ruigrok, Mitchel J R; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the potential added value of intranasal drug administration, preclinical studies to date have typically used the area under the curve (AUC) in brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared to plasma following intranasal and intravenous administration to calculate measures of extent like drug targeting efficiencies (%DTE) and nose-to-brain transport percentages (%DTP). However, CSF does not necessarily provide direct information on the target site concentrations, while total brain concentrations are not specific to that end either as non-specific binding is not explicitly considered. Moreover, to predict nose-to-brain transport in humans, the use of descriptive analysis of preclinical data does not suffice. Therefore, nose-to-brain research should be performed translationally and focus on preclinical studies to obtain specific information on absorption from the nose, and distinguish between the different transport routes to the brain (absorption directly from the nose to the brain, absorption from the nose into the systemic circulation, and distribution between the systemic circulation and the brain), in terms of extent as well as rate. This can be accomplished by the use of unbound concentrations obtained from plasma and brain, with subsequent advanced mathematical modeling. To that end, brain extracellular fluid (ECF) is a preferred sampling site as it represents most closely the site of action for many targets. Furthermore, differences in nose characteristics between preclinical species and humans should be considered. Finally, pharmacodynamic measurements that can be obtained in both animals and humans should be included to further improve the prediction of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of intranasally administered CNS drugs in humans.

  19. Current Knowledge on Cannabinoids in Oral Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dayong; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is a new biological matrix for clinical and forensic drug testing, offering non-invasive and directly observable sample collection reducing adulteration potential, ease of multiple sample collections, lower biohazard risk during collection, recent exposure identification, and stronger correlation with blood than urine concentrations. Because cannabinoids are usually the most prevalent analytes in illicit drug testing, application of OF drug testing requires sufficient scientific data to support sensitive and specific OF cannabinoid detection. This review presents current knowledge on OF cannabinoids, evaluating pharmacokinetic properties, detection windows, and correlation with other biological matrices and impairment from field applications and controlled drug administration studies. In addition, on-site screening technologies, confirmatory analytical methods, drug stability, and effects of sample collection procedure, adulterants, and passive environmental exposure are reviewed. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol OF concentrations could be > 1000 μg/L shortly after smoking, whereas minor cannabinoids are detected at 10-fold and metabolites at 1000-fold lower concentrations. OF research over the past decade demonstrated that appropriate interpretation of test results requires a comprehensive understanding of distinct elimination profiles and detection windows for different cannabinoids, which are influenced by administration route, dose, and drug use history. Thus, each drug testing program should establish cutoff criteria, collection/analysis procedures, and storage conditions tailored to its purposes. Building a scientific basis for OF testing is on-going, with continuing OF cannabinoids research on passive environmental exposure, drug use history, donor physiological conditions, and oral cavity metabolism needed to better understand mechanisms of cannabinoid OF disposition and expand OF drug testing applicability. PMID:23983217

  20. AN EXAMPLE OF MODEL STRUCTURE DIFFERENCES USING SENSITIVITY ANALYSES IN PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial chemical and an environmental contaminant. TCE and its metabolites may be carcinogenic and affect human health. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models that differ in compartmentalization are developed for TCE metabo...

  1. Human plasma concentrations of herbicidal carbamate molinate extrapolated from the pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masanao; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Nishiyama, Sayako; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    To predict concentrations in humans of the herbicidal carbamate molinate, used exclusively in rice cultivation, a forward dosimetry approach was carried out using data from lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses orally administered to rats, wild type mice, and chimeric mice with humanized liver and from in vitro human and rodent experiments. Human liver microsomes preferentially mediated hydroxylation of molinate, but rat livers additionally produced molinate sulfoxide and an unidentified metabolite. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents for molinate and its primary sulfoxide from animal studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and human metabolic data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The slower disposition of molinate and accumulation of molinate sulfoxide in humans were estimated by modeling after single and multiple doses compared with elimination in rodents. The results from simplified PBPK modeling in combination with chimeric mice with humanized liver suggest that ratios of estimated parameters of molinate sulfoxide exposure in humans to those in rats were three times as many as general safety factor of 10 for species difference in toxicokinetics. Thus, careful regulatory decision is needed when evaluating the human risk resulting from exposure to low doses of molinate and related carbamates based on data obtained from rats.

  2. Cannabinoid-Induced Hyperemesis: A Conundrum—From Clinical Recognition to Basic Science Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Darmani, Nissar A.

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids are used clinically on a subacute basis as prophylactic agonist antiemetics for the prevention of nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapeutics. Cannabinoids prevent vomiting by inhibition of release of emetic neurotransmitters via stimulation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Cannabis-induced hyperemesis is a recently recognized syndrome associated with chronic cannabis use. It is characterized by repeated cyclical vomiting and learned compulsive hot water bathing behavior. Although considered rare, recent international publications of numerous case reports suggest the contrary. The syndrome appears to be a paradox and the pathophysiological mechanism(s) underlying the induced vomiting remains unknown. Although some traditional hypotheses have already been proposed, the present review critically explores the basic science of these explanations in the clinical setting and provides more current mechanisms for the induced hyperemesis. These encompass: (1) pharmacokinetic factors such as long half-life, chronic exposure, lipid solubility, individual variation in metabolism/excretion leading to accumulation of emetogenic cannabinoid metabolites, and/or cannabinoid withdrawal; and (2) pharmacodynamic factors including switching of the efficacy of Δ9-THC from partial agonist to antagonist, differential interaction of Δ9-THC with Gs and Gi signal transduction proteins, CB1 receptor desensitization or downregulation, alterations in tissue concentrations of endocannabinoid agonists/inverse agonists, Δ9-THC-induced mobilization of emetogenic metabolites of the arachidonic acid cascade, brainstem versus enteric actions of Δ9-THC, and/or hypothermic versus hyperthermic actions of Δ9-THC. In addition, human and animal findings suggest that chronic exposure to cannabis may not be a prerequisite for the induction of vomiting but is required for the intensity of emesis. PMID:27713347

  3. Validation of Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Vinyl Acetate Against Human Nasal Dosimetry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hinderliter, Paul M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Corley, Rick A.; Bloemen, Louis J.; Bogdanffy, M S.

    2005-05-01

    Vinyl acetate has been shown to induce nasal lesions in rodents in inhalation bioassays. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for vinyl acetate has been used in human risk assessment, but previous in vivo validation was conducted only in rats. Controlled human exposures to vinyl acetate were conducted to provide validation data for the application of the model in humans. Five volunteers were exposed to 1, 5, and 10 ppm 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate via inhalation. A probe inserted into thenasopharyngeal region sampled both 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate and the major metabolite 13 C1 , 13 C2 acetaldehyde during rest and light exercise. Nasopharyngeal air concentrations were analyzed in real time by ion trap mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Experimental concentrations of both vinyl acetate and acetaldehyde were then compared to predicted concentrations calculated from the previously published human model. Model predictions of vinyl acetate nasal extraction compared favorably with measured values of vinyl acetate, as did predictions of nasopharyngeal acetaldehyde when compared to measured acetaldehyde. The results showed that the current PBPK model structure and parameterization are appropriate for vinyl acetate. These analyses were conducted from 1 to 10 ppm vinyl acetate, a range relevant to workplace exposure standards but which would not be expected to saturate vinyl acetate metabolism. Risk assessment based on this model further concluded that 24 h per day exposures up to 1 ppm do not present concern regarding cancer or non-cancer toxicity. Validation of the vinyl acetate human PBPK model provides support for these conclusions.

  4. Validation of human physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for vinyl acetate against human nasal dosimetry data.

    PubMed

    Hinderliter, P M; Thrall, K D; Corley, R A; Bloemen, L J; Bogdanffy, M S

    2005-05-01

    Vinyl acetate has been shown to induce nasal lesions in rodents in inhalation bioassays. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for vinyl acetate has been used in human risk assessment, but previous in vivo validation was conducted only in rats. Controlled human exposures to vinyl acetate were conducted to provide validation data for the application of the model in humans. Five volunteers were exposed to 1, 5, and 10 ppm 13C1,13C2 vinyl acetate via inhalation. A probe inserted into the nasopharyngeal region sampled both 13C1,13C2 vinyl acetate and the major metabolite 13C1,13C2 acetaldehyde during rest and light exercise. Nasopharyngeal air concentrations were analyzed in real time by ion trap mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Experimental concentrations of both vinyl acetate and acetaldehyde were then compared to predicted concentrations calculated from the previously published human model. Model predictions of vinyl acetate nasal extraction compared favorably with measured values of vinyl acetate, as did predictions of nasopharyngeal acetaldehyde when compared to measured acetaldehyde. The results showed that the current PBPK model structure and parameterization are appropriate for vinyl acetate. These analyses were conducted from 1 to 10 ppm vinyl acetate, a range relevant to workplace exposure standards but which would not be expected to saturate vinyl acetate metabolism. Risk assessment based on this model further concluded that 24 h per day exposures up to 1 ppm do not present concern regarding cancer or non-cancer toxicity. Validation of the vinyl acetate human PBPK model provides support for these conclusions.

  5. Population pharmacokinetics of rifabutin in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Gatti, G; Papa, P; Torre, D; Andreoni, M; Poggio, A; Bassetti, M; Marone, P

    1998-08-01

    Rifabutin pharmacokinetics were studied by the population approach (NONMEM) with 40 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving rifabutin at different doses for prophylaxis or therapy of mycobacterial infections. A two-compartment open model with first-order absorption was used as the structural pharmacokinetic model. Parameter estimates were the absorption rate constant (0. 201/h), clearance/bioavailability (CL/F; 60.9 liters/h), volume of the central compartment/bioavailability (231 liters), intercompartmental clearance (60.3 liters/h), and volume of the peripheral compartment/bioavailability (Vp/F; 1,050 liters). The distribution and elimination half-lives were 1.24 and 25.4 h, respectively. The covariates tested for influence on CL/F and Vp/F were sex, age, weight, height, body surface area, tobacco smoking, drug addiction, alanine aminotransferase levels, creatinine clearance, total protein, bilirubin, numbers of CD4(+) cells, presence of diarrhea, cachexia index, rifabutin use (prophylaxis versus therapy), rifabutin dose, study site, and the concomitant administration of clarithromycin, fluconazole, phenobarbital, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, or benzodiazepines. The only statistically significant effects on rifabutin pharmacokinetic parameters were a 27% decrease in Vp/F due to the concomitant administration of azithromycin and a 39% increase in Vp/F due to tobacco smoking. Such effects may be considered clinically unimportant. Our results confirm the lack of a correlation of rifabutin pharmacokinetic parameters with parameters of disease progression and gastrointestinal function. Also, the lack of a correlation with covariates which were previously found to be significant, such as concomitant fluconazole and clarithromycin use, may suggest that the effect of such covariates may be less important in the real clinical setting, in which several concomitant factors may influence pharmacokinetic parameters, with an overall effect of no apparent

  6. Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of 1,4-Dioxane in Rats, Mice, and Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Lisa M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Poet, Torka S.; Corley, Rick; Weber, Thomas J.; Locey, B. J.; Clarkson, Jacquelyn; Sager, S.; Gargas, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1,4-Dioxane (CAS No. 123-91-1) is used primarily as a solvent or as a solvent stabilizer. It can cause lung, liver and kidney damage at sufficiently high exposure levels. Two physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of 1,4-dioxane and its major metabolite, hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (HEAA), were published in 1990. These models have uncertainties and deficiencies that could be addressed and the model strengthened for use in a contemporary cancer risk assessment for 1,4-dioxane. Studies were performed to fill data gaps and reduce uncertainties pertaining to the pharmacokinetics of 1,4-dioxane and HEAA in rats, mice, and humans. Three types of studies were performed:partition coefficient measurements, blood time course in mice, and in vitro pharmacokinetics using rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes. Updated PBPK models were developed based on these new data and previously available data. The optimized rate of metabolism for the mouse was significantly higher than the value previously estimated. The optimized rat kinetic parameters were similar to those in the 1990 models. Only two human studies were identified. Model predictions were consistent with one study, but did not fit the second as well. In addition, a rat nasal exposure was completed. The results confirmed water directly contacts rat nasal tissues during drinking water under bioassays. Consistent with previous PBPK models, nasal tissues were not specifically included in the model. Use of these models will reduce the uncertainty in future 1,4-dioxane risk assessments.

  7. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia. PMID:26539529

  8. An analgesia circuit activated by cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Meng, I D; Manning, B H; Martin, W J; Fields, H L

    1998-09-24

    Although many anecdotal reports indicate that marijuana and its active constituent, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), may reduce pain sensation, studies of humans have produced inconsistent results. In animal studies, the apparent pain-suppressing effects of delta-9-THC and other cannabinoid drugs are confounded by motor deficits. Here we show that a brainstem circuit that contributes to the pain-suppressing effects of morphine is also required for the analgesic effects of cannabinoids. Inactivation of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) prevents the analgesia but not the motor deficits produced by systemically administered cannabinoids. Furthermore, cannabinoids produce analgesia by modulating RVM neuronal activity in a manner similar to, but pharmacologically dissociable from, that of morphine. We also show that endogenous cannabinoids tonically regulate pain thresholds in part through the modulation of RVM neuronal activity. These results show that analgesia produced by cannabinoids and opioids involves similar brainstem circuitry and that cannabinoids are indeed centrally acting analgesics with a new mechanism of action.

  9. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid-based drugs.

    PubMed

    Klein, Thomas W; Newton, Catherine A

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoid-based drugs modeled on cannabinoids originally isolated from marijuana are now known to significantly impact the functioning of the endocannabinoid system of mammals. This system operates not only in the brain but also in organs and tissues in the periphery including the immune system. Natural and synthetic cannabinoids are tricyclic terpenes, whereas the endogenous physiological ligands are eicosanoids. Several receptors for these compounds have been extensively described, CB1 and CB2, and are G protein-coupled receptors; however, cannabinoid-based drugs are also demonstrated to function independently of these receptors. Cannabinoids regulate many physiological functions and their impact on immunity is generally antiinflammatory as powerful modulators of the cytokine cascade. This anti-inflammatory potency has led to the testing of these drugs in chronic inflammatory laboratory paradigms and even in some human diseases. Psychoactive and nonpsychoactive cannabinoid-based drugs such as Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, HU-211, and ajulemic acid have been tested and found moderately effective in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, arthritis, and neuropathic pain. Furthermore, although clinical trials are not yet reported, preclinical data with cannabinoid-based drugs suggest efficacy in other inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis.

  10. Synthetic cannabinoids and potential reproductive consequences.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofei; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2014-02-27

    Increases in emergency room visits due to abuse of designer drugs, popularly known by the street names "K2" and "Spice," are a cause for social, judicial, and clinical concerns. The psychoactive components in these herbal drugs mainly consist of different synthetic cannabinoids, and users of these street drugs are primarily within the age group of 12 to 20years old. The abusive use of synthetic cannabinoids results in anxiety, nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, elevated blood pressure, tremors, seizures, hallucinations, and paranoid behavior, but the effects of maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids during pregnancy are ambiguous due to limited studies in humans and a relative short history of the drugs. In this review, we discuss the known and potential adverse effects of synthetic cannabinoids on human pregnancy using knowledge gathered from studies in mice and limited studies in humans. In mice, multiple sites and stages of pregnancy are potential targets of synthetic cannabinoids, including preimplantation embryo development, oviductal embryo transport, implantation, placentation, and parturition. It is anticipated that maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids would result in severely compromised female fertility and pregnancy outcome.

  11. Effects of chlorophyll and chlorophyllin on low-dose aflatoxin B(1) pharmacokinetics in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Jubert, Carole; Mata, John; Bench, Graham; Dashwood, Roderick; Pereira, Cliff; Tracewell, William; Turteltaub, Kenneth; Williams, David; Bailey, George

    2009-12-01

    Chlorophyll (Chla) and chlorophyllin (CHL) were shown previously to reduce carcinogen bioavailability, biomarker damage, and tumorigenicity in trout and rats. These findings were partially extended to humans, where CHL reduced excretion of aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1))-DNA repair products in Chinese unavoidably exposed to dietary AFB(1). However, neither AFB(1) pharmacokinetics nor Chla effects were examined. We conducted an unblinded crossover study to establish AFB(1) pharmacokinetic parameters among four human volunteers, and to explore possible effects of CHL or Chla cotreatment in three of those volunteers. For protocol 1, fasted subjects received an Institutional Review Board-approved dose of 14C-AFB(1) (30 ng, 5 nCi) by capsule with 100 mL water, followed by normal eating and drinking after 2 hours. Blood and cumulative urine samples were collected over 72 hours, and 14C- AFB(1) equivalents were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry. Protocols 2 and 3 were similar except capsules also contained 150 mg of purified Chla or CHL, respectively. Protocols were repeated thrice for each volunteer. The study revealed rapid human AFB(1) uptake (plasma k(a), 5.05 + or - 1.10 h(-1); T(max), 1.0 hour) and urinary elimination (95% complete by 24 hours) kinetics. Chla and CHL treatment each significantly impeded AFB(1) absorption and reduced Cmax and AUCs (plasma and urine) in one or more subjects. These initial results provide AFB(1) pharmacokinetic parameters previously unavailable for humans, and suggest that Chla or CHL co-consumption may limit the bioavailability of ingested aflatoxin in humans, as they do in animal models.

  12. [Pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody in human body].

    PubMed

    Li, Yunchun; Tan, Tianzhi; Mo, Tingshu; Lu, Wusheng; Deng, Houfu; Yang, Xiaochuan; Li, Xiao

    2007-08-01

    To study pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody (hepatoma monoclonal antibody HAb18 F(ab')2) in vivo. 24 cases of primary hepatocelluar carcinoma (PHC) were equally divided into the low dose group, middle dose group and high dose group. After the relevant injection was administrated into the hepatic artery of each case, intravenous blood and urine samples were separately collected at different time for determination of the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)). The proportion of 131I-HAb18 F(ab')2 in serum of each blood sample was determined, and the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)) of druggery for each blood sample was revised according to the proportion. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using DAS ver 1.0 (Drug And Statistics for Windows) program. The component of urine radiomaterial was determined and the percentages of urine radioactivity in administration dosage were calculated. The catabolism of the injection with time accorded with dynamics two-compartment model. The catabolism product was mainly free-131I and was excreted via kidney; the urine radioactivity was 47.70%-51.16% of administration dosage during 120 h after administration of drug. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics of the injection can satisfy the clinical demands. The drug dose recommended for clinical use was 27.75 MBq of the injection for each kg of human body.

  13. Population pharmacokinetics of dapsone administered biweekly to human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, G; Merighi, M; Hossein, J; Travaini, S; Casazza, R; Karlsson, M; Cruciani, M; Bassetti, D

    1996-01-01

    The population pharmacokinetics of dapsone were examined in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients receiving dapsone at a dosage of 100 mg twice weekly for the prevention of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Nonlinear mixed-effect modeling was used to determine the best pharmacostatistical model for the data. A one-compartment open model with first-order absorption and elimination was used as the structural pharmacokinetic model. Several covariates were tested for their influence on pharmacokinetic parameters. Rifampin was found to increase the values of clearance/bioavailability (CL/F) and volume of distribution/ bioavailability (V/F) by approximately 70%. CL/F and V/F were 1.83 liters/h and 69.6 liters, respectively, for patients not taking rifampin. The effect of rifampin on the pharmacokinetic parameters of dapsone was appreciably less than expected on the basis of studies with healthy volunteers. Increased bilirubin levels were associated with a significant decrease in the absorption rate constant (Ka). However, this finding may be considered clinically irrelevant because the post hoc Bayesian estimates of Ka for patients with high bilirubin levels ( > 1.2 mg/dl) were at the lower bound of the values for patients with normal bilirubin levels. The value of Ka was 0.957 h-1 for a patient with a bilirubin level of 0.7 mg/dl. After inclusion of covariates in the model, the interpatient variability was 35% for CL/F, not significant for V/F, and 85% for Ka. Simulation of plasma concentration-versus-time curves indicated that the administration of 100 mg of dapsone biweekly is associated with sustained dapsone levels in the plasma of the majority of the patients. Dosage adjustments for patients concomitantly treated with rifampin may be necessary. PMID:9124833

  14. [Drug discrimination properties and cytotoxicity of the cannabinoid receptor ligands].

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2012-06-01

    The worldwide distribution of smokable herbal mixtures called "Spice" that contain synthetic cannabinoids with a pharmacological activity similar to delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) has been reported. The synthetic cannabinoids induce behavior and have biochemical properties similar to naturally occurring cannabinoids such as delta 9-THC. In drug discrimination procedures, animal behavior is differentially reinforced depending on the presence or absence of specific drug stimuli. This review seeks to establish an animal model to serve as a discriminative stimulus of the synthetic cannabinoids, to determine whether this discriminative stimulus is identical to that of delta 9-THC. Much data have been obtained in drug discrimination experiments with various synthetic cannabinoids. In the discriminative study, synthetic cannabinoids such as CP-55,940 and WIN-55,212-2 were substituted for delta 9-THC in rats trained to discriminate delta 9-THC from the vehicle. These discriminative effects of synthetic cannabinoids were antagonized by CB1 antagonist SR-141,716A. The discriminative effects of synthetic cannabinoids may overlap with the delta 9-THC cue mediated by CB1 receptors. In in vitro study using NG 108-15 cell lines, synthetic cannabinoids have produced strong cytotoxicities that were suppressed by pretreatment with the CB1 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, pretreatment with caspase inhibitors suppressed these synthetic-cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicities in NG 108-15 cells. These findings indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards NG 108-15 cells is mediated by the CB1 receptors and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the cytotoxicities induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, synthetic cannabinoid abuse could be a health hazard for humans.

  15. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model of Rifapentine and 25-Desacetyl Rifapentine Disposition in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Zurlinden, Todd J.; Eppers, Garrett J.

    2016-01-01

    Rifapentine (RPT) is a rifamycin antimycobacterial and, as part of a combination therapy, is indicated for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although the results from a number of studies indicate that rifapentine has the potential to shorten treatment duration and enhance completion rates compared to other rifamycin agents utilized in antituberculosis drug regimens (i.e., regimens 1 to 4), its optimal dose and exposure in humans are unknown. To help inform such an optimization, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to predict time course, tissue-specific concentrations of RPT and its active metabolite, 25-desacetyl rifapentine (dRPT), in humans after specified administration schedules for RPT. Starting with the development and verification of a PBPK model for rats, the model was extrapolated and then tested using human pharmacokinetic data. Testing and verification of the models included comparisons of predictions to experimental data in several rat tissues and time course RPT and dRPT plasma concentrations in humans from several single- and repeated-dosing studies. Finally, the model was used to predict RPT concentrations in the lung during the intensive and continuation phases of a current recommended TB treatment regimen. Based on these results, it is anticipated that the PBPK model developed in this study will be useful in evaluating dosing regimens for RPT and for characterizing tissue-level doses that could be predictors of problems related to efficacy or safety. PMID:27270284

  16. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model of Rifapentine and 25-Desacetyl Rifapentine Disposition in Humans.

    PubMed

    Zurlinden, Todd J; Eppers, Garrett J; Reisfeld, Brad

    2016-08-01

    Rifapentine (RPT) is a rifamycin antimycobacterial and, as part of a combination therapy, is indicated for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Although the results from a number of studies indicate that rifapentine has the potential to shorten treatment duration and enhance completion rates compared to other rifamycin agents utilized in antituberculosis drug regimens (i.e., regimens 1 to 4), its optimal dose and exposure in humans are unknown. To help inform such an optimization, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to predict time course, tissue-specific concentrations of RPT and its active metabolite, 25-desacetyl rifapentine (dRPT), in humans after specified administration schedules for RPT. Starting with the development and verification of a PBPK model for rats, the model was extrapolated and then tested using human pharmacokinetic data. Testing and verification of the models included comparisons of predictions to experimental data in several rat tissues and time course RPT and dRPT plasma concentrations in humans from several single- and repeated-dosing studies. Finally, the model was used to predict RPT concentrations in the lung during the intensive and continuation phases of a current recommended TB treatment regimen. Based on these results, it is anticipated that the PBPK model developed in this study will be useful in evaluating dosing regimens for RPT and for characterizing tissue-level doses that could be predictors of problems related to efficacy or safety.

  17. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to determine the dose of ST-246 to protect against smallpox in humans.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Janet M; Fenneteau, Frederique; Gosselin, Nathalie H; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Kassir, Nastya; Marier, J F; Chen, Yali; Grosenbach, Doug; Frimm, Annie E; Honeychurch, Kady M; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Although smallpox has been eradicated, the United States government considers it a "material threat" and has funded the discovery and development of potential therapeutic compounds. As reported here, the human efficacious dose for one of these compounds, ST-246, was determined using efficacy studies in nonhuman primates (NHPs), together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis that predicted the appropriate dose and exposure levels to provide therapeutic benefit in humans. The efficacy analysis combined the data from studies conducted at three separate facilities that evaluated treatment following infection with a closely related virus, monkeypox virus (MPXV), in a total of 96 NHPs. The effect of infection on ST-246 pharmacokinetics in NHPs was applied to humans using population pharmacokinetic models. Exposure at the selected human dose of 600 mg is more than 4-fold higher than the lowest efficacious dose in NHPs and is predicted to provide protection to more than 95% of the population.

  18. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in human exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, K.

    1995-12-31

    The potential dose received by an individual during defined exposure situations can be determined using personal dosimeters or estimated by combining information on exposure scenarios with the environmental concentration (C.) of chemicals. With the latter approach, not only the potential dose but also the internal dose (i.e., amount of chemical that has been absorbed and available for interaction with receptors) and biologically-effective dose (i.e., amount of chemical that actually reaches the cellular sites where interaction with macromolecules occur) can be estimated if C. is provided as an input to PBPK models. These models are mathematical representations of the interrelationships among the critical determinants of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of chemicals in biota. Since the compartments in this model correspond to biologically relevant tissues or tissue groups, the amount of chemical reaching specific target organ(s) can be estimated. Further, the PBPK models permit the use of biological monitoring data such as urinary levels of metabolites, hemoglobin adduct levels, and alveolar air concentrations, to reconstruct the exposure levels and scenarios for specific subgroups of populations. These models are also useful in providing estimates of target tissue dose in humans simultaneously exposed to chemicals in various media (air, water, soil, food) by different routes (oral, dermal, inhalation). Several examples of exposure assessment for volatile organic chemicals using PBPK models for mammals will be presented, and the strategies for development of these models for other classes of chemicals highlighted.

  19. Dendritic Cell Regulation by Cannabinoid-Based Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Mattias; Chen, Puran; Hammarfjord, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the cannabinoid system was discovered. Studies in experimental models and in humans have produced promising results using cannabinoid-based drugs for the treatment of obesity and cancer, as well as neuroinflammatory and chronic inflammatory diseases. Moreover, as we discuss here, additional studies also indicates that these drugs have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties including modulation of immune cell function. Thus, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies against inflammatory disorders. At least two types of cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid 1 and cannabinoid 2 receptors are expressed on immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC). Dendritic cells are recognized for their critical role in initiating and maintaining immune responses. Therefore, DC are potential targets for cannabinoid-mediated modulation. Here, we review the effects of cannabinoids on DC and provide some perspective concerning the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for the treatment of human diseases involving aberrant inflammatory processes. PMID:27713374

  20. Impact of Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Endocannabinoids in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Caroline; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laviolette, Michel; Flamand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Since the identification of cannabinoid receptors in the 1990s, a research field has been dedicated to exploring the role of the cannabinoid system in immunity and the inflammatory response in human tissues and animal models. Although the cannabinoid system is present and crucial in many human tissues, studying the impact of cannabinoids on the lungs is particularly relevant because of their contact with exogenous cannabinoids in the context of marijuana consumption. In the past two decades, the scientific community has gathered a large body of evidence supporting that the activation of the cannabinoid system alleviates pain and reduces inflammation. In the context of lung inflammation, exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids have shown therapeutic potential because of their inhibitory effects on immune cell recruitment and functions. On the other hand, cannabinoids were shown to be deleterious to lung function and to impact respiratory pathogen clearance. In this review, we present the existing data on the regulation of lung immunity and inflammation by phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids and endocannabinoids. PMID:27695418

  1. Simultaneous LC-MS/MS determination of JWH-210, RCS-4, ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and their main metabolites in pig and human serum, whole blood, and urine for comparing pharmacokinetic data.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nadine; Kettner, Mattias; Laschke, Matthias W; Schlote, Julia; Peters, Benjamin; Bregel, Dietmar; Menger, Michael D; Maurer, Hans H; Ewald, Andreas H; Schmidt, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    A series of new synthetic cannabinoids (SC) has been consumed without any toxicological testing. For example, pharmacokinetic data have to be collected from forensic toxicological case work and/or animal studies. To develop a corresponding model for assessing such data, samples of controlled pig studies with two selected SC (JWH-210, RCS-4) and, as reference, ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) should be analyzed as well as those of human cases. Therefore, a method for determination of JWH-210, RCS-4, THC, and their main metabolites in pig and human serum, whole blood, and urine samples is presented. Specimens were analyzed by liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and multiple-reaction monitoring with three transitions per compound. Full validation was carried out for the pig specimens and cross-validation for the human specimens concerning precision and bias. For the pig studies, the limits of detection were between 0.05 and 0.50 ng/mL in serum and whole blood and between 0.05 and 1.0 ng/mL in urine, the lower limits of quantification between 0.25 and 1.0 ng/mL in serum and 0.50 and 2.0 ng/mL in whole blood and urine, and the intra- and interday precision values lower than 15% and bias values within ±15%. The applicability was tested with samples taken from a pharmacokinetic pilot study with pigs following intravenous administration of a mixture of 200 μg/kg body mass dose each of JWH-210, RCS-4, and THC. The cross-validation data for human serum, whole blood, and urine showed that this approach should also be suitable for human specimens, e.g., of clinical or forensic cases.

  2. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  3. Cannabinoids: mechanisms and therapeutic applications in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, Alison J; Platt, Bettina

    2003-12-01

    Cannabinoids comprise three classes of compounds, the active components of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), as well as endogenous and synthetic derivatives. To date, two distinct cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) have been discovered, but evidence for further receptor types has been brought forward. The potential use of cannabinoids for medicinal purposes has long been known, but the mechanisms of action of both exogenously applied and endogenous cannabinoids are only partly established. For nervous system disorders, cannabinoids may be useful by modulating neurotransmission and calcium homeostasis as well as by anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant actions. Some cannabinoids can also trigger cell death, which may be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of malignant tumours. A number of both in vitro and in vivo models have provided promising but diverse evidence for cannabinoid protection in glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, hypoxia and glucose deprivation, brain trauma, epilepsy and MS. Subsequent to many preclinical investigations, clinical trials are now underway in a variety of the above applications. Overall, the understanding of the therapeutic relevance of cannabinoids will rely on further investigations into the neuroprotective and neurotoxic potency of cannabinoids in animal models and humans, as much as on a further advancement of our general understanding of the endocannabinoid system and the development of specific compounds devoid of unwanted psychoactive side effects.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of PEGylated recombinant human endostatin (M2ES) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zuo-gang; Jia, Lin; Guo, Li-fang; Yu, Min; Sun, Xu; Nie, Wen; Fu, Yan; Rao, Chun-ming; Wang, Jun-zhi; Luo, Yong-zhang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: M2ES is PEGylated recombinant human endostatin. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and excretion of M2ES in rats. Methods: 125I-radiolabeled M2ES was administered to rats by intravenous bolus injection at 3 mg/kg. The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of M2ES were investigated using the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation method. Results: The serum M2ES concentration-time curve after a single intravenous dose of 3 mg/kg in rats was fitted with a non-compartment model. The pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated as follows: Cmax=28.3 μg·equ/mL, t1/2=71.5 h, AUC(0–∞)=174.6 μg·equ·h/mL, Cl=17.2 mL·h−1·kg−1, MRT=57.6 h, and Vss=989.8 mL/kg for the total radioactivity; Cmax=30.3 μg·equ/mL, t1/2=60.1 h, AUC(0–∞)=146.2 μg·equ·h/mL, Cl=20.6 mL·h−1·kg−1, MRT=47.4 h, and Vss=974.6 mL/kg for the TCA precipitate radioactivity. M2ES was rapidly and widely distributed in various tissues and showed substantial deposition in kidney, adrenal gland, lung, spleen, bladder and liver. The radioactivity recovered in the urine and feces by 432 h post-dose was 71.3% and 8.3%, respectively. Only 0.98% of radioactivity was excreted in the bile by 24 h post-dose. Conclusion: PEG modification substantially prolongs the circulation time of recombinant human endostatin and effectively improves its pharmacokinetic behavior. M2ES is extensively distributed in most tissues of rats, including kidney, adrenal gland, lung, spleen, bladder and liver. Urinary excretion was the major elimination route for M2ES. PMID:26027657

  5. Development of a hybrid physiologically based pharmacokinetic model with drug-specific scaling factors in rat to improve prediction of human pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Sayama, Hiroyuki; Komura, Hiroshi; Kogayu, Motohiro; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2013-11-01

    Accurate prediction of pharmacokinetics (PK) in humans has been a vital part of drug discovery. The aims of this study are to verify the usefulness of scaling factors for clearance (CL) and apparent volume of distribution at the steady state (Vss ) estimated from the difference between observed and predicted PK profiles in rats for human PK prediction, and to develop a novel hybrid physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model with the two scaling factors. The human prediction accuracies for CL with in vitro-in vivo extrapolation and Vss with a tissue composition model were improved by using rat-scaling factors. This improvement was explainable by data that the scaling factors for CL and Vss in rats were correlated with those in humans. The predictability of plasma concentration-time profiles by the hybrid PBPK model incorporating two scaling factors was compared mainly with that by the conventional PBPK model. The hybrid PBPK model yielded higher prediction accuracy for plasma concentrations than the conventional method. Furthermore, we proposed a tiered approach using the three prediction methods, including the hybrid Dedrick approach, that were previously reported (Sayama H, Komura H, Kogayu M. 2013. Drug Metab Dispos 41:498-507), taking the available information in the individual stages of drug discovery and development into consideration.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of human chorionic gonadotropin after i.m. administration in goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Saleh, M; Shahin, M; Wuttke, W; Gauly, M; Holtz, W

    2012-07-01

    The present investigation addresses the pharmacokinetics of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), intramuscularly (i.m.) administered to goats. Nine pluriparous does of the Boer goat breed, 2-6 years of age and weighing 45-60 kg, were administered 500 IU hCG (2 ml Chorulon) deep into the thigh musculature 18 h after superovulatory FSH treatment. Blood samples were drawn from the jugular vein at 2  h intervals for the first 24h, at 6 h intervals until 42 h, and at 12 h intervals until 114 h after administration. After centrifugation, plasma hCG concentrations were determined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Pharmacokinetical parameters were as follows: lag time, 0.4 (s.e.m. 0.1) h; absorption rate constant, 0.34 (s.e.m. 0.002) h; absorption half-life, 2.7 (s.e.m. 0.5) h; elimination rate constant, 0.02 (s.e.m. 0.002) h; biological half-life, 39.4 (s.e.m. 5.1) h; and apparent volume of distribution, 16.9 (s.e.m. 4.3) l. The plasma hCG profile was characterized by an absorption phase of 11.6 (s.e.m. 1.8) h and an elimination phase of 70.0 (s.e.m. 9.8) h, with considerable individual variation in bioavailability and pharmacokinetical parameters. Biological half-life was negatively correlated (P<0.05) with peak concentration (r=-0.76), absorption rate constant (r=-0.78), and elimination rate constant (r=-0.87). The results indicate that after rapid absorption, hCG remains in the circulation for an extended period. This has to be taken into account when assessing the stimulatory response to hCG treatment on an ovarian level.

  7. Usefulness of minipigs for predicting human pharmacokinetics: Prediction of distribution volume and plasma clearance.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Hiromichi; Konno, Yoshihiro; Ishii, Kunikazu; Satsukawa, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shinji

    2016-02-01

    In this study, advantages of minipigs to use in preclinical study for new drug development were evaluated in terms of prediction of human pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of various drugs. Fourteen model drugs having diverse physicochemical properties were selected and intravenously administered to mice, rats and minipigs to obtain their PK parameters. The human volume of distribution (Vd) and clearance (CL) of model drugs were predicted from PK parameters in each animal species. When Vd of 14 drugs in each species were directly compared with those in humans, minipigs showed the highest correlation. Correction of Vd with an unbound fraction of drugs in tissues further improved the correlation. Allometric scaling that included minipig data resulted in high accuracy in the prediction of human Vd, clearly indicating an importance of minipig data. Minipigs also showed the high predictability of human CL. The prediction of human CL by allometric scaling showed a high accuracy when the data of minipigs were included. In conclusion, potential advantages of minipigs for predicting human Vd and CL were clearly demonstrated. Reliable prediction of human PK from data of minipigs appears to be possible in preclinical PK study, without relying on PK analysis in other species.

  8. [Potential therapeutic usefulness of cannabis and cannabinoids].

    PubMed

    Lorenzo Fernández, P

    2000-01-01

    Diseases in which Cannabis and cannabinoids have demonstrated some medicinal putative properties are: nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy, muscle spasticity (multiple sclerosis, movement disorders), pain, anorexia, epilepsy, glaucoma, bronchial asthma, neuroegenerative diseases, cancer, etc. Although some of the current data comes from clinical controlled essays, the majority are based on anecdotic reports. Basic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies and more extensive controlled clinical essays with higher number of patients and long term studies are necessary to consider these compounds useful since a therapeutical point of view.

  9. Non-linear pharmacokinetics of MDMA (‘ecstasy’) in humans

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, R; Farré, M; Ortuño, J; Mas, M; Brenneisen, R; Roset, P N; Segura, J; Camí, J

    2000-01-01

    Aims 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, commonly called ecstasy) is a synthetic compound increasingly popular as a recreational drug. Little is known about its pharmacology, including its metabolism and pharmacokinetics, in humans in controlled settings. A clinical trial was designed for the evaluation of MDMA pharmacological effects and pharmacokinetics in healthy volunteers. Methods A total of 14 subjects were included. In the pilot phase six received MDMA at 50 (n = 2), 100 (n = 2), and 150 mg (n = 2). In the second phase eight received MDMA at both 75 and 125 mg (n = 8). Subjects were phenotyped for CYP2D6 activity and were classified as extensive metabolizers for substrates, such as MDMA, whose hepatic metabolism is regulated by this enzyme. Plasma and urine samples were collected throughout the study for the evaluation of MDMA pharmacokinetics. Body fluids were analysed for the determination of MDMA and its main metabolites 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-methamphetamine (HMMA) and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-amphetamine (HMA). Results As the dose of MDMA administered was increased, volunteers showed rises in MDMA concentrations that did not follow the same proportionality which could be indicative of nonlinearity. In the full range of doses tested the constant recovery of HMMA in the urine combined with the increasing MDMA recovery seems to point towards a saturation or an inhibition of MDMA metabolism (the demethylenation step). These observations are further supported by the fact that urinary clearance was rather constant while nonrenal clearance was dose dependent. Conclusions It has previously been postulated that individuals genetically deficient for the hepatic enzyme CYP2D6 (about 10% of the Caucasian people) were at risk of developing acute toxicity at moderate doses of MDMA because the drug would accumulate in the body instead of being metabolized and inactivated. The lack of linearity of MDMA pharmacokinetics (in a window of

  10. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Jonathan A.; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2013-01-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation. PMID:22150623

  11. Development and application of a multiroute physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for oxytetracycline in dogs and humans.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Riviere, Jim E

    2015-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a commonly used tetracycline antibiotic in veterinary and human medicine. To establish a quantitative model for predicting OTC plasma and tissue exposure, a permeability-limited multiroute physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed in dogs. The model was calibrated with plasma pharmacokinetic data in beagle dogs following single intravenous (5 mg/kg), oral (100 mg/kg), and intramuscular (20 mg/kg) administrations. The model predicted other available dog data well, including drug concentrations in the liver, kidney, and muscle after repeated exposure, and data in the mixed-breed dog. The model was extrapolated to humans and the human model adequately simulated measured plasma OTC concentrations after intravenous (7.14 mg/kg) and oral exposures (6.67 mg/kg). The dog model was applied to predict 24-h OTC area-under-the-curve after three therapeutic treatments. Results were 27.75, 51.76, and 64.17 μg/mL*h in the plasma, and 120.93, 225.64, and 279.67 μg/mL*h in the kidney for oral (100 mg/kg), intravenous (10 mg/kg), and intramuscular (20 mg/kg) administrations, respectively. This model can be used to predict plasma and tissue concentrations to aid in designing optimal therapeutic regimens with OTC in veterinary, and potentially, human medicine; and as a foundation for scaling to other tetracycline antibiotics and to other animal species. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:233-243, 2015.

  12. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, metabolism, toxicology and residues of phenylbutazone in humans and horses.

    PubMed

    Lees, Peter; Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    2013-06-01

    The presence of horse meat in food products destined for human consumption and labelled as beef has raised several concerns of public interest. This review deals solely with one aspect of these concerns; samples of equine tissue from horses destined for the human food chain have tested positive for the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, phenylbutazone. The safety of some or all such foods for human consumers is a major concern, because it was shown many years ago that phenylbutazone therapy in humans can be associated with life threatening blood dyscrasias. As an initial basis for assessing the potential toxicity of foods containing phenylbutazone and its metabolites, this article reviews (1) the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, metabolic and toxicological profiles of phenylbutazone, with particular reference to horses and humans; (2) toxicity data in laboratory animals; (3) phenylbutazone residues in food producing species, and (4) as a preliminary assessment, the potential hazard associated with the consumption of horse meat containing phenylbutazone and its metabolites. Since phenylbutazone cannot be classified as a carcinogenic substance in humans, and noting that blood dyscrasias in humans are likely to be dose and treatment duration-dependent, the illegal and erratic presence of trace amount residues of phenylbutazone in horse meat is not a public health issue.

  13. A Qualitative Review on the Pharmacokinetics of Antibiotics in Saliva: Implications on Clinical Pharmacokinetic Monitoring in Humans.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Tony K L; Ensom, Mary H H

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a systematic search to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the utility of saliva for clinical pharmacokinetic monitoring (CPM) of antibiotics. Although the majority of identified studies lacked sufficient pharmacokinetic data needed to assign an appropriate suitability classification, most aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, penicillins/cephalosporins, and tetracyclines are likely not suitable for CPM in saliva. No clear pattern of correlation was observed between physiochemical properties that favor drug distribution into saliva and the likelihood of the antibiotic being classified as suitable for CPM in saliva (and vice versa). Insufficient data were available to determine if pathophysiological conditions affected salivary distribution of antibiotics. Additional confirmatory data are required for drugs (especially in patients) that are deemed likely suitable for CPM in saliva because only a few studies were available and many focused only on healthy subjects. All studies identified had relatively small sample sizes and exhibited large variability. Very few studies reported salivary collection parameters (e.g., salivary flow, pH) that could potentially have some impact on drug distribution into saliva. The available data are heavily weighted on healthy subjects, and insufficient data were available to determine if pathophysiology had effects on saliva drug distribution. Some studies also lacked assay sensitivity for detecting antibiotics in saliva. Overall, this review can be useful to clinicians who desire an overview on the suitability of saliva for conducting CPM of specific antibiotics, or for researchers who wish to fill the identified knowledge gaps to move the science of salivary CPM further.

  14. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the tau PET radiotracer [18F]T807 ([18F]AV-1451) in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Dustin; Guehl, Nicolas J; Verwer, Eline E; Shoup, Timothy M; Yokell, Daniel L; Zubcevik, Nevena; Vasdev, Neil; Zafonte, Ross D; Johnson, Keith A; El Fakhri, Georges; Normandin, Marc David

    2016-09-22

    [(18)F]T807 is a PET radiotracer developed for imaging tau protein aggregates, which are implicated in neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The current study characterizes [(18)F]T807 pharmacokinetics in human subjects using dynamic PET imaging and metabolite-corrected arterial input functions.

  15. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  16. Human methamphetamine pharmacokinetics simulated in the rat: behavioral and neurochemical effects of a 72-h binge.

    PubMed

    Kuczenski, Ronald; Segal, David S; Melega, William P; Lacan, Goran; McCunney, Stanley J

    2009-10-01

    Bingeing is one pattern of high-dose methamphetamine (METH) abuse, which involves continuous drug taking over several days and can result in psychotic behaviors for which the brain pathology remains poorly defined. A corresponding animal model of this type of METH exposure may provide novel insights into the neurochemical and behavioral sequelae associated with this condition. Accordingly, to simulate the pharmacokinetic profile of a human METH binge exposure in rats, we used a computer-controlled, intravenous METH procedure (dynamic infusion, DI) to overcome species differences in METH pharmacokinetics and to replicate the human 12-h plasma METH half-life. Animals were treated over 13 weeks with escalating METH doses, using DI, and then exposed to a binge in which drug was administered every 3 h for 72 h. Throughout the binge, behavioral effects included unabated intense oral stereotypies in the absence of locomotion and in the absence of sleep. Decrements in regional brain dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin levels, measured at 1 and 10 h after the last injection of the binge, had, with the exception of caudate-putamen dopamine and frontal cortex serotonin, recovered by 48 h. At 10 h after the last injection of the binge, [(3)H]ligand binding to dopamine and vesicular monoamine transporters in caudate-putamen were reduced by 35 and 13%, respectively. In a separate METH binge-treated cohort, post-binge behavioral alterations were apparent in an attenuated locomotor response to a METH challenge infusion at 24 h after the last injection of the binge. Collectively, the changes we characterized during and after a METH binge suggest that for human beings under similar exposure conditions, multiple time-dependent neurochemical deficits contribute to their behavioral profiles.

  17. HUMAN METHAMPHETAMINE PHARMACOKINETICS SIMULATED IN THE RAT: BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF A 72- HOUR BINGE

    PubMed Central

    Kuczenski, Ronald; Segal, David S.; Melega, William P.; Lacan, Goran; McCunney, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    Bingeing is one pattern of high dose methamphetamine (METH) abuse which involves continuous drug taking over several days and can result in psychotic behaviors for which the brain pathology remains poorly-defined. A corresponding animal model of this type of METH exposure may provide novel insights into the neurochemical and behavioral sequelae associated with this condition. Accordingly, to simulate the pharmacokinetic profile of a human METH binge exposure in rats we used a computer-controlled, intravenous METH procedure (dynamic infusion) to overcome species differences in METH pharmacokinetics and to replicate the human 12-h plasma METH half-life. Animals were treated over 13 weeks with escalating METH doses, using dynamic infusion, and then exposed to a binge in which drug was administered every 3 h for 72h. Throughout the binge, behavioral effects included unabated intense oral stereotypies in the absence of locomotion and in the absence of sleep. Decrements in regional brain dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin levels, measured at 1 and 10 h after the last injection of the binge, had, with the exception of caudate-putamen dopamine and frontal cortex serotonin, recovered by 48 h. At 10 h after the last injection of the binge, [3H]ligand binding to dopamine and vesicular monoamine transporters in caudate-putamen were reduced by 35% and 13%, respectively. In a separate METH binge treated cohort, post-binge behavioral alterations were apparent in an attenuated locomotor response to a METH challenge infusion at 24h after the last injection of the binge. Collectively, the changes we characterized during and following a METH binge suggest that for humans under similar exposure conditions, multiple time-dependent neurochemical deficits contribute to their behavioral profiles. PMID:19571794

  18. The dietary polyphenols trans-resveratrol and curcumin selectively bind human CB1 cannabinoid receptors with nanomolar affinities and function as antagonists/inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Seely, Kathryn A; Levi, Mark S; Prather, Paul L

    2009-07-01

    The dietary polyphenols trans-resveratrol [5-[(1E)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethenyl]-1,3-benzenediol; found in red wine] and curcumin [1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione] (found in curry powders) exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects via poorly defined mechanisms. It is interesting that cannabinoids, derived from the marijuana plant (Cannabis sativa), produce similar protective effects via CB1 and CB2 receptors. We examined whether trans-resveratrol, curcumin, and ASC-J9 [1,7-bis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-hydroxy-1E,4E,6E-heptatriene-3-one] (a curcumin analog) act as ligands at cannabinoid receptors. All three bind to human (h) CB1 and mouse CB1 receptors with nanomolar affinities, displaying only micromolar affinities for hCB2 receptors. Characteristic of inverse agonists, the polyphenols inhibit basal G-protein activity in membranes prepared from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-hCB1 cells or mouse brain that is reversed by a neutral CB1 antagonist. Furthermore, they competitively antagonize G-protein activation produced by a CB1 agonist. In intact CHO-hCB1 cells, the polyphenols act as neutral antagonists, producing no effect when tested alone, whereas competitively antagonizing CB1 agonist mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. Confirming their neutral antagonist profile in cells, the polyphenols similarly attenuate stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity produced by a CB1 inverse agonist. In mice, the polyphenols dose-dependently reverse acute hypothermia produced by a CB1 agonist. Upon repeated administration, the polyphenols also reduce body weight in mice similar to that produced by a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist. Finally, trans-resveratrol and curcumin share common structural motifs with other known cannabinoid receptor ligands. Collectively, we suggest that trans-resveratrol and curcumin act as antagonists/inverse agonists at CB1 receptors at dietary relevant concentrations. Therefore, these polyphenols and their

  19. Strokes are possible complications of cannabinoids use.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Jouanjus, Emilie

    2017-02-23

    cannabinoids, the low frequency of neurovascular complications after their use may be due to a genetic predisposition to their neurovascular toxicity in some individuals. Further studies should focus on this point. More importantly however, this low frequency may be underestimated because the drug consumption may not be systematically researched, neither by questioning nor by laboratory screening. Besides this vascular role of cannabinoids in the occurrence of stroke, a cellular effect of cannabis on brain mitochondria was recently suggested in an experimental study. One of the mechanisms involved in young cannabis users with stroke may be the generation of reactive oxygen species leading to an oxidative stress, which is a known mechanism in stroke in humans. It is useful to inform the young population about the real potential risk of using cannabinoids. We suggest to systematically ask all young adults with stroke about their drug consumption including cannabinoids, to screen urine for cannabis or to include a specific diagnostic test to detect synthetic cannabinoids, and to obtain non-invasive intracranial arterial investigations (i.e. CT-angiography or cerebral MRA) in order to search for cerebral vasoconstriction. However, several questions remained unresolved and further research is still needed to assess the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in young cannabinoids users with stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Cannabinoids and Epilepsy".

  20. Application of a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: Result of ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Piotrowski, Roman; Baran, Jakub; Kułakowski, Piotr; Wroczyński, Piotr

    2016-05-10

    Antazoline is a first-generation antihistaminic agent with antiarrhythmic quinidine-like properties. In some countries, it is widely used for termination of cardiac arrhythmias, especially atrial fibrillation (AF). However, no human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted with intravenous antazoline. The aim of our study was to develop and validate a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: the ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study. Antazoline was extracted from plasma using liquid-liquid extraction. The concentration of the analyte was measured by LC-MS/MS with xylometazoline as an internal standard. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, stability (freeze/thaw stability, stability in autosampler, short and long term stability), dilution integrity and matrix effect. The analyzed validation criteria were fulfilled. The method was applied to a pharmacokinetic study involving 10 healthy volunteers. Following a single intravenous dose of antazoline mesylate (100 mg), the plasma concentration profile showed a relative fast elimination with a terminal elimination half-life of 2.29 h. A relatively high volume of distribution was observed (Vss=315 L). The values of mean residence time (MRT∞), area under the curve (AUC∞) and clearance were 3.45 h, 0.91 mg h L(-1) and 80.5 L h(-1), respectively. One volunteer showed significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters. In conclusion, the proposed new LC-MS/MS method was successfully used for the first time for the determination of antazoline in human plasma.

  1. Cellular approaches to the interaction between cannabinoid receptor ligands and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Oz, Murat; Al Kury, Lina; Keun-Hang, Susan Yang; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Galadari, Sehamuddin

    2014-05-15

    Cannabinoids are among the earliest known drugs to humanity. Cannabis plant contains various phytochemicals that bind to cannabinoid receptors. In addition, synthetic and endogenously produced cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) constitute other classes of cannabinoid receptor ligands. Although many pharmacological effects of these cannabinoids are mediated by the activation of cannabinoid receptors, recent studies indicate that cannabinoids also modulate the functions of various integral membrane proteins including ion channels, receptors, neurotransmitter transporters, and enzymes by mechanism(s) not involving the activation of known cannabinoid receptors. Currently, the mechanisms of these effects were not fully understood. However, it is likely that direct actions of cannabinoids are closely linked to their lipophilic structures. This report will focus on the actions of cannabinoids on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and will examine the results of recent studies in this field. In addition some mechanistic approaches will be provided. The results discussed in this review indicate that, besides cannabinoid receptors, further molecular targets for cannabinoids exist and that these targets may represent important novel sites to alter neuronal excitability.

  2. Anticancer mechanisms of cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, G.; Sánchez, C.; Guzmán, M.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the well-known palliative effects of cannabinoids on some cancer-associated symptoms, a large body of evidence shows that these molecules can decrease tumour growth in animal models of cancer. They do so by modulating key cell signalling pathways involved in the control of cancer cell proliferation and survival. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit angiogenesis and decrease metastasis in various tumour types in laboratory animals. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of cannabinoids as antitumour agents, focusing on recent discoveries about their molecular mechanisms of action, including resistance mechanisms and opportunities for their use in combination therapy. Those observations have already contributed to the foundation for the development of the first clinical studies that will analyze the safety and potential clinical benefit of cannabinoids as anticancer agents. PMID:27022311

  3. What Are Synthetic Cannabinoids?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... they are related to chemicals found in the marijuana plant. Because of this similarity, synthetic cannabinoids are ...

  4. Cannabis and Cannabinoids (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Cannabis and Cannabinoids (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to ... treatment (see Question 9 ). Questions and Answers About Cannabis What is Cannabis ? Cannabis , also known as marijuana , ...

  5. Comparison of predictability for human pharmacokinetics parameters among monkeys, rats, and chimeric mice with humanised liver.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Maki; Iwasaki, Shinji; Chisaki, Ikumi; Nakagawa, Sayaka; Amano, Nobuyuki; Hirabayashi, Hideki

    2017-03-02

    1. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of chimeric mice with humanised liver (PXB mice) for the prediction of clearance (CLt) and volume of distribution at steady state (Vdss), in comparison with monkeys, which have been reported as a reliable model for human pharmacokinetics (PK) prediction, and with rats, as a conventional PK model. 2. CLt and Vdss values in PXB mice, monkeys and rats were determined following intravenous administration of 30 compounds known to be mainly eliminated in humans via the hepatic metabolism by various drug-metabolising enzymes. Using single-species allometric scaling, human CLt and Vdss values were predicted from the three animal models. 3. Predicted CLt values from PXB mice exhibited the highest predictability: 25 for PXB mice, 21 for monkeys and 14 for rats were predicted within a three-fold range of actual values among 30 compounds. For predicted human Vdss values, the number of compounds falling within a three-fold range was 23 for PXB mice, 24 for monkeys, and 16 for rats among 29 compounds. PXB mice indicated a higher predictability for CLt and Vdss values than the other animal models. 4. These results demonstrate the utility of PXB mice in predicting human PK parameters.

  6. Comparative clinical pharmacokinetics of antibody-drug conjugates in first-in-human Phase 1 studies

    PubMed Central

    Deslandes, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Although there are currently more than 30 antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) in clinical development for the treatment of blood cancers and solid tumors, comparison of their clinical pharmacokinetics (PK) is challenging because of the large number of, and differences between, the targets, ADC constructs, dosing regimens, and patient populations. In this review, we standardized the evaluation, using non-compartmental PK data reported at Cycle 1, i.e., following the first drug administration of what is usually a repeated-dose treatment, in monotherapy. We report ADC clinical PK properties, dosing regimen, determination of doses ranges and associated maximum tolerated doses. We also evaluated the effect of structural characteristics and target types (hematological vs. solid tumors) on PK. In addition, we discuss how integration of PK/pharmacodynamics approaches on top of classical dose escalation in first-in-human studies may improve dosing regimen determination for subsequent phases of clinical development. PMID:24852950

  7. Analysis of nabumetone in human plasma by HPLC. Application to single dose pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Kobylińska, Kamila; Barlińska, Małgorzata; Kobylińska, Maria

    2003-06-01

    A simple and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of nabumetone in human plasma is described. The procedure involves liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate and reversed-phase chromatography with fluorimetric detection (excitation 230 nm, emission 356 nm). The chromatographic conditions and the extraction procedure gave a clean chromatogram for the compound. The limit of quantitation was established as 0.313 ng/ml and the calibration curve was linear up to 20 ng/ml. The within-day and between-day relative standard deviations were less than 10% and the accuracy of the assay was in the range of 99-104%. The suitability of the method is shown for pharmacokinetic studies.

  8. Evaluation of the analgesic efficacy and psychoactive effects of AZD1940, a novel peripherally acting cannabinoid agonist, in human capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, Jarkko; Annas, Peter; Huizar, Karin; Clarke, Cyril; Zettergren, Annika; Karlsten, Rolf; Segerdahl, Märta

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of AZD1940, a novel peripherally acting cannabinoid CB(1) /CB(2) receptor agonist, on capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia, as well as on biomarkers of cannabinoid central nervous system (CNS) effects. The present study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-sequence, two-period, cross-over study in 44 male healthy volunteers aged 20-45 years. The effects of two single oral doses of AZD1940 (400 and 800 μg) were compared with placebo. Pain intensity after intradermal capsaicin injections in the forearm was assessed on a continuous visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-100 mm). Primary and secondary hyperalgesia induced by application of capsaicin cream on the calf were assessed by measuring heat pain thresholds and the area of mechanical allodynia, respectively. The CNS effects were assessed at baseline and up to 24 h after dosing using a visual analogue mood scales (VAMS) for feeling 'stimulated', 'high', 'anxious', 'sedated' or 'down'. AZD1940 did not significantly attenuate ongoing pain or primary or secondary hyperalgesia compared with placebo. Mild CNS effects for AZD1940were observed on the VAMS for 'high' and 'sedated'. Dose-dependent mild-to-moderate CNS-related and gastrointestinal adverse events were reported following treatment with AZD1940. No evidence of analgesic efficacy was found for a peripherally acting CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist in the human capsaicin pain model. The emergence of mild dose-dependent CNS effects suggests that the dose range predicted from preclinical data had been attained.

  9. Determination of cannabinoids in hemp nut products in Taiwan by HPLC-MS/MS coupled with chemometric analysis: quality evaluation and a pilot human study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Tung, Chun-Wei; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Wu, Yu-Tse; Hsu, Mei-Chich

    2016-09-02

    Hemp nuts are mature cannabis seeds obtained after shelling and that are commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating functional constipation. In this work, we screened hemp nut products, classified them, and verified the legality of consuming them. A total of 18 products were purchased from Taiwan, China, and Canada. Validated high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry methods were developed for analyzing the cannabinoid (i.e., Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabinol) content of the products and the concentration of urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC. Chemometric techniques, namely hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA), were applied for rapidly classifying 11 concentrated powder products in Taiwan. A pilot human study comprising single and multiple administrations of a product with 1.5 µg/g of THC was conducted to examine the urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC concentration. Through optimization of 3(2) full factorial design, using 60% isopropanol as the extraction solvent exhibited the highest yield of cannabinoids and was applied as the optimal condition in further analysis. The results of HCA and PCA on quality evaluation were in good agreement; however, the tested products possessed distinct CBD-to-THC ratios which ranged widely from 0.1:1 to 46.8:1. Particularly, the products with CBD-to-THC ratios higher than 1:1 were the majority in Taiwan. Our data suggested that all the tested hemp nut products met the Taiwan restriction criterion of 10 µg/g of THC. We propose a usual consumption amount of hemp nut products in Taiwan would unlikely to violate the cut-off point of 15 ng/mL of urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism of Lumiracoxib in Chimeric Humanized and Murinized FRG Mice.

    PubMed

    Dickie, A P; Wilson, C E; Schreiter, K; Wehr, R; Wilson, E M; Bial, J; Scheer, N; Wilson, I D; Riley, R J

    2017-03-25

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of lumiracoxib were studied, after administration of single 10 mg/kg oral doses to chimeric liver-humanized and murinized FRG mice. In the chimeric humanized mice, lumiracoxib reached peak observed concentrations in the blood of 1.10 ± 0.08 μg/mL at 0.25-0.5 h post-dose with an AUCinf of 1.74 ± 0.52 μg h/mL and an effective half-life for the drug of 1.42 ± 0.72 h (n=3). In the case of the murinized animals peak observed concentrations in the blood were determined as 1.15 ± 0.08 μg/mL at 0.25 h post-dose with an AUCinf of 1.94 ± 0.22 μg h/mL and an effective half-life of 1.28 ± 0.02 h (n=3). Analysis of blood indicated only the presence of unchanged lumiracoxib. Metabolic profiling of urine, bile and faecal extracts revealed a complex pattern of metabolites for both humanized and murinized animals with, in addition to unchanged parent drug, a variety of hydroxylated and conjugated metabolites detected. The profiles obtained in humanized mice were different compared to murinized animals with e.g., a higher proportion of the dose detected in the form of acyl glucuronide metabolites and much reduced amounts of taurine conjugates. Comparison of the metabolic profiles obtained from the present study with previously published data from C57bl/6J mice and humans, revealed a greater though not complete match between chimeric humanized mice and humans, such that the liver-humanized FRG model may represent a useful approach to assessing the biotransformation of such compounds in humans.

  11. Effect of Resveratrol Treatment on the Pharmacokinetics of Diclofenac in Healthy Human Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bedada, Satish Kumar; Yellu, Narsimha Reddy; Neerati, Prasad

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of resveratrol (RSV) treatment on the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac (DIC) in healthy human volunteers. The open-label, two period, sequential study was conducted in 12 healthy human volunteers. A single dose of RSV 500 mg was administered daily for 10 days during treatment phase. A single dose of DIC 100 mg was administered during control and after treatment phases under fasting conditions. The blood samples were collected after DIC dosing and analyzed by HPLC. Treatment with RSV significantly enhanced maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) (1.73 to 2.91 µg/mL), area under the curve (AUC) (5.05 to 9.95 g h/mL), half life (T1/2) (1.12 to 1.76 h) and significantly decreased elimination rate constant (Kel ) (0.71 to 0.41 h(-1)), apparent oral clearance (CL/F) (14.58 to 6.48 L/h) of DIC as compared to control. The geometric mean ratios for Cmax, AUC, T1/2, Kel and CL/F of DIC were 1.75, 2.12, 1.65, 0.61 and 0.47, respectively were outside the limits of 0.8-1.25, which indicates clinically significant interaction between DIC and RSV. The results suggest that the altered pharmacokinetics of DIC might be attributed to RSV mediated inhibition of CYP2C9 enzyme. Therefore, combination therapy of DIC along with RSV may represent a novel approach to reduce dosage and results in reduced gastrointestinal side effects of DIC.

  12. Enantioselective analysis of 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide in human plasma with application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Francine Attié; Scatena, Gabriel dos Santos; Rocha, Otávio Pelegrino; Marques, Maria Paula; Cass, Quézia Bezerra; Simões, Belinda Pinto; Lanchote, Vera Lucia

    2016-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CY) is one of the most common immunosuppressive agents used in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. CY is a prodrug and is metabolized to active 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide (HCY). Many authors have suggested an association between enantioselectivity in CY metabolism and treatment efficacy and/or complications. This study describes the development and validation of an analytical method of HCY enantiomers in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) that can be applied to pharmacokinetic studies, filling this gap in the literature. HCY enantiomers previously derivatized with phenylhydrazine were extracted from 200-μL plasma aliquots spiked with antipyrine as internal standard and a mixture of hexane and dichloromethane (80:20, v/v) was used as the extraction solvent. The derivatized HCY enantiomers were resolved on a Chiracel(®) OD-R column using water:acetonitrile:formic acid (55:45:0.2, v/v) as the mobile phase. No matrix effect was observed and the analysis of HCY enantiomers was linear for plasma concentrations of 5-5000ng of each enantiomer/mL plasma. The coefficients of variation and inaccuracy calculated in precision and accuracy assessments were less than 15%. HCY was stable in human plasma after three successive freeze/thaw cycles, during 3h at room temperature, and in the autosampler at 4°C for 24h after processing, with deviation values less than 15%. The method was applied to evaluate the kinetic disposition of HCY in a patient with multiple sclerosis who was pretreated with intravenous racemic CY for stem cell transplantation. The clinical study showed enantioselectivity in the pharmacokinetics of HCY.

  13. Cardiovascular Pharmacology of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Pacher, P.; Bátkai, S.; Kunos, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids and their synthetic and endogenous analogs affect a broad range of physiological functions, including cardiovascular variables, the most important component of their effect being profound hypotension. The mechanisms of the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids in vivo are complex and may involve modulation of autonomic outflow in both the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as direct effects on the myocardium and vasculature. Although several lines of evidence indicate that the cardiovascular depressive effects of cannabinoids are mediated by peripherally localized CB1 receptors, recent studies provide strong support for the existence of as-yet-undefined endothelial and cardiac receptor(s) that mediate certain endocannabinoid-induced cardiovascular effects. The endogenous cannabinoid system has been recently implicated in the mechanism of hypotension associated with hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and cardiogenic shock, and advanced liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, cannabinoids have been considered as novel antihypertensive agents. A protective role of endocannabinoids in myocardial ischemia has also been documented. In this chapter, we summarize current information on the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids and highlight the importance of these effects in a variety of pathophysiological conditions. PMID:16596789

  14. A cannabinoid link between mitochondria and memory.

    PubMed

    Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne; Desprez, Tifany; Serrat, Román; Bellocchio, Luigi; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Pagano Zottola, Antonio Christian; Delamarre, Anna; Cannich, Astrid; Vincent, Peggy; Varilh, Marjorie; Robin, Laurie M; Terral, Geoffrey; García-Fernández, M Dolores; Colavita, Michelangelo; Mazier, Wilfrid; Drago, Filippo; Puente, Nagore; Reguero, Leire; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Dupuy, Jean-William; Cota, Daniela; Lopez-Rodriguez, Maria-Luz; Barreda-Gómez, Gabriel; Massa, Federico; Grandes, Pedro; Bénard, Giovanni; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-11-24

    Cellular activity in the brain depends on the high energetic support provided by mitochondria, the cell organelles which use energy sources to generate ATP. Acute cannabinoid intoxication induces amnesia in humans and animals, and the activation of type-1 cannabinoid receptors present at brain mitochondria membranes (mtCB1) can directly alter mitochondrial energetic activity. Although the pathological impact of chronic mitochondrial dysfunctions in the brain is well established, the involvement of acute modulation of mitochondrial activity in high brain functions, including learning and memory, is unknown. Here, we show that acute cannabinoid-induced memory impairment in mice requires activation of hippocampal mtCB1 receptors. Genetic exclusion of CB1 receptors from hippocampal mitochondria prevents cannabinoid-induced reduction of mitochondrial mobility, synaptic transmission and memory formation. mtCB1 receptors signal through intra-mitochondrial Gαi protein activation and consequent inhibition of soluble-adenylyl cyclase (sAC). The resulting inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of specific subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport system eventually leads to decreased cellular respiration. Hippocampal inhibition of sAC activity or manipulation of intra-mitochondrial PKA signalling or phosphorylation of the Complex I subunit NDUFS2 inhibit bioenergetic and amnesic effects of cannabinoids. Thus, the G protein-coupled mtCB1 receptors regulate memory processes via modulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. By directly linking mitochondrial activity to memory formation, these data reveal that bioenergetic processes are primary acute regulators of cognitive functions.

  15. The effects of cannabinoids on the brain.

    PubMed

    Ameri, A

    1999-07-01

    Cannabinoids have a long history of consumption for recreational and medical reasons. The primary active constituent of the hemp plant Cannabis sativa is delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC). In humans, psychoactive cannabinoids produce euphoria, enhancement of sensory perception, tachycardia, antinociception, difficulties in concentration and impairment of memory. The cognitive deficiencies seem to persist after withdrawal. The toxicity of marijuana has been underestimated for a long time, since recent findings revealed delta9-THC-induced cell death with shrinkage of neurons and DNA fragmentation in the hippocampus. The acute effects of cannabinoids as well as the development of tolerance are mediated by G protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors. The CB1 receptor and its splice variant CB1A, are found predominantly in the brain with highest densities in the hippocampus, cerebellum and striatum. The CB2 receptor is found predominantly in the spleen and in haemopoietic cells and has only 44% overall nucleotide sequence identity with the CB1 receptor. The existence of this receptor provided the molecular basis for the immunosuppressive actions of marijuana. The CB1 receptor mediates inhibition of adenylate cyclase, inhibition of N- and P/Q-type calcium channels, stimulation of potassium channels, and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. The CB2 receptor mediates inhibition of adenylate cyclase and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. The discovery of endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligands, anandamide (N-arachidonylethanolamine) and 2-arachidonylglycerol made the notion of a central cannabinoid neuromodulatory system plausible. Anandamide is released from neurons upon depolarization through a mechanism that requires calcium-dependent cleavage from a phospholipid precursor in neuronal membranes. The release of anandamide is followed by rapid uptake into the plasma and hydrolysis by fatty-acid amidohydrolase. The psychoactive cannabinoids

  16. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Rifapentine in Subjects Seropositive for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus: a Phase I Study

    PubMed Central

    Keung, Anther C.-F.; Owens, Robert C.; Eller, Mark G.; Weir, Scott J.; Nicolau, David P.; Nightingale, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    Rifapentine is undergoing development for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. This study was conducted to characterize the single-dose pharmacokinetics of rifapentine and its 25-desacetyl metabolite and to assess the effect of food on the rate and extent of absorption in participants infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Twelve men and four women, mean age, 38.6 ± 6.9 years, received a single 600-mg oral dose of rifapentine in an open-label, randomized two-way, complete crossover study. Each volunteer received rifapentine following a high-fat breakfast or during a fasting period. Serial blood samples were collected for 72 h and both rifapentine and its metabolite were assayed by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method. Pharmacokinetics of rifapentine and 25-desacetylrifapentine were determined by noncompartmental methods. Mean (± the standard deviation) maximum concentrations of rifapentine in serum and areas under the curve from time zero to infinity following a high-fat breakfast were 14.09 ± 2.81 and 373.63 ± 78.19 μg/ml, respectively, and following a fasting period they were 9.42 ± 2.67 and 256.10 ± 86.39 μg · h/ml, respectively. Pharmacokinetic data from a previously published healthy volunteer study were used for comparison. Administration of rifapentine with a high-fat breakfast resulted in a 51% increase in rifapentine bioavailability, an effect also observed in healthy volunteers. Although food increased the exposure of these patients to rifapentine, the infrequent dosing schedule for the treatment of tuberculosis (e.g., once- or twice-weekly dosing) would be unlikely to lead to accumulation. Additionally, autoinduction has been previously studied and has not been demonstrated with this compound, unlike with rifabutin and rifampin. Rifapentine was well tolerated by HIV-infected study participants. The results of our study suggest that no dosage adjustments may be required for rifapentine in HIV-infected patients

  18. Fentanyl pharmacokinetics is not dependent on hepatic uptake by organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 in human beings.

    PubMed

    Ziesenitz, Victoria C; König, Sonja K; Mahlke, Nina; Jantos, Ricarda; Skopp, Gisela; Weiss, Johanna; Haefeli, Walter E; Mikus, Gerd

    2013-07-01

    A recent study investigating the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl in Sprague-Dawley rats suggested fentanyl to be a substrate of rat organic anion-transporting polypeptide Oatp. In human beings, the most important OATP for the pharmacokinetics of many drugs is OATP1B1. Therefore, genetic variants of OATP1B1 (SLCO1B1) might modulate fentanyl pharmacokinetics and efficacy in human beings. Sixteen healthy male and female volunteers, homozygous for SLCO1B1*1a (genetic wild-type) (n = 11) or *15 (deficient haplotype carrying the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs2306283 and rs4149056 and exhibiting altered transport activity; n = 5), were included in this randomized crossover study. The participants received fentanyl (5 μg/kg) intravenously alone or with the OATP inhibitor rifampicin (600 mg single oral dose). The pharmacokinetics of fentanyl and norfentanyl were determined by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In addition, fentanyl uptake in vitro was evaluated in OATP1B1 overexpressing HEK293 cells and compared to a mock-transfected cell line. In the clinical trial, fentanyl clearance was 18.8 ± 8.2 mL/min. kg in SLCO1B1*1a and 19.5 ± 1.8 mL/min/kg in SLCO1B1*15 carriers and not significantly different between the genotypes. During rifampicin, fentanyl clearance was 15.0 ± 4.4 mL/min/kg in SLCO1B1*1a and 16.7 ± 5.9 mL/min/kg in SLCO1B1*15 carriers (p > 0.5). In addition, in vitro data also indicate that fentanyl is not transported by OATP1B1. In conclusion, our data indicate that OATP1B1 has no impact on fentanyl pharmacokinetics in human beings.

  19. The pharmacokinetics of albumin conjugates of D-penicillamine in humans.

    PubMed

    Joyce, D A; Day, R O; Murphy, B R

    1991-01-01

    D-penicillamine (D-PEN) is incompletely recovered during short-term balance studies, despite rapid elimination of D-PEN and its low molecular weight metabolites. Urinary excretion of metabolites of D-PEN also persists long after cessation of chronic therapy. A study was performed to determine whether the formation and later breakdown of a stable disulfide between D-PEN and plasma albumin could explain these aspects of D-PEN pharmacokinetics. Five human volunteers received D-penicillamine, 250 mg orally, daily for 21 days. Plasma concentration-time profiles for D-PEN and D-PEN-albumin disulfide (D-PEN-albumin) were determined during the first day and pre-dose concentrations were measured on five further occasions. The pharmacokinetics of D-PEN on the first day were similar to those reported previously. No D-PEN was found in any of the pre-dose specimens. The concentration of D-PEN-albumin rose rapidly during the first day, with an estimated 8.6% of the bioavailable D-PEN being transformed to D-PEN-albumin. Pseudo-steady-state concentrations of D-PEN-albumin were achieved in three subjects at between 14 and 21 days. The mean trough concentration of D-PEN-albumin at 21 days (19.5 microM) exceeded the peak concentration of D-PEN (during the first day) by 5.7-fold. The terminal elimination half-life of D-PEN-albumin was 1.65 +/- 0.29 days, which compared with an elimination half-life of 59 +/- 8.4 min for D-PEN.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Estimating uptake of phthalate ester metabolites into the human nail plate using pharmacokinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thuy T; Alves, Andreia; Palm-Cousins, Anna; Voorspoels, Stefan; Covaci, Adrian; Cousins, Ian T

    2017-03-01

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding uptake of phthalate esters (PEs) and other chemicals into the human nail plate and thus, clarity concerning the suitability of human nails as a valid alternative matrix for monitoring long-term exposure. In particular, the relative importance of internal uptake of phthalate metabolites (from e.g. blood) compared to external uptake pathways is unknown. This study provides first insights into the partitioning of phthalate-metabolites between blood and nail using pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling and biomonitoring data from a Norwegian cohort. A previously published PK model (Lorber PK model) was used in combination with measured urine data to predict serum concentrations of DEHP and DnBP/DiBP metabolites at steady state. Then, partitioning between blood and nail was assessed assuming equilibrium conditions and treating the nail plate as a tissue, assuming a fixed lipid and water content. Although calculated as a worst-case scenario at equilibrium, the predicted nail concentrations of metabolites were lower than the biomonitoring data by factors of 44 to 1300 depending on the metabolite. It is therefore concluded that internal uptake of phthalate metabolites from blood into nail is a negligible pathway and does not explain the observed nail concentrations. Instead, external uptake pathways are more likely to dominate, possibly through deposition of phthalates onto the skin/nail and subsequent metabolism. Modelling gaseous diffusive uptake of PEs from air to nail revealed that this pathway is unlikely to be important. Experimental quantification of internal and external uptake pathways of phthalates and their metabolites into the human nail plate is needed to verify these modelling results. However, based on this model, human nails are not a good indicator of internal human exposure for the phthalate esters studied.

  1. Methods to identify and characterize developmental neurotoxicity for human health risk assessment. III: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, D C; Allen, S L; Byczkowski, J Z; Claudio, L; Fisher, J E; Fisher, J W; Harry, G J; Li, A A; Makris, S L; Padilla, S; Sultatos, L G; Mileson, B E

    2001-01-01

    We review pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors that should be considered in the design and interpretation of developmental neurotoxicity studies. Toxicologic effects on the developing nervous system depend on the delivered dose, exposure duration, and developmental stage at which exposure occurred. Several pharmacokinetic processes (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) govern chemical disposition within the dam and the nervous system of the offspring. In addition, unique physical features such as the presence or absence of a placental barrier and the gradual development of the blood--brain barrier influence chemical disposition and thus modulate developmental neurotoxicity. Neonatal exposure may depend on maternal pharmacokinetic processes and transfer of the xenobiotic through the milk, although direct exposure may occur through other routes (e.g., inhalation). Measurement of the xenobiotic in milk and evaluation of biomarkers of exposure or effect following exposure can confirm or characterize neonatal exposure. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models that incorporate these and other determinants can estimate tissue dose and biologic response following in utero or neonatal exposure. These models can characterize dose--response relationships and improve extrapolation of results from animal studies to humans. In addition, pharmacologic data allow an experimenter to determine whether exposure to the test chemical is adequate, whether exposure occurs during critical periods of nervous system development, whether route and duration of exposure are appropriate, and whether developmental neurotoxicity can be differentiated from direct actions of the xenobiotic. PMID:11250810

  2. Determination and pharmacokinetic study of norcantharidin in human serum by HPLC-MS/MS method.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chun-min; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Ben-jie; Yuan, Gui-yan; Guo, Rui-chen

    2008-01-01

    A sensitive, simple and selective high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and applied to the determination of norcantharidin concentration in human serum. Norcantharidin (NCTD) and cyclophosphamide (IS) in serum were extracted with acetone, separated on a C18 reversed-phase column, gradiently eluted with a mobile phase of acetonitrile-water containing 2 mm ammonium acetate and 0.1% formic acid (pH 3), ionized by positive ion pneumatically assisted electrospray and detected in the multi-reaction monitoring mode using precursor-->product ions of m/z 169.3-->123.1 for NCTD and 261.2-->140.2 for IS, respectively. The linear range of the calibration curve for NCTD was 2.5-50 ng/mL, with a lowest limit of quantification of 2.5 ng/mL, and the intra/inter-day RSD was less than 10%. The method was suitable for determination of low NCTD concentration in human serum after therapeutic oral doses, and has been successfully used for pharmacokinetic studies in healthy Chinese volunteers.

  3. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for methyl mercury (MeHg) in monkey and human

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, J.M.; Clewall, H.J. III; Shipp, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    A PBPK model for MeHg was developed which coherently describes MeHg pharmacokinetics in the adult rat, monkey and man, and predicts fetal levels of MeHg from in utero exposure. The model includes a description of enterohepatic recirculation of MeHg, conversion to inorganic mercury in tissues and intestinal flora, slowly reversible incorporation of mercury in tissues, and excretion of both organic and inorganic mercury into urine, feces, and hair. The adult submodel includes compartments representing the red blood tells (RBC), plasma, brain, liver, kidney, gut intestinal lumen, gut tissue, hair, richly and slowly perfused tissues, and placenta. The fetal submodel includes compartments representing RBC`s, plasma, brain, and remaining body mass. Two features of the model structure which are critical to prediction of the kinetics of MeHg in different species is the use of separate RBC and plasma compartments, allowing the use of species specific RBC/plasma ratios, and biliary excretion with enterohepatic recirculation. Published tissue and blood MeHg concentrations were used to derive the partition coefficients and RBC/plasma ratios to adjust for species differences in MeHg distribution. Validation involved comparing the model simulations with data from repeated dosing studies in animals and humans, and from accidental human exposures. The model will be used to investigate maternal MeHg intake as it relates to measured blood and hair MeHg concentrations, and to fetal exposure.

  4. Bioanalytical Method for Carbocisteine in Human Plasma by Using LC-MS/MS: A Pharmacokinetic Application.

    PubMed

    Dhanure, Shivanand; Savalia, Atulkumar; More, Pravinkumar; Shirode, Prashant; Kapse, Kailas; Shah, Virag

    2014-01-01

    A simple, sensitive, and selective LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the quantification of carbocisteine in human plasma. Rosiglitazone was used as the internal standard and heparin was used as the anticoagulant. The chromatographic separation was performed by using the Waters Symmetry Shield RP 8, 150 × 3.9 mm, 5 μ column at 40°C with a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of methanol and 0.5% formic acid solution in a 40:60 proportion. The flow rate was 500 μl/min along with a 5 μl injection volume. Protein precipitation was used as the extraction method. Mass spectrometric data were detected in positive ion mode. The MRM mode of the ions for carbocisteine was 180.0 > 89.0 and for rosiglitazone it was 238.1 > 135.1. The method was validated in the concentration curve range of 50.000 ng/mL to 6000.000 ng/mL. The retention times of carbocisteine and the internal standard rosiglitazone were approximately 2.20 and 3.01 min, respectively. The overall run time was 4.50 min. This method was found suitable to analyze human plasma samples for the application in pharmacokinetic and BA/BE studies.

  5. Bioanalytical Method for Carbocisteine in Human Plasma by Using LC-MS/MS: A Pharmacokinetic Application

    PubMed Central

    Dhanure, Shivanand; Savalia, Atulkumar; More, Pravinkumar; Shirode, Prashant; Kapse, Kailas; Shah, Virag

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A simple, sensitive, and selective LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the quantification of carbocisteine in human plasma. Rosiglitazone was used as the internal standard and heparin was used as the anticoagulant. The chromatographic separation was performed by using the Waters Symmetry Shield RP 8, 150 × 3.9 mm, 5 μ column at 40°C with a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of methanol and 0.5% formic acid solution in a 40:60 proportion. The flow rate was 500 μl/min along with a 5 μl injection volume. Protein precipitation was used as the extraction method. Mass spectrometric data were detected in positive ion mode. The MRM mode of the ions for carbocisteine was 180.0 > 89.0 and for rosiglitazone it was 238.1 > 135.1. The method was validated in the concentration curve range of 50.000 ng/mL to 6000.000 ng/mL. The retention times of carbocisteine and the internal standard rosiglitazone were approximately 2.20 and 3.01 min, respectively. The overall run time was 4.50 min. This method was found suitable to analyze human plasma samples for the application in pharmacokinetic and BA/BE studies. PMID:26171322

  6. Molecular imaging of human tumor cells that naturally overexpress type 2 cannabinoid receptors using a quinolone-based near-infrared fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Shao, Pin; Zhang, Shaojuan; Ling, Xiaoxi; Bai, Mingfeng

    2014-07-01

    Cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2R) hold promise as therapeutic targets for treating diverse diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders, addiction, and immune disorders. However, the fundamental role of CBR in the regulation of diseases remains unclear, largely due to a lack of reliable imaging tools for the receptors. The goal of this study was to develop a CBR-targeted molecular imaging probe and evaluate the specificity of the probe using human tumor cells that naturally overexpress CBR. To synthesize the CBR-targeted probe (NIR760-Q), a conjugable CBR ligand based on the quinolone structure was first prepared, followed by bioconjugation with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, NIR760. In vitro fluorescence imaging and competitive binding studies showed higher uptake of NIR760-Q than free NIR760 dye in Jurkat human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In addition, the high uptake of NIR760-Q was significantly inhibited by the blocking agent, 4-quinolone-3-carboxamide, indicating specific binding of NIR760-Q to the target receptors. These results indicate that the NIR760-Q has potential in diagnostic imaging of CBR positive cancers and elucidating the role of CBR in the regulation of disease progression.

  7. Molecular imaging of human tumor cells that naturally overexpress type 2 cannabinoid receptors using a quinolone-based near-infrared fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Shao, Pin; Zhang, Shaojuan; Ling, Xiaoxi; Bai, Mingfeng

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2R) hold promise as therapeutic targets for treating diverse diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders, addiction, and immune disorders. However, the fundamental role of CB2R in the regulation of diseases remains unclear, largely due to a lack of reliable imaging tools for the receptors. The goal of this study was to develop a CB2R-targeted molecular imaging probe and evaluate the specificity of the probe using human tumor cells that naturally overexpress CB2R. To synthesize the CB2R-targeted probe (NIR760-Q), a conjugable CB2R ligand based on the quinolone structure was first prepared, followed by bioconjugation with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, NIR760. In vitro fluorescence imaging and competitive binding studies showed higher uptake of NIR760-Q than free NIR760 dye in Jurkat human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In addition, the high uptake of NIR760-Q was significantly inhibited by the blocking agent, 4-quinolone-3-carboxamide, indicating specific binding of NIR760-Q to the target receptors. These results indicate that the NIR760-Q has potential in diagnostic imaging of CB2R positive cancers and elucidating the role of CB2R in the regulation of disease progression.

  8. [Post-marketing re-evaluation about usage and dosage of Chinese medicine based on human population pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junjie; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    The usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine are determined by rigorous evaluation which include four clinical trail stages: I, II, III. But the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine are lacked re-evaluation after marketing. And this lead to unchanging or fixed of the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine instead of different quantity based on different situations in individual patients. The situation of Chinese patent medicine used in clinical application is far away from the idea of the "Treatment based on syndrome differentiation" in traditional Chinese medicine and personalized therapy. Human population pharmacokinetics provides data support to the personalized therapy in clinical application, and achieved the postmarking reevaluating of the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine. This paper briefly introduced the present situation, significance and the application of human population pharmacokinetics about re-evaluation of the usage and dosage of Chinese patent medicine after marketing.

  9. GC-FID determination and pharmacokinetic studies of oleanolic acid in human serum.

    PubMed

    Rada, Mirela; Castellano, José María; Perona, Javier S; Guinda, Ángeles

    2015-11-01

    Analytical interest of OA determination in human serum has increased owing to the increasing interest in pharmaceutical research by pharmaceutical properties. A simple, specific, precise and accurate GC method with flame ionization detector (FID) developed and validated for the determination of oleanolic acid (OA) in human serum (HS). To an aliquot of HS, internal standard was added and a combination of liquid-liquid extraction with a mixture of diethyl ether-isopropyl alcohol, filtration and consecutive GC resulted in separation and quantification of OA. The organic phase was analyzed using a GC system equipped with a 30 × 0.25 mm i.d. Rtx-65TG capillary column and FID detection. Total chromatographic time was 10 min and no interfering peaks from endogenous components in blank serum were observed. The OA/internal standard peak area ratio was linearly fitted to the OA concentration (r = 0.992) over the range 10-1500 ng/mL. The mean serum extraction recovery of OA was 96.7 ± 1.0% and the lower limit of quantification based on 5 mL of serum was 10.7 ng/mL. The intra-day coefficient of variation ranged from 1.3 to 3.6% and inter-day varied from 1.4 to 4.5%. The developed method was used to study the pharmacokinetics of OA after oral administration in humans. The assay was simple, sensitive, precise and accurate for the use in the study of the mechanisms of absorption and distribution of OA in humans.

  10. The inverse agonist effect of rimonabant on G protein activation is not mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor: evidence from postmortem human brain.

    PubMed

    Erdozain, A M; Diez-Alarcia, R; Meana, J J; Callado, L F

    2012-01-15

    Rimonabant (SR141716) was the first potent and selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist synthesized. Several data support that rimonabant behaves as an inverse agonist. Moreover, there is evidence suggesting that this inverse agonism may be CB1 receptor-independent. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the effect of rimonabant over G protein activation in postmortem human brain is CB1 dependent or independent. [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays and antibody-capture [(35)S]GTPγS scintillation proximity assays (SPA) were performed in human and mice brain. [(3)H]SR141716 binding characteristics were also studied. Rimonabant concentration-dependently decreased basal [(35)S]GTPγS binding to human cortical membranes. This effect did not change in the presence of either the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2, the CB1 receptor neutral antagonist O-2050, or the CB1 allosteric modulator Org 27569. [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays performed in CB1 knockout mice brains revealed that rimonabant inhibited the [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the same manner as it did in wild-type mice. The SPA combined with the use of specific antibody-capture of G(α) specific subunits showed that rimonabant produces its inverse agonist effect through G(i3), G(o) and G(z) subtypes. This effect was not inhibited by the CB1 receptor antagonist O-2050. Finally, [(3)H]SR141716 binding assays in human cortical membranes demonstrated that rimonabant recognizes an additional binding site other than the CB1 receptor orthosteric binding site recognized by O-2050. This study provides new data demonstrating that at least the inverse agonist effect observed with >1μM concentrations of rimonabant in [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays is not mediated by the CB1 receptor in human brain.

  11. A novel control of human keratin expression: cannabinoid receptor 1-mediated signaling down-regulates the expression of keratins K6 and K16 in human keratinocytes in vitro and in situ

    PubMed Central

    Zákány, Nóra; Tóth, Balázs I.; Bíró, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors (CB) are expressed throughout human skin epithelium. CB1 activation inhibits human hair growth and decreases proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. Since psoriasis is a chronic hyperproliferative, inflammatory skin disease, it is conceivable that the therapeutic modulation of CB signaling, which can inhibit both proliferation and inflammation, could win a place in future psoriasis management. Given that psoriasis is characterized by up-regulation of keratins K6 and K16, we have investigated whether CB1 stimulation modulates their expression in human epidermis. Treatment of organ-cultured human skin with the CB1-specific agonist, arachidonoyl-chloro-ethanolamide (ACEA), decreased K6 and K16 staining intensity in situ. At the gene and protein levels, ACEA also decreased K6 expression of cultured HaCaT keratinocytes, which show some similarities to psoriatic keratinocytes. These effects were partly antagonized by the CB1-specific antagonist, AM251. While CB1-mediated signaling also significantly inhibited human epidermal keratinocyte proliferation in situ, as shown by K6/Ki-67-double immunofluorescence, the inhibitory effect of ACEA on K6 expression in situ was independent of its anti-proliferative effect. Given recent appreciation of the role of K6 as a functionally important protein that regulates epithelial wound healing in mice, it is conceivable that the novel CB1-mediated regulation of keratin 6/16 revealed here also is relevant to wound healing. Taken together, our results suggest that cannabinoids and their receptors constitute a novel, clinically relevant control element of human K6 and K16 expression. PMID:23638377

  12. Efficacy of Extended-Interval Dosing of Micafungin Evaluated Using a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study with Humanized Doses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lepak, A.; Marchillo, K.; VanHecker, J.; Azie, N.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) characteristics of the echinocandins favor infrequent administration of large doses. The in vivo investigation reported here tested the utility of a range of humanized dose levels of micafungin using a variety of prolonged dosing intervals for the prevention and therapy of established disseminated candidiasis. Humanized doses of 600 mg administered every 6 days prevented fungal growth in prophylaxis. Humanized doses of 300 to 1,000 mg administered every 6 days demonstrated efficacy for established infections. PMID:26552968

  13. Identification of cannabinoid type 1 receptor in dog hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Mercati, Francesca; Dall'Aglio, Cecilia; Pascucci, Luisa; Boiti, Cristiano; Ceccarelli, Piero

    2012-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there is an increasing interest in the study of the endo-cannabinoid system and the possible use of the cannabinoids for the treatment of several diseases. Cannabinoid receptors (CB) are widely distributed in human and laboratory animal tissues, justifying the involvement of the endo-cannabinoid system in a great number of metabolic ways. Since there are no data regarding cannabinoid receptors in hair follicles of domestic animals, we investigated the presence and localization of CB1 receptor in dog hair follicles. By using a goat anti-CB1 polyclonal antibody, we observed CB1 receptor in the proximal part of both primary and secondary hair follicles. Staining was localized in the inner root sheath cells. We suppose that the endo-cannabinoid system is involved in the molecular mechanisms regulating hair follicle activity in dog. The identification of CB1 receptor at the level of the inner root sheath may help in the understanding of hair follicle biology and the possibility that cannabinoid molecules could be considered as suitable therapeutic tools in dog.

  14. Strategies to distinguish new synthetic cannabinoid FUBIMINA (BIM-2201) intake from its isomer THJ-2201: metabolism of FUBIMINA in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Huestis, Marilyn A

    Since 2013, a new drugs-of-abuse trend attempts to bypass drug legislation by marketing isomers of scheduled synthetic cannabinoids (SCs), e.g., FUBIMINA (BIM-2201) and THJ-2201. It is much more challenging to confirm a specific isomer's intake and distinguish it from its structural analog because the isomers and their major metabolites usually have identical molecular weights and display the same product ions. Here, we investigated isomers FUBIMINA and THJ-2201 and propose strategies to distinguish their consumption. THJ-2201 was scheduled in the US, Japan, and Europe; however, FUBIMINA is easily available on the Internet. We previously investigated THJ-2201 metabolism in human hepatocytes, but human FUBIMINA metabolism is unknown. We aim to characterize FUBIMINA metabolism in human hepatocytes, recommend optimal metabolites to confirm its consumption, and propose strategies to distinguish between intakes of FUBIMINA and THJ-2201. FUBIMINA (10 μM) was incubated in human hepatocytes for 3 h, and metabolites were characterized with high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). We identified 35 metabolites generated by oxidative defluorination, further carboxylation, hydroxylation, dihydrodiol formation, glucuronidation, and their combinations. We recommend 5'-OH-BIM-018 (M34), BIM-018 pentanoic acid (M33), and BIM-018 pentanoic acid dihydrodiol (M7) as FUBIMINA specific metabolites. THJ-2201 produced specific metabolite markers 5'-OH-THJ-018 (F26), THJ-018 pentanoic acid (F25), and hydroxylated THJ-2201 (F13). Optimized chromatographic conditions to achieve different retention times and careful selection of specific product ion spectra enabled differentiation of isomeric metabolites, in this case FUBIMINA from THJ-2201. Our HR-MS approach should be applicable for differentiating future isomeric SCs, which is especially important when different isomers have different legal status.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and effects on serum cholinesterase activities of organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sota, Shigeto; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in foods have potential to impact human health. The aim of the current study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of acephate and chlorpyrifos orally administered at lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Absorbed acephate and its metabolite methamidophos were detected in serum from wild type mice and chimeric mice orally administered 150mg/kg. Approximately 70% inhibition of cholinesterase was evident in plasma of chimeric mice with humanized liver (which have higher serum cholinesterase activities than wild type mice) 1day after oral administrations of acephate. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated plasma concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. Acephate cleared similarly in humans and chimeric mice but accidental/incidental overdose levels of chlorpyrifos cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in mice. The data presented here illustrate how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of toxicological potential of organophosphorus pesticides.

  16. Similarity of Bisphenol A Pharmacokinetics in Rhesus Monkeys and Mice: Relevance for Human Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Julia A.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Welshons, Wade V.; Drury, Bertram; Rottinghaus, George; Hunt, Patricia A.; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Laffont, Céline M.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Daily adult human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has been estimated at < 1 μg/kg, with virtually complete first-pass conjugation in the liver in primates but not in mice. We measured unconjugated and conjugated BPA levels in serum from adult female rhesus monkeys and adult female mice after oral administration of BPA and compared findings in mice and monkeys with prior published data in women. Methods Eleven adult female rhesus macaques were fed 400 μg/kg deuterated BPA (dBPA) daily for 7 days. Levels of serum dBPA were analyzed by isotope-dilution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (0.2 ng/mL limit of quantitation) over 24 hr on day 1 and on day 7. The same dose of BPA was fed to adult female CD-1 mice; other female mice were administered 3H-BPA at doses ranging from 2 to 100,000 μg/kg. Results In monkeys, the maximum unconjugated serum dBPA concentration of 4 ng/mL was reached 1 hr after feeding and declined to low levels by 24 hr, with no significant bioaccumulation after seven daily doses. Mice and monkeys cleared unconjugated serum BPA at virtually identical rates. We observed a linear (proportional) relationship between administered dose and serum BPA in mice. Conclusions BPA pharmacokinetics in women, female monkeys, and mice is very similar. By comparison with approximately 2 ng/mL unconjugated serum BPA reported in multiple human studies, the average 24-hr unconjugated serum BPA concentration of 0.5 ng/mL in both monkeys and mice after a 400 μg/kg oral dose suggests that total daily human exposure is via multiple routes and is much higher than previously assumed. PMID:20855240

  17. Simulation of Human Plasma Concentrations of Thalidomide and Primary 5-Hydroxylated Metabolites Explored with Pharmacokinetic Data in Humanized TK-NOG Mice.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Sayako; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shibata, Norio; Guengerich, F Peter; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-11-16

    Plasma concentrations of thalidomide and primary 5-hydroxylated metabolites including 5,6-dihydroxythalidomide and glutathione (GSH) conjugate(s) were investigated in chimeric mice with highly "humanized" liver cells harboring cytochrome P450 3A5*1. Following oral administration of thalidomide (100 mg/kg), plasma concentrations of GSH conjugate(s) of 5-hydroxythalidomide were higher in humanized mice than in controls. Simulation of human plasma concentrations of thalidomide were achieved with a simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in accordance with reported thalidomide concentrations. The results indicate that the pharmacokinetics in humans of GSH conjugate and/or catechol primary 5-hydroxylated thalidomide contributing in vivo activation can be estimated for the first time.

  18. HPLC Determination of Fexofenadine in Human Plasma For Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Pharmacokinetic Studies.

    PubMed

    Helmy, S A; El Bedaiwy, H M

    2016-07-01

    A simple and sensitive method was developed for fexofenadine determination in human plasma by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Satisfactory separation was achieved on a Hypersil® BDS C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5μm) using a mobile phase comprising 20 mm sodium dihydrogen phosphate-2 hydrate (pH adjusted to 3 with phosphoric acid)-acetonitrile at a ratio of 52:48, v/v. The elution was isocratic at ambient temperature with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The UV detector was set at 215 nm for the drug and 330 nm for the internal standared (tinidazole). The total time for a chromatographic separation was ~6.5 min. Linearity was demonstrated over the concentration range 0.01-4 μg/mL. The observed within- and between-day assay precision ranged from 0.346 to 13.6%; accuracy varied between 100.4 and 111.2%. This method was successfully applied for therapeutic drug monitoring in patients treated with clinical doses of fexofenadine and for pharmacokinetic studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus immunoglobulin in persons with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, C V; Goodroad, B K; Cummins, L M; Henry, K; Balfour, H H; Rhame, F S

    1997-01-01

    Hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus immunoglobulin (HIVIG) is an intravenous immunoglobulin prepared from HIV-infected asymptomatic donors with a CD4 cell count greater than 400 cells/microl and a high titer of antibody to HIV-1 p24 protein. Twelve persons with AIDS received four doses of HMG (two at 50 mg/kg of body weight and then two at 200 mg/kg) every 28 days. Pharmacokinetics were evaluated by measurement of anti-p24 antibody. HIVIG was well tolerated, and all participants completed the study. Three subjects who were not receiving Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis developed PCP. The mean value for HIVIG clearance was 3.02 ml/kg/day at 50 mg/kg and 3.65 ml/kg/day at 200 mg/kg (P = 0.027); the mean trough antibody titers (reciprocal units) were 1,442 and 4,428, respectively. This study indicates that high titers of anti-p24 antibody can be maintained with a monthly administration schedule of HIVIG and that short-term safety is acceptable. Comparisons to evaluate the therapeutic potential of HIVIG are justified. PMID:9210687

  20. Chemical Polysialylation and In Vivo Tetramerization Improve Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase-Based Bioscavengers

    PubMed Central

    Terekhov, S. S.; Smirnov, I. V.; Shamborant, O. G.; Bobik, T. V.; Ilyushin, D. G.; Murashev, A. N.; Dyachenko, I. A.; Palikov, V. A.; Knorre, V. D.; Belogurov, A. A.; Ponomarenko, N. A.; Kuzina, E. S.; Genkin, D. D.; Masson, P.; Gabibov, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate toxins (OPs) are the most toxic low-molecular compounds. The extremely potent toxicity of OPs is determined by their specificity toward the nerve system. Human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE) is a natural bioscavenger against a broad spectrum of OPs, which makes it a promising candidate for the development of DNA-encoded bioscavengers. The high values of the protective index observed for recombinant hBChE (rhBChE) make it appropriate for therapy against OP poisoning, especially in the case of highly toxic warfare nerve agents. Nevertheless, large-scale application of biopharmaceuticals based on hBChE is restricted due to its high cost and extremely rapid elimination from the bloodstream. In the present study, we examine two approaches for long-acting rhBChE production: I) chemical polysialylation and II) in-vivo tetramerization. We demonstrate that both approaches significantly improve the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rhBChE (more than 5 and 10 times, respectively), which makes it possible to use rhBChE conjugated with polysialic acids (rhBChE-CAO) and tetrameric rhBChE (4rhBChE) in the treatment of OP poisonings. PMID:26798501

  1. Time course of pharmacokinetic and hormonal effects of inhaled high-dose salvinorin A in humans

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew W.; MacLean, Katherine A.; Caspers, Michael J.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2017-01-01

    Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the Salvia divinorum plant, which has been used for hallucinogenic effects. Previous research on salvinorin A pharmacokinetics likely underestimated plasma levels typically resulting from the doses administered due to inefficient vaporization and not collecting samples during peak drug effects. Six healthy adults inhaled a single high dose of vaporized salvinorin A (n=4, 21 mcg/kg; n=2, 18 mcg/kg). Participant- and monitor-rated effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min post-inhalation. Blood samples were collected at 13 time points up to 90 min post-inhalation. Drug levels peaked at 2 min and then rapidly decreased. Drug levels were significantly, positively correlated with participant and monitor drug effect ratings. Significant elevations in prolactin were observed beginning 5 min post-inhalation and peaking at 15 min post-inhalation. Cortisol showed inconsistent increases across participants. Hormonal responses were not well correlated with drug levels. This is the first study to demonstrate a direct relationship between changes in plasma levels of salvinorin A and drug effects in humans. The results confirm the efficacy of an inhalation technique for salvinorin A. PMID:26880225

  2. Time course of pharmacokinetic and hormonal effects of inhaled high-dose salvinorin A in humans.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew W; MacLean, Katherine A; Caspers, Michael J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Griffiths, Roland R

    2016-04-01

    Salvinorin A is a kappa opioid agonist and the principal psychoactive constituent of the Salvia divinorum plant, which has been used for hallucinogenic effects. Previous research on salvinorin A pharmacokinetics likely underestimated plasma levels typically resulting from the doses administered due to inefficient vaporization and not collecting samples during peak drug effects. Six healthy adults inhaled a single high dose of vaporized salvinorin A (n = 4, 21 mcg/kg; n = 2, 18 mcg/kg). Participant- and monitor-rated effects were assessed every 2 min for 60 min post-inhalation. Blood samples were collected at 13 time points up to 90 min post-inhalation. Drug levels peaked at 2 min and then rapidly decreased. Drug levels were significantly, positively correlated with participant and monitor drug effect ratings. Significant elevations in prolactin were observed beginning 5 min post-inhalation and peaking at 15 min post-inhalation. Cortisol showed inconsistent increases across participants. Hormonal responses were not well correlated with drug levels. This is the first study to demonstrate a direct relationship between changes in plasma levels of salvinorin A and drug effects in humans. The results confirm the efficacy of an inhalation technique for salvinorin A.

  3. PET measurement of C-11-methylphenidate pharmacokinetics and distribution in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.S.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.J.

    1994-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP), a psychostimulant drug which binds to the dopamine transporter (DAT), is the most commonly prescribed psychotropic medication for children in the USA yet little is known about its pharmacokinetics and distribution in the human brain. PET was used to measure the pharmacokinetics of d,l-threo-[{sup 11}C]methylphenidate (MP*) the labelled form of the prescribed drug (ritalin) in eight normal male subjects (age range 20-74 years). Four subjects had 2 repeated scans to assess test/retest reproducibility and 4 had one wan as baseline and the second 10 minutes after administration of 0.5 mg/kg MP to assess specific to nonspecific binding. Dynamic scans were started immediately after injection of MP*(5-10 mCi) for 90 min on the CTI-931 (6 x 6 x 6.5 mm FWHM). Time activity curves for tissue concentration and for unchanged tracer in plasma were used to calculate the distribution volume (DV) in basal ganglia (BG), cerebellum (CB) and global (GL) regions using graphical analysis. Binding of MP* was highest in the BG (0.008% dose/cc) uptake in CB corresponded to (0.006) and in GL to (0.005). Kinetic analysis revealed fast uptake of MP* with peak uptake in BG occurring 5-20 min PI, and in CB and GL at 5-13 min PI. Half time clearance for MP* occurred 90 min PI for BG and 60 min for CB and GL. Test/retest variability was <10% (range -0.5 to +7.0% for the DV ratio (BG/CB)). Pretreatment with MP selectively reduced uptake in BG wherein it did not affect uptake in CB or GL. The ratio of the DV in BG to that in CB changed from 2.12{plus_minus}0.1 to 1.35{plus_minus}0.04. The lack of an effect of MP in CB an area with a high density of norepinephrine (NE) transporters suggests that MP* is not binding to the NE transporter.

  4. Imaging the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in humans with [11C]OMAR: assessment of kinetic analysis methods, test-retest reproducibility, and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Normandin, Marc D; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Mason, N Scott; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Henry, Shannan; Williams, Wendol A; Carson, Richard E; Neumeister, Alexander; Huang, Yiyun

    2015-08-01

    The Radiotracer [(11)C]OMAR was developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1R). The objectives of the present study were to evaluate kinetic analysis methods, determine test-retest reliability, and assess gender differences in receptor availability. Dynamic PET data were acquired in 10 human subjects, and analyzed with one-tissue (1T) and two-tissue (2T) compartment models and by the Logan and multilinear analysis (MA1) methods to estimate regional volume of distribution (VT). The 2T model inclusive of a vascular component (2TV) and MA1 were the preferred techniques. Test-retest reliability of VT was good (mean absolute deviation ~9%; intraclass correlation coefficient ~0.7). Tracer parent fraction in plasma was lower in women (P<0.0001). Cerebral uptake normalized by body weight and injected dose was higher in men by 17% (P<0.0001), but VT was significantly greater in women by 23% (P<0.0001). These findings show that [(11)C]OMAR binding can be reliably quantified by the 2T model or MA1 method and demonstrate the utility of this tracer for in vivo imaging of CB1R. In addition, results from the present study indicate that gender difference in receptor binding should be taken into consideration when [(11)C]OMAR is used to quantify CB1R availability in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  5. Simultaneous quantification of major cannabinoids and metabolites in human urine and plasma by HPLC-MS/MS and enzyme-alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; Zarandona, Iratxe; Ortiz, Laura; Navarro, Patricia; Etxebarria, Nestor; Usobiaga, Aresatz

    2016-06-24

    A high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its two metabolites 11-hydroxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), and four additional cannabinoids (cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), and cannabinol (CBN)) in 1 mL of human urine and plasma was developed and validated. The hydrolysis process was studied to ensure complete hydrolysis of glucuronide conjugates and the extraction of a total amount of analytes. Initially, urine and plasma blank samples were spiked with THC-COOH-glucuronide and THC-glucuronide, and four different pretreatment methods were compared: hydrolysis-free method, enzymatic hydrolysis with Escherichia Coli β-glucuronidase, alkaline hydrolysis with 10 M NaOH, and enzyme-alkaline tandem hydrolysis. The last approach assured the maximum efficiencies (close to 100%) for both urine and plasma matrices. Regarding the figures of merit, the limits of detection were below 1 ng/mL for all analytes, the accuracy ranged from 84% to 115%, and both within-day and between-day precision were lower than 12%. Finally, the method was successfully applied to real urine and plasma samples from cannabis users. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  7. Absence of pharmacokinetic interaction between intravenous peramivir and oral oseltamivir or rimantadine in humans.

    PubMed

    Atiee, George; Lasseter, Kenneth; Baughman, Sharon; McCullough, Amy; Collis, Phil; Hollister, Alan; Hernandez, Jaime

    2012-09-01

    Peramivir, an intravenously administered neuraminidase inhibitor, may be used concomitantly with other influenza antivirals. Two studies were conducted to assess the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions of peramivir when coadministered with oseltamivir or rimantadine. Twenty-one healthy subjects were enrolled in each randomized, open-label, crossover study, and they received 1 intravenous dose of peramivir (600 mg), 1 oral dose of oseltamivir (75 mg) or rimantadine (100 mg), or a combination of peramivir with oseltamivir or rimantadine. Assessment of the 90% confidence interval for the geometric mean ratio of peramivir and oseltamivir carboxylate or rimantadine pharmacokinetic parameters showed no effect of oseltamivir or rimantadine on the pharmacokinetics of peramivir and no effect of peramivir on the pharmacokinetics of oseltamivir carboxylate or rimantadine. The drugs were well tolerated. These results suggest no reason to expect an effect of concomitant administration of oseltamivir or rimantadine on the safety profile of peramivir in patients with influenza.

  8. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and Triadimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Kinetic time course data...

  9. The cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Allyn C

    2002-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptors were named because they have affinity for the agonist delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), a ligand found in organic extracts from Cannabis sativa. The two types of cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. are G protein coupled receptors that are coupled through the Gi/o family of proteins to signal transduction mechanisms that include inhibition of adenylyl cyclase, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase, regulation of calcium and potassium channels (CB1 only), and other signal transduction pathways. A class of the eicosanoid ligands are relevant to lipid-mediated cellular signaling because they serve as endogenous agonists for cannabinoid receptors, and are thus referred to as endocannabinoids. Those compounds identified to date include the eicosanoids arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide), 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 2-arachidonylglyceryl ether (noladin ether). Several excellent reviews on endocannabinoids and their synthesis, metabolism and function have appeared in recent years. This paper will describe the biological activities, pharmacology, and signal transduction mechanisms for the cannabinoid receptors, with particular emphasis on the responses to the eicosanoid ligands.

  10. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  11. Adapting pharmacokinetic properties of a humanized anti-interleukin-8 antibody for therapeutic applications using site-specific pegylation.

    PubMed

    Leong, S R; DeForge, L; Presta, L; Gonzalez, T; Fan, A; Reichert, M; Chuntharapai, A; Kim, K J; Tumas, D B; Lee, W P; Gribling, P; Snedecor, B; Chen, H; Hsei, V; Schoenhoff, M; Hale, V; Deveney, J; Koumenis, I; Shahrokh, Z; McKay, P; Galan, W; Wagner, B; Narindray, D; Hébert, C; Zapata, G

    2001-11-07

    A neutralizing anti-interleukin-(IL-)8 monoclonal antibody was humanized by grafting the complementary determining regions onto the human IgG framework. Subsequent alanine scanning mutagenesis and phage display enabled the production of an affinity matured antibody with a >100-fold improvement in IL-8 binding. Antibody fragments can be efficiently produced in Escherichia coli but have the limitation of rapid clearance rates in vivo. The Fab' fragment of the antibody was therefore modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) in order to obtain a more desirable pharmacokinetic profile. PEG (5-40 kDa) was site-specifically conjugated to the Fab' via the single free cysteine residue in the hinge region. In vitro binding and bioassays showed little or no loss of activity. The pharmacokinetic profiles of the 20 kDa, 30 kDa, 40 kDa, and 40 kDa branched PEG-Fab' molecules were evaluated in rabbits. Relative to the native Fab', the clearance rates of the PEGylated molecules were decreased by 44-175-fold. In a rabbit ear model of ischemia/reperfusion injury, all PEGylated Fab' molecules were as efficacious in reducing oedema as the original monoclonal antibody. These studies demonstrate that it is possible to customize the pharmacokinetic properties of a Fab' while retaining its antigen binding activity.

  12. Surinabant, a selective cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonist, inhibits Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced central nervous system and heart rate effects in humans

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Linda E; Roy, Christine; Ferron, Geraldine; Turpault, Sandrine; Poitiers, Franck; Pinquier, Jean-Louis; van Hasselt, Johan G C; Zuurman, Lineke; Erwich, Frank A S; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2013-01-01

    Aim Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists have been developed for the treatment of obesity and associated risk factors. Surinabant is a high affinity CB1 antagonist in vitro. The aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of inhibition by surinabant of CNS effects and heart rate induced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans. Methods This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, four period six sequence crossover study. Thirty healthy young male occasional cannabis users (<1 per week) were included. A single oral dose of surinabant (5, 20 or 60 mg) or placebo was administered followed 1.5 h later by four intrapulmonary THC doses (2, 4, 6 and 6 mg) or vehicle, administered at 1 h intervals. The wash-out period was 14–21 days. Subjective and objective pharmacodynamic (PD) measurements were performed. A population PK–PD model for THC and surinabant quantified PK and PD effects. Results Surinabant 20 and 60 mg inhibited all THC-induced PD effects in a similar range for both doses with inhibition ratios ranging from 68.3% (95% CI = 32.5, 104.2; heart rate) to 91.1% (95% CI = 30.3, 151.8; body sway). IC50 ranged from 22.0 ng ml−1 [relative standard error (RSE) = 45.2%; body sway] to 58.8 ng ml−1 (RSE = 44.2%; internal perception). Surinabant 5 mg demonstrated no significant effects. Conclusions The dose-related inhibition by surinabant, without any effect of its own, suggests that this compound behaves as a CB1 receptor antagonist in humans at these concentrations. A single surinabant dose between 5 to 20 mg and above was able to antagonize THC-induced effects in humans. PMID:23278647

  13. Metabolite Profiling and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Hydrocortisone in a Perfused Three-Dimensional Human Liver Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Ujjal; Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Large, Emma M.; Hughes, David J.; Ravindra, Kodihalli C.; Dyer, Rachel L.; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    Endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to cause liver injury primarily involving inflammatory cells such as Kupffer cells, but few in vitro culture models are applicable for investigation of inflammatory effects on drug metabolism. We have developed a three-dimensional human microphysiological hepatocyte–Kupffer cell coculture system and evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids on liver cultures. LPS was introduced to the cultures to elicit an inflammatory response and was assessed by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α. A sensitive and specific reversed-phase–ultra high-performance liquid chromatography–quadrupole time of flight–mass spectrometry method was used to evaluate hydrocortisone disappearance and metabolism at near physiologic levels. For this, the systems were dosed with 100 nM hydrocortisone and circulated for 2 days; hydrocortisone was depleted to approximately 30 nM, with first-order kinetics. Phase I metabolites, including tetrahydrocortisone and dihydrocortisol, accounted for 8–10% of the loss, and 45–52% consisted of phase II metabolites, including glucuronides of tetrahydrocortisol and tetrahydrocortisone. Pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., half-life, rate of elimination, clearance, and area under the curve, were 23.03 hours, 0.03 hour−1, 6.6 × 10−5 l⋅hour−1, and 1.03 (mg/l)*h, respectively. The ability of the bioreactor to predict the in vivo clearance of hydrocortisone was characterized, and the obtained intrinsic clearance values correlated with human data. This system offers a physiologically relevant tool for investigating hepatic function in an inflamed liver. PMID:25926431

  14. Determination of Acyclovir in Human Plasma Samples by HPLC Method with UV Detection: Application to Single-Dose Pharmacokinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Zendelovska, Dragica; Simeska, Suzana; Atanasovska, Emilija; Georgievska, Kalina; Kikerkov, Igor; Labachevski, Nikola; Jakovski, Krume; Balkanov, Trajan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters: Cmax, tmax, t1/2, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ with the two-way analysis of variance, single observation (ANOVA) for two preparations containing acyclovir. OBJECTIVE: In order to evaluate pharmacokinetic study of acyclovir, method for quantitative determination of acyclovir in human plasma should be simple, rapid and reproducible. Therefore, the method is developed, validated and applied for analysis of acyclovir in plasma samples obtained from healthy volunteers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: High performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with UV-detection for the determination of acyclovir in human plasma is presented. This method involves protein precipitation with 20 % (V/V) perchloric acid. The chromatographic separation was accomplished on a reversed phase C8 column with a mobile phase composed of 0.1 % (V/V) triethylamine in water (pH 2.5). No internal standard is required. UV detection was set at 255 nm. The method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetic profiles of acyclovir tablets in 24 healthy volunteers. RESULTS: The validation results shows that proposed method is rugged, precise (RSDs for intra- and inter-day precision ranged from 1.02 to 8.37 %) and accurate (relative errors are less than 6.66 %). The calibration curve was linear in the concentration range of 0.1-2.0 µg/ml and the limit of quantification was 0.1 µg/ml. The Cmax, tmax and AUCs for the two products were not statistically different (p>0.05), suggesting that the plasma profiles generated by Zovirax were comparable to those produced by acyclovir manufactured by Jaka 80 company. CONCLUSION: Good precision, accuracy, simplicity, sensitivity and shorter time of analysis of the method makes it particularly useful for processing of multiple samples in a limited period of time for pharmacokinetic study of acyclovir. PMID:27275193

  15. Oxaza adamantyl cannabinoids. A new class of cannabinoid receptor probes.

    PubMed

    Le Goanvic, David; Tius, Marcus A

    2006-09-29

    The preparation of C3 oxaza adamantyl cannabinoids has been described starting from phloroglucinol. Straightforward manipulations of the aromatic ring lead to a bromononaflate that is a benzyne precursor and that serves as a common intermediate for the synthesis of diverse C3-substituted tricyclic cannabinoids. Generation of the benzyne in the presence of an oxaza adamantyl amide anion results in efficient and regiospecific addition to C3 of the aromatic ring. This represents an attractive strategy for the synthesis of classical tricyclic cannabinoids that bear a modified aromatic appendage. The oxaza adamantyl cannabinoids that have been prepared represent a new class of ligands for the CB1 and CB2 receptors.

  16. Effects of chlorophyll and chlorophyllin on low-dose aflatoxin B1 pharmacokinetics in human volunteers: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Jubert, C; Mata, J; Bench, G; Dashwood, R; Pereira, C; Tracewell, W; Turteltaub, K; Williams, D; Bailey, G

    2009-04-20

    Chlorophyll (Chla) and chlorophyllin (CHL) were shown previously to reduce carcinogen bioavailability, biomarker damage, and tumorigenicity in trout and rats. These findings were partially extended to humans (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98, 14601-14606 (2001)), where CHL reduced excretion of aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-DNA repair products in Chinese unavoidably exposed to dietary AFB{sub 1}. However, neither AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetics nor Chla effects were examined. We conducted a small unblinded crossover study to establish AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters in human volunteers, and to explore possible effects of CHL or Chla co-treatment on those parameters. For protocol 1, fasted subjects received an IRB-approved dose of 14C-AFB{sub 1} (30 ng, 5 nCi) by capsule with 100 ml water, followed by normal eating and drinking after hr 2. Blood and cumulative urine samples were collected over 72 hr, and {sup 14}C-AFB{sub 1} equivalents were determined by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Protocols 2 and 3 were similar except capsules also contained 150 mg of purified Chla, or CHL, respectively. All protocols were repeated 3 times for each of three volunteers. The study revealed rapid human AFB{sub 1} uptake (plasma ka 5.05 {+-} 1.10 hr-1, Tmax 1.0 hr) and urinary elimination (95% complete by 24 hr) kinetics. Chla and CHL treatment each significantly impeded AFB{sub 1} absorption and reduced Cmax and AUC's (plasma and urine) in one or more subjects. These initial results provide AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters previously unavailable for humans, and suggest that Chla or CHL co-consumption may limit the bioavailability of ingested aflatoxin in humans, as they do in animal models.

  17. Detection of the recently emerged synthetic cannabinoid 5 F-MDMB-PICA in 'legal high' products and human urine samples.

    PubMed

    Mogler, Lukas; Franz, Florian; Rentsch, Daniel; Angerer, Verena; Weinfurtner, Georg; Longworth, Mitchell; Banister, Samuel D; Kassiou, Michael; Moosmann, Bjoern; Auwärter, Volker

    2017-03-31

    Indole or indazole based synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) bearing substituents derived from valine or tert-leucine are frequently abused new psychoactive substances (NPS). The emergence of 5 F-MDMB-PICA (methyl N-{[1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]carbonyl}-3-methylvalinate) on the German drug market is a further example of a substance synthesized in the context of scientific research being misused by clandestine laboratories by adding it to 'legal high' products. In this work we present the detection of 5 F-MDMB-PICA in several 'legal high' products by GC-MS analysis. To detect characteristic metabolites suitable for a proof of 5 F-MDMB-PICA consumption by urine analysis, pooled human liver microsome (pHLM) assays were performed and evaluated using LC-MS/MS and LC-QToF-MS techniques to generate reference spectra of the in vitro phase I metabolites. The in vivo phase I metabolism was investigated by the analysis of more than 20 authentic human urine specimens and compared to the data received from the pHLM assay. Biotransformation of the 5-fluoropentyl side chain and hydrolysis of the terminal methyl ester bond are main phase I biotransformation steps. Two of the identified main metabolites formed by methyl ester hydrolysis or mono-hydroxylation at the indole ring system were evaluated as suitable urinary biomarkers and discussed regarding the interpretation of analytical findings. Exemplary analysis of one urine sample for 5 F-MDMB-PICA phase II metabolites showed that two of the main phase I metabolites are subject to extensive glucuronidation prior to renal excretion. Therefore, conjugate cleavage is reasonable for enhancing sensitivity. Commercially available immunochemical pre-tests for urine proved to be unsuitable for the detection of 5 F-MDMB-PICA consumption.

  18. Simultaneous pharmacokinetics evaluation of human cytochrome P450 probes, caffeine, warfarin, omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam, in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shotaro; Inoue, Takashi; Utoh, Masahiro; Toda, Akiko; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Erika; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    1. Pharmacokinetics of human cytochrome P450 probes (caffeine, racemic warfarin, omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam) composite, after single intravenous and oral administrations at doses of 0.20 and 1.0 mg kg(-1), respectively, to four male common marmosets were investigated. 2. The plasma concentrations of caffeine and warfarin decreased slowly in a monophasic manner but those of omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam decreased extensively after intravenous and oral administrations, in a manner that approximated those as reported for pharmacokinetics in humans. 3. Bioavailabilities were ∼100% for caffeine and warfarin, but <25% for omeprazole and metoprolol. Bioavailability of midazolam was 4% in marmosets, presumably because of contribution of marmoset P450 3A4 expressed in small intestine and liver, with a high catalytic efficiency for midazolam 1'-hydroxylation as evident in the recombinant system. 4. These results suggest that common marmosets, despite their rapid clearance of some human P450 probe substrates, could be an experimental model for humans and that marmoset P450s have functional characteristics that differ from those of human and/or cynomolgus monkey P450s in some aspects, indicating their importance in modeling in P450-dependent drug metabolism studies in marmosets and of further studies.

  19. Prediction of Deoxypodophyllotoxin Disposition in Mouse, Rat, Monkey, and Dog by Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model and the Extrapolation to Human

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Zhao, Kaijing; Liu, Fei; Xie, Qiushi; Zhong, Zeyu; Miao, Mingxing; Liu, Xiaodong; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT) is a potential anti-tumor candidate prior to its clinical phase. The aim of the study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model consisting of 13 tissue compartments to predict DPT disposition in mouse, rat, monkey, and dog based on in vitro and in silico inputs. Since large interspecies difference was found in unbound fraction of DPT in plasma, we assumed that Kt:pl,u (unbound tissue-to-plasma concentration ratio) was identical across species. The predictions of our model were then validated by in vivo data of corresponding preclinical species, along with visual predictive checks. Reasonable matches were found between observed and predicted plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters in all four animal species. The prediction in the related seven tissues of mouse was also desirable. We also attempted to predict human pharmacokinetic profile by both the developed PBPK model and interspecies allometric scaling across mouse, rat and monkey, while dog was excluded from the scaling. The two approaches reached similar results. We hope the study will help in the efficacy and safety assessment of DPT in future clinical studies and provide a reference to the preclinical screening of similar compounds by PBPK model. PMID:28018224

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of recombinant human erythropoietin in athletes. Blood sampling and doping control

    PubMed Central

    SOUILLARD, AGNES; AUDRAN, MICHEL; BRESSOLLE, FRANÇOISE; GAREAU, RAYNALD; DUVALLET, ALAIN; CHANAL, JEAN-LOUIS

    1996-01-01

    1The pharmacokinetics of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) were initially determined in two healthy volunteers after a single subcutaneous dose (50 u kg−1). Twenty subjects then received repeated subcutaneous administrations of high dose (200 u kg−1) rHuEpo and 10 subjects received placebo. An immunoradiometric assay was used to measure the concentrations of erythropoietin (Epo) in serum and urine. 2Serum Epo concentration-time profiles were best described by a one-compartment open model with zero-order input. The mean elimination half-life (±s.d.) was 42.0±34.2 h. Clearance, uncorrected for bioavailability, was 0.05±0.01 l h−1 kg& minus;1. Erythropoietin concentrations returned to normal values in serum and urine, 7 and 4 days after the last administration, respectively. 3The recombinant hormone was well tolerated. Significant changes in reticulocytes and red blood cells, haemoglobin concentrations and haematocrit were observed after administration of rHuEpo. In the control group, these parameters remained unchanged. 4The change in reticulocytes was used as an index of the therapeutic effect of rHuEpo. The concentration-effect relationship was best described by an exponential model. 5These data show the limitations of the measurement of Epo concentrations in blood and urine samples, collected in athletes during competition, for antidoping control. Epo doping can be detected only during or within 4 to 7 days of ending, a course of rHuEpo. PMID:8877027

  1. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Efficacy of a Novel Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone: Fc Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Hyun-Hee; Cho, Sung Yoon; Sohn, Young Bae; Park, Sung Won; Huh, Rimm; Kim, Jinsup; Ko, Ah-Ra; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2015-10-05

    The current recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy requires daily subcutaneous (sc) injections, which results in poor patient compliance, especially in young children. To reduce the dosing frequency, we generated a chimeric protein of rhGH and the Fc-domain of immunoglobulin G (IgG) (rhGH-Fc). The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of sc-injected rhGH-Fc were assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats and hypophysectomized rats, respectively. A single sc injection of rhGH-Fc at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg slowly reached a Cmax of 16.80 ng/mL and remained for 7 days with a half-life of 51.1 h. Conversely, a single sc injection of rhGH 0.2 mg/kg rapidly reached a Cmax of 46.88 ng/mL and declined with a half-life of 0.55 h to baseline values in 4 h. In the efficacy study, the sc-injected rhGH-Fc induced rapid weight gain and tibial width growth at a dose of 240 μg/animal. The effect of two injections of rhGH-Fc separated by 1 week was comparable to that of the same dose of 14 daily injections of rhGH. The rhGH-Fc is a novel candidate for long-acting rhGH therapy with more convenient weekly administration, as it reduces glomerular filtration and receptor-mediated clearance while allowing for the rapid reversal of potential adverse events.

  2. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of recombinant human erythropoietin in haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Brockmöller, J; Köchling, J; Weber, W; Looby, M; Roots, I; Neumayer, H H

    1992-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of and therapeutic response to recombinant human erythropoietin (rcEPO) were studied in 12 patients under chronic haemodialysis on a thrice weekly intravenous rcEPO treatment scheme. The kinetics of rcEPO were also assessed after a subcutaneous injection during the initial period and during maintenance treatment. RcEPO was measured in plasma by radioimmunoassay. 2. After the first i.v. dose plasma erythropoietin concentrations were best described by a monoexponential disposition function with a mean (+/- s.d.) elimination half-life of 5.4 +/- 1.7 h. The volume of distribution was 70 +/- 5.2 ml kg-1 and the clearance was 10.1 +/- 3.5 ml h-1 kg-1 (n = 12). 3. After 3 months of continuous therapy, the plasma half-life of rcEPO decreased by 15% (P < 0.05, mean half-life during steady state: 4.6 +/- 2.8 h), while mean clearance and volume of distribution remained constant. 4. After the first s.c. injection the mean (+/- s.d.) absorption time was 22 +/- 11 h and systemic availability was 44 +/- 7%. 5. Changes in haemoglobin concentrations were described by a linear additive dose-response model, defined by an efficacy constant (Keff) and the mean erythrocyte lifetime (MRTHb). The sample mean (+/- s.d.) Keff was 0.043 +/- 0.017 g dl-1 Hb per 1000 units rcEPO and MRTHb was 10.02 +/- 1.75 weeks. The net effect of rcEPO treatment was described by the area under the unit-dose-response curve (AUEC) with a mean (+/- s.d.) value of 0.45 +/- 0.23 g dl-1 weeks. 6. RcEPO clearance showed a significant positive correlation (r2 = 0.41) with the effectiveness of rcEPO therapy, as measured by the parameters Keff or AUEC. PMID:1493082

  3. Characterization and pharmacokinetic study of recombinant human N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Montaño, Adriana M; Gutierrez, Monica; Grubb, Jeffrey H; Oikawa, Hirotaka; Dung, Vu Chi; Ohashi, Amiko; Nishioka, Tatsuo; Yamada, Masamichi; Yamada, Mana; Tosaka, Yasuhiro; Trandafirescu, Georgeta G; Orii, Tadao

    2007-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). The aims of this study were to establish Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells overexpressing recombinant human GALNS (rhGALNS) and to assess pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of purified enzymes by using MPS IVA knock-out mouse (Galns(-/-)). The CHO-cell derived rhGALNS was purified from the media by a two-step affinity chromatography procedure. The rhGALNS was administered intravenously to 3-month-old Galns(-/-) mice at a single dose of 250U/g of body weight. The treated mice were examined by assaying the GALNS activity at baseline and up to 240min to assess clearance of the enzyme from blood circulation. The mice were sacrificed 4h after infusion of the enzyme to study the enzyme distribution in tissues. The rhGALNS was purified 1317-fold with 71% yield. The enzyme was taken up by Galns(-/-) chondrocytes (150U/mg/15h). The uptake was inhibited by mannose-6-phosphate. The enzyme activity disappeared from circulation with a half-life of 2.9min. After enzyme infusion, the enzyme was taken up and detected in multiple tissues (40.7% of total infused enzymes in liver). Twenty-four hours after a single infusion of the fluorescence-labeled enzymes into MPS IVA mice, biodistribution pattern showed the amount of tagged enzyme retained in bone, bone marrow, liver, spleen, kidney, and heart. In conclusion, we have shown that the phosphorylated rhGALNS is delivered to multiple tissues, including bone, and that it functions bioactively in Galns(-/-) chondrocytes implying a potential enzyme replacement treatment.

  4. Framework selection can influence pharmacokinetics of a humanized therapeutic antibody through differences in molecule charge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Tesar, Devin; Boswell, C Andrew; Cahaya, Hendry S; Wong, Anne; Zhang, Jianhuan; Meng, Y Gloria; Eigenbrot, Charles; Pantua, Homer; Diao, Jinyu; Kapadia, Sharookh B; Deng, Rong; Kelley, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) testing of a humanized (κI, VH3 framework) and affinity matured anti-hepatitis C virus E2-glycoprotein (HCV-E2) antibody (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v3) in rats revealed unexpected fast clearance (34.9 mL/day/kg). This antibody binds to the rat recycling receptor FcRn as expected for a human IgG1 antibody and does not display non-specific binding to baculovirus particles in an assay that is correlated with fast clearance in cynomolgus monkey. The antigen is not expressed in rat so target-dependent clearance does not contribute to PK. Removal of the affinity maturation changes (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1) did not restore normal clearance. The antibody was re-humanized on a κ4, VH1 framework and the non-affinity matured version (hu5B3.κ4VH1.v1) was shown to have normal clearance (8.5 mL/day/kg). Since the change in framework results in a lower pI, primarily due to more negative charge on the κ4 template, the effect of additional charge variation on antibody PK was tested by incorporating substitutions obtained through phage display affinity maturation of hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1. A variant having a pI of 8.61 gave very fast clearance (140 mL/day/kg) whereas a molecule with pI of 6.10 gave slow clearance (5.8 mL/kg/day). Both antibodies exhibited comparable binding to rat FcRn, but biodistribution experiments showed that the high pI variant was catabolized in liver and spleen. These results suggest antibody charge can have an effect on PK through alterations in antibody catabolism independent of FcRn-mediated recycling. Furthermore, introduction of affinity maturation changes into the lower pI framework yielded a candidate with PK and virus neutralization properties suitable for clinical development. PMID:25517310

  5. Evaluation of sex differences in the pharmacokinetics of ranitidine in humans.

    PubMed

    Abad-Santos, F; Carcas, A J; Guerra, P; Govantes, C; Montuenga, C; Gómez, E; Fernández, A; Frias, J

    1996-08-01

    A bioequivalence study of two oral formulations of 300 mg ranitidine was carried out in 16 healthy volunteers (8 men and 8 women), and the pharmacokinetics in both sexes were compared. There was bioequivalence of both formulations. The terminal half-life of ranitidine was 7% shorter and the oral apparent clearance 10.5% higher in women (1.44 L/h/kg) than in men (1.29 L/h/kg), although this difference did not reach statistical significance. No differences were observed in maximum concentration (Cmax) or the time of its occurrence (tmax). Sex, age, and weight did not correlate significantly with oral clearance. These results suggest that there are no sex differences in the pharmacokinetics of ranitidine, or that any differences would not be of clinical relevance. It also should be emphasized that bioequivalence trials also can be used to study other pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic characteristics of drugs without damaging the main endpoint of the study.

  6. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  7. [HPLC-MS/MS method for determination of sodium cromoglycate concentration in human plasma and its pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Rui; Yuan, Gui-yan; Wang, Ben-jie; Liu, Xiao-yan; Guo, Rui-chen

    2008-09-01

    The study established an HPLC-MS/MS method for determining the concentrations of sodium cromoglycate in human plasma and evaluated the pharmacokinetics of nasal drops and nasal spray. A C18 column was used to separate sodium cromoglycate in plasma with a mobile phase of a mixture of ammonium-methanol (involves 50% acetonitrile) (15:85) at a flow rate of 0.4 mL x min(-1). Electronic spray ionization (ESI) and multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) were used for the determination of sodium cromoglycate in human plasma. The linear range of the standard curve of sodium cromoglycate was from 0.3 to 20 ng x mL(-1), and the minimum concentration of detection was 0.3 ng x mL(-1). The extraction recovery was more than 94.1%, intra-day and inter-day RSD were less than 14.3%. After a single dose of sodium cromoglycate, the main pharmacokinetic parameters of nasal spray and nasal drops were as follows, T(1/2)(1.82 +/- 0.54) h, (1.59 +/- 0.52) h; Tmax (0.47 +/- 0.12) h, (0.44 +/- 0.15) h; Cmax, (9.79 +/- 4.66) ng x mL(-1), (10.88 +/- 4.05) ng x mL(-1); AUC(0-5 h)(11.52 +/- 3.46) ng x mL(-1) x h x h, (12.63 +/- 4.23) ng x mL(-1) x h, Fr(93.6 +/- 13.8)%. The method is sensitive, rapid and accurate. It is suitable for therapeutic drug monitoring and human pharmacokinetic study of sodium cromoglycate.

  8. Species differences in the pharmacokinetics of cefadroxil as determined in wildtype and humanized PepT1 mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E

    2016-05-01

    PepT1 (SLC15A1) is a high-capacity low-affinity transporter that is important in the absorption of digested di/tripeptides from dietary protein in the small intestine. PepT1 is also crucial for the intestinal uptake and absorption of therapeutic agents such as the β-lactam aminocephalosporins and antiviral prodrugs. Species differences, however, have been observed in PepT1-mediated intestinal absorption and pharmacokinetics, thereby, making it more difficult to predict systemic drug exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the in situ intestinal permeability of the PepT1 substrate cefadroxil in wildtype and humanized PepT1 (huPepT1) mice, and the in vivo absorption and disposition of drug after escalating oral doses. The in situ perfusions indicated that cefadroxil had a twofold higher affinity (i.e., twofold lower Km) for jejunal PepT1 in huPepT1 mice, lower but substantial permeability in all regions of the small intestine, and low but measureable permeability in the colon as compared to wildtype animals. The in vivo experiments indicated almost superimposable pharmacokinetic profiles between the two genotypes after intravenous bolus dosing of cefadroxil. In contrast, after oral dose escalation, the systemic exposure of cefadroxil was reduced in huPepT1 mice as compared to wildtype animals. Moreover, the AUC and Cmax versus dose relationships were nonlinear for huPepT1 but not wildtype mice, and similar to that observed from human subjects. In conclusion, our findings indicate that huPepT1 mice may provide a valuable tool in the drug discovery process by better predicting the oral pharmacokinetic profiles of PepT1 substrates in humans.

  9. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jeffrey W. Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  10. Assessment of juvenile pigs to serve as human pediatric surrogates for preclinical formulation pharmacokinetic testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pediatric drug development is hampered by the various biological, clinical, and formulation challenges associated with age-based populations. A primary cause for this lack of development is the inability to accurately predict ontogenic changes that affect pharmacokinetics (PK) in children using trad...

  11. Thermolytic Degradation of Synthetic Cannabinoids: Chemical Exposures and Pharmacological Consequences.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian F; Lefever, Timothy W; Cortes, Ricardo A; Grabenauer, Megan; Kovach, Alexander L; Cox, Anderson O; Patel, Purvi R; Pollard, Gerald T; Marusich, Julie A; Kevin, Richard C; Gamage, Thomas F; Wiley, Jenny L

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids are manufactured clandestinely with little quality control and are distributed as herbal "spice" for smoking or as bulk compound for mixing with a solvent and inhalation via electronic vaporizers. Intoxication with synthetic cannabinoids has been associated with seizure, excited delirium, coma, kidney damage, and other disorders. The chemical alterations produced by heating these structurally novel compounds for consumption are largely unknown. Here, we show that heating synthetic cannabinoids containing tetramethylcyclopropyl-ring substituents produced thermal degradants with pharmacological activity that varied considerably from their parent compounds. Moreover, these degradants were formed under conditions simulating smoking. Some products of combustion retained high affinity at the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors, were more efficacious than (-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexanol (CP55,940) in stimulating CB1 receptor-mediated guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) binding, and were potent in producing Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-like effects in laboratory animals, whereas other compounds had low affinity and efficacy and were devoid of cannabimimetic activity. Degradants that retained affinity and efficacy also substituted in drug discrimination tests for the prototypical synthetic cannabinoid 1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole (JWH-018), and are likely to produce psychotropic effects in humans. Hence, it is important to take into consideration the actual chemical exposures that occur during use of synthetic cannabinoid formulations to better comprehend the relationships between dose and effect.

  12. Cannabinoid WIN55, 212-2 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits the proliferation and migration of human BEL7402 hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dacai; Wang, Jianglin; Zhou, Zhenkang; He, Zhiwei; Zhao, Qing

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide; however, only limited therapeutic treatments are currently available. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of cannabinoids as novel therapeutic targets in HCC. In addition, the mechanism underlying the effects of a synthetic cannabinoid, WIN55, 212‑2, on the BEL7402 HCC cell line was investigated. The results demonstrated that WIN55, 212‑2 induced cell cycle arrest of the BEL7402 cells at the G0/G1 phase via cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2)‑mediated downregulation of phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2, upregulation of p27, and downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin‑dependent kinase 4. Furthermore, inhibition of CB2 with the CB2 antagonist AM630 abrogated WIN55, 212‑2‑induced cell cycle arrest. Inhibition of ERK1/2 also resulted in cell cycle dysregulation and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, which subsequently resulted in cell growth inhibition. In addition, the present study detected a significant reduction in matrix metalloproteinase‑9, retinoblastoma protein and E2F1 expression, and migration inhibition by WIN treatment. These results suggested that cannabinoid receptor agonists, including WIN, may be considered as novel therapeutics for the treatment of HCC.

  13. Effects of cannabinoids and cannabinoid-enriched Cannabis extracts on TRP channels and endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Ligresti, Alessia; Moriello, Aniello Schiano; Allarà, Marco; Bisogno, Tiziana; Petrosino, Stefania; Stott, Colin G; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) interact with transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and enzymes of the endocannabinoid system. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of 11 pure cannabinoids and botanical extracts [botanical drug substance (BDS)] from Cannabis varieties selected to contain a more abundant cannabinoid, on TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPM8, TRPA1, human recombinant diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGLα), rat brain fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), COS cell monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), human recombinant N-acylethanolamine acid amide hydrolase (NAAA) and anandamide cellular uptake (ACU) by RBL-2H3 cells, were studied using fluorescence-based calcium assays in transfected cells and radiolabelled substrate-based enzymatic assays. Cannabinol (CBN), cannabichromene (CBC), the acids (CBDA, CBGA, THCA) and propyl homologues (CBDV, CBGV, THCV) of CBD, cannabigerol (CBG) and THC, and tetrahydrocannabivarin acid (THCVA) were also tested. KEY RESULTS CBD, CBG, CBGV and THCV stimulated and desensitized human TRPV1. CBC, CBD and CBN were potent rat TRPA1 agonists and desensitizers, but THCV-BDS was the most potent compound at this target. CBG-BDS and THCV-BDS were the most potent rat TRPM8 antagonists. All non-acid cannabinoids, except CBC and CBN, potently activated and desensitized rat TRPV2. CBDV and all the acids inhibited DAGLα. Some BDS, but not the pure compounds, inhibited MAGL. CBD was the only compound to inhibit FAAH, whereas the BDS of CBC > CBG > CBGV inhibited NAAA. CBC = CBG > CBD inhibited ACU, as did the BDS of THCVA, CBGV, CBDA and THCA, but the latter extracts were more potent inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results are relevant to the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects of cannabinoids and Cannabis extracts. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011

  14. Determination of salbutamol in human plasma and urine using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry and its pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dujuan; Teng, Yanni; Chen, Keguang; Liu, Sha; Wei, Chunmin; Wang, Benjie; Yuan, Guiyan; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Xiaoyan; Guo, Ruichen

    2012-10-01

    A sensitive and selective liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed and validated for the determination of salbutamol in human plasma and urine, and successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of salbutamol in Chinese healthy volunteers after inhalation of salbutamol sulfate aerosol. Salbutamol and the internal standard (IS) acetaminophen in plasma and urine were extracted with ethyl acetate, separated on a C(18) reversed-phase column, eluted with mobile phase of acetonitrile-ammonium acetate (5 m m; 30:70, v/v), ionized by positive ion pneumatically assisted electrospray and detected in the multi-reaction monitoring mode using precursor → product ions of m/z 240.2 → 148.1 for salbutamol and 152 → 110 for the IS. The lower limits of quantitation of salbutamol in human plasma and urine by this method were 0.02 and 1 ng/mL, respectively. The specificity, matrix effect, recovery, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, precision and several stabilities were validated for salbutamol in human plasma and urine. In conclusion, the validation results showed that this method is robust, specific and sensitive, and can successfully fulfill the requirement of clinical pharmacokinetic study of salbutamol in healthy Chinese volunteers.

  15. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 regulates STAT3 activity and its expression dictates the responsiveness to SR141716 treatment in human glioma patients' cells

    PubMed Central

    Ciaglia, Elena; Torelli, Giovanni; Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; D'Alessandro, Alba; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Fiore, Donatella; Zottola, Antonio Christian Pagano; Proto, Maria Chiara; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Herein we show that a majority of human brain tumor samples and cell lines over-expressed cannabinoid receptor CB1 as compared to normal human astrocytes (NHA), while uniformly expressed low levels of CB2. This finding prompted us to investigate the therapeutic exploitation of CB1 inactivation by SR141716 treatment, with regard to its direct and indirect cell-mediated effects against gliomas. Functional studies, using U251MG glioma cells and primary tumor cell lines derived from glioma patients expressing different levels of CB1, highlighted SR141716 efficacy in inducing apoptosis via G1 phase stasis and block of TGF-β1 secretion through a mechanism that involves STAT3 inhibition. According to the multivariate role of STAT3 in the immune escape too, interestingly SR141716 lead also to the functional and selective expression of MICA/B on the surface of responsive malignant glioma cells, but not on NHA. This makes SR141716 treated-glioma cells potent targets for allogeneic NK cell-mediated recognition through a NKG2D restricted mechanism, thus priming them for NK cell antitumor reactivity. These results indicate that CB1 and STAT3 participate in a new oncogenic network in the complex biology of glioma and their expression levels in patients dictate the efficacy of the CB1 antagonist SR141716 in multimodal glioma destruction. SIGNIFICANCE CB1 is implicated in the regulation of cellular processes linked to survival, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in several physio-pathological conditions. We shed light on previously unrecognized molecular mechanism of CB1-mediated modulation of human glioma progression and provide the first and original demonstration of CB1-STAT3 axis as a new target and predictor biomarkers of the benefit from specific therapies. Indeed CB1 antagonism capable of tumoral cell division' control while making the glioma immunovisible and engaging the immune system to fight it may represent a hopeful alternative to other established

  16. Pharmacokinetics of flavanone glycosides after ingestion of single doses of fresh-squeezed orange juice versus commercially processed orange juice in healthy humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange juice is a rich source of flavonoids known to be beneficial to cardiovascular health in humans. The objective of this study was to analyze the pharmacokinetics of the main flavanone glycosides, hesperidin and narirutin, in humans after the consumption of two types of orange juice, fresh squee...

  17. Assessment of chimeric mice with humanized livers in new drug development: generation of pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity data for selecting the final candidate compound.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    1. Chimeric mice with humanized livers are expected to be a novel tool for new drug development. This review discusses four applications where these animals can be used efficiently to collect supportive data for selecting the best compound in the final stage of drug discovery. 2. The first application is selection of the final compound based on estimated pharmacokinetic parameters in humans. Since chimeric mouse livers are highly repopulated with human hepatocytes, hepatic clearance values in vivo could be used preferentially to estimate pharmacokinetic profiles for humans. 3. The second is prediction of human-specific or disproportionate metabolites. Chimeric mice reproduce human-specific metabolites of drugs under development to conform to ICH guidance M3(R2), except for compounds that were extensively eliminated by co-existing mouse hepatocytes. 4. The third is identifying metabolites with distinct pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Slow metabolite elimination specifically in humans increases its exposure level, but if its elimination is faster in laboratory animals, the animal exposure level might not satisfy ICH guidance M3(R2). 5. Finally, two examples of reproducing acute liver toxicity in chimeric mice are introduced. Integrated pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity information are expected to assist pharmaceutical scientists in selecting the best candidate compound in new drug development.

  18. Evaluation of an integrated in vitro-in silico PBPK (physiologically based pharmacokinetic) model to provide estimates of human bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hongliang; Stoner, Chad; Reddy, Anita; Freiwald, Sascha; Smith, Danielle; Winters, Roger; Stankovic, Charles; Surendran, Narayanan

    2006-02-03

    PK express module is a physiologically based model of first pass metabolism, which integrates in vitro data with an in silico physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict human bioavailability (F(H)). There are three required inputs: FDp (Fraction dose absorbed, final parameter from iDEA absorption module), protein binding (fu) and disappearance kinetics in human hepatocytes. Caco-2 permeability, aqueous solubility (at multiple pH's), estimated dose and chemical structure are inputs required for the estimation of FDp (Norris et al., 2000; Stoner et al., 2004) and were determined for all compounds in our laboratory or obtained from literature. Protein binding data was collected from literature references and/or Pfizer database. Human hepatocyte data was generated in-house using an automated human hepatocyte method (using Tecan Genesis Workstation) as described previously (). Sixteen compounds (commercial and Pfizer compounds) were chosen to evaluate the PK express model and the bioavailability predicted from the module was compared with known clinical endpoints. For majority of the 16 compounds (approximately 80%), the PK express model F(H) values were comparable to the known human bioavailability (F(H)) (within 23.7 units of the known human (true) F, except for PF 3, PF 4, PF 6). In conclusion, the PK express model integrates a number of key readily available discovery parameters and provides estimates of human performance by integrating in silico and experimental variables built on a physiological based pharmacokinetic model. Information from this model in conjunction with other ADME data (e.g., P450 inhibition) will enable progression of most promising compounds for further in vivo PK and/or efficacy studies.

  19. New metabolic and pharmacokinetic characteristics of thiocolchicoside and its active metabolite in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Trellu, M; Filali-Ansary, A; Françon, D; Adam, R; Lluel, P; Dubruc, C; Thénot, J P

    2004-08-01

    Thiocolchicoside (TCC) has been prescribed for several years as a muscle relaxant drug, but its pharmacokinetic (PK) profile and metabolism still remain largely unknown. Therefore, we re-investigated its metabolism and PK, and we assessed the muscle relaxant properties of its metabolites. After oral administration of 8 mg (a therapeutic dose) of 14C-labelled TCC to healthy volunteers, we found no detectable TCC in plasma, urine or faeces. On the other hand, the aglycone derivative obtained after de-glycosylation of TCC (M2) was observed and, in addition, we identified, as the major circulating metabolic entity, 3-O-glucuronidated aglycone (M1) obtained after glucuro-conjugation of M2. One hour after oral administration, M1 plus M2 accounted for more than 75% of the circulating total radioactivity. The pharmacological activity of these metabolites was assessed using a rat model, the muscle relaxant activity of M1 was similar to that of TCC whereas M2 was devoid of any activity. Subsequently, to investigate the PK profile of TCC in human PK studies, we developed and validated a specific bioanalytical method that combines liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection to assay both active entities. After oral administration, TCC was not quantifiable with an lower limit of quantification set at 1 ng/mL, whereas its active metabolite M1 was detected. M1 appeared rapidly in plasma (tmax=1 h) and was eliminated with an apparent terminal half-life of 7.3 h. In contrast, after intramuscular administration both active entities (TCC and M1) were present; TCC was rapidly absorbed (tmax=0.4 h) and eliminated with an apparent terminal half-life of 1.5 h. M1 concentration peaked at 5 h and this metabolite was eliminated with an apparent terminal half-life of 8.6 h. As TCC and M1 present an equipotent pharmacological activity, the relative oral pharmacological bioavailability of TCC vs. intramuscular administration was calculated and represented 25%. Therefore, to correctly

  20. Population pharmacokinetics of recombinant human C1 inhibitor in patients with hereditary angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Colm; Hayes, Siobhan; Relan, Anurag; van Amersfoort, Edwin S; Pijpstra, Rienk; Hack, C Erik

    2013-01-01

    Aims To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of recombinant human C1 inhibitor (rhC1INH) in healthy volunteers and hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients. Methods Plasma levels of C1INH following 294 administrations of rhC1INH in 133 subjects were fitted using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. The model was used to simulate maximal C1INH levels for the proposed dosing scheme. Results A one-compartment model with Michaelis–Menten elimination kinetics described the data. Baseline C1INH levels were 0.901 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.839–0.968] and 0.176 U ml−1 (95% CI: 0.154–0.200) in healthy volunteers and HAE patients, respectively. The volume of distribution of rhC1INH was 2.86 l (95% CI: 2.68–3.03). The maximal rate of elimination and the concentration corresponding to half this maximal rate were 1.63 U ml−1 h−1 (95% CI: 1.41–1.88) and 1.60 U ml−1 (95% CI: 1.14–2.24), respectively, for healthy volunteers and symptomatic HAE patients. The maximal elimination rate was 36% lower in asymptomatic HAE patients. Peak C1INH levels did not change upon repeated administration of rhC1INH. Bodyweight was found to be an important predictor of the volume of distribution. Simulations of the proposed dosing scheme predicted peak C1INH concentrations above the lower level of the normal range (0.7 U ml−1) for at least 94% of all patients. Conclusions The population PK model for C1INH supports a dosing scheme on a 50 U kg−1 basis up to 84 kg, with a fixed dose of 4200 U above 84 kg. The PK of rhC1INH following repeat administration are consistent with the PK following the first administration. PMID:23594263

  1. Population Pharmacokinetics of Emtricitabine in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Pregnant Women and Their Neonates▿

    PubMed Central

    Hirt, Déborah; Urien, Saik; Rey, Elisabeth; Arrivé, Elise; Ekouévi, Didier K.; Coffié, Patrick; Leang, Sim Kruy; Lalsab, Sarita; Avit, Divine; Nerrienet, Eric; McIntyre, James; Blanche, Stéphane; Dabis, François; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate emtricitabine (FTC) pharmacokinetics in pregnant women and their neonates and to determine the optimal prophylactic dose for neonates after birth to prevent mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A total of 38 HIV-infected pregnant women were administered tenofovir disoproxyl fumarate (300 mg)-FTC (200 mg) tablets—two tablets at the initiation of labor and one daily for 7 days postpartum. By pair, 11 maternal, one cord blood, and two neonatal FTC concentrations were measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry validated method and analyzed by a population approach. Model and mean estimates (interpatient variability) were a two-compartment model for mothers, with an absorption rate constant of 0.54 h−1 (61%), apparent elimination and intercompartmental clearances of 23.2 (17%) and 6.04 liters·h−1, and apparent central and peripheral volumes of 127 and 237 liters, respectively; an effect compartment linked to maternal circulation for cord blood and a neonatal compartment disconnected, after delivery, with a 10.6-h half-life (30%). After the 400-mg FTC administration, the median population area under the concentration-time curve and the minimal and maximal plasma FTC concentrations in pregnant women were 14.3 mg·liter−1·h and 1.68 and 0.076 mg/liter, respectively. At delivery, median (range) predicted maternal and cord blood FTC concentrations were, respectively, 1.16 (0.14 to 1.99) and 0.72 (0.05 to 1.19) mg·liter−1. We concluded that the 400-mg FTC administration in pregnant women produces higher exposition than does the 200-mg administration in other adults, at steady state. FTC was shown to have good placental transfer (80%). Administering 1 mg FTC/kg as soon as possible after birth or 2 mg/kg 12 h after birth should produce neonatal concentrations comparable to the concentrations observed in adults. PMID:19104016

  2. An Extended Minimal Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model: Evaluation of Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy on Human IgG Pharmacokinetics in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Gurkishan S; Morris, Marilyn E

    2015-11-01

    Although many studies have evaluated the effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of low molecular weight molecules, there is limited information regarding effects on monoclonal antibodies. Our previous studies have reported significant increases in total (2-4 fold) and renal (100-300 fold) clearance of human IgG, an antibody isotype, in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Pioglitazone treatment incompletely reversed the disease-related PK changes. The objective of this study was to construct a mechanistic model for simultaneous fitting plasma and urine data, to yield physiologically relevant PK parameters. We propose an extended minimal physiologically based PK (mPBPK) model specifically for IgG by classifying organs as either leaky or tight vascular tissues, and adding a kidney compartment. The model incorporates convection as the primary mechanism of IgG movement from plasma into tissues, interstitial fluid (ISF) in extravascular distribution space, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), sieving coefficient and fraction reabsorbed in the kidney. The model captured the plasma and urine PK profiles well, and simulated concentrations in ISF. The model estimated a 2-4 fold increase in nonrenal clearance from plasma and 30-120 fold increase in renal clearance with T2DM, consistent with the experimental findings, and these differences in renal clearance were related to changes in GFR, sieving coefficient, and proximal tubular reabsorption. In conclusion, the mPBPK model offers a more relevant approach for analyzing plasma and urine IgG concentration-time data than conventional models and provides insight regarding alterations in distributional and elimination parameters occurring with T2DM.

  3. A first-generation physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of alpha-tocopherol in human influenza vaccine adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Tegenge, Million A; Mitkus, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Alpha (α)-tocopherol is a component of a new generation of squalene-containing oil-in-water (SQ/W) emulsion adjuvants that have been licensed for use in certain influenza vaccines. Since regulatory pharmacokinetic studies are not routinely required for influenza vaccines, the in vivo fate of this vaccine constituent is largely unknown. In this study, we constructed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for emulsified α-tocopherol in human adults and infants. An independent sheep PBPK model was also developed to inform the local preferential lymphatic transfer and for the purpose of model evaluation. The PBPK model predicts that α-tocopherol will be removed from the injection site within 24h and rapidly transfer predominantly into draining lymph nodes. A much lower concentration of α-tocopherol was estimated to peak in plasma within 8h. Any systemically absorbed α-tocopherol was predicted to accumulate slowly in adipose tissue, but not in other tissues. Model evaluation and uncertainty analyses indicated acceptable fit, with the fraction of dose taken up into the lymphatics as most influential on plasma concentration. In summary, this study estimates the in vivo fate of α-tocopherol in adjuvanted influenza vaccine, may be relevant in explaining its immunodynamics in humans, and informs current regulatory risk-benefit analyses.

  4. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and its Metabolite Triandimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Pharmacokinetic data for par...

  5. Bedaquiline: a review of human pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    van Heeswijk, R P G; Dannemann, B; Hoetelmans, R M W

    2014-09-01

    Bedaquiline has recently been approved for the treatment of pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) as part of combination therapy in adults. It is metabolized primarily by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 3A4 (CYP3A4) to a less-active N-monodesmethyl metabolite. Phase I and Phase II studies in healthy subjects and patients with drug-susceptible or multidrug-resistant TB have assessed the pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction profile of bedaquiline. Potential interactions have been assessed between bedaquiline and first- and second-line anti-TB drugs (rifampicin, rifapentine, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethambutol, kanamycin, ofloxacin and cycloserine), commonly used antiretroviral agents (lopinavir/ritonavir, nevirapine and efavirenz) and a potent CYP3A inhibitor (ketoconazole). This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic profile of bedaquiline as well as the results of the drug-drug interaction studies.

  6. Cannabis, cannabinoids and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Park, Boram; McPartland, John M; Glass, Michelle

    2004-02-01

    In most countries Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug. Its use during pregnancy in developed nations is estimated to be approximately 10%. Recent evidence suggests that the endogenous cannabinoid system, now consisting of two receptors and multiple endocannabinoid ligands, may also play an important role in the maintenance and regulation of early pregnancy and fertility. The purpose of this review is therefore twofold, to examine the impact that cannabis use may have on fertility and reproduction, and to review the potential role of the endocannabinoid system in hormonal regulation, embryo implantation and maintenance of pregnancy.

  7. Stable isotope methodology in the pharmacokinetic studies of androgenic steroids in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Y.; Baba, S. )

    1990-04-01

    The use of stable isotopically labeled steroids combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has found a broad application in pharmacologic studies. Initially, stable isotopically labeled steroids served as the ideal analytic internal standard for GC/MS analysis; however, their in vivo use has expanded and has proven to be a powerful pharmacokinetic tool. We have successfully used stable isotope methodology to study the pharmacokinetic/bioavailability of androgens. The primary advantage of the technique is that endogenous and exogenous steroids with the same basic structure can be differentiated by using stable isotopically labeled analogs. The method was used to examine the pharmacokinetics of testosterone and testosterone propionate, and to clarify the influence of endogenous testosterone. Another advantage of the isotope methods is that steroidal drugs can be administered concomitantly in two formulations (e.g., solution and solid dosage). A single set of blood samples serves to describe the time course of the formulations being compared. This stable isotope coadministration technique was used to estimate the relative bioavailability of 17 alpha-methyltestosterone. 35 references.

  8. Human pharmacokinetic study of tutin in honey; a plant-derived neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Fields, Barry A; Reeve, John; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Mueller, Utz

    2014-10-01

    Over the last 150 years a number of people in New Zealand have been incapacitated, hospitalised, or died from eating honey contaminated with tutin, a plant-derived neurotoxin. A feature of the most recent poisoning incident in 2008 was the large variability in the onset time of clinical signs and symptoms of toxicity (0.5-17 h). To investigate the basis of this variability a pharmacokinetic study was undertaken in which 6 healthy males received a single oral dose of tutin-containing honey giving a tutin dose of 1.8 μg/kg body weight. The serum concentration-time curve for all volunteers exhibited two discrete peaks with the second and higher level occurring at approximately 15 h post-dose. Two subjects reported mild, transient headache at a time post-dose corresponding to maximum tutin concentrations. There were no other signs or symptoms typical of tutin intoxication such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness or seizures. Pharmacokinetic analysis using a two-site absorption model resulted in a good fit to the observed concentration data. A novel analytical method subsequently revealed the presence of glycoside conjugates of tutin in addition to unconjugated tutin in honey. These pharmacokinetic data will be important to better define a safe maximum tutin concentration in honey.

  9. Determination of roxithromycin in human plasma by HPLC with fluorescence and UV absorbance detection: application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Główka, Franciszek K; Karaźniewicz-Łada, Marta

    2007-06-01

    A selective HPLC method with fluorescence detection for the determination of roxithromycin (ROX) in human plasma was described. After solid-phase extraction (SPE), ROX and erythromycin (internal standard, I.S.) were derivatized by treatment with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC-Cl). Optimal resolution of fluorescence derivatives of ROX and I.S. was obtained during one analytical run using reversed phase, C(18) column. The mobile phase was composed of potassium dihydrogenphosphate solution, pH 7.5 and acetonitrile. Fluorescence of the compounds was measured at the maximum excitation, 255 nm and emission, 313 nm, of ROX derivatives. Validation parameters of the method were also established. After SPE, differences in recoveries of ROX and erythromycin from human plasma were observed. The linear range of the standard curve of ROX in plasma was 0.5-10.0 mg/l. The validated method was successfully applied for pharmacokinetic studies of ROX after administration of a single tablet of ROX.

  10. Synthetic Cannabinoids: Epidemiology, Pharmacodynamics, and Clinical Implications*

    PubMed Central

    Castaneto, Marisol S.; Gorelick, David A.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Hartman, Rebecca L.; Pirard, Sandrine; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthetic cannabinoids (SC) are a heterogeneous group of compounds developed to probe the endogenous cannabinoid system or as potential therapeutics. Clandestine laboratories subsequently utilized published data to develop SC variations marketed as abuseable “designer drugs.” In the early 2000’s, SC became popular as “legal highs” under brand names such as “Spice” and “K2,” in part due to their ability to escape detection by standard cannabinoid screening tests. The majority of SC detected in herbal products have greater binding affinity to the cannabinoid CB1 receptor than does Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive compound in the cannabis plant, and greater affinity at the CB1 than the CB2 receptor. In-vitro and animal in-vivo studies show SC pharmacological effects 2-100 times more potent than THC, including analgesic, anti-seizure, weight-loss, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer growth effects. SC produce physiological and psychoactive effects similar to THC, but with greater intensity, resulting in medical and psychiatric emergencies. Human adverse effects include nausea and vomiting, shortness of breath or depressed breathing, hypertension, tachycardia, chest pain, muscle twitches, acute renal failure, anxiety, agitation, psychosis, suicidal ideation, and cognitive impairment. Long-term or residual effects are unknown. Due to these public health consequences, many SC are classified as controlled substances. However, frequent structural modification by clandestine laboratories results in a stream of novel SC that may not be legally controlled or detectable by routine laboratory tests. Methods We present here a comprehensive review, based on a systematic electronic literature search, of SC epidemiology and pharmacology and their clinical implications. PMID:25220897

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR ETHYLENE GLYCOL AND ITS MAJOR METABOLITE, GLYCOLIC ACID, IN RATS AND HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Bartels, M J.; Carney, E W.; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Gies, Richard A.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2005-05-19

    An extensive database on the toxicity and modes of action of the major industrial chemical, ethylene glycol (EG), has been developed over the past several decades. These studies have consistently identified the kidney as a primary target organ, with rats being more sensitive than mice and males more sensitive than females following chronic exposure. Renal toxicity has been associated with the terminal metabolite, oxalic acid which can precipitate with calcium to form crystals. EG also induces developmental toxicity, although these effects appear to require high-doses or accelerated dose-rates, and have been reported only in rats and mice. The developmental toxicity of EG has been attributed to the intermediate metabolite, glycolic acid (GA). The developmental toxicity of EG has been the subject of extensive research and regulatory review in recent years. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to integrate the extensive mode of action and pharmacokinetic data on EG and GA for use in developmental risk assessment. Metabolic rate constants and partition coefficients for EG and GA were estimated from in vitro studies. Other biochemical constants were optimized from appropriate in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The resulting PBPK model includes inhalation, oral, dermal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration. Metabolism of EG and GA were described in the liver with elimination via the kidneys. Several rat and human metabolism studies were used to validate the resulting PBPK model. Consistent with these studies, simulations indicated that the metabolism of EG to GA was essentially first-order (linear) up to 2500 mg/kg/day while the metabolism of GA saturated between bolus ethylene glycol doses of 200 and 1000 mg/kg/day. This saturation results in non-linear increases in blood GA concentrations, correlating with the developmental toxicity of EG. Pregnancy had no effect on maternal EG and GA kinetics over a broad dose

  12. Pharmacokinetics and Disposition of the Thiouracil Derivative PF-06282999, an Orally Bioavailable, Irreversible Inactivator of Myeloperoxidase Enzyme, Across Animals and Humans.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jennifer Q; Varma, Manthena V; Wolford, Angela; Ryder, Tim; Di, Li; Feng, Bo; Terra, Steven G; Sagawa, Kazuko; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2016-02-01

    The thiouracil derivative PF-06282999 [2-(6-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide] is an irreversible inactivator of myeloperoxidase and is currently in clinical trials for the potential treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Concerns over idiosyncratic toxicity arising from bioactivation of the thiouracil motif to reactive species in the liver have been largely mitigated through the physicochemical (molecular weight, lipophilicity, and topological polar surface area) characteristics of PF-06282999, which generally favor elimination via nonmetabolic routes. To test this hypothesis, pharmacokinetics and disposition studies were initiated with PF-06282999 using animals and in vitro assays, with the ultimate goal of predicting human pharmacokinetics and elimination mechanisms. Consistent with its physicochemical properties, PF-06282999 was resistant to metabolic turnover from liver microsomes and hepatocytes from animals and humans and was devoid of cytochrome P450 inhibition. In vitro transport studies suggested moderate intestinal permeability and minimal transporter-mediated hepatobiliary disposition. PF-06282999 demonstrated moderate plasma protein binding across all of the species. Pharmacokinetics in preclinical species characterized by low to moderate plasma clearances, good oral bioavailability at 3- to 5-mg/kg doses, and renal clearance as the projected major clearance mechanism in humans. Human pharmacokinetic predictions using single-species scaling of dog and/or monkey pharmacokinetics were consistent with the parameters observed in the first-in-human study, conducted in healthy volunteers at a dose range of 20-200 mg PF-06282999. In summary, disposition characteristics of PF-06282999 were relatively similar across preclinical species and humans, with renal excretion of the unchanged parent emerging as the principal clearance mechanism in humans, which was anticipated based on its physicochemical properties and

  13. Cannabinoids receptor type 2, CB2, expression correlates with human colon cancer progression and predicts patient survival.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Esther; Gómez, Irene; Martín, Paloma; Sánchez, Antonio; Román, Laura; Tejerina, Eva; Bonilla, Félix; Merino, Antonio García; de Herreros, Antonio García; Provencio, Mariano; García, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is altered in different tumor types, including colon cancer. However, little is known about the role of the ECS in tumor progression. Here we report the correlation between CB 2 expression and pathological data in a series of 175 colorectal cancer patients, as well as the response of the HT29 colon cancer-derived cell line upon CB 2 activation. CB 2 mRNA was detected in 28.6% of samples tested. It was more frequent in N+ patients and predicts disease free survival and overall survival in colon cancer. In positive samples, CB 2 was expressed with great intensity in tumor epithelial cells and correlated with tumor growth. Treatment of HT29 with CB 2 agonist revealed membrane loss of E-cadherin and SNAIL1 overexpression. A direct correlation between CB 2 and SNAIL1 expression was also found in human tumors. CB 2 receptor expression is a poor prognostic marker for colon cancer and the activation of this receptor, with non-apoptotic doses of agonists, could be collaborating with disease progression. These results raise the question whether the activation of CB 2 should be considered as anti-tumoral therapy.

  14. Cannabinoids receptor type 2, CB2, expression correlates with human colon cancer progression and predicts patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Esther; Gómez, Irene; Martín, Paloma; Sánchez, Antonio; Román, Laura; Tejerina, Eva; Bonilla, Félix; Merino, Antonio García; de Herreros, Antonio García; Provencio, Mariano; García, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is altered in different tumor types, including colon cancer. However, little is known about the role of the ECS in tumor progression. Here we report the correlation between CB2 expression and pathological data in a series of 175 colorectal cancer patients, as well as the response of the HT29 colon cancer-derived cell line upon CB2 activation. CB2 mRNA was detected in 28.6% of samples tested. It was more frequent in N+ patients and predicts disease free survival and overall survival in colon cancer. In positive samples, CB2 was expressed with great intensity in tumor epithelial cells and correlated with tumor growth. Treatment of HT29 with CB2 agonist revealed membrane loss of E-cadherin and SNAIL1 overexpression. A direct correlation between CB2 and SNAIL1 expression was also found in human tumors. CB2 receptor expression is a poor prognostic marker for colon cancer and the activation of this receptor, with non-apoptotic doses of agonists, could be collaborating with disease progression. These results raise the question whether the activation of CB2 should be considered as anti-tumoral therapy. PMID:25859556

  15. Cannabinoids as pharmacotherapies for neuropathic pain: from the bench to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2009-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus, multiple sclerosis, and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) agonists, CB(2) selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e., inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Delta(9)-THC analogs (e.g., Marinol, Cesamet) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Delta(9)-THC and cannabidiol (e.g., Sativex, Cannador) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e., rating scales) and objective (i.e., stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research.

  16. A PET study comparing receptor occupancy by five selective cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonists in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Hjorth, Stephan; Karlsson, Cecilia; Jucaite, Aurelija; Varnäs, Katarina; Hamrén, Ulrika Wählby; Johnström, Peter; Gulyás, Balázs; Donohue, Sean R; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars

    2015-01-01

    There is a medical need for safe and efficacious anti-obesity drugs with acceptable side effect profiles. To mitigate the challenge posed by translating target interaction across species and balancing beneficial vs. adverse effects, a positron emission tomography (PET) approach could help guide clinical dose optimization. Thus, as part of a compound differentiation effort, three novel selective CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonists, developed by AstraZeneca (AZ) for the treatment of obesity, were compared with two clinically tested reference compounds, rimonabant and taranabant, with regard to receptor occupancy relative to dose and exposure. A total of 42 PET measurements were performed in 6 non-human primates using the novel CB1R antagonist radioligand [11C]SD5024. The AZ CB1R antagonists bound in a saturable manner to brain CB1R with in vivo affinities similar to that of rimonabant and taranabant, compounds with proven weight loss efficacy in clinical trials. Interestingly, it was found that exposures corresponding to those needed for optimal clinical efficacy of rimonabant and taranabant resulted in a CB1R occupancy typically around ~20–30%, thus much lower than what would be expected for classical G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists in other therapeutic contexts. These findings are also discussed in relation to emerging literature on the potential usefulness of ‘neutral’ vs. ‘classical’ CB1R (inverse agonist) antagonists. The study additionally highlighted the usefulness of the radioligand [11C]SD5024 as a specific tracer for CB1R in the primate brain, though an arterial input function would ideally be required in future studies to further assure accurate quantitative analysis of specific binding. PMID:25791528

  17. A PET study comparing receptor occupancy by five selective cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonists in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Stephan; Karlsson, Cecilia; Jucaite, Aurelija; Varnäs, Katarina; Wählby Hamrén, Ulrika; Johnström, Peter; Gulyás, Balázs; Donohue, Sean R; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars

    2016-02-01

    There is a medical need for safe and efficacious anti-obesity drugs with acceptable side effect profiles. To mitigate the challenge posed by translating target interaction across species and balancing beneficial vs. adverse effects, a positron emission tomography (PET) approach could help guide clinical dose optimization. Thus, as part of a compound differentiation effort, three novel selective CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonists, developed by AstraZeneca (AZ) for the treatment of obesity, were compared with two clinically tested reference compounds, rimonabant and taranabant, with regard to receptor occupancy relative to dose and exposure. A total of 42 PET measurements were performed in 6 non-human primates using the novel CB1R antagonist radioligand [(11)C]SD5024. The AZ CB1R antagonists bound in a saturable manner to brain CB1R with in vivo affinities similar to that of rimonabant and taranabant, compounds with proven weight loss efficacy in clinical trials. Interestingly, it was found that exposures corresponding to those needed for optimal clinical efficacy of rimonabant and taranabant resulted in a CB1R occupancy typically around ∼20-30%, thus much lower than what would be expected for classical G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists in other therapeutic contexts. These findings are also discussed in relation to emerging literature on the potential usefulness of 'neutral' vs. 'classical' CB1R (inverse agonist) antagonists. The study additionally highlighted the usefulness of the radioligand [(11)C]SD5024 as a specific tracer for CB1R in the primate brain, though an arterial input function would ideally be required in future studies to further assure accurate quantitative analysis of specific binding.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A HUMAN PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ITS MONO- AND DI-METHYLATED METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to estimate levels of arsenic and its metabolites in human tissues and urine after oral exposure to either arsenate (AsV) or arsnite (AsIII). The model consists of interconnected individual ...

  19. Effect of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and kava kava (Piper methysticum) supplementation on digoxin pharmacokinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Gurley, Bill J; Swain, Ashley; Barone, Gary W; Williams, D Keith; Breen, Philip; Yates, C Ryan; Stuart, Leslie B; Hubbard, Martha A; Tong, Yudong; Cheboyina, Sreekhar

    2007-02-01

    Phytochemical-mediated modulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and other drug transporters may give rise to many herb-drug interactions. Serial plasma concentration-time profiles of the P-gp substrate, digoxin, were used to determine whether supplementation with goldenseal or kava kava modified P-gp activity in vivo. Twenty healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to receive a standardized goldenseal (3210 mg daily) or kava kava (1227 mg daily) supplement for 14 days, followed by a 30-day washout period. Subjects were also randomized to receive rifampin (600 mg daily, 7 days) and clarithromycin (1000 mg daily, 7 days) as positive controls for P-gp induction and inhibition, respectively. Digoxin (Lanoxin, 0.5 mg) was administered p.o. before and at the end of each supplementation and control period. Serial digoxin plasma concentrations were obtained over 24 h and analyzed by chemiluminescent immunoassay. Comparisons of area under the curve (AUC)((0-3)), AUC((0-24)), C(max,) CL/F, and elimination half-life were used to assess the effects of goldenseal, kava kava, rifampin, and clarithromycin on digoxin pharmacokinetics. Rifampin produced significant reductions (p < 0.01) in AUC((0-3)), AUC((0-24)), CL/F, t(1/2), and C(max), whereas clarithromycin increased these parameters significantly (p < 0.01). With the exception of goldenseal's effect on C(max) (14% increase), no statistically significant effects on digoxin pharmacokinetics were observed following supplementation with either goldenseal or kava kava. When compared with rifampin and clarithromycin, supplementation with these specific formulations of goldenseal or kava kava did not appear to affect digoxin pharmacokinetics, suggesting that these supplements are not potent modulators of P-gp in vivo.

  20. Quantification of etodolac in human plasma for pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence studies in 27 Korean subjects.

    PubMed

    Song, Il-Dong; Kang, Je-Seop; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Se-Mi; Zhao, Dong-Xu; Kim, Shin-Hee; Chun, Min-Young; Lee, Kyuhyun

    2017-01-16

    We developed a simple and validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry(LC-MS/MS) for quantification of etodolac using pioglitazone as an internal standard (IS) to assess pharmacokinetics and to appraise bioequivalence of two formulations of etodolac (reference and tested) in 27 healthy Korean subjects. Isocratic mobile phase consisted of 10 mM ammonium formate and acetonitrile were used to separate the analytes on a Gemini C18 column. Also, analytes were analyzed by MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using the transitions of (M+H)+ ions, m/z 288.2→172.3 and m/z 357.1→134.2 for quantification of etodolac and IS each. The standard calibration curves displayed significant linearity within the range of 0.2-30.0 μg/mL (r2=0.9956, 1/x2 weighting) with LLOQ of 0.1 μg/mL. The retention times of etodolac and the IS were 0.77 min and 0.57 min each, indicating the high-throughput potential of the proposed method. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated from the plasma samples and data form the reference and test drugs were represented as follows; Area under plasma concentration-time curve (AUCt) (78.03 vs. 84.00 μg×h/mL), AUC∞ (86.67 vs. 93.92 μg×h/mL), maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) (19.49 vs. 18.94 μg/mL), time for maximal concentrations (Tmax) (2.13 vs. 2.26 h), Plasma elimination half-life (T1/2) (8.12 vs. 8.47 h), elimination rate constant (λz) (0.0853 vs. 0.0818 h-1). Pharmacokinetic parameters with 90% confidence interval fall within the bioequivalence range of 80-125%. Thus, the new testified method was successfully applied for the pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies for two etodolac formulations.

  1. [Cannabinoid system and feeding regulation].

    PubMed

    Arias Horcajadas, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the cannabinoid system is a crucial mechanism in the regulation of feeding and metabolism. It is against this background that a cannabinoid antagonist, rimonabant, is about to come onto the market for the treatment of obesity. Moreover, in addition to weight-loss effect, this drug has a beneficial effect on the so-called metabolic syndrome, with changes in the lipid and glucidic metabolism not observed for other anti-obesity drugs currently available. We present a review of current knowledge in this field and data from our own studies: genetic studies of this system in eating disorders and in obesity and studies of localization of cannabinoid receptors at sites related to feeding. These studies support a state of cannabinoid hyperactivity in obesity; furthermore, such hyperactivity can constitute a prognostic factor.

  2. A validated bioanalytical HPLC method for pharmacokinetic evaluation of 2-deoxyglucose in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Gounder, Murugesan K; Lin, Hongxia; Stein, Mark; Goodin, Susan; Bertino, Joseph R; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; DiPaola, Robert S

    2012-05-01

    2-Deoxyglucose (2-DG), an analog of glucose, is widely used to interfere with glycolysis in tumor cells and studied as a therapeutic approach in clinical trials. To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of 2-DG, we describe the development and validation of a sensitive HPLC fluorescent method for the quantitation of 2-DG in plasma. Plasma samples were deproteinized with methanol and the supernatant was dried at 45°C. The residues were dissolved in methanolic sodium acetate-boric acid solution. 2-DG and other monosaccharides were derivatized to 2-aminobenzoic acid derivatives in a single step in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride at 80°C for 45 min. The analytes were separated on a YMC ODS C₁₈ reversed-phase column using gradient elution. The excitation and emission wavelengths were set at 360 and 425 nm. The 2-DG calibration curves were linear over the range of 0.63-300 µg/mL with a limit of detection of 0.5 µg/mL. The assay provided satisfactory intra-day and inter-day precision with RSD less than 9.8%, and the accuracy ranged from 86.8 to 110.0%. The HPLC method is reproducible and suitable for the quantitation of 2-DG in plasma. The method was successfully applied to characterize the pharmacokinetics profile of 2-DG in patients with advanced solid tumors.

  3. In vitro to human in vivo translation - pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of quinidine.

    PubMed

    Polak, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The translational sciences aim to transfer results from basic research to the treatment of animals or patients. One of the approaches that could be utilized to achieve this goal is the in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties using in silico methods. Such methodology, if properly applied, could help substantially reduce the use of animals in pre-clinical research. Here, quinidine was chosen as an example of a drug with cardiac effects and results of nine published clinical studies describing its PK (plasma concentration) and PD (QTcB/?QTcB) effects were mimicked by combination of the IVIVE platform Simcyp (pharmacokinetics prediction) with the ToxComp (cardiac effect prediction) system, based exclusively on in vitro data. The results show that reliable QT prediction is possible using the mechanistic IVIVE of the PK and PD effects. This can be considered a proof-of-concept that also could be applied as a drug safety evaluation procedure.

  4. High-dose short-term administration of naringin did not alter talinolol pharmacokinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, M A; Staubach, P; Tamai, I; Langguth, P

    2015-02-20

    Naringin is considered the major causative ingredient of the inhibition of intestinal drug uptake by grapefruit juice. Moreover, it is contained in highly dosed nutraceuticals available on the market. A controlled, open, randomized, crossover study was performed in 10 healthy volunteers to investigate the effect of high-dose naringin on the bioavailability of talinolol, a substrate of intestinal organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP)-mediated uptake. Following 6-day supplementation with 3 capsules of 350 mg naringin daily, 100mg talinolol were administered orally with 3 capsules of the same dietary supplement (1050 mg naringin) on the seventh day. This test treatment was compared to 100mg talinolol only (control). The results showed that short-term high-dose naringin supplementation did not significantly affect talinolol pharmacokinetics. Geometric mean ratios of test versus control ranged between 0.90 and 0.98 for talinolol c(max), AUC(0-48 h), AUC(0-∞), t(1/2) and A(e(0-48 h)). The high dose may provoke inhibition of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) which counteracts the uptake inhibition. As disintegration and dissolution processes are required for the solid dosage form, dissolved naringin may arrive at the site of interaction after talinolol is already absorbed. In conclusion, the effect of nutraceuticals on drug pharmacokinetics can deviate from that observed when administered as food component due to the different dose and dosage form.

  5. HPLC fluorescence method for the determination of nizatidine in human plasma and its application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Çakar, Mahmut B; Ulu, Sevgi T

    2014-06-01

    A sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was developed for the determination of nizatidine in human plasma. Nizatidine was derivatized by 4-fluoro-7-nitrobenzofurazan (NBD-F). Chromatographic separation was performed on a Inertsil C18 column (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) using isocratic elution by a mobile phase consisting of methanol/water (55:45) at a flow rate of 1.2 mL/min. Amlodipine was used as the internal standard (IS). Fluorescence detector was used operated at 461 nm (excitation) and 517 nm (emission), respectively. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 50-2000 ng/mL. This method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study after oral administration of a dose (150 mg) of nizatidine.

  6. Safety, pharmacokinetics and neutralization of the broadly neutralizing HIV-1 human monoclonal antibody VRC01 in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, J E; Coates, E E; Yamshchikov, G; Saunders, J G; Holman, L; Enama, M E; DeZure, A; Lynch, R M; Gordon, I; Plummer, S; Hendel, C S; Pegu, A; Conan-Cibotti, M; Sitar, S; Bailer, R T; Narpala, S; McDermott, A; Louder, M; O'Dell, S; Mohan, S; Pandey, J P; Schwartz, R M; Hu, Z; Koup, R A; Capparelli, E; Mascola, J R; Graham, B S

    2015-12-01

    VRC-HIVMAB060-00-AB (VRC01) is a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) isolated from the B cells of an HIV-infected patient. It is directed against the HIV-1 CD4 binding site and is capable of potently neutralizing the majority of diverse HIV-1 strains. This Phase I dose-escalation study in healthy adults was conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center (Bethesda, MD, USA). Primary objectives were the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of VRC01 intravenous (i.v.) infusion at 5, 20 or 40 mg/kg, given either once (20 mg/kg) or twice 28 days apart (all doses), and of subcutaneous (s.c.) delivery at 5 mg/kg compared to s.c. placebo given twice, 28 days apart. Cumulatively, 28 subjects received 43 VRC01 and nine received placebo administrations. There were no serious adverse events or dose-limiting toxicities. Mean 28-day serum trough concentrations after the first infusion were 35 and 57 μg/ml for groups infused with 20 mg/kg (n = 8) and 40 mg/kg (n = 5) doses, respectively. Mean 28-day trough concentrations after the second infusion were 56 and 89 μg/ml for the same two doses. Over the 5-40 mg/kg i.v. dose range (n = 18), the clearance was 0.016 l/h and terminal half-life was 15 days. After infusion VRC01 retained expected neutralizing activity in serum, and anti-VRC01 antibody responses were not detected. The human monoclonal antibody (mAb) VRC01 was well tolerated when delivered i.v. or s.c. The mAb demonstrated expected half-life and pharmacokinetics for a human immunoglobulin G. The safety and PK results support and inform VRC01 dosing schedules for planning HIV-1 prevention efficacy studies.

  7. Quantitation of metformin in human plasma and urine by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Flemming; Christensen, Mette M H; Brøsen, Kim

    2014-04-01

    We describe an analytical method for the quantification of the widely used antihyperglycemic agent, metformin, in human plasma and urine. The separation was performed using isocratic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography on a Luna hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column (125 × 4.6 mm, 3 μm). The sample preparation was accomplished by solid-phase extraction. Validation of the method was performed in the range 10-2000 ng/mL for plasma and 5-30 mcg/mL for urine. The methods were linear within the investigated range (r(2) > 0.988). Within-day repeatability ranged from 3.1% to 7.5% in plasma and 1.6% to 6.2% in urine. Between-day reproducibility ranged from 2.9% to 5.3% in plasma and 0.6% to 1.8% in urine. The inaccuracy expressed as bias ranged from -3.1% to 1.9% in plasma and from -7.2% to 0.7% in urine. The lower limit of quantification for metformin in plasma was 5 ng/mL and in urine was 40 ng/mL. The method was therefore considered to be precise, accurate, reproducible, and sensitive enough to be appropriate for pharmacokinetic studies of metformin. The applicability of the method for human pharmacokinetic studies was demonstrated by dosing a healthy male volunteer with 500-mg metformin hydrochloride as a single oral dose; plasma and urine concentrations were measured for 24 hours.

  8. Human in Vivo Pharmacokinetics of [14C]Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Following Oral Microdosing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dibenzo(def,p)chrysene (DBC), (also known as dibenzo[a,l]pyrene), is a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) found in the environment, including food, produced by the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. DBC, classified by IARC as a 2A probable human carcinogen, has a relative potency factor (RPF) in animal cancer models 30-fold higher than benzo[a]pyrene. No data are available describing the disposition of high molecular weight (>4 rings) PAHs in humans to compare to animal studies. Pharmacokinetics of DBC was determined in 3 female and 6 male human volunteers following oral microdosing (29 ng, 5 nCi) of [14C]-DBC. This study was made possible with highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), capable of detecting [14C]-DBC equivalents in plasma and urine following a dose considered of de minimus risk to human health. Plasma and urine were collected over 72 h. The plasma Cmax was 68.8 ± 44.3 fg·mL–1 with a Tmax of 2.25 ± 1.04 h. Elimination occurred in two distinct phases: a rapid (α)-phase, with a T1/2 of 5.8 ± 3.4 h and an apparent elimination rate constant (Kel) of 0.17 ± 0.12 fg·h–1, followed by a slower (β)-phase, with a T1/2 of 41.3 ± 29.8 h and an apparent Kel of 0.03 ± 0.02 fg·h–1. In spite of the high degree of hydrophobicity (log Kow of 7.4), DBC was eliminated rapidly in humans, as are most PAHs in animals, compared to other hydrophobic persistent organic pollutants such as, DDT, PCBs and TCDD. Preliminary examination utilizing a new UHPLC-AMS interface, suggests the presence of polar metabolites in plasma as early as 45 min following dosing. This is the first in vivo data set describing pharmacokinetics in humans of a high molecular weight PAH and should be a valuable addition to risk assessment paradigms. PMID:25418912

  9. Human in Vivo Pharmacokinetics of [(14)C]Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Following Oral Microdosing.

    PubMed

    Madeen, Erin; Corley, Richard A; Crowell, Susan; Turteltaub, Kenneth; Ognibene, Ted; Malfatti, Mike; McQuistan, Tammie J; Garrard, Mary; Sudakin, Dan; Williams, David E

    2015-01-20

    Dibenzo(def,p)chrysene (DBC), (also known as dibenzo[a,l]pyrene), is a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) found in the environment, including food, produced by the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. DBC, classified by IARC as a 2A probable human carcinogen, has a relative potency factor (RPF) in animal cancer models 30-fold higher than benzo[a]pyrene. No data are available describing the disposition of high molecular weight (>4 rings) PAHs in humans to compare to animal studies. Pharmacokinetics of DBC was determined in 3 female and 6 male human volunteers following oral microdosing (29 ng, 5 nCi) of [(14)C]-DBC. This study was made possible with highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), capable of detecting [(14)C]-DBC equivalents in plasma and urine following a dose considered of de minimus risk to human health. Plasma and urine were collected over 72 h. The plasma Cmax was 68.8 ± 44.3 fg·mL(-1) with a Tmax of 2.25 ± 1.04 h. Elimination occurred in two distinct phases: a rapid (α)-phase, with a T1/2 of 5.8 ± 3.4 h and an apparent elimination rate constant (Kel) of 0.17 ± 0.12 fg·h(-1), followed by a slower (β)-phase, with a T1/2 of 41.3 ± 29.8 h and an apparent Kel of 0.03 ± 0.02 fg·h(-1). In spite of the high degree of hydrophobicity (log Kow of 7.4), DBC was eliminated rapidly in humans, as are most PAHs in animals, compared to other hydrophobic persistent organic pollutants such as, DDT, PCBs and TCDD. Preliminary examination utilizing a new UHPLC-AMS interface, suggests the presence of polar metabolites in plasma as early as 45 min following dosing. This is the first in vivo data set describing pharmacokinetics in humans of a high molecular weight PAH and should be a valuable addition to risk assessment paradigms.

  10. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  11. Cross-species pharmacokinetic comparison from mouse to man of a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide, ISIS 301012, targeting human apolipoprotein B-100.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rosie Z; Kim, Tae-Won; Hong, An; Watanabe, Tanya A; Gaus, Hans J; Geary, Richard S

    2007-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl)-modified oligonucleotide, ISIS 301012 [targeting human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100)], was characterized in mouse, rat, monkey, and human. Plasma pharmacokinetics following parental administration was similar across species, exhibiting a rapid distribution phase with t(1/2alpha) of several hours and a prolonged elimination phase with t(1/2beta) of days. The prolonged elimination phase represents equilibrium between tissues and circulating drug due to slow elimination from tissues. Absorption was nearly complete following s.c. injection, with bioavailability ranging from 80 to 100% in monkeys. Plasma clearance scaled well across species as a function of body weight alone, and this correlation was improved when corrected for plasma protein binding. In all of the animal models studied, the highest tissue concentrations of ISIS 301012 were observed in kidney and liver. Urinary excretion was less than 3% in monkeys and human in the first 24 h. ISIS 301012 is highly bound to plasma proteins, probably preventing rapid removal by renal filtration. However, following 25 mg/kg s.c. administration in mouse and 5-mg/kg i.v. bolus administration in rat, plasma concentrations of ISIS 301012 exceeded their respective protein binding capacity. Thus, urinary excretion increased to 16% or greater within the first 24 h. Albeit slow, urinary excretion of ISIS 301012 and its shortened metabolites is the ultimate elimination pathway of this compound, as demonstrated by 32% of dose recovered in total excreta by 14 days in a rat mass balance study. The pharmacokinetics of ISIS 301012 in human is predictable from the pharmacokinetics measured in animals. The pharmacokinetic properties of ISIS 301012 provide guidance for clinical development and support infrequent dose administration.

  12. Repeated dosing with oral cocaine in humans: assessment of direct effects, withdrawal, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Sharon L; Stoops, William W; Moody, David E; Lin, Shen-Nan; Bigelow, George E

    2009-08-01

    Cocaine withdrawal symptoms are thought to play a role in relapse; studies characterizing the symptomatology have yielded mixed findings. This study sought to examine the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic profile of repeated high dose exposure to oral cocaine and characterize acute and protracted withdrawal in cocaine abusers. This study employed a repeated-dosing, single-blind design in which subjects (n = 9), resided for 40 days on a closed ward. They were maintained for two 4-day cocaine exposure periods (Days 1-4 & Days 9-12, cocaine 175 mg, p.o.; 5 hourly doses; 875 mg/day) separated by a 4-day matched placebo exposure period (Days 5-8). After these 12 days, an additional period of 28 days of placebo maintenance followed (Days 13-40). Test sessions were conducted during each phase; measures of mood, drug effects, sleep, pharmacokinetics, and prolactin were collected throughout the study. The dosing regimen produced cocaine plasma concentrations (Cmax of 680 ng/mL) two to threefold higher than typically seen in acute dose studies. Prototypic psychostimulant effects, including subjective ratings of euphoric effects (liking, high, good effects) and significant cardiopressor effects, were sustained during the active dosing periods, corresponding to the rise and fall of plasma cocaine. Withdrawal-like symptoms (i.e., disruptions of sleep, increased ratings of anxiety, irritability, crashing) were observed within 24-hr after cessation of dosing. Cocaine reduced prolactin acutely, but no sustained alterations were observed for this measure or for other signs or symptoms during the 28-day abstinence period. These findings indicate that exposure to controlled high doses of cocaine produces modest symptoms consistent with cocaine withdrawal within hours of cessation of dosing but provide no evidence of symptoms persisting beyond 24 hours.

  13. Pharmacological characterization of the cannabinoid CB₁ receptor PET ligand ortholog, [³H]MePPEP.

    PubMed

    Suter, Todd M; Chesterfield, Amy K; Bao, Chun; Schaus, John M; Krushinski, Joseph H; Statnick, Michael A; Felder, Christian C

    2010-12-15

    MePPEP ((3R,5R)-5-(3-methoxy-phenyl)-3-((R)-1-phenyl-ethylamino)-1-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-pyrrolidin-2-one) is an inverse agonist shown to be an effective PET ligand for labeling cannabinoid CB₁ receptors in vivo. [¹¹C]MePPEP and structurally related analogs have been reported to specifically and reversibly label cannabinoid CB₁ receptors in rat and non-human primate brains, and [¹¹C]MePPEP has been used in human subjects as a PET tracer. We have generated [³H]MePPEP, an ortholog of [¹¹C]MePPEP, to characterize the molecular pharmacology of the cannabinoid CB₁ receptor across preclinical and clinical species. [³H]MePPEP demonstrates saturable, reversible, and single-site high affinity binding to cannabinoid CB₁ receptors. In cerebellar membranes purified from brains of rat, non-human primate and human, and cells ectopically expressing recombinant human cannabinoid CB₁ receptor, [³H]MePPEP binds cannabinoid CB₁ receptors with similar affinity with K(d) values of 0.09 nM, 0.19 nM, 0.14 nM and 0.16 nM, respectively. Both agonist and antagonist cannabinoid ligands compete [³H]MePPEP with predicted rank order potency. No specific binding is present in autoradiographic sections from cannabinoid CB₁ receptor knockout mouse brains, demonstrating that [³H]MePPEP selectively binds cannabinoid CB₁ receptors in native mouse tissue. Furthermore, [³H]MePPEP binding to anatomical sites in mouse and rat brain is comparable to the anatomical profiles of [¹¹C]MePPEP in non-human primate and human brain in vivo, as well as the binding profiles of other previously described cannabinoid CB₁ receptor agonist and antagonist radioligands. Therefore, [³H]MePPEP is a promising tool for translation of preclinical cannabinoid CB₁ receptor pharmacology to clinical PET ligand and cannabinoid CB₁ receptor inverse agonist therapeutic development.

  14. Albumin-deficient mouse models for studying metabolism of human albumin and pharmacokinetics of albumin-based drugs

    PubMed Central

    Roopenian, Derry C; Low, Benjamin E; Christianson, Gregory J; Proetzel, Gabriele; Sproule, Thomas J; Wiles, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    Serum albumin is the major determinant of blood colloidal osmotic pressure acting as a depot and distributor of compounds including drugs. In humans, serum albumin exhibits an unusually long half-life mainly due to protection from catabolism by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn)-mediated recycling. These properties make albumin an attractive courier of therapeutically-active compounds. However, pharmaceutical research and development of albumin-based therapeutics has been hampered by the lack of appropriate preclinical animal models. To overcome this, we developed and describe the first mouse with a genetic deficiency in albumin and its incorporation into an existing humanized FcRn mouse model, B6.Cg-Fcgrttm1Dcr Tg(FCGRT)32Dcr/DcrJ (Tg32). Albumin-deficient strains (Alb-/-) were created by TALEN-mediated disruption of the albumin (Alb) gene directly in fertilized oocytes derived from Tg32 mice and its non-transgenic background control, C57BL/6J (B6). The resulting Alb-/- strains are analbuminemic but healthy. Intravenous administration of human albumin to Tg32-Alb-/- mFcRn-/- hFcRnTg/Tg) mice results in a remarkably extended human albumin serum half-life of ∼24 days, comparable to that found in humans, and in contrast to half-lives of 2.6–5.8 d observed in B6, B6-Alb-/- and Tg32 strains. This striking increase can be explained by the absence of competing endogenous mouse albumin and the presence of an active human FcRn. These novel albumin-deficient models provide unique tools for investigating the biology and pathobiology of serum albumin and are a more appropriate rodent surrogates for evaluating human serum albumin pharmacokinetics and albumin-based compounds. PMID:25654695

  15. Case report of extensive metabolism by aldehyde oxidase in humans: pharmacokinetics and metabolite profile of FK3453 in rats, dogs, and humans.

    PubMed

    Akabane, Takafumi; Tanaka, Kohichiro; Irie, Megumi; Terashita, Shigeyuki; Teramura, Toshio

    2011-05-01

    We describe the preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetic profiles of FK3453 [6-(2-amino-4-phenylpyrimidin-5-yl)-2-isopropylpyridazin-3(2H)-one] and the mechanism responsible for poor oral exposure of FK3453 in humans. FK3453 showed favourable profiles in preclinical pharmacokinetic studies, including satisfactory absolute bioavailability and total body clearance in animals (30.5%-41.4%, 54.7%-68.2%, and 71.3%-93.4% and 10.8-17.6, 1.9-17.1, and 5.0 mL/min/kg in male rats, female rats, and dogs, respectively), and good metabolic stability in liver microsomes (42.3, 14.5, and 1.1 mL/min/kg in male rats, dogs, and humans, respectively). However, despite these promising preclinical findings, plasma concentrations of FK3453 in humans were extremely low, with the oxidative metabolite of the aminopyrimidine moiety (M4) identified as a major metabolite. Given that aldehyde oxidase (AO) and xanthine oxidase (XO) were presumed to be the enzymes responsible for M4 formation, we investigated the mechanism of M4 formation using human liver subcellular fractions. M4 was detected in the incubation mixture with S9 and cytosol but not with microsomes, and M4 formation was inhibited by AO inhibitors (menadione, isovanillin) but not by cytochrome P-450 inhibitor (1-aminobenzotiazole) or XO inhibitor (allopurinol). These results suggest M4 formation is catalyzed by AO, and therefore, its poor exposure in humans was attributed to extensive AO metabolism.

  16. Population pharmacokinetic model of THC integrates oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dosing and characterizes short- and long-term pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Jules A A C; Guan, Zheng; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Klumpers, Linda; Morrison, Paul D; Beumer, Tim L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Cohen, Adam F; Freijer, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannobinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound of Cannabis, is known to have a long terminal half-life. However, this characteristic is often ignored in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of THC, which may affect the accuracy of predictions in different pharmacologic areas. For therapeutic use for example, it is important to accurately describe the terminal phase of THC to describe accumulation of the drug. In early clinical research, the THC challenge test can be optimized through more accurate predictions of the dosing sequence and the wash-out between occasions in a crossover setting, which is mainly determined by the terminal half-life of the compound. The purpose of this study is to better quantify the long-term pharmacokinetics of THC. A population-based PK model for THC was developed describing the profile up to 48 h after an oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dose of THC in humans. In contrast to earlier models, the current model integrates all three major administration routes and covers the long terminal phase of THC. Results show that THC has a fast initial and intermediate half-life, while the apparent terminal half-life is long (21.5 h), with a clearance of 38.8 L/h. Because the current model characterizes the long-term pharmacokinetics, it can be used to assess the accumulation of THC in a multiple-dose setting and to forecast concentration profiles of the drug under many different dosing regimens or administration routes. Additionally, this model could provide helpful insights into the THC challenge test used for the development of (novel) compounds targeting the cannabinoid system for different therapeutic applications and could improve decision making in future clinical trials.

  17. Pharmacokinetic Properties and Human Use Characteristics of an FDA-Approved Intranasal Naloxone Product for the Treatment of Opioid Overdose.

    PubMed

    Krieter, Philip; Chiang, Nora; Gyaw, Shwe; Skolnick, Phil; Crystal, Roger; Keegan, Fintan; Aker, Julie; Beck, Melissa; Harris, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Parenteral naloxone has been approved to treat opiate overdose for over 4 decades. Intranasal naloxone, administered "off label" using improvised devices, has been widely used by both first responders and the lay public to treat overdose. However, these improvised devices require training for effective use, and the recommended volumes (2 to 4 mL) exceed those considered optimum for intranasal administration. The present study compared the pharmacokinetic properties of intranasal naloxone (2 to 8 mg) delivered in low volumes (0.1 to 0.2 mL) using an Aptar Unit-Dose device to an approved (0.4 mg) intramuscular dose. A parallel study assessed the ease of use of this device in a simulated overdose situation. All doses of intranasal naloxone resulted in plasma concentrations and areas under the curve greater than those observed following the intramuscular dose; the time to reach maximum plasma concentrations was not different following intranasal and intramuscular administration. Plasma concentrations of naloxone were dose proportional between 2 and 8 mg and independent of whether drug was administered to 1 or both nostrils. In a study using individuals representative of the general population, >90% were able to perform both critical tasks (inserting nozzle into a nostril and pressing plunger) needed to deliver a simulated dose of naloxone without prior training. Based on both pharmacokinetic and human use studies, a 4-mg dose delivered in a single device (0.1 mL) was selected as the final product. This product can be used by first responders and the lay public, providing an important and potentially life-saving intervention for victims of an opioid overdose.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of topically applied recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor-2 in alkali-burned and intact rabbit eye.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jianqiu; Dou, Guifang; Zheng, Long; Yang, Ting; Jia, Xuechao; Tang, Lu; Huang, Yadong; Wu, Wencan; Li, Xiaokun; Wang, Xiaojie

    2015-07-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor-2 (KGF-2), an effective agent in the development of epithelial tissue and regeneration during corneal wound healing, is a potential therapeutic option to treat the corneal diseases with corneal epithelial defects. However the tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics of KGF-2 have not been explored yet in eye upon topical application. Using (125)I-labeled recombinant human KGF-2 ((125)I-rhKGF-2), tissue distribution of rhKGF-2 in alkali-burned and control rabbit eyes was studied. Our results revealed that (125)I-rhKGF-2 was distributed to all eye tissues examined. The highest radioactivity level was found in the cornea, followed by iris, sclera, ciliary body, lens, aqueous humor, vitreous body, and serum in a greatest to least order. The levels of (125)I-rhKGF-2 were higher in corneas of alkali-burned eyes than those in control eyes though without statistical significance. Calculated pharmacokinetic parameters of t1/2, Cmax, and Tmax of rhKGF-2 in the rabbit corneas were 3.4 h, 135.2 ng/ml, and 0.5 h, respectively. In iris, lens, aqueous humor, and tear, t1/2, Cmax, and Tmax values were 6.2, 6.5, 5.2, and 2.5 h; 23.2, 4.5, 24.1, and 29,498.9 ng/ml; and 1.0, 0.5, 0.5, and 1.0 h, respectively. Predominant and rapid accumulation of rhKGF-2 in corneas suggests that therapeutic doses of rhKGF-2 could be delivered by topical application for treatment of corneal diseases.

  19. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Disposition in Plasma, Saliva and Urine of Scopolamine after Intranasal Administration to Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND) protocol. The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trials with INSCOP. Methods: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min and 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on the likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. Results: The best structural model for INSCOP (minimal -2LL= 502.8) was established. It consisted of one compartment each for plasma, saliva and urine, respectively, which were connected with linear transport processes except the nonlinear PK process from plasma to saliva compartment. The best-fit estimates of PK parameters from individual PK compartmental analysis and Population PK model analysis were shown in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: A population PK model that could predict population and individual PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after dosing was developed and validated. Incorporating a non-linear transfer from plasma to saliva compartments resulted in a significantly improved model fitting. The model could be used to predict scopolamine plasma concentrations from salivary and urinary drug levels, allowing non-invasive therapeutic monitoring of scopolamine in space and other remote environments.

  20. The Analgesic Potential of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Elikottil, Jaseena; Gupta, Pankaj; Gupta, Kalpna

    2013-01-01

    Historically and anecdotally cannabinoids have been used as analgesic agents. In recent years, there has been an escalating interest in developing cannabis-derived medications to treat severe pain. This review provides an overview of the history of cannabis use in medicine, cannabinoid signaling pathways, and current data from preclinical as well as clinical studies on using cannabinoids as potential analgesic agents. Clinical and experimental studies show that cannabis-derived compounds act as anti-emetic, appetite modulating and analgesic agents. However, the efficacy of individual products is variable and dependent upon the route of administration. Since opioids are the only therapy for severe pain, analgesic ability of cannabinoids may provide a much-needed alternative to opioids. Moreover, cannabinoids act synergistically with opioids and act as opioid sparing agents, allowing lower doses and fewer side effects from chronic opioid therapy. Thus, rational use of cannabis based medications deserves serious consideration to alleviate the suffering of patients due to severe pain. PMID:20073408

  1. Cannabinoids: occurrence and medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Appendino, G; Chianese, G; Taglialatela-Scafati, O

    2011-01-01

    With an inventory of several hundreds secondary metabolites identified, Cannabis sativa L. (hemp) is one of the phytochemically best characterized plant species. The biomedical relevance of hemp undoubtedly underlies the wealth of data on its constituents and their biological activities, and cannabinoids, a class of unique meroterpenoids derived from the alkylation of an olivetollike alkyl resorcinol with a monoterpene unit, are the most typical constituents of Cannabis. In addition to the well-known psychotropic properties of Δ(9)-THC, cannabinoids have been reported to show potential in various fields of medicine, with the capacity to address unmet needs like the relief of chemotherapy-derived nausea and anorexia, and symptomatic mitigation of multiple sclerosis. Many of the potential therapeutic uses of cannabinoids are related to the interaction with (at least) two cannabinoid G-protein coupled receptors (CB1 and CB2). However, a number of activities, like the antibacterial or the antitumor properties are non totally dependent or fully independent from the interaction with these proteins. These pharmacological activities are particularly interesting since, in principle, they could be easily dissociated by the unwanted psychotropic effects. This review aims at giving readers a survey of the more recent advances in both phytochemistry of C. sativa, the medicinal chemistry of cannabinoids, and their distribution in plants, highlighting the impact that research in these hot fields could have for modern medicinal chemistry and pharmacology.

  2. Behavioural consequences of maternal exposure to natural cannabinoids in rats.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M; Rubio, P; de Fonseca, F R

    1995-11-01

    Cannabis sativa preparations (hashish, marijuana) are the most widely used illicit drugs during pregnancy in Western countries. The possible long-term consequences for the child of in utero exposure to cannabis derivatives are still poorly understood. Animal models of perinatal cannabinoid exposure provide a useful tool for examining the developmental effects of cannabinoids. Behavioral consequences of maternal exposure to either cannabis preparations or to its main psychoactive component, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in rat models are reviewed in this paper. Maternal exposure to cannabinoids resulted in alteration in the pattern of ontogeny of spontaneous locomotor and exploratory behavior in the offspring. Adult animals exposed during gestational and lactational periods exhibited persistent alterations in the behavioral response to novelty, social interactions, sexual orientation and sexual behavior. They also showed a lack of habituation and reactivity to different illumination conditions. Adult offspring of both sexes also displayed a characteristic increase in spontaneous and water-induced grooming behavior. Some of the effects were dependent on the sex of the animals being studied, and the dose of cannabinoid administered to the mother during gestational and lactational periods. Maternal exposure to low doses of THC sensitized the adult offspring of both sexes to the reinforcing effects of morphine, as measured in a conditioned place preference paradigm. The existence of sexual dimorphisms on the developmental effects of cannabinoids, the role of sex steroids, glucocorticoids, and pituitary hormones, the possible participation of cortical projecting monoaminergic systems, and the mediation of the recently described cannabinoid receptors are also analyzed. The information obtained in animal studies is compared to the few data available on the long-term behavioral and cognitive effects on in utero exposure to cannabis in humans.

  3. Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-07-15

    Phenoxyacetic acids including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are widely utilized organic acid herbicides that have undergone extensive toxicity and pharmacokinetic analyses. The dog is particularly susceptible to the toxicity of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids relative to other species. Active renal clearance mechanisms for organic acids are ubiquitous in mammalian species, and thus a likely mechanism responsible for the increased sensitivity of the dog to these agents is linked to a lower capacity to secrete organic acids from the kidney. Using published data describing the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic and structurally related organic acids in a variety of species including humans, inter-species comparative pharmacokinetics were evaluated using allometic parameter scaling. For both 2,4-D and MCPA the dog plasma half-life (t1/2) and renal clearance (Clr; ml hr-1) rates did not scale as a function of body weight across species; whereas for all other species evaluated, including humans, these pharmacokinetic parameters reasonably scaled. This exceptional response in the dog is clearly illustrated by comparing the plasma t1/2 at comparable doses of 2,4-D and MCPA, across several species. At a dosage of 5 mg/kg, in dogs the plasma t1/2 for 2,4-D and MCPA were {approx}92 - 106 hr and 63 hr, respectively, which is substantially longer than in the rat ({approx}1 and 6 hr, respectively) or in humans (12 and 11 hr, respectively). This longer t1/2, and slower elimination in the dog, results in substantially higher body burdens of these organic acids, at comparable doses, relative to other species. Although these results indicate the important role of renal transport clearance mechanisms as determinants of the clearance and potential toxicity outcomes of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides across several species, other contributing mechanisms such as reabsorption from the renal tubules is highly likely. These

  4. Pharmacokinetics of verapamil and norverapamil from controlled release floating pellets in humans.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Wieslaw

    2002-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of verapamil (V) in a dose of 40 mg and its metabolite norverapamil (N) from the new oral drug formulation in a form of capsule filled with floating pellets was determined. Conventional 40-mg tablets used in a medical practice served as a reference. Bioavailability studies were carried out in 12 healthy volunteers including six men and six women. In an in vitro test the pellets floated on the surface of the extraction fluid for 6 h. Mean value of maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of V for floating pellets was 28.27 ng ml(-1) and t(max) 3.75 h. The value of the area under the concentrations versus time, AUC(0-infinity) was calculated as 364.65 ng ml(-1) h, biological half-lives of the absorption and elimination (t(0.5el)) phase were 0.5 h and 10.68 h, respectively. For the reference conventional tablets those values were 33.07 ng ml(-1), 1.21 h, 224.22 ng ml(-1) h, 0.36 h and 6.17 h, respectively. The average concentration of N in plasma was similar to that of V.

  5. Development and pharmacokinetic characterization of pulmonal and intravenous delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans.

    PubMed

    Naef, Myrtha; Russmann, Stefan; Petersen-Felix, Steen; Brenneisen, Rudolf

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a physiologically compatible inhalation solution of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and to compare the pharmacokinetic and analgesic properties of pulmonal THC versus pulmonal placebo and intravenous (iv) THC, respectively. Eight healthy volunteers were included in this randomized, double-blind, crossover study. The aqueous THC formulations were prepared by using a solubilization technique. iv THC (0.053 mg/kg body weight), pulmonal THC (0.053 mg/kg), or a placebo inhalation solution was administered as single dose. At defined time points, blood samples were collected, and somatic and psychotropic side effects as well as vital functions monitored. An ice water immersion test was performed to measure analgesia. Using a pressure-driven nebulizer, the pulmonal administration of the THC liquid aerosol resulted in high THC peak plasma levels within minutes. The bioavailability of the pulmonal THC was 28.7 +/- 8.2% (mean +/- SEM). The side effects observed after pulmonal THC were coughing and slight irritation of the upper respiratory tract, very mild psychotropic symptoms, and headache. The side effects after iv THC were much more prominent. Neither pulmonal nor iv THC significantly reduced experimentally induced pain.

  6. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of the (99m)Tc labeled human elastase inhibitor, elafin, in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaschwich, Mark; Lützen, Ulf; Zhao, Yi; Tjiong, Angelina; Marx, Marlies; Haenisch, Sierk; Wiedow, Oliver; Preuss, Stefanie; Culman, Juraj; Zuhayra, Maaz

    2016-04-01

    Elafin is a potent reversible inhibitor of the pro-inflammatory proteases leukocyte elastase and protease 3. It is currently in clinical development for the use in postoperative inflammatory diseases. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of (99m)Tc-labeled elafin ((99m)Tc-Elafin) in blood and individual organs in rat after bolus intravenous injection using the single photon emission tomography (SPECT). (99m)Tc-Elafin predominantly accumulated in the kidney reaching a maximum of 8.5% ± 0.1% of the injected dose per gram (ID/g) at 5 min post injection (p.i) and decreased only slowly during 24 h. In contrast, the initially high radio activity recorded in the other organs rapidly decreased parallel to the radioactivity detected in blood. The blood kinetics fits to a two compartment kinetics model. The radio activity in the dissected kidney was 4.98 ± 1.24%ID/g 24 h p.i, while in other organs, including the brain, no accumulation of (99m)Tc-Elafin was detected. At this time point 30% of the detected radioactivity in the kidney was identified to be not metabolized (99m)Tc-Elafin. In conclusion, the blood and organ-specific kinetic data provide a basis for planning of adequate dosing regimens and the high accumulation of intact elafin in the kidney favors clinical developments targeting inflammatory kidney diseases, such as chronic allograft nephropathy after kidney transplantation.

  7. Molecular and pharmacokinetic properties of 222 commercially available oral drugs in humans.

    PubMed

    Sakaeda, T; Okamura, N; Nagata, S; Yagami, T; Horinouchi, M; Okumura, K; Yamashita, F; Hashida, M

    2001-08-01

    This study was performed to determine the exclusion criteria that differentiate poorly absorbed drugs from good drug candidates, and to accelerate drug development by exclusion of unnecessary assessment. The molecular and pharmacokinetic properties of 222 commercially available oral drugs were tabulated and their correlations were analyzed. The exclusion criteria obtained were 1) a molecular weight of more than 500, and 2) a ClogP value of more than 5. Exceptions to molecular weight criteria were compounds with a sugar moiety, high atomic weight, and large cyclic structure. It was also suggested that being a substrate for MDRI (P-glycoprotein) does not always result in poor bioavailability, and that drug development by chemical modification of a seed or lead compound with quantitative structure activity relationship analysis can result in lower bioavailability, higher bound fraction and lower urinary excretion, which would hamper later development processes and might result in considerable drug-drug interaction. The criteria should be adjusted according to the pharmacological profiles of the agents in question and depending on the estimated profit, but ignoring these criteria may result in a significant waste of time and money during drug development.

  8. Voclosporin food effect and single oral ascending dose pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Patrick R; Huizinga, Robert B; Ling, Spencer Y; Freitag, Derrick G; Aspeslet, Launa J; Foster, Robert T

    2013-08-01

    Voclosporin (VCS) is a novel calcineurin (CN) inhibitor intended for prevention of organ graft rejection and treatment of lupus nephritis. These studies evaluated the single ascending dose pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD, CN activity) of VCS and the effect of food. VCS was administered orally in single doses of 0.25 through 4.5 mg/kg in 62 subjects in the single ascending dose study and as a single oral 1.5 mg/kg dose to 18 subjects after fasting, consumption of a low-fat and high-fat meal. Non-compartmental PK, PD, and PKPD correlation were evaluated. Following single oral doses, systemic exposure increased in a linear manner and demonstrated 1:1 dose-proportional, first-order linear PK above 1.5 mg/kg. VCS inhibited CN activity in a dose-related fashion with maximal inhibition peaking at 3.0 mg/kg. PKPD correlation indicated an EC50 of 78.3 ± 6.8 ng/mL. Administration of VCS with a low-fat and high-fat meal decreased C(max) by 29% and 53%, respectively, and AUC(inf) by 15% and 25%, respectively. Following ascending single doses of VCS, exposure increased in a linear fashion. A food effect on exposure was demonstrated, with a more pronounced effect following a high-fat meal. VCS concentrations were also found to correlate with CN activity.

  9. Quantitation and pharmacokinetic modeling of therapeutic antibody quality attributes in human studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinyin; Monine, Michael; Huang, Yu; Swann, Patrick; Nestorov, Ivan; Lyubarskaya, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A thorough understanding of drug metabolism and disposition can aid in the assessment of efficacy and safety. However, analytical methods used in pharmacokinetics (PK) studies of protein therapeutics are usually based on ELISA, and therefore can provide a limited perspective on the quality of the drug in concentration measurements. Individual post-translational modifications (PTMs) of protein therapeutics are rarely considered for PK analysis, partly because it is technically difficult to recover and quantify individual protein variants from biological fluids. Meanwhile, PTMs may be directly linked to variations in drug efficacy and safety, and therefore understanding of clearance and metabolism of biopharmaceutical protein variants during clinical studies is an important consideration. To address such challenges, we developed an affinity-purification procedure followed by peptide mapping with mass spectrometric detection, which can profile multiple quality attributes of therapeutic antibodies recovered from patient sera. The obtained data enable quantitative modeling, which allows for simulation of the PK of different individual PTMs or attribute levels in vivo and thus facilitate the assessment of quality attributes impact in vivo. Such information can contribute to the product quality attribute risk assessment during manufacturing process development and inform appropriate process control strategy. PMID:27216574

  10. Enantioselective analysis of etodolac in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: Application to clinical pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    de Miranda Silva, Carolina; Rocha, Adriana; Tozatto, Eduardo; da Silva, Lucienir Maria; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Lanchote, Vera Lucia

    2016-02-20

    Etodolac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with preferential inhibition of cyclooxigenase-2 and is widely used in the management of pain in patients with inflammatory arthritis. Etodolac is available as a racemic mixture of (-)-(R)-Etodolac and (+)-(S)-Etodolac; cyclooxigenases inhibition is attributed to (+)-(S)-Etodolac. According to our knowledge, this is the first method for determination of etodolac enantiomers in plasma using LC-MS/MS. Plasma extraction were performed with 25μL of plasma and 1mL of n-hexane:ethyl acetate (95:5); racemic ibuprofen was used as internal standard. Resolution of enantiomers were performed in a Chiralcel(®)OD-H column; deprotonated [M-H](-) and their respective ion products were monitored at transitions of 286>242 for etodolac enantiomers and 205>161 for ibuprofen. The quantitation limit was 3.2ng/mL for both enantiomers in plasma. The method was applied to study the pharmacokinetics of etodolac enantiomers after the administration of a 300 and 400mg dose of racemic drug to a healthy volunteer. Analysis of plasma samples showed higher plasma concentration of (-)-(R)-Etodolacfor both doses (300mg dose: AUC(0-∞)49.80 versus 4.55ugh/mL;400mg dose: AUC(0-∞) 63.90 versus 6.00ugh/mL) with an (R)-(+)/(S)-(-) ratio of approximately 11.

  11. Effect of antacids on the pharmacokinetics of raltegravir in human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Jennifer J; Bumpass, J Brock; Meditz, Amie L; Anderson, Peter L; Bushman, Lane; Ray, Michelle; Predhomme, Julie A; Rower, Joseph; Mawhinney, Sam; Brundage, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Raltegravir's divalent metal ion chelating motif may predispose the drug to interactions with divalent cations. We determined whether a divalent cation-containing antacid interacted with raltegravir. Twelve HIV-1-seronegative subjects were enrolled in this randomized, prospective, crossover study of single-dose raltegravir (400 mg) with and without an antacid. Subjects underwent two intensive pharmacokinetic visits in the fasted state separated by a 5- to 12-day washout period. With simultaneous antacid administration, time to peak raltegravir concentration occurred 2 h sooner (P = 0.002) and there was a 67% lower raltegravir concentration at 12 h postdose (P < 0.0001) than with administration of raltegravir alone. The raltegravir area under the-concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 h and maximum concentration were unchanged with the addition of an antacid. Studies are needed to determine the clinical relevance of this interaction, whether it remains after multiple dosing to steady state, whether it is mitigated by temporal separation, and whether raltegravir interacts with divalent cation-containing vitamins, supplements, or foods.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of barnidipine hydrochloride, a new dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, in the rat, dog and human.

    PubMed

    Teramura, T; Watanabe, T; Higuchi, S; Hashimoto, K

    1995-11-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of a new calcium antagonist barnidipine hydrochloride, a stereochemically pure enantiomer, was studied after intravenous and oral dosing to the rat and dog, and oral to man. 2. After intravenous dosing, plasma concentrations of barnidipine hydrochloride declined bi-exponentially with the terminal half-lives of 0.6 h in the rat and 4.1 h in the dog. The blood clearance was 5.2 l/h/kg in the rat and 3.3 l/h/kg in the dog, and was comparable with hepatic blood flow in both species. 3. After oral dosing, plasma concentrations of barnidipine hydrochloride peaked rapidly (0.3-0.4 h in the rat and dog, 1.0-1.6 h in man). Cmax and AUC rose non-linearly with increasing doses in all three species. 4. The absolute bioavailability was low (11-18% in the rat and 6-9% in the dog), suggesting a marked first-pass metabolism.

  13. Synthetic cannabinoids: analysis and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Wanas, Amira S; Radwan, Mohamed M

    2014-02-27

    Cannabimimetics (commonly referred to as synthetic cannabinoids), a group of compounds encompassing a wide range of chemical structures, have been developed by scientists with the hope of achieving selectivity toward one or the other of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The goal was to have compounds that could possess high therapeutic activity without many side effects. However, underground laboratories have used the information generated by the scientific community to develop these compounds for illicit use as marijuana substitutes. This chapter reviews the different classes of these "synthetic cannabinoids" with particular emphasis on the methods used for their identification in the herbal products with which they are mixed and identification of their metabolites in biological specimens.

  14. Hallucinogens and cannabinoids for headache.

    PubMed

    McGeeney, Brian E

    2012-10-01

    Most hallucinogens and cannabinoids fall into Federal Controlled Substances schedule 1, meaning they cannot be prescribed by practitioners, allegedly have no accepted medical use, and have a high abuse potential. The legal and regulatory status has inhibited clinical research on these substances such that there are no blinded studies from which to assess true efficacy. Despite such classification, hallucinogens and cannabinoids are used by patients with headache on occasion. Cannabinoids in particular have a long history of use for headache and migraine before prohibition and are still used by patients as a migraine abortive. Hallucinogens are being increasing used by cluster headache patients outside of physician recommendation mainly to abort a cluster period and to maintain quiescence for which there is considerable anecdotal success.

  15. Simultaneous quantification of 20 synthetic cannabinoids and 21 metabolites, and semi-quantification of 12 alkyl hydroxy metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-01-31

    Clandestine laboratories constantly produce new synthetic cannabinoids to circumvent legislative efforts, complicating toxicological analysis. No extensive synthetic cannabinoid quantitative urinary methods are reported in the literature. We developed and validated a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneously quantifying JWH-018, JWH-019, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-200, JWH-210, JWH-250, JWH-398, RCS-4, AM-2201, MAM-2201, UR-144, CP 47,497-C7, CP 47,497-C8 and their metabolites, and JWH-203, AM-694, RCS-8, XLR-11 and HU-210 parent compounds in urine. Non-chromatographically resolved alkyl hydroxy metabolite isomers were considered semi-quantitative. β-Glucuronidase hydrolyzed urine was extracted with 1ml Biotage SLE+ columns. Specimens were reconstituted in 150μL mobile phase consisting of 50% A (0.01% formic acid in water) and 50% B (0.01% formic acid in 50:50 methanol:acetonitrile). 4 and 25μL injections were performed to acquire data in positive and negative ionization modes, respectively. The LC-MS/MS instrument consisted of a Shimadzu UFLCxr system and an ABSciex 5500 Qtrap mass spectrometer with an electrospray source. Gradient chromatographic separation was achieved utilizing a Restek Ultra Biphenyl column with a 0.5ml/min flow rate and an overall run time of 19.5 and 11.4min for positive and negative mode methods, respectively. Quantification was by multiple reaction monitoring with CP 47,497 compounds and HU-210 ionized via negative polarity; all other analytes were acquired in positive mode. Lower and upper limits of linearity were 0.1-1.0 and 50-100μg/l (r(2)>0.994). Validation parameters were evaluated at three concentrations spanning linear dynamic ranges. Inter-day analytical recovery (bias) and imprecision (N=20) were 88.3-112.2% and 4.3-13.5% coefficient of variation, respectively. Extraction efficiencies and matrix effect (N=10) were 44-110 and -73 to 52%, respectively. We present a novel LC

  16. Analysis of rocuronium in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with application in clinical pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Natália Valadares; Lauretti, Gabriela Rocha; Filgueira, Gabriela Campos de Oliveira; Lopes, Bruno Carvalho Portes; Lanchote, Vera Lucia

    2014-03-01

    Rocuronium (ROC) is a neuromuscular blocking agent used in surgical procedures which is eliminated primarily by biliary excretion. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for analysis of ROC in human plasma. Separation of ROC and IS (verapamil) was performed using an endcapped C-18 column and a mixture of water:acetonitrile:trifluoracetic acid (50:50:0.1, v/v) as mobile phase. Aliquots of 100 μL of human plasma were extracted at pH 3, using dichloromethane. The lower limit of quantification of 5 ng/mL shows the high sensitivity of this method. Intra- and inter-assay precision (as relative standard deviation) was all ≤14.2% and accuracy (as relative standard error) did not exceed 10.1%. The validated method was successfully applied to quantify ROC concentrations in patients under surgical procedures up to 6h after the administration of the 0.4-0.9 mg/kg ROC. The pharmacokinetic parameter estimations of ROC showed AUC/dose of 563 μg min/mL, total clearance of 2.5 mL/min/kg, volume of distribution at steady state of 190 mL/kg and mean residence time of 83 min.

  17. Determination of bergenin in human plasma after oral administration by HPLC-MS/MS method and its pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Wang, Ben-Jie; Wei, Chun-Min; Yuan, Gui-Yan; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Guo, Rui-Chen

    2009-02-01

    A highly sensitive, simple and selective high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and applied to the determination of bergenin concentration in human plasma. Bergenin and the internal standard (IS) thiamphenicol in plasma were extracted with ethyl acetate, separated on a C(18 )reversed-phase column, eluted with mobile phase of acetonitrile-water, ionized by negative ion pneumatically assisted electrospray and detected in the multi-reaction monitoring mode using precursor --> product ions of m/z 327.1 --> 192 for bergenin and 354 --> 185.1 for the IS, respectively. The linear range of the calibration curve for bergenin was 0.25-60 ng mL(-1), with the lowest limit of quantification of 0.25 ng mL(-1), and the intra/inter-day relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 10%. The method is suitable for the determination of low bergenin concentration in human plasma after therapeutic oral doses, and has been first and successfully used for its pharmacokinetic studies in healthy Chinese volunteers.

  18. Enantioselective analysis of citalopram and demethylcitalopram in human and rat plasma by chiral LC-MS/MS: application to pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Adriana; Marques, Maria P; Coelho, Eduardo B; Lanchote, Vera L

    2007-11-01

    Citalopram (CITA) is available as a racemic mixture and as a pure enantiomer. Its antidepressive action is related to the (+)-(S)-CITA and to the metabolite (+)-(S)-demethylcitalopram (DCITA). In the present investigation, a method for the analysis of CITA and DCITA enantiomers in human and rat plasma was developed and applied to the study of pharmacokinetics. Plasma samples (1 ml) were extracted at pH 9.0 with toluene:isoamyl alcohol (9:1, v/v). The CITA and DCITA enantiomers were analyzed by LC-MS/MS on a Chiralcel OD-R column. Recovery was higher than 70% for both enantiomers. The quantification limit was 0.1 ng/ml, and linearity was observed up to 500 ng/ml plasma for each CITA and DCITA enantiomer. The method was applied to the study of the kinetic disposition of CITA administered in a single oral dose of 20 mg to a healthy volunteer and in a single dose of 20 mg/kg (by gavage) to Wistar rats (n = 6 for each time). The results showed a higher proportion of the (-)-(R)-CITA in human and rat plasma, with S/R AUC ratios for CITA of 0.28 and 0.44, respectively. S/R AUC ratios of DCITA were 0.48 for rats and 1.04 for the healthy volunteer.

  19. Striatal adenosine A2A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors form functional heteromeric complexes that mediate the motor effects of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Carriba, Paulina; Ortiz, Oskar; Patkar, Kshitij; Justinova, Zuzana; Stroik, Jessica; Themann, Andrea; Müller, Christa; Woods, Anima S; Hope, Bruce T; Ciruela, Francisco; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I; Lluis, Carme; Goldberg, Steven R; Moratalla, Rosario; Franco, Rafael; Ferré, Sergi

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of action responsible for the motor depressant effects of cannabinoids, which operate through centrally expressed cannabinoid CB1 receptors, is still a matter of debate. In the present study, we report that CB1 and adenosine A2A receptors form heteromeric complexes in co-transfected HEK-293T cells and rat striatum, where they colocalize in fibrilar structures. In a human neuroblastoma cell line, CB1 receptor signaling was found to be completely dependent on A2A receptor activation. Accordingly, blockade of A2A receptors counteracted the motor depressant effects produced by the intrastriatal administration of a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist. These biochemical and behavioral findings demonstrate that the profound motor effects of cannabinoids depend on physical and functional interactions between striatal A2A and CB1 receptors.

  20. Beta-caryophyllene is a dietary cannabinoid

    PubMed Central

    Gertsch, Jürg; Leonti, Marco; Raduner, Stefan; Racz, Ildiko; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Karsak, Meliha; Zimmer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The psychoactive cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. and the arachidonic acid-derived endocannabinoids are nonselective natural ligands for cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors. Although the CB1 receptor is responsible for the psychomodulatory effects, activation of the CB2 receptor is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammation, pain, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis. Here, we report that the widespread plant volatile (E)-β-caryophyllene [(E)-BCP] selectively binds to the CB2 receptor (Ki = 155 ± 4 nM) and that it is a functional CB2 agonist. Intriguingly, (E)-BCP is a common constituent of the essential oils of numerous spice and food plants and a major component in Cannabis. Molecular docking simulations have identified a putative binding site of (E)-BCP in the CB2 receptor, showing ligand π–π stacking interactions with residues F117 and W258. Upon binding to the CB2 receptor, (E)-BCP inhibits adenylate cylcase, leads to intracellular calcium transients and weakly activates the mitogen-activated kinases Erk1/2 and p38 in primary human monocytes. (E)-BCP (500 nM) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression in peripheral blood and attenuates LPS-stimulated Erk1/2 and JNK1/2 phosphorylation in monocytes. Furthermore, peroral (E)-BCP at 5 mg/kg strongly reduces the carrageenan-induced inflammatory response in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking CB2 receptors, providing evidence that this natural product exerts cannabimimetic effects in vivo. These results identify (E)-BCP as a functional nonpsychoactive CB2 receptor ligand in foodstuff and as a macrocyclic antiinflammatory cannabinoid in Cannabis. PMID:18574142

  1. Are cannabinoids effective for epilepsy?

    PubMed

    Peña, Javier; Rada, Gabriel

    2017-01-13

    Several beneficial effects have been proposed for cannabinoids in different clinical conditions, including epilepsy. However, their clinical role is controversial. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases, we identified five systematic reviews including four randomized trials addressing the question of this article. We extracted data and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether cannabinoids reduce the frequency of seizures in epilepsy because the certainty of the evidence is very low, and they probably increase adverse effects.

  2. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of select chemotherapeutic agents following intranasal delivery in a non-human primate model.

    PubMed

    League-Pascual, James C; Lester-McCully, Cynthia M; Shandilya, Shaefali; Ronner, Lukas; Rodgers, Louis; Cruz, Rafael; Peer, Cody J; Figg, William D; Warren, Katherine E

    2017-03-13

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits entry of most chemotherapeutic agents into the CNS, resulting in inadequate exposure within CNS tumor tissue. Intranasal administration is a proposed means of delivery that can bypass the BBB, potentially resulting in more effective chemotherapeutic exposure at the tumor site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and pharmacokinetics (plasma and CSF) of intranasal delivery using select chemotherapeutic agents in a non-human primate (NHP) model. Three chemotherapeutic agents with known differences in CNS penetration were selected for intranasal administration in a NHP model to determine proof of principle of CNS delivery, assess tolerability and feasibility, and to evaluate whether certain drug characteristics were associated with increased CNS exposure. Intravenous (IV) temozolomide (TMZ), oral (PO) valproic acid, and PO perifosine were administered to adult male rhesus macaques. The animals received a single dose of each agent systemically and intranasally in separate experiments, with each animal acting as his own control. The dose of the agents administered systemically was the human equivalent of a clinically appropriate dose, while the intranasal dose was the maximum achievable dose based on the volume limitation of 1 mL. Multiple serial paired plasma and CSF samples were collected and quantified using a validated uHPLC/tandem mass spectrometry assay after each drug administration. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using non-compartmental analysis. CSF penetration was calculated from the ratio of areas under the concentration-time curves for CSF and plasma (AUCCSF:plasma). Intranasal administration was feasible and tolerable for all agents with no significant toxicities observed. For TMZ, the degrees of CSF drug penetration after intranasal and IV administration were 36 (32-57) and 22 (20-41)%, respectively. Although maximum TMZ drug concentration in the CSF (Cmax) was lower after intranasal

  3. The influence of cannabinoids on learning and memory processes of the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G

    2015-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the mammalian endocannabinoid system plays an integral role in learning and memory. Our understanding of how cannabinoids influence memory comes predominantly from studies examining cognitive and emotional memory systems mediated by the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. However, recent evidence suggests that cannabinoids also affect habit or stimulus-response (S-R) memory mediated by the dorsal striatum. Studies implementing a variety of maze tasks in rats indicate that systemic or intra-dorsolateral striatum infusions of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists impair habit memory. In mice, cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor knockdown can enhance or impair habit formation, whereas Δ(9)THC tolerance enhances habit formation. Studies in human cannabis users also suggest an enhancement of S-R/habit memory. A tentative conclusion based on the available data is that acute disruption of the endocannabinoid system with either agonists or antagonists impairs, whereas chronic cannabinoid exposure enhances, dorsal striatum-dependent S-R/habit memory. CB1 receptors are required for multiple forms of striatal synaptic plasticity implicated in memory, including short-term and long-term depression. Interactions with the hippocampus-dependent memory system may also have a role in some of the observed effects of cannabinoids on habit memory. The impairing effect often observed with acute cannabinoid administration argues for cannabinoid-based treatments for human psychopathologies associated with a dysfunctional habit memory system (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction/relapse). In addition, the enhancing effect of repeated cannabinoid exposure on habit memory suggests a novel neurobehavioral mechanism for marijuana addiction involving the dorsal striatum-dependent memory system.

  4. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of silybin nanoparticles in mice bearing SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma xenocraft

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xin-Lei; Zhao, Shu-Zhen; Hou, Rui-Jie; Yang, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Quan-Le; Yin, Shan-Lan; Wang, Shi-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The particle fabrication technique was used to fabricate monodisperse size and shape specific poly (lactide-co-glycolide) particles loaded with the silybin. Response surface methodology (RSM) using the central composite rotatable design (CCRD) model was used to optimize formulations of silybin nanoparticles. Further the optimized nanoparticles are characterized for particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, entrapment efficiency, in-vitro drug release, silybin availability for tumor, plasma, lung, spleen, liver were determined. The significant findings were the optimal formulation of PLGA concentration 10 mg, PVA concentration 2000 and PET width of 6 gave rise to the EE of 88%, mean diameter of 223 nm and zeta potential of 25-mV. Release studies were investigated at pH 1.2 and pH 6.8. It was studied that lower the pH, faster the release of sylibin. The nanoparticles had~15-fold higher plasma exposure as measured by AUC contrasted to pure silybin. The nanoparticles had a 60% increase altogether tumor silybin presentation contrasted with pure silybin. Nanoparticles had higher silybin presentation in the spleen and liver contrasted with pure silybin suspension as expected for a nanoparticle formulation. The lung silybin presentation for the nanoparticle was additionally 2-fold higher than that of the pure silybin suspension. The results of pharmacokinetic parameters and oral bioavailability data exhibited that drug-nanoparticle complex could enhance the oral absorption of silybin and as well as the use of particles with smaller feature size may be preferred to decrease clearance by organs of the mononuclear phagocyte system. PMID:26770331

  6. Pharmacokinetics of cefpimizole in normal humans after single- and multiple-dose intravenous infusions.

    PubMed Central

    Lakings, D B; Friis, J M; Brown, R J; Allen, H R

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefpimizole (free acid equivalents of cefpimizole sodium), a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic, were determined after single- and multiple-dose 20-min intravenous infusions of 1, 2, and 4 g. The kinetics of single-dose administration of cefpimizole correspond to a two-compartment model with an average apparent volume of distribution of 20.0 +/- 3.5 liters, a distribution rate constant of 2.24 +/- 1.00 h-1, and a terminal rate constant of 0.358 +/- 0.036 h-1 (half-life, 1.9 h). The total body clearance was 118.6 +/- 20.2 ml/min. The primary route of elimination for cefpimizole was the renal route, with approximately 80% of the administered dose excreted as the parent compound. The elimination rate constant, as calculated from urinary excretion data, was 0.339 +/- 0.043 h-1, which is in close agreement with the terminal rate constant for plasma. Renal clearance of cefpimizole was 96.2 +/- 17.3 ml/min. Dose proportionality over the three dose levels was obtained from area under the plasma curve and cumulative urinary excretion data. The results of the multiple-dose study indicated that no apparent change in the distribution or elimination kinetics of cefpimizole occurred after the administration of 1-, 2-, and 4-g doses for 7 days, three times a day. The kinetics from the multiple-dose study were in close agreement with those from the single-dose study. No accumulation of cefpimizole occurred, and nondetectable levels was observed 24 h after administration of the last dose. Peaks that could be attributed to metabolites of cefpimizole were not observed during high-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis of either plasma or urine specimens. PMID:6524897

  7. Human pharmacokinetics and toxicity of high-dose metronidazole administered orally and intravenously

    SciTech Connect

    Urtasun, R.C.; Rabin, H.R.; Partington, J.

    1983-01-01

    This study is part of a clinical program to assess the use of nitroimidazoles as radiosensitizers of hypoxic tumor cells. A total of 37 patients with malignant tumors have been entered into the study to receive oral high-dose metronidazole in conjunction with radiation. Twenty-eight patients with malignant brain tumors received 6 gm/m2 three times a week for 3 weeks (a mean total dose of 5.3 gm/m2). Maximum mean plasma drug concentration of 1 mM was obtained at 4 hours after drug ingestion with a mean half-life of 13 hours. Tissue and cerebrospinal fluid levels of 80% to 90% of the plasma levels were obtained at 4 to 6 hours. A linear relationship between increased drug dose and increased plasma concentration was observed at doses of 2.5 gm/m2 up to 6 gm/m2. Acute gastrointestinal and central nervous system toxicity was the dose-limiting factor (50% and 25%, respectively, at total doses of 5.3 gm/m2). Pharmacokinetic studies of intravenous metronidazole were performed in eight consenting patients. Single doses of 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 gm were administered intravenously by zero-order infusion pump. Seven of the eight patients received a second identical dose orally 1 week later and the results were compared. Open two-compartment kinetic characteristics of metronidazole were computed from simultaneous plasma infusion and urine excretion rate equations, by use of a nonlinear least-squares regression analysis program (NONLIN). The mean (+/- SD) for alpha half-life was 1.2 +/- 1.3 hours, and that for the beta half-life was 9.8 +/- 5.9 hours. The absolute oral bioavailability was estimated to approximate 100%.

  8. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral cannabidiol when administered concomitantly with intravenous fentanyl in humans

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Yiannoulos, Georgia; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Barnes, Allan J.; Winkel, Gary; Sinha, Rajita; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cannabidiol (CBD) is hypothesized as a potential treatment for opioid addiction, with safety studies an important first step for medication development. We determined CBD safety and pharmacokinetics when administered concomitantly with a high-potency opioid in healthy subjects. Methods This double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study of CBD co-administered with intravenous fentanyl, was conducted at the Clinical Research Center in Mount Sinai Hospital, a tertiary care medical center in New York City. Participants were healthy volunteers aged 21–65 years with prior opioid exposure, regardless of route. Blood samples were obtained before and after 400 or 800 mg CBD pretreatment, followed by a single 0.5 (Session 1) or 1.0mcg/Kg (Session 2) intravenous fentanyl dose. The primary outcome was the Systematic Assessment for Treatment Emergent Events (SAFTEE) to assess safety and adverse effects. CBD peak plasma concentrations, time to reach peak plasma concentrations (tmax), and area under the curve (AUC) were measured. Results SAFTEE data were similar between groups without respiratory depression or cardiovascular complications during any test session. Following low dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 1.5h (Sessions 1 and 2, respectively). Following high dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 4h in Sessions 1 and 2, respectively. There were no significant differences in plasma CBD or cortisol (AUC p=NS) between sessions. Conclusions CBD does not exacerbate adverse effects associated with intravenous fentanyl administration. Co-administration of CBD and opioids was safe and well tolerated. These data provide the foundation for future studies examining CBD as a potential treatment for opioid abuse. PMID:25748562

  9. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2012-12-05

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released 'endocannabinoids' or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive 'multi-targeting'.

  10. Preclinical and Clinical Assessment of Cannabinoids as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ladin, Daniel A.; Soliman, Eman; Griffin, LaToya; Van Dross, Rukiyah

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States with 1.7 million new cases estimated to be diagnosed in 2016. This disease remains a formidable clinical challenge and represents a substantial financial burden to the US health care system. Therefore, research and development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of cancer is of high priority. Cannabinoids and their derivatives have been utilized for their medicinal and therapeutic properties throughout history. Cannabinoid activity is regulated by the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is comprised of cannabinoid receptors, transporters, and enzymes involved in cannabinoid synthesis and breakdown. More recently, cannabinoids have gained special attention for their role in cancer cell proliferation and death. However, many studies investigated these effects using in vitro models which may not adequately mimic tumor growth and metastasis. As such, this article aims to review study results which evaluated effects of cannabinoids from plant, synthetic and endogenous origins on cancer development in preclinical animal models and to examine the current standing of cannabinoids that are being tested in human cancer patients. PMID:27774065

  11. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors that can be activated by endogenously released ‘endocannabinoids’ or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)) and Sativex (Δ9-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive ‘multi-targeting’. PMID:23108552

  12. Combination therapy of advanced invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in transiently neutropenic rats using human pharmacokinetic equivalent doses of voriconazole and anidulafungin.

    PubMed

    van de Sande, Wendy W J; Mathot, Ron A A; ten Kate, Marian T; van Vianen, Wim; Tavakol, Mehri; Rijnders, Bart J A; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M

    2009-05-01

    At present, voriconazole (VOR) is the drug of first choice for treating invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). However, particularly in advanced stages of disease and in the severely immunocompromised host, the mortality remains substantial. The combination of VOR with an echinocandin may improve the therapeutic outcome. We investigate here whether combining VOR and anidulafungin (ANI) in advanced IPA in transiently neutropenic rats results in a higher therapeutic efficacy. Since VOR is metabolized more rapidly in rodents than in humans, dosage adjustment for VOR is necessary to obtain an area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) in rodents that is equivalent to that of humans. In this study, the pharmacokinetics of VOR and ANI in rats were elucidated, and dosage schedules were applied that produced AUCs similar to those of humans. The developed dose schedules were well tolerated by the rats, without effects on renal and hepatic functions. VOR showed excellent efficacy in early IPA (100% rat survival). In advanced IPA, VOR was less efficacious (50% rat survival), whereas a significant decrease in galactomannan concentrations in lungs and sera was found in surviving rats. ANI administered in advanced IPA resulted in 22% rat survival, and the serum concentrations of fungal galactomannan were slightly but not significantly decreased. The addition of ANI to VOR did not result in significantly increased therapeutic efficacy in advanced IPA, resulting in 67% rat survival and a significant decrease in galactomannan concentration in serum. In conclusion, VOR monotherapy is therapeutically effective in the treatment of advanced-stage IPA and superior to the use of ANI. Combining both agents does not significantly improve the therapeutic outcome.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR PROPYLENE GLYCOL MONOMETHYL ETHER AND ITS ACETATE IN RATS AND HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Gies, Richard A.; Wu, Hong; Weitz, Karl K.

    2005-03-05

    Propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PM), along with its acetate, is the most widely used of the propylene glycol ether family of solvents. The most common toxic effects of PM observed in animal studies include sedation, very slight alpha2u globulin-mediated nephropathy (male rats only) and hepatomegally at high exposures (typically >1000 ppm). Sedation in animal studies usually resolves within a few exposures to 3000 ppm (the highest concentration used in subchronic and chronic inhalation studies) due to the induction of metabolizing enzymes. Data from a variety of pharmacokinetic and mechanistic studies have been incorporated into a PBPK model for PM and its acetate in rats and mice. Published controlled exposure and workplace biomonitoring studies have also been included for comparisons of the internal dosimetry of PM and its acetate between laboratory animals and humans. PM acetate is rapidly hydrolyzed to PM, which is further metabolized to either glucuronide or sulphate conjugates (minor pathways) or propylene glycol (major pathway). In vitro half-lives for PM acetate range from 14-36 min depending upon the tissue and species. In vivo half-lives are considerably faster, reflecting the total contributions of esterases in the blood and tissues of the body, and are on the order of just a few minutes. Thus, very little PM acetate is found in vivo and, other than potential portal of entry irritation, the toxicity of PM acetate is related to PM. Regardless of the source for PM (either PM or its acetate), rats were predicted to have a higher Cmax and AUC for PM in blood than humans, especially at concentrations greater than the current ACGIH TLV of 100 ppm. This would indicate that the major systemic effects of PM would be expected to be less severe in humans than rats at comparable inhalation exposures.

  14. UPLC-MS/MS determination of phentolamine in human plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Kan, X; Zheng, S-L; Zhou, C-Y

    2014-11-01

    A sensitive and rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed to determine phentolamine in human plasma. Sample preparation was accomplished through a simple liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. Chromatographic separation was carried out on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column using an isocratic mobile phase system composed of acetonitrile and 1% formic acid in water (33:67, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.45 mL/min. Mass spectrometric analysis was performed using a QTrap5500 mass spectrometer coupled with an electro-spray ionization (ESI) source in the positive ion mode. The MRM transitions of m/z 282.1 → 212.0 and m/z 237.1 → 194.2 were used to quantify for phentolamine and carbamazepine (internal standard, IS), respectively. The linearity of this method was found to be within the concentration range of 0.5-100.0 ng/mL with a lower limit of quantification of 0.5 ng/mL. Only 1.0 min was needed for an analytical run. This fully validated method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study after oral administration of 60 mg phentolamine to 20 Chinese healthy male volunteers.

  15. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester exhibiting distinctive binding interaction with human serum albumin implies the pharmacokinetic basis of propolis bioactive components.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Wu, Fan; Tan, Jing; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Cuiping; Zheng, Huoqing; Hu, Fuliang

    2016-04-15

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), as one of the major bioactive components present in propolis, exhibits versatile bioactivities, especially for its potent cytotoxic effects on several cancer cell models. To understand the pharmacokinetic characteristics of CAPE, the binding interaction between CAPE and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated in vitro using multiple spectroscopic methods and molecular docking. The results reveal that CAPE exhibits a distinctive binding interaction with HSA comparing with other propolis components. The association constant K(A) (L mol(-1)) of the binding reaches 10(6) order of magnitude, which is significantly stronger than the other components of propolis. Based on the theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the binding distance was calculated as 5.7 nm, which is longer than that of the other components of propolis. The thermodynamic results indicate that the binding is mainly driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. The docking and drugs (warfarin and ibuprofen) competitive results show that CAPE is located in the subdomain IIA (Sudlow's site I, FA7) of HSA, and Gln196 and Lys199 contribute to the hydrogen bonds. Circular dichroism spectra suggest an alteration of the secondary structure of HSA due to its partial unfolding in the presence of CAPE.

  16. Determination of Sertraline in Human Plasma by UPLC-MS/MS and its Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiao-Hong; Wang, Zhen; Tian, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Jian-Wei; Zhu, Kang; Ye, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    A sensitive and rapid ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) method was developed to determine sertraline in human plasma. Sample preparation was accomplished through a simple liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate. Chromatographic separation was carried out on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column using a gradient mobile phase system composed of acetonitrile and 1% formic acid in water at a flow rate of 0.40 mL/min. Mass spectrometric analysis was performed using a XEVO TQD mass spectrometer coupled with an electrospray ionization source in the positive ion mode. The multiple reaction monitoring transitions of m/z 306.3 → 275.2 and 326.2 → 291.1 were used to quantify for sertraline and midazolam (internal standard), respectively. The linearity of this method was found to be within the concentration range of 1.0-100.0 ng/mL with a lower limit of quantification of 1.0 ng/mL. Only 2.0 min was needed for an analytical run. This fully validated method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study after an oral administration of 100 mg sertraline to 20 Chinese healthy male volunteers.

  17. Use of minipig skin biopsy model as an innovative tool to design topical formulation to achieve desired pharmacokinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Amitava; Leyes, Aquiles; Manser, Kimberly; Roadcap, Brad; Mestre, Christine; Tatosian, Daniel; Jin, Lan; Uemura, Naoto

    2015-05-01

    In vitro cadaver skin permeation studies are often conducted to characterize the permeation profile of compounds for dermal delivery. However, its utility could be limited in the case of topical products because of lack of reliable prediction of in vivo skin kinetics. In this paper, the use of in vivo skin biopsy data to guide topical formulation development is described. A formulation was developed by compounding MK-0873, a phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, into a commercially available cream base. The cream was characterized by skin pharmacokinetic studies in minipigs, which demonstrated that MK-0873 concentrations in the epidermis and dermis were substantially higher than the IC80 for human whole blood PDE4 inhibition of ∼200 nM, suggesting that cream should provide sufficient skin exposure to assess clinical efficacy. In toxicological studies, after 1 month repeat application in minipigs minor dermal irritation and minimal systemic exposure were observed. Based on these preclinical data, the cream formulation was chosen for single rising dose clinical studies, where plasma levels of MK-0873 were mostly below the LOQ, whereas skin biopsy concentrations ranged from 6.5 to 25.1 μM. These data suggested that minipig skin biopsy model can be a valuable tool to assess performance of topical formulations and guide formulation development.

  18. PEGylated recombinant human interferon-ω as a long-acting antiviral agent: structure, antiviral activity and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weili; Yu, Changming; Wu, Ling; Fang, Ting; Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Jinlong; Yu, Ting; Fu, Ling; Chen, Wei; Hu, Tao

    2014-08-01

    Recombinant human interferon-ω (rhIFN-ω) exhibits a potent antiviral activity. Because of poor pharmacokinetics (PK) of rhIFN-ω, frequent dosing of rhIFN-ω is necessitated to achieve the sustained antiviral efficacy. PEGylation can efficiently improve the PK of rhIFN-ω while substantially decrease its bioactivity. The structure, antiviral activity and PK of the PEGylated rhIFN-ω were measured to establish their relationship with PEGylation sites, polyethylene glycol (PEG) mass and PEG structure. Accordingly, N-terminus and the lysine residues were selected as the PEGylation sites. PEGs with Mw of 20kDa and 40kDa were used to investigate the effect of PEG mass. Linear and branched PEGs were used to investigate the effect of PEG structure. PEGylation decreased the antiviral activity of rhIFN-ω and improved its PK. The PEGylation sites determine the bioactivity of the PEGylated rhIFN-ω and the conjugated PEG mass determines the PK. N-terminally PEGylated rhIFN-ω with 40kDa linear PEG maintains 21.7% of the rhIFN-ω antiviral activity with a half-life of 139.6h. Thus, N-terminally PEGylated rhIFN-ω with linear 40kDa PEG is a potential antiviral agent for long-acting treatment of the viral diseases.

  19. Phenyl amide linker improves the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of N-terminally mono-PEGylated human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling; Ji, Shaoyang; Shen, Lijuan; Hu, Tao

    2014-09-02

    Human growth hormone (hGH) suffers from a short plasma half-life of ∼15 min, necessitating frequent injections to maintain its physiological effect. PEGylation, conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG), is an effective strategy to prolong the plasma half-life of hGH. However, PEGylation can significantly decrease the bioactivity of hGH. Thus, a new PEGylation approach is desired to improve the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of the PEGylated hGH. In the present study, two N-terminally mono-PEGylated hGHs were prepared using aldehyde chemistry. Phenyl amide and ethyl moieties were used as the linkers between PEG and hGH, respectively. The hydrodynamic volume, proteolytic sensitivity, and immunogenicity of the PEGylated hGH with phenyl amide linker (hGH-phenyl-PEG) were lower than those of the one with propyl linker (hGH-prop-PEG). In addition, hGH-phenyl-PEG showed a higher in vitro bioactivity and better PK and PD than hGH-prop-PEG. The better PK of hGH-phenyl-PEG was mainly due to its lower proteolytic sensitivity and low immunogenicity. The better PD of hGH-phenyl-PEG was mainly due to its higher in vitro bioactivity. Thus, the phenyl amide linker can improve the overall pharmacological profiles of the PEGylated hGH. Our study is expected to advance the development of long-acting protein biotherapeutics with high therapeutic efficacy.

  20. Simultaneous determination of amoxicillin and ambroxol in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: validation and application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wen, Aidong; Hang, Taijun; Chen, Suning; Wang, Zhirui; Ding, Likun; Tian, Yun; Zhang, Meng; Xu, Xinxin

    2008-11-04

    A rapid, simple and sensitive LC-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous determination of amoxicillin and ambroxol in human plasma using clenbuterol as internal standard (IS). The plasma samples were subjected to a simple protein precipitation with methanol. Separation was achieved on a Lichrospher C(18) column (150 mm x 4.6mm ID, dp 5 microm) using methanol (containing 0.2% of formic acid) and water (containing 0.2% of formic acid) as a mobile phase by gradient elution at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Detection was performed using electrospray ionization in positive ion multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode by monitoring the ion transitions from m/z 365.9-->348.9 (amoxicillin), m/z 378.9-->263.6 (ambroxol) and m/z 277.0-->203.0 (IS). Calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 5-20,000 ng/mL for amoxicillin, and 1-200 ng/mL for ambroxol, with the intra- and inter-run precisions of <9% and the accuracies of 100+/-7%. The method has been validated and applied to pharmacokinetic studies of compound amoxicillin and ambroxol hydrochloride tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of catechols in human subjects intravenously receiving XueBiJing injection, an emerging antiseptic herbal medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuxue; Cheng, Chen; Wang, Fengqing; Huang, Yühong; Jia, Weiwei; Olaleye, Olajide E; Li, Meijuan; Li, Yanfen; Li, Chuan

    2016-02-01

    XueBiJing injection, prepared from a five-herb combination, is extensively used as add-on therapy in routine sepsis care in China. Catechols, derived from the component herb Salvia miltiorrhiza roots (Danshen), are probably important because of their reported antiseptic properties. This study was designed to characterize pharmacokinetics of major circulating Danshen catechols in human subjects intravenously receiving the injection at the label doses. A total of 17 Danshen catechols were detected in XueBiJing injection (content level, 0.1-139.3 μmol/L). After dosing, tanshinol and salvianolic acid B exhibited relatively high levels of systemic exposure with mean elimination half-lives of 0.38 and 0.29 h, respectively. The total plasma clearance and apparent volume of distribution at steady state of tanshinol were 1.07 L/h/kg and 0.40 L/kg, respectively, whereas those of salvianolic acid B were 0.43 L/h/kg and 0.13 L/kg, respectively. Protocatechuic acid and five other catechols were also detected in plasma but at low exposure levels. Although protocatechuic aldehyde had the highest content level in the injection, like the remaining eight catechols, it was undetected in plasma. Protocatechuic aldehyde was extensively converted into protocatechuic acid and other metabolites. The information gained here facilitates understanding the roles of Danshen catechols in therapeutic actions of XueBiJing injection.

  2. In vitro enantioselective human liver microsomal metabolism and prediction of in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters of tetrabenazine by DLLME-CE.

    PubMed

    Bocato, Mariana Zuccherato; de Lima Moreira, Fernanda; de Albuquerque, Nayara Cristina Perez; de Gaitani, Cristiane Masetto; de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo Moraes

    2016-09-05

    A new capillary electrophoresis method for the enantioselective analysis of cis- and trans- dihydrotetrabenazine (diHTBZ) after in vitro metabolism by human liver microsomes (HLMs) was developed. The chiral electrophoretic separations were performed by using tris-phosphate buffer (pH 2.5) containing 1% (w/v) carboxymethyl-β-CD as background electrolyte with an applied voltage of +15kV and capillary temperature kept at 15°C. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was employed to extract the analytes from HLMs. Dichloromethane was used as extraction solvent (75μL) and acetone as disperser solvent (150μL). The method was validated according to official guidelines and showed to be linear over the concentration range of 0.29-19.57μmolL(-1) (r=0.9955) for each metabolite enantiomer. Within- and between-day precision and accuracy evaluated by relative standard deviation and relative error were lower than 15% for all enantiomers. The stability assay showed that the analytes kept stable under handling, storage and in metabolism conditions. After method validation, an enantioselective in vitro metabolism and in vivo pharmacokinetic prediction was carried out. This study showed a stereoselective metabolism and the observed kinetic profile indicated a substrate inhibition behavior. DiHTBZ enantiomers were catalyzed mainly by CYP2C19 and the predicted clearance suggests that liver metabolism is the main route for TBZ elimination which supports the literature data.

  3. Cannabinoids and hallucinogens for headache.

    PubMed

    McGeeney, Brian E

    2013-03-01

    Hallucinogens and most cannabinoids are classified under schedule 1 of the Federal Controlled Substances Act 1970, along with heroin and ecstacy. Hence they cannot be prescribed by physicians, and by implication, have no accepted medical use with a high abuse potential. Despite their legal status, hallucinogens and cannabinoids are used by patients for relief of headache, helped by the growing number of American states that have legalized medical marijuana. Cannabinoids in particular have a long history of use in the abortive and prophylactic treatment of migraine before prohibition and are still used by patients as a migraine abortive in particular. Most practitioners are unaware of the prominence cannabis or "marijuana" once held in medical practice. Hallucinogens are being increasingly used by cluster headache patients outside of physician recommendation mainly to abort a cluster period and maintain quiescence for which there is considerable anecdotal success. The legal status of cannabinoids and hallucinogens has for a long time severely inhibited medical research, and there are still no blinded studies on headache subjects, from which we could assess true efficacy.

  4. Intravenous and oral zidovudine pharmacokinetics and coagulation effects in asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected hemophilia patients.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, G D; Portmore, A C; Marder, V; Plank, C; Olson, J; Taylor, C; Bonnez, W; Reichman, R C

    1992-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic and coagulation studies were carried out over a 12-week period with 11 asymptomatic hemophilia patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection receiving zidovudine (ZDV). The patients received 300 mg every 4 h while awake (the accepted dose at the time of this study); consecutive 24-h intravenous (i.v.) and 12-h oral pharmacokinetic studies were conducted at weeks 1, 6, and 12. Coagulation studies were conducted at weeks 0, 4, 8, and 12. The numbers of units of factors VIII and IX and cryoprecipitate transfused during the 12-week periods before, during, and after ZDV treatment were recorded. Following i.v. and oral ZDV administration, the concentration in plasma declined rapidly over the first 4 h, and in some patients, ZDV was still detectable at 4 to 10 h. The i.v. total clearances (means +/- standard deviations) were 14.9 +/- 7.3, 11.2 +/- 3.7, and 15.1 +/- 4.7 ml/min/kg of body weight. The i.v. distribution volumes were 1.08 +/- 0.5, 1.0 +/- 0.4, and 1.65 +/- 1.4 liters/kg. The bioavailabilities were 0.54 +/- 0.22, 0.46 +/- 0.19, and 0.59 +/- 0.13 at weeks 1, 6, and 12, respectively. The pattern of ZDV-glucuronide (GZDV) disposition was similar to that of ZDV, and the peak plasma GZDV-to-ZDV ratio was higher after oral dosing, consistent with first-pass metabolism. In some individuals, up to 33% of an i.v. dose was excreted unchanged. At weeks 6 and 12, greater than 300 mg of total ZDV (GZDV plus ZDV) was recovered in the urine of some patients, suggesting tissue redistribution. Concentration in plasma after oral ZDV administration were variable, both within and between patients. The von Willebrand antigen level consistently decreased throughout the study but was not accompanied by a parallel change in ristocetin cofactor A activity, and no clinical adverse effects on coagulation were noted. This study demonstrates that ZDV can be used in hemophilia patients without worsening of their bleeding tendencies. The clinical significance of

  5. Quantitative Evaluation of Dichloroacetic Acid Kinetics in Human -- A Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    use include mild liver dysfunction, transient central neuropathy , peripheral neuropathy and hypocalcemia. The clinical effects are generally...metabolite of trichloroethylene. DCA liver carcinogenicity has been demonstrated in rodents but epidemiological evidence in humans is not available. High...probable minor metabolite of trichloroethylene. DCA liver carcinogenicity has been demonstrated in rodents but epidemiological evidence in humans is not

  6. Cannabinoids in medicine: A review of their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, Mohamed

    2006-04-21

    In order to assess the current knowledge on the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids, a meta-analysis was performed through Medline and PubMed up to July 1, 2005. The key words used were cannabis, marijuana, marihuana, hashish, hashich, haschich, cannabinoids, tetrahydrocannabinol, THC, dronabinol, nabilone, levonantradol, randomised, randomized, double-blind, simple blind, placebo-controlled, and human. The research also included the reports and reviews published in English, French and Spanish. For the final selection, only properly controlled clinical trials were retained, thus open-label studies were excluded. Seventy-two controlled studies evaluating the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids were identified. For each clinical trial, the country where the project was held, the number of patients assessed, the type of study and comparisons done, the products and the dosages used, their efficacy and their adverse effects are described. Cannabinoids present an interesting therapeutic potential as antiemetics, appetite stimulants in debilitating diseases (cancer and AIDS), analgesics, and in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, Tourette's syndrome, epilepsy and glaucoma.

  7. Safety and pharmacokinetics of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immunoglobulin administered to HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns. Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 185 Pharmacokinetic Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J S; Mofenson, L M; Fletcher, C V; Moye, J; Stiehm, E R; Meyer, W A; Nemo, G J; Mathieson, B J; Hirsch, G; Sapan, C V; Cummins, L M; Jimenez, E; O'Neill, E; Kovacs, A; Stek, A

    1997-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics and safety of hyperimmune anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intravenous immunoglobulin (HIVIG) were evaluated in the first 28 maternal-infant pairs enrolled in a randomized, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-controlled trial of HIVIG maternal-infant HIV transmission prophylaxis. Using 200 mg/kg, mean half-life and volume of distribution (Vd) in women were 15 days and 72 mL/kg, respectively, after one and 32 days and 154 mL/kg after three monthly infusions, with stable 4 mL/kg/day clearance. Transplacental passage occurred. Newborn single-dose half-life, Vd, and clearance were 30 days, 143 mL/kg, and 4 mL/kg/day, respectively. HIVIG rapidly cleared maternal serum immune complex-dissociated p24 antigen, and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels were stable. Mild to moderate adverse clinical effects occurred in 2 of 103 maternal and 2 of 25 infant infusions. No adverse hematologic, blood chemistry, or immunologic effects were seen. HIVIG is well-tolerated in HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns, clears antigenemia, crosses the placenta, and exhibits pharmacokinetics similar to those of other immunoglobulin preparations.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of IDX184, a liver-targeted oral prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, in the monkey and formulation optimization for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Pan-Zhou, Xin-Ru; Mayes, Benjamin A; Rashidzadeh, Hassan; Gasparac, Rahela; Smith, Steven; Bhadresa, Sanjeev; Gupta, Kusum; Cohen, Marita Larsson; Bu, Charlie; Good, Steven S; Moussa, Adel; Rush, Roger

    2016-10-01

    IDX184 is a phosphoramidate prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, developed to treat patients infected with hepatitis C virus. A mass balance study of radiolabeled IDX184 and pharmacokinetic studies of IDX184 in portal vein-cannulated monkeys revealed relatively low IDX184 absorption but higher exposure of IDX184 in the portal vein than in the systemic circulation, indicating >90 % of the absorbed dose was subject to hepatic extraction. Systemic exposures to the main metabolite, 2'-methylguanosine (2'-MeG), were used as a surrogate for liver levels of the pharmacologically active entity 2'-MeG triphosphate, and accordingly, systemic levels of 2'-MeG in the monkey were used to optimize formulations for further clinical development of IDX184. Capsule formulations of IDX184 delivered acceptable levels of 2'-MeG in humans; however, the encapsulation process introduced low levels of the genotoxic impurity ethylene sulfide (ES), which necessitated formulation optimization. Animal pharmacokinetic data guided the development of a tablet with trace levels of ES and pharmacokinetic performance equal to that of the clinical capsule in the monkey. Under fed conditions in humans, the new tablet formulation showed similar exposure to the capsule used in prior clinical trials.

  9. Pharmacokinetic study in pigs and in vitro metabolic characterization in pig- and human-liver microsomes reveal marked differences in disposition and metabolism of tiletamine and zolazepam (Telazol).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Mann, Henry J; Remmel, Rory P; Beilman, Greg J; Kaila, Nitin

    2014-04-01

    1. An equal-dose combination of tiletamine and zolazepam (Telazol®) is used as a veterinary anesthetic. There also have been reports of human abuse of Telazol®. The pharmacokinetics and metabolic fate of tiletamine and zolazepam and the rationale for their administration as an equal-dose combination are unclear. 2. The single-dose pharmacokinetics of intramuscular tiletamine and zolazepam (3 mg/kg each) in 16 Yorkshire-crossbred pigs were determined. The metabolites of tiletamine and zolazepam in pig plasma and urine were identified by mass spectrometry. The metabolic stability of tiletamine and zolazepam and the kinetics of formation of their metabolites by pig- and human-liver microsomes were determined. 3. Higher concentrations of zolazepam were observed in pig plasma and it was cleared more slowly compared to tiletamine (apparent clearance: 11 versus 134 l/h; half-life: 2.76 versus 1.97 h). Three metabolites of zolazepam and one metabolite of tiletamine were identified in pig urine, plasma and in microsomal incubations. In vitro formation of each of these metabolites in microsomes was biphasic involving a high-affinity/low-capacity and a low-affinity/high-capacity enzyme. The in vitro metabolic stability of tiletamine was considerably lower compared to zolazepam. 4. These results collectively point to major pharmacokinetic and metabolic differences between the two components of this fixed-dose anesthetic combination.

  10. Utility of a human FcRn transgenic mouse model in drug discovery for early assessment and prediction of human pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Avery, Lindsay B; Wang, Mengmeng; Kavosi, Mania S; Joyce, Alison; Kurz, Jeffrey C; Fan, Yao-Yun; Dowty, Martin E; Zhang, Minlei; Zhang, Yiqun; Cheng, Aili; Hua, Fei; Jones, Hannah M; Neubert, Hendrik; Polzer, Robert J; O'Hara, Denise M

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies continue to develop as an emerging drug class, with a need for preclinical tools to better predict in vivo characteristics. Transgenic mice expressing human neonatal Fc receptor (hFcRn) have potential as a preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) model to project human PK of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Using a panel of 27 mAbs with a broad PK range, we sought to characterize and establish utility of this preclinical animal model and provide guidance for its application in drug development of mAbs. This set of mAbs was administered to both hemizygous and homozygous hFcRn transgenic mice (Tg32) at a single intravenous dose, and PK parameters were derived. Higher hFcRn protein tissue expression was confirmed by liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry in Tg32 homozygous versus hemizygous mice. Clearance (CL) was calculated using non-compartmental analysis and correlations were assessed to historical data in wild-type mouse, non-human primate (NHP), and human. Results show that mAb CL in hFcRn Tg32 homozygous mouse correlate with human (r(2) = 0.83, r = 0.91, p < 0.01) better than NHP (r(2) = 0.67, r = 0.82, p < 0.01) for this dataset. Applying simple allometric scaling using an empirically derived best-fit exponent of 0.93 enabled the prediction of human CL from the Tg32 homozygous mouse within 2-fold error for 100% of mAbs tested. Implementing the Tg32 homozygous mouse model in discovery and preclinical drug development to predict human CL may result in an overall decreased usage of monkeys for PK studies, enhancement of the early selection of lead molecules, and ultimately a decrease in the time for a drug candidate to reach the clinic.

  11. Nicotine Delivery to Rats via Lung Alveolar Region-Targeted Aerosol Technology Produces Blood Pharmacokinetics Resembling Human Smoking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nicotine is a heavily used addictive drug acquired through smoking tobacco. Nicotine in cigarette smoke is deposited and absorbed in the lungs, which results in a rapidly peaked slowly declining arterial concentration. This pattern plays an important role in initiation of nicotine addiction. Methods: A method and device were developed for delivering nicotine to rodents with lung alveolar region-targeted aerosol technology. The dose of delivery can be controlled by the nicotine aerosol concentration and duration of exposure. Results: Our data showed that, in the breathing zone of the nose-only exposure chamber, the aerosol droplet size distribution was within the respirable diameter range. Rats were exposed to nicotine aerosol for 2min. The arterial blood nicotine concentration reached 43.2±15.7ng/ml (mean ± SD) within 1–4min and declined over the next 20min, closely resembling the magnitude and early pharmacokinetics of a human smoking a cigarette. The acute inhalation toxicity of nicotine: LC50 = 2.3mg/L was determined; it was affected by pH, suggesting that acidification decreases nicotine absorption and/or bioavailability. Conclusions: A noninvasive method and toolkit were developed for delivering nicotine to rodents that enable rapid delivery of a controllable amount of nicotine into the systemic circulation and brain-inducing dose-dependent pharmacological effects, even a lethal dose. Aerosol inhalation can produce nicotine kinetics in both arterial and venous blood resembling human smoking. This method can be applied to studies of the effects of chronic intermittent nicotine exposure, nicotine addiction, toxicology, tobacco-related diseases, teratogenicity, and for discovery of pharmacological therapeutics. PMID:23239844

  12. Amoxicillin is effective against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains in a mouse pneumonia model simulating human pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Abgueguen, Pierre; Azoulay-Dupuis, Esther; Noel, Violaine; Moine, Pierre; Rieux, Veronique; Fantin, Bruno; Bedos, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    High-dose oral amoxicillin (3 g/day) is the recommended empirical outpatient treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in many European guidelines. To investigate the clinical efficacy of this treatment in CAP caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with MICs of amoxicillin > or =2 microg/ml, we used a lethal bacteremic pneumonia model in leukopenic female Swiss mice with induced renal failure to replicate amoxicillin kinetics in humans given 1 g/8 h orally. Amoxicillin (15 mg/kg of body weight/8 h subcutaneously) was given for 3 days. We used four S. pneumoniae strains with differing amoxicillin susceptibility and tolerance profiles. Rapid bacterial killing occurred with an amoxicillin-susceptible nontolerant strain: after 4 h, blood cultures were negative and lung homogenate counts under the 2 log(10) CFU/ml detection threshold (6.5 log(10) CFU/ml in controls, P < 0.01). With an amoxicillin-intermediate nontolerant strain, significant pulmonary bacterial clearance was observed after 24 h (4.3 versus 7.9 log(10) CFU/ml, P < 0.01), and counts were undetectable 12 h after treatment completion. With an amoxicillin-intermediate tolerant strain, 24-h bacterial clearance was similar (5.4 versus 8.3 log(10) CFU/ml, P < 0.05), but 12 h after treatment completion, lung homogenates contained 3.3 log(10) CFU/ml. Similar results were obtained with an amoxicillin-resistant and -tolerant strain. Day 10 survival rates were usually similar across strains. Amoxicillin with pharmacokinetics simulating 1 g/8 h orally in humans is bactericidal in mice with pneumonia due to S. pneumoniae for which MICs were 2 to 4 microg/ml. The killing rate depends not only on resistance but also on tolerance of the S. pneumoniae strains.

  13. Determination of levocetirizine in human plasma by LC-MS-MS: validation and application in a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wichitnithad, Wisut; Jithavech, Ponsiree; Sanphanya, Kingkan; Vicheantawatchai, Petploy; Rojsitthisak, Pornchai

    2015-01-01

    A fast and simple sample cleanup approach for levocetirizine in human was developed using protein precipitation coupled with LC-MS-MS. Samples were treated with 6% trichloroacetic acid in water prior to LC-MS-MS analysis. Chromatographic separation was performed on a reverse phase column with an isocratic mobile phase of acetonitrile and 10 mM ammonium formate pH 3.5 (80:20, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The run time was 3.5 min. Mass parameters were optimized to monitor transitions at m/z [M+H](+) 389.0→201.0 for levocetirizine and m/z [M+H](+) 375.3→201.0 for hydroxyzine as internal standard. The lower limit of quantification and the dynamic range were 1.00 and 1.00-500 ng/mL, respectively. Linearity was good for intraday and interday validations (r(2) ≥ 0.995). The mean recoveries were 59 and 69% for levocetirizine and hydroxyzine, respectively. Matrix effect was acceptable with %CV < 15. Hemolytic effect was negligible. Levocetirizine was stable in human plasma for 27 h at room temperature (25°C), for 16 weeks frozen at -70°C, 4 weeks frozen at -20°C, for 24 h in an autosampler at 15°C and for three freeze/thaw cycles. The validated method was applied in a pharmacokinetic study to determine the concentration of levocetirizine in plasma samples. The study provides a fast and simple bioanalytical method for routine analysis and may be particularly useful for bioequivalence studies.

  14. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  15. Behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of chronic alcohol or cannabinoids on HIV/AIDs: Studies in the Non-Human Primate SIV model

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Patricia E.; Amedee, Angela M.; Winsauer, Peter; Nelson, Steve; Bagby, Gregory; Simon, Liz

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated mortality has been significantly reduced with antiretroviral therapy (ART), and HIV infection has become a chronic disease that frequently coexists with many disorders, including substance abuse (Azar et al. 2010; Phillips et al. 2001). Alcohol and drugs of abuse may modify host-pathogen interactions at various levels including behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of HIV infection, as well as the ability of the virus to integrate into the genome and replicate in host cells. Identifying mechanisms responsible for these interactions is complicated by many factors, such as the tissue specific responses to viral infection, multiple cellular mechanisms involved in inflammatory responses, neuroendocrine and localized responses to infection, and kinetics of viral replication. An integrated physiological analysis of the biomedical consequences of chronic alcohol and drug use or abuse on disease progression is possible using rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a relevant model of HIV infection. This review will provide an overview of the data gathered using this model to show that chronic administration of two of the most commonly abused substances, alcohol and cannabinoids (Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol; THC), affect host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25795088

  16. Metabolism of classical cannabinoids and the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018.

    PubMed

    Su, M K; Seely, K A; Moran, J H; Hoffman, R S

    2015-06-01

    Although the putative pharmacological targets of synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) abused in "K2" and "Spice" are similar to Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC), it remains unclear why SCB toxicity is similar yet different from marijuana. There are obvious potency and efficacy differences, but also important metabolic differences that help explain the unique adverse reactions associated with SCBs. This brief review discusses the limited research on the metabolism of the SCB JWH-018 and contrasts that with the metabolism of Δ(9) -THC.

  17. The role of cannabinoids in adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Prenderville, Jack A; Kelly, Áine M; Downer, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    The processes underpinning post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain continue to be defined. Such processes involve the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neuronal migration, differentiation and integration into a network of functional synapses within the brain. Both intrinsic (cell signalling cascades) and extrinsic (neurotrophins, neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones) signalling molecules are intimately associated with adult neurogenesis and largely dictate the proliferative activity and differentiation capacity of neural cells. Cannabinoids are a unique class of chemical compounds incorporating plant-derived cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa), the endogenous cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid ligands, and these compounds are becoming increasingly recognized for their roles in neural developmental processes. Indeed, cannabinoids have clear modulatory roles in adult neurogenesis, probably through activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, a large body of literature has deciphered the signalling networks involved in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of neurogenesis. This timely review summarizes the evidence that the cannabinoid system is intricately associated with neuronal differentiation and maturation of NPCs and highlights intrinsic/extrinsic signalling mechanisms that are cannabinoid targets. Overall, these findings identify the central role of the cannabinoid system in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and the lateral ventricles and hence provide insight into the processes underlying post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. PMID:25951750

  18. Combined image guided monitoring the pharmacokinetics of rapamycin loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles with a split luciferase reporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Zhe; Ma, Ying; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Tian, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery carriers upon administration in the blood circulation, which complicates the interpretation of image findings. Herein we applied a genetically encoded luciferase reporter in conjunction with near infrared (NIR) fluorophores to investigate the respective PK profiles of a drug and its carrier in a biodegradable drug delivery system. In this system, a prototype hydrophobic agent, rapamycin (Rapa), was encapsulated into human serum albumin (HSA) to form HSA Rapa nanoparticles, which were then labeled with Cy5 fluorophore to facilitate the fluorescence imaging of HSA carrier. Meanwhile, we employed transgenetic HN12 cells that were modified with a split luciferase reporter, whose bioluminescence function is regulated by Rapa, to reflect the PK profile of the encapsulated agent. It was interesting to discover that there existed an obvious inconsistency of PK behaviors between HSA carrier and rapamycin in vitro and in vivo through near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIFRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) after treatment with Cy5 labeled HSA Rapa. Nevertheless, HSA Rapa nanoparticles manifested favorable in vivo PK and tumor suppression efficacy in a follow-up therapeutic study. The developed strategy of combining a molecular reporter and a fluorophore in this study could be extended to other drug delivery systems to provide profound insights for non-invasive real-time evaluation of PK profiles of drug-loaded nanoparticles in pre-clinical studies.Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery

  19. Preclinical Studies on the Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Toxicology of Oxfendazole: Toward First in Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Codd, Ellen E.; Ng, Hanna H.; McFarlane, Claire; Riccio, Edward S.; Doppalapudi, Rupa; Mirsalis, Jon C.; Horton, R. John; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, H. Hugo; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    A two-week study in rats identified target organs of oxfendazole toxicity to be bone marrow, epididymis, liver, spleen, testis, and thymus. Female rats had greater oxfendazole exposure and exhibited toxicities at lower doses than did males. Decreased WBC levels, a class effect of benzimidazole anthelminthics, returned to normal during the recovery period. The NOAEL was determined to be >5 but < 25 mg/kg/d and the MTD 100 mg/kg/d. The highest dose, 200 mg/kg/d resulted in significant toxicity and mortality, leading to euthanization of the main study animals in this group after seven days. Oxfendazole did not exhibit genetic toxicology signals in standard Ames bacterial, mouse lymphoma or rat micronucleus assays, nor did it provoke safety concerns when evaluated for behavioral effects in rats or cardiovascular safety effects in dogs. These results support the transition of oxfendazole to First in Human safety studies preliminary to its evaluation in human helminth diseases. PMID:25701764

  20. Influence of Urinary pH on the Pharmacokinetics of Cinoxacin in Humans and on Antibacterial Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Barbhaiya, Rashmi H.; Gerber, Andreas U.; Craig, William A.; Welling, Peter G.

    1982-01-01

    The impact of acidification and alkalinization of the urine on the pharmacokinetics of cinoxacin was examined after single 500-mg oral doses were administered to nine healthy male volunteers. Acidic and alkaline conditions were achieved by repeated oral doses of ammonium chloride or sodium bicarbonate, respectively. Plasma cinoxacin levels in all subjects were adequately described in terms of one-compartment-model kinetics with first-order absorption and elimination. Acidification and alkalinization treatment had no effect on cinoxacin absorption or distribution. The mean elimination half-life of cinoxacin in plasma was 1.1, 2.0, and 0.6 h in control subjects and with acidification and alkalinization of urine, respectively. Recovery of intact cinoxacin in samples of urine collected 0 to 36 h after cinoxacin administration represented 65% of the dose in control subjects and urine acidification and 80% of the dose with alkalinization of urine. The mean renal clearance of cinoxacin was 76, 118, and 278 ml/min with acidification, control, and alkalinization, respectively, and renal clearance was highly correlated with urinary pH. Urine concentrations of cinoxacin were significantly higher with alkalinization compared with control values during the first 4 h after drug administration. Urine cinoxacin concentrations were reduced somewhat by acidification, but these tended not to be significantly different from control values. Changes in cinoxacin elimination owing to urine pH are less pronounced in humans than in dogs. The antibacterial activity of cinoxacin against some common urinary tract pathogens was pH dependent. A four- to eightfold reduction in cinoxacin activity was generally observed at pH 8 compared with lower pH values. However, in view of the high levels of cinoxacin which are obtained in both acidic and basic urine, the impact of urine pH on cinoxacin antibacterial efficacy would be of minor clinical importance. PMID:7103450

  1. A model-based meta-analysis of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics to guide optimal first-in-human study design.

    PubMed

    Davda, Jasmine P; Dodds, Michael G; Gibbs, Megan A; Wisdom, Wendy; Gibbs, John

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective analysis were (1) to characterize the population pharmacokinetics (popPK) of four different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in a combined analysis of individual data collected during first-in-human (FIH) studies and (2) to provide a scientific rationale for prospective design of FIH studies with mAbs. The data set was composed of 171 subjects contributing a total of 2716 mAb serum concentrations, following intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SC) doses. mAb PK was described by an open 2-compartment model with first-order elimination from the central compartment and a depot compartment with first-order absorption. Parameter values obtained from the popPK model were further used to generate optimal sampling times for a single dose study. A robust fit to the combined data from four mAbs was obtained using the 2-compartment model. Population parameter estimates for systemic clearance and central volume of distribution were 0.20 L/day and 3.6 L with intersubject variability of 31% and 34%, respectively. The random residual error was 14%. Differences (> 2-fold) in PK parameters were not apparent across mAbs. Rich designs (22 samples/subject), minimal designs for popPK (5 samples/subject), and optimal designs for non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and popPK (10 samples/subject) were examined by stochastic simulation and estimation. Single-dose PK studies for linear mAbs executed using the optimal designs are expected to yield high-quality model estimates, and accurate capture of NCA estimations. This model-based meta-analysis has determined typical popPK values for four mAbs with linear elimination and enabled prospective optimization of FIH study designs, potentially improving the efficiency of FIH studies for this class of therapeutics.

  2. Combined image guided monitoring the pharmacokinetics of rapamycin loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles with a split luciferase reporter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Zhe; Ma, Ying; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from that of drug delivery carriers upon administration in the blood circulation, which will complicate the interpretation of image findings. Herein we applied a genetically encoded luciferase reporter in conjunction of near infrared (NIR) fluorophores to investigate the respective PK profiles of drug and its carrier in a biodegradable drug delivery system. In this system, a prototype hydrophobic agent, rapamycin (Rapa), was encapsulated into human serum albumin (HSA) to form HSA Rapa nanoparticles, which were then labeled with Cy5 fluorophore to facilitate the fluorescence imaging of HSA carrier. Meanwhile, we employed transgenetic HN12 cells that were modified with a split luciferase reporter, whose bioluminescence function is regulated by Rapa, to reflect the PK profile of the encapsulated agent. It is interesting to uncover that there existed an obvious inconsistency of PK behaviors between HSA carrier and rapamycin in vitro and in vivo through near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIFRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) after treatment with Cy5 labeled HSA Rapa. Nevertheless, HSA Rapa nanoparticles manifested a favorable in vivo PK and tumor suppression efficacy in a follow-up therapeutic study. The developed strategy of combining a molecular reporter and a fluorophore in this study could be extended to other drug delivery systems to provide profound insights for non-invasive real-time evaluation of PK profiles of drug-loaded nanoparticles in pre-clinical studies. PMID:26818100

  3. First-in-human pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of the dual m-TORC 1/2 inhibitor, AZD2014

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Bristi; Dean, Emma; Puglisi, Martina; Greystoke, Alastair; Ong, Michael; Burke, Wendy; Cavallin, Maria; Bigley, Graham; Womack, Christopher; Harrington, Elizabeth A; Green, Stephen; Oelmann, Elisabeth; de Bono, Johann S; Ranson, Malcolm; Banerji, Udai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose AZD2014 is a novel, oral, m-TORC 1/2 inhibitor which has shown in-vitro and in-vivo efficacy across a range of preclinical human cancer models. Experimental Design A rolling six dose escalation was performed to define a maximal tolerated dose (MTD) (Part A) and at MTD a further cohort of patients was treated to further characterize toxicities and perform pre- and post-treatment biopsies (Part B). AZD2014 was administered orally twice a day (BD) continuously. Flow cytometry, ELISA and immunohistochemistry were used to quantify pharmacodynamic biomarkers. Pharmacokinetic analysis was carried out by mass spectrometry. Results A total of 56 patients were treated across a dose range of 25 -100 mg. The MTD was 50 mg BD. The dose limiting toxicities were fatigue and mucositis. At the MTD the most common AEs were fatigue (78%), nausea (51%) and mucositis (49%) but these were equal to or greater than grade 3 in only 5% of patients. Drug levels achieved at the MTD (AUCss 6686 ng.hr/mL, Cmaxss 1664 ng/mL) were consistent with activity in pre-clinical models. A reduction in p-S6 levels and Ki67 staining was observed in 8/8 and 5/9 evaluable paired biopsy samples. Partial responses were seen in a patient with pancreatic cancer and a patient with breast cancer who were found to have a PDGFR and ERBB2 mutation, respectively. Conclusions The recommended phase II dose for further evaluation of AZD2014 is 50 mg BD and at this dose it has been possible to demonstrate pharmacologically relevant plasma concentrations, target inhibition in tumor and clinical responses. PMID:25805799

  4. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary assessment of efficacy of mecasermin (recombinant human IGF-1) for the treatment of Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khwaja, Omar S.; Ho, Eugenia; Barnes, Katherine V.; O’Leary, Heather M.; Pereira, Luis M.; Finkelstein, Yaron; Nelson, Charles A.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; DeGregorio, Geneva; Holm, Ingrid A.; Khatwa, Umakanth; Kapur, Kush; Alexander, Mark E.; Finnegan, Deirdre M.; Cantwell, Nicole G.; Walco, Alexandra C.; Rappaport, Leonard; Gregas, Matt; Fichorova, Raina N.; Shannon, Michael W.; Sur, Mriganka; Kaufmann, Walter E.

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder mainly affecting females and is associated with mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding methyl CpG-binding protein 2. Mouse models suggest that recombinant human insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) (rhIGF1) (mecasermin) may improve many clinical features. We evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic profiles of IGF-1 in 12 girls with MECP2 mutations (9 with RTT). In addition, we performed a preliminary assessment of efficacy using automated cardiorespiratory measures, EEG, a set of RTT-oriented clinical assessments, and two standardized behavioral questionnaires. This phase 1 trial included a 4-wk multiple ascending dose (MAD) (40–120 μg/kg twice daily) period and a 20-wk open-label extension (OLE) at the maximum dose. Twelve subjects completed the MAD and 10 the entire study, without evidence of hypoglycemia or serious adverse events. Mecasermin reached the CNS compartment as evidenced by the increase in cerebrospinal fluid IGF-1 levels at the end of the MAD. The drug followed nonlinear kinetics, with greater distribution in the peripheral compartment. Cardiorespiratory measures showed that apnea improved during the OLE. Some neurobehavioral parameters, specifically measures of anxiety and mood also improved during the OLE. These improvements in mood and anxiety scores were supported by reversal of right frontal alpha band asymmetry on EEG, an index of anxiety and depression. Our data indicate that IGF-1 is safe and well tolerated in girls with RTT and, as demonstrated in preclinical studies, ameliorates certain breathing and behavioral abnormalities. PMID:24623853

  5. Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results

    SciTech Connect

    Redding, Laurel E.; Sohn, Michael D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Wang, Shu-Li; Hsieh, Dennis P. H.; Yang, Raymond S. H.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of PCB 153 in women, and predict its transfer via lactation to infants. The model is the first human, population-scale lactational model for PCB 153. Data in the literature provided estimates for model development and for performance assessment. Physiological parameters were taken from a cohort in Taiwan and from reference values in the literature. We estimated partition coefficients based on chemical structure and the lipid content in various body tissues. Using exposure data in Japan, we predicted acquired body burden of PCB 153 at an average childbearing age of 25 years and compare predictions to measurements from studies in multiple countries. Forward-model predictions agree well with human biomonitoring measurements, as represented by summary statistics and uncertainty estimates. The model successfully describes the range of possible PCB 153 dispositions in maternal milk, suggesting a promising option for back estimating doses for various populations. One example of reverse dosimetry modeling was attempted using our PBPK model for possible exposure scenarios in Canadian Inuits who had the highest level of PCB 153 in their milk in the world.

  6. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling to predict concentrations and actions of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 2 inhibitor canagliflozin in human intestines and renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazumi; Saito, Ryuta; Nakamaru, Yoshinobu; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Canagliflozin is a recently developed sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 inhibitor that promotes renal glucose excretion and is considered to inhibit renal SGLT2 from the luminal side of proximal tubules. Canagliflozin reportedly inhibits SGLT1 weakly and suppresses postprandial plasma glucose, suggesting that it also inhibits intestinal SGLT1. However, it is difficult to measure the drug concentrations of these assumed sites of action directly. The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships of canagliflozin remain poorly characterized. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of canagliflozin was developed based on clinical data from healthy volunteers and it was used to simulate luminal concentrations in intestines and renal tubules. In small intestine simulations, the inhibition ratios for SGLT1 were predicted to be 40%-60% after the oral administration of clinical doses (100-300 mg/day). In contrast, inhibition ratios of canagliflozin for renal SGLT2 and SGLT1 were predicted to be approximately 100% and 0.2%-0.4%, respectively. These analyses suggest that canagliflozin only inhibits SGLT2 in the kidney. Using the simulated proximal tubule luminal concentrations of canagliflozin, the urinary glucose excretion rates in canagliflozin-treated diabetic patients were accurately predicted using the renal glucose reabsorption model as a PD model. Because the simulation of canagliflozin pharmacokinetics was successful, this PBPK methodology was further validated by successfully simulating the pharmacokinetics of dapagliflozin, another SGLT2 inhibitor. The present results suggest the utility of this PBPK/PD model for predicting canagliflozin concentrations at target sites and help to elucidate the pharmacological effects of SGLT1/2 inhibition in humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. In vivo pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of topical ketoconazole and miconazole in human stratum corneum.

    PubMed Central

    Pershing, L K; Corlett, J; Jorgensen, C

    1994-01-01

    A direct study evaluating whether differential drug uptake of topical 2% miconazole and 2% ketoconazole from cream formulations into human stratum corneum correlated with differential pharmacological activity against Candida albicans was investigated in healthy human subjects. A single 24-h topical dose of 2% ketoconazole cream or 2% miconazole cream was applied unoccluded, at the same dose (2.6 mg of formulation per cm2 of surface area), at four skin sites on both ventral forearms of six human subjects. At the end of the treatment, residual drug was removed with a tissue from all sites and the treated site was tape stripped 11 times, either 1, 4, 8, or 24 h later. The first tape disc was discarded. The remaining tape discs, 2 through 11, were combined and extracted for drug quantification by high-performance liquid chromatography and bioactivity against C. albicans growth in vitro. Topical 2% ketoconazole produced 14-, 10-, and 7-fold greater drug concentrations in stratum corneum than 2% miconazole at 1, 4, and 8 h after a single topical dose. Ketoconazole and miconazole concentrations in the stratum corneum were similar 24 h after drug removal. Tape disc extracts from 2% ketoconazole-treated skin sites demonstrated significantly greater bioactivity in the bioassay than 2% miconazole. The increased efficacy of 2% ketoconazole compared with that of 2% miconazole in vitro reflects their differential uptake into the stratum corneum and inherent pharmacological activity. Tape stripping the drug-treated site in conjunction with a bioassay is therefore a useful approach in the determination of bioavailability of topical antifungal agents. PMID:8141586

  8. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of diethylcarbamazine in human plasma for clinical pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mark S; King, Christopher L; Thomsen, Edward K; Siba, Peter M; Sanuku, Nelly; Fleckenstein, Lawrence

    2014-09-01

    A sensitive and selective liquid chromatographic method using mass spectrometric detection was developed for the determination of diethylcarbamazine (DEC) in human plasma. DEC and its stable isotope internal standard d3-DEC were extracted from 0.25mL of human plasma using solid phase extraction. Chromatography was performed using a Phenomenex Synergi 4μ Fusion-RP column (2mm×250mm) with gradient elution. The retention time was approximately 4.8min. The assay was linear from 4 to 2200ng/mL. Analysis of quality control samples at 12, 300, and 1700ng/mL (N=15) had interday coefficients of variation of 8.4%, 5.4%, and 6.2%, respectively (N=15). Interday bias results were -2.2%, 6.0%, and 0.8%, respectively. Recovery of DEC from plasma ranged from 84.2% to 90.1%. The method was successfully applied to clinical samples from patients with lymphatic filariasis from a drug-drug interaction study between DEC and albendazole and/or ivermectin.

  9. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid medicines.

    PubMed

    Robson, P J

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis was extensively used as a medicine throughout the developed world in the nineteenth century but went into decline early in the twentieth century ahead of its emergence as the most widely used illicit recreational drug later that century. Recent advances in cannabinoid pharmacology alongside the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) have re-ignited interest in cannabis-based medicines. The ECS has emerged as an important physiological system and plausible target for new medicines. Its receptors and endogenous ligands play a vital modulatory role in diverse functions including immune response, food intake, cognition, emotion, perception, behavioural reinforcement, motor co-ordination, body temperature, wake/sleep cycle, bone formation and resorption, and various aspects of hormonal control. In disease it may act as part of the physiological response or as a component of the underlying pathology. In the forefront of clinical research are the cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and their contrasting pharmacology will be briefly outlined. The therapeutic potential and possible risks of drugs that inhibit the ECS will also be considered. This paper will then go on to review clinical research exploring the potential of cannabinoid medicines in the following indications: symptomatic relief in multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, intractable nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight in the context of cancer or AIDS, psychosis, epilepsy, addiction, and metabolic disorders.

  10. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of 14C/13C-labeled ortho-phenylphenol formation following dermal application to human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Timchalk, C; Selim, S; Sangha, G; Bartels, M J

    1998-08-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of uniformly labeled 14C/13C-ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) were followed in six human male volunteers given a single 8 h dermal dose of 6 microg OPP/kg body weight formulated as a 0.4% (w/v) solution in isopropyl alcohol. The application site was covered with a non-occlusive dome allowing free movement of air, but preventing the loss of radioactivity due to physical contact. At 8 h post-exposure the non-occlusive dome was removed, the dose site was wiped with isopropyl alcohol containing swabs and the skin surface repeatedly stripped with tape. Blood specimens, urine, and feces were collected from each volunteer over a 5 day post-exposure period and were analyzed for radioactivity and metabolites (urine only). 2. Following dermal application, peak plasma levels of radioactivity were obtained within 4 h post-exposure and rapidly declined with virtually all of the absorbed dose rapidly excreted into the urine within 24 h post-exposure. A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to describe the time-course of OPP absorption and clearance in male human volunteers. Approximately 43% of the dermally applied dose was absorbed through the skin with an average absorption half-life of 10 h. Once absorbed the renal clearance of OPP was rapid with an average half-life of 0.8 h. The rate limiting step for renal clearance was the relatively slower rate of dermal absorption; therefore the pharmacokinetics of OPP in humans was described by a 'flip-flop' single compartment model. Overall, the pharmacokinetics were similar between individuals, and the model parameters were in excellent agreement with the experimental data. 3. Approximately 73% of the total urinary radioactivity was accounted for as free OPP, OPP-sulfate and OPP-glucuronide conjugates. The sulfate conjugate was the major metabolite (approximately 69%). Therefore, total urinary OPP equivalents (acid-labile conjugates+free OPP) can be used to estimate the systemically absorbed

  11. Preclinical pharmacokinetics and distribution to tissue of AG1343, an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    PubMed

    Shetty, B V; Kosa, M B; Khalil, D A; Webber, S

    1996-01-01

    AG1343, a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (Ki = 2 nM), was designed by protein structure-based drug design techniques. AG1343 has potent antiviral activity (95% effective dose = 0.04 microgram/ml) against a number of HIV-1 strains in acute and chronic models of infection. As part of its preclinical development, the oral bioavailability of AG1343 in rats, dogs, monkeys, and marmosets was determined and its tissue distribution in rats was evaluated. There were no major interspecies differences in AG1343 pharmacokinetics. Following intravenous administration, the elimination half-life of AG1343 ranged from 1 to 1.4 hr. The total volume of distribution (2 to 7 liters/kg) exceeded the volume of total body water, indicating extensive tissue distribution. Systemic clearance of AG1343 (1 to 4 liters/kg) in the different species corresponded to hepatic blood flow, suggesting possible hepatic involvement in the elimination of AG1343. Following oral administration, peak levels in plasma ranged from 0.34 microgram/ml after treatment with 10 mg/kg of body weight in the dog to 1.7 micrograms/ml after dosing with 50 mg/kg in the rat. Because of the slow absorption of AG1343, plasma concentrations of AG1343 exceeding that required for 95% inhibition of HIV-1 replication were maintained for up to 7 h after a single oral dose in all species evaluated. Average oral bioavailability of AG1343 ranged from 17% in the marmoset to 47% in the dog. Studies of distribution to tissue in the rat after oral administration of 14C-AG1343 established extensive distribution with concentrations in most tissues exceeding that found in plasma. Of particular significance were high levels of AG1343 equivalent in mesenteric lymph nodes (32.05 micrograms/g) and spleen tissue (9.33 micrograms/g). The major excretory route for AG1343 was via feces, with 100% of the dose recovered by 48 h. Results from these studies demonstrate that AG1343 is orally bioavailable and

  12. Preclinical pharmacokinetics and distribution to tissue of AG1343, an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, B V; Kosa, M B; Khalil, D A; Webber, S

    1996-01-01

    AG1343, a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (Ki = 2 nM), was designed by protein structure-based drug design techniques. AG1343 has potent antiviral activity (95% effective dose = 0.04 microgram/ml) against a number of HIV-1 strains in acute and chronic models of infection. As part of its preclinical development, the oral bioavailability of AG1343 in rats, dogs, monkeys, and marmosets was determined and its tissue distribution in rats was evaluated. There were no major interspecies differences in AG1343 pharmacokinetics. Following intravenous administration, the elimination half-life of AG1343 ranged from 1 to 1.4 hr. The total volume of distribution (2 to 7 liters/kg) exceeded the volume of total body water, indicating extensive tissue distribution. Systemic clearance of AG1343 (1 to 4 liters/kg) in the different species corresponded to hepatic blood flow, suggesting possible hepatic involvement in the elimination of AG1343. Following oral administration, peak levels in plasma ranged from 0.34 microgram/ml after treatment with 10 mg/kg of body weight in the dog to 1.7 micrograms/ml after dosing with 50 mg/kg in the rat. Because of the slow absorption of AG1343, plasma concentrations of AG1343 exceeding that required for 95% inhibition of HIV-1 replication were maintained for up to 7 h after a single oral dose in all species evaluated. Average oral bioavailability of AG1343 ranged from 17% in the marmoset to 47% in the dog. Studies of distribution to tissue in the rat after oral administration of 14C-AG1343 established extensive distribution with concentrations in most tissues exceeding that found in plasma. Of particular significance were high levels of AG1343 equivalent in mesenteric lymph nodes (32.05 micrograms/g) and spleen tissue (9.33 micrograms/g). The major excretory route for AG1343 was via feces, with 100% of the dose recovered by 48 h. Results from these studies demonstrate that AG1343 is orally bioavailable and

  13. Cannabinoid 2 receptor- and beta Arrestin 2-dependent upregulation of serotonin 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Franklin, J M; Vasiljevik, T; Prisinzano, T E; Carrasco, G A

    2013-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that cannabinoid receptor agonists may regulate serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor neurotransmission in the brain, although no molecular mechanism has been identified. Here, we present experimental evidence that sustained treatment with a non-selective cannabinoid agonist (CP55,940) or selective CB2 receptor agonists (JWH133 or GP1a) upregulate 5-HT(2A) receptors in a neuronal cell line. Furthermore, this cannabinoid receptor agonist-induced upregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors was prevented in cells stably transfected with either CB2 or β-Arrestin 2 shRNA lentiviral particles. Additionally, inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis also prevented the cannabinoid receptor-induced upregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors. Our results indicate that cannabinoid agonists might upregulate 5-HT(2A) receptors by a mechanism that requires CB2 receptors and β-Arrestin 2 in cells that express both CB2 and 5-HT(2A) receptors. 5-HT(2A) receptors have been associated with several physiological functions and neuropsychiatric disorders such as stress response, anxiety and depression, and schizophrenia. Therefore, these results might provide a molecular mechanism by which activation of cannabinoid receptors might be relevant to some cognitive and mood disorders in humans.

  14. Prevention of cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome by lithium: involvement of oxytocinergic neuronal activation.

    PubMed

    Cui, S S; Bowen, R C; Gu, G B; Hannesson, D K; Yu, P H; Zhang, X

    2001-12-15

    Cannabis (i.e., marijuana and cannabinoids) is the most commonly used illicit drug in developed countries, and the lifetime prevalence of marijuana dependence is the highest of all illicit drugs in the United States. To provide clues for finding effective pharmacological treatment for cannabis-dependent patients, we examined the effects and possible mechanism of lithium administration on the cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome in rats. A systemic injection of the mood stabilizer lithium, at serum levels that were clinically relevant, prevented the cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome. The effects of lithium were accompanied by expression of the cellular activation marker Fos proteins within most oxytocin-immunoreactive neurons and a significant increase in oxytocin mRNA expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. Lithium also produced a significant elevation of oxytocin levels in the peripheral blood. We suggest that the effects of lithium against the cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome are mediated by oxytocinergic neuronal activation and subsequent release and action of oxytocin within the CNS. In support of our hypothesis, we found that the effects of lithium against the cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome were antagonized by systemic preapplication of an oxytocin antagonist and mimicked by systemic or intracerebroventricular injection of oxytocin. These results demonstrate that oxytocinergic neuronal activation plays a critical role in the action of lithium against the cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome in rats, thus providing a potentially novel strategy for the treatment of cannabis dependence in humans.

  15. Liquid chromatographic assay for metronidazole and tinidazole: pharmacokinetic and metabolic studies in human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson-Ehle, I; Ursing, B; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1981-01-01

    We developed methods for measuring metronidazole, its two major metabolites, and tinidazole in serum and urine. After treatment of each sample with an equal volume of 5% perchloric acid, the drugs were separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (retention times, 6 to 18 min). Quantitation was based on spectrometry at 320 nm. These assays were sensitive, rapid, and specific, and recoveries from biological samples were quantitative. Metronidazole and tinidazole were given as rapid intravenous infusions to four healthy human volunteers. The biological half-lives of these two compounds were 5.4 and 11.1 h, respectively. The hydroxy metabolite of metronidazole appeared quickly in serum and was eliminated at a slow rate. The acetic acid metabolite of metronidazole was detected in serum at very low levels and only for a limited time. No metabolic products of tinidazole were found in serum samples. In urine, 43.7% of the administered dose of metronidazole was recovered over a period of 24 h (24.1% of the dose as the hydroxy metabolite, 12.0% as the acetic acid metabolite, and 7.6% as unchanged drug). Only 18.4% of the infused dose of tinidazole was eliminated in urine over a period of 72 h, and no metabolic products were detected. PMID:7294765

  16. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of parenterally administered human alpha-lymphotoxin in normal and meth-A tumor-bearing BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Averbook, B.J.; Jeffes, E.B.; Yamamoto, R.S.; Masunaka, I.; Kobayashi, M.; Granger, G.A. )

    1989-08-01

    These in vivo studies examine the pharmacokinetics of parenterally administered purified, native human alpha-lymphotoxin (LT) in normal and Meth-A bearing BALB/c mice. We found that the lytic activity of alpha-LT was inactivated within 5 h in the blood of both normal and tumor-bearing mice in vivo. However, LT bioactivity in vitro was not affected by incubation with fresh serum. Radioiodinated LT was rapidly sequestered in the kidneys of both normal and tumor-bearing animals. Systemically administered, radioiodinated LT did not selectively localize in tumor tissues.

  17. Distribution and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in the human body: clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.-J.; Shumay, E.; Telang, F.; Thanos, P.; Alexoff, D.

    2010-12-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most toxic of the drugs of abuse, which may reflect its distribution and accumulation in the body. However no studies have measured methamphetamine's organ distribution in the human body. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was used in conjunction with [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine to measure its whole-body distribution and bioavailability as assessed by peak uptake (% Dose/cc), rate of clearance (time to reach 50% peak-clearance) and accumulation (area under the curve) in healthy participants (9 Caucasians and 10 African Americans). Methamphetamine distributed through most organs. Highest uptake (whole organ) occurred in lungs (22% Dose; weight {approx}1246 g), liver (23%; weight {approx}1677 g) and intermediate in brain (10%; weight {approx}1600 g). Kidneys also showed high uptake (per/cc basis) (7%; weight 305 g). Methamphetamine's clearance was fastest in heart and lungs (7-16 minutes), slowest in brain, liver and stomach (>75 minutes), and intermediate in kidneys, spleen and pancreas (22-50 minutes). Lung accumulation of [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine was 30% higher for African Americans than Caucasians (p < 0.05) but did not differ in other organs. The high accumulation of methamphetamine, a potent stimulant drug, in most body organs is likely to contribute to the medical complications associated with methamphetamine abuse. In particular, we speculate that methamphetamine's high pulmonary uptake could render this organ vulnerable to infections (tuberculosis) and pathology (pulmonary hypertension). Our preliminary findings of a higher lung accumulation of methamphetamine in African Americans than Caucasians merits further investigation and questions whether it could contribute to the infrequent use of methamphetamine among African Americans.

  18. Elucidating Cannabinoid Biology in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Randall G.; Clark, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    The number of annual cannabinoid users exceeds 100,000,000 globally and an estimated 9 % of these individuals will suffer from dependency. Although exogenous cannabinoids, like those contained in marijuana, are known to exert their effects by disrupting the endocannabinoid system, a dearth of knowledge exists about the potential toxicological consequences on public health. Conversely, the endocannabinoid system represents a promising therapeutic target for a plethora of disorders because it functions to endogenously regulate a vast repertoire of physiological functions. Accordingly, the rapidly expanding field of cannabinoid biology has sought to leverage model organisms in order to provide both toxicological and therapeutic insights about altered endocannabinoid signaling. The primary goal of this manuscript is to review the existing field of cannabinoid research in the genetically tractable zebrafish model—focusing on the cannabinoid receptor genes, cnr1 and cnr2, and the genes that produce enzymes for synthesis and degradation of the cognate ligands anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol. Consideration is also given to research that has studied the effects of exposure to exogenous phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids that are known to interact with cannabinoid receptors. These results are considered in the context of either endocannabinoid gene expression or endocannabinoid gene function, and are integrated with findings from rodent studies. This provides the framework for a discussion of how zebrafish may be leveraged in the future to provide novel toxicological and therapeutic insights in the field of cannabinoid biology, which has become increasingly significant given recent trends in cannabis legislation. PMID:26192460

  19. Cannabinoid Receptors: Nomenclature and Pharmacological Principles

    PubMed Central

    Console-Bram, Linda; Marcu, Jahan; Abood, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    The CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family that are pharmacologically well defined. However, the discovery of additional sites of action for endocannabinoids as well as synthetic cannabinoid compounds suggests the existence of additional cannabinoid receptors. Here we review this evidence, as well as the current nomenclature for classifying a target as a cannabinoid receptor. Basic pharmacological definitions, principles and experimental conditions are discussed in order to place in context the mechanisms underlying cannabinoid receptor activation. Constitutive (agonist-independent) activity is observed with the overexpression of many GPCRs, including cannabinoid receptors. Allosteric modulators can alter the pharmacological responses of cannabinoid receptors. The complex molecular architecture of each of the cannabinoid receptors allows for a single receptor to recognize multiple classes of compounds and produce an array of distinct downstream effects. Natural polymorphisms and alternative splice variants may also contribute to their pharmacological diversity. As our knowledge of the distinct differences grows, we may be able to target select receptor conformations and their corresponding pharmacological responses. Importantly, the basic biology of the endocannabinoid system will continue to be revealed by ongoing investigations. PMID:22421596

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling with dichloromethane, its metabolite, carbon monoxide, and blood carboxyhemoglobin in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M E; Clewell, H J; Gargas, M L; MacNaughton, M G; Reitz, R H; Nolan, R J; McKenna, M J

    1991-03-15

    Dichloromethane (methylene chloride, DCM) and other dihalomethanes are metabolized to carbon monoxide (CO) which reversibly binds hemoglobin and is eliminated by exhalation. We have developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model which describes the kinetics of CO, carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO), and parent dihalomethane, and have applied this model to examine the inhalation kinetics of CO and of DCM in rats and humans. The portion of the model describing CO and HbCO kinetics was adapted from the Coburn-Forster-Kane equation, after modification to include production of CO by DCM oxidation. DCM kinetics and metabolism were described by a generic PB-PK model for volatile chemicals (RAMSEY AND ANDERSEN, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 73, 159-175, 1984). Physiological and biochemical constants for CO were first estimated by exposing rats to 200 ppm CO for 2 hr and examining the time course of HbCO after cessation of CO exposure. These CO inhalation studies provided estimates of CO diffusing capacity under free breathing and for the Haldane coefficient, the relative equilibrium distribution ratio for hemoglobin between CO and O2. The CO model was then coupled to a PB-PK model for DCM to predict HbCO time course behavior during and after DCM exposures in rats. By coupling the models it was possible to estimate the yield of CO from oxidation of DCM. In rats only about 0.7 mol of CO are produced from 1 mol of DCM during oxidation. The combined model adequately represented HbCO and DCM behavior following 4-hr exposures to 200 or 1000 ppm DCM, and HbCO behavior following 1/2-hr exposure to 5160 ppm DCM or 5000 ppm bromochloromethane. The rat PB-PK model was scaled to predict DCM, HbCO, and CO kinetics in humans exposed either to DCM or to CO. Three human data sets from the literature were examined: (1) inhalation of CO at 50, 100, 250, and 500 ppm; (2) seven 1/2-hr inhalation exposures to 50, 100, 250, and 500 ppm DCM; and (3) 2-hr inhalation exposures to 986 ppm DCM

  1. Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/PKB pathway by CB(1) and CB(2) cannabinoid receptors expressed in prostate PC-3 cells. Involvement in Raf-1 stimulation and NGF induction.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, María G; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia; Sánchez, Ana M; Díaz-Laviada, Inés

    2003-09-01

    Cannabinoids exert a variety of physiological and pharmacological responses in humans through interaction with specific cannabinoid receptors. Cannabinoid receptors described to date belong to the seven-transmembrane-domain receptor superfamily and are coupled through the inhibitory G(i) protein to adenylyl cyclase inhibition. However, downstream signal transduction mechanisms triggered by cannabinoids are poorly understood. We examined here the involvement of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PKB pathway in the mechanism of action of cannabinoids in human prostate epithelial PC-3 cells. Cannabinoid receptors CB(1) and CB(2) are expressed in these cells, as shown by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence techniques. Treatment of PC-3 cells with either Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, or R-(+)-methanandamide (MET), an analogue of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide, increased phosphorylation of PKB in Thr308 and Ser473. The stimulation of PKB induced by cannabinoids was blocked by the two cannabinoid receptor antagonists, SR 141716 and SR 144528, and by the PI3K inhibitor LY 294002. These results indicate that activation of cannabinoid receptors in PC-3 cells stimulate the PI3K/PKB pathway. We further investigated the involvement of Raf-1/Erk activation in the mechanism of action of cannabinoid receptors. THC and MET induced translocation of Raf-1 to the membrane and phosphorylation of p44/42 Erk kinase, which was reversed by cannabinoid receptor antagonists and PI3K inhibitor. These results point to a sequential connection between cannabinoid receptors/PI3K/PKB pathway and Raf-1/Erk in prostate PC-3 cells. We also show that this pathway is involved in the mechanism of NGF induction exerted by cannabinoids in PC-3 cells.

  2. A rapid LC-MS/MS method for quantitation of eszopiclone in human plasma: application to a human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Hotha, Kishore Kumar; Vijaya Bharathi, D; Jagadeesh, B; Ravindranath, L K; Jaya Veera, K N; Venkateswarulu, V

    2012-02-01

    A highly reproducible, specific and cost-effective LC-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous estimation of eszopiclone (ESZ) with 50 μL of human plasma using paroxetine as an internal standard (IS). The API-4000 LC-MS/MS was operated under the multiple reaction-monitoring mode using the electrospray ionization technique. A simple liquid-liquid extraction process was used to extract ESZ and IS from human plasma. The total run time was 1.5 min and the elution of ESZ and IS occurred at 0.90 min; this was achieved with a mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid-methanol (15:85, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.50 mL/min on a Discover C(18) (50 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) column. The developed method was validated in human plasma with a lower limit of quantitation of 0.1 ng/mL for ESZ. A linear response function was established for the range of concentrations 0.10-120 ng/mL (r > 0.998) for ESZ. The intra- and inter-day precision values for ESZ were acceptable as per FDA guidelines. Eszopiclone was stable in the battery of stability studies, viz. bench-top, autosampler and freeze-thaw cycles. The developed assay method was applied to an oral bioequivalence study in humans.

  3. Cannabinoids in eating disorders and obesity.

    PubMed

    Arias Horcajadas, Francisco

    2007-08-01

    Cannabinoid system is a crucial mechanism in regulating food intake and energy metabolism. It is involved in central and peripheral mechanisms regulating such behavior, interacting with many other signaling systems with a role in metabolic regulation. Cannabinoid agonists promote food intake, and soon a cannabinoid antagonist, rimonabant, will be marketed for the treatment of obesity. It not only causes weight loss, but also alleviates metabolic syndrome. We present a review of current knowledge on this subject, along with data from our own research: genetic studies on this system in eating disorders and obesity and studies locating cannabinoid receptors in areas related to food intake. Such studies suggest cannabinoid hyperactivity in obesity, and this excessive activity may have prognostic implications.

  4. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption

    PubMed Central

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child’s hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke. PMID:26443501

  5. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-10-07

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child's hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and disposition of monoterpene glycosides derived from Paeonia lactiflora roots (Chishao) after intravenous dosing of antiseptic XueBiJing injection in human subjects and rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chen; Lin, Jia-zhen; Li, Li; Yang, Jun-ling; Jia, Wei-wei; Huang, Yu-hong; Du, Fei-fei; Wang, Feng-qing; Li, Mei-juan; Li, Yan-fen; Xu, Fang; Zhang, Na-ting; Olaleye, Olajide E.; Sun, Yan; Li, Jian; Sun, Chang-hai; Zhang, Gui-ping; Li, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Monoterpene glycosides derived from Paeonia lactiflora roots (Chishao) are believed to be pharmacologically important for the antiseptic herbal injection XueBiJing. This study was designed to characterize the pharmacokinetics and disposition of monoterpene glycosides. Methods: Systemic exposure to Chishao monoterpene glycosides was assessed in human subjects receiving an intravenous infusion and multiple infusions of XueBiJing injection, followed by assessment of the pharmacokinetics of the major circulating compounds. Supportive rat studies were also performed. Membrane permeability and plasma-protein binding were assessed in vitro. Results: A total of 18 monoterpene glycosides were detected in XueBiJing injection (content levels, 0.001–2.47 mmol/L), and paeoniflorin accounted for 85.5% of the total dose of monoterpene glycosides detected. In human subjects, unchanged paeoniflorin exhibited considerable levels of systemic exposure with elimination half-lives of 1.2–1.3 h; no significant metabolite was detected. Oxypaeoniflorin and albiflorin exhibited low exposure levels, and the remaining minor monoterpene glycosides were negligible or undetected. Glomerular-filtration-based renal excretion was the major elimination pathway of paeoniflorin, which was poorly bound to plasma protein. In rats, the systemic exposure level of paeoniflorin increased proportionally as the dose was increased. Rat lung, heart, and liver exposure levels of paeoniflorin were lower than the plasma level, with the exception of the kidney level, which was 4.3-fold greater than the plasma level; brain penetration was limited by the poor membrane permeability. Conclusion: Due to its significant systemic exposure and appropriate pharmacokinetic profile, as well as previously reported antiseptic properties, paeoniflorin is a promising XueBiJing constituent of therapeutic importance. PMID:26838074

  7. Comparative pharmacokinetics between a microdose and therapeutic dose for clarithromycin, sumatriptan, propafenone, paracetamol (acetaminophen), and phenobarbital in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lappin, Graham; Shishikura, Yoko; Jochemsen, Roeline; Weaver, Richard John; Gesson, Charlotte; Brian Houston, J; Oosterhuis, Berend; Bjerrum, Ole J; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Alder, Jane; Rowland, Malcolm; Garner, Colin

    2011-06-14

    A clinical study was conducted to assess the ability of a microdose (100 μg) to predict the human pharmacokinetics (PK) following a therapeutic dose of clarithromycin, sumatriptan, propafenone, paracetamol (acetaminophen) and phenobarbital, both within the study and by reference to the existing literature on these compounds and to explore the source of any nonlinearity if seen. For each drug, 6 healthy male volunteers were dosed with 100 μg (14)C-labelled compound. For clarithromycin, sumatriptan, and propafenone this labelled dose was administered alone, i.e. as a microdose, orally and intravenously (iv) and as an iv tracer dose concomitantly with an oral non-labelled therapeutic dose, in a 3-way cross over design. The oral therapeutic doses were 250, 50, and 150 mg, respectively. Paracetamol was given as the labelled microdose orally and iv using a 2-way cross over design, whereas phenobarbital was given only as the microdose orally. Plasma concentrations of total (14)C and parent drug were measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) or HPLC followed by AMS. Plasma concentrations following non-(14)C-labelled oral therapeutic doses were measured using either HPLC-electrochemical detection (clarithromycin) or HPLC-UV (sumatriptan, propafenone). For all five drugs an oral microdose predicted reasonably well the PK, including the shape of the plasma profile, following an oral therapeutic dose. For clarithromycin, sumatriptan, and propafenone, one parameter, oral bioavailability, was marginally outside of the normally acceptable 2-fold prediction interval around the mean therapeutic dose value. For clarithromycin, sumatriptan and propafenone, data obtained from an oral and iv microdose were compared within the same cohort of subjects used in the study, as well as those reported in the literature. For paracetamol (oral and iv) and phenobarbital (oral), microdose data were compared with those reported in the literature only. Where 100 μg iv (14)C-doses were

  8. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the tau PET radiotracer 18F-T807 (18F-AV-1451) in human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wooten, Dustin W.; Guehl, Nicolas J.; Verwer, Eline E.; Shoup, Timothy M.; Yokell, Daniel L.; Zubcevik, Nevena; Vasdev, Neil; Zafonte, Ross D.; Johnson, Keith A.; Fakhri, Georges El; Normandin, Marc D.

    2017-01-01

    18F-T807 is a PET radiotracer developed for imaging tau protein aggregates, which are implicated in neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The current study characterizes 18F-T807 pharmacokinetics in human subjects using dynamic PET imaging and metabolite-corrected arterial input functions. Methods Nine subjects (4 control, 3 with history of TBI, 2 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to suspected AD) underwent dynamic PET imaging for up to 120 minutes after bolus injection of 18F-T807 with arterial blood sampling. Total volume of distribution (VT) was estimated using compartmental modeling (one- and two-tissue configurations) and graphical analysis techniques (Logan and MA1 regression methods). Reference region-based methods of quantification were explored including Logan distribution volume ratio (DVR) and static standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) utilizing the cerebellum as a reference tissue. Results Percent unmetabolized 18F-T807 in plasma followed a single exponential with T1/2 of 17.0±4.2 minutes. Metabolite corrected plasma radioactivity concentration fit a bi-exponential (T1/2: 18.1±5.8; 2.4±0.5 minutes). 18F-T807 in gray matter peaked quickly (SUV >2 at ∼5 minutes). Compartmental modeling resulted in good fits and the two-tissue model with estimated blood volume correction (2Tv) performed best, particularly in regions with elevated binding. VT was greater in MCI subjects than controls in the occipital, parietal, and temporal cortices as well as the posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus, and mesial temporal cortex. High focal uptake was found in the posterior corpus callosum of a TBI subject. Plots from Logan and MA1 graphical methods became linear by 30 minutes, yielding regional estimates of VT in excellent agreement with compartmental analysis and providing high quality parametric maps when applied in voxelwise fashion. Reference region based approaches including Logan DVR (t*=55 min) and SUVR

  9. Investigations on the pharmacokinetics of trofosfamide and its metabolites-first report of 4-hydroxy-trofosfamide kinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Preiss, Rainer; Baumann, Frank; Stefanovic, Dragan; Niemeyer, Ulf; Pönisch, Wolfgang; Niederwieser, Dietger

    2004-06-01

    Trofosfamide (TRO), like cyclophosphamide (CYCLO) and ifosfamide (IFO), is a prodrug oxazaphosphorine derivative that requires hepatic biotransformation to form the cytotoxically active 4-hydroxy derivative (4-hydroxy-TRO). Individual 4-hydroxyoxazaphosphorines and 4-hydroxy-TRO itself have not been demonstrated in humans up to now. For investigation of the principal pharmacokinetics of TRO and its metabolites, six tumour patients (49-65 years of age, Karnofsky index >70%) with normal liver and renal function were given a single oral dose of 600 mg/m(2) TRO. Plasma was sampled using a bedside technique. Individual 4-hydroxyoxazaphosphorines and TRO together with further metabolites were determined by a specially developed HPLC-UV method and a HPLC-MS method, respectively. With a short apparent half-life (1.2 h) and high apparent clearance (Cl/F 4.0 l/min), TRO was very quickly eliminated from plasma and highly converted to its metabolites, mainly 4-hydroxy-TRO and IFO. In relation to the AUC values of TRO (1.0) the following molar quotients were calculated: 1.59 (4-hydroxy-TRO), 0.40 (4-hydroxy-IFO), 6.90 (IFO) and 0.74 (CYCLO). C(max) values were in the range 10-13 micromol/l for TRO, 4-hydroxy-TRO and IFO and in the range 1.5-4.0 micromol/l for CYCLO, 2- and 3-dechloroethyl-IFO and 4-hydroxy-IFO. Kinetic data indicate that 4-hydroxy-IFO is formed by both hydroxylation of TRO and exocyclic N-dechloroethylation of 4-hydroxy-TRO. 4-hydroxy-CYCLO was not detected above the quantification limit of the method. Only mild haemodepressive side effects were observed after oral administration of 600 mg/m(2) TRO. In relation to known data for IFO, TRO is much more 4-hydroxylated than IFO. The high 4-hydroxy-TRO/TRO ratio found suggests that TRO is a promising tumourstatic agent.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Fosamprenavir plus Ritonavir in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Adult Subjects with Hepatic Impairment▿

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Elías, María J.; Morellon, María Larrousse; Ortega, Enrique; Hernández-Quero, José; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Clotet, Bonaventura; Felizarta, Franco; Gutiérrez, Felix; Pineda, Juan A.; Nichols, Garrett; Lou, Yu; Wire, Mary Beth

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hepatic impairment on fosamprenavir/ritonavir pharmacokinetics was investigated. Sixty human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected subjects, including 13, 20, and 10 subjects with mild, moderate, and severe hepatic impairment, respectively, and a comparator group of 17 subjects with normal hepatic function, were enrolled. Subjects with normal hepatic function received fosamprenavir at 700 mg plus ritonavir at 100 mg twice daily, whereas subjects with hepatic impairment received adjusted doses in anticipation of increased exposures. For subjects with mild hepatic impairment, the studied regimen of fosamprenavir 700 mg twice daily plus ritonavir 100 mg once daily delivered 17% higher values for the maximum plasma amprenavir concentration at the steady state (Cmax), 22% higher values for the area under the plasma concentration versus time curve over the dosing interval at the steady state [AUC(0-τ)], similar values for the concentration at the end of the dosing interval (Cτ), and 114% higher unbound Cτ values. For subjects with moderate hepatic impairment, the studied dosage regimen of fosamprenavir at 300 mg twice daily plus ritonavir at 100 mg once daily delivered 27% lower plasma amprenavir Cmax values, 27% lower AUC(0-24) values, 57% lower Cτ values, and 21% higher unbound amprenavir Cτ values. For subjects with severe hepatic impairment, the studied dosage regimen of fosamprenavir at 300 mg twice daily plus ritonavir at 100 mg once daily delivered 19% lower plasma amprenavir Cmax values, 23% lower AUC(0-24) values, 38% lower Cτ values, and similar unbound amprenavir Cτ values. With a reduced ritonavir dosing frequency of 100 mg once daily, the plasma ritonavir AUC(0-24) values were 39% lower, similar, and 40% higher for subjects with mild, moderate, and severe hepatic impairment, respectively. The results of the study support the use of reduced fosamprenavir/ritonavir doses or dosing frequencies in the treatment of patients with hepatic

  11. 1-Benzhydryl-3-phenylurea and 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylthiourea derivatives: new templates among the CB1 cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Muccioli, Giulio G; Wouters, Johan; Scriba, Gerhard K E; Poppitz, Wolfgang; Poupaert, Jacques H; Lambert, Didier M

    2005-11-17

    New 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylurea derivatives and their 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylthiourea isosteres were synthesized and evaluated for their human CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor affinity. These compounds proved to be selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor ligands, acting as inverse agonists in a [35S]-GTPgammaS assay. The affinity of 3,5,5'-triphenylimidazolidine-2,4-dione and 3,5,5'-triphenyl-2-thioxoimidazolidin-4-one derivatives, possessing the 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylurea and 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylthiourea moiety, respectively, was also evaluated. In conclusion, the 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylurea scaffold seems to be a new interesting template of CB1 cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of High-Dose Human Regular U-500 Insulin Versus Human Regular U-100 Insulin in Healthy Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Amparo; Riddle, Matthew; Morrow, Linda A.; Jiang, Honghua H.; Linnebjerg, Helle; Scott, Adam; Win, Khin M.; Hompesch, Marcus; Mace, Kenneth F.; Jacobson, Jennie G.; Jackson, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Human regular U-500 (U-500R) insulin (500 units/mL) is increasingly being used clinically, yet its pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) have not been well studied. Therefore, we compared PK and PD of clinically relevant doses of U-500R with the same doses of human regular U-100 (U-100R) insulin (100 units/mL). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a single-site, randomized, double-blind, crossover euglycemic clamp study. Single subcutaneous injections of 50- and 100-unit doses of U-500R and U-100R were administered to 24 healthy obese subjects. RESULTS Both overall insulin exposure (area under the serum insulin concentration versus time curve from zero to return to baseline [AUC0-t’]) and overall effect (total glucose infused during a clamp) were similar between formulations at both 50- and 100-unit doses (90% [CI] of ratios contained within [0.80, 1.25]). However, peak concentration and effect were significantly lower for U-500R at both doses (P < 0.05). Both formulations produced relatively long durations of action (18.3 to 21.5 h). Time-to-peak concentration and time to maximum effect were significantly longer for U-500R than U-100R at the 100-unit dose (P < 0.05). Time variables reflective of duration of action (late tRmax50, tRlast) were prolonged for U-500R versus U-100R at both doses (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Overall exposure to and action of U-500R insulin after subcutaneous injection were no different from those of U-100R insulin. For U-500R, peaks of concentration and action profiles were blunted and the effect after the peak was prolonged. These findings may help guide therapy with U-500R insulin for highly insulin-resistant patients with diabetes. PMID:21994429

  13. Plasma pharmacokinetics and biological activity of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibody, F105, in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cavacini, L A; Power, J; Emes, C L; Mace, K; Treacy, G; Posner, M R

    1994-05-01

    The IgG1 kappa human monoclonal antibody (HMab), F105 reacts with a discontinuous epitope on the CD4 binding site (CD4BS) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)/gp120 and has broad neutralizing activity. F105 HMab (60 mg/kg bolus) was administered intravenously to four monkeys and serum was collected at intervals to determine pharmacokinetics in a primate model. Average serum F105 concentrations, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, were analyzed with MINSQ software using a two-compartment, first-order model. The half-life for the alpha phase of the distribution curve is 6.7 h and for the beta elimination phase, 9.6 days. The volume of distribution is 0.65 L/kg and the rate of clearance 2 ml/kg/h. Serum levels of 1.3-1.6 mg/ml of F105 were maintained for 24 h. When monkey serum from day 15 postdose was tested, total serum F105 was 230 +/- 79 micrograms/ml and was immunoreactive with cells infected with the MN and IIIB strains of HIV-1 as determined by flow cytometry. Binding activity was identical to that obtained with stock F105 HMab. Identical neutralizing activity between the injected and uninjected antibody was also observed. Thus, serum neutralizing titers (90%) of 1:2000 at peak and 1:30 at day 15 postdose for MN virus were observed. These data indicate that high in vivo levels of HMab F105 can be attained by single bolus administration with full retention of biological activity. Of importance, levels of antibody necessary for effective neutralization can be achieved and maintained.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism of Delamanid, a Novel Anti-Tuberculosis Drug, in Animals and Humans: Importance of Albumin Metabolism In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Katsunori; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Hirao, Yukihiro; Koyama, Noriyuki; Kitano, Kazuyoshi; Shibata, Masakazu; Umehara, Ken

    2015-08-01

    Delamanid, a new anti-tuberculosis drug, is metabolized to M1, a unique metabolite formed by cleavage of the 6-nitro-2,3-dihydroimidazo[2,1-b] oxazole moiety, in plasma albumin in vitro. The metabolic activities in dogs and humans are higher than those in rodents. In this study, we characterized the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of delamanid in animals and humans. Eight metabolites (M1-M8) produced by cleavage of the imidazooxazole moiety of delamanid were identified in the plasma after repeated oral administration by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Delamanid was initially catalyzed to M1 and subsequently metabolized by three separate pathways, which suggested that M1 is a crucial starting point. The major pathway in humans was hydroxylation of the oxazole moiety of M1 to form M2 and then successive oxidation to the ketone form (M3) mainly by CYP3A4. M1 had the highest exposure among the eight metabolites after repeated oral dosing in humans, which indicated that M1 was the major metabolite. The overall metabolism of delamanid was qualitatively similar across nonclinical species and humans but was quantitatively different among the species. After repeated administration, the metabolites had much higher concentrations in dogs and humans than in rodents. The in vitro metabolic activity of albumin on delamanid probably caused the species differences observed. We determined that albumin metabolism is a key component of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of delamanid. Nonhepatic formation of M1 and multiple separate pathways for metabolism of M1 suggest that clinically significant drug-drug interactions with delamanid and M1 are limited.

  15. Development and validation of a sensitive LC-MS/MS assay for the quantification of nizatidine in human plasma and urine and its application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Shang, De-Wei; Wang, Zhan-Zhang; Ni, Xiao-Jia; Zhang, Ming; Hu, Jin-Qing; Qiu, Chang; Wen, Yu-Guan

    2015-08-15

    We developed and validated a high performance liquid chromatographic method coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry for analysis of nizatidine in human plasma and urine. The biological samples were precipitated with methanol before separation on an Agilent Eclipse Plus C18 column (100mm×46mm, 5μm) with a mixture of methanol and water (95:5, plus 5mM ammonium formate) as the mobile phase at 0.5mL/min. Detection was performed using multiple reaction monitoring modes via electrospray ionization (ESI) at m/z 332.1→155.1 (for nizatidine) and m/z 335.1→155.1 (for [(2)H3]-nizatidine, the internal standard). The linear response range was 5-2000ng/mL and 0.5-80μg/mL for human plasma and urine, with the lower limits of quantification of 5ng/mL and 0.5μg/mL, respectively. The method was validated according to the biological method validation guidelines of the Food and Drug Administration and proved acceptable. This newly developed analytical method was successfully applied in a pharmacokinetic study following single oral administration of a 150mg nizatidine capsule in to 16 healthy Chinese subjects. Maximum and endpoint concentrations in plasma and urine were quantifiable, suggesting our method is appropriate for routine pharmacokinetic analysis.

  16. Safety and Toxicology of Cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Jane; McGlade, Erin; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    There is extensive research on the safety, toxicology, potency, and therapeutic potential of cannabis. However, uncertainty remains facilitating continued debate on medical and recreational cannabis policies at the state and federal levels. This review will include a brief description of cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system; a summary of the acute and long-term effects of cannabis; and a discussion of the therapeutic potential of cannabis. The conclusions about safety and efficacy will then be compared with the current social and political climate to suggest future policy directions and general guidelines.

  17. Human Microdosing with Carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene and Metabolites by UPLC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Madeen, Erin P; Ognibene, Ted J; Corley, Richard A; McQuistan, Tammie J; Henderson, Marilyn C; Baird, William M; Bench, Graham; Turteltaub, Ken W; Williams, David E

    2016-10-17

    Metabolism is a key health risk factor following exposures to pro-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), an IARC classified 2A probable human carcinogen. Human exposure to PAHs occurs primarily from the diet in nonsmokers. However, little data is available on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans of high molecular weight PAHs (≥4 aromatic rings), including DBC. We previously determined the pharmacokinetics of DBC in human volunteers orally administered a microdose (29 ng; 5 nCi) of [(14)C]-DBC by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis of total [(14)C] in plasma and urine. In the current study, we utilized a novel "moving wire" interface between ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and AMS to detect and quantify parent DBC and its major metabolites. The major [(14)C] product identified in plasma was unmetabolized [(14)C]-DBC itself (Cmax = 18.5 ±15.9 fg/mL, Tmax= 2.1 ± 1.0 h), whereas the major metabolite was identified as [(14)C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12-diol (Cmax= 2.5 ±1.3 fg/mL, Tmax= 1.8 h). Several minor species of [(14)C]-DBC metabolites were also detected for which no reference standards were available. Free and conjugated metabolites were detected in urine with [(14)C]-(+/-)-DBC-11,12,13,14-tetraol isomers identified as the major metabolites, 56.3% of which were conjugated (Cmax= 35.8 ± 23.0 pg/pool, Tmax = 6-12 h pool). [(14)C]-DBC-11,12-diol, of which 97.5% was conjugated, was also identified in urine (Cmax = 29.4 ± 11.6 pg/pool, Tmax = 6-12 h pool). Parent [(14)C]-DBC was not detected in urine. This is the first data set to assess metabolite profiles and associated pharmacokinetics of a carcinogenic PAH in human volunteers at an environmentally relevant dose, providing the data necessary for translation of high dose animal models to humans for translation of environmental health risk assessment.

  18. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of Bisphenol A following ingestion in soup: Individual pharmacokinetic data and emographics

    DOE PAGES

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Churchwell, Mona I.; ...

    2015-09-01

    Here we present data to evaluate potential absorption of Bisphenol A through non-metabolizing tissues of the upper digestive tract. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 h period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. The pharmacokinetic behavior of BPA and its metabolites in this cohort (rapid absorption, complete elimination, evidence against sublingual absorption) was reported. This Data in Brief article contains the corresponding individual pharmacokinetic data, reports the demographics of the cohort and provides additional details related to the analyticalmore » methods employed and is related to [4].« less

  19. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of Bisphenol A following ingestion in soup: Individual pharmacokinetic data and emographics

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Churchwell, Mona I.; Yang, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Seryak, Liesel M.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2015-09-01

    Here we present data to evaluate potential absorption of Bisphenol A through non-metabolizing tissues of the upper digestive tract. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 h period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. The pharmacokinetic behavior of BPA and its metabolites in this cohort (rapid absorption, complete elimination, evidence against sublingual absorption) was reported. This Data in Brief article contains the corresponding individual pharmacokinetic data, reports the demographics of the cohort and provides additional details related to the analytical methods employed and is related to [4].

  20. Immunoactive effects of cannabinoids: considerations for the therapeutic use of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Greineisen, William E; Turner, Helen

    2010-05-01

    The active constituents of Cannabis sativa have been used for centuries as recreational drugs and medicinal agents. Today, marijuana is the most prevalent drug of abuse in the United States and, conversely, therapeutic use of marijuana constituents are gaining mainstream clinical and political acceptance. Given the documented contributions of endocannabinoid signaling to a range of physiological systems, including cognitive function, and the control of eating behaviors, it is unsurprising that cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are showing significant clinical potential. In addition to the neuroactive effects of cannabinoids, an emerging body of data suggests that both endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids are potently immunoactive. The central premise of this review article is that the immunological effects of cannabinoids should be considered in the context of each prescribing decision. We present evidence that the immunological effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are highly relevant to the spectrum of disorders for which cannabinoid therapeutics are currently offered.

  1. Synthetic Cannabinoids and Cathinones: Prevalence and Markets.

    PubMed

    Bretteville-Jensen, A L; Tuv, S S; Bilgrei, O R; Fjeld, B; Bachs, L

    2013-03-01

    Over the past few years, the phenomenon of new designer drugs has attracted much attention. Synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones are the two main classes of these drugs. Both are potent drugs of abuse, and several cases of severe toxicity and deaths are reported. The present work is based on a systematic review of studies that have assessed the market and prevalence of synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones, and integrates pharmacological, sociological, and epidemiological aspects of these two groups of emerging synthetic drugs. The review reflects that the Internet has made synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones widely available. Furthermore, aggressive and widespread marketing, as well as the low price level of these drugs, their juridical status and their lack of detection on standard drug tests may serve as major motivations for drug use. The number of prevalence studies is small and derived from a limited number of countries. In spite of the many methodological shortcomings, some conclusions may be cautiously drawn. Taken together, the results point toward higher prevalence of use for synthetic cathinones than for synthetic cannabinoids. In the general population, the prevalence of use of synthetic cathinones is reported to be around 4% compared to figures lower than 1% for synthetic cannabinoids. Among students, the prevalence varies from 1-20% for synthetic cathinones and 2-10% for synthetic cannabinoids. Among groups with high rates of drug use, the prevalence varies between 4% to more than 60% for synthetic cathinones and around 10% for synthetic cannabinoids.

  2. Phase 1 safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic study of single ascending doses of XM17 (recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone) in downregulated healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Lammerich, Andreas; Bias, Peter; Gertz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Background XM17 is a recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (follitropin alfa) for stimulation of multifollicular development in women undergoing controlled ovarian hyper-stimulation during assisted reproductive therapy and for treatment of anovulation. Manufactured using Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with the human follicle-stimulating hormone gene, XM17 has an identical amino acid sequence to that of the human protein as well as to those of the other approved recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone products. Glycosylation patterns may differ slightly between products. The objectives of this first-in-human study were to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and dose-proportionality of single ascending subcutaneous doses of XM17 in healthy young female volunteers. Methods Endogenous follicle-stimulating hormone was downregulated by implanting a 1-month depot of goserelin acetate 3.6 mg on day 0 in eligible subjects. On day 14 of the experimental period, subjects received one of four ascending doses of XM17. Blood sampling to obtain the pharmacokinetic profile of XM17 was done at frequent intervals until 168 hours post-dose. Results Following downregulation of endogenous follicle-stimulating hormone to <4 IU/L, 40 subjects (of mean age 29±5.4 years) received single subcutaneous doses of 37.5 (n=4, pilot group), 75, 150, or 300 IU (n=12 each) of XM17. The mean serum concentration-time profiles of XM17 revealed dose-related increases in maximum concentration (Cmax) within 24 hours followed by monoexponential decay for the three higher dose levels. Slopes estimated by linear regression for Cmax and AUC0–168h were ~1.0 (0.9052 IU/L and 1.0964 IU·h/L, respectively). For each IU of XM17 administered, Cmax and AUC0–168h rose by 0.032 IU/L and 2.60 IU·h/L, respectively. Geometric mean elimination half-life ranged from 54 to 90 hours. No antibodies to XM17 were detected. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events were

  3. Cannabinoid-like anti-inflammatory compounds from flax fiber.

    PubMed

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kulma, Anna; Ratajczak, Katarzyna; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Szopa, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Flax is a valuable source of fibers, linseed and oil. The compounds of the latter two products have already been widely examined and have been proven to possess many health-beneficial properties. In the course of analysis of fibers extract from previously generated transgenic plants overproducing phenylpropanoids a new terpenoid compound was discovered.The UV spectra and the retention time in UPLC analysis of this new compound reveal similarity to a cannabinoid-like compound, probably cannabidiol (CBD). This was confirmed by finding two ions at m/z 174.1 and 231.2 in mass spectra analysis. Further confirmation of the nature of the compound was based on a biological activity assay. It was found that the compound affects the expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes in mouse and human fibroblasts and likely the CBD from Cannabis sativa activates the specific peripheral cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) gene expression. Besides fibers, the compound was also found in all other flax tissues. It should be pointed out that the industrial process of fabric production does not affect CBD activity.The presented data suggest for the first time that flax products can be a source of biologically active cannabinoid-like compounds that are able to influence the cell immunological response. These findings might open up many new applications for medical flax products, especially for the fabric as a material for wound dressing with anti-inflammatory properties.

  4. Cannabinoids as novel anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Nagarkatti, Prakash; Pandey, Rupal; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Hegde, Venkatesh L; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2009-10-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds that mediate their effects through cannabinoid receptors. The discovery of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as the major psychoactive principle in marijuana, as well as the identification of cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, has led to a significant growth in research aimed at understanding the physiological functions of cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptors include CB1, which is predominantly expressed in the brain, and CB2, which is primarily found on the cells of the immune system. The fact that both CB1 and CB2 receptors have been found on immune cells suggests that cannabinoids play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Recent studies demonstrated that administration of THC into mice triggered marked apoptosis in T cells and dendritic cells, resulting in immunosuppression. In addition, several studies showed that cannabinoids downregulate cytokine and chemokine production and, in some models, upregulate T-regulatory cells (Tregs) as a mechanism to suppress inflammatory responses. The endocannabinoid system is also involved in immunoregulation. For example, administration of endocannabinoids or use of inhibitors of enzymes that break down the endocannabinoids, led to immunosuppression and recovery from immune-mediated injury to organs such as the liver. Manipulation of endocannabinoids and/or use of exogenous cannabinoids in vivo can constitute a potent treatment modality against inflammatory disorders. This review will focus on the potential use of cannabinoids as a new class of anti-inflammatory agents against a number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases that are primarily triggered by activated T cells or other cellular immune components.

  5. Lack of response suppression follows repeated ventral tegmental cannabinoid administration: an in vitro electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Cheer, J F; Marsden, C A; Kendall, D A; Mason, R

    2000-01-01

    . To assess the role of GABA in cannabinoid-mediated excitation, HU210 was added in the presence of bicuculline. HU210 did not affect the initial bicuculline-induced increase in firing, suggesting different sites of action for the two compounds. Our data fail to support previously reported findings using repeated cannabinoid administration and cell preparations. The maintained increase in DA drive elicited by the potent cannabinoid agonist HU210 in the in vitro ventral tegmental circuit could explain some of the behavioural properties of cannabinoids, such as the lack of tolerance for the psychotropic effects of marijuana seen in human users.

  6. Pharmacology of cannabinoids in the treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Tyler E; Friedman, Daniel

    2017-01-10

    The use of cannabis products in the treatment of epilepsy has long been of interest to researchers and clinicians alike; however, until recently very little published data were available to support its use. This article summarizes the available scientific data of pharmacology from human and animal studies on the major cannabinoids which have been of interest in the treatment of epilepsy, including ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC), cannabidiol (CBD), ∆9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (∆9-THCV), cannabidivarin (CBDV), and ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (Δ9-THCA). It has long been known that ∆9-THC has partial agonist activity at the endocannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, though it also binds to other targets which may modulate neuronal excitability and neuroinflammation. The actions of Δ9-THCV and Δ9-THCA are less well understood. In contrast to ∆9-THC, CBD has low affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors and other targets have been investigated to explain its anticonvulsant properties including TRPV1, voltage gated potassium and sodium channels, and GPR55, among others. We describe the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of each of the above mentioned compounds. Cannabinoids as a whole are very lipophilic, resulting in decreased bioavailability, which presents challenges in optimal drug delivery. Finally, we discuss the limited drug-drug interaction data available on THC and CBD. As cannabinoids and cannabis-based products are studied for efficacy as anticonvulsants, more investigation is needed regarding the specific targets of action, optimal drug delivery, and potential drug-drug interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue titled Cannabinoids and Epilepsy.

  7. Rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS method for determination of megestrol acetate in human plasma: application to a human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji-Hyung; Park, Ji-Sun; Jo, Min-Ho; Park, Mi-Sun; Ryu, Ju-Hee; Cho, Young-Wuk; Shim, Wang-Sup; Noh, Gyu-Jeong; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2013-04-01

    A rapid, simple and fully validated LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the determination of megestrol acetate in human plasma using tolbutamide as an internal standard (IS) after one-step liquid-liquid extraction with methyl-tert-butyl-ether. Detection was performed using electrospray ionization in positive ion multiple reaction monitoring mode by monitoring the transitions m/z 385.5 → 267.1 for megestrol acetate and m/z 271.4 → 155.1 for IS. Chromatographic separation was performed on a YMC Hydrosphere C18 column with an isocratic mobile phase, which consisted of 10 mm ammonium formate buffer (adjusted to pH 5.0 with formic acid)-methanol (60:40, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. The achieved lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) was 1 ng/mL (signal-to-noise ratio > 10) and the standard calibration curve for megestrol acetate was linear (r > 0.99) over the studied concentration range (1-2000 ng/mL). The proposed method was fully validated by determining its specificity, linearity, LLOQ, intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy, recovery, matrix effect and stability. The validated LC-MS/MS method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetic parameters of megestrol acetate after oral administration of a single dose 800 mg of megestrol acetate (Megace™) to five healthy Korean male volunteers under fed conditions.

  8. Pharmacokinetic study of amoxicillin in human plasma by solid-phase microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Szultka, Malgorzata; Krzeminski, Rafal; Walczak, Justyna; Jackowski, Marek; Buszewski, Boguslaw

    2014-02-01

    Sensitive and selective analytical procedures based on high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric detection were developed for the determination of amoxicillin in human plasma samples. Samples were prepared by applying in-house manufactured molecularly imprinted solid-phase microextraction probes. The detection of target compounds was performed in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The multiple reaction monitoring detection was operated in the positive electrospray ionization mode using the transitions of m/z 366 ([M + H](+) ) → 349 for amoxicillin and m/z 390 ([M + H](+) ) → 372 for gemifloxacin. The method was validated with precision within 15% relative standard deviation and accuracy within 15% relative error. The method was successfully applied to study of the pharmacokinetics of amoxicillin in human plasma after oral administration of amoxicillin.

  9. A validated high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the determination of glibenclamide in human plasma and its application to pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Niopas, Ioannis; Daftsios, Athanasios C

    2002-05-15

    Glibenclamide is a potent second generation oral sulfonylurea antidiabetic agent widely used for the treatment of type II diabetes melitus. A rapid, sensitive, precise, accurate and specific HPLC assay for the determination of glibenclamide in human plasma was developed and validated. After addition of flufenamic acid as internal standard, the analytes were isolated from human plasma by liquid-liquid extraction. The method was linear in the 10-400 ng/ml concentration range (r > 0.999). Recovery for glibenclamide was greater than 91.5% and for internal standard was 93.5%. Within-day and between-day precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD%), ranged from 1.4 to 5.9% and 5.8 to 6.6%, respectively. Assay accuracy was better than 93.4%. The assay was used to estimate the pharmacokinetics of glibenclamide after oral administration of a 5 mg tablet of glibenclamide to 18 healthy volunteers.

  10. Role of the Endogenous Cannabinoid System in Nicotine Addiction: Novel Insights

    PubMed Central

    Gamaleddin, Islam Hany; Trigo, Jose M.; Gueye, Aliou B.; Zvonok, Alexander; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Goldberg, Steven R.; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that the endogenous cannabinoids are implicated in several neuropsychiatric diseases. Notably, preclinical and human clinical studies have shown a pivotal role of the cannabinoid system in nicotine addiction. The CB1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist rimonabant (also known as SR141716) was effective to decrease nicotine-taking and nicotine-seeking in rodents, as well as the elevation of dopamine induced by nicotine in brain reward area. Rimonabant has been shown to improve the ability of smokers to quit smoking in randomized clinical trials. However, rimonabant was removed from the market due to increased risk of psychiatric side-effects observed in humans. Recently, other components of the endogenous cannabinoid system have been explored. Here, we present the recent advances on the understanding of the role of the different components of the cannabinoid system on nicotine’s effects. Those recent findings suggest possible alternative ways of modulating the cannabinoid system that could have implication for nicotine dependence treatment. PMID:25859226

  11. Estimation of the binding modes with important human cytochrome P450 enzymes, drug interaction potential, pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity of ginger components using molecular docking, computational, and pharmacokinetic modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for the treatment of numerous ailments and improvement of body functions. It may be used in combination with prescribed drugs. The coadministration of ginger with therapeutic drugs raises a concern of potential deleterious drug interactions via the modulation of the expression and/or activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, resulting in unfavorable therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to determine the molecular interactions between 12 main active ginger components (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, ar-curcumene, β-bisabolene, β-sesquiphelandrene, 6-gingerdione, (-)-zingiberene, and methyl-6-isogingerol) and human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) of the 12 ginger components using computational approaches and comprehensive literature search. Docking studies showed that ginger components interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 mainly through hydrogen bond formation, to a lesser extent, via π-π stacking. The pharmacokinetic simulation studies showed that the [I]/[Ki ] value for CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 ranged from 0.0002 to 19.6 and the R value ranged from 1.0002 to 20.6 and that ginger might exhibit a high risk of drug interaction via inhibition of the activity of human CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, but a low risk of drug interaction toward CYP2C19-mediated drug metabolism. Furthermore, it has been evaluated that the 12 ginger components possessed a favorable ADMET profiles with regard to the solubility, absorption, permeability across the blood-brain barrier, interactions with CYP2D6, hepatotoxicity, and plasma protein binding. The validation results showed that there was no remarkable effect of ginger on the metabolism of warfarin in humans, whereas concurrent use of ginger and nifedipine exhibited a

  12. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Panel met on 29-30 Aug. 1988 at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas to discuss pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic implications of space flight and make recommendations for operational and research strategies. Based on the knowledge available on the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the dependence of pharmacokinetics on physiological factors, and the therapeutic requirements for future space missions, the panel made several recommendations for research. It was suggested that using medications available with a large (wide) therapeutic window will avoid unforeseen therapeutic consequences during flight. The sequence for conducting research was outlined as follows: (1) identify ground-based simulation models (e.g., antiorthostatic bed rest) for conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic research; (2) estimate parametric changes in these models using pharmacologic agents that have different pharmacokinetic characteristics and a narrow therapeutic index; (3) verify these findings during flight; and (4) develop and identify appropriate and effective drug delivery systems, dosage forms, and regimens. The panel recommended gaining a thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetic deviations of medications that have a narrow therapeutic index (e.g. cardiovascular drugs and sedative hypnotics) in order to ensure safe and effective treatment during flight with these agents. It was also suggested that basic information on physiological factors such as organ blood flow, protein composition and binding, tissue distribution, and metabolism by hepatic enzymes must be accumulated by conducting ground-based animal and human studies using models of weightlessness. This information will be useful to construct and identify physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that can provide valuable information on the pharmacodynamic consequences of space flight and aid in identifying appropriate therapeutic

  13. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-hydroxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in human plasma after controlled oral administration of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Robert S; Gustafson, Richard A; Barnes, Allan; Nebro, Wesenyalsh; Moolchan, Eric T; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2006-08-01

    A clinical study to investigate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral tetrahydrocannabinol was performed. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject, inpatient study compared the effects of THC-containing hemp oils in liquid and capsule form to dronabinol (synthetic THC) in doses used for appetite stimulation. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Institutional Review Board approved the protocol and each participant provided informed consent. Detection times and concentrations of THC, 11-hydroxy-Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in plasma were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry [limits of quantification (LOQ)=0.5, 0.5, and 1.0 ng/mL, respectively] after oral THC administration. Six volunteers ingested liquid hemp oil (0.39 and 14.8 mg THC/d), hemp oil in capsules (0.47 mg THC/d), dronabinol capsules (7.5 mg THC/d), and placebo. Plasma specimens were collected during and after each dosing condition. THC and 11-OH-THC concentrations were low and never exceeded 6.1 ng/mL. Analytes were detectable 1.5 hour after initiating dosing with the 7.5 mg THC/d regimen and 4.5 hour after starting the 14.8 mg THC/d sessions. THCCOOH was detected 1.5 hour after the first dose, except for the 0.47 mg THC/d session, which required 4.5 hour for concentrations to reach the LOQ. THCCOOH concentrations peaked at 3.1 ng/mL during dosing with the low-dose hemp oils. Plasma THC and 11-OH-THC concentrations were negative for all participants at all doses within 15.5 hours after the last THC dose. Plasma THCCOOH persisted for at least 39.5 hours after the end of dosing and at much higher concentrations (up to 43.0 ng/mL). This study demonstrated that subjects who used high THC content hemp oil (347 mug/mL) as a dietary supplement had THC and metabolites in plasma in quantities comparable to those of patients using dronabinol for appetite stimulation. There was a significant

  14. Transport of recombinant human CD4-immunoglobulin G across the human placenta: pharmacokinetics and safety in six mother-infant pairs in AIDS clinical trial group protocol 146.

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, W T; Duliege, A M; Kline, M W; Hammill, H; Minkoff, H; Ammann, A J; Chen, S; Izu, A; Mordenti, J

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant CD4-immunoglobulin G (rCD4-IgG) is a 98-kDa human immunoglobulin-like protein that is produced by fusing the gp120 binding domain of CD4 to the Fc portion of the human IgG1 heavy chain. This hybrid molecule was given to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected pregnant women at the onset of labor by intravenous bolus at 1 mg/kg of body weight (group A; n = 3) and 1 week prior to and at the onset of labor by the same route and at the same dose (group B; n = 3). In addition to pharmacokinetic studies, safety in the mothers and infants was determined through routine chemistries, hematology, and urinalysis; immunologic and HIV infection statuses in the infants were assessed through lymphocyte cultures, p24 antigen level determination, culture of HIV from plasma, PCR, lymphocyte subset enumeration, quantitative immunoglobulin analysis, and lymphocyte proliferation. Thirty minutes after the rCD4-IgG injection, concentrations in maternal serum were 12 to 23 micrograms/ml. These concentrations declined slowly, with initial and terminal half-lives (mean +/- standard deviation) of 9.95 +/- 3.23 and 47.6 +/- 22.3 h, respectively. Infants were born 2.6 to 46.5 h after rCD4-IgG administration; concentrations of rCD4-IgG in cord blood ranged from 28 to 107 ng/ml. The half-life of rCD4-IgG in infants ranged from 5 to 29 h. These data demonstrate that the transfer of rCD4-IgG from the mother to the fetus is rapid and that newborns do not appear to have any difficulty eliminating rCD4-IgG. No safety concerns in mothers or infants were encountered. Although the study did not address the question of efficacy, none of the infants was HIV type 1 infected 36 months later. In summary, these findings document that bifunctional immune molecules can be transported across the placenta, and this general approach may be used in the future to block vertical transmission of HIV type 1. PMID:7664172

  15. What We Know and Don’t Know About the Cannabinoid Receptor 2 (CB2)

    PubMed Central

    Malfitano, Anna Maria; Basu, Sreemanti; Maresz, Katarzyna; Bifulco, Maurizio; Dittel, Bonnie N.

    2015-01-01

    It well appreciated that the endocannabinoid system can regulate immune responses via the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), which is primarily expressed by cells of the hematopoietic system. The endocannabinoid system is composed of receptors, ligands and enzymes controlling the synthesis and degradation of endocannabinoids. Along with endocannabinoids, both plant-derived and synthetic cannabinoids have been shown to bind to and signal through CB2 via G proteins leading to both inhibitory and stimulatory signals depending on the biological process. Because no cannabinoid ligand has been identified that only binds to CB2, the generation of mice deficient in CB2 has greatly expanded our knowledge of how CB2 contributes to immune cell development and function in health and disease. In regards to humans, genetic studies have associated CB2 with a variety of human diseases. Here, we review the endocannabinoid system with an emphasis on CB2 and its role in the immune system. PMID:24877594

  16. Combined analysis of pharmacokinetic and efficacy data of preclinical studies with statins markedly improves translation of drug efficacy to human trials.

    PubMed

    van de Steeg, E; Kleemann, R; Jansen, H T; van Duyvenvoorde, W; Offerman, E H; Wortelboer, H M; Degroot, J

    2013-12-01

    Correct prediction of human pharmacokinetics (PK) and the safety and efficacy of novel compounds based on preclinical data, is essential but often fails. In the current study, we aimed to improve the predictive value of ApoE*3Leiden (E3L) transgenic mice regarding the cholesterol-lowering efficacy of various statins in humans by combining pharmacokinetic with efficacy data. The efficacy of five currently marketed statins (atorvastatin, simvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, and rosuvastatin) in hypercholesterolemic patients (low-density lipoprotein ≥ 160 mg/dl) was ranked based on meta-analysis of published human trials. Additionally, a preclinical combined PK efficacy data set for these five statins was established in E3L mice that were fed a high-cholesterol diet for 4 weeks, followed by 6 weeks of drug intervention in which statins were supplemented to the diet. Plasma and tissue levels of the statins were determined on administration of (radiolabeled) drugs (10 mg/kg p.o.). As expected, all statins reduced plasma cholesterol in the preclinical model, but a direct correlation between cholesterol lowering efficacy of the different statins in mice and in humans did not reach statistical significance (R(2) = 0.11, P < 0.57). It is noteworthy that, when murine data were corrected for effective liver uptake of the different statins, the correlation markedly increased (R(2) = 0.89, P < 0.05). Here we show for the first time that hepatic uptake of statins is related to their cholesterol-lowering efficacy and provide evidence that combined PK and efficacy studies can substantially improve the translational value of the E3L mouse model in the case of statin treatment. This strategy may also be applicable for other classes of drugs and other preclinical models.

  17. Determination of ketotifen and its conjugated metabolite in human plasma by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry: application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhong, Dafang; Liu, Dan; Wang, Yingwu; Han, Ying; Gu, Jingkai

    2003-01-01

    A sensitive and specific liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method was developed for the investigation of the pharmacokinetics of ketotifen and its major metabolite, ketotifen N-glucuronide, in human plasma. The plasma samples were treated by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed using LC/MS/MS with an electrospray ionization interface. Diphenhydramine was used as the internal standard. The method had a lower limit of quantitation of 10 pg/mL for ketotifen, which offered increased sensitivity, selectivity and speed of analysis, compared with existing methods. The intra- and inter-day precision were measured to be below 8.2% and accuracy between -2.4% and 3.4% for all QC samples. Incubation of the plasma samples with beta-glucuronidase allowed the quantitation of ketotifen N-glucuronide. This quantitation method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of ketotifen and its major metabolite after oral administration of 2 mg ketotifen fumarate to 16 healthy volunteers.

  18. Flavanols from green tea and phenolic acids from coffee: critical quantitative evaluation of the pharmacokinetic data in humans after consumption of single doses of beverages.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Gary; Dionisi, Fabiola; Renouf, Mathieu

    2011-06-01

    Coffee contains a complex mixture of chlorogenic acids, which are mainly ferulic and caffeic acids ester-linked to quinic acid. Green tea contains flavanols, mainly (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC) and (-)-epicatechin (EC). For healthy humans, we identified seven studies on green tea in liquid form and five on coffee beverage reporting single-dose plasma pharmacokinetics. Weighted averages, based on the number of subjects, and elimination of outliers, allowed estimation of some pharmacokinetic parameters. After consumption of an "average" cup of green tea containing 112 mg of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, 51 mg of EGC and 15 mg of EC in 200 mL, the predicted C(max) values (total free and sulfate/glucuronide conjugates) in plasma are 125, 181 and 76 nM, respectively, together with 94 nM methyl-EGC and 51 nM methyl-EC (standard deviation <20%). After consumption of an "average" cup of coffee (160 mg total chlorogenic acids (0.46 mmol)/200 mL), predicted C(max) values of caffeic, ferulic, isoferulic, dihydrocaffeic and dihydroferulic acids are 114, 96, 50, 384 and 594 nM, respectively (too few studies to calculate standard deviation). Most studies report a very low amount of intact chlorogenic acids in plasma, with one exception. More studies on absorption of chlorogenic acids from coffee are required, including dose-response studies.

  19. Toxicological profiles of selected synthetic cannabinoids showing high binding affinities to the cannabinoid receptor subtype CB₁.

    PubMed

    Koller, Verena J; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Auwärter, Volker; Fuchs, Sabine; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2013-07-01

    Products containing synthetic cannabinoids are consumed as a surrogate for marihuana due to their non-detectability with commonly used drug tests and their strong cannabimimetic effects. Because data concerning their toxicological properties are scarce, the cytotoxic, genotoxic, immunomodulatory, and hormonal activities of four naphthoylindole compounds (JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-122 and JWH-210) and of one benzoylindole (AM-694) were studied in human cell lines and primary cells; tetrahydrocannabinol was included as the classical non-endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand. All compounds induced damage to the cell membranes of buccal (TR146) and breast (MCF-7) derived cells at concentrations of ≥75-100 μM. No cytotoxic responses were seen in other assays which reflect mitochondrial damage, protein synthesis, and lysosomal activities. JWH-073 and JWH-122 induced DNA migration in buccal and liver cells (HepG2) in single cell gel electrophoresis assays, while JWH-210 was only in the latter cell line active. No estrogenic activities were detected in bone marrow cells (U2-OS), but all compounds caused anti-estrogenic effects at levels between 2.1 and 23.0 μM. Furthermore, no impact on cytokine release (i.e., on IL-10, IL-6, IL-12/23p40 and TNFα levels) was seen in LPS-stimulated human PBMCs, except with JWH-210 and JWH-122 which caused a decrease of TNFα and IL-12/23p40. All toxic effects were observed with concentrations higher than those expected in body fluids of users. Since genotoxic effects are in general linear over a wide concentration range and the exposure levels may be higher in epithelial cells than [corrected] in serum, further experimental work is required to find out if DNA damage takes place in drug users.

  20. Cannabinoids, endocannabinoids, and related analogs in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Sumner H; Zurier, Robert B

    2009-03-01

    This review covers reports published in the last 5 years on the anti-inflammatory activities of all classes of cannabinoids, including phytocannabinoids such as tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, synthetic analogs such as ajulemic acid and nabilone, the endogenous cannabinoids anandamide and related compounds, namely, the elmiric acids, and finally, noncannabinoid components of Cannabis that show anti-inflammatory action. It is intended to be an update on the topic of the involvement of cannabinoids in the process of inflammation. A possible mechanism for these actions is suggested involving increased production of eicosanoids that promote the resolution of inflammation. This differentiates these cannabinoids from cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors that suppress the synthesis of eicosanoids that promote the induction of the inflammatory process.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and elucidation of the rates and routes of N-glucuronidation of PF-592379, an oral dopamine 3 agonist in rat, dog, and human.

    PubMed

    Attkins, Neil; Betts, Alison; Hepworth, David; Heatherington, Anne C

    2010-11-01

    PF-592379 is a potent, selective agonist of the dopamine 3 receptor, for the treatment of male erectile dysfunction and female sexual dysfunction. In vivo, PF-592379 has low-moderate clearance relative to liver blood flow of 6.3 and 8.5 ml/min/kg in dog and 44.8 and 58.2 ml/min/kg in rat. It has high permeability in Caco-2 cells and was completely absorbed in rat and dog pharmacokinetic studies with an oral bioavailability of 28% in both rats and 61 and 87% in the dogs. These data are consistent with the physicochemical properties of PF-592379, which indicate complete absorption by the transcellular route. Elimination of PF-592379 was predominantly metabolic in nature. In vitro routes of metabolism studies indicate that metabolism in the rat is a combination of P450 mechanisms and N-glucuronidation, whereas in dog and human, N-glucuronidation is the major route. NMR analysis indicates that N-glucuronidation is non-quaternary in nature and occurs on both the pyridyl amine and ring nitrogen. Rates of clearance via N-glucuronidation were predicted to be low in humans compared with acyl or phenolic glucuronidation. PF-592379 was predicted to have complete absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and an oral bioavailability of >60% in the clinic. Clinical data verified that PF-592379 is a low clearance compound in human, with a mean oral clearance of 6.5 ml/min/kg following a 200 mg oral dose. PF-592379 has ideal pharmacokinetic properties for an oral D3 agonist, intended for on demand dosing.

  2. Single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of AM-1155, a new 6-fluoro-8-methoxy quinolone, in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, M; Uematsu, T; Kosuge, K; Kusajima, H; Ooie, T; Masuda, Y; Ishida, R; Uchida, H

    1995-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of AM-1155, a new 6-fluoro-8-methoxy quinolone, was examined in healthy male volunteers after the oral administration of a single dose of 100, 200, 400, or 600 mg and multiple doses of 300 mg twice daily for 6.5 days (13 total doses). Throughout the whole study period, AM-1155 was well tolerated in every subject. In the single-dose study, the concentrations in serum reached a peak between 1 and 2 h, and the peak concentrations were 0.873, 1.71, 3.35, and 5.41 micrograms/ml at the doses of 100, 200, 400, and 600 mg, respectively. The elimination half-life was 7 to 8 h, independently of the doses. The unchanged drug was excreted mainly in the urine, with 82 to 88% of the doses appearing for 72 h. The fecal recovery of the unchanged drug amounted to 5.7% for 72 h after a single oral administration of a 400-mg dose. Urinary excretion of metabolites was minimal. The serum protein binding was 20%, independently of the concentrations in serum. The concentrations in saliva were approximately 80% of those in serum. The intake of food had no effect on the pharmacokinetic parameters and urinary excretion of AM-1155 except the slight decrease in area under the concentration-time curve. The concurrent administration of probenecid prolonged the elimination half-life, increased the area under the concentration-time curve, and decreased the apparent total body clearance, renal clearance, urinary recovery of unchanged drug, and the excretion ratio (intrinsic renal clearance of AM-1155/creatinine clearance). This indicated that the tubular secretion contributed to the renal excretion of AM-1155. In the multiple-dose study, the concentrations of AM-1155 in serum and urine reached a steady state within 2 to 3 days. The measured concentrations in serum fitted well the simulation curve, which reflected the persistence of linear pharmacokinetics of AM-1155. In conclusion, AM-1155 is expected to be clinically useful because of its potent antibacterial activity and

  3. Alcohol Versus Cannabinoids: A Review of Their Opposite Neuro-Immunomodulatory Effects and Future Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Madhavan P.; Figueroa, Gloria; Casteleiro, Gianna; Muñoz, Karla; Agudelo, Marisela

    2015-01-01

    Due to the legalization of marijuana and the increased demand for cannabis and alcohol consumption, research efforts highlighting the biomedical consequences of the use of alcohol and cannabinoids are not only relevant to the substance abuse scientific field, but are also of public health interest. Moreover, an overview of the recent literature about alcohol and cannabinoids neuro-immunomodulatory effects highlighting their future therapeutic potentials will provide a significant contribution to science and medicine. Therefore, in the current review, we will first discuss briefly the prevalence of alcohol and marijuana abuse, followed by a discussion on the individual effects of alcohol and cannabinoids on the immune system; then, we will focus on the role of endocannabinoids on the alcohol-induced inflammatory effects. In addition, the review also incorporates cytokine array data obtained from human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, providing a different perspective on the alcohol and cannabinoid abuse divergent effects on cytokine production. The final section will highlight the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid receptors and the novel strategies to treat alcohol dependence as determined by in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies. PMID:26478902

  4. Marijuana and other cannabinoids as a treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, Maria M; Blessing, Esther M; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Hollahan, Laura C; Anderson, William T

    2017-03-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common in the general population, yet there are limitations to the effectiveness, tolerability, and acceptability of available first-line interventions. We review the extant knowledge on the effects of marijuana and other cannabinoids on PTSD. Potential therapeutic effects of these agents may largely derive from actions on the endocannabinoid system and we review major animal and human findings in this area. Preclinical and clinical studies generally support the biological plausibility for cannabinoids' potential therapeutic effects, but underscore heterogeneity in outcomes depending on dose, chemotype, and individual variation. Treatment outcome studies of whole plant marijuana and related cannabinoids on PTSD are limited and not methodologically rigorous, precluding conclusions about their potential therapeutic effects. Reported benefits for nightmares and sleep (particularly with synthetic cannabinoid nabilone) substantiate larger controlled trials to determine effectiveness and tolerability. Of concern, marijuana use has been linked to adverse psychiatric outcomes, including conditions commonly comorbid with PTSD such as depression, anxiety, psychosis, and substance misuse. Available evidence is stronger for marijuana's harmful effects on the development of psychosis and substance misuse than for the development of depression and anxiety. Marijuana use is also associated with worse treatment outcomes in naturalistic studies, and with maladaptive coping styles that may maintain PTSD symptoms. Known risks of marijuana thus currently outweigh unknown benefits for PTSD. Although controlled research on marijuana and other cannabinoids' effects on PTSD remains limited, rapid shifts in the legal landscape may now enable such studies, potentially opening new avenues in PTSD treatment research.

  5. Intraperirhinal cortex administration of the synthetic cannabinoid, HU210, disrupts object recognition memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Sticht, Martin A; Jacklin, Derek L; Mechoulam, Raphael; Parker, Linda A; Winters, Boyer D

    2015-03-25

    Cannabinoids disrupt learning and memory in human and nonhuman participants. Object recognition memory, which is particularly susceptible to the impairing effects of cannabinoids, relies critically on the perirhinal cortex (PRh); however, to date, the effects of cannabinoids within PRh have not been assessed. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of localized administration of the synthetic cannabinoid, HU210 (0.01, 1.0 μg/hemisphere), into PRh on spontaneous object recognition in Long-Evans rats. Animals received intra-PRh infusions of HU210 before the sample phase, and object recognition memory was assessed at various delays in a subsequent retention test. We found that presample intra-PRh HU210 dose dependently (1.0 μg but not 0.01 μg) interfered with spontaneous object recognition performance, exerting an apparently more pronounced effect when memory demands were increased. These novel findings show that cannabinoid agonists in PRh disrupt object recognition memory.

  6. Cannabinoid modulation of fear extinction brain circuits: a novel target to advance anxiety treatment.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Phan, K Luan

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress (PTSD), panic, and phobic disorders, can be conceptualized as a failure to inhibit inappropriate fear responses. A common, effective treatment strategy involves repeated presentations to the feared cue without any danger (extinction). However, extinction learning has a number of important limitations, and enhancing its effects, generalizability and durability via cognitive enhancers may improve its therapeutic impact. In this review we focus specifically on the role of the cannabinoid system in fear extinction learning and its retention. We address the following questions: What are the neural circuits mediating fear extinction?; Can we make fear extinction more effective?; Can cannabinoids facilitate fear extinction in humans?; How might the cannabinoid system effect fear extinction? Collectively, translational evidence suggest that enhancing cannabinoid transmission may facilitate extinction learning and its recall, and that the cannabinoid system is a potential pharmacological target for improving the active learning that occurs during exposure-based behavioral treatments prompting future research in terms of mechanisms research, novel treatment approaches ('cognitive enhancers'), and pharmacotherapeutic drug discovery.

  7. Cannabinoid properties of methylfluorophosphonate analogs.

    PubMed

    Martin, B R; Beletskaya, I; Patrick, G; Jefferson, R; Winckler, R; Deutsch, D G; Di Marzo, V; Dasse, O; Mahadevan, A; Razdan, R K

    2000-09-01

    Methylarachidonylfluorophosphonate (MAFP) and related analogs have been shown to inhibit fatty acid amidohydrolase activity (FAAH), the enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of the endogenous cannabinoid ligand anandamide. To fully characterize this class of compounds, methylfluorophosphonate compounds with saturated alkyl chains ranging from C8 to C20 along with C20 unsaturated derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to interact with the CB1 receptor, inhibit FAAH, and produce in vivo pharmacological effects. These analogs demonstrated widely varying affinities for the CB1 receptor. Of the saturated compounds, C8:0 was incapable of displacing [(3)H]CP 55,940 binding, whereas C12:0 exhibited high affinity (2.5 nM). The C20:0 saturated analog had low affinity (900 nM), but the introduction of unsaturation into the C20 analogs restored receptor affinity. However, none of the analogs were capable of fully displacing [(3)H]CP 55,940 binding. On the other hand, all compounds were able to completely inhibit FAAH enzyme activity, with the C20:0 analog being the least potent. The most potent FAAH inhibitor was the short-chained saturated C12:0, whereas the other analogs were 15- to 30-fold less potent. In vivo, the C8:0 and C12:0 analogs were highly potent and fully efficacious in producing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-like effects, whereas the other analogs were either inactive or acted as partial agonists. None was capable of attenuating the agonist effects of THC. Conversely, the C20:0 analog potentiated the effects of anandamide but not those of 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol and THC. The high in vivo potency of the novel short-chain saturated MAFP derivatives (C8:0 and C12:0) underscores the complexity of manipulating the endogenous cannabinoid system.

  8. Development of a prolonged-release gastroretentive tablet formulation of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride: pharmacokinetic characterization in healthy human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Abolfazl; Emami, Jaber; Varshosaz, Jaleh; Davies, Neal M; Rezazadeh, Mahboubeh

    2011-05-16

    The fluroquinolone anti-biotic ciprofloxacin is primarily dissolved and absorbed from the upper part of the GI tract. We, therefore, aimed to develop a prolonged release gastroretentive (GT) formulation of ciprofloxacin that could be administered once daily with a conventional tablet (CT). A variety of polymers and effervescent properties were utilized to optimize the desired disposition profile. Tablets were prepared by the direct compression technique and evaluated for physical properties, swelling, floating, and drug release. In vivo studies were also carried out on the optimized GT formulation and CT in healthy volunteers. A very sensitive and reliable HPLC method was developed to measure plasma concentration of ciprofloxacin. The duration of floating times were predominantly >24 h and floating lag times <20 s. The drug release mechanism followed zero order kinetics. C(max), T(max), and AUC(0-∞) of GT vs CT were 0.945±0.29 vs 2.1±0.46 μg/ml, 6.0±1.42 vs 1.42±0.59 h and 8.54±1.87 vs 9.45±2.12 μg/ml/h, respectively. Pharmacokinetic parameters indicate that the developed GT formulation extended the pharmacokinetic profile achieved with CT. The C(max)/MIC and AUC(0-∞)/MIC, which are indicative of eradication of pathogens, following co-administration of GT with CT were comparable to those of twice-daily administration of CT alone.

  9. A New Differential Diagnosis: Synthetic Cannabinoids-Associated Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gudsoorkar, Vineet S.; Perez, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are herbal blends that use plant material with varying concentrations of synthetic analogues of cannabinoids. These products are sold as incense or potpourri and are labeled “Not for human use.” Even so, rates of abuse are rapidly increasing worldwide, especially in the young adult population. An extensive network of users exists, and the products can easily be ordered on the Internet under various brand names, including the most popular ones, “K2” and “Spice.” Not much is known about their spectrum of toxicity and no specific antidote is available at present. Renal failure is a rare complication associated with SC abuse. We describe a case of acute kidney injury associated with use of SCs and present a review of the current literature, including the history and some key pharmacologic and epidemiologic findings related to synthetic cannabinoid compounds. PMID:26634029

  10. Prediction of clinical pharmacokinetics of AMG 181, a human anti-α4β7 monoclonal antibody for treating inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Köck, Kathleen; Wisler, John A; Rees, William A; Prince, Peter J; Reynhardt, Kai O; Hsu, Hailing; Yu, Zhigang; Borie, Dominic C; Salinger, David H; Pan, Wei-Jian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict a safe starting dose of AMG 181, a human anti-α4β7 antibody for treating inflammatory bowel diseases, based on cynomolgus monkey pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data. A two-compartment model with parallel linear and target-mediated drug disposition for AMG 181 PK in cynomolgus monkey was developed. The estimated parameters were allometrically scaled to predict human PK. An Emax PD model was used to relate AMG 181 concentration and free α4β7 receptor data in cynomolgus monkey. AMG 181 clinical doses were selected based on observed exposures at the no adverse effect level of 80 mg·kg−1 in monkeys, the predicted human exposures, and AMG 181 concentration expected to produce greater than 50% α4β7 receptor occupancy in humans. The predicted human AMG 181 clearance and central volume of distribution were 144 mL·day−1 and 2900 mL, respectively. The estimated EC50 for free α4β7 receptor was 14 ng·mL−1. At the 0.7 mg starting dose in humans, the predicted exposure margins were greater than 490,000 and AMG 181 concentrations were predicted to only briefly cover the free α4β7 receptor EC10. Predictions for both Cmax and AUC matched with those observed in the first-in-human study within the 7 mg subcutaneous to 420 mg intravenous dose range. The developed model aided in selection of a safe starting dose and a pharmacological relevant dose escalation strategy for testing of AMG 181 in humans. The clinically observed human AMG 181 PK data validated the modeling approach based on cynomolgus monkey data alone. PMID:25692016

  11. Simultaneous determination of nimesulide and its four possible metabolites in human plasma by LC-MS/MS and its application in a study of pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Xue, Kai-Lu; Jiao, Xin-Yue; Chen, Qian; Xu, Li; Zheng, Heng; Ding, Yu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    In this study, it was the first time that we simultaneously quantified nimesulide and its possible metabolites M1, M2, M3 and M4 by employing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Nimesulide-d5 was used as internal standard (IS) for validation. Analytes and IS were recovered from human plasma by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Prepared plasma samples were analyzed under the same LC-MS/MS conditions, and chromatographic separation was realized by using an Ultimate C18 column, with run time being 5min for each sample. Our results showed that various analytes within their concentration ranges could be quantified accurately by using the method. Mean intra- and inter-day accuracies ranged from -4.8% to 4.8% (RE), and intra- and inter-assay precision ≤6.2% (RSD). The following parameters were validated: specificity, recovery, matrix effects, dilution integrity, carry-over, sample stability under a variety of storage and handling conditions (room temperature, freezer, freeze-thaw and post-preparative) and stock solution stability. Pharmacokinetics of nimesulide and its metabolites were calculated based on the analysis of samples collected from twelve Chinese healthy volunteers after single oral dose of 100mg nimesulide tablets. By applying the pharmacokinetic determination into human samples, we preliminarily detected a new metabolite of nimesulide (M4*), and the concentration of M4* was relatively higher in plasma. Furthermore, we predicted part of conceivable metabolism pathway in plasma of after oral administration of 100mg nimesulide tablets. This research provided an experimental basis for further studies on metabolic activation and biotransformation of nimesulide, and for more comprehensive conjecture of its metabolic pathways.

  12. Effect of Short-Term Drinking Water Exposure to Dichloroacetate on its Pharmacokinetics and Oral Bioavailability in Human Volunteers: A Stable Isotope Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv R.; Shangraw, Robert E.

    2006-06-21

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) is a by-product of drinking water disinfection, a known rodent hepatocarcinogen and is also used therapeutically to treat a variety of metabolic disorders in humans. We measured DCAA bioavailability in 16 human volunteers (8 male, 8 female) after simultaneous administration of oral and iv DCAA doses. Volunteers consumed DCAA-free bottled water for 2 weeks to wash out background effects of DCAA. Subsequently, each subject drank 12C-DCAA (2 mg/kg) in 500 ml water over three minutes. Five minutes after the start of the 12C-DCAA consumption, 13C-labeled DCAA (0.3 mg/kg) was administered iv over 20 seconds, and plasma 12C/13C-DCAA concentrations measured at predetermined time points over 4 h. Volunteers subsequently consumed DCAA 0.02 mg/kg/day in 500 ml water for 14 consecutive days to simulate a low-level chronic DCAA intake. Afterwards, the 12C/13C-DCAA administrations was repeated. Study endpoints were calculation of AUC0??, apparent volume of distribution (Vss), total body clearance (Clb), plasma elimination half-life (t?,?), oral absorption rate (Ka), and oral bioavailability. Oral bioavailability was estimated from dose-adjusted AUC ratios, and by using a compartmental pharmacokinetic model after simultaneous fitting of oral and iv DCAA concentration-time profiles. DCAA bioavailability had large inter-individual variation, ranging from 28 ? 100 %. In the absence of prior DCAA intake, there were no significant differences (p>0.05) in any pharmacokinetic parameters between male and female volunteers, although there was a trend that women absorbed DCAA was more rapidly (increased Ka), and cleared DCAA more slowly (decreased Clb), than men. Only women were affected by previous 14 d DCAA exposure, which increased the AUC0?? for both oral and i.v. DCAA doses (P<0.04; 0.014 respectively) with a corresponding decrease in the Clb.

  13. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of mitoxantrone in mice and scale-up to humans: a semi-mechanistic model incorporating DNA and protein binding.

    PubMed

    An, Guohua; Morris, Marilyn E

    2012-06-01

    We conducted a pharmacokinetic (PK) study of mitoxantrone (Novantrone®), a clinically well-established anticancer agent, in mice and developed a mechanism-based PBPK (physiologically based pharmacokinetic) model to describe its disposition. Mitoxantrone concentrations in plasma and six organs (lung, heart, liver, kidney, spleen, and brain) were determined after a 5 mg/kg i.v. dose. We evaluated three different PBPK models in order to characterize our experimental data: model 1 containing Kp values, model 2 incorporating a deep binding compartment, and model 3 incorporating binding of mitoxantrone to DNA and protein. Among the three models, only model 3 with DNA and protein binding captured all the experimental data well. The estimated binding affinity for DNA (K (DNA)) and protein (K (macro)) were 0.0013 and 1.44 μM, respectively. Predicted plasma and tissue AUC values differed from observed values by <19 %, except for heart (60 %). Model 3 was further used to simulate plasma mitoxantrone concentrations in humans for a 12-mg/m(2) dose, using human physiological parameters. The simulated results generally agreed with the observed time course of mitoxantrone plasma concentrations in patients after a standard dose of 12 mg/m(2). In summary, we reported for the first time a mechanism-based PBPK model of mitoxantrone incorporating macromolecule binding which may have clinical applicability in optimizing clinical therapy. Since mitoxantrone is a substrate of the efflux transporters ABCG2 and ABCB1, the incorporation of efflux transporters may also be necessary to characterize the data obtained in low-dose studies.

  14. First-in-Human Trial of MIV-150 and Zinc Acetate Coformulated in a Carrageenan Gel: Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Acceptability, Adherence, and Pharmacodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hoesley, Craig J.; Plagianos, Marlena; Hoskin, Elena; Zhang, Shimin; Teleshova, Natalia; Alami, Mohcine; Novak, Lea; Kleinbeck, Kyle R.; Katzen, Lauren L.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.; Fernández-Romero, José A.; Creasy, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of MIV-150 and zinc acetate in a carrageenan gel (PC-1005). Acceptability, adherence, and pharmacodynamics were also explored. Design: A 3-day open-label safety run-in (n = 5) preceded a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial in healthy, HIV-negative, abstinent women randomized (4:1) to vaginally apply 4 mL of PC-1005 or placebo once daily for 14 days. Methods: Assessments included physical examinations, safety labs, colposcopy, biopsies, cervicovaginal lavages (CVLs), and behavioral questionnaires. MIV-150 (plasma, CVL, tissue), zinc (plasma, CVL), and carrageenan (CVL) concentrations were determined with LC-MS/MS, ICP-MS, and ELISA, respectively. CVL antiviral activity was measured using cell-based assays. Safety, acceptability, and adherence were analyzed descriptively. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartmental techniques and actual sampling times. CVL antiviral EC50 values were calculated using a dose–response inhibition analysis. Results: Participants (n = 20) ranged from 19–44 years old; 52% were black or African American. Among those completing the trial (13/17, PC-1005; 3/3, placebo), 11/17 reported liking the gel overall; 7 recommended reducing the volume. Adverse events, which were primarily mild and/or unrelated, were comparable between groups. Low systemic MIV-150 levels were observed, without accumulation. Plasma zinc levels were unchanged from baseline. Seven of seven CVLs collected 4-hour postdose demonstrated antiviral (HIV, human papillomavirus) activity. High baseline CVL anti–herpes-simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) activity precluded assessment of postdose activity. Conclusions: PC-1005 used vaginally for 14 days was well tolerated. Low systemic levels of MIV-150 were observed. Plasma zinc levels were unchanged. Postdose CVLs had anti-HIV and anti–human papillomavirus activity. These data warrant further development of PC-1005 for HIV and sexually transmitted

  15. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    PubMed Central

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Background Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Methods Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half

  16. Evaluation of principal cannabinoids in airborne particulates.

    PubMed

    Balducci, C; Nervegna, G; Cecinato, A

    2009-05-08

    The determination of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC), cannabidiol (CND) and cannabinol (CNB), primary active components in cannabis preparation, was carried out on airborne particulates by applying a specific procedure consisting of soot extraction by ultrasonic bath, purification by solvent partitioning, derivatization with N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyl-trifluoroacetamide, and separation/detection through gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The optimized procedure was found suitable for measuring the three psychotropic substances at concentrations ranging from ca. 0.001 to ca. 5.0 ng cm(-3) of air, with recoveries always higher than 82%, accuracy >7.3% and precision >90%. Application of the procedure performed on field in Rome and Bari, Italy, demonstrated that all three compounds contaminate the air in Italian cities whereas in Algiers, Algeria, only cannabinol, the most stable in the atmosphere, exceeded the limit of quantification of the method. The relative percentages of the three cannabinoids in general reproduced those typical of the Cannabis sativa plant and were very different from those found in human blood, urine and sweat.

  17. Incorporation of Therapeutic Interventions in Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Human Clinical Case Reports of Accidental or Intentional Overdosing with Ethylene Glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; McMartin, K. E.

    2005-05-16

    Ethylene glycol is a high production volume chemical used in the manufacture of resins and fibers, antifreeze, deicing fluids, heat transfer and hydraulic fluids. Although occupational uses of ethylene glycol have not been associated with adverse effects, there are case reports where humans have either intentionally or accidentally ingested large quantities of ethylene glycol, primarily from antifreeze. The acute toxicity of ethylene glycol in humans and animals and can proceed through three stages, each associated with a different metabolite: central nervous system depression (ethylene glycol), cardiopulmonary effects associated with metabolic acidosis (glycolic acid) and ultimately renal toxicity (oxalic acid), depending upon the total amounts consumed and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model developed in a companion paper (Corley et al., 2004) was refined in this study to include clinically relevant treatment regimens for ethylene glycol poisoning such as hemodialysis or metabolic inhibition with either ethanol or fomepizole. Such modifications enabled the model to describe several human case reports which included analysis of ethylene glycol and/or glycolic acid. Such data and model simulations provide important confirmation that the PBPK model developed previously can adequately describe the pharmacokinetics of ethylene glycol in humans following low, occupational or environmentally relevant inhalation exposures, as well as massive oral doses even under conditions where treatments have been employed that markedly affect the disposition of ethylene glycol and glycolic acid. By integrating the case report data sets with controlled studies in this PBPK model, it was demonstrated that fomepizole, if administered early enough in a clinical situation, can be more effective than ethanol or hemodialysis in preventing the metabolism of ethylene glycol to more toxic metabolites. Hemodialysis remains an

  18. The gastrointestinal pharmacology of cannabinoids: focus on motility.

    PubMed

    Abalo, Raquel; Vera, Gema; López-Pérez, Ana Esther; Martínez-Villaluenga, María; Martín-Fontelles, María Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sp. and its derivatives and analogues, known as cannabinoids (CBs), induce many effects throughout the whole body. Herein we briefly review the gastrointestinal (GI) pharmacology of CBs, with special focus on motor function. Some drugs are available to treat nausea and emesis, and evidences in humans and animal models suggest that other GI motility alterations (gastro-oesophageal reflux, inflammatory bowel conditions or paralytic ileus) might benefit from modifications of the CB tone throughout the gut. However, central and peripheral (including GI) side effects may occur upon acute and chronic CB administration. Hopefully, the ongoing worldwide intense research on CBs will soon provide new, safer CB-based medicines.

  19. Role of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids in cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Cecilia J.

    2008-01-01

    The human costs of stroke are very large and growing; it is the third largest cause of death in the United States and survivors are often faced with loss of ability to function independently. There is a large need for therapeutic approaches that act to protect neurons from the injury produced by ischemia and reperfusion. The goal of this review is to introduce and discuss the available data that endogenous cannabinoid signaling is altered during ischemia and that it contributes to the consequences of ischemia-induced injury. Overall, the available data suggest that inhibition of CB1 receptor activation together with increased CB2 receptor activation produces beneficial effects. PMID:18781985

  20. Toxic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids: Animal data.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The present article reviews the main toxic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids in animals. Toxic effects can be separated into acute and chronic classifications. Acute toxicity studies show that it is virtually impossible to die from acute administration of marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychoactive component of cannabis. Chronic toxicity involves lesions of airway and lung tissues, as well as problems of neurotoxicity, tolerance and dependence, and dysregulations in the immune and hormonal systems. Animal toxicity data, however, are difficult to extrapolate to humans.

  1. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in predicting drug–drug interactions for sarpogrelate hydrochloride in humans

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jee Sun; Kim, Doyun; Park, Jung Bae; Heo, Hyunjin; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Seo, Jae Hong; Oh, Euichaul; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluating the potential risk of metabolic drug–drug interactions (DDIs) is clinically important. Objective To develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for sarpogrelate hydrochloride and its active metabolite, (R,S)-1-{2-[2-(3-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]-phenoxy}-3-(dimethylamino)-2-propanol (M-1), in order to predict DDIs between sarpogrelate and the clinically relevant cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 substrates, metoprolol, desipramine, dextromethorphan, imipramine, and tolterodine. Methods The PBPK model was developed, incorporating the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of sarpogrelate hydrochloride, and M-1 based on the findings from in vitro and in vivo studies. Subsequently, the model was verified by comparing the predicted concentration-time profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters of sarpogrelate and M-1 to the observed clinical data. Finally, the verified model was used to simulate clinical DDIs between sarpogrelate hydrochloride and sensitive CYP2D6 substrates. The predictive performance of the model was assessed by comparing predicted results to observed data after coadministering sarpogrelate hydrochloride and metoprolol. Results The developed PBPK model accurately predicted sarpogrelate and M-1 plasma concentration profiles after single or multiple doses of sarpogrelate hydrochloride. The simulated ratios of area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration of metoprolol in the presence of sarpogrelate hydrochloride to baseline were in good agreement with the observed ratios. The predicted fold-increases in the area under the curve ratios of metoprolol, desipramine, imipramine, dextromethorphan, and tolterodine following single and multiple sarpogrelate hydrochloride oral doses were within the range of ≥1.25, but <2-fold, indicating that sarpogrelate hydrochloride is a weak inhibitor of CYP2D6 in vivo. Collectively, the predicted low DDIs suggest that sarpogrelate hydrochloride has limited potential for causing

  2. Architecture of cannabinoid signaling in mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Arnold, Andy; Hutchens, Jacqueline M.; Radicke, Josh; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Wager-Miller, Jim; Mackie, Ken; Straiker, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors and their ligands constitute an endogenous signaling system that is found throughout the body, including the eye. This system can be activated by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, a major drug of abuse. Cannabinoids offer considerable therapeutic potential in modulating ocular immune and inflammatory responses and in regulating intraocular pressure. The location of cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB1) in the retina is known, but recently a constellation of proteins has been identified that produce and break down endocannabinoids (eCBs) and modulate CB1 function. Localization of these proteins is critical to defining specific cannabinoid signaling circuitry in the retina. Here we show the localization of diacylglycerol lipase α and β (DGLα/β), implicated in the production of the eCB 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG); monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) and α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6), both implicated in the breakdown of 2-AG; cannabinoid receptor interacting protein 1a (CRIP1a), a protein that may modulate CB1 function; Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA) which have been shown to break down the eCB anandamide and related acyl amides. In our most prominent finding, DGLα is present in post-synaptic Type 1 OFF cone bipolar cells juxtaposed to CB1-containing cone photoreceptor terminals. Interestingly, CRIP1a is reliably presynaptic to DGLα, consistent with a possible role in cannabinoid signaling, NAAA is restricted to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), while DGLβ is limited to retinal blood vessels. These results taken together with previous anatomic and functional studies define specific cannabinoid circuitry likely to modulate eCB signaling at the first synapse of the retina as well as in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). PMID:20653038

  3. Prospects for cannabinoid therapies in viral encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Solbrig, Marylou V; Fan, Yijun; Hazelton, Paul

    2013-11-06

    Cannabinoids are promising therapies to support neurogenesis and decelerate disease progression in neuroinflammatory and degenerative disorders. Whether neuroprotective effects of cannabinoids are sustainable during persistent viral infection of the CNS is not known. Using a rodent model of chronic viral encephalitis based on Borna Disease (BD) virus, in which 1 week treatment with the general cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 has been shown to be neuroprotective (Solbrig et al., 2010), we examine longer term (2 week treatment) effects of a general (CB1 and CB2) cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (1mg/kg ip twice per day) or a specific (CB2) cannabinoid receptor agonist HU-308 (5mg/kg ip once daily) on histopathology, measures of frontostriatal neurogenesis and gliogenesis, and viral load. We find that WIN and HU-308 differ in their ability to protect new BrdU(+) cells. The selective CB2 agonist HU increases BrdU(+) cells in prefrontal cortex (PFC), significantly increases BrdU(+) cells in striatum, differentially regulates polydendrocytes vs. microglia/macrophages, and reduces immune activation at a time WIN-treated rats appear tolerant to the anti-inflammatory effect of their cannabinoid treatment. WIN and HU had little direct viral effect in PFC and striatum, yet reduced viral signal in hippocampus. Thus, HU-308 action on CB2 receptors, receptors known to be renewed during microglia proliferation and action, is a nontolerizing mechanism of controlling CNS inflammation during viral encephalitis by reducing microglia activation, as well as partially limiting viral infection, and uses a nonpsychotropic cannabinoid agonist.

  4. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic analysis of grepafloxacin.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Y; Hattori, K; Shinsei, M; Matsunaga, N; Iizasa, H; Sasabe, H; Akiyama, H; Miyanmoto, G; Nakashima, E

    2000-09-01

    Grepafloxacin (GPFX) is a synthetic new quinolone antimicrobial agent that possesses an extensive tissue distribution and exhibits a strong antibacterial activity in vivo. In this study, the tissue distribution characteristics of GPFX were examined using tissue concentration-time profiles following intravenous administration to rats. Subsequently, the pharmacokinetics of GPFX were analyzed based on the physiological pharmacokinetic model. The tissue-to-plasma partition coefficients (Kp) of GPFX in rats were high in all tissues except brain. A pharmacokinetic model for rabbits, monkeys and dogs was constructed using the tissue-to-plasma free concentration ratio (Kp,f) of GPFX in rats to simulate the GPFX concentration-time profile in plasma following intravenous administration of GPFX to each animal. The calculation-derived concentrations correlated well with the experimentally-derived data, suggesting that there are no interspecies differences in the high tissue distribution characteristics of GPFX. The clearance rates of GPFX in humans were predicted from the pharmacokinetic parameters of rats, rabbits, monkeys and dogs by an animal scale-up method and a pharmacokinetic model for humans was constructed. The GPFX concentration-time profiles in plasma, following oral administration of GPFX to humans, were predicted within 0.5-1.0 h of mean absorption time and the calculation-derived results were in good agreement with the experimental data. Thus, it is suggested that the concentration-time profile in plasma and all human organs can be predicted from the pharmacokinetic data of animals.

  5. [What sense in cannabinoid use as regulated by Italian DM 18/04/07? Pharmacological and legal considerations].

    PubMed

    Molinelli, A; Grossi, S; Bonsignore, A; Martelli, A

    2008-06-01

    The present article relates to the Italian Ministerial Decree (DM) 18/04/2007 referring to what was established by the Financial Law 2007 on the matter of the use of drugs for the so called ''off-label'' uses. This law introduces three cannabinoid substances, with the common name of Delta 9 and Trans-delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol and Nabilone, within the possible therapies for the treatment of ''severe pain''. The authors underline the absence of a sufficient pharmacokinetical and pharmacodynamical knowledge supporting the use of cannabinoid substances in the ''severe pain'' therapy. Further more the professional prescriber could go against judicial consequences if the drugs causes as verified the onset of collateral effects even severe that, for the scientific knowledge in possess at the present state, the authors know could take place.

  6. Control of spasticity in a multiple sclerosis model using central nervous system-excluded CB1 cannabinoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Pryce, Gareth; Visintin, Cristina; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V; Al-Izki, Sarah; De Faveri, Lia E; Nuamah, Rosamond A; Mein, Charles A; Montpetit, Alexandre; Hardcastle, Alison J; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E; Amor, Sandra; Thomas, Sarah A; Ledent, Catherine; Marsicano, Giovanni; Lutz, Beat; Thompson, Alan J; Selwood, David L; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the generation of central nervous system (CNS)-excluded cannabinoid receptor agonists to test the hypothesis that inhibition of spasticity, due to CNS autoimmunity, could be controlled by affecting neurotransmission within the periphery. Procedures included identification of chemicals and modeling to predict the mode of exclusion; induction and control of spasticity in the ABH mouse model of multiple sclerosis; conditional deletion of CB1 receptor in peripheral nerves; side-effect profiling to demonstrate the mechanism of CNS-exclusion via drug pumps; genome-wide association study in N2(129×ABH) backcross to map polymorphic cannabinoid drug pump; and sequencing and detection of cannabinoid drug-pump activity in human brain endothelial cell lines. Three drugs (CT3, SAB378 and SAD448) were identified that control spasticity via action on the peripheral nerve CB1 receptor. These were peripherally restricted via drug pumps that limit the CNS side effects (hypothermia) of cannabinoids to increase the therapeutic window. A cannabinoid drug pump is polymorphic and functionally lacking in many laboratory (C57BL/6, 129, CD-1) mice used for transgenesis, pharmacology, and toxicology studies. This phenotype was mapped and controlled by 1-3 genetic loci. ABCC1 within a cluster showing linkage is a cannabinoid CNS-drug pump. Global and conditional CB1 receptor-knockout mice were used as controls. In summary, CNS-excluded CB1 receptor agonists are a novel class of therapeutic agent for spasticity.

  7. Multiple-dose escalation study of the safety, pharmacokinetics, and biologic activity of oral AMD070, a selective CXCR4 receptor inhibitor, in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Stone, Nimalie D; Dunaway, Shelia B; Flexner, Charles; Tierney, Camlin; Calandra, Gary B; Becker, Stephen; Cao, Ying-Jun; Wiggins, Ilene P; Conley, Jeanne; MacFarland, Ron T; Park, Jeong-Gun; Lalama, Christina; Snyder, Sally; Kallungal, Beatrice; Klingman, Karin L; Hendrix, Craig W

    2007-07-01

    AMD070 is an oral CXCR4 antagonist with in vitro activity against X4-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Thirty fasting healthy male volunteers received oral doses of AMD070 ranging from a single 50-mg dose to seven 400-mg doses given every 12 h (q12h). Nine subjects received a 200-mg dose during fasting and prior to a meal. Subjects were monitored for safety and pharmacokinetics. AMD070 was well tolerated, without serious adverse events. Transient headaches (13 subjects) and neurocognitive (8 subjects) and gastrointestinal (7 subjects) symptoms were the most common complaints. Seven subjects had sinus tachycardia, and two were symptomatic. AMD070 plasma concentrations peaked 1 to 2 h after patient dosing. The estimated terminal half-life ranged from 11.2 to 15.9 h among cohorts. Dose proportionality was not demonstrated. Less than 1% of the drug appeared unchanged in the urine. Food reduced the maximum concentration of drug in serum and the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h by 70% and 56%, respectively (P < or = 0.01). A dose-dependent elevation of white blood cells (WBC) demonstrated a maximum twofold increase over baseline (95% confidence interval, 2.0- to 2.1-fold) in an E(max) model. In healthy volunteers, AMD070 was well tolerated and demonstrated mixed-order pharmacokinetics, and food reduced drug exposure. AMD070 induced a dose-related elevation of WBC which was attributed to CXCR4 blockade. Using leukocytosis as a surrogate marker for CXCR4 inhibition, this dose-response relationship suggests that the doses used in this study were active in vivo, though not maximal, throughout the dosing interval. Trough concentrations with the 400-mg dose q12h exceeded the antiviral in vitro 90% effective concentration of AMD070.

  8. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of biomarker response and tumor growth inhibition to an orally available heat shock protein 90 inhibitor in a human tumor xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shinji; Nguyen, Leslie; Vekich, Sylvia; Shen, Zhongzhou; Yin, Min-Jean; Mehta, Pramod P; Kung, Pei-Pei; Vicini, Paolo

    2011-09-01

    PF04942847 [2-amino-4-{4-chloro-2-[2-(4-fluoro-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)ethoxy]-6-methylphenyl}-N-(2,2-difluoropropyl)-5,7-dihydro-6H-pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine-6-carboxamide] was identified as an orally available, ATP-competitive, small-molecule inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). The objectives of the present study were: 1) to characterize the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of the plasma concentrations of PF04942847 to the inhibition of HSP90-dependent protein kinase, AKT, as a biomarker and 2) to characterize the relationship of AKT degradation to tumor growth inhibition as a pharmacological response (antitumor efficacy). Athymic mice implanted with MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells were treated with PF04942847 once daily at doses selected to encompass ED(50) values. Plasma concentrations of PF04942847 were adequately described by a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model. A time delay (hysteresis) was observed between the plasma concentrations of PF04942847 and AKT degradation; therefore, a link model was used to account for the hysteresis. The model reasonably fit the time courses of AKT degradation with the estimated EC(50) of 18 ng/ml. For tumor growth inhibition, the signal transduction model reasonably fit the inhibition of individual tumor growth curves with the estimated EC(50) of 7.3 ng/ml. Thus, the EC(50) for AKT degradation approximately corresponded to the EC(50) to EC(80) for tumor growth inhibition, suggesting that 50% AKT degradation was required for significant antitumor efficacy (50-80%). The consistent relationship between AKT degradation and antitumor efficacy was also demonstrated by applying an integrated signal transduction model for linking AKT degradation to tumor growth inhibition. The present results will be helpful in determining the appropriate dosing regimen and guiding dose escalation to achieve efficacious systemic exposure in the clinic.

  9. Phenol-Explorer 2.0: a major update of the Phenol-Explorer database integrating data on polyphenol metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans and experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Rothwell, Joseph A.; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Boto-Ordoñez, Maria; Knox, Craig; Llorach, Rafael; Eisner, Roman; Cruz, Joseph; Neveu, Vanessa; Wishart, David; Manach, Claudine; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Scalbert, Augustin

    2012-01-01

    Phenol-Explorer, launched in 2009, is the only comprehensive web-based database on the content in foods of polyphenols, a major class of food bioactives that receive considerable attention due to their role in the prevention of diseases. Polyphenols are rarely absorbed and excreted in their ingested forms, but extensively metabolized in the body, and until now, no database has allowed the recall of identities and concentrations of polyphenol metabolites in biofluids after the consumption of polyphenol-rich sources. Knowledge of these metabolites is essential in the planning of experiments whose aim is to elucidate the effects of polyphenols on health. Release 2.0 is the first major update of the database, allowing the rapid retrieval of data on the biotransformations and pharmacokinetics of dietary polyphenols. Data on 375 polyphenol metabolites identified in urine and plasma were collected from 236 peer-reviewed publications on polyphenol metabolism in humans and experimental animals and added to the database by means of an extended relational design. Pharmacokinetic parameters have been collected and can be retrieved in both tabular and graphical form. The web interface has been enhanced and now allows the filtering of information according to various criteria. Phenol-Explorer 2.0, which will be periodically updated, should prove to be an even more useful and capable resource for polyphenol scientists because bioactivities and health effects of polyphenols are dependent on the nature and concentrations of metabolites reaching the target tissues. The Phenol-Explorer database is publicly available and can be found online at http://www.phenol-explorer.eu. Database URL: http://www.phenol-explorer.eu PMID:22879444

  10. Preliminary efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and quality of life study of pegylated recombinant human arginase 1 in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yau, Thomas; Cheng, Paul N; Chan, Pierre; Chen, Li; Yuen, Jimmy; Pang, Roberta; Fan, Sheung Tat; Wheatley, Denys N; Poon, Ronnie T

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy, safety profile, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and quality of life of pegylated recombinant human arginase 1 (Peg-rhAgr1) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients were given weekly doses of Peg-rhAgr1 (1600 U/kg). Tumour response was assessed every 8 weeks using RECIST 1.1 and modified RECIST criteria. A total of 20 patients were recruited, of whom 15 were deemed evaluable for treatment efficacy. Eighteen patients (90%) were hepatitis B carriers. Median age was 61.5 (range 30-75). Overall disease control rate was 13%, with 2 of the 15 patients achieving stable disease for >8 weeks. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 1.7 (95% CI: 1.67-1.73) months, with median overall survival (OS) of all 20 enrolled patients being 5.2 (95% CI: 3.3-12.0) months. PFS was significantly prolonged in patients with adequate arginine depletion (ADD) >2 months versus those who had ≤2 months of ADD (6.4 versus 1.7 months; p = 0.01). The majority of adverse events (AEs) were grade 1/2 non-hematological toxicities. Transient liver dysfunctions (25%) were the most commonly reported serious AEs and likely due to disease progression. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data showed that Peg-rhAgr1 induced rapid and sustained arginine depletion. The overall quality of life of the enrolled patients was well preserved. Peg-rhAgr1 is well tolerated with a good toxicity profile in patients with advanced HCC. A weekly dose of 1600 U/kg is sufficient to induce ADD. Significantly longer PFS times were recorded for patients who had ADD for >2 months.

  11. Simultaneous determination of dextromethorphan, dextrorphan and doxylamine in human plasma by HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry: application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Donato, J L; Koizumi, F; Pereira, A S; Mendes, G D; De Nucci, G

    2012-06-15

    In the present study, a fast, sensitive and robust method to quantify dextromethorphan, dextrorphan and doxylamine in human plasma using deuterated internal standards (IS) is described. The analytes and the IS were extracted from plasma by a liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) using diethyl-ether/hexane (80/20, v/v). Extracted samples were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). Chromatographic separation was performed by pumping the mobile phase (acetonitrile/water/formic acid (90/9/1, v/v/v) during 4.0min at a flow-rate of 1.5 mL min⁻¹ into a Phenomenex Gemini® C18, 5 μm analytical column (150 × 4.6 mm i.d.). The calibration curve was linear over the range from 0.2 to 200 ng mL⁻¹ for dextromethorphan and doxylamine and 0.05 to 10 ng mL⁻¹ for dextrorphan. The intra-batch precision and accuracy (%CV) of the method ranged from 2.5 to 9.5%, and 88.9 to 105.1%, respectively. Method inter-batch precision (%CV) and accuracy ranged from 6.7 to 10.3%, and 92.2 to 107.1%, respectively. The run-time was for 4 min. The analytical procedure herein described was used to assess the pharmacokinetics of dextromethorphan, dextrorphan and doxylamine in healthy volunteers after a single oral dose of a formulation containing 30 mg of dextromethorphan hydrobromide and 12.5mg of doxylamine succinate. The method has high sensitivity, specificity and allows high throughput analysis required for a pharmacokinetic study.

  12. Validated LC-MS/MS method for quantification of gabapentin in human plasma: application to pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in Korean volunteers.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Hee; Jhee, Ok-Hwa; Park, Song-Hee; Lee, Jung-Sik; Lee, Min-Ho; Shaw, Leslie M; Kim, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Yong-Seok; Kang, Ju-Seop

    2007-08-01

    A sensitive validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method (LC-MS/MS) for gabapentin (GB) in human plasma has been developed and applied to pharmacokinetic (PK) and bioequivalence (BE) studies in human. In a randomized crossover design with a 1-week period, each subject received a 300 mg GB capsule. The procedure involves a simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile and separated by LC with a Gemini C(18) column using acetonitrile-10 mm ammonium acetate (20:80, v/v, pH 3.2) as mobile phase. The GB and internal standard [(S)-(+)-alpha-aminocyclohexanepropionic acid hydrate] were analyzed using an LC-API 2000 MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The ionization was optimized using ESI(+) and selectivity was achieved using MS/MS analysis, m/z 172.0 --> 154.0 and m/z 172.0 --> 126.0 for GB and IS, respectively. The assay exhibited good linearity over a working range of 20-5000 ng/mL for GB in human plasma with a lower limit of quantitation of 20 ng/mL. No endogenous compounds were found to interfere with the analysis. The accuracy and precision were shown for concentrations over the standard ranges. This method was successfully applied for the PK and BE studies by analysis of blood samples taken up to 36 h after an oral dose of 300 mg of GB in 24 healthy volunteers.

  13. Concurrent determination of olanzapine, risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone in human plasma by ultra performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection method: application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Siva Selva Kumar, M; Ramanathan, M

    2016-02-01

    A simple and sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method has been developed and validated for simultaneous estimation of olanzapine (OLZ), risperidone (RIS) and 9-hydroxyrisperidone (9-OHRIS) in human plasma in vitro. The sample preparation was performed by simple liquid-liquid extraction technique. The analytes were chromatographed on a Waters Acquity H class UPLC system using isocratic mobile phase conditions at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min and Acquity UPLC BEH shield RP18 column maintained at 40°C. Quantification was performed on a photodiode array detector set at 277 nm and clozapine was used as internal standard (IS). OLZ, RIS, 9-OHRIS and IS retention times were found to be 0.9, 1.4, .1.8 and 3.1 min, respectively, and the total run time was 4 min. The method was validated for selectivity, specificity, recovery, linearity, accuracy, precision and sample stability. The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range 1-100 ng/mL for OLZ, RIS and 9-OHRIS. Intra- and inter-day precisions for OLZ, RIS and 9-OHRIS were found to be good with the coefficient of variation <6.96%, and the accuracy ranging from 97.55 to 105.41%, in human plasma. The validated UPLC method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of RIS and 9-OHRIS in human plasma.

  14. Determination of Sodium Tanshinone IIA Sulfonate in human plasma by LC-MS/MS and its application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Qin, WeiWei; Wang, Bin; Lu, XiaoPei; Liu, HaiMing; Wang, Li; Qi, WeiLin

    2016-03-20

    An assay based on protein precipitation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed and validated for the quantitative analysis of Sodium Tanshinone IIA Sulfonate (STS) in human plasma. After the addition of dehydroepiandrosterone-D5-3-sulfate sodium salt (DHEAS-D5) as internal standard (IS) and formic acid, plasma samples were prepared by one-step protein precipitation with a mixture of acetonitrile and methanol. Isocratic mobile phase consisted of 0.4 mmol/L ammonium formate buffer (16 ppm formic acid)/acetonitrile (40/60, v/v) on a XSELECT™ HSS T3 column. Detection was performed on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer utilizing an electrospray ionization (ESI) interface operating in positive ion and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with the precursor to product ion transitions m/z 373.3→357.1 for STS and m/z 373.0→97.8 for the IS. Calibration curves of STS in human plasma were linear (r=0.9957-0.9998) over the concentration range of 2-1000 ng/mL with acceptable accuracy and precision. The lower limit of quantification in human plasma was 2 ng/mL. The validated LC-MS/MS method has been successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of STS in Chinese healthy male volunteers.

  15. Cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous agonist, anandamide.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, J; Felder, C C

    1998-05-01

    Cannabinoids are a class of compound found in marijuana which have been known for their therapeutic and psychoactive properties for at least 4000 years. Isolation of the active principle in marijuana, delta9-THC, provided the lead structure in the development of highly potent congeners which were used to probe for the mechanism of marijuana action. Cannabinoids were shown to bind to selective binding sites in brain tissue thereby regulating second messenger formation. Such studies led to the cloning of three cannabinoid receptor subtypes, CB1, CB2, and CB1A all of which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled plasma membrane receptors. Analogous to the discovery of endogenous opiates, isolation of cannabinoid receptors provided the appropriate tool to isolate an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, anandamide, from porcine brain. Recent studies indicate that anandamide is a member of a family of fatty acid ethanolamides that may represent a novel class of lipid neurotransmitters. This review discusses recent progress in cannabinoid research with a focus on the receptors for delta9-THC, their coupling to second messenger responses, and the endogenous lipid cannabimimetic, anandamide.

  16. Ligands for cannabinoid receptors, promising anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Nikan, Marjan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Manayi, Azadeh

    2016-02-01

    Cannabinoid compounds are unique to cannabis and provide some interesting biological properties. These compounds along with endocannabinoids, a group of neuromodulator compounds in the body especially in brain, express their effects by activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. There are several physiological properties attributed to the endocannabinoids including pain relief, enhancement of appetite, blood pressure lowering during shock, embryonic development, and blocking of working memory. On the other hand, activation of endocannabinoid system may be suppresses evolution and progression of several types of cancer. According to the results of recent studies, CB receptors are over-expressed in cancer cell lines and application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds reduce tumor size through decrease of cell proliferation or induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis along with desirable effect on decrease of tumor-evoked pain. Therefore, modulation of endocannabinoid system by inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme, which metabolized endocannabinoids, or application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds, may be appropriate for the treatment of several cancer subtypes. This review focuses on how cannabinoid affect different types of cancers.

  17. Leaner and greener analysis of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Elizabeth M; Murch, Susan J; Brown, Paula N

    2017-02-23

    There is an explosion in the number of labs analyzing cannabinoids in marijuana (Cannabis sativa L., Cannabaceae) but existing methods are inefficient, require expert analysts, and use large volumes of potentially environmentally damaging solvents. The objective of this work was to develop and validate an accurate method for analyzing cannabinoids in cannabis raw materials and finished products that is more efficient and uses fewer toxic solvents. An HPLC-DAD method was developed for eight cannabinoids in cannabis flowers and oils using a statistically guided optimization plan based on the principles of green chemistry. A single-laboratory validation determined the linearity, selectivity, accuracy, repeatability, intermediate precision, limit of detection, and limit of quantitation of the method. Amounts of individual cannabinoids above the limit of quantitation in the flowers ranged from 0.02 to 14.9% w/w, with repeatability ranging from 0.78 to 10.08% relative standard deviation. The intermediate precision determined using HorRat ratios ranged from 0.3 to 2.0. The LOQs for individual cannabinoids in flowers ranged from 0.02 to 0.17% w/w. This is a significant improvement over previous methods and is suitable for a wide range of applications including regulatory compliance, clinical studies, direct patient medical services, and commercial suppliers.

  18. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor expression in relation to visceral adipose depots, endocannabinoid levels, microvascular damage, and the presence of the Cnr1 A3813G variant in humans.

    PubMed

    Bordicchia, Marica; Battistoni, Ilaria; Mancinelli, Lucia; Giannini, Elena; Refi, Giada; Minardi, Daniele; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Montironi, Rodolfo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Petrosino, Stefania; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Rappelli, Alessandro; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Sarzani, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    Dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is associated with metabolic and cardiovascular complications of obesity. We studied perirenal VAT CB1 receptor expression in relation to anthropometry, VAT area and endocannabinoid levels, kidney microvascular damage (MVDa), and the presence of the CB1 gene A3813G variant, the frequency of which was also evaluated in a large population of obese-hypertensive (OH) patients with or without the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Perirenal VAT and kidney samples were obtained from 30 patients undergoing renal surgery. Total and perirenal VAT areas were determined by computed tomography. CB1 messenger RNA expression and endocannabinoid levels in perirenal VAT were determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. The MVDa was evaluated in healthy portions of kidney cortex. The A3813G alleles were identified by genotyping in these patients and in 280 nondiabetic OH patients (age human visceral obesity and its renal complications.

  19. Hollow fiber-based liquid phase microextraction with factorial design optimization and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for determination of cannabinoids in human hair.

    PubMed

    Emídio, Elissandro Soares; de Menezes Prata, Vanessa; de Santana, Fernando José Malagueño; Dórea, Haroldo Silveira

    2010-08-15

    A new method, based on hollow fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MSMS), was developed for determination of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) in samples of human hair. Since hair is a solid matrix, the samples were subjected to alkaline digestion using NaOH. The aqueous solutions obtained were extracted using a 6cm polypropylene fiber (600microm i.d., 200microm wall thickness, 0.2microm pore size) for each extraction. A 2(5-1) fractional factorial design for screening, and a central composite design for optimization of significant variables, was applied during development of the extraction method. The variables evaluated were the type of extraction solvent, pH, stirring speed, extraction time, and acceptor phase volume. The optimized conditions for the proposed extraction procedure were 10mg of hair sample; 20microL of butyl acetate; aqueous (pH 14) donor phase containing 6.8% NaCl; 600rpm stirring speed; 20min extraction time. A linear response was obtained in the ranges 1-500pgmg(-1) (CBD and CBN) and 20-500pgmg(-1) (THC), with regression coefficients >0.99. Precision, determined as the relative standard deviation, was 3.3-8.9% (intra-day) and 4.4-13.7% (inter-day). Absolute recoveries varied in the ranges 4.4-4.8% (CBD), 7.6-8.9% (THC) and 7.7-8.2% (CBN). Limits of detection (LOD, S/N=3) and quantification (LOQ, S/N=10) were 0.5-15pgmg(-1) and 1-20pgmg(-1), respectively. The method was successfully used to determine CBD, THC and CBN in hair samples from patients in a drug dependency rehabilitation center. Concentrations varied in the ranges 1-18pgmg(-1) (CBD), 20-232pgmg(-1) (THC) and 9-107pgmg(-1) (CBN), confirming the suitability of the method for monitoring studies.

  20. Cannabinoids: Glutamatergic Transmission and Kynurenines.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Aguilera, Gabriela; Santamaría, Abel

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) comprises a complex of receptors, enzymes, and endogenous agonists that are widely distributed in the central nervous system of mammals and participates in a considerable number of neuromodulatory functions, including neurotransmission, immunological control, and cell signaling. In turn, the kynurenine pathway (KP) is the most relevant metabolic route for tryptophan degradation to form the metabolic precursor NAD(+). Recent studies demonstrate that the control exerted by the pharmacological manipulation of the ECS on the glutamatergic system in the brain may offer key information not only on the development of psychiatric disorders like psychosis and schizophrenia-like symptoms, but it also may constitute a solid basis for the development of therapeutic strategies to combat excitotoxic events occurring in neurological disorders like Huntington's disease (HD). Part of the evidence pointing to the last approach is based on experimental protocols demonstrating the efficacy of cannabinoids to prevent the deleterious actions of the endogenous neurotoxin and KP metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN). These findings intuitively raise the question about what is the precise role of the ECS in tryptophan metabolism through KP and vice versa. In this chapter, we will review basic concepts on the physiology of both the ECS and the KP to finally describe those recent findings combining the components of these two systems and hypothesize the future course that the research in this emerging field will take in the next years.

  1. The liver partition coefficient-corrected inhibitory quotient and the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of directly acting anti-hepatitis C virus agents in humans.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jianmin; Bolger, Gordon; Garneau, Michel; Amad, Ma'an; Batonga, Joëlle; Montpetit, Hélène; Otis, François; Jutras, Martin; Lapeyre, Nicole; Rhéaume, Manon; Kukolj, George; White, Peter W; Bethell, Richard C; Cordingley, Michael G

    2012-10-01

    Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) data analyses from early hepatitis C virus (HCV) clinical trials failed to show a good correlation between the plasma inhibitory quotient (IQ) and antiviral activity of different classes of directly acting antiviral agents (DAAs). The present study explored whether use of the liver partition coefficient-corrected IQ (LCIQ) could improve the PK-PD relationship. Animal liver partition coefficients (Kp(liver)) were calculated from liver to plasma exposure ratios. In vitro hepatocyte partition coefficients (Kp(hep)) were determined by the ratio of cellular to medium drug concentrations. Human Kp(liver) was predicted using an in vitro-in vivo proportionality method: the species-averaged animal Kp(liver) multiplied by the ratio of human Kp(hep) over those in animals. LCIQ was calculated using the IQ multiplied by the predicted human Kp(liver). Our results demonstrated that the in vitro-in vivo proportionality approach provided the best human Kp(liver) prediction, with prediction errors of <45% for all 5 benchmark drugs evaluated (doxorubicin, verapamil, digoxin, quinidine, and imipramine). Plasma IQ values correlated poorly (r(2) of 0.48) with maximum viral load reduction and led to a corresponding 50% effective dose (ED(50)) IQ of 42, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.1 to 148534. In contrast, the LCIQ-maximum VLR relationship fit into a typical sigmoidal curve with an r(2) value of 0.95 and an ED(50) LCIQ of 121, with a 95% CI of 83 to 177. The present study provides a novel human Kp(liver) prediction model, and the LCIQ correlated well with the viral load reductions observed in short-term HCV monotherapy of different DAAs and provides a valuable tool to guide HCV drug discovery.

  2. Pharmacoscintigraphic and pharmacokinetic evaluation on healthy human volunteers of sustained-release floating minitablets containing levodopa and carbidopa.

    PubMed

    Goole, J; Van Gansbeke, B; Pilcer, G; Deleuze, Ph; Blocklet, D; Goldman, S; Pandolfo, M; Vanderbist, F; Amighi, K

    2008-11-19

    In this study, scintigraphic and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted on 10 healthy, fed volunteers. Two concepts of sustained-release floating minitablets--Levo-Form 1 (matrix) and 2 (coated)--were evaluated and compared to the marketed product Prolopa HBS 125. All the floating forms were radiolabelled with (111)In in order to evaluate their gastric residence time using gamma-scintigraphy. It was shown that the three formulations offered almost the same mean gastric residence time, which was about 240 min. Prolopa HBS 125 and Levo-Form 2 presented intragastric disintegration, which can lead to a more pronounced "peak & valley" effect on the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa. In contrast, the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa following the administration of Levo-Form 1 was more evenly distributed. Moreover, Levo-Form 1 provided the lowest variations between men and women in terms of AUC and C(max) values. Finally, when the same amount of inhibitors of extracerebral dopa decarboxylase--carbidopa and benserazide--had been administrated, the mean AUC, C(max) and T(max) values obtained for benserazide were lower than those obtained for carbidopa.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (CTHC) after intravenous administration of CTHC in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Glaz-Sandberg, A; Dietz, L; Nguyen, H; Oberwittler, H; Aderjan, Rolf; Mikus, Gerd

    2007-07-01

    After cannabis consumption there is only limited knowledge about the pharmacokinetic (PK) and metabolic properties of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (CTHC), which is formed by oxidative breakdown from Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Despite widely-varying concentrations observed in smoking studies, attempts have been made to interpret consumption behavior with special regard to a cumulated or decreasing concentration of CTHC in serum. Ten healthy nonsmoking white male individuals received 5 mg CTHC intravenously over 10 min. Highest serum concentrations of CTHC were observed at the end of the infusion (336.8+/-61.7 microg/l) followed by a quick decline. CTHC concentration could be quantified up to 96 h after administration, with a terminal elimination half-life of 17.6+/-5.5 h. Total clearance was low (91.2+/-24.0 ml/min), with renal clearance having only a minor contribution (0.136+/-0.094 ml/min). This first metabolite-based kinetic approach will allow an advanced understanding of CTHC PKs data obtained in previous studies with THC.

  4. Phase I Safety and Pharmacokinetics Study of Micronized Atovaquone in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Walter; Dorenbaum, Alejandro; Yogev, Ram; Beauchamp, Belinda; Xu, Jing; McNamara, James; Moye, John; Purdue, Lynette; van Dyke, Russell; Rogers, Michael; Sadler, Brian; Group, The Pediatric Aids Clinical Trials

    1998-01-01

    A phase I dose-escalating safety and pharmacokinetic study evaluated an oral suspension of micronized atovaquone (m-atovaquone) in infants and children stratified into age groups from 1 month to 12 years of age. Dosages of 10, 30, and 45 mg/kg of body weight/day were evaluated as single daily doses over a period of 12 days. Steady-state concentrations in plasma were determined on day 12, and single postdose concentrations were measured on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 13, 15, 18, 21, and 24. Prior studies with adults suggest that the average plasma atovaquone concentration of 15 μg/ml is associated with therapeutic success in more than 95% of patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonitis. The results showed m-atovaquone to be safe and well tolerated. Dosages of 30 mg/kg/day were adequate to achieve an average steady-state concentration of greater than 15 μg/ml in children ages 1 to 3 months and 2 to 12 years, but a dosage of 45 mg/kg/day was needed to reach this concentration in infants 3 to 24 months of age. The oral suspension of atovaquone is safe and well tolerated in children. A single daily dose of 30 mg/kg provides bioavailability considered adequate for therapy of P. carinii pneumonia, but infants between 3 and 24 months of age may require a dosage of 45 mg/kg/day. PMID:9624466

  5. Validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for quantitative determination of dauricine in human plasma and its application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoying; Liu, Qian; Wang, Dongmei; Wang, Xueya; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Haiyan; Zhao, Hui; Zhao, Huaiqing

    2010-05-01

    A highly sensitive and selective LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the determination of dauricine in human plasma, using protopine as internal standard (IS). The analyte and IS were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Chromatographic separation was performed on Agilent TC-C(18) column with a mobile phase of methanol-water-glacial acetic acid (60:40:0.8, v/v/v) at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min. Detection was performed on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrum by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using the electrospray ionization technique in positive mode. The method was linear over the concentration range of 1-200 ng/mL. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 1 ng/mL in human plasma with acceptable precision and accuracy. The intra- and inter-day precision was less than 5.9% determined from quality control (QC) samples at concentrations of 2.0, 20.0 and 160 ng/mL, and the accuracy was within +/-9.9%. This method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetics of dauricine after oral doses of 100, 300 and 600 mg phenolic alkaloids of menispermum dauricum tablet (PAMDT) to 12 Chinese healthy volunteers.

  6. The application of global sensitivity analysis in the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, George D.; McNally, Kevin; Jones, Kate; Cocker, John

    2015-01-01

    Global sensitivity analysis (SA) was used during the development phase of a binary chemical physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model used for the analysis of m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans. SA was used to identify those parameters which had the most significant impact on variability of venous blood and exhaled m-xylene and urinary excretion of the major metabolite of m-xylene metabolism, 3-methyl hippuric acid. This analysis informed the selection of parameters for estimation/calibration by fitting to measured biological monitoring (BM) data in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. Data generated in controlled human studies were shown to be useful for investigating the structure and quantitative outputs of PBPK models as well as the biological plausibility and variability of parameters for which measured values were not available. This approach ensured that a priori knowledge in the form of prior distributions was ascribed only to those parameters that were identified as having the greatest impact on variability. This is an efficient approach which helps reduce computational cost. PMID:26175688

  7. Simple protein precipitation extraction technique followed by validated chromatographic method for linezolid analysis in real human plasma samples to study its pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Samah A; Eissa, Maya S; Ahmed, Hytham M

    2017-02-01

    Fast and sensitive HPLC method was developed, optimized and validated for quantification of linezolid (LNZ) in human plasma using guaifenesin as an internal standard (IS). Analyte and IS were extracted from plasma by simple protein precipitation extraction technique using methanol as the precipitating solvent. The pretreated samples were injected in a mobile phase formed of acetonitrile:water:methanol (20:70:10v/v/v) in an isocratic mode at a flow rate of 1.5mL/min with UV detection at 251nm. Separation was done using Aglient ODS C18. The method showed linearity in the range of 0.75-50μg/mL with correlation coefficients equals to 0.9991. Precision and accuracy were in conformity with the criteria normally accepted in bio-analytical method validation. The RSDs for intra- and inter-day assays were <3.56 and 4.63%, respectively. The intra- and inter-day accuracies were 94.67-98.28% and 91.25-96.18%, respectively. The mean absolute recoveries ranged from 92.56±1.78 to 95.24±2.84. According to stability results, LNZ was stable in human plasma during the storage and analysis. LNZ a pharmacokinetic behavior was studied by applying the proposed analytical method.

  8. Measurement of fexofenadine concentration in micro-sample human plasma by a rapid and sensitive LC-MS/MS employing protein precipitation: application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Daqing; Zou, Jianjun; Zhu, Yubing; Lou, Sheng; Fan, Hongwei; Qin, Qun

    2010-03-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography/positive ion electro-spray tandem mass spectrometry method (LC-MS/MS) was developed and validated for the quantification of fexofenadine with 100 microL human plasma employing glipizide as internal standard (IS). Protein precipitation was used in the sample preparation procedure. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a reversed-phase C(18 )column (5 microm, 100 x 2.1 mm) with methanol : buffer (containing 10 mmol/L ammonium acetate and 0.1% formic acid; 70 : 30, v/v) as mobile phase. The total chromatographic runtime was approximately 3.0 min with retention time for fexofenadine and IS at approximately 1.9 and 2.1 min, respectively. Detection of fexofenadine and IS was achieved by LC-MS/MS in positive ion mode using 502.1 --> 466.2 and 446.0 --> 321.1 transitions, respectively. The method was proved to be accurate and precise at linearity range of 1-600 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient (r) of > or =0.9976. The validated method was applied to a pharmacokinetic study in human volunteers following oral administration of 60 or 120 mg fexofenadine formulations, successfully.

  9. Simultaneous determination of morniflumate and its major active metabolite, niflumic acid, in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography in stability and