Science.gov

Sample records for human cannabinoid pharmacokinetics

  1. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2003-01-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the consumption of cannabis, both the marijuana-like action and the medicinal benefits of the plant. However, its acid metabolite THC-COOH, the non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), several cannabinoid analogues and newly discovered modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoids exert many effects through activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral tissues. Additionally, there is evidence for non-receptor-dependent mechanisms. Natural cannabis products and single cannabinoids are usually inhaled or taken orally; the rectal route, sublingual administration, transdermal delivery, eye drops and aerosols have only been used in a few studies and are of little relevance in practice today. The pharmacokinetics of THC vary as a function of its route of administration. Pulmonary assimilation of inhaled THC causes a maximum plasma concentration within minutes, psychotropic effects start within seconds to a few minutes, reach a maximum after 15-30 minutes, and taper off within 2-3 hours. Following oral ingestion, psychotropic effects set in with a delay of 30-90 minutes, reach their maximum after 2-3 hours and last for about 4-12 hours, depending on dose and specific effect. At doses exceeding the psychotropic threshold, ingestion of cannabis usually causes enhanced well-being and relaxation with an intensification of ordinary sensory experiences. The most important acute adverse effects caused by overdosing are anxiety and panic attacks, and with regard to somatic effects increased heart rate and changes in blood pressure. Regular use of cannabis may lead to dependency and to a mild withdrawal syndrome. The existence and the intensity of possible long-term adverse effects on psyche and cognition, immune system, fertility and pregnancy remain controversial

  2. Synthetic cannabinoids pharmacokinetics and detection methods in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Castaneto, Marisol S; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Hartman, Rebecca L; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SC), originally developed as research tools, are now highly abused novel psychoactive substances. We present a comprehensive systematic review covering in vivo and in vitro animal and human pharmacokinetics and analytical methods for identifying SC and their metabolites in biological matrices. Of two main phases of SC research, the first investigated therapeutic applications, and the second abuse-related issues. Administration studies showed high lipophilicity and distribution into brain and fat tissue. Metabolite profiling studies, mostly with human liver microsomes and human hepatocytes, structurally elucidated metabolites and identified suitable SC markers. In general, SC underwent hydroxylation at various molecular sites, defluorination of fluorinated analogs and phase II metabolites were almost exclusively glucuronides. Analytical methods are critical for documenting intake, with different strategies applied to adequately address the continuous emergence of new compounds. Immunoassays have different cross-reactivities for different SC classes, but cannot keep pace with changing analyte targets. Gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry assays - first for a few, then numerous analytes - are available but constrained by reference standard availability, and must be continuously updated and revalidated. In blood and oral fluid, parent compounds are frequently present, albeit in low concentrations; for urinary detection, metabolites must be identified and interpretation is complex due to shared metabolic pathways. A new approach is non-targeted HRMS screening that is more flexible and permits retrospective data analysis. We suggest that streamlined assessment of new SC's pharmacokinetics and advanced HRMS screening provide a promising strategy to maintain relevant assays.

  3. [Tetrahydrocannabinol pharmacokinetics; new synthetic cannabinoids; road safety and cannabis].

    PubMed

    Goullé, Jean-Perre; Guerbet, Michel

    2014-03-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, a drug which is commonly smoked This paper focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC. The average THC content in cannabis plant material has risen by a factor offour over the past 20 years, from 4% to 16%. This increase has important implications not only for the pharmacokinetics but also for the pharmacology of THC The mean bioavailability of THC in smoked cannabis is about 25%. In a cigarette containing 3.55% of THC, a peak plasma level of about 160 ng/mL occurs approximately 10 min after inhalation. THC is quickly cleared from plasma in a multiphasic manner and is widely distributed to tissues, leading to its pharmacologic effects. Body fat is a long-term storage site. This particular pharmacokinetic behavior explains the lack of correlation between the THC blood level and clinical effects, contrary to ethanol. The main THC metabolites are 11-OH-THC (the only active metabolite) and THC-COOH, which is eliminated in feces and urine over several weeks. Therefore, abstinence can be established by analyzing THC-COOH in urine, while blood THC analysis is used to confirm recent exposure. Cannabis is the main illicit drug found among vehicle drivers. Various traffic safety studies indicate that recent use of this drug at least doubles the risk of causing an accident, and that simultaneous alcohol consumption multiplies this risk by afactor of 14. Since 2009, synthetic cannabinoids have emerged on the illicit drug market. These substances act on the same CB1 receptors as THC, but with higher afinity. Their pharmacokinetics differs from that of THC, as they are metabolized into multiple derivatives, most of which are more active than THC itself. PMID:26427296

  4. Human Laboratory Studies on Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Mohamed; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Ranganathan, Mohini

    2016-04-01

    Some of the most compelling evidence supporting an association between cannabinoid agonists and psychosis comes from controlled laboratory studies in humans. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover laboratory studies demonstrate that cannabinoid agonists, including phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids, produce a wide range of positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms and psychophysiologic deficits in healthy human subjects that resemble the phenomenology of schizophrenia. These effects are time locked to drug administration, are dose related, and are transient and rarely necessitate intervention. The magnitude of effects is similar to the effects of ketamine but qualitatively distinct from other psychotomimetic drugs, including ketamine, amphetamine, and salvinorin A. Cannabinoid agonists have also been shown to transiently exacerbate symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia in laboratory studies. Patients with schizophrenia are more vulnerable than healthy control subjects to the acute behavioral and cognitive effects of cannabinoid agonists and experience transient exacerbation of symptoms despite treatment with antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, laboratory studies have failed to demonstrate any "beneficial" effects of cannabinoid agonists in individuals with schizophrenia-challenging the cannabis self-medication hypothesis. Emerging evidence suggests that polymorphisms of several genes related to dopamine metabolism (e.g., COMT, DAT1, and AKT1) may moderate the effects of cannabinoid agonists in laboratory studies. Cannabinoid agonists induce dopamine release, although the magnitude of release does not appear to be commensurate to the magnitude and spectrum of their acute psychotomimetic effects. Interactions between the endocannabinoid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and glutamate systems and their individual and interactive effects on neural oscillations provide a plausible mechanism underlying the psychotomimetic effects of

  5. Vascular targets for cannabinoids: animal and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2014-01-01

    Application of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids to perfused vascular beds or individual isolated arteries results in changes in vascular resistance. In most cases, the result is vasorelaxation, although vasoconstrictor responses are also observed. Cannabinoids also modulate the actions of vasoactive compounds including acetylcholine, methoxamine, angiotensin II and U46619 (thromboxane mimetic). Numerous mechanisms of action have been proposed including receptor activation, potassium channel activation, calcium channel inhibition and the production of vasoactive mediators such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, prostanoids, NO, endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor and hydrogen peroxide. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence for the range of receptors now known to be activated by cannabinoids. Direct activation by cannabinoids of CB1, CBe, TRPV1 (and potentially other TRP channels) and PPARs in the vasculature has been observed. A potential role for CB2, GPR55 and 5-HT1A has also been identified in some studies. Indirectly, activation of prostanoid receptors (TP, IP, EP1 and EP4) and the CGRP receptor is involved in the vascular responses to cannabinoids. The majority of this evidence has been obtained through animal research, but recent work has confirmed some of these targets in human arteries. Vascular responses to cannabinoids are enhanced in hypertension and cirrhosis, but are reduced in obesity and diabetes, both due to changes in the target sites of action. Much further work is required to establish the extent of vascular actions of cannabinoids and the application of this research in physiological and pathophysiological situations. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:24329566

  6. Exogenous cannabinoids as substrates, inhibitors, and inducers of human drug metabolizing enzymes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stout, Stephen M; Cimino, Nina M

    2014-02-01

    Exogenous cannabinoids are structurally and pharmacologically diverse compounds that are widely used. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the data characterizing the potential for these compounds to act as substrates, inhibitors, or inducers of human drug metabolizing enzymes, with the aim of clarifying the significance of these properties in clinical care and drug interactions. In vitro data were identified that characterize cytochrome P-450 (CYP-450) enzymes as potential significant contributors to the primary metabolism of several exogenous cannabinoids: tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; CYPs 2C9, 3A4); cannabidiol (CBD; CYPs 2C19, 3A4); cannabinol (CBN; CYPs 2C9, 3A4); JWH-018 (CYPs 1A2, 2C9); and AM2201 (CYPs 1A2, 2C9). CYP-450 enzymes may also contribute to the secondary metabolism of THC, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases have been identified as capable of catalyzing both primary (CBD, CBN) and secondary (THC, JWH-018, JWH-073) cannabinoid metabolism. Clinical pharmacogenetic data further support CYP2C9 as a significant contributor to THC metabolism, and a pharmacokinetic interaction study using ketoconazole with oromucosal cannabis extract further supports CYP3A4 as a significant metabolic pathway for THC and CBD. However, the absence of interaction between CBD from oromucosal cannabis extract with omeprazole suggests a less significant role of CYP2C19 in CBD metabolism. Studies of THC, CBD, and CBN inhibition and induction of major human CYP-450 isoforms generally reflect a low risk of clinically significant drug interactions with most use, but specific human data are lacking. Smoked cannabis herb (marijuana) likely induces CYP1A2 mediated theophylline metabolism, although the role of cannabinoids specifically in eliciting this effect is questionable.

  7. Targeted metabolomic approach for assessing human synthetic cannabinoid exposure and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Patton, Amy L; Seely, Kathryn A; Chimalakonda, Krishna C; Tran, Johnny P; Trass, Matthew; Miranda, Art; Fantegrossi, William E; Kennedy, Paul D; Dobrowolski, Paul; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; McCain, Keith R; James, Laura P; Endres, Gregory W; Moran, Jeffery H

    2013-10-01

    Designer synthetic cannabinoids like JWH-018 and AM2201 have unique clinical toxicity. Cytochrome-P450-mediated metabolism of each leads to the generation of pharmacologically active (ω)- and (ω-1)-monohydroxyl metabolites that retain high affinity for cannabinoid type-1 receptors, exhibit Δ(9)-THC-like effects in rodents, and are conjugated with glucuronic acid prior to excretion in human urine. Previous studies have not measured the contribution of the specific (ω-1)-monohydroxyl enantiomers in human metabolism and toxicity. This study uses a chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy approach (LC-MS/MS) to quantify each specific enantiomer and other nonchiral, human metabolites of JWH-018 and AM2201 in human urine. The accuracy (average % RE = 18.6) and reproducibility (average CV = 15.8%) of the method resulted in low-level quantification (average LLQ = 0.99 ng/mL) of each metabolite. Comparisons with a previously validated nonchiral method showed strong correlation between the two approaches (average r(2) = 0.89). Pilot data from human urine samples demonstrate enantiospecific excretion patterns. The (S)-isomer of the JWH-018-(ω-1)-monohydroxyl metabolite was predominantly excreted (>87%) in human urine as the glucuronic acid conjugate, whereas the relative abundance of the corresponding AM2201-(ω-1)-metabolite was low (<5%) and did not demonstrate enantiospecificity (approximate 50:50 ratio of each enantiomer). The new chiral method provides a comprehensive, targeted metabolomic approach for studying the human metabolism of JWH-018 and AM2201. Preliminary evaluations of specific enantiomeric contributions support the use of this approach in future studies designed to understand the pharmacokinetic properties of JWH-018 and/or AM2201.

  8. The effects of cannabinoid administration on sleep: a systematic review of human studies.

    PubMed

    Gates, Peter J; Albertella, Lucy; Copeland, Jan

    2014-12-01

    This paper reviews the literature regarding the effects of cannabinoid administration on sleep in humans. A literature search using a set of cannabinoid and sleep-related terms was conducted across eight electronic databases. Human studies that involved the administration of cannabinoids and at least one quantitative sleep-related measure were included. Review papers, opinion pieces, letters or editorials, case studies (final N < 7), published abstracts, posters, and non-English papers were excluded. Thirty-nine publications were included in the review. Findings were mixed and showed various effects of cannabinoid administration on several aspects of sleep. Methodological issues in the majority of studies to date, however, preclude any definitive conclusion.

  9. Cannabinoids: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Le Foll, B; Tyndale, R F

    2015-06-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on cannabinoids. Our understanding of these interesting endogenous and synthetic compounds, and their role in the cannabinoid system, has evolved dramatically, in part because of the acquisition of new research tools. Cannabis has been used for centuries by humans for recreational and medicinal purposes, however, there is substantial evidence that cannabis use can expose people to varying complications (e.g., risk of addiction, cognitive impairment), thus, it is important to determine the benefit/risk of cannabis with precision and to implement policy measures based on evidence to maximize the benefits and minimize the harm. Novel cannabinoid drugs are emerging for medicinal use (e.g., dronabinol, nabiximols) and as illicit drugs (e.g., Spice, K2) perpetuating the perception that cannabinoid drugs can be a friend or foe. This special issue will cover these various aspects of cannabinoid pharmacology and therapeutics ranging from basic chemistry, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical trial results, to policy and education efforts in this area. PMID:25801347

  10. Cannabinoids: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Le Foll, B; Tyndale, R F

    2015-06-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on cannabinoids. Our understanding of these interesting endogenous and synthetic compounds, and their role in the cannabinoid system, has evolved dramatically, in part because of the acquisition of new research tools. Cannabis has been used for centuries by humans for recreational and medicinal purposes, however, there is substantial evidence that cannabis use can expose people to varying complications (e.g., risk of addiction, cognitive impairment), thus, it is important to determine the benefit/risk of cannabis with precision and to implement policy measures based on evidence to maximize the benefits and minimize the harm. Novel cannabinoid drugs are emerging for medicinal use (e.g., dronabinol, nabiximols) and as illicit drugs (e.g., Spice, K2) perpetuating the perception that cannabinoid drugs can be a friend or foe. This special issue will cover these various aspects of cannabinoid pharmacology and therapeutics ranging from basic chemistry, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical trial results, to policy and education efforts in this area.

  11. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  12. Cannabinoid facilitation of fear extinction memory recall in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Sripada, Chandra S.; Abelson, James L.; Liberzon, Israel; Milad, Mohammed R.; Phan, K. Luan

    2012-01-01

    A first-line approach to treat anxiety disorders is exposure-based therapy, which relies on extinction processes such as repeatedly exposing the patient to stimuli (conditioned stimuli; CS) associated with the traumatic, fear-related memory. However, a significant number of patients fail to maintain their gains, partly attributed to the fact that this inhibitory learning and its maintenance is temporary and conditioned fear responses can return. Animal studies have shown that activation of the cannabinoid system during extinction learning enhances fear extinction and its retention. Specifically, CB1 receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC), can facilitate extinction recall by preventing recovery of extinguished fear in rats. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in humans. We conducted a study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design, coupling a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and simultaneous skin conductance response (SCR) recording with an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) or placebo (PBO) 2 hours prior to extinction learning in 29 healthy adult volunteers (THC = 14; PBO = 15) and tested extinction retention 24 hours after extinction learning. Compared to subjects that received PBO, subjects that received THC showed low SCR to a previously extinguished CS when extinction memory recall was tested 24 hours after extinction learning, suggesting that THC prevented the recovery of fear. These results provide the first evidence that pharmacological enhancement of extinction learning is feasible in humans using cannabinoid system modulators, which may thus warrant further development and clinical testing. PMID:22796109

  13. Characterization of two cloned human CB1 cannabinoid receptor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi-Carmona, M; Calandra, B; Shire, D; Bouaboula, M; Oustric, D; Barth, F; Casellas, P; Ferrara, P; Le Fur, G

    1996-08-01

    We have investigated the pharmacology of two central human cannabinoid receptor isoforms, designated CB1 and CB1A, stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, designated as CHO-CB1 and CHO-CB1A, respectively. In direct binding assays on isolated membranes the agonist [3H]CP 55,940 bound in a saturable and highly specific manner to both cannabinoid receptor isoforms. Competition binding experiments performed with other commonly used receptor agonists showed the following rank order of potency: CP 55,940 > tetrahydrocannabinol > WIN 55212-2 > anandamide. Except for the endogenous ligand anandamide (CB1, Ki = 359.6 nM vs. CB1A, Ki = 298 nM), these agonists bound to CB1A (CP 55,940, WIN 55212-2 and delta 9-THC, Ki = 7.24,345 and 26.7 nM, respectively) with about 3-fold less affinity than to CB1 (CP 55,940, WIN 55212-2 and delta 9-THC, Ki = 2.26, 93 and 7.1 nM, respectively). The cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716A also bound to CB1A (Ki = 43.3 nM) with slightly less affinity than to CB1 (Ki = 4.9 nM). Cannabinoid receptor-linked second messenger system studies performed in the CHO-CB1 and CHO-CB1A cells showed that both receptors mediated their action through the agonist-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. This activity was totally blocked by pretreatment with PTX. Additionally, both isoforms activated mitogen-activated protein kinase. The selective antagonist SR 141716A was able to selectively block these responses in both cell lines, to an extent that reflected its binding characteristics. Our results show that the amino-truncated and -modified CB1 isoform CB1A exhibits all the properties of CB1 to a slightly attenuated extent.

  14. Plasma Cannabinoid Pharmacokinetics After Controlled Smoking and Ad libitum Cannabis Smoking in Chronic Frequent Users.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dayong; Bergamaschi, Mateus M; Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J; Queiroz, Regina H C; Vandrey, Ryan; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-10-01

    More Americans are dependent on cannabis than any other illicit drug. The main analytes for cannabis testing include the primary psychoactive constituent, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), equipotent 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and inactive 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). Eleven adult chronic frequent cannabis smokers resided on a closed research unit with unlimited access to 5.9% THC cannabis cigarettes from 12:00 to 23:00 during two ad libitum smoking phases, followed by a 5-day abstinence period in seven participants. A single cigarette was smoked under controlled topography on the last day of the smoking and abstinence phases. Plasma cannabinoids were quantified by two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Median plasma maximum concentrations (Cmax) were 28.3 (THC), 3.9 (11-OH-THC) and 47.0 μg/L (THCCOOH) 0.5 h after controlled single cannabis smoking. Median Cmax 0.2-0.5 h after ad libitum smoking was higher for all analytes: 83.5 (THC), 14.2 (11-OH-THC) and 155 μg/L (THCCOOH). All 11 participants' plasma samples were THC and THCCOOH-positive, 58.3% had THC ≥5 μg/L and 79.2% were 11-OH-THC-positive 8.1-14 h after last cannabis smoking. Cannabinoid detection rates in seven participants 106-112 h (4-5 days) after last smoking were 92.9 (THC), 35.7 (11-OH-THC) and 100% (THCCOOH), with limits of quantification of 0.5 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH, and 1.0 μg/L for 11-OH-THC. These data greatly expand prior research findings on cannabinoid excretion profiles in chronic frequent cannabis smokers during ad libitum smoking. Smoking multiple cannabis cigarettes led to higher Cmax and AUC compared with smoking a single cigarette. The chronic frequent cannabis smokers exhibited extended detection windows for plasma cannabinoids, reflecting a large cannabinoid body burden. PMID:26378131

  15. Plasma Cannabinoid Pharmacokinetics After Controlled Smoking and Ad libitum Cannabis Smoking in Chronic Frequent Users

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dayong; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J.; Queiroz, Regina H.C.; Vandrey, Ryan; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    More Americans are dependent on cannabis than any other illicit drug. The main analytes for cannabis testing include the primary psychoactive constituent, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), equipotent 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and inactive 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). Eleven adult chronic frequent cannabis smokers resided on a closed research unit with unlimited access to 5.9% THC cannabis cigarettes from 12:00 to 23:00 during two ad libitum smoking phases, followed by a 5-day abstinence period in seven participants. A single cigarette was smoked under controlled topography on the last day of the smoking and abstinence phases. Plasma cannabinoids were quantified by two-dimensional gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Median plasma maximum concentrations (Cmax) were 28.3 (THC), 3.9 (11-OH-THC) and 47.0 μg/L (THCCOOH) 0.5 h after controlled single cannabis smoking. Median Cmax 0.2–0.5 h after ad libitum smoking was higher for all analytes: 83.5 (THC), 14.2 (11-OH-THC) and 155 μg/L (THCCOOH). All 11 participants' plasma samples were THC and THCCOOH-positive, 58.3% had THC ≥5 μg/L and 79.2% were 11-OH-THC-positive 8.1–14 h after last cannabis smoking. Cannabinoid detection rates in seven participants 106–112 h (4–5 days) after last smoking were 92.9 (THC), 35.7 (11-OH-THC) and 100% (THCCOOH), with limits of quantification of 0.5 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH, and 1.0 μg/L for 11-OH-THC. These data greatly expand prior research findings on cannabinoid excretion profiles in chronic frequent cannabis smokers during ad libitum smoking. Smoking multiple cannabis cigarettes led to higher Cmax and AUC compared with smoking a single cigarette. The chronic frequent cannabis smokers exhibited extended detection windows for plasma cannabinoids, reflecting a large cannabinoid body burden. PMID:26378131

  16. Plasma Cannabinoid Pharmacokinetics After Controlled Smoking and Ad libitum Cannabis Smoking in Chronic Frequent Users.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dayong; Bergamaschi, Mateus M; Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J; Queiroz, Regina H C; Vandrey, Ryan; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-10-01

    More Americans are dependent on cannabis than any other illicit drug. The main analytes for cannabis testing include the primary psychoactive constituent, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), equipotent 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) and inactive 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). Eleven adult chronic frequent cannabis smokers resided on a closed research unit with unlimited access to 5.9% THC cannabis cigarettes from 12:00 to 23:00 during two ad libitum smoking phases, followed by a 5-day abstinence period in seven participants. A single cigarette was smoked under controlled topography on the last day of the smoking and abstinence phases. Plasma cannabinoids were quantified by two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Median plasma maximum concentrations (Cmax) were 28.3 (THC), 3.9 (11-OH-THC) and 47.0 μg/L (THCCOOH) 0.5 h after controlled single cannabis smoking. Median Cmax 0.2-0.5 h after ad libitum smoking was higher for all analytes: 83.5 (THC), 14.2 (11-OH-THC) and 155 μg/L (THCCOOH). All 11 participants' plasma samples were THC and THCCOOH-positive, 58.3% had THC ≥5 μg/L and 79.2% were 11-OH-THC-positive 8.1-14 h after last cannabis smoking. Cannabinoid detection rates in seven participants 106-112 h (4-5 days) after last smoking were 92.9 (THC), 35.7 (11-OH-THC) and 100% (THCCOOH), with limits of quantification of 0.5 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH, and 1.0 μg/L for 11-OH-THC. These data greatly expand prior research findings on cannabinoid excretion profiles in chronic frequent cannabis smokers during ad libitum smoking. Smoking multiple cannabis cigarettes led to higher Cmax and AUC compared with smoking a single cigarette. The chronic frequent cannabis smokers exhibited extended detection windows for plasma cannabinoids, reflecting a large cannabinoid body burden.

  17. Cannabinoid facilitation of fear extinction memory recall in humans.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Sripada, Chandra S; Abelson, James L; Liberzon, Israel; Milad, Mohammed R; Phan, K Luan

    2013-01-01

    A first-line approach to treat anxiety disorders is exposure-based therapy, which relies on extinction processes such as repeatedly exposing the patient to stimuli (conditioned stimuli; CS) associated with the traumatic, fear-related memory. However, a significant number of patients fail to maintain their gains, partly attributed to the fact that this inhibitory learning and its maintenance is temporary and conditioned fear responses can return. Animal studies have shown that activation of the cannabinoid system during extinction learning enhances fear extinction and its retention. Specifically, CB1 receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC), can facilitate extinction recall by preventing recovery of extinguished fear in rats. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in humans. We conducted a study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design, coupling a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and simultaneous skin conductance response (SCR) recording with an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) or placebo (PBO) 2 h prior to extinction learning in 29 healthy adult volunteers (THC = 14; PBO = 15) and tested extinction retention 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects that received PBO, subjects that received THC showed low SCR to a previously extinguished CS when extinction memory recall was tested 24 h after extinction learning, suggesting that THC prevented the recovery of fear. These results provide the first evidence that pharmacological enhancement of extinction learning is feasible in humans using cannabinoid system modulators, which may thus warrant further development and clinical testing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'. PMID:22796109

  18. Genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG theta power in humans.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Kenemans, J L; Böcker, K B E; Baas, J M P

    2014-11-01

    It has long been postulated that exogenous cannabinoids have a profound effect on human cognitive functioning. These cannabinoid effects are thought to depend, at least in parts, on alterations of phase-locking of local field potential neuronal firing. The latter can be measured as activity in the theta frequency band (4-7Hz) by electroencephalogram. Theta oscillations are supposed to serve as a mechanism in neural representations of behaviorally relevant information. However, it remains unknown whether variability in endogenous cannabinoid activity is involved in theta rhythms and therefore, may serve as an individual differences index of human cognitive functioning. To clarify this issue, we recorded resting state EEG activity in 164 healthy human subjects and extracted EEG power across frequency bands (δ, θ, α, and β). To assess variability in the endocannabinoid system, two genetic polymorphisms (rs1049353, rs2180619) within the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) were determined in all participants. As expected, we observed significant effects of rs1049353 on EEG power in the theta band at frontal, central and parietal electrode regions. Crucially, these effects were specific for the theta band, with no effects on activity in the other frequency bands. Rs2180619 showed no significant associations with theta power after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, we provide novel evidence in humans showing that genetic variability in the cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG power in the theta frequency band. This extends prior findings of exogenous cannabinoid effects on theta power to the endogenous cannabinoid system.

  19. Genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG theta power in humans.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Kenemans, J L; Böcker, K B E; Baas, J M P

    2014-11-01

    It has long been postulated that exogenous cannabinoids have a profound effect on human cognitive functioning. These cannabinoid effects are thought to depend, at least in parts, on alterations of phase-locking of local field potential neuronal firing. The latter can be measured as activity in the theta frequency band (4-7Hz) by electroencephalogram. Theta oscillations are supposed to serve as a mechanism in neural representations of behaviorally relevant information. However, it remains unknown whether variability in endogenous cannabinoid activity is involved in theta rhythms and therefore, may serve as an individual differences index of human cognitive functioning. To clarify this issue, we recorded resting state EEG activity in 164 healthy human subjects and extracted EEG power across frequency bands (δ, θ, α, and β). To assess variability in the endocannabinoid system, two genetic polymorphisms (rs1049353, rs2180619) within the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) were determined in all participants. As expected, we observed significant effects of rs1049353 on EEG power in the theta band at frontal, central and parietal electrode regions. Crucially, these effects were specific for the theta band, with no effects on activity in the other frequency bands. Rs2180619 showed no significant associations with theta power after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, we provide novel evidence in humans showing that genetic variability in the cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG power in the theta frequency band. This extends prior findings of exogenous cannabinoid effects on theta power to the endogenous cannabinoid system. PMID:25116250

  20. Plasma Cannabinoid Pharmacokinetics following Controlled Oral Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and Oromucosal Cannabis Extract Administration

    PubMed Central

    Karschner, Erin L.; Darwin, W. David; Goodwin, Robert S.; Wright, Stephen; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sativex®, a cannabis extract oromucosal spray containing Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), is currently in phase III trials as an adjunct to opioids for cancer pain treatment, and recently received United Kingdom approval for treatment of spasticity. There are indications that CBD modulates THC’s effects, but it is unclear if this is due to a pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic interaction. METHODS Cannabis smokers provided written informed consent to participate in this randomized, controlled, double-blind, double-dummy institutional review board–approved study. Participants received 5 and 15 mg synthetic oral THC, low-dose (5.4 mg THC and 5.0 mg CBD) and high-dose (16.2 mg THC and 15.0 mg CBD) Sativex, and placebo over 5 sessions. CBD, THC, 11-hydroxy-THC, and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC were quantified in plasma by 2-dimensional GC-MS. Lower limits of quantification were ≤0.25 μg/L. RESULTS Nine cannabis smokers completed all 5 dosing sessions. Significant differences (P < 0.05) in maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) and areas under the curve from 0–10.5 h postdose (AUC0→10.5) for all analytes were found between low and high doses of synthetic THC and Sativex. There were no statistically significant differences in Cmax, time to maximum concentration or in the AUC0→10.5 between similar oral THC and Sativex doses. Relative bioavailability was calculated to determine the relative rate and extent of THC absorption; 5 and 15 mg oral THC bioavailability was 92.6% (13.1%) and 98.8% (11.0%) of low- and high-dose Sativex, respectively. CONCLUSION These data suggest that CBD modulation of THC’s effects is not due to a pharmacokinetic interaction at these therapeutic doses. PMID:21078841

  1. Intravenous buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine pharmacokinetics in humans

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, M.A.; Cone, E.J.; Pirnay, S.O.; Umbricht, A.; Preston, K.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribed sublingual (SL) buprenorphine is sometimes diverted for intravenous (IV) abuse, but no human pharmacokinetic data are available following high-dose IV buprenorphine. Methods Plasma was collected for 72 h after administration of placebo or 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16 mg IV buprenorphine in escalating order (single-blind, double-dummy) in 5 healthy male non-dependent opioid users. Buprenorphine and its primary active metabolite, norbuprenorphine, were quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with limits of quantitation of 0.1 μg/L. Results Maximum buprenorphine concentrations (mean ± SE) were detected 10 min after 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 mg IV: 19.3±1.0, 44.5±4.8, 85.2±7.7, 124.6±16.6, and 137.7±18.8 μg/L, respectively. Maximum norbuprenorphine concentrations occurred 10–15 min (3.7±0.7 μg/L) after 16 mg IV administration. Conclusions Buprenorphine concentrations increased in a significantly linear dose-dependent manner up to 12 mg IV buprenorphine. Thus, previously demonstrated pharmacodynamic ceiling effects (over 2–16 mg) are not due to pharmacokinetic adaptations within this range, although they may play a role at doses higher than 12 mg. PMID:23246635

  2. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB2Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB2Rs (hCB2Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB2Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB2Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB2Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB2R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB2Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB2Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB1 and CB2Rs. PMID:23537664

  3. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K; Franks, Lirit N; Moran, Jeffery H; Prather, Paul L

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB2Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB2Rs (hCB2Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB2Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB2Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB2Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB2R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB2Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB2Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB1 and CB2Rs.

  4. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K Luan

    2014-09-01

    Pre-extinction administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely occurs via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders.

  5. Genetic variations in the human cannabinoid receptor gene are associated with happiness.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  6. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  7. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems.

  8. Virtual pharmacokinetic model of human eye.

    PubMed

    Kotha, Sreevani; Murtomäki, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    A virtual pharmacokinetic 3D model of the human eye is built using Comsol Multiphysics® software, which is based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The model considers drug release from a polymer patch placed on sclera. The model concentrates on the posterior part of the eye, retina being the target tissue, and comprises the choroidal blood flow, partitioning of the drug between different tissues and active transport at the retina pigment epithelium (RPE)-choroid boundary. Although most straightforward, in order to check the mass balance, no protein binding or metabolism is yet included. It appeared that the most important issue in obtaining reliable simulation results is the finite element mesh, while time stepping has hardly any significance. Simulations were extended to 100,000 s. The concentration of a drug is shown as a function of time at various points of retina, as well as its average value, varying several parameters in the model. This work demonstrates how anybody with basic knowledge of calculus is able to build physically meaningful models of quite complex biological systems. PMID:24721554

  9. Alcohol and Cannabinoids Differentially Affect HIV Infection and Function of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells (MDDC)

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo, Marisela; Figueroa, Gloria; Yndart, Adriana; Casteleiro, Gianna; Muñoz, Karla; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2015-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, alcohol has been known to induce inflammation while cannabinoids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory role. For instance cannabinoids have been shown to reduce susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and attenuate HIV replication in macrophages. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol induces cannabinoid receptors and regulates cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). However, the ability of alcohol and cannabinoids to alter MDDC function during HIV infection has not been clearly elucidated yet. In order to study the potential impact of alcohol and cannabinoids on differentiated MDDC infected with HIV, monocytes were cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-4, differentiated MDDC were infected with HIV-1Ba-L and treated with EtOH (0.1 and 0.2%), THC (5 and 10 μM), or JWH-015 (5 and 10 μM) for 4–7 days. HIV infection of MDDC was confirmed by p24 and Long Terminal Repeats (LTR) estimation. MDDC endocytosis assay and cytokine array profiles were measured to investigate the effects of HIV and substances of abuse on MDDC function. Our results show the HIV + EtOH treated MDDC had the highest levels of p24 production and expression when compared with the HIV positive controls and the cannabinoid treated cells. Although both cannabinoids, THC and JWH-015 had lower levels of p24 production and expression, the HIV + JWH-015 treated MDDC had the lowest levels of p24 when compared to the HIV + THC treated cells. In addition, MDDC endocytic function and cytokine production were also differentially altered after alcohol and cannabinoid treatments. Our results show a differential effect of alcohol and cannabinoids, which may provide insights into the divergent inflammatory role of alcohol and cannabinoids to modulate MDDC function in the context of HIV infection. PMID:26733986

  10. TOLUENE EXPERIMENTAL EXPOSURES IN HUMANS: PHARMACOKINETICS AND BEHAVIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toluene Experimental Exposures in Humans:
    Pharmacokinetics and Behavioral Effects
    (Ongoing Research)

    Vernon A. Benignus1, Philip J. Bushnell2 and William K. Boyes2

    Human subjects will be exposed to 250 and 500 ppm toluene for one hour in the Human St...

  11. Failure to extinguish fear and genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Heitland, I; Klumpers, F; Oosting, R S; Evers, D J J; Leon Kenemans, J; Baas, J M P

    2012-01-01

    Failure to extinguish fear can lead to persevering anxiety and has been postulated as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of human anxiety disorders. In animals, it is well documented that the endogenous cannabinoid system has a pivotal role in the successful extinction of fear, most importantly through the cannabinoid receptor 1. However, no human studies have reported a translation of this preclinical evidence yet. Healthy medication-free human subjects (N=150) underwent a fear conditioning and extinction procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex was measured to assess fear-conditioned responding, and subjective fear ratings were collected. Participants were genotyped for two polymorphisms located within the promoter region (rs2180619) and the coding region (rs1049353) of cannabinoid receptor 1. As predicted from the preclinical literature, acquisition and expression of conditioned fear did not differ between genotypes. Crucially, whereas both homozygote (G/G, N=23) and heterozygote (A/G, N=68) G-allele carriers of rs2180619 displayed robust extinction of fear, extinction of fear-potentiated startle was absent in A/A homozygotes (N=51). Additionally, this resistance to extinguish fear left A/A carriers of rs2180619 with significantly higher levels of fear-potentiated startle at the end of the extinction training. No effects of rs1049353 genotype were observed regarding fear acquisition and extinction. These results suggest for the first time involvement of the human endocannabinoid system in fear extinction. Implications are that genetic variability in this system may underlie individual differences in anxiety, rendering cannabinoid receptor 1 a potential target for novel pharmacological treatments of anxiety disorders. PMID:23010766

  12. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R.; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K. Luan

    2013-01-01

    Pre-extinction administration of ∆9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely involves via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 hours after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders. PMID:24055595

  13. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-12-04

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1(HIGH) cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1(HIGH) cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions.

  14. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1HIGH cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1HIGH cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions. PMID:26634814

  15. Endocannabinoids Stimulate Human Melanogenesis via Type-1 Cannabinoid Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Mariangela; Pasquariello, Nicoletta; Battista, Natalia; Di Tommaso, Monia; Rapino, Cinzia; Fezza, Filomena; Zuccolo, Michela; Jourdain, Roland; Finazzi Agrò, Alessandro; Breton, Lionel; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    We show that a fully functional endocannabinoid system is present in primary human melanocytes (normal human epidermal melanocyte cells), including anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the respective target receptors (CB1, CB2, and TRPV1), and their metabolic enzymes. We also show that at higher concentrations AEA induces normal human epidermal melanocyte apoptosis (∼3-fold over controls at 5 μm) through a TRPV1-mediated pathway that increases DNA fragmentation and p53 expression. However, at lower concentrations, AEA and other CB1-binding endocannabinoids dose-dependently stimulate melanin synthesis and enhance tyrosinase gene expression and activity (∼3- and ∼2-fold over controls at 1 μm). This CB1-dependent activity was fully abolished by the selective CB1 antagonist SR141716 or by RNA interference of the receptor. CB1 signaling engaged p38 and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases, which in turn activated the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Silencing of tyrosinase or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor further demonstrated the involvement of these proteins in AEA-induced melanogenesis. In addition, CB1 activation did not engage the key regulator of skin pigmentation, cyclic AMP, showing a major difference compared with the regulation of melanogenesis by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone through melanocortin 1 receptor. PMID:22431736

  16. Pharmacokinetic model-predicted anticancer drug concentrations in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Gallo, James M; Vicini, Paolo; Orlansky, Amy; Li, Shaolan; Zhou, Feng; Ma, Jianguo; Pulfer, Sharon; Bookman, Michel A; Guo, Ping

    2004-12-01

    In an era when molecular and targeted anticancer therapeutics is a major focus and when understanding drug dynamics in tumor is critical, it seems advantageous to be able to relate drug concentrations in tumors to corresponding biological end points. To that end, a novel method, based on physiologically based hybrid pharmacokinetic models, is presented to predict human tumor drug concentrations. Such models consist of a forcing function, describing the plasma drug concentration-time profile, which is linked to a model describing drug disposition in tumors. The hybrid models are originally derived from preclinical data and then scaled to humans. Integral to the scale-up procedure is the ability to derive human forcing functions directly from clinical pharmacokinetic data. Three examples of this approach are presented based on preclinical investigations with carboplatin, topotecan, and temozolomide. Translation of these preclinical hybrid models to humans used a Monte Carlo simulation technique that accounted for intrasubject and intersubject variability. Different pharmacokinetic end points, such as the AUC tumor, were extracted from the simulated human tumor drug concentrations to show how the predicted drug concentrations might be used to select drug-dosing regimens. It is believed that this modeling strategy can be used as an aid in the drug development process by providing key insights into drug disposition in tumors and by offering a foundation to optimize drug regimen design. PMID:15585640

  17. The Effect of Chronic Cannabinoids on Broadband EEG Neural Oscillations in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Skosnik, Patrick D; D'Souza, Deepak C; Steinmetz, Adam B; Edwards, Chad R; Vollmer, Jennifer M; Hetrick, William P; O'Donnell, Brian F

    2012-01-01

    Animal and cellular work has shown that central cannabinoid-1 receptors modulate neural oscillations in the gamma range (40 Hz), which may be important for normal perceptual and cognitive processes. In order to assess the effect of cannabinoids on broadband-frequency neural oscillations in humans, the current study examined the effect of chronic cannabis use on auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) utilizing electroencephalography (EEG). Passive ASSRs were assessed using varying rates of binaural stimulation (auditory click-trains; 10–50 Hz in increments of 5 Hz; 80 dB SPL) in carefully screened cannabis users and controls. Chronic cannabis users (n=22; 12 h abstinence before study; positive 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol urine levels) and cannabis naïve controls (n=24) were evaluated. Time X frequency analyses on EEG data were performed using Fourier-based mean trial power (MTP) and phase-locking (inter-trial coherence; ITC). Transient ERPs to stimulus onset (auditory N100 components) were also evaluated. As predicted, a decrease in spectral power (MTP) at 40 Hz was observed in the cannabis group (p<0.018). No effects on phase-locking (ITC) or the N100 were observed. Further, within the cannabis group, lower 40 Hz power correlated with an earlier age of onset of cannabis use (p<0.04). These data suggest that chronic exposure to exogenous cannabinoids can alter the ability to generate neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma range. This is consistent with preclinical animal and cellular data, which may have implications for understanding the short- and long-term psychopharmacological effects of cannabis. PMID:22713908

  18. Spicing thing up: Synthetic cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. Objectives The availability, acute subjective effects—including self-reports posted on Erowid—laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Results Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike THC, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid-receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. Conclusions There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug-detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available. PMID:23836028

  19. Astrocytic expression of cannabinoid type 1 receptor in rat and human sclerotic hippocampi

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xian-Dong; Wei, Dong; Li, Juan; Kang, Jun-Jun; Wu, Chen; Ma, Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhu, Ge-Min; Ou-Yang, Tang-Peng; Liu, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), which is traditionally located on axon terminals, plays an important role in the pathology of epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases by modulating synaptic transmission. Using the pilocarpine model of chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures, which mimics the main features of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) in humans, we examined the expression of CB1R in hippocampal astrocytes of epileptic rats. Furthermore, we also examined the expression of astrocytic CB1R in the resected hippocampi from patients with medically refractory mesial TLE. Using immunofluorescent double labeling, we found increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in hippocampi of epileptic rats, whereas expression of astrocytic CB1R was not detectable in hippocampi of saline treated animals. Furthermore, CB1R was also found in some astrocytes in sclerotic hippocampi in a subset of patients with intractable mesial TLE. Detection with immune electron microscopy showed that the expression of CB1R was increased in astrocytes of epileptic rats and modest levels of CB1R were also found on the astrocytic membrane of sclerotic hippocampi. These results suggest that increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in sclerotic hippocampi might be involved in the cellular basis of the effects of cannabinoids on epilepsy. PMID:25031702

  20. Involvement of cannabinoid receptor-1 activation in mitochondrial depolarizing effect of lipopolysaccharide in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Barbonetti, A; Vassallo, M R C; Costanzo, M; Battista, N; Maccarrone, M; Francavilla, S; Francavilla, F

    2014-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteria frequently involved in urogenital tract infections release the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS); its receptor, toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), has been recently identified in human spermatozoa, and its direct activation has been suggested in mediating adverse effects of LPS on human spermatozoa. However, the underlying signal transduction remains to be clarified. In other cell types, LPS induces the generation of endocannabinoids, which are involved in mediating endotoxin effects. In human spermatozoa, which exhibit a completely functional endocannabinoid system, the activation of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) inhibited sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). In this study, we tested the hypothesis of a contribution of CB1 activation by sperm-generated endocannabinoids in the adverse effects exerted by LPS on human spermatozoa. The exposure of motile sperm suspensions to E. coli LPS produced a significant decrease in sperm ΔΨm, assessed at flow cytometry with JC-1, similar to that induced by Metanandamide (Met-AEA), a non-hydrolyzable analogue of the endocannabinoid AEA. The LPS-induced inhibition of ΔΨm was prevented by the selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR141716. However, the inhibition of ΔΨm induced by either LPS or Met-AEA did not affect sperm motility. Consistent with this finding, the CB1-mediated inhibition of ΔΨm was neither associated to mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species as evaluated by flow cytometry with MytoSox Red nor to apoptosis pathway activation as evaluated with cytoflorimetric assay for activated caspase-9 and caspase-3. Any oxidative genomic damage was also ruled out with the cytoflorimetric quantification of the oxidized base adduct 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. In conclusion, E. coli LPS inhibited sperm ΔΨm through the activation of CB1, but this effect was not accompanied to the activation of mitochondrial dysfunction-related apoptotic/oxidative mechanisms, which could

  1. Simultaneous Quantification of Free and Glucuronidated Cannabinoids in Human Urine by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cannabis is the most commonly abused drug of abuse and is commonly quantified during urine drug testing. We conducted a controlled drug administration studies investigating efficacy of urinary cannabinoid glucuronide metabolites for documenting recency of cannabis intake and for determining stability of urinary cannabinoids. Methods A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated quantifying Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), cannabidiol, cannabinol, THC-glucuronide and THCCOOH-glucuronide in 0.5 ml human urine via supported-liquid extraction. Chromatography was performed on an Ultra Biphenyl column with a gradient of 10 mmol/l ammonium acetate, pH 6.15 and 15% methanol in acetonitrile at 0. 4ml/min. Analytes were monitored by positive and negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. Results Linear ranges were 0.5–50 ng/ml for THC-glucuronide, 1–100 ng/ml for THCCOOH, 11-OH-THC and cannabidiol, 2–100 ng/ml for THC and cannabinol, and 5–500 ng/ml for THCCOOH-glucuronide (R2>0.99). Mean extraction efficiencies were 34–73% with analytical recovery (bias) 80.5–118.0% and total imprecision 3.0–10.2% coefficient of variation. Conclusion This method simultaneously quantifies urinary cannabinoids and phase II glucuronide metabolites, and enables evaluation of urinary cannabinoid glucuronides for documenting recency of cannabis intake and cannabinoid stability. The assay is applicable for routine urine cannabinoid testing. PMID:22771478

  2. Screening for the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and its major metabolites in human doping controls.

    PubMed

    Möller, Ines; Wintermeyer, Annette; Bender, Katja; Jübner, Martin; Thomas, Andreas; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2011-09-01

    Referred to as 'spice', several new drugs, advertised as herbal blends, have appeared on the market in the last few years, in which the synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and a C(8) homologue of CP 47,497 were identified as major active ingredients. Due to their reported cannabis-like effects, many European countries have banned these substances. The World Anti-Doping Agency has also explicitly prohibited synthetic cannabinoids in elite sport in-competition. Since urine specimens have been the preferred doping control samples, the elucidation of the metabolic pathways of these substances is of particular importance to implement them in sports drug testing programmes. In a recent report, an in vitro phase-I metabolism study of JWH-018 was presented yielding mainly hydroxylated and N-dealkylated metabolites. Due to these findings, a urine sample of a healthy man declaring to have smoked a 'spice' product was screened for potential phase-I and -II metabolites by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry in the present report. The majority of the phase-I metabolites observed in earlier in vitro studies of JWH-018 were detected in this urine specimen and furthermore most of their respective monoglucuronides. As no intact JWH-018 was detectable, the monohydroxylated metabolite being the most abundant one was chosen as a target analyte for sports drug testing purposes; a detection method was subsequently developed and validated in accordance to conventional screening protocols based on enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The method was applied to approximately 7500 urine doping control samples yielding two JWH-018 findings and demonstrated its capability for a sensitive and selective identification of JWH-018 and its metabolites in human urine.

  3. Cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors and tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    One hypothesis suggests that tinnitus is a form of sensory epilepsy, arising partly from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory regions of the brain such as the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus. Although there is currently no effective drug treatment for tinnitus, anti-epileptic drugs are used in some cases as a potential treatment option. There is increasing evidence to suggest that cannabinoid drugs, i.e. cannabinoid receptor agonists, can also have anti-epileptic effects, at least in some cases and in some parts of the brain. It has been reported that cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and that they are involved in the regulation of plasticity. This review explores the question of whether cannabinoid receptor agonists are likely to be pro- or anti-epileptic in the cochlear nucleus and therefore whether cannabinoids and Cannabis itself are likely to make tinnitus better or worse.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of pindolol in humans and several animal species.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, H J

    1982-08-01

    The absorption, distribution, detoxification, and excretion of pindolol were investigated in mice, rats, dogs, rhesus monkeys, and humans. The absorption was very good in all species; however, the quantitative composition of the final excretion products was unique for each species. Considerable interspecies variation was also apparent with respect to excretion patterns. The pharmacokinetics of pindolol in humans was investigated in single- and multiple-dose studies. All results were in agreement with a three-compartment model. The absorption was rapid and a first-pass effect of 12% to 25% of the dose (mean 20%) was calculated. The half-lives of the excretion of radioactivity were 3.0, 1.2, and less than 100 hours. The pharmacokinetic parameters obtained in normal volunteers were compared with corresponding values obtained in patients with hypertension, renal insufficiency, or liver impairment. Results in these patients were not significantly different. The bioavailability interaction was investigated with drugs often coadministered with a beta blocker. No drug-drug interaction was found with hydralazine, hydrochlorothiazide, coumarin, or aspirin. Pindolol coadministration resulted in a possible lowering of digoxin levels. The bioavailability of the tablet dosage forM proposed for marketing was compared to that of a solution and found to be optimal.

  5. Metabolite profiling of RCS-4, a novel synthetic cannabinoid designer drug, using human hepatocyte metabolism and TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Adarsh S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2009, scheduling legislation of synthetic cannabinoids prompted new compound emergence to circumvent legal restrictions. 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-indol-3-yl)methanone (RCS-4) is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist sold in herbal smoking blends. Absence of parent synthetic cannabinoids in urine suggests the importance of metabolite identification for detecting RCS-4 consumption in clinical and forensic investigations. Materials & methods & Results With 1 h human hepatocyte incubation and TOF high-resolution MS, we identified 18 RCS-4 metabolites, many not yet reported. Most metabolites were hydroxylated with or without demethylation, carboxylation and dealkylation followed by glucuronidation. One additional sulfated metabolite was also observed. O-demethylation was the most common biotransformation and generated the major metabolite. Conclusion For the first time, we present a metabolic scheme of RCS-4 obtained from human hepatocytes, including Phase I and II metabolites. Metabolite structural information and associated high-resolution mass spectra can be employed for developing clinical and forensic laboratory RCS-4 urine screening methods. PMID:25046048

  6. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics (PBPK) Model For Dermal Permeability for Lindane

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficient...

  7. Pharmacokinetic modeling of trichloroethylene and trichloroacetic acid in humans.

    PubMed

    Allen, B C; Fisher, J W

    1993-02-01

    The development and application of appropriate physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of chemical contaminants will provide a rational basis for risk assessment extrapolation. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widespread contaminant found in soil, groundwater, and the atmosphere. Exposures to TCE and its metabolites have been found to be carcinogenic in rodents. In this study, a PBPK model for TCE and its major metabolite, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), is developed for humans. The model parameters, estimated from the relevant published literature on human exposures to TCE and its metabolites, are described. Key parameters describing the metabolism of TCE and the kinetics of TCA were estimated by optimization. The optimization was accomplished by simultaneously matching model predictions to observations of TCE concentrations in blood and exhaled breath, TCA plasma concentrations, and urinary TCA excretion from five published studies. The optimized human PBPK model provides an excellent description of TCE and TCA kinetics. The predictions were especially good for TCA plasma concentrations following repeated TCE inhalation, an exposure scenario similar to that occurring in the workplace. The human PBPK model can be used to estimate dose metrics resulting from TCE exposures and is therefore useful when considering the estimation of human health risks associated with such exposures.

  8. Conjugation of Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073, Metabolites by Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chimalakonda, Krishna C.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Le, Vi-Huyen; Yiew, Kan Hui; Dineva, Anna; Moran, Cindy L.; James, Laura P.; Moran, Jeffery H.

    2011-01-01

    K2, a synthetic cannabinoid (SC), is an emerging drug of abuse touted as “legal marijuana” and marketed to young teens and first-time drug users. Symptoms associated with K2 use include extreme agitation, syncope, tachycardia, and visual and auditory hallucinations. One major challenge to clinicians is the lack of clinical, pharmacological, and metabolic information for the detection and characterization of K2 and its metabolites in human samples. Information on the metabolic pathway of SCs is very limited. However, previous reports have shown the metabolites of these compounds are excreted primarily as glucuronic acid conjugates. Based on this information, this study evaluates nine human recombinant uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms and human liver and intestinal microsomes for their ability to glucuronidate hydroxylated metabolites of 1-naphthalenyl-1(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-methanone (JWH-018) and (1-butyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (JWH-073), the two most common SCs found in K2 products. Conjugates were identified and characterized using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, whereas kinetic parameters were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-UV-visible methods. UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A9, UGT1A10, and UGT2B7 were shown to be the major enzymes involved, showing relatively high affinity with Km ranging from 12 to 18 μM for some hydroxylated K2s. These UGTs also exhibited a high metabolic capacity for these compounds, which indicates that K2 metabolites may be rapidly glucuronidated and eliminated from the body. Studies of K2 metabolites will help future development and validation of a specific assay for K2 and its metabolites and will allow researchers to fully explore their pharmacological actions. PMID:21746969

  9. Conjugation of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073, metabolites by human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Chimalakonda, Krishna C; Bratton, Stacie M; Le, Vi-Huyen; Yiew, Kan Hui; Dineva, Anna; Moran, Cindy L; James, Laura P; Moran, Jeffery H; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2011-10-01

    K2, a synthetic cannabinoid (SC), is an emerging drug of abuse touted as "legal marijuana" and marketed to young teens and first-time drug users. Symptoms associated with K2 use include extreme agitation, syncope, tachycardia, and visual and auditory hallucinations. One major challenge to clinicians is the lack of clinical, pharmacological, and metabolic information for the detection and characterization of K2 and its metabolites in human samples. Information on the metabolic pathway of SCs is very limited. However, previous reports have shown the metabolites of these compounds are excreted primarily as glucuronic acid conjugates. Based on this information, this study evaluates nine human recombinant uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms and human liver and intestinal microsomes for their ability to glucuronidate hydroxylated metabolites of 1-naphthalenyl-1(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-methanone (JWH-018) and (1-butyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (JWH-073), the two most common SCs found in K2 products. Conjugates were identified and characterized using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, whereas kinetic parameters were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-UV-visible methods. UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A9, UGT1A10, and UGT2B7 were shown to be the major enzymes involved, showing relatively high affinity with K(m) ranging from 12 to 18 μM for some hydroxylated K2s. These UGTs also exhibited a high metabolic capacity for these compounds, which indicates that K2 metabolites may be rapidly glucuronidated and eliminated from the body. Studies of K2 metabolites will help future development and validation of a specific assay for K2 and its metabolites and will allow researchers to fully explore their pharmacological actions.

  10. Cannabinoids in late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aia; van der Marck, M A; van den Elsen, Gah; Olde Rikkert, Mgm

    2015-06-01

    Given the lack of effective treatments for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and the substantial burden on patients, families, health care systems, and economies, finding an effective therapy is one of the highest medical priorities. The past few years have seen a growing interest in the medicinal uses of cannabinoids, the bioactive components of the cannabis plant, including the treatment of LOAD and other physical conditions that are common in older people. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids can reduce oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the key hallmarks of LOAD. In addition, in population-based studies, cannabinoids reduced dementia-related symptoms (e.g., behavioral disturbances). The current article provides an overview of the potential of cannabinoids in the treatment of LOAD and related neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people. We also discuss the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of cannabinoid-based drugs in older people with dementia.

  11. Human plasma concentrations of cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Shida, Satomi; Utoh, Masahiro; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    1. Cynomolgus monkeys are widely used in preclinical studies as non-human primate species. Pharmacokinetics of human cytochrome P450 probes determined in cynomolgus monkeys after single oral or intravenous administrations were extrapolated to give human plasma concentrations. 2. Plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and R-/S-warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole and midazolam previously observed in cynomolgus monkeys were scaled to human oral biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Results of the simplified human PBPK models were consistent with reported experimental PK data in humans or with values simulated by a fully constructed population-based simulator (Simcyp). 3. Oral administrations of metoprolol and dextromethorphan (human P450 2D probes) in monkeys reportedly yielded plasma concentrations similar to their quantitative detection limits. Consequently, ratios of in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearances of metoprolol and dextromethorphan determined in monkeys and humans were used with simplified PBPK models to extrapolate intravenous PK in monkeys to oral PK in humans. 4. These results suggest that cynomolgus monkeys, despite their rapid clearance of some human P450 substrates, could be a suitable model for humans, especially when used in conjunction with simple PBPK models.

  12. Simultaneous determination of five naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites and their deposition in human and rat hair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Park, Yuran; Park, Meejung; Kim, Eunmi; Yang, Wonkyung; Baeck, Seungkyung; Lee, Sooyeun; Han, Sangbeom

    2015-01-01

    The continuing appearance of new synthetic cannabinoids has been a major issue in the field of forensic and clinical toxicology. In response to that, analytical methods for synthetic cannabinoids have been increasingly established in a variety of biological matrices. Since most of synthetic cannabinoids with structure similarity share some enzymatic metabolites, making the interpretation of analytical results and the discovery of the parent drug actually ingested very complicated, the investigation on metabolites of the first generation of synthetic cannabinoids with their relatively short side chains in chemical structure could be more important. Therefore, in the present study, we developed the analytical method for AM-2201, JWH-122 and MAM-2201 with JWH-018 as a precursor and their monohydroxylated metabolites in hair matrix. Also, using a rat model, AM-2201 and its monohydroxylated metabolites were identified and then the ratios of metabolite-to-parent drug were estimated to be used as criteria on external contamination. All analytes were extracted with methanol from washed and cut hair samples and the extracts were injected into LC-MS/MS with electrospray ion source in the positive ionization mode. Matrix effect and recovery were evaluated in hair matrices and no significant variations were observed. The validation results for precision and accuracy were satisfactory in both human and rat hair. The LOD and LOQ were 0.5 pg/10mg and 1.0 pg/10mg in human hair and 0.5 pg/20mg and 1.0 pg/20mg in pigmented and non-pigmented rat hair, respectively. Additionally, as a result of the animal study, there were not significant differences in the effect of pigmentation on the distribution of AM-2201 and its monohydroxylated metabolites in hair. Wide variations were observed for the concentrations of the naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites in authentic hair samples from nine cases; those were 0.4-59.2 pg/mg for JWH-018, 0.1-0.8 pg/mg for JWH-073, 1

  13. Human urine and plasma concentrations of bisphenol A extrapolated from pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Miyaguchi, Takamori; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Makiko; Shida, Satomi; Nishiyama, Sayako; Takano, Ryohji; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to extrapolate to humans the pharmacokinetics of estrogen analog bisphenol A determined in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Higher plasma concentrations and urinary excretions of bisphenol A glucuronide (a primary metabolite of bisphenol A) were observed in chimeric mice than in control mice after oral administrations, presumably because of enterohepatic circulation of bisphenol A glucuronide in control mice. Bisphenol A glucuronidation was faster in mouse liver microsomes than in human liver microsomes. These findings suggest a predominantly urinary excretion route of bisphenol A glucuronide in chimeric mice with humanized liver. Reported human plasma and urine data for bisphenol A glucuronide after single oral administration of 0.1mg/kg bisphenol A were reasonably estimated using the current semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model extrapolated from humanized mice data using algometric scaling. The reported geometric mean urinary bisphenol A concentration in the U.S. population of 2.64μg/L underwent reverse dosimetry modeling with the current human semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model. This yielded an estimated exposure of 0.024μg/kg/day, which was less than the daily tolerable intake of bisphenol A (50μg/kg/day), implying little risk to humans. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling will likely prove useful for determining the species-dependent toxicological risk of bisphenol A.

  14. Pitfall in cannabinoid analysis--detection of a previously unrecognized interfering compound in human serum.

    PubMed

    Toennes, Stefan W; Hanisch, Stephanie; Pogoda, Werner; Wunder, Cora; Paulke, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In clinical and forensic toxicology, high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is increasingly used since it allows the development of sensitive and fast drug analysis procedures. During development of a LC-MS/MS method for determination of the psychoactive cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and of its two metabolites 11-hydroxy-THC (THCOH) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in serum, a previously unrecognized interfering compound was detected. Extending the fast gradient elution program by an isocratic phase leads to sufficient separation of the interfering compound, initially co-eluting with THCCOOH and exhibiting the same fragments. For characterization, product ion scans and precursor ion scans were performed. Samples from cannabis users were analyzed to estimate the abundance of the interfering compound. The mass spectrometric experiments showed that the interfering compound exhibited the same molecular mass as THCCOOH and a similar fragmentation pattern except for relative fragment intensities. This compound was exclusively detectable in authentic samples. Concentrations were in the range of 4.5 to 51 % (median 14.6 %, n = 73) of those of THCCOOH. After further optimization of the gradient, the method was sufficiently selective and sensitive and validation parameters were within acceptance limits. A new compound related to cannabis use was detected in human serum, and data suggest an isomeric structure to THCCOOH. Considering the rather high amounts observed, it was surprising that this compound had not been detected previously. Further studies on its structure and origin are necessary. PMID:25391576

  15. Variation in the human cannabinoid receptor CNR1 gene modulates gaze duration for happy faces

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background From an early age, humans look longer at preferred stimuli and also typically look longer at facial expressions of emotion, particularly happy faces. Atypical gaze patterns towards social stimuli are common in autism spectrum conditions (ASC). However, it is unknown whether gaze fixation patterns have any genetic basis. In this study, we tested whether variations in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene are associated with gaze duration towards happy faces. This gene was selected because CNR1 is a key component of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in processing reward, and in our previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we found that variations in CNR1 modulate the striatal response to happy (but not disgust) faces. The striatum is involved in guiding gaze to rewarding aspects of a visual scene. We aimed to validate and extend this result in another sample using a different technique (gaze tracking). Methods A total of 30 volunteers (13 males and 17 females) from the general population observed dynamic emotional expressions on a screen while their eye movements were recorded. They were genotyped for the identical four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CNR1 gene tested in our earlier fMRI study. Results Two SNPs (rs806377 and rs806380) were associated with differential gaze duration for happy (but not disgust) faces. Importantly, the allelic groups associated with a greater striatal response to happy faces in the fMRI study were associated with longer gaze duration at happy faces. Conclusions These results suggest that CNR1 variations modulate the striatal function that underlies the perception of signals of social reward, such as happy faces. This suggests that CNR1 is a key element in the molecular architecture of perception of certain basic emotions. This may have implications for understanding neurodevelopmental conditions marked by atypical eye contact and facial emotion processing, such as ASC. PMID

  16. Cannabinoids in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Natalya M; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds. In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable--instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and--in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity--just to monitor these side effects carefully.

  17. Cannabinoids in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Natalya M.; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds. In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable - instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and - in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity - just to monitor these side effects carefully. PMID:18286801

  18. Metabolism of RCS-8, a synthetic cannabinoid with cyclohexyl structure, in human hepatocytes by high-resolution MS

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Zhu, Mingshe; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-01-01

    Background Since 2008, synthetic cannabinoids are major new designer drugs of abuse. They are extensively metabolized and excreted in urine, but limited human metabolism data are available. As there are no reports on the metabolism of RCS-8, a scheduled phenylacetylindole synthetic cannabinoid with an N-cyclohexylethyl moiety, we investigated metabolism of this new designer drug by human hepatocytes and high resolution MS. Methods After human hepatocyte incubation with RCS-8, samples were analyzed on a TripleTOF 5600+ mass spectrometer with time-of-flight survey scan and information-dependent acquisition triggered product ion scans. Data mining of the accurate mass full scan and product ion spectra employed different data processing algorithms. Results and Conclusion More than 20 RCS-8 metabolites were identified, products of oxidation, demethylation, and glucuronidation. Major metabolites and targets for analytical methods were hydroxyphenyl RCS - 8 glucuronide, a variety of hydroxycyclohexyl-hydroxyphenyl RCS-8 glucuronides, hydroxyphenyl RCS-8, as well as the demethyl-hydroxycyclohexyl RCS-8 glucuronide. PMID:24946920

  19. Synthetic Cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Mills, Brooke; Yepes, Andres; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs), also known under the brand names of "Spice," "K2," "herbal incense," "Cloud 9," "Mojo" and many others, are becoming a large public health concern due not only to their increasing use but also to their unpredictable toxicity and abuse potential. There are many types of SCBs, each having a unique binding affinity for cannabinoid receptors. Although both Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and SCBs stimulate the same receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), studies have shown that SCBs are associated with higher rates of toxicity and hospital admissions than is natural cannabis. This is likely due to SCBs being direct agonists of the cannabinoid receptors, whereas THC is a partial agonist. Furthermore, the different chemical structures of SCBs found in Spice or K2 may interact in unpredictable ways to elicit previously unknown, and the commercial products may have unknown contaminants. The largest group of users is men in their 20s who participate in polydrug use. The most common reported toxicities with SCB use based on studies using Texas Poison Control records are tachycardia, agitation and irritability, drowsiness, hallucinations, delusions, hypertension, nausea, confusion, dizziness, vertigo and chest pain. Acute kidney injury has also been strongly associated with SCB use. Treatment mostly involves symptom management and supportive care. More research is needed to identify which contaminants are typically found in synthetic marijuana and to understand the interactions between different SBCs to better predict adverse health outcomes.

  20. Methamphetamine blood concentrations in human abusers: application to pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Melega, William P; Cho, Arthur K; Harvey, Dennis; Laćan, Goran

    2007-04-01

    Characterization of methamphetamine's (METH) dose-dependent effects on brain neurochemistry may represent a critical component for better understanding the range of resultant behavioral pathologies. Most human studies, however, have assessed only the effects of long term, high dose METH abuse (e.g., greater than 1000 mg/day) in individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for METH dependence. Yet, for the majority of METH abusers, their patterns of METH exposure that consist of lower doses remain less well-characterized. In this study, blood samples were obtained from 105 individuals detained by police for possible criminal activity and testing positive for stimulants by EMIT assay. METH blood concentrations were subsequently quantified by GC-MS and were predominantly in the low micromolar range (0.1-11.1 microM), with median and mean values of 1.3 microM (0.19 mg/l) and 2 microM (0.3 mg/l), respectively. Pharmacokinetic calculations based on these measured values were used to estimate initial METH body burdens, the median value being 52 mg. Modeling a 52 mg dose for a 4 day-METH maintenance exposure pattern of 4 doses/day at 4 h intervals showed that blood concentrations remained between 1 and 4 microM during this period. Collectively, these data present evidence for a METH exposure pattern distinct from high dose-METH abuse and provide the rationale for assessing potential brain pathology associated with such lower dose-METH exposure.

  1. Dendritic Cell Regulation by Cannabinoid-Based Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Mattias; Chen, Puran; Hammarfjord, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the cannabinoid system was discovered. Studies in experimental models and in humans have produced promising results using cannabinoid-based drugs for the treatment of obesity and cancer, as well as neuroinflammatory and chronic inflammatory diseases. Moreover, as we discuss here, additional studies also indicates that these drugs have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties including modulation of immune cell function. Thus, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies against inflammatory disorders. At least two types of cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid 1 and cannabinoid 2 receptors are expressed on immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC). Dendritic cells are recognized for their critical role in initiating and maintaining immune responses. Therefore, DC are potential targets for cannabinoid-mediated modulation. Here, we review the effects of cannabinoids on DC and provide some perspective concerning the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for the treatment of human diseases involving aberrant inflammatory processes.

  2. First characterization of AKB-48 metabolism, a novel synthetic cannabinoid, using human hepatocytes and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Adarsh S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Liu, Hua-Fen; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-10-01

    Since the federal authorities scheduled the first synthetic cannabinoids, JWH-018 and JWH-073, new synthetic cannabinoids were robustly marketed. N-(1-Adamantyl)-1-pentylindazole-3-carboxamide (AKB-48), also known as APINACA, was recently observed in Japanese herbal smoking blends. The National Forensic Laboratory Information System registered 443 reports of AKB-48 cases in the USA from March 2010 to January 2013. In May 2013, the Drug Enforcement Administration listed AKB-48 as a Schedule I drug. Recently, AKB-48 was shown to have twice the CB1 receptor binding affinity than CB2. These pharmacological effects and the difficulty in detecting the parent compound in urine highlight the importance of metabolite identification for developing analytical methods for clinical and forensic investigations. Using human hepatocytes and TripleTOF mass spectrometry, we identified 17 novel phase I and II AKB-48 metabolites, products of monohydroxylation, dihydroxylation, or trihydroxylation on the aliphatic adamantane ring or N-pentyl side chain. Glucuronide conjugation of some mono- and dihydroxylated metabolites also occurred. Oxidation and dihydroxylation on the adamantane ring and N-pentyl side chain formed a ketone. More metabolites were identified after 3 h of incubation than at 1 h. For the first time, we present a AKB-48 metabolic scheme obtained from human hepatocytes and high-resolution mass spectrometry. These data are needed to develop analytical methods to identify AKB-48 consumption in clinical and forensic testing.

  3. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    PubMed

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects.

  4. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    PubMed

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects. PMID:26912385

  5. Systemic availability and pharmacokinetics of thymol in humans.

    PubMed

    Kohlert, Claudia; Schindler, Gernot; März, Reinhard W; Abel, Gudrun; Brinkhaus, Benno; Derendorf, Hartmut; Gräfe, Eva-Ulrike; Veit, Markus

    2002-07-01

    Essential oil compounds such as found in thyme extract are established for the therapy of chronic and acute bronchitis. Various pharmacodynamic activities for thyme extract and the essential thyme oil, respectively, have been demonstrated in vitro, but availability of these compounds in the respective target organs has not been proven. Thus, investigation of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion are necessary to provide the link between in vitro effects and in vivo studies. To determine the systemic availability and the pharmacokinetics of thymol after oral application to humans, a clinical trial was carried out in 12 healthy volunteers. Each subject received a single dose of a Bronchipret TP tablet, which is equivalent to 1.08 mg thymol. No thymol could be detected in plasma or urine. However, the metabolites thymol sulfate and thymol glucuronide were found in urine and identified by LC-MS/MS. Plasma and urine samples were analyzed after enzymatic hydrolysis of the metabolites by headspace solid-phase microextraction prior to GC analysis and flame ionization detection. Thymol sulfate, but not thymol glucuronide, was detectable in plasma. Peak plasma concentrations were 93.1+/-24.5 ng ml(-1) and were reached after 2.0+/-0.8 hours. The mean terminal elimination half-life was 10.2 hours. Thymol sulfate was detectable up to 41 hours after administration. Urinary excretion could be followed over 24 hours. The amount of both thymol sulfate and glucuronide excreted in 24-hour urine was 16.2%+/-4.5% of the dose. PMID:12092740

  6. [Function of cannabinoids in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Rudź, Radosław; Baranowska, Urszula; Malinowska, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids, substances derived from Cannabis sativa, have been used by humans as therapeutic agents for thousands of years. They act through the cannabinoid CB(1), CB(2), vanilloid TRPV1, and the as yet undefined putative endothelial cannabinoid receptors. Intensive research on the influence of cannabinoids on the cardiovascular system has been conducted since the 1990s after the discovery that cannabinoids are involved in hypotension connected with septic, cardiogenic, and hemorrhagic shock. One cannot exclude the future possibility of using cannabinoids as new therapeutic agents in diseases of the cardiovascular system. In the present paper the mechanisms of cannabinoids on heart failure are described. In the acute phase of myocardial infarction, cannabinoids protect the endothelium of coronary vessels and decrease the heart's necrotic area and the risk of arrhythmia. Cannabinoids also act in the chronic phase of myocardial infarction in the process of the heart remodeling. However, the present knowledge of the effects of cannabinoids on the acute and chronic phases of myocardial infarction and the possibility of using these agents in cardiovascular disease therapy is still insufficient. PMID:18464680

  7. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes by inhibiting expression of syndecan-1

    PubMed Central

    KONG, YING; WANG, WANCHUN; ZHANG, CHANGJIE; WU, YI; LIU, YANG; ZHOU, XIAORONG

    2016-01-01

    A central feature of osteoarthritis (OA) is the loss of articular cartilage, which is primarily attributed to cartilage breakdown. A group of metalloproteinases termed the A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family are reported to be important in cartilage breakdown. Recent studies have suggested that ADAMTS-4 is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of OA and that syndecan-1 is closely associated with activation of ADAMTS-4 in human chondrocytes. Accumulating evidence also suggests that cannabinoids have chondroprotective effects. The current study explored the effects of synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) on the expression of syndecan-1 and ADAMTS-4, as well as ADAMTS-4 activity, in unstimulated and interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Primary human OA articular chondrocytes were treated with WIN-55 in the presence or absence of IL-1β and cannabinoid receptor antagonists. The results of the present study demonstrated that WIN-55 inhibited ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated primary human OA articular chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) were constitutively expressed in human OA articular chondrocytes. Furthermore, selective CB2 antagonist, JTE907, but not selective CB1 antagonist, MJ15, abolished the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on ADAMTS-4 activity. WIN55 inhibited the expression of syndecan-1 but not ADAMTS-4, and overexpression of syndecan-1 reversed the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on the ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated human OA articular chondrocytes. Despite having no significant effect on syndecan-1 gene promoter activity, WIN-55 markedly decreased the stability of syndecan-1 mRNA via CB2. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first in vitro evidence supporting that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55 inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1

  8. Human plasma concentrations of five cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in dogs and minipigs using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Shida, Satomi; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cytochrome P450 probes in humans can be extrapolated from corresponding data in cynomolgus monkeys using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. In the current study, despite some species difference in drug clearances, this modeling methodology was adapted to estimate human plasma concentrations of P450 probes based on data from commonly used medium-sized experimental animals, namely dogs and minipigs. Using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data, the observed plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam in two young dogs were scaled to human oral monitoring equivalents. Using the same approach, the previously reported pharmacokinetics of the five P450 probes in minipigs was also scaled to human monitoring equivalents. The human plasma concentration profiles of the five P450 probes estimated by the simplified human PBPK models based on observed/reported pharmacokinetics in dogs/minipigs were consistent with previously published pharmacokinetic data in humans. These results suggest that dogs and minipigs, in addition to monkeys, could be suitable models for humans during research into new drugs, especially when used in combination with simple PBPK models.

  9. The endocannabinoid/endovanilloid N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) and synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 abate the inflammatory activation of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Khakpour, Samira; Tran, Alphonso; Sheehan, Kayla; Schumacher, Mark; Xu, Fengyun; Hellman, Judith

    2014-05-01

    Although cannabinoids, such as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, have been studied extensively for their psychoactive effects, it has become apparent that certain cannabinoids possess immunomodulatory activity. Endothelial cells (ECs) are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of organ injury in acute inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, because they express cytokines and chemokines, which facilitate the trafficking of leukocytes to organs, and they modulate vascular barrier function. In this study, we find that primary human ECs from multiple organs express the cannabinoid receptors CB1R, GPR18, and GPR55, as well as the ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1. In contrast to leukocytes, CB2R is only minimally expressed in some EC populations. Furthermore, we show that ECs express all of the known endocannabinoid (eCB) metabolic enzymes. Examining a panel of cannabinoids, we demonstrate that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 and the eCB N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA), but neither anandamide nor 2-arachidonoylglycerol, reduce EC inflammatory responses induced by bacterial lipopeptide, LPS, and TNFα. We find that endothelial CB1R/CB2R are necessary for the effects of NADA, but not those of WIN55,212-2. Furthermore, transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1 appears to counter the anti-inflammatory properties of WIN55,212-2 and NADA, but conversely, in the absence of these cannabinoids, its inhibition exacerbates the inflammatory response in ECs activated with LPS. These data indicate that the eCB system can modulate inflammatory activation of the endothelium and may have important implications for a variety of acute inflammatory disorders that are characterized by EC activation.

  10. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. )

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  11. Detection and quantification of new designer drugs in human blood: Part 1 - Synthetic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Julia; McLaren, Jenna M; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Beyer, Jochen

    2012-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids sprayed on herbal mixtures have been abused as a new designer drug all over the world since 2004. In 2008, the first compounds, CP 47,497 and JWH-018, were identified as active ingredients in these mixtures. Most of the compounds have been synthesized for research purposes and are potent CB1 and/or CB2 receptor agonists. To investigate the presence of synthetic cannabinoids in blood samples, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method was developed using only 100 µL of blood. After the addition of 0.2 mL of trizma buffer, the blood was extracted using liquid-liquid extraction with 1 mL of 1-chlorobutane containing 10% of isopropanol for 5 min on a shaker at 1,500 rpm. After centrifugation at 12,000 rpm for 1 min, the separated solvent layer was transferred to an autosampler vial and evaporated to dryness under N₂. The residue was reconstituted in methanol and injected into a Shimadzu 8030 LC-MS-MS system to separate and detect 25 synthetic cannabinoids. The method has been validated according to international guidelines and was found to be selective for all tested compounds. Calibration was satisfactory from 0.5-100 ng/mL, and from 5.0-500 ng/mL. for HU-210, CP 47,497 and the CP 47,497 C-8 homolog, respectively. The extraction efficiencies ranged from 30-101% and the matrix effects from 67-112%. Accuracy data were within the acceptance interval of ±15% (±20% at the lower limit of quantification) of the nominal values for all drugs.

  12. PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans can be exposed by inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an oxygenated fuel additive, from contaminated water sources. The purpose of this research was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model describing in human...

  13. Arsenite medicinal use, metabolism, pharmacokinetics and monitoring in human hair.

    PubMed

    Nicolis, I; Curis, E; Deschamps, P; Bénazeth, S

    2009-10-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a distinctive subtype of acute myeloid leukaemias. Even through this human disease can be treated by the intravenous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), 25% of patients typically relapse after the first treatment. In this context, the intravenous administration of APL patients with an aqueous solution of arsenic trioxide has also been demonstrated to be successful despite the established mammalian toxicity of this arsenic compound. Accordingly, the administration of a therapeutic dose of arsenic trioxide has resulted in an improved patient survival in both relapsing as well newly diagnosed APL patients. We present here a mini-review of the medicinal use of arsenite, its mammalian metabolism (with an emphasis on biomethylation pathways), its elimination and pharmacokinetics and the novel application of hair analysis as a biomonitoring material. This mini-review also introduces our own results on the analysis of hair of patients receiving arsenic trioxide therapy. In this work, instead of quantifying arsenic content in bulk hair, we performed longitudinal analysis in order to use hair as a marker of arsenic exposure correlated to a time scale. Taking into account the hair growth rate, the longitudinal analysis of hair is demonstrated to provide a chronological record of the treatment of patients with arsenic trioxide. The small quantity of material to be analysed required the use of Synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) spectroscopy. The hair arsenic content was well correlated with the clinical background of patients and reflected the intake of arsenic trioxide. In particular, the onset of arsenic trioxide therapy and interruptions during therapy were reflected by total arsenic content, which suggested rapid elimination. Another type of experiment, micro-XRF cartography on thin hair slices, allowed us to obtain distribution maps of arsenic, which demonstrated that arsenic is located at the

  14. Cannabinoids: potential targets for bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Cannabinoids are the active chemical components of Cannabis sativa (marijuana). The medical use of cannabis goes back over 5,000 years. Cannabinoids produce a very wide array of central and peripheral effects, some of which may have beneficial clinical applications. The discovery of cannabinoid receptors has spawned great interest within the pharmaceutical industry with the hopes of capitalizing on the beneficial effects of cannabis without the unwanted psychotropic effects on the central and peripheral nervous system. This chapter presents an overview of the pharmacology of cannabinoids and their derivatives. It reviews the current literature on central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors as related to effects on the lower urinary tract and the role of these receptors in normal and abnormal urinary tract function. An objective evaluation of the published results of clinical trials of cannabis extracts for the treatment of bladder dysfunction resulting from multiple sclerosis is also presented. It is clear that cannabinoid receptors are present in the lower urinary tract as well as spinal and higher centers involved in lower urinary tract control. Systemic cannabinoids have effects on the lower urinary tract that may be able to become clinically useful; however, a much greater understanding of the mechanisms of cannabinoid receptors in control of the human lower urinary tract is necessary to facilitate development of novel cannabinoid drugs for treatment of pelvic disorders.

  15. The Pharmacokinetics of Potassium in Humans Is Unusual.

    PubMed

    Hinderling, Peter H

    2016-10-01

    Potassium is critical for maintaining cellular tonicity, propagation of nerve impulses, contraction of cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles, and normal renal function. The focus of this review is on the pharmacokinetics of potassium, K(+) , after administration of liquid and solid formulations of potassium chloride, KCl, to healthy subjects. Potassium can be considered an endogenous and exogenous compound. The amounts of endogenous K(+) are kept constant by balancing intake and loss of exogenous K(+) . Food and ingestion of KCl-containing medicines are sources for exogenous K(+) . In the pharmacokinetic context exogenous K(+) from KCl-containing medicines, K(+) exo,dose , is of primary interest. The distinction between the different K(+) entities is critical for obtaining unbiased estimates of the kinetic parameters for K(+) exo,dose . A literature search using prespecified acceptance criteria was performed. Publications were selected that reported plasma and urine data of K(+) exo,dose directly or provided information allowing their determination. Additional criteria applied included that the studies used a randomized design and controlled for the important covariates. Most of the selected publications reported urinary excretion data. Only 2 publications also reported plasma concentrations. The excursions of the plasma concentrations of K(+) exo,dose were considered too small to be of use by most investigators. The aggregate results indicate that urinary recovery data have the potential for providing reliable estimates for bioavailability and bioequivalence of K(+) exo,dose with KCl-containing formulations. Absorption efficiency, peak rates, and corresponding times of K(+) exo,dose with liquid formulations are fairly consistent among studies. The mean absorption efficiency of K(+) exo,dose with solid and liquid formulations of KCl ranges between 70% and 90%. The absorption rate of liquid formulations is rapid, whereas the solid formulations show extended release

  16. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jäntti, Maria H.; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  17. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of ethyl acetate and ethanol in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Crowell, S R; Smith, J N; Creim, J A; Faber, W; Teeguarden, J G

    2015-10-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed and applied to a metabolic series approach for the ethyl series (i.e., ethyl acetate, ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate). This approach bases toxicity information on dosimetry analyses for metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic data for each compound and toxicity data for parent or individual compounds. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies of ethyl acetate and ethanol were conducted in rats following IV and inhalation exposure. Regardless of route, ethyl acetate was rapidly converted to ethanol. Blood concentrations of ethyl acetate and ethanol following both IV bolus and infusion suggested linear kinetics across blood concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mM ethyl acetate and 0.01-0.8 mM ethanol. Metabolic parameters were optimized and evaluated based on available pharmacokinetic data. The respiratory bioavailability of ethyl acetate and ethanol were estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting ethyl series model successfully reproduces blood ethyl acetate and ethanol kinetics following IV administration and inhalation exposure in rats, and blood ethanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to ethanol in humans. The extrapolated human model was used to derive human equivalent concentrations for the occupational setting of 257-2120 ppm ethyl acetate and 72-517 ppm ethyl acetate for continuous exposure, corresponding to rat LOAELs of 350 and 1500 ppm.

  18. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of ethyl acetate and ethanol in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Crowell, S R; Smith, J N; Creim, J A; Faber, W; Teeguarden, J G

    2015-10-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed and applied to a metabolic series approach for the ethyl series (i.e., ethyl acetate, ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate). This approach bases toxicity information on dosimetry analyses for metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic data for each compound and toxicity data for parent or individual compounds. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies of ethyl acetate and ethanol were conducted in rats following IV and inhalation exposure. Regardless of route, ethyl acetate was rapidly converted to ethanol. Blood concentrations of ethyl acetate and ethanol following both IV bolus and infusion suggested linear kinetics across blood concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mM ethyl acetate and 0.01-0.8 mM ethanol. Metabolic parameters were optimized and evaluated based on available pharmacokinetic data. The respiratory bioavailability of ethyl acetate and ethanol were estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting ethyl series model successfully reproduces blood ethyl acetate and ethanol kinetics following IV administration and inhalation exposure in rats, and blood ethanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to ethanol in humans. The extrapolated human model was used to derive human equivalent concentrations for the occupational setting of 257-2120 ppm ethyl acetate and 72-517 ppm ethyl acetate for continuous exposure, corresponding to rat LOAELs of 350 and 1500 ppm. PMID:26297692

  19. New ursane triterpenoids from Ficus pandurata and their binding affinity for human cannabinoid and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Amgad I M; Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A; Ahmed, Hany E A; Ahmad, Amany S; Ramadan, Mahmoud A; El-Baky, Atef E Abd; Yamada, Koji; Ross, Samir A

    2016-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Ficus pandurata Hance (Moraceae) fruits has led to the isolation of two new triterpenoids, ficupanduratin A [1β-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (11) and ficupanduratin B [21α-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (17), along with 20 known compounds: α-amyrin acetate (1), α-amyrin (2), 3β-acetoxy-20-taraxasten-22-one (3), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (4), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-12-ursene (5), 11-oxo-α-amyrin acetate (6), 11-oxo-β-amyrin acetate (7), palmitic acid (8), stigmast-4,22-diene-3,6-dione (9), stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione (10), stigmasterol (12), β-sitosterol (13), stigmast-22-ene-3,6-dione (14), stigmastane-3,6-dione (15), 3β,21β-dihydroxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (16), 3β-hydroxy-11α-methoxyurs-12-ene (18), 6-hydroxystigmast-4,22-diene-3-one (19), 6-hydroxystigmast-4-ene-3-one (20), 11α,21α-dihydroxy-3β-acetoxy-urs-12-ene (21), and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22). Compound 21 is reported for the first time from a natural source. The structures of the 20 compounds were elucidated on the basis of IR, 1D ((1)H and (13)C), 2D ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY) NMR and MS spectroscopic data, in addition to comparison with literature data. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-leishmanial, and cytotoxic activities. In addition, their radioligand displacement affinity on opioid and cannabinoid receptors was assessed. Compounds 4, 11, and 15 exhibited good affinity towards the CB2 receptor, with displacement values of 69.7, 62.5 and 86.5 %, respectively. Furthermore, the binding mode of the active compounds in the active site of the CB2 cannabinoid receptors was investigated through molecular modelling. PMID:27350550

  20. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for assessment of human exposure to bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Doerge, Daniel R; Teeguarden, Justin G; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2015-12-15

    A previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys was modified to characterize the pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II conjugates in adult humans following oral ingestion. Coupled with in vitro studies on BPA metabolism in the liver and the small intestine, the PBPK model was parameterized using oral pharmacokinetic data with deuterated-BPA (d6-BPA) delivered in cookies to adult humans after overnight fasting. The availability of the serum concentration time course of unconjugated d6-BPA offered direct empirical evidence for the calibration of BPA model parameters. The recalibrated PBPK adult human model for BPA was then evaluated against published human pharmacokinetic studies with BPA. A hypothesis of decreased oral uptake was needed to account for the reduced peak levels observed in adult humans, where d6-BPA was delivered in soup and food was provided prior to BPA ingestion, suggesting the potential impact of dosing vehicles and/or fasting on BPA disposition. With the incorporation of Monte Carlo analysis, the recalibrated adult human model was used to address the inter-individual variability in the internal dose metrics of BPA for the U.S. general population. Model-predicted peak BPA serum levels were in the range of pM, with 95% of human variability falling within an order of magnitude. This recalibrated PBPK model for BPA in adult humans provides a scientific basis for assessing human exposure to BPA that can serve to minimize uncertainties incurred during extrapolations across doses and species. PMID:26522835

  1. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Broyd, Samantha J; van Hell, Hendrika H; Beale, Camilla; Yücel, Murat; Solowij, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    Cannabis use has been associated with impaired cognition during acute intoxication as well as in the unintoxicated state in long-term users. However, the evidence has been mixed and contested, and no systematic reviews of the literature on neuropsychological task-based measures of cognition have been conducted in an attempt to synthesize the findings. We systematically review the empirical research published in the past decade (from January 2004 to February 2015) on acute and chronic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids and on persistence or recovery after abstinence. We summarize the findings into the major categories of the cognitive domains investigated, considering sample characteristics and associations with various cannabis use parameters. Verbal learning and memory and attention are most consistently impaired by acute and chronic exposure to cannabis. Psychomotor function is most affected during acute intoxication, with some evidence for persistence in chronic users and after cessation of use. Impaired verbal memory, attention, and some executive functions may persist after prolonged abstinence, but persistence or recovery across all cognitive domains remains underresearched. Associations between poorer performance and a range of cannabis use parameters, including a younger age of onset, are frequently reported. Little further evidence has emerged for the development of tolerance to the acutely impairing effects of cannabis. Evidence for potential protection from harmful effects by cannabidiol continues to increase but is not definitive. In light of increasing trends toward legalization of cannabis, the knowledge gained from this body of research needs to be incorporated into strategies to minimize harm. PMID:26858214

  2. Pharmacokinetics of temafloxacin in humans after multiple oral doses.

    PubMed Central

    Granneman, G R; Carpentier, P; Morrison, P J; Pernet, A G

    1992-01-01

    The multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and tolerance of temafloxacin, a new fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent, were evaluated in healthy volunteers. Temafloxacin was found to be well tolerated when administered orally every 12 h for 7 days at doses of 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 800 mg. Steady-state maximum and minimum concentrations in plasma were proportional to dose, averaging slightly over 1.0 and 0.5 microgram/ml/100 mg administered. Analyses of variance found no significant differences among the dosage groups in total apparent clearances (CLT/F), renal clearances (CLR), or nonrenal clearances, which averaged 197, 119, and 78 ml/min, respectively. The half-life increased slightly with dose, averaging 8.4 h overall. The extent of absorption of temafloxacin was quite reproducible, with day-to-day intrasubject variability in minima averaging under 10%. Renal glomerular filtration of unbound drug was the dominant elimination process; however, tubular secretion and reabsorption also appear to occur. Secretion was estimated to account for about 12% of CLT/F during a regimen of 600 mg every 12 h. CLR was relatively constant for urine flow rates above 1 ml/min, but reabsorption appeared to occur under low-flow conditions, resulting in day-versus-night differences in CLR. Intersubject variability in CLT/F over the eightfold range in dosage was only 20%, and 60% of this variance was accounted for by differences in body surface area (or lean body mass), concentration in plasma, and urine flow rate. Overall, it appears that the pharmacokinetics of temafloxacin are essentially linear, reproducible within a subject, and predictable among subjects. PMID:1318680

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Human Metabolism of Synthetic Cannabinoids FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Kronstrand, Robert; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22, two novel synthetic cannabinoids, were detected in herbal blends in Japan, Russia, and Germany and were quickly added to their scheduled drugs list. Unfortunately, no human metabolism data are currently available, making it challenging to confirm their intake. The present study aims to identify appropriate analytical markers by investigating FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 metabolism in human hepatocytes and confirm the results in authentic urine specimens. For metabolic stability, 1 μM FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 was incubated with human liver microsomes for up to 1 h; for metabolite profiling, 10 μM was incubated with human hepatocytes for 3 h. Two authentic urine specimens from FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 positive cases were analyzed after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. Metabolite identification in hepatocyte samples and urine specimens was accomplished by high-resolution mass spectrometry using information-dependent acquisition. Both FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 were rapidly metabolized in HLM with half-lives of 12.4 and 11.5 min, respectively. In human hepatocyte samples, we identified seven metabolites for both compounds, generated by ester hydrolysis and further hydroxylation and/or glucuronidation. After ester hydrolysis, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 yielded the same metabolite M7, fluorobenzylindole-3-carboxylic acid (FBI-COOH). M7 and M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) were the major metabolites. In authentic urine specimens after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis, M6 and M7 also were the predominant metabolites. Based on our study, we recommend M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) and M7 (FBI-COOH) as suitable urinary markers for documenting FDU-PB-22 and/or FUB-PB-22 intake.

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Human Metabolism of Synthetic Cannabinoids FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Kronstrand, Robert; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22, two novel synthetic cannabinoids, were detected in herbal blends in Japan, Russia, and Germany and were quickly added to their scheduled drugs list. Unfortunately, no human metabolism data are currently available, making it challenging to confirm their intake. The present study aims to identify appropriate analytical markers by investigating FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 metabolism in human hepatocytes and confirm the results in authentic urine specimens. For metabolic stability, 1 μM FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 was incubated with human liver microsomes for up to 1 h; for metabolite profiling, 10 μM was incubated with human hepatocytes for 3 h. Two authentic urine specimens from FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 positive cases were analyzed after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. Metabolite identification in hepatocyte samples and urine specimens was accomplished by high-resolution mass spectrometry using information-dependent acquisition. Both FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 were rapidly metabolized in HLM with half-lives of 12.4 and 11.5 min, respectively. In human hepatocyte samples, we identified seven metabolites for both compounds, generated by ester hydrolysis and further hydroxylation and/or glucuronidation. After ester hydrolysis, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 yielded the same metabolite M7, fluorobenzylindole-3-carboxylic acid (FBI-COOH). M7 and M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) were the major metabolites. In authentic urine specimens after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis, M6 and M7 also were the predominant metabolites. Based on our study, we recommend M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) and M7 (FBI-COOH) as suitable urinary markers for documenting FDU-PB-22 and/or FUB-PB-22 intake. PMID:26810398

  5. Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorobutyrate in Rats, Mice,Monkeys, and Humans and Relevance to Human Exposurevia Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorobutyrate (PFBA) has been detected in precipitation, surface waters, water treatment effluent, and in public and private wells in Minnesota at up to low mg/l concentrations. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of PFBA in rats, mice, monkeys, and humans to provide a rati...

  6. Development of a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for dermal permeability for lindane.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Megan E; Evans, Marina V; Wilson, Charles A; Beesley, Lauren J; Leon, Lider S; Eklund, Chris R; Croom, Edward L; Pegram, Rex A

    2016-03-14

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficients using human kinetic data obtained from in vitro and in vivo experimentation as well as a default compound-specific calculation based on physicochemical characteristics used in the absence of kinetic data. A dermal model was developed to describe lindane diffusion into the skin, where the skin compartment consisted of homogeneous dermal tissue. This study utilized Fick's law of diffusion along with chemical binding to protein and lipids to determine appropriate dermal absorption parameters which were then incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe in vivo kinetics. The estimation of permeability coefficients using chemical binding in combination with in vivo data demonstrates the advantages of combining physiochemical properties with a PBPK model to predict dermal absorption.

  7. Mixed-effects modelling of the interspecies pharmacokinetic scaling of pegylated human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Jolling, Koen; Perez Ruixo, Juan Jose; Hemeryck, Alex; Vermeulen, An; Greway, Tony

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model for interspecies allometric scaling of pegylated r-HuEPO (PEG-EPO) pharmacokinetics to man. A total of 927 serum concentrations from 193 rats, 6 rabbits, 34 monkeys, and 9 dogs obtained after a single dose of PEG-EPO, administered by the i.v. (dose range: 12.5-550 microg/kg) and s.c. (dose range: 12.5-500 microg/kg) routes, were pooled in this analysis. An open two-compartment model with first-order absorption and lag time (Tlag) and linear elimination from the central compartment was fitted to the data using the NONMEM V software. Body weight (WT) was used as a scaling factor and the effect of brain weight (BW), sex, and pregnancy status on the pharmacokinetic parameters was investigated. The final model was evaluated by means of a non-parametric bootstrap analysis and used to predict the PEG-EPO pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects. The systemic clearance (CL) in males was estimated to be 4.08WT1.030xBW-0.345 ml/h. In females, the CL was 90.7% of the CL in males. The volumes of the central (Vc) and the peripheral (Vp) compartment were characterized as 57.8WT0.959 ml, and 48.1WT1.150 ml, respectively. Intercompartmental flow was estimated at 2.32WT0.930 ml/h. Absorption rate constant (Ka) was estimated at 0.0538WT-0.149. The absolute s.c. bioavailability F was calculated at 52.5, 80.2, and 49.4% in rat, monkey, and dog, respectively. The interindividual variability in the population pharmacokinetic parameters was fairly low (<35%). Non-parametric bootstrap confirmed the accuracy of the NONMEM estimates. The mean model predicted pharmacokinetic parameters in healthy male subjects of 70 kg were estimated at: CL: 26.2 ml/h; Vc: 3.6l; Q: 286 l/h; Vp: 6.9l, and Ka: 0.031 h-1. The population pharmacokinetic model developed was appropriate to describe the time course of PEG-EPO serum concentrations and their variability in different species. The model predicted pharmacokinetics of PEG

  8. AN EXAMPLE OF MODEL STRUCTURE DIFFERENCES USING SENSITIVITY ANALYSES IN PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial chemical and an environmental contaminant. TCE and its metabolites may be carcinogenic and affect human health. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models that differ in compartmentalization are developed for TCE metabo...

  9. Cannabinoids in late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aia; van der Marck, M A; van den Elsen, Gah; Olde Rikkert, Mgm

    2015-06-01

    Given the lack of effective treatments for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and the substantial burden on patients, families, health care systems, and economies, finding an effective therapy is one of the highest medical priorities. The past few years have seen a growing interest in the medicinal uses of cannabinoids, the bioactive components of the cannabis plant, including the treatment of LOAD and other physical conditions that are common in older people. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids can reduce oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the key hallmarks of LOAD. In addition, in population-based studies, cannabinoids reduced dementia-related symptoms (e.g., behavioral disturbances). The current article provides an overview of the potential of cannabinoids in the treatment of LOAD and related neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people. We also discuss the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of cannabinoid-based drugs in older people with dementia. PMID:25788394

  10. Current Knowledge on Cannabinoids in Oral Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dayong; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is a new biological matrix for clinical and forensic drug testing, offering non-invasive and directly observable sample collection reducing adulteration potential, ease of multiple sample collections, lower biohazard risk during collection, recent exposure identification, and stronger correlation with blood than urine concentrations. Because cannabinoids are usually the most prevalent analytes in illicit drug testing, application of OF drug testing requires sufficient scientific data to support sensitive and specific OF cannabinoid detection. This review presents current knowledge on OF cannabinoids, evaluating pharmacokinetic properties, detection windows, and correlation with other biological matrices and impairment from field applications and controlled drug administration studies. In addition, on-site screening technologies, confirmatory analytical methods, drug stability, and effects of sample collection procedure, adulterants, and passive environmental exposure are reviewed. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol OF concentrations could be > 1000 μg/L shortly after smoking, whereas minor cannabinoids are detected at 10-fold and metabolites at 1000-fold lower concentrations. OF research over the past decade demonstrated that appropriate interpretation of test results requires a comprehensive understanding of distinct elimination profiles and detection windows for different cannabinoids, which are influenced by administration route, dose, and drug use history. Thus, each drug testing program should establish cutoff criteria, collection/analysis procedures, and storage conditions tailored to its purposes. Building a scientific basis for OF testing is on-going, with continuing OF cannabinoids research on passive environmental exposure, drug use history, donor physiological conditions, and oral cavity metabolism needed to better understand mechanisms of cannabinoid OF disposition and expand OF drug testing applicability. PMID:23983217

  11. Human plasma concentrations of herbicidal carbamate molinate extrapolated from the pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masanao; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Nishiyama, Sayako; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    To predict concentrations in humans of the herbicidal carbamate molinate, used exclusively in rice cultivation, a forward dosimetry approach was carried out using data from lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses orally administered to rats, wild type mice, and chimeric mice with humanized liver and from in vitro human and rodent experiments. Human liver microsomes preferentially mediated hydroxylation of molinate, but rat livers additionally produced molinate sulfoxide and an unidentified metabolite. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents for molinate and its primary sulfoxide from animal studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and human metabolic data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The slower disposition of molinate and accumulation of molinate sulfoxide in humans were estimated by modeling after single and multiple doses compared with elimination in rodents. The results from simplified PBPK modeling in combination with chimeric mice with humanized liver suggest that ratios of estimated parameters of molinate sulfoxide exposure in humans to those in rats were three times as many as general safety factor of 10 for species difference in toxicokinetics. Thus, careful regulatory decision is needed when evaluating the human risk resulting from exposure to low doses of molinate and related carbamates based on data obtained from rats. PMID:25016177

  12. Human plasma concentrations of herbicidal carbamate molinate extrapolated from the pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masanao; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Nishiyama, Sayako; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    To predict concentrations in humans of the herbicidal carbamate molinate, used exclusively in rice cultivation, a forward dosimetry approach was carried out using data from lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses orally administered to rats, wild type mice, and chimeric mice with humanized liver and from in vitro human and rodent experiments. Human liver microsomes preferentially mediated hydroxylation of molinate, but rat livers additionally produced molinate sulfoxide and an unidentified metabolite. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents for molinate and its primary sulfoxide from animal studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and human metabolic data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The slower disposition of molinate and accumulation of molinate sulfoxide in humans were estimated by modeling after single and multiple doses compared with elimination in rodents. The results from simplified PBPK modeling in combination with chimeric mice with humanized liver suggest that ratios of estimated parameters of molinate sulfoxide exposure in humans to those in rats were three times as many as general safety factor of 10 for species difference in toxicokinetics. Thus, careful regulatory decision is needed when evaluating the human risk resulting from exposure to low doses of molinate and related carbamates based on data obtained from rats.

  13. Pharmacokinetic studies of the fragrance compound 1,8-cineol in humans during inhalation.

    PubMed

    Jäger, W; Nasel, B; Nasel, C; Binder, R; Stimpfl, T; Vycudilik, W; Buchbauer, G

    1996-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the pharmacokinetics of 1,8-cineol in human subjects during prolonged inhalation. The results showed that 1,8-cineol is well absorbed from breathing air, with a peak plasma concentration after approximately 18 min. The elimination of this fragrance compound from the blood is biphasic, with a mean distribution half-life of 6.7 min and an elimination half-life of 104.6 min.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity of a recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase bioscavenger in macaques following intravenous and pulmonary delivery.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Yvonne J; Adams, Robert J; Hernandez-Abanto, Segundo; Jiang, Xiaoming; Sun, Wei; Mao, Lingjun; Lee, K David

    2015-12-01

    Recombinant (r) and native butyrylcholinesterse (BChE) are potent bioscavengers of organophosphates (OPs) such as nerve agents and pesticides and are undergoing development as antidotal treatments for OP-induced toxicity. Because of the lethal properties of such agents, regulatory approval will require extensive testing under the Animal Rule. However, human (Hu) glycoprotein biologicals, such as BChE, present a challenge for assessing immunogenicity and efficacy in heterologous animal models since any immune responses to the small species differences in amino acids or glycans between the host and biologic may alter pharmacodynamics and preclude accurate efficacy testing; possibly underestimating their potential protective value in humans. To establish accurate pharmacokinetic and efficacy data, an homologous animal model has been developed in which native and PEGylated forms of CHO-derived rMaBChE were multiply injected into homologous macaques with no induction of antibody. These now serve as controls for assessing the pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity in macaques of multiple administrations of PEGylated and unmodified human rBChE (rHuBChE) by both intravenous (IV) and pulmonary routes. The results indicate that, except for maximal concentration (Cmax), the pharmacokinetic parameters following IV injection with heterologous PEG-rHuBChE were greatly reduced even after the first injection compared with homologous PEG-rMaBChE. Anti-HuBChE antibody responses were induced in all monkeys after the second and third administrations regardless of the route of delivery; impacting rates of clearance and usually resulting in reduced endogenous MaBChE activity. These data highlight the difficulties inherent in assessing pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity in animal models, but bode well for the efficacy and safety of rHuBChE pretreatments in homologous humans. PMID:26415620

  15. Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of 1,4-Dioxane in Rats, Mice, and Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Lisa M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Poet, Torka S.; Corley, Rick; Weber, Thomas J.; Locey, B. J.; Clarkson, Jacquelyn; Sager, S.; Gargas, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1,4-Dioxane (CAS No. 123-91-1) is used primarily as a solvent or as a solvent stabilizer. It can cause lung, liver and kidney damage at sufficiently high exposure levels. Two physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of 1,4-dioxane and its major metabolite, hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (HEAA), were published in 1990. These models have uncertainties and deficiencies that could be addressed and the model strengthened for use in a contemporary cancer risk assessment for 1,4-dioxane. Studies were performed to fill data gaps and reduce uncertainties pertaining to the pharmacokinetics of 1,4-dioxane and HEAA in rats, mice, and humans. Three types of studies were performed:partition coefficient measurements, blood time course in mice, and in vitro pharmacokinetics using rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes. Updated PBPK models were developed based on these new data and previously available data. The optimized rate of metabolism for the mouse was significantly higher than the value previously estimated. The optimized rat kinetic parameters were similar to those in the 1990 models. Only two human studies were identified. Model predictions were consistent with one study, but did not fit the second as well. In addition, a rat nasal exposure was completed. The results confirmed water directly contacts rat nasal tissues during drinking water under bioassays. Consistent with previous PBPK models, nasal tissues were not specifically included in the model. Use of these models will reduce the uncertainty in future 1,4-dioxane risk assessments.

  16. Synthetic cathinone pharmacokinetics, analytical methods, and toxicological findings from human performance and postmortem cases.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kayla N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic cathinones are commonly abused novel psychoactive substances (NPS). We present a comprehensive systematic review addressing in vitro and in vivo synthetic cathinone pharmacokinetics, analytical methods for detection and quantification in biological matrices, and toxicological findings from human performance and postmortem toxicology cases. Few preclinical administration studies examined synthetic cathinone pharmacokinetic profiles (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion), and only one investigated metabolite pharmacokinetics. Synthetic cathinone metabolic profiling studies, primarily with human liver microsomes, elucidated metabolite structures and identified suitable biomarkers to extend detection windows beyond those provided by parent compounds. Generally, cathinone derivatives underwent ketone reduction, carbonylation of the pyrrolidine ring, and oxidative reactions, with phase II metabolites also detected. Reliable analytical methods are necessary for cathinone identification in biological matrices to document intake and link adverse events to specific compounds and concentrations. NPS analytical methods are constrained in their ability to detect new emerging synthetic cathinones due to limited commercially available reference standards and continuous development of new analogs. Immunoassay screening methods are especially affected, but also gas-chromatography and liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry confirmation methods. Non-targeted high-resolution-mass spectrometry screening methods are advantageous, as they allow for retrospective data analysis and easier addition of new synthetic cathinones to existing methods. Lack of controlled administration studies in humans complicate interpretation of synthetic cathinones in biological matrices, as dosing information is typically unknown. Furthermore, antemortem and postmortem concentrations often overlap and the presence of other psychoactive substances are typically found in combination

  17. Validation of Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Vinyl Acetate Against Human Nasal Dosimetry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hinderliter, Paul M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Corley, Rick A.; Bloemen, Louis J.; Bogdanffy, M S.

    2005-05-01

    Vinyl acetate has been shown to induce nasal lesions in rodents in inhalation bioassays. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for vinyl acetate has been used in human risk assessment, but previous in vivo validation was conducted only in rats. Controlled human exposures to vinyl acetate were conducted to provide validation data for the application of the model in humans. Five volunteers were exposed to 1, 5, and 10 ppm 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate via inhalation. A probe inserted into thenasopharyngeal region sampled both 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate and the major metabolite 13 C1 , 13 C2 acetaldehyde during rest and light exercise. Nasopharyngeal air concentrations were analyzed in real time by ion trap mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Experimental concentrations of both vinyl acetate and acetaldehyde were then compared to predicted concentrations calculated from the previously published human model. Model predictions of vinyl acetate nasal extraction compared favorably with measured values of vinyl acetate, as did predictions of nasopharyngeal acetaldehyde when compared to measured acetaldehyde. The results showed that the current PBPK model structure and parameterization are appropriate for vinyl acetate. These analyses were conducted from 1 to 10 ppm vinyl acetate, a range relevant to workplace exposure standards but which would not be expected to saturate vinyl acetate metabolism. Risk assessment based on this model further concluded that 24 h per day exposures up to 1 ppm do not present concern regarding cancer or non-cancer toxicity. Validation of the vinyl acetate human PBPK model provides support for these conclusions.

  18. Nontargeted SWATH acquisition for identifying 47 synthetic cannabinoid metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography-high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheidweiler, Karl B; Jarvis, Michael J Y; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-01-01

    Clandestine laboratories constantly produce new synthetic cannabinoids to circumvent legislative scheduling efforts, challenging and complicating toxicological analysis. Sundstrom et al. (Anal Bioanal Chem 405(26):8463-8474, [9]) and Kronstrand et al. (Anal Bioanal Chem 406(15):3599-3609, [10]) published nontargeted liquid chromatography, high-resolution, quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometric (LC-QTOF) assays with validated detection of 18 and 38 urinary synthetic cannabinoid metabolites, respectively. We developed and validated a LC-QTOF urine method for simultaneously identifying the most current 47 synthetic cannabinoid metabolites from 21 synthetic cannabinoid families (5-fluoro AB-PINACA, 5-fluoro-AKB48, 5-fluoro PB-22, AB-PINACA, ADB-PINACA, AKB48, AM2201, JWH-018, JWH-019, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-200, JWH-210, JWH-250, JWH-398, MAM2201, PB-22, RCS-4, UR-144, and XLR11). β-Glucuronidase-hydrolyzed urine was extracted with 1-mL Biotage SLE+ columns. Specimens were reconstituted in 150-μL mobile phase consisting of 80% A (0.1% formic acid in water) and 20% B (0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile). Fifty microliters was injected, and SWATH™ MS data were acquired in positive electrospray mode. The LC-QTOF instrument consisted of a Shimadzu UFLCxr system and an ABSciex 5600+ TripleTOF® mass spectrometer. Gradient chromatographic separation was achieved with a Restek Ultra Biphenyl column with a 0.5-mL/min flow rate and an overall run time of 15 min. Identification criteria included molecular ion mass error, isotopic profiles, retention time, and library fit criteria. Limits of detection were 0.25-5 μg/L (N = 10 unique fortified urine samples), except for two PB-22 metabolites with limits of 10 and 20 μg/L. Extraction efficiencies and matrix effects (N = 10) were 55-104 and -65-107%, respectively. We present a highly useful novel LC-QTOF method for simultaneously confirming 47 synthetic cannabinoid metabolites in human urine.

  19. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia. PMID:26539529

  20. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia.

  1. Synthetic cannabinoids and potential reproductive consequences

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofei; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2013-01-01

    Increases in emergency room visits due to abuse of designer drugs, popularly known by the street names “K2” and “Spice,” are a cause for social, judicial, and clinical concerns. The psychoactive components in these herbal drugs mainly consist of different synthetic cannabinoids, and users of these street drugs are primarily within the age group of 12 to 20 years old. The abusive use of synthetic cannabinoids results in anxiety, nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, elevated blood pressure, tremors, seizures, hallucinations, and paranoid behavior, but the effects of maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids during pregnancy are ambiguous due to limited studies in humans and a relative short history of the drugs. In this review, we discuss the known and potential adverse effects of synthetic cannabinoids on human pregnancy using knowledge gathered from studies in mice and limited studies in humans. In mice, multiple sites and stages of pregnancy are potential targets of synthetic cannabinoids, including preimplantation embryo development, oviductal embryo transport, implantation, placentation, and parturition. It is anticipated that maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids would result in severely compromised female fertility and pregnancy outcome. PMID:23827241

  2. [Pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody in human body].

    PubMed

    Li, Yunchun; Tan, Tianzhi; Mo, Tingshu; Lu, Wusheng; Deng, Houfu; Yang, Xiaochuan; Li, Xiao

    2007-08-01

    To study pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody (hepatoma monoclonal antibody HAb18 F(ab')2) in vivo. 24 cases of primary hepatocelluar carcinoma (PHC) were equally divided into the low dose group, middle dose group and high dose group. After the relevant injection was administrated into the hepatic artery of each case, intravenous blood and urine samples were separately collected at different time for determination of the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)). The proportion of 131I-HAb18 F(ab')2 in serum of each blood sample was determined, and the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)) of druggery for each blood sample was revised according to the proportion. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using DAS ver 1.0 (Drug And Statistics for Windows) program. The component of urine radiomaterial was determined and the percentages of urine radioactivity in administration dosage were calculated. The catabolism of the injection with time accorded with dynamics two-compartment model. The catabolism product was mainly free-131I and was excreted via kidney; the urine radioactivity was 47.70%-51.16% of administration dosage during 120 h after administration of drug. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics of the injection can satisfy the clinical demands. The drug dose recommended for clinical use was 27.75 MBq of the injection for each kg of human body.

  3. Prediction of human pharmacokinetics using physiologically based modeling: a retrospective analysis of 26 clinically tested drugs.

    PubMed

    De Buck, Stefan S; Sinha, Vikash K; Fenu, Luca A; Nijsen, Marjoleen J; Mackie, Claire E; Gilissen, Ron A H J

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate different physiologically based modeling strategies for the prediction of human pharmacokinetics. Plasma profiles after intravenous and oral dosing were simulated for 26 clinically tested drugs. Two mechanism-based predictions of human tissue-to-plasma partitioning (P(tp)) from physicochemical input (method Vd1) were evaluated for their ability to describe human volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)). This method was compared with a strategy that combined predicted and experimentally determined in vivo rat P(tp) data (method Vd2). Best V(ss) predictions were obtained using method Vd2, providing that rat P(tp) input was corrected for interspecies differences in plasma protein binding (84% within 2-fold). V(ss) predictions from physicochemical input alone were poor (32% within 2-fold). Total body clearance (CL) was predicted as the sum of scaled rat renal clearance and hepatic clearance projected from in vitro metabolism data. Best CL predictions were obtained by disregarding both blood and microsomal or hepatocyte binding (method CL2, 74% within 2-fold), whereas strong bias was seen using both blood and microsomal or hepatocyte binding (method CL1, 53% within 2-fold). The physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) model, which combined methods Vd2 and CL2 yielded the most accurate predictions of in vivo terminal half-life (69% within 2-fold). The Gastroplus advanced compartmental absorption and transit model was used to construct an absorption-disposition model and provided accurate predictions of area under the plasma concentration-time profile, oral apparent volume of distribution, and maximum plasma concentration after oral dosing, with 74%, 70%, and 65% within 2-fold, respectively. This evaluation demonstrates that PBPK models can lead to reasonable predictions of human pharmacokinetics. PMID:17620347

  4. Disposition and pharmacokinetics of the antimigraine drug, rizatriptan, in humans.

    PubMed

    Vyas, K P; Halpin, R A; Geer, L A; Ellis, J D; Liu, L; Cheng, H; Chavez-Eng, C; Matuszewski, B K; Varga, S L; Guiblin, A R; Rogers, J D

    2000-01-01

    The absorption and disposition of rizatriptan (MK-0462, Maxalt(TM)), a selective 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist used in the treatment of migraine headaches, was investigated in humans. In a two-period, single i.v. (3 mg, 30-min infusion), and single oral (10 mg) dose study with [(14)C]rizatriptan in six healthy human males, total recovery of radioactivity was approximately 94%, with unchanged rizatriptan and its metabolites being excreted mainly in the urine (89% i.v. dose, 82% p.o. dose). Approximately 26 and 14% of i.v. and oral rizatriptan doses, respectively, were excreted in urine as intact parent drug. In a second, high-dose study (60 mg p.o.), five metabolites excreted into urine were identified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and NMR methods. They were triazolomethyl-indole-3-acetic acid, rizatriptan-N(10)-oxide, 6-hydroxy-rizatriptan, 6-hydroxy-rizatriptan sulfate, and N(10)-monodesmethyl-rizatriptan. Urinary excretion of triazolomethyl-indole-3-acetic acid after i.v. and oral administrations of rizatriptan accounted for 35 and 51% of the dose, respectively, whereas the corresponding values for rizatriptan-N(10)-oxide were 4 and 2% of the dose. Plasma clearance (CL) and renal clearance (CL(r)) were 1325 and 349 ml/min, respectively, after i.v. administration. A similar CL(r) value was obtained after oral administration (396 ml/min). The primary route of rizatriptan elimination occurred via nonrenal route(s) (i.e., metabolism) because the CL(r) of rizatriptan accounted for 25% of total CL. Furthermore, the CL(r) was higher than normal glomerular filtration rate ( approximately 130 ml/min), indicating that this compound was actively secreted by renal tubules. The absorption of rizatriptan was approximately 90%, but it experienced a moderate first-pass effect, resulting in a bioavailability estimate of 47%. PMID:10611145

  5. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling To Determine the Dose of ST-246 To Protect against Smallpox in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Leeds, Janet M.; Fenneteau, Frederique; Gosselin, Nathalie H.; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Kassir, Nastya; Marier, J. F.; Chen, Yali; Grosenbach, Doug; Frimm, Annie E.; Honeychurch, Kady M.; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R.; Jordan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Although smallpox has been eradicated, the United States government considers it a “material threat” and has funded the discovery and development of potential therapeutic compounds. As reported here, the human efficacious dose for one of these compounds, ST-246, was determined using efficacy studies in nonhuman primates (NHPs), together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis that predicted the appropriate dose and exposure levels to provide therapeutic benefit in humans. The efficacy analysis combined the data from studies conducted at three separate facilities that evaluated treatment following infection with a closely related virus, monkeypox virus (MPXV), in a total of 96 NHPs. The effect of infection on ST-246 pharmacokinetics in NHPs was applied to humans using population pharmacokinetic models. Exposure at the selected human dose of 600 mg is more than 4-fold higher than the lowest efficacious dose in NHPs and is predicted to provide protection to more than 95% of the population. PMID:23254433

  6. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to determine the dose of ST-246 to protect against smallpox in humans.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Janet M; Fenneteau, Frederique; Gosselin, Nathalie H; Mouksassi, Mohamad-Samer; Kassir, Nastya; Marier, J F; Chen, Yali; Grosenbach, Doug; Frimm, Annie E; Honeychurch, Kady M; Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Although smallpox has been eradicated, the United States government considers it a "material threat" and has funded the discovery and development of potential therapeutic compounds. As reported here, the human efficacious dose for one of these compounds, ST-246, was determined using efficacy studies in nonhuman primates (NHPs), together with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis that predicted the appropriate dose and exposure levels to provide therapeutic benefit in humans. The efficacy analysis combined the data from studies conducted at three separate facilities that evaluated treatment following infection with a closely related virus, monkeypox virus (MPXV), in a total of 96 NHPs. The effect of infection on ST-246 pharmacokinetics in NHPs was applied to humans using population pharmacokinetic models. Exposure at the selected human dose of 600 mg is more than 4-fold higher than the lowest efficacious dose in NHPs and is predicted to provide protection to more than 95% of the population.

  7. Binding affinity and agonist activity of putative endogenous cannabinoids at the human neocortical CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Marc; Zentner, Josef; Honegger, Jürgen; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the affinity of putative endocannabinoids (2-arachidonylglycerol, 2-AG; noladin ether, virodhamine) for the human neocortical CB1 receptor. Functional activity of these compounds (including anandamide, AEA) was determined by examining basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation. Assays were performed with synaptosomes, prepared from fresh human neocortical tissue. Receptor affinity was assessed from competition binding experiments with the CB1/2 agonist [3H]-CP55.940 in absence or presence of a protease inhibitor to assess enzymatic stability. Noladin ether and virodhamine inhibited [3H]-CP55.940 binding (Ki: 98, 1740 nM, respectively). Protease inhibition decreased the Ki value of virodhamine (Ki: 912 nM), but left that of noladin ether unchanged. 2-AG almost lacked affinity (Ki lymphoblasic )10 microM). Basal cAMP formation was unaffected by AEA and noladin ether, but strongly enhanced by 2-AG and virodhamine. Forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation was inhibited by AEA and noladin ether (IC50: 69, 427 nM, respectively) to the same extent as by CP55.940 (Imax each approximately 30%). Inhibitions by AEA or noladin ether were blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. Virodhamine increased forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation, also in presence of AM251, by approximately 20%. 2-AG had no effect; in presence of AM251, however, 10 microM 2-AG stimulated cAMP formation by approximately 15%. Our results suggest, that AEA and noladin ether are full CB1 receptor agonists in human neocortex, whereas virodhamine may act as a CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Particularly the (patho)physiological role of 2-AG should be further investigated, since its CB1 receptor affinity and agonist activity especially in humans might be lower than generally assumed. PMID:15588725

  8. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  9. Impact of Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Endocannabinoids in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Caroline; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laviolette, Michel; Flamand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Since the identification of cannabinoid receptors in the 1990s, a research field has been dedicated to exploring the role of the cannabinoid system in immunity and the inflammatory response in human tissues and animal models. Although the cannabinoid system is present and crucial in many human tissues, studying the impact of cannabinoids on the lungs is particularly relevant because of their contact with exogenous cannabinoids in the context of marijuana consumption. In the past two decades, the scientific community has gathered a large body of evidence supporting that the activation of the cannabinoid system alleviates pain and reduces inflammation. In the context of lung inflammation, exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids have shown therapeutic potential because of their inhibitory effects on immune cell recruitment and functions. On the other hand, cannabinoids were shown to be deleterious to lung function and to impact respiratory pathogen clearance. In this review, we present the existing data on the regulation of lung immunity and inflammation by phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids and endocannabinoids. PMID:27695418

  10. Impact of Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Endocannabinoids in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Caroline; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laviolette, Michel; Flamand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Since the identification of cannabinoid receptors in the 1990s, a research field has been dedicated to exploring the role of the cannabinoid system in immunity and the inflammatory response in human tissues and animal models. Although the cannabinoid system is present and crucial in many human tissues, studying the impact of cannabinoids on the lungs is particularly relevant because of their contact with exogenous cannabinoids in the context of marijuana consumption. In the past two decades, the scientific community has gathered a large body of evidence supporting that the activation of the cannabinoid system alleviates pain and reduces inflammation. In the context of lung inflammation, exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids have shown therapeutic potential because of their inhibitory effects on immune cell recruitment and functions. On the other hand, cannabinoids were shown to be deleterious to lung function and to impact respiratory pathogen clearance. In this review, we present the existing data on the regulation of lung immunity and inflammation by phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids and endocannabinoids.

  11. Simultaneous LC-MS/MS determination of JWH-210, RCS-4, ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and their main metabolites in pig and human serum, whole blood, and urine for comparing pharmacokinetic data.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nadine; Kettner, Mattias; Laschke, Matthias W; Schlote, Julia; Peters, Benjamin; Bregel, Dietmar; Menger, Michael D; Maurer, Hans H; Ewald, Andreas H; Schmidt, Peter H

    2015-05-01

    A series of new synthetic cannabinoids (SC) has been consumed without any toxicological testing. For example, pharmacokinetic data have to be collected from forensic toxicological case work and/or animal studies. To develop a corresponding model for assessing such data, samples of controlled pig studies with two selected SC (JWH-210, RCS-4) and, as reference, ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) should be analyzed as well as those of human cases. Therefore, a method for determination of JWH-210, RCS-4, THC, and their main metabolites in pig and human serum, whole blood, and urine samples is presented. Specimens were analyzed by liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and multiple-reaction monitoring with three transitions per compound. Full validation was carried out for the pig specimens and cross-validation for the human specimens concerning precision and bias. For the pig studies, the limits of detection were between 0.05 and 0.50 ng/mL in serum and whole blood and between 0.05 and 1.0 ng/mL in urine, the lower limits of quantification between 0.25 and 1.0 ng/mL in serum and 0.50 and 2.0 ng/mL in whole blood and urine, and the intra- and interday precision values lower than 15% and bias values within ±15%. The applicability was tested with samples taken from a pharmacokinetic pilot study with pigs following intravenous administration of a mixture of 200 μg/kg body mass dose each of JWH-210, RCS-4, and THC. The cross-validation data for human serum, whole blood, and urine showed that this approach should also be suitable for human specimens, e.g., of clinical or forensic cases. PMID:25772567

  12. A comparative review of the pharmacokinetics of boric acid in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Murray, F J

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of boric acid (BA) have been studied in animals and humans. Orally administered BA is readily and completely absorbed in rats, rabbits, and humans, as well as other animal species. In animals and humans, absorbed BA appears to be rapidly distributed throughout the body water via passive diffusion. Following administration of BA, the ratio of blood: soft tissue concentrations of boron (B) is approx 1.0 in rats and humans; in contrast, concentrations of B in bone exceed those in blood by a factor of approx 4 in both rats and humans. In rats, adipose tissue concentrations of B are only 20% of the levels found in blood and soft tissues; however, human data on adipose tissue levels are not available. BA does not appear to be metabolized in either animals or humans owing to the excessive energy required to break the B-O bond. BA has an affinity for cis-hydroxy groups, and it has been hypothesized to elicit its biological activity through this mechanism. The elimination kinetics of BA also appear to be similar for rodents and humans. BA is eliminated unchanged in the urine. The kinetics of elimination were evaluated in human volunteers given BA orally or intravenously; the half-life for elimination was essentially the same (approx 21 h) by either route of exposure. In rats, blood and tissue levels of B reached steady-state after 3-4 d of oral administration of BA; assuming first-order kinetics, a half-life of 14-19 h may be calculated. The lack of metabolism of BA eliminates metabolic clearance as a potential source of interspecies variation. Accordingly, in the absence of differences in metabolic clearance, renal clearance is expected to be the major determinant of interspecies variation in pharmacokinetics. Because glomerular filtration rates are slightly higher in rats than in humans, the slight difference in half-lives may be readily explained. The most sensitive toxicity end point for BA appears to be developmental toxicity in rats, with a No

  13. From mouse to man: predictions of human pharmacokinetics of orally administered docetaxel from preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Koolen, S L W; van Waterschoot, R A B; van Tellingen, O; Schinkel, A H; Beijnen, J H; Schellens, J H M; Huitema, A D R

    2012-03-01

    Intravenously administered docetaxel is approved for the treatment of various types of cancer. An oral regimen, in combination with ritonavir, is being evaluated in clinical trials. The pharmacokinetics of docetaxel are determined by the activity of the metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) and the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The effects of these proteins on the pharmacokinetics of docetaxel were investigated in different mouse models that lack 1 or both detoxifying systems. Docetaxel was given to these mice orally or intravenously with or without a strong CYP3A inhibitor, ritonavir. The data of these 2 preclinical studies were pooled and analyzed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. The results of the preclinical studies could be integrated successfully, with only a small difference in residual error (33% and 26%, respectively). Subsequently, the model was used to predict human exposure using allometric scaling and this was compared with clinical trial data. This model led to adequate predictions of docetaxel exposure in humans.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of PEGylated recombinant human endostatin (M2ES) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zuo-gang; Jia, Lin; Guo, Li-fang; Yu, Min; Sun, Xu; Nie, Wen; Fu, Yan; Rao, Chun-ming; Wang, Jun-zhi; Luo, Yong-zhang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: M2ES is PEGylated recombinant human endostatin. In this study we investigated the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and excretion of M2ES in rats. Methods: 125I-radiolabeled M2ES was administered to rats by intravenous bolus injection at 3 mg/kg. The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion of M2ES were investigated using the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation method. Results: The serum M2ES concentration-time curve after a single intravenous dose of 3 mg/kg in rats was fitted with a non-compartment model. The pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated as follows: Cmax=28.3 μg·equ/mL, t1/2=71.5 h, AUC(0–∞)=174.6 μg·equ·h/mL, Cl=17.2 mL·h−1·kg−1, MRT=57.6 h, and Vss=989.8 mL/kg for the total radioactivity; Cmax=30.3 μg·equ/mL, t1/2=60.1 h, AUC(0–∞)=146.2 μg·equ·h/mL, Cl=20.6 mL·h−1·kg−1, MRT=47.4 h, and Vss=974.6 mL/kg for the TCA precipitate radioactivity. M2ES was rapidly and widely distributed in various tissues and showed substantial deposition in kidney, adrenal gland, lung, spleen, bladder and liver. The radioactivity recovered in the urine and feces by 432 h post-dose was 71.3% and 8.3%, respectively. Only 0.98% of radioactivity was excreted in the bile by 24 h post-dose. Conclusion: PEG modification substantially prolongs the circulation time of recombinant human endostatin and effectively improves its pharmacokinetic behavior. M2ES is extensively distributed in most tissues of rats, including kidney, adrenal gland, lung, spleen, bladder and liver. Urinary excretion was the major elimination route for M2ES. PMID:26027657

  15. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum,...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum,...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum,...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum,...

  19. Clinical pharmacokinetics of cidofovir in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cundy, K C; Petty, B G; Flaherty, J; Fisher, P E; Polis, M A; Wachsman, M; Lietman, P S; Lalezari, J P; Hitchcock, M J; Jaffe, H S

    1995-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cidofovir (HPMPC; (S)-1-[3-hydroxy-2-(phosphonylmethoxy)propyl]cytosine) were examined at five dose levels in three phase I/II studies in a total of 42 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients (with or without asymptomatic cytomegalovirus infection). Levels of cidofovir in serum following intravenous infusion were dose proportional over the dose range of 1.0 to 10.0 mg/kg of body weight and declined biexponentially with an overall mean +/- standard deviation terminal half-life of 2.6 +/- 1.2 h (n = 25). Approximately 90% of the intravenous dose was recovered unchanged in the urine in 24 h. The overall mean +/- standard deviation total clearance of the drug from serum (148 +/- 25 ml/h/kg; n = 25) approximated renal clearance (129 +/- 42 ml/h/kg; n = 25), which was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than the baseline creatinine clearance in the same patients (83 +/- 21 ml/h/kg; n = 12). These data indicate that active tubular secretion played a significant role in the clearance of cidofovir. The steady-state volume of distribution of cidofovir was approximately 500 ml/kg, suggesting that the drug was distributed in total body water. Repeated dosing with cidofovir at 3.0 and 10.0 mg/kg/week did not alter the pharmacokinetics of the drug. Concomitant administration of intravenous cidofovir and oral probenecid to hydrated patients had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of cidofovir at a 3.0-mg/kg dose. At higher cidofovir doses, probenecid appeared to block tubular secretion of cidofovir and reduce its renal clearance to a level approaching glomerular filtration. PMID:7574510

  20. Chiral Plasma Pharmacokinetics of 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine and its Phase I and II Metabolites following Controlled Administration to Humans.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Andrea E; Schmidhauser, Corina; Schmid, Yasmin; Rickli, Anna; Liechti, Matthias E; Kraemer, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Generally, pharmacokinetic studies on 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in blood have been performed after conjugate cleavage, without taking into account that phase II metabolites represent distinct chemical entities with their own effects and stereoselective pharmacokinetics. The aim of the present study was to stereoselectively investigate the pharmacokinetics of intact glucuronide and sulfate metabolites of MDMA in blood plasma after a controlled single MDMA dose. Plasma samples from 16 healthy participants receiving 125 mg of MDMA orally in a controlled study were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy after chiral derivatization. Pharmacokinetic parameters of R- and S-stereoisomers were determined. Sulfates of 3,4-dihydroxymethamphetamine (DHMA), and sulfate and glucuronide of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxymethamphetamine (HMMA) were identified, whereas free phase I metabolites were not detected. Stereoselective differences in Cmax and AUC24 were observed with the following preferences: R>S for MDMA and DHMA 4-sulfate; S>R for 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), DHMA 3-sulfate, and HMMA glucuronide; and no preference in Cmax for HMMA sulfate. R/S ratios were >1 for all analytes after 24 hours, independent of the initial chiral preference. These are the first data on chiral pharmacokinetics of MDMA phase II metabolites in human plasma in vivo after controlled administration. The main human MDMA metabolites were shown to be sulfate and glucuronide conjugates. PMID:26395866

  1. 76 FR 71351 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Cannabinoid(s) and Cannabidiol(s) Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... practice the invention embodied in U.S. Patent 6,630,507, entitled ``Cannabinoids as antioxidants and... ``Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants'' to KannaLife Sciences Inc., which has offices in New York... antioxidants and neuroprotectants for use and delivery in humans, for the treatment of hepatic...

  2. Determination of flurbiprofen in human plasma by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and its pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Bilal; Sahin, Huseyin; Akba, Vedat; Erdem, Ali Fuat

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a GCIMS method for the determination of flurbiprofen in human plasma. Flurbiprofen and internal standard ibuprofen were extracted from plasma by using a liquid-liquid extraction method. Derivatization was carried out using N-Methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide. The calibration curve was linear between the concentration range of 0.10 and 5.0 microg/mL. Intraday and interday precision values for flurbiprofen in plasma were less than 5.49%, and accuracy (relative error) was better than 5.33%. The extraction recoveries of flurbiprofen from human plasma were between 93.6 and 98.6%. The LOD and LOQ of flurbiprofen were 0.03 and 0.10 microg/mL, respectively. This assay was applied to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of flurbiprofen in healthy Turkish volunteers who had been given 100 mg of flurbiprofen.

  3. Determination of phenazopyridine in human plasma by GC-MS and its pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai-jun; Chen, Qin-hua; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhou, Peng; Li, Peng; Liu, Jia; Zhu, Jun

    2008-09-01

    A sensitive, selective, and simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method is developed for quantitation of phenazopyridine (PAP) in human plasma using internal standard (diazepam). PAP and IS are extracted from plasma by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed on a DB-5MS column with mass selective detector. Excellent linearity is found between 5-500 ng/mL (r = 0.9992, n = 7) for PAP in human plasma. The limit of detection is 0.3 ng/mL. Intra- and Inter-day precisions expressed as the relative standard deviation for the method are 1.37-6.69% and 1.24-6.01%, respectively. Extraction efficiency is more than 90%, and recoveries are in the range of 92.65-96.21%. This method is successfully applied for the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of 2 formulations of PAP in 18 healthy male volunteers who received a single 200 mg dose of each formulation.

  4. Development and application of a multiroute physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for oxytetracycline in dogs and humans.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Li, Mengjie; Gehring, Ronette; Riviere, Jim E

    2015-01-01

    Oxytetracycline (OTC) is a commonly used tetracycline antibiotic in veterinary and human medicine. To establish a quantitative model for predicting OTC plasma and tissue exposure, a permeability-limited multiroute physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed in dogs. The model was calibrated with plasma pharmacokinetic data in beagle dogs following single intravenous (5 mg/kg), oral (100 mg/kg), and intramuscular (20 mg/kg) administrations. The model predicted other available dog data well, including drug concentrations in the liver, kidney, and muscle after repeated exposure, and data in the mixed-breed dog. The model was extrapolated to humans and the human model adequately simulated measured plasma OTC concentrations after intravenous (7.14 mg/kg) and oral exposures (6.67 mg/kg). The dog model was applied to predict 24-h OTC area-under-the-curve after three therapeutic treatments. Results were 27.75, 51.76, and 64.17 μg/mL*h in the plasma, and 120.93, 225.64, and 279.67 μg/mL*h in the kidney for oral (100 mg/kg), intravenous (10 mg/kg), and intramuscular (20 mg/kg) administrations, respectively. This model can be used to predict plasma and tissue concentrations to aid in designing optimal therapeutic regimens with OTC in veterinary, and potentially, human medicine; and as a foundation for scaling to other tetracycline antibiotics and to other animal species. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:233-243, 2015.

  5. Non-Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Prediction of Human Pharmacokinetics and First-in-Human Dose Selection for CNTO 5825, an Anti-Interleukin-13 Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Nnane, Ivo P; Xu, Zhenhua; Zhou, Honghui; Davis, Hugh M

    2015-10-01

    CNTO 5825 is a human anti-interleukin-13 (IL-13) monoclonal antibody (mAb) that inhibits binding of human IL-13 to IL-13Rα1 and IL-13Rα2. The purpose of this investigation was to predict human pharmacokinetics (PK) of CNTO 5825 using different allometric approaches and non-clinical PK data in order to select the right and safe doses for first-in-human (FIH) study. After intravenous (IV) administration of CNTO 5825, clearance (CL) ranged from 9.98 to 11.49 ml/day/kg in rats and from 5.78 to 7.19 ml/day/kg in cynomolgus monkeys. The volume of distribution at steady-state (Vss) in rats was large (151.52-155.64 ml/kg) compared to cynomolgus monkey (49.77-61.10 ml/kg). The terminal half-life (T1/2 ) ranged from 12.29 to 14.15 days in rats and from 6.61 to 7.73 days in cynomolgus monkeys. The PK of CNTO 5825 was linear in 1-10 mg/kg dose range in both species. The bioavailability after subcutaneous (SC) administration was 94% and 79% in rats and cynomolgus monkeys, respectively. The predicted CL and Vss based on allometric methods and PK data from rats and monkeys were within twofold of observed CL and Vss in human beings; the predicted CL and Vss in human beings (70 kg) based on time-invariant method with combined PK data from rats and monkeys were 4.84 ± 1.13 ml/day/kg and 68.93 ± 35.55 ml/kg, respectively. The selected doses for the FIH study based on time-invariant method and no observed adverse effect level in toxicity studies in rats and monkeys provided exposures that were subsequently shown to be well tolerated and safe in human beings.

  6. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, metabolism, toxicology and residues of phenylbutazone in humans and horses.

    PubMed

    Lees, Peter; Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    2013-06-01

    The presence of horse meat in food products destined for human consumption and labelled as beef has raised several concerns of public interest. This review deals solely with one aspect of these concerns; samples of equine tissue from horses destined for the human food chain have tested positive for the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, phenylbutazone. The safety of some or all such foods for human consumers is a major concern, because it was shown many years ago that phenylbutazone therapy in humans can be associated with life threatening blood dyscrasias. As an initial basis for assessing the potential toxicity of foods containing phenylbutazone and its metabolites, this article reviews (1) the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, metabolic and toxicological profiles of phenylbutazone, with particular reference to horses and humans; (2) toxicity data in laboratory animals; (3) phenylbutazone residues in food producing species, and (4) as a preliminary assessment, the potential hazard associated with the consumption of horse meat containing phenylbutazone and its metabolites. Since phenylbutazone cannot be classified as a carcinogenic substance in humans, and noting that blood dyscrasias in humans are likely to be dose and treatment duration-dependent, the illegal and erratic presence of trace amount residues of phenylbutazone in horse meat is not a public health issue.

  7. Recombinant human pentraxin-2 therapy in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: safety, pharmacokinetics and exploratory efficacy.

    PubMed

    van den Blink, Bernt; Dillingh, Marlous R; Ginns, Leo C; Morrison, Lake D; Moerland, Matthijs; Wijsenbeek, Marlies; Trehu, Elizabeth G; Bartholmai, Brian J; Burggraaf, Jacobus

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal fibrogenic repair response upon alveolar injury is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). PRM-151 (recombinant human pentraxin-2, also known as serum amyloid P), has been shown to reduce fibrosis in preclinical lung fibrosis models, and was well tolerated with a favourable pharmacokinetic profile in an earlier single-dose phase I study.A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple ascending dose trial was performed to assess the tolerability and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of multiple doses of PRM-151 in IPF patients. Subjects in three successive cohorts (1, 5, or 10 mg·kg(-1) versus placebo) received intravenous study drug on days 1, 3, 5, 8 and 15, and were followed-up to day 57.PRM-151 was well tolerated at all dose levels, with no serious adverse reactions. Administration of PRM-151 resulted in two- to eight-fold dose-dependent increases in circulating pentraxin-2 levels. Forced vital capacity and 6-min walk test showed trends towards improvement in the combined PRM-151 dose groups. On high-resolution computed tomography scans, stable or improved lung volume unoccupied by interstitial lung abnormality was noted in some PRM-151 subjects compared to placebo subjects on day 57.The efficacy of PRM-151 in IPF remains to be investigated in dedicated future trials.

  8. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Jonathan A.; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2013-01-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation. PMID:22150623

  9. Human methamphetamine pharmacokinetics simulated in the rat: behavioral and neurochemical effects of a 72-h binge.

    PubMed

    Kuczenski, Ronald; Segal, David S; Melega, William P; Lacan, Goran; McCunney, Stanley J

    2009-10-01

    Bingeing is one pattern of high-dose methamphetamine (METH) abuse, which involves continuous drug taking over several days and can result in psychotic behaviors for which the brain pathology remains poorly defined. A corresponding animal model of this type of METH exposure may provide novel insights into the neurochemical and behavioral sequelae associated with this condition. Accordingly, to simulate the pharmacokinetic profile of a human METH binge exposure in rats, we used a computer-controlled, intravenous METH procedure (dynamic infusion, DI) to overcome species differences in METH pharmacokinetics and to replicate the human 12-h plasma METH half-life. Animals were treated over 13 weeks with escalating METH doses, using DI, and then exposed to a binge in which drug was administered every 3 h for 72 h. Throughout the binge, behavioral effects included unabated intense oral stereotypies in the absence of locomotion and in the absence of sleep. Decrements in regional brain dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin levels, measured at 1 and 10 h after the last injection of the binge, had, with the exception of caudate-putamen dopamine and frontal cortex serotonin, recovered by 48 h. At 10 h after the last injection of the binge, [(3)H]ligand binding to dopamine and vesicular monoamine transporters in caudate-putamen were reduced by 35 and 13%, respectively. In a separate METH binge-treated cohort, post-binge behavioral alterations were apparent in an attenuated locomotor response to a METH challenge infusion at 24 h after the last injection of the binge. Collectively, the changes we characterized during and after a METH binge suggest that for human beings under similar exposure conditions, multiple time-dependent neurochemical deficits contribute to their behavioral profiles.

  10. HUMAN METHAMPHETAMINE PHARMACOKINETICS SIMULATED IN THE RAT: BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF A 72- HOUR BINGE

    PubMed Central

    Kuczenski, Ronald; Segal, David S.; Melega, William P.; Lacan, Goran; McCunney, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    Bingeing is one pattern of high dose methamphetamine (METH) abuse which involves continuous drug taking over several days and can result in psychotic behaviors for which the brain pathology remains poorly-defined. A corresponding animal model of this type of METH exposure may provide novel insights into the neurochemical and behavioral sequelae associated with this condition. Accordingly, to simulate the pharmacokinetic profile of a human METH binge exposure in rats we used a computer-controlled, intravenous METH procedure (dynamic infusion) to overcome species differences in METH pharmacokinetics and to replicate the human 12-h plasma METH half-life. Animals were treated over 13 weeks with escalating METH doses, using dynamic infusion, and then exposed to a binge in which drug was administered every 3 h for 72h. Throughout the binge, behavioral effects included unabated intense oral stereotypies in the absence of locomotion and in the absence of sleep. Decrements in regional brain dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin levels, measured at 1 and 10 h after the last injection of the binge, had, with the exception of caudate-putamen dopamine and frontal cortex serotonin, recovered by 48 h. At 10 h after the last injection of the binge, [3H]ligand binding to dopamine and vesicular monoamine transporters in caudate-putamen were reduced by 35% and 13%, respectively. In a separate METH binge treated cohort, post-binge behavioral alterations were apparent in an attenuated locomotor response to a METH challenge infusion at 24h after the last injection of the binge. Collectively, the changes we characterized during and following a METH binge suggest that for humans under similar exposure conditions, multiple time-dependent neurochemical deficits contribute to their behavioral profiles. PMID:19571794

  11. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  12. Human biofluid concentrations of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in chimeric mice with humanized liver administered with di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koichiro; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is a reproductive toxicant in male rodents. The aim of the current study was to extrapolate the pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP, a primary metabolite of DEHP) in humans by using data from oral administration of DEHP to chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. MEHP and its glucuronide were detected in plasma from control mice and chimeric mice after single oral doses of 250mg DEHP/kg body weight. Biphasic plasma concentration-time curves of MEHP and its glucuronide were seen only in control mice. MEHP and its glucuronide were extensively excreted in urine within 24h in mice with humanized liver. In contrast, fecal excretion levels of MEHP glucuronide were high in control mice compared with those with humanized liver. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated urine MEHP concentrations in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. This research illustrates how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of the primary or secondary metabolites of DEHP.

  13. Application of a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: Result of ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Piotrowski, Roman; Baran, Jakub; Kułakowski, Piotr; Wroczyński, Piotr

    2016-05-10

    Antazoline is a first-generation antihistaminic agent with antiarrhythmic quinidine-like properties. In some countries, it is widely used for termination of cardiac arrhythmias, especially atrial fibrillation (AF). However, no human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted with intravenous antazoline. The aim of our study was to develop and validate a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: the ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study. Antazoline was extracted from plasma using liquid-liquid extraction. The concentration of the analyte was measured by LC-MS/MS with xylometazoline as an internal standard. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, stability (freeze/thaw stability, stability in autosampler, short and long term stability), dilution integrity and matrix effect. The analyzed validation criteria were fulfilled. The method was applied to a pharmacokinetic study involving 10 healthy volunteers. Following a single intravenous dose of antazoline mesylate (100 mg), the plasma concentration profile showed a relative fast elimination with a terminal elimination half-life of 2.29 h. A relatively high volume of distribution was observed (Vss=315 L). The values of mean residence time (MRT∞), area under the curve (AUC∞) and clearance were 3.45 h, 0.91 mg h L(-1) and 80.5 L h(-1), respectively. One volunteer showed significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters. In conclusion, the proposed new LC-MS/MS method was successfully used for the first time for the determination of antazoline in human plasma. PMID:26895496

  14. Severe Toxicity Following Synthetic Cannabinoid Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    LAPOINT, J.; JAMES, L. P.; MORAN, C. L.; NELSON, L. S.; HOFFMAN, R. S.; MORAN, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report a case of seizures and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) following confirmed synthetic cannabinoid ingestion. Background Despite widespread use of legal synthetic cannabinoids, reports of serious toxicity following confirmed use of synthetic cannabinoids are rare. We report severe toxicity including seizures following intentional ingestion of the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and detail confirmation by laboratory analysis. Case Report A healthy 48 year old man had a generalized seizure within thirty minutes of ingesting an ethanol mixture containing a white powder he purchased from the Internet in an attempt to get high. Seizures recurred and abated with lorazepam. Initial vital signs were: pulse, 106/min; BP, 140/88 mmHg; respirations, 22/min; temperature, 37.7 °C. A noncontrast computed tomography of the brain and EEG were negative, and serum chemistry values were normal. The blood ethanol concentration was 3.8 mg/dL and the CPK 2,649 U/L. Urine drug screening by EMIT was negative for common drugs of abuse, including tetrahydrocannabinol. On hospital day 1, he developed medically refractory SVT. The patient had no further complications and was discharged in his normal state of health 10 days after admission. The original powder was confirmed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to be JWH-018, and a primary JWH-018 metabolite was detected in the patient’s urine (200 nM) using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Discussion Synthetic cannabinoids are legal in many parts of the world and easily obtained over the Internet. Data on human toxicity are limited and real-time confirmatory testing is unavailable to clinicians. The potential for toxicity exists for users mistakenly associating the dose and side effect profiles of synthetic cannabinoids to those of marijuana. Conclusion Ingestion of JWH-018 can produce seizures and tachyarrhythmias. Clinicians, lawmakers, and the general public need to be aware of the potential for

  15. A First-in-Human Study To Assess the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Cytomegalovirus in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dole, Kiran; Segal, Florencia Pereyra; Feire, Adam; Magnusson, Baldur; Rondon, Juan C; Vemula, Janardhana; Yu, Jing; Pang, Yinuo; Pertel, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause significant disease in immunocompromised patients and treatment options are limited by toxicities. CSJ148 is a combination of two anti-HCMV human monoclonal antibodies (LJP538 and LJP539) that bind to and inhibit the function of viral HCMV glycoprotein B (gB) and the pentameric complex, consisting of glycoproteins gH, gL, UL128, UL130, and UL131. Here, we evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous dose of LJP538 or LJP539 or their combination in healthy volunteers. Adverse events and laboratory abnormalities occurred sporadically with similar incidence between antibody and placebo groups and without any apparent relationship to dose. No subject who received antibody developed a hypersensitivity, infusion-related reaction or anti-drug antibodies. After intravenous administration, both LJP538 and LJP539 demonstrated typical human IgG1 pharmacokinetic properties, with slow clearances, limited volumes of distribution, and long terminal half-lives. The pharmacokinetic parameters were linear and dose proportional for both antibodies across the 50-fold range of doses evaluated in the study. There was no apparent impact on pharmacokinetics when the antibodies were administered alone or in combination. CSJ148 and the individual monoclonal antibodies were safe and well tolerated, with pharmacokinetics as expected for human immunoglobulin.

  16. Impact of a synthetic cannabinoid (CP-47,497-C8) on protein expression in human cells: evidence for induction of inflammation and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bileck, Andrea; Ferk, Franziska; Al-Serori, Halh; Koller, Verena J; Muqaku, Besnik; Haslberger, Alexander; Auwärter, Volker; Gerner, Christopher; Knasmüller, Siegfried

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are marketed worldwide as legal surrogates for marihuana. In order to predict potential health effects in consumers and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action, we investigated the impact of a representative of the cyclohexylphenols, CP47,497-C8, which binds to both cannabinoid receptors, on protein expression patterns, genomic stability and on induction of inflammatory cytokines in human lymphocytes. After treatment of the cells with the drug, we found pronounced up-regulation of a variety of enzymes in nuclear extracts which are involved in lipid metabolism and inflammatory signaling; some of the identified proteins are also involved in the endogenous synthesis of endocannabinoids. The assumption that the drug causes inflammation is further supported by results obtained in additional experiments with cytosols of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes which showed that the SC induces pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL12p40 and IL-6) as well as TNF-α. Furthermore, the proteome analyses revealed that the drug causes down-regulation of proteins which are involved in DNA repair. This observation provides an explanation for the formation of comets which was seen in single-cell gel electrophoresis assays and for the induction of micronuclei (which reflect structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations) by the drug. These effects were seen in experiments with human lymphocytes which were conducted under identical conditions as the proteome analysis. Taken together, the present findings indicate that the drug (and possibly other structurally related SCs) may cause DNA damage and inflammation in directly exposed cells of consumers. PMID:26194647

  17. Cellular approaches to the interaction between cannabinoid receptor ligands and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Oz, Murat; Al Kury, Lina; Keun-Hang, Susan Yang; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Galadari, Sehamuddin

    2014-05-15

    Cannabinoids are among the earliest known drugs to humanity. Cannabis plant contains various phytochemicals that bind to cannabinoid receptors. In addition, synthetic and endogenously produced cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) constitute other classes of cannabinoid receptor ligands. Although many pharmacological effects of these cannabinoids are mediated by the activation of cannabinoid receptors, recent studies indicate that cannabinoids also modulate the functions of various integral membrane proteins including ion channels, receptors, neurotransmitter transporters, and enzymes by mechanism(s) not involving the activation of known cannabinoid receptors. Currently, the mechanisms of these effects were not fully understood. However, it is likely that direct actions of cannabinoids are closely linked to their lipophilic structures. This report will focus on the actions of cannabinoids on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and will examine the results of recent studies in this field. In addition some mechanistic approaches will be provided. The results discussed in this review indicate that, besides cannabinoid receptors, further molecular targets for cannabinoids exist and that these targets may represent important novel sites to alter neuronal excitability.

  18. Enantioselective analysis of 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide in human plasma with application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Francine Attié; Scatena, Gabriel dos Santos; Rocha, Otávio Pelegrino; Marques, Maria Paula; Cass, Quézia Bezerra; Simões, Belinda Pinto; Lanchote, Vera Lucia

    2016-02-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CY) is one of the most common immunosuppressive agents used in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. CY is a prodrug and is metabolized to active 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide (HCY). Many authors have suggested an association between enantioselectivity in CY metabolism and treatment efficacy and/or complications. This study describes the development and validation of an analytical method of HCY enantiomers in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) that can be applied to pharmacokinetic studies, filling this gap in the literature. HCY enantiomers previously derivatized with phenylhydrazine were extracted from 200-μL plasma aliquots spiked with antipyrine as internal standard and a mixture of hexane and dichloromethane (80:20, v/v) was used as the extraction solvent. The derivatized HCY enantiomers were resolved on a Chiracel(®) OD-R column using water:acetonitrile:formic acid (55:45:0.2, v/v) as the mobile phase. No matrix effect was observed and the analysis of HCY enantiomers was linear for plasma concentrations of 5-5000ng of each enantiomer/mL plasma. The coefficients of variation and inaccuracy calculated in precision and accuracy assessments were less than 15%. HCY was stable in human plasma after three successive freeze/thaw cycles, during 3h at room temperature, and in the autosampler at 4°C for 24h after processing, with deviation values less than 15%. The method was applied to evaluate the kinetic disposition of HCY in a patient with multiple sclerosis who was pretreated with intravenous racemic CY for stem cell transplantation. The clinical study showed enantioselectivity in the pharmacokinetics of HCY.

  19. Simulation of amoxicillin pharmacokinetics in humans for the prevention of streptococcal endocarditis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Fluckiger, U; Moreillon, P; Blaser, J; Bickle, M; Glauser, M P; Francioli, P

    1994-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic determinants of successful antibiotic prophylaxis of endocarditis are not precisely known. Differences in half-lives of antibiotics between animals and humans preclude extrapolation of animal results to human situations. To overcome this limitation, we have mimicked in rats the amoxicillin kinetics in humans following a 3-g oral dose (as often used for prophylaxis of endocarditis) by delivering the drug through a computerized pump. Rats with catheter-induced vegetations were challenged with either of two strains of antibiotic-tolerant viridans group streptococci. Antibiotics were given either through the pump (to simulate the whole kinetic profile during prophylaxis in humans) or as an intravenous bolus which imitated only the peak level of amoxicillin (18 mg/liter) in human serum. Prophylaxis by intravenous bolus was inoculum dependent and afforded a limited protection only in rats challenged with the minimum inoculum size infecting > or = 90% of untreated controls. In contrast, simulation of kinetics in humans significantly protected animals challenged with 10 to 100 times the inoculum of either of the test organisms infecting > or = 90% of untreated controls. Thus, simulation of the profiles of amoxicillin prophylaxis in human serum was more efficacious than mere imitation of the transient peak level in rats. This confirms previous studies suggesting that the duration for which the serum amoxicillin level remained detectable (not only the magnitude of the peak) was an important parameter in successful prophylaxis of endocarditis. The results also suggest that single-dose prophylaxis with 3 g of amoxicillin in humans might be more effective than predicted by conventional animal models in which only peak levels of antibiotic in human serum were stimulated. PMID:7695272

  20. Anticancer mechanisms of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Velasco, G; Sánchez, C; Guzmán, M

    2016-03-01

    In addition to the well-known palliative effects of cannabinoids on some cancer-associated symptoms, a large body of evidence shows that these molecules can decrease tumour growth in animal models of cancer. They do so by modulating key cell signalling pathways involved in the control of cancer cell proliferation and survival. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit angiogenesis and decrease metastasis in various tumour types in laboratory animals. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of cannabinoids as antitumour agents, focusing on recent discoveries about their molecular mechanisms of action, including resistance mechanisms and opportunities for their use in combination therapy. Those observations have already contributed to the foundation for the development of the first clinical studies that will analyze the safety and potential clinical benefit of cannabinoids as anticancer agents.

  1. Anticancer mechanisms of cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, G.; Sánchez, C.; Guzmán, M.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the well-known palliative effects of cannabinoids on some cancer-associated symptoms, a large body of evidence shows that these molecules can decrease tumour growth in animal models of cancer. They do so by modulating key cell signalling pathways involved in the control of cancer cell proliferation and survival. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit angiogenesis and decrease metastasis in various tumour types in laboratory animals. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of cannabinoids as antitumour agents, focusing on recent discoveries about their molecular mechanisms of action, including resistance mechanisms and opportunities for their use in combination therapy. Those observations have already contributed to the foundation for the development of the first clinical studies that will analyze the safety and potential clinical benefit of cannabinoids as anticancer agents. PMID:27022311

  2. What Are Synthetic Cannabinoids?

    MedlinePlus

    ... those produced by marijuana: elevated mood relaxation altered perception —awareness of surrounding objects and conditions symptoms of ... those produced by marijuana: elevated mood relaxation altered perception symptoms of psychosis Synthetic cannabinoids can also cause ...

  3. Endogenous cannabinoid system as a modulator of food intake.

    PubMed

    Cota, D; Marsicano, G; Lutz, B; Vicennati, V; Stalla, G K; Pasquali, R; Pagotto, U

    2003-03-01

    The ability of Cannabis sativa (marijuana) to increase hunger has been noticed for centuries, although intensive research on its molecular mode of action started only after the characterization of its main psychoactive component Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the late 1960s. Despite the public concern related to the abuse of marijuana and its derivatives, scientific studies have pointed to the therapeutic potentials of cannabinoid compounds and have highlighted their ability to stimulate appetite, especially for sweet and palatable food. Later, the discovery of specific receptors and their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids) suggested the existence of an endogenous cannabinoid system, providing a physiological basis for biological effects induced by marijuana and other cannabinoids. Epidemiological reports describing the appetite-stimulating properties of cannabinoids and the recent insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cannabinoid action have proposed a central role of the cannabinoid system in obesity. The aim of this review is to provide an extensive overview on the role of this neuromodulatory system in feeding behavior by summarizing the most relevant data obtained from human and animal studies and by elucidating the interactions of the cannabinoid system with the most important neuronal networks and metabolic pathways involved in the control of food intake. Finally, a critical evaluation of future potential therapeutical applications of cannabinoid antagonists in the therapy of obesity and eating disorders will be discussed.

  4. Cannabinoids and haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzeska, Agnieszka; Grędziński, Tomasz; Kisiel, Wioleta; Chabielska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system (cannabinoid receptors CB1, CB2, CBPT and CBED, endocannabinoids, enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of endocannabinoids) are located on the structures involved in the process of hemostasis. An increasing level of endocannabinoids was also observed in some pathological conditions, which may occur in disorders of hemostasis. At the same time, disconcertingly, there is an increased number of reports about incidents of cardiovascular events in smokers of marijuana. Experimental and clinical studies demonstrated multidirectional, often contradictory, effects of cannabinoids on hemostasis, including effects of the compounds on platelets, vascular endothelium, fibrinolysis and plasma coagulation systems. The mechanisms of action of cannabinoids on homeostasis depend on the cannabinoid receptors CB1, CB2, CBPT and CBED, receptors of other systems stimulated by endocannabinoids, as well as metabolites of endocannabinoids and nitrogen oxide. The range of biological functions of endo- and plant cannabinoids, expanded to include the process of hemostasis, may constitute a condition for their recognition as a new factor responsible for thromboembolism in smokers of marijuana, in pathological disorders with increased levels of endocannabinoids and in individuals with polymorphisms of FAAH C385A and A385A. On the other hand, there are compelling reasons for anti‑hemostatic action of cannabinoids. PMID:27383573

  5. Recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 infusion to the monkey CNS: Safety, pharmacokinetics, and distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Vuillemenot, Brian R.; Kennedy, Derek; Reed, Randall P.; Boyd, Robert B.; Butt, Mark T.; Musson, Donald G.; Keve, Steve; Cahayag, Rhea; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.

    2014-05-15

    CLN2 disease is caused by deficiency in tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1), leading to neurodegeneration and death. The safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and CNS distribution of recombinant human TPP1 (rhTPP1) were characterized following a single intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intrathecal-lumbar (IT-L) infusion to cynomolgus monkeys. Animals received 0, 5, 14, or 20 mg rhTPP1, ICV, or 14 mg IT-L, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) vehicle. Plasma and CSF were collected for PK analysis. Necropsies occurred at 3, 7, and 14 days post-infusion. CNS tissues were sampled for rhTPP1 distribution. TPP1 infusion was well tolerated and without effect on clinical observations or ECG. A mild increase in CSF white blood cells (WBCs) was detected transiently after ICV infusion. Isolated histological changes related to catheter placement and infusion were observed in ICV treated animals, including vehicle controls. The CSF and plasma exposure profiles were equivalent between animals that received an ICV or IT-L infusion. TPP1 levels peaked at the end of infusion, at which point the enzyme was present in plasma at 0.3% to 0.5% of CSF levels. TPP1 was detected in brain tissues with half-lives of 3–14 days. CNS distribution between ICV and IT-L administration was similar, although ICV resulted in distribution to deep brain structures including the thalamus, midbrain, and striatum. Direct CNS infusion of rhTPP1 was well tolerated with no drug related safety findings. The favorable nonclinical profile of ICV rhTPP1 supports the treatment of CLN2 by direct administration to the CNS. - Highlights: • TPP1 enzyme replacement therapy to the CNS is in development for CLN2 disease. • Toxicology, pharmacokinetics, and CNS distribution were assessed in monkeys. • TPP1 infusion directly to the brain did not result in any safety concerns. • A positive pharmacokinetic and distribution profile resulted from TPP1 infusion. • This study demonstrates the feasibility of ICV administered

  6. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of the Enterohepatic Recirculation of Fimasartan in Rats, Dogs, and Humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Shin, Soyoung; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; Chi, Yong Ha; Paik, Soo Heui; Myung, Jayhyuk; Yadav, Rajbharan; Horkovics-Kovats, Stefan; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Shin, Beom Soo

    2015-09-01

    Enterohepatic recirculation (EHC) can greatly enhance plasma drug exposures and therapeutic effects. This study aimed to develop a population pharmacokinetic model that can simultaneously characterize the extent and time-course of EHC in three species using fimasartan, a novel angiotensin II receptor blocker, as a model drug. All fimasartan plasma concentration profiles in 32 rats (intravenous doses, 0.3-3 mg/kg; oral doses, 1-10 mg/kg), 34 dogs (intravenous doses, 0.3-1 mg/kg; oral doses, 1-10 mg/kg), and 42 healthy volunteers (single or multiple oral doses, 20-480 mg) were determined via liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and simultaneously modeled in S-ADAPT. The proposed model quantitatively characterized EHC in three species after oral and intravenous dosing. The median (range) fraction of drug undergoing recirculation was 76.3% (64.9-88.7%) in rats, 33.3% (24.0-45.9%) in dogs, and 65.6% (56.5-72.0%) in humans. In the presence compared with the absence of EHC, the area under the curve in plasma was predicted to be 4.22-fold (2.85-8.85) as high in rats, 1.50-fold (1.32-1.85) in dogs, and 2.91-fold (2.30-3.57) in humans. The modeled oral bioavailability in rats (median (range), 38.7% (20.0-59.8%)) and dogs (median, 7.13% to 15.4%, depending on the formulation) matched the non-compartmental estimates well. In humans, the predicted oral bioavailability was 25.1% (15.1-43.9%) under fasting and 18.2% (12.2-31.0%) under fed conditions. The allometrically scaled area under the curve predicted from rats was 420 ng·h/mL for 60 mg fimasartan compared with 424 ± 63 ng·h/mL observed in humans. The developed population pharmacokinetic model can be utilized to characterize the impact of EHC on plasma drug exposure in animals and humans.

  7. First Metabolic Profile of XLR-11, a Novel Synthetic Cannabinoid, Obtained by Using Human Hepatocytes and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Zhu, Mingshe; Gandhi, Adarsh S.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Liu, Hua-fen; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Since the mid-2000s synthetic cannabinoids have been abused as recreational drugs, prompting scheduling of these substances in many countries. To circumvent legislation, manufacturers constantly market new compounds; [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (XLR-11), the fluorinated UR-144 analog, is one of the most recent and widely abused drugs, and its use is now linked with acute kidney injury. Our goal was to investigate XLR-11 metabolism for identification of major urinary targets in analytical methods and to clarify the origin of metabolites when one or more parent synthetic cannabinoids can be the source. METHODS We incubated 10 μmol/L XLR-11 with pooled human hepatocytes and sampled after 1 and 3 h. Samples were analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry with a TOF scan followed by information-dependent acquisition triggered product ion scans with dynamic background subtraction and mass defect filters. Scans were thoroughly data mined with different data processing algorithms (Metabolite Pilot 1.5). RESULTS XLR-11 underwent phase I and II metabolism, producing more than 25 metabolites resulting from hydroxylation, carboxylation, hemiketal and hemiacetal formation, internal dehydration, and further glucuronidation of some oxidative metabolites. No sulfate or glutathione conjugation was observed. XLR-11 also was defluorinated, forming UR-144 metabolites. On the basis of mass spectrometry peak areas, we determined that the major metabolites were 2′-carboxy-XLR-11, UR-144 pentanoic acid, 5-hydroxy-UR-144, hydroxy-XLR-11 glucuronides, and 2′-carboxy-UR-144 pentanoic acid. Minor metabolites were combinations of the biotransformations mentioned above, often glucuronidated. CONCLUSIONS These are the first data defining major urinary targets of XLR-11 metabolism that could document XLR-11 intake in forensic and clinical investigations. PMID:24014837

  8. Detection Times of Carboxylic Acid Metabolites of the Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 in Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Hegstad, Solfrid; Westin, Andreas A; Spigset, Olav

    2015-05-01

    Over the past years, use of synthetic cannabinoids has become increasingly popular. To draw the right conclusions regarding new intake of these substances in situations of repeated urinary drug testing, knowledge of their elimination rate in urine is essential. We report data from consecutive urine specimens from five subjects after ingestion of synthetic cannabinoids. Urinary concentrations of the carboxylic acid metabolites JWH-018-COOH and JWH-073-COOH were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) with a limit of quantification of 0.1 ng/mL. In these subjects, specimens remained positive over a period of 20-43 (mean 27) days for JWH-018-COOH and over a period of 11-25 (mean 19) days for JWH-073-COOH. Detection times were shorter for subjects that appeared to have ingested only one, or a few, doses prior to urine collection in the study. Creatinine-normalized concentrations (CN-concentrations) slowly declined throughout the follow-up period in all subjects, suggesting that no new intake had taken place during this period. Mean elimination half-lives in urine were 14.0 (range 4.4-23.8) days for CN-JWH-018-COOH and 9.3 (range 3.6-16.8) days for CN-JWH-073-COOH. These data show that urine specimens could be positive for JWH-018-COOH for more than 6 weeks and JWH-073-COOH for more than 3 weeks after ingestion. However, such long detection periods require a low limit of quantification.

  9. Cannabinoids and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Katchan, Valeria; David, Paula; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-06-01

    Cannabinoids have shown to have a variety effects on body systems. Through CB1 and CB2 receptors, amongst other, they exert an effect by modulating neurotransmitter and cytokine release. Current research in the role of cannabinoids in the immune system shows that they possess immunosuppressive properties. They can inhibit proliferation of leucocytes, induce apoptosis of T cells and macrophages and reduce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In mice models, they are effective in reducing inflammation in arthritis, multiple sclerosis, have a positive effect on neuropathic pain and in type 1 diabetes mellitus. They are effective as treatment for fibromyalgia and have shown to have anti-fibrotic effect in scleroderma. Studies in human models are scarce and not conclusive and more research is required in this field. Cannabinoids can be therefore promising immunosuppressive and anti-fibrotic agents in the therapy of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26876387

  10. Fentanyl pharmacokinetics is not dependent on hepatic uptake by organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 in human beings.

    PubMed

    Ziesenitz, Victoria C; König, Sonja K; Mahlke, Nina; Jantos, Ricarda; Skopp, Gisela; Weiss, Johanna; Haefeli, Walter E; Mikus, Gerd

    2013-07-01

    A recent study investigating the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl in Sprague-Dawley rats suggested fentanyl to be a substrate of rat organic anion-transporting polypeptide Oatp. In human beings, the most important OATP for the pharmacokinetics of many drugs is OATP1B1. Therefore, genetic variants of OATP1B1 (SLCO1B1) might modulate fentanyl pharmacokinetics and efficacy in human beings. Sixteen healthy male and female volunteers, homozygous for SLCO1B1*1a (genetic wild-type) (n = 11) or *15 (deficient haplotype carrying the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs2306283 and rs4149056 and exhibiting altered transport activity; n = 5), were included in this randomized crossover study. The participants received fentanyl (5 μg/kg) intravenously alone or with the OATP inhibitor rifampicin (600 mg single oral dose). The pharmacokinetics of fentanyl and norfentanyl were determined by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In addition, fentanyl uptake in vitro was evaluated in OATP1B1 overexpressing HEK293 cells and compared to a mock-transfected cell line. In the clinical trial, fentanyl clearance was 18.8 ± 8.2 mL/min. kg in SLCO1B1*1a and 19.5 ± 1.8 mL/min/kg in SLCO1B1*15 carriers and not significantly different between the genotypes. During rifampicin, fentanyl clearance was 15.0 ± 4.4 mL/min/kg in SLCO1B1*1a and 16.7 ± 5.9 mL/min/kg in SLCO1B1*15 carriers (p > 0.5). In addition, in vitro data also indicate that fentanyl is not transported by OATP1B1. In conclusion, our data indicate that OATP1B1 has no impact on fentanyl pharmacokinetics in human beings.

  11. Cannabinoid system and cyclooxygenases inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Coman, OA; Coman, L; Ghiţă, I; Georgescu, SR; Drăia, F; Fulga, I

    2011-01-01

    Rationale. The cannabinoid system consists of a complex array of receptors, substances with agonist/antagonist properties for those receptors, biosynthetic machineries and mechanisms for cellular uptake and degradation for endocannabinoids. This system is in interrelation with other systems that comprise lipid mediators like prostaglandins/leukotrienes systems. A clear antagonist, additive or synergic effect of nonsteroidal anti–inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)–cannabinoid associations was not yet demonstrated. Aim. The present study tried to summarize the existent data on NSAIDS-cannabinoid system interactions. Methods and results A bibliographic research in Medline, Scirus, Embase was made using as keywords cannabinoid, nonsteroidal anti–inflammatory drugs, aspirin, ibuprofen, flurbiprofen, diclofenac, indomethacin, acetaminophen, coxibs, antinociceptive, antinociception, analgesia DiscussionsA systematization of the results focusing on the NSAIDs drugs interaction with the cannabinoid system was presented. Out of all the substances analyzed in the present review, acetaminophen was studied the most regarding its interferences with the cannabinoid system, mainly due to contradictory results. Conclusions Some NSAIDs have additional influences on the cannabinoid system either by inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or by inhibiting a possible intracellular transporter of endocannabinoids. All the NSAIDs that inhibit COX2 can influence the cannabinoid system because a possible important degradative pathway for anandamide and 2–arachidonoyl glycerol might involve COX 2. One of the causes for the variety of experimental results presented might be due to pharmacokinetic mechanisms, depending on the route of administration and the dose Abbreviationsdelta9 THC, (–)–(6aR,10aR)–6,6,9–trimethyl–3–pentyl–6a,7,8,10a–tetrahydro–6H–benzo[c]chromen–1–ol; delta9–THC–11–oic acid, 1–hydroxy–6,6–dimethyl–3–pentyl–6a,7,8,10a

  12. Development of a Physiologically Based Model to Describe the Pharmacokinetics of Methylphenidate in Juvenile and Adult Humans and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Morris, Suzanne M.; Gearhart, Jeffery M.; Ruark, Christopher D.; Paule, Merle G.; Slikker, William; Mattison, Donald R.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Young, John F.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread usage of methylphenidate (MPH) in the pediatric population has received considerable attention due to its potential effect on child development. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been developed in juvenile and adult humans and nonhuman primates to quantitatively evaluate species- and age-dependent enantiomer specific pharmacokinetics of MPH and its primary metabolite ritalinic acid. The PBPK model was first calibrated in adult humans using in vitro enzyme kinetic data of MPH enantiomers, together with plasma and urine pharmacokinetic data with MPH in adult humans. Metabolism of MPH in the small intestine was assumed to account for the low oral bioavailability of MPH. Due to lack of information, model development for children and juvenile and adult nonhuman primates primarily relied on intra- and interspecies extrapolation using allometric scaling. The juvenile monkeys appear to metabolize MPH more rapidly than adult monkeys and humans, both adults and children. Model prediction performance is comparable between juvenile monkeys and children, with average root mean squared error values of 4.1 and 2.1, providing scientific basis for interspecies extrapolation of toxicity findings. Model estimated human equivalent doses in children that achieve similar internal dose metrics to those associated with pubertal delays in juvenile monkeys were found to be close to the therapeutic doses of MPH used in pediatric patients. This computational analysis suggests that continued pharmacovigilance assessment is prudent for the safe use of MPH. PMID:25184666

  13. Pharmacokinetics and safety of oral levofloxacin in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals receiving concomitant zidovudine.

    PubMed Central

    Chien, S C; Chow, A T; Rogge, M C; Williams, R R; Hendrix, C W

    1997-01-01

    This phase I, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-design study was conducted to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects concomitantly receiving a stable regimen of zidovudine (AZT). Sixteen HIV-infected males with CD4-cell counts ranging from 100 to 550 and not experiencing significant AZT intolerance were enrolled. Subjects received levofloxacin (350 mg of levofloxacin hemihydrate) or a placebo (eight subjects per treatment group) as a single oral dose on day 1, multiple doses every 8 h from days 3 to 9, and a single dose on day 10. On days 1 and 10, an AZT dose (100 mg) was administered concurrently with the study drug. In between these doses, AZT was administered according to the regimen used by the subject prior to entering the study up to a maximum of 500 mg/day. Plasma levofloxacin concentrations were monitored for 36 h after levofloxacin dosing on day 1, immediately prior to the morning doses on days 3 to 9, and for 72 h after dosing on day 10. Plasma AZT concentrations were monitored on day 0 for baseline (for 6 h after the AZT dose) and for 4 h after the AZT doses on days 1 and 10. Levofloxacin was rapidly absorbed (time to maximum plasma concentration, approximately 1.0 h) and extensively distributed in the body with an apparent volume of distribution of approximately 104 liters (approximately 1.34 liters/kg). Steady-state conditions on day 10 were confirmed. Pharmacokinetic profiles of levofloxacin from single doses and multiple (three-times-daily) doses were similar, with a moderate accumulation (observed day 10-to-day 1 ratio of the maximum plasma concentration, approximately 185% versus expected 169%; for the corresponding ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 8 h [AUC(0-8)], the values were observed 217% versus expected 169%) at steady state. Mean average steady-state peak plasma concentration, plasma levofloxacin concentration at the

  14. Pro-drugs for indirect cannabinoids as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John

    2008-10-01

    Medicinal cannabis, cannabis extracts, and other cannabinoids are currently in use or under clinical trial investigation for the control of nausea, emesis and wasting in patients undergoing chemotherapy, the control of neuropathic pain and arthritic pain, and the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. The further development of medicinal cannabinoids has been challenged with problems. These include the psychoactivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists and the lack of availability of highly selective cannabinoid receptor full agonists (for the CB1 or CB2 receptor), as well as problems of pharmacokinetics. Global activation of cannabinoid receptors is usually undesirable, and so enhancement of local endocannabinoid receptor activity with indirect cannabimimetics is an attractive strategy for therapeutic modulation of the endocannabinoid system. However, existing drugs of this type tend to be metabolized by the same enzymes as their target endocannabinoids and are not yet available in a form that is clinically useful. A potential solution to these problems may now have been suggested by the discovery that paracetamol (acetaminophen) exerts its analgesic (and probably anti-pyretic) effects by its degradation into an anandamide (an endocannabinoid) reuptake inhibitor (AM404) within the body, thus classifying it as pro-drug for an indirect cannabimimetic. Given the proven efficacy and safety of paracetamol, the challenge now is to develop related drugs, or entirely different substrates, into pro-drug indirect cannabimimetics with a similar safety profile to paracetamol but at high effective dose titrations.

  15. Pro-drugs for indirect cannabinoids as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John

    2008-10-01

    Medicinal cannabis, cannabis extracts, and other cannabinoids are currently in use or under clinical trial investigation for the control of nausea, emesis and wasting in patients undergoing chemotherapy, the control of neuropathic pain and arthritic pain, and the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. The further development of medicinal cannabinoids has been challenged with problems. These include the psychoactivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists and the lack of availability of highly selective cannabinoid receptor full agonists (for the CB1 or CB2 receptor), as well as problems of pharmacokinetics. Global activation of cannabinoid receptors is usually undesirable, and so enhancement of local endocannabinoid receptor activity with indirect cannabimimetics is an attractive strategy for therapeutic modulation of the endocannabinoid system. However, existing drugs of this type tend to be metabolized by the same enzymes as their target endocannabinoids and are not yet available in a form that is clinically useful. A potential solution to these problems may now have been suggested by the discovery that paracetamol (acetaminophen) exerts its analgesic (and probably anti-pyretic) effects by its degradation into an anandamide (an endocannabinoid) reuptake inhibitor (AM404) within the body, thus classifying it as pro-drug for an indirect cannabimimetic. Given the proven efficacy and safety of paracetamol, the challenge now is to develop related drugs, or entirely different substrates, into pro-drug indirect cannabimimetics with a similar safety profile to paracetamol but at high effective dose titrations. PMID:18855592

  16. Methods to identify and characterize developmental neurotoxicity for human health risk assessment. III: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, D C; Allen, S L; Byczkowski, J Z; Claudio, L; Fisher, J E; Fisher, J W; Harry, G J; Li, A A; Makris, S L; Padilla, S; Sultatos, L G; Mileson, B E

    2001-01-01

    We review pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors that should be considered in the design and interpretation of developmental neurotoxicity studies. Toxicologic effects on the developing nervous system depend on the delivered dose, exposure duration, and developmental stage at which exposure occurred. Several pharmacokinetic processes (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) govern chemical disposition within the dam and the nervous system of the offspring. In addition, unique physical features such as the presence or absence of a placental barrier and the gradual development of the blood--brain barrier influence chemical disposition and thus modulate developmental neurotoxicity. Neonatal exposure may depend on maternal pharmacokinetic processes and transfer of the xenobiotic through the milk, although direct exposure may occur through other routes (e.g., inhalation). Measurement of the xenobiotic in milk and evaluation of biomarkers of exposure or effect following exposure can confirm or characterize neonatal exposure. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models that incorporate these and other determinants can estimate tissue dose and biologic response following in utero or neonatal exposure. These models can characterize dose--response relationships and improve extrapolation of results from animal studies to humans. In addition, pharmacologic data allow an experimenter to determine whether exposure to the test chemical is adequate, whether exposure occurs during critical periods of nervous system development, whether route and duration of exposure are appropriate, and whether developmental neurotoxicity can be differentiated from direct actions of the xenobiotic. PMID:11250810

  17. Low dose aspirin estimation: an application to a human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Vijaya Bharathi, D; Hotha, Kishore Kumar; Kolagatla, Pandu Ranga Reddy; Venkateswarlu, V

    2013-05-01

    Low dose to very high dose aspirin is used to prevent heart attack. We have developed and validated a sensitive and robust method that could detect low levels of aspirin and salicylic acid in plasma and also a novel sample collection procedure to carry out sample preparation at room temperature. The total run time was 3.00 min; the developed method was validated in human plasma with a lower limit of quantitation of 0.99 ng/mL for aspirin and 2.01 ng/mL for salicylic acid. A linear response function was established for the range of concentrations 0.99-756.20 ng/mL (r > 0.998) for aspirin and 2.01-2486.86 ng/mL for salicylic acid. The intra- and inter-day precision values for aspirin and salicylic acid met the acceptance as per FDA guidelines. The developed assay method was applied to an oral pharmacokinetic study in humans.

  18. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for methyl mercury (MeHg) in monkey and human

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, J.M.; Clewall, H.J. III; Shipp, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    A PBPK model for MeHg was developed which coherently describes MeHg pharmacokinetics in the adult rat, monkey and man, and predicts fetal levels of MeHg from in utero exposure. The model includes a description of enterohepatic recirculation of MeHg, conversion to inorganic mercury in tissues and intestinal flora, slowly reversible incorporation of mercury in tissues, and excretion of both organic and inorganic mercury into urine, feces, and hair. The adult submodel includes compartments representing the red blood tells (RBC), plasma, brain, liver, kidney, gut intestinal lumen, gut tissue, hair, richly and slowly perfused tissues, and placenta. The fetal submodel includes compartments representing RBC`s, plasma, brain, and remaining body mass. Two features of the model structure which are critical to prediction of the kinetics of MeHg in different species is the use of separate RBC and plasma compartments, allowing the use of species specific RBC/plasma ratios, and biliary excretion with enterohepatic recirculation. Published tissue and blood MeHg concentrations were used to derive the partition coefficients and RBC/plasma ratios to adjust for species differences in MeHg distribution. Validation involved comparing the model simulations with data from repeated dosing studies in animals and humans, and from accidental human exposures. The model will be used to investigate maternal MeHg intake as it relates to measured blood and hair MeHg concentrations, and to fetal exposure.

  19. Human-on-a-chip design strategies and principles for physiologically based pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    Advances in maintaining multiple human tissues on microfluidic platforms has led to a growing interest in the development of microphysiological systems for drug development studies. Determination of the proper design principles and scaling rules for body-on-a-chip systems is critical for their strategic incorporation into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) model-aided drug development. While the need for a functional design considering organ-organ interactions has been considered, robust design criteria and steps to build such systems have not yet been defined mathematically. In this paper, we first discuss strategies for incorporating body-on-a-chip technology into the current PBPK modeling-based drug discovery to provide a conceptual model. We propose two types of platforms that can be involved in the different stages of PBPK modeling and drug development; these are μOrgans-on-a-chip and μHuman-on-a-chip. Then we establish the design principles for both types of systems and develop parametric design equations that can be used to determine dimensions and operating conditions. In addition, we discuss the availability of the critical parameters required to satisfy the design criteria, consider possible limitations for estimating such parameter values and propose strategies to address such limitations. This paper is intended to be a useful guide to the researchers focused on the design of microphysiological platforms for PBPK/PD based drug discovery. PMID:25739725

  20. Evaluation of human pharmacokinetics, therapeutic dose and exposure predictions using marketed oral drugs.

    PubMed

    McGinnity, D F; Collington, J; Austin, R P; Riley, R J

    2007-06-01

    In this article approaches to predict human pharmacokinetics (PK) are discussed and the capability of the exemplified methodologies to estimate individual PK parameters and therapeutic dose for a set of marketed oral drugs has been assessed. For a set of 63 drugs where the minimum efficacious concentration (MEC) and human PK were known, the clinical dose was shown to be well predicted or in some cases over-estimated using a simple one-compartment oral PK model. For a subset of these drugs, in vitro potency against the primary human targets was gathered, and compared to the observed MEC. When corrected for plasma protein binding, the MEC of the majority of compounds was < or=3 fold over the respective in vitro target potency value. A series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to predict the human PK parameters. Metabolic clearance was generally predicted well from human hepatocytes. Interestingly, for this compound set, allometry or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) ratio methods appeared to be applicable for renal CL even where CL(renal) > GFR. For approximately 90% of compounds studied, the predicted CL using in vitro-in vivo (IVIV) extrapolation together with a CL(renal) estimate, where appropriate, was within 2-fold of that observed clinically. Encouragingly volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)) estimated in preclinical species (rat and dog) when corrected for plasma protein binding, predicted human V(ss) successfully on the majority of occasions--73% of compounds within 2-fold. In this laboratory, absorption estimated from oral rat PK studies was lower than the observed human absorption for most drugs, even when solubility and permeability appeared not to be limiting. Preliminary data indicate absorption in the dog may be more representative of human for compounds absorbed via the transcellular pathway. Using predicted PK and MEC values estimated from in vitro potency assays there was a good correlation between predicted and observed dose

  1. Comparison of the pharmacology and signal transduction of the human cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Felder, C C; Joyce, K E; Briley, E M; Mansouri, J; Mackie, K; Blond, O; Lai, Y; Ma, A L; Mitchell, R L

    1995-09-01

    The recently cloned CB2 cannabinoid receptor subtype was stably transfected into AtT-20 and Chinese hamster ovary cells to compare the binding and signal transduction properties of this receptor with those of the CB1 receptor subtype. The binding of [3H]CP 55,940 to both CB1 and CB2 was of similar high affinity (2.6 and 3.7 nM, respectively) and saturable. In competitive binding experiments, (-)-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and CP 55,940 were equipotent at the CB1 and CB2 receptors, but WIN 55212-2 and cannabinol bound with higher affinity to the CB2 than the CB1 receptor. HU 210 had a higher affinity for the CB1 receptor. Anandamide, a recently identified endogenous cannabinoid agonist, was essentially equipotent at both receptor subtypes. The structurally related fatty acid ethanolamides dihomo-gamma-linolenylethanolamide and mead ethanolamide also bound with relatively equal affinity to both receptors, but adrenylethanolamide had a higher affinity for the CB1 receptor. The rank order of potency and efficacy for binding of the selected agonists to the CB1 and CB2 receptors was mimicked in functional inhibition of cAMP accumulation experiments for all compounds tested. Both CB1 and CB2 receptors couple to the inhibition of cAMP accumulation that was pertussis toxin sensitive. SR141716A, a CB1 receptor antagonist, was a poor antagonist at the CB2 receptor in both binding and functional inhibition of cAMP accumulation experiments. When expressed in AtT-20 cells, the CB1 receptor mediated an inhibition of Q-type calcium channels and an activation of inward rectifying potassium channels. In contrast, the CB2 receptor did not modulate the activity of either channel under identical assay conditions. Similar to results obtained for CB1 receptor, the CB2 receptor did not couple to the activation of phospholipases A2, C, or D or to the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Except for its inability to couple to the modulation of Q-type calcium channels or inwardly rectifying

  2. Qualitative Confirmation of 9 Synthetic Cannabinoids and 20 Metabolites in Human Urine Using LC–MS/MS and Library Search

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Hua-fen; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Synthetic cannabinoids are an emerging illicit drug class. The variety of available substances is large and ever-changing, making it difficult for laboratories to remain current. We present a qualitative LC–MS/MS method identifying urinary metabolites of JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-200, JWH-210, JWH-250, RCS-4, and AM2201 and the parent compounds JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-210, JWH-250, RCS-4, AM2201, and MAM2201. Methods After enzymatic hydrolysis, urinary proteins were precipitated with acetonitrile. Chromatography utilized a 10 min gradient on a Kinetex XB-C18 column with 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile. Scheduled multiple reaction monitoring “survey scans” were followed by information-dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion scan experiments on an ABSciex 5500 QTRAP mass spectrometer. Analytes were identified by software-assisted library searching against reference spectra. Results The method was fully validated, including proof of selectivity (no exogenous or endogenous interferences were observed), assessment of matrix effects (95–122%) and recovery (53–95%), determination of limits of detection (0.5–10 ng/mL), carry-over studies (thresholds between 100 and 1000 ng/mL), and determination of autosampler stability (samples were stable for at least 3 days). Hydrolysis efficiency was thoroughly investigated for a wide range of glucuronides and for the reference standard, JWH-018 5-hydroxypentyl glucuronide PMID:23458260

  3. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 regulates STAT3 activity and its expression dictates the responsiveness to SR141716 treatment in human glioma patients' cells.

    PubMed

    Ciaglia, Elena; Torelli, Giovanni; Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; D'Alessandro, Alba; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Fiore, Donatella; Pagano Zottola, Antonio Christian; Proto, Maria Chiara; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2015-06-20

    Herein we show that a majority of human brain tumor samples and cell lines over-expressed cannabinoid receptor CB1 as compared to normal human astrocytes (NHA), while uniformly expressed low levels of CB2. This finding prompted us to investigate the therapeutic exploitation of CB1 inactivation by SR141716 treatment, with regard to its direct and indirect cell-mediated effects against gliomas. Functional studies, using U251MG glioma cells and primary tumor cell lines derived from glioma patients expressing different levels of CB1, highlighted SR141716 efficacy in inducing apoptosis via G1 phase stasis and block of TGF-β1 secretion through a mechanism that involves STAT3 inhibition. According to the multivariate role of STAT3 in the immune escape too, interestingly SR141716 lead also to the functional and selective expression of MICA/B on the surface of responsive malignant glioma cells, but not on NHA. This makes SR141716 treated-glioma cells potent targets for allogeneic NK cell-mediated recognition through a NKG2D restricted mechanism, thus priming them for NK cell antitumor reactivity. These results indicate that CB1 and STAT3 participate in a new oncogenic network in the complex biology of glioma and their expression levels in patients dictate the efficacy of the CB1 antagonist SR141716 in multimodal glioma destruction.

  4. Molecular imaging of human tumor cells that naturally overexpress type 2 cannabinoid receptors using a quinolone-based near-infrared fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Shao, Pin; Zhang, Shaojuan; Ling, Xiaoxi; Bai, Mingfeng

    2014-07-01

    Cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2R) hold promise as therapeutic targets for treating diverse diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders, addiction, and immune disorders. However, the fundamental role of CBR in the regulation of diseases remains unclear, largely due to a lack of reliable imaging tools for the receptors. The goal of this study was to develop a CBR-targeted molecular imaging probe and evaluate the specificity of the probe using human tumor cells that naturally overexpress CBR. To synthesize the CBR-targeted probe (NIR760-Q), a conjugable CBR ligand based on the quinolone structure was first prepared, followed by bioconjugation with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, NIR760. In vitro fluorescence imaging and competitive binding studies showed higher uptake of NIR760-Q than free NIR760 dye in Jurkat human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In addition, the high uptake of NIR760-Q was significantly inhibited by the blocking agent, 4-quinolone-3-carboxamide, indicating specific binding of NIR760-Q to the target receptors. These results indicate that the NIR760-Q has potential in diagnostic imaging of CBR positive cancers and elucidating the role of CBR in the regulation of disease progression.

  5. Efficacy of Extended-Interval Dosing of Micafungin Evaluated Using a Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Study with Humanized Doses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lepak, A.; Marchillo, K.; VanHecker, J.; Azie, N.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) characteristics of the echinocandins favor infrequent administration of large doses. The in vivo investigation reported here tested the utility of a range of humanized dose levels of micafungin using a variety of prolonged dosing intervals for the prevention and therapy of established disseminated candidiasis. Humanized doses of 600 mg administered every 6 days prevented fungal growth in prophylaxis. Humanized doses of 300 to 1,000 mg administered every 6 days demonstrated efficacy for established infections. PMID:26552968

  6. Medicinal chemistry of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Vemuri, V Kiran; Makriyannis, A

    2015-06-01

    The endocannabinoid system comprises the two well characterized Gi/o -protein coupled receptors (cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and CB2), their endogenous lipid ligands, and the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and biotransformation. Drug discovery efforts relating to the endocannabinoid system have been focused mainly on the two cannabinoid receptors and the two endocannabinoid deactivating enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). This review provides an overview of cannabinergic agents used in drug research and those being explored clinically.

  7. Medicinal Chemistry of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Vemuri, V Kiran; Makriyannis, A

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system comprises the two well characterized Gi/o-protein coupled receptors (cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and CB2), their endogenous lipid ligands, and the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and biotransformation. Drug discovery efforts relating to the endocannabinoid system have been focused mainly on the two cannabinoid receptors and the two endocannabinoid deactivating enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). This review provides an overview of cannabinergic agents used in drug research and those being explored clinically. PMID:25801236

  8. Medicinal chemistry of cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Vemuri, V Kiran

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system comprises the two well characterized Gi/o‐protein coupled receptors (cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and CB2), their endogenous lipid ligands, and the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and biotransformation. Drug discovery efforts relating to the endocannabinoid system have been focused mainly on the two cannabinoid receptors and the two endocannabinoid deactivating enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). This review provides an overview of cannabinergic agents used in drug research and those being explored clinically. PMID:25801236

  9. Urinary pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine and its metabolite, amphetamine following controlled oral administration to humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Insook; Oyler, Jonathan M; Moolchan, Eric T; Cone, Edward J; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2004-12-01

    Methamphetamine is widely abused for its euphoric effects. Our objectives were to characterize the urinary pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine and amphetamine after controlled methamphetamine administration to humans and to improve the interpretation of urine drug test results. Participants (n = 8) received 4 daily 10-mg (low) oral doses of sustained-release (d)-methamphetamine hydrochloride within 7 days. After 4 weeks, 5 participants received 4 daily 20-mg (high) oral doses. All urine specimens were collected during the study. Methamphetamine and amphetamine were measured by GC-MS/PCI. Maximum excretion rates ranged from 403 to 4919 microg/h for methamphetamine and 59 to 735 microg/h for amphetamine with no relationship between dose and excretion rate. The mean molar percentage of dose in the urine as total methamphetamine and amphetamine were 57.5 +/- 21.7% (low dose) and 40.9 +/- 8.5% (high dose). Mean urinary terminal elimination half-lives across doses were 23.6 +/- 6.6 hours for methamphetamine and 20.7 +/- 7.3 hours for amphetamine. Methamphetamine renal clearance across doses was 175 +/- 102 mL/min. The mean amphetamine/methamphetamine percentage ratio based on the area under the urinary excretion-time curve increased over time from 13.4 +/- 6.5% to 35.7 +/- 26.6%. Slow urinary excretion results in drug accumulation and increases in detection time windows. Our findings also support the presence of an active renal excretion mechanism for methamphetamine.

  10. Pharmacokinetics, biotransformation, and mass balance of edoxaban, a selective, direct factor Xa inhibitor, in humans.

    PubMed

    Bathala, Mohinder S; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Oguma, Toshihiro; He, Ling; Lowrie, Chris; Mendell, Jeanne

    2012-12-01

    This study determined the mass balance and pharmacokinetics of edoxaban in humans after oral administration of [¹⁴C]edoxaban. After oral administration of 60 mg (as active moiety) of [¹⁴C]edoxaban to six healthy male subjects, serial blood/plasma and urinary and fecal samples were collected for up to 168 h postdose. All samples were analyzed for total radioactivity by liquid scintillation counting and for concentrations of edoxaban and four metabolites in plasma, urine, and fecal samples by either high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method using multiple reaction modes, or a liquid chromatography radiometric method. The mean recovery of radioactivity was >97% of the administered radioactive dose, with 62.2% eliminated in feces and 35.4% in urine. Unchanged edoxaban accounted for the majority of radioactivity, with 49.1 and 23.8% of the dose as parent observed in feces and urine, respectively. Unchanged edoxaban was the most abundant species in plasma, with a mean area under the curve (AUC)(0-∞) of 1596 ng · h/ml. The next most abundant species was metabolite M4, with a mean AUC(0-∞) 147 ng · h/ml. The mass balance of edoxaban was well described, with unchanged edoxaban as the most abundant component of total radioactivity. Edoxaban is eliminated through multiple pathways, but each accounts for only a small amount of overall elimination. PMID:22936313

  11. Novel LC- ESI-MS/MS method for desvenlafaxine estimation human plasma: application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Kancharla, Pushpa Kumari; Kondru, Venu Gopal Raju; Dannana, Gowri Sankar

    2016-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and specific liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method was developed for the quantification of desvenlafaxine in human plasma using desvenlafaxine d6 as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed using a Thermo-BDS hypersil C8 column (50 × 4.6 mm, 3 µm) with an isocratic mobile phase composed of 5 mM ammonium acetate buffer: methanol (20:80, v/v), at a flow rate of 0.80 mL/min. Desvenlafaxine and desvenlafaxine d6 were detected with proton adducts at m/z 264.2/58.1 and 270.2/ 64.1 in multiple reaction monitoring positive mode, respectively. Liquid-liquid extraction was used to extract the drug and the IS. The method was linear over the concentration range 1.001-400.352 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of ≥0.9994. This method demonstrated intra and inter-day precision within 0.7-5.5 and 1.9-6.8%, and accuracy within 95.3-107.4 and 93.4-99.5%. Desvenlafaxine was found to be stable throughout the freeze-thaw cycles, bench-top and long-term matrix stability studies. The developed and validated method can be successfully applied for the bioequivalence/pharmacokinetic studies of desvenlafaxine in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  12. Chemical Polysialylation and In Vivo Tetramerization Improve Pharmacokinetic Characteristics of Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase-Based Bioscavengers.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, S S; Smirnov, I V; Shamborant, O G; Bobik, T V; Ilyushin, D G; Murashev, A N; Dyachenko, I A; Palikov, V A; Knorre, V D; Belogurov, A A; Ponomarenko, N A; Kuzina, E S; Genkin, D D; Masson, P; Gabibov, A G

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate toxins (OPs) are the most toxic low-molecular compounds. The extremely potent toxicity of OPs is determined by their specificity toward the nerve system. Human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE) is a natural bioscavenger against a broad spectrum of OPs, which makes it a promising candidate for the development of DNA-encoded bioscavengers. The high values of the protective index observed for recombinant hBChE (rhBChE) make it appropriate for therapy against OP poisoning, especially in the case of highly toxic warfare nerve agents. Nevertheless, large-scale application of biopharmaceuticals based on hBChE is restricted due to its high cost and extremely rapid elimination from the bloodstream. In the present study, we examine two approaches for long-acting rhBChE production: I) chemical polysialylation and II) in-vivo tetramerization. We demonstrate that both approaches significantly improve the pharmacokinetic characteristics of rhBChE (more than 5 and 10 times, respectively), which makes it possible to use rhBChE conjugated with polysialic acids (rhBChE-CAO) and tetrameric rhBChE (4rhBChE) in the treatment of OP poisonings. PMID:26798501

  13. Estimated cancer risk of dioxins to humans using a bioassay and physiologically based pharmacokinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Wakae . E-mail: maruw@nies.go.jp; Aoki, Yasunobu

    2006-07-15

    The health risk of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds to humans was analyzed quantitatively using experimental data and mathematical models. To quantify the toxicity of a mixture of three dioxin congeners, we calculated the new relative potencies (REPs) for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), 1,2,3,7,8-pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (PeCDD), and 2,3,4,7,8- pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF), focusing on their tumor promotion activity. We applied a liver foci formation assay to female SD rats after repeated oral administration of dioxins. The REP of dioxin for a rat was determined using dioxin concentration and the number of the foci in rat liver. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK model) was used for interspecies extrapolation targeting on dioxin concentration in liver. Toxic dose for human was determined by back-estimation with a human PBPK model, assuming that the same concentration in the target tissue may cause the same level of effect in rats and humans, and the REP for human was determined by the toxic dose obtained. The calculated REPs for TCDD, PeCDD, and PeCDF were 1.0, 0.34, and 0.05 for rats, respectively, and the REPs for humans were almost the same as those for rats. These values were different from the toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) presented previously (Van den Berg, M., Birnbaum, L., Bosveld, A.T.C., Brunstrom, B., Cook, P., Feeley, M., Giesy, J.P., Hanberg, A., Hasegawa, R., Kennedy, S.W., Kubiak, T., Larsen, J.C., Rolaf van Leeuwen, F.X., Liem, A.K.D., Nolt, C., Peterson, R.E., Poellinger. L., Safe, S., Schrenk, D., Tillitt, D, Tysklind, M., Younes, M., Waern, F., Zacharewski, T., 1998. Toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) for PCBs, PCDDs, PCDFs for humans and wildlife. Environ. Health Perspect. 106, 775-792). The relative risk of excess liver cancer for Japanese people in general was 1.7-6.5 x 10{sup -7} by TCDD only, and 2.9-11 x 10{sup -7} by the three dioxins at the present level of contamination.

  14. PET measurement of C-11-methylphenidate pharmacokinetics and distribution in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.S.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.J.

    1994-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP), a psychostimulant drug which binds to the dopamine transporter (DAT), is the most commonly prescribed psychotropic medication for children in the USA yet little is known about its pharmacokinetics and distribution in the human brain. PET was used to measure the pharmacokinetics of d,l-threo-[{sup 11}C]methylphenidate (MP*) the labelled form of the prescribed drug (ritalin) in eight normal male subjects (age range 20-74 years). Four subjects had 2 repeated scans to assess test/retest reproducibility and 4 had one wan as baseline and the second 10 minutes after administration of 0.5 mg/kg MP to assess specific to nonspecific binding. Dynamic scans were started immediately after injection of MP*(5-10 mCi) for 90 min on the CTI-931 (6 x 6 x 6.5 mm FWHM). Time activity curves for tissue concentration and for unchanged tracer in plasma were used to calculate the distribution volume (DV) in basal ganglia (BG), cerebellum (CB) and global (GL) regions using graphical analysis. Binding of MP* was highest in the BG (0.008% dose/cc) uptake in CB corresponded to (0.006) and in GL to (0.005). Kinetic analysis revealed fast uptake of MP* with peak uptake in BG occurring 5-20 min PI, and in CB and GL at 5-13 min PI. Half time clearance for MP* occurred 90 min PI for BG and 60 min for CB and GL. Test/retest variability was <10% (range -0.5 to +7.0% for the DV ratio (BG/CB)). Pretreatment with MP selectively reduced uptake in BG wherein it did not affect uptake in CB or GL. The ratio of the DV in BG to that in CB changed from 2.12{plus_minus}0.1 to 1.35{plus_minus}0.04. The lack of an effect of MP in CB an area with a high density of norepinephrine (NE) transporters suggests that MP* is not binding to the NE transporter.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and effects on serum cholinesterase activities of organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sota, Shigeto; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in foods have potential to impact human health. The aim of the current study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of acephate and chlorpyrifos orally administered at lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Absorbed acephate and its metabolite methamidophos were detected in serum from wild type mice and chimeric mice orally administered 150mg/kg. Approximately 70% inhibition of cholinesterase was evident in plasma of chimeric mice with humanized liver (which have higher serum cholinesterase activities than wild type mice) 1day after oral administrations of acephate. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated plasma concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. Acephate cleared similarly in humans and chimeric mice but accidental/incidental overdose levels of chlorpyrifos cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in mice. The data presented here illustrate how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of toxicological potential of organophosphorus pesticides.

  16. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and Triadimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Kinetic time course data...

  17. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  18. Simulation of Human Plasma Concentrations of Thalidomide and Primary 5-Hydroxylated Metabolites Explored with Pharmacokinetic Data in Humanized TK-NOG Mice.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Sayako; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shibata, Norio; Guengerich, F Peter; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-11-16

    Plasma concentrations of thalidomide and primary 5-hydroxylated metabolites including 5,6-dihydroxythalidomide and glutathione (GSH) conjugate(s) were investigated in chimeric mice with highly "humanized" liver cells harboring cytochrome P450 3A5*1. Following oral administration of thalidomide (100 mg/kg), plasma concentrations of GSH conjugate(s) of 5-hydroxythalidomide were higher in humanized mice than in controls. Simulation of human plasma concentrations of thalidomide were achieved with a simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in accordance with reported thalidomide concentrations. The results indicate that the pharmacokinetics in humans of GSH conjugate and/or catechol primary 5-hydroxylated thalidomide contributing in vivo activation can be estimated for the first time. PMID:26492539

  19. Simulation of Human Plasma Concentrations of Thalidomide and Primary 5-Hydroxylated Metabolites Explored with Pharmacokinetic Data in Humanized TK-NOG Mice.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Sayako; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shibata, Norio; Guengerich, F Peter; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-11-16

    Plasma concentrations of thalidomide and primary 5-hydroxylated metabolites including 5,6-dihydroxythalidomide and glutathione (GSH) conjugate(s) were investigated in chimeric mice with highly "humanized" liver cells harboring cytochrome P450 3A5*1. Following oral administration of thalidomide (100 mg/kg), plasma concentrations of GSH conjugate(s) of 5-hydroxythalidomide were higher in humanized mice than in controls. Simulation of human plasma concentrations of thalidomide were achieved with a simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic model in accordance with reported thalidomide concentrations. The results indicate that the pharmacokinetics in humans of GSH conjugate and/or catechol primary 5-hydroxylated thalidomide contributing in vivo activation can be estimated for the first time.

  20. Prediction of Pharmacokinetics and Penetration of Moxifloxacin in Human with Intra-Abdominal Infection Based on Extrapolated PBPK Model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, LiQin; Yang, JianWei; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, YongMing; Zhang, JianLei; Zhao, YuanYuan; Dong, WeiLin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model in intra-abdominal infected rats, and extrapolate it to human to predict moxifloxacin pharmacokinetics profiles in various tissues in intra-abdominal infected human. 12 male rats with intra-abdominal infections, induced by Escherichia coli, received a single dose of 40 mg/kg body weight of moxifloxacin. Blood plasma was collected at 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480, 1440 min after drug injection. A PBPK model was developed in rats and extrapolated to human using GastroPlus software. The predictions were assessed by comparing predictions and observations. In the plasma concentration versus time profile of moxifloxcinin rats, Cmax was 11.151 µg/mL at 5 min after the intravenous injection and t1/2 was 2.936 h. Plasma concentration and kinetics in human were predicted and compared with observed datas. Moxifloxacin penetrated and accumulated with high concentrations in redmarrow, lung, skin, heart, liver, kidney, spleen, muscle tissues in human with intra-abdominal infection. The predicted tissue to plasma concentration ratios in abdominal viscera were between 1.1 and 2.2. When rat plasma concentrations were known, extrapolation of a PBPK model was a method to predict drug pharmacokinetics and penetration in human. Moxifloxacin has a good penetration into liver, kidney, spleen, as well as other tissues in intra-abdominal infected human. Close monitoring are necessary when using moxifloxacin due to its high concentration distribution. This pathological model extrapolation may provide reference to the PK/PD study of antibacterial agents.

  1. A multi-route model of nicotine-cotinine pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in humans.

    PubMed

    Teeguarden, Justin G; Housand, Conrad J; Smith, Jordan N; Hinderliter, Paul M; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles A

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  2. A Multi-Route Model of Nicotine-Cotinine Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Brain Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Housand, Conrad; Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Gunawan, Rudy; Timchalk, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine, the pharmacologically active alkaloid in tobacco responsible for addiction, are well characterized in humans. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model of nicotine pharmacokinetics, brain dosimetry and brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) occupancy. A Bayesian framework was applied to optimize model parameters against multiple human data sets. The resulting model was consistent with both calibration and test data sets, but in general underestimated variability. A pharmacodynamic model relating nicotine levels to increases in heart rate as a proxy for the pharmacological effects of nicotine accurately described the nicotine related changes in heart rate and the development and decay of tolerance to nicotine. The PBPK model was utilized to quantitatively capture the combined impact of variation in physiological and metabolic parameters, nicotine availability and smoking compensation on the change in number of cigarettes smoked and toxicant exposure in a population of 10,000 people presented with a reduced toxicant (50%), reduced nicotine (50%) cigarette Across the population, toxicant exposure is reduced in some but not all smokers. Reductions are not in proportion to reductions in toxicant yields, largely due to partial compensation in response to reduced nicotine yields. This framework can be used as a key element of a dosimetry-driven risk assessment strategy for cigarette smoke constituents.

  3. Pyridopyrimidine based cannabinoid-1 receptor inverse agonists: Synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Debenham, John S; Madsen-Duggan, Christina B; Wang, Junying; Tong, Xinchun; Lao, Julie; Fong, Tung M; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Xiao, Jing Chen; Huang, Cathy C R-R; Shen, Chun-Pyn; Sloan Stribling, D; Shearman, Lauren P; Strack, Alison M; Euan Macintyre, D; Hale, Jeffrey J; Walsh, Thomas F

    2009-05-01

    The synthesis, SAR and binding affinities are described for cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) specific inverse agonists based on pyridopyrimidine and heterotricyclic scaffolds. Food intake and pharmacokinetic evaluation of several of these compounds indicate that they are effective orally active modulators of CB1R.

  4. Metabolite profiling and pharmacokinetic evaluation of hydrocortisone in a perfused three-dimensional human liver bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Ujjal; Rivera-Burgos, Dinelia; Large, Emma M; Hughes, David J; Ravindra, Kodihalli C; Dyer, Rachel L; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Wishnok, John S; Griffith, Linda G; Tannenbaum, Steven R

    2015-07-01

    Endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to cause liver injury primarily involving inflammatory cells such as Kupffer cells, but few in vitro culture models are applicable for investigation of inflammatory effects on drug metabolism. We have developed a three-dimensional human microphysiological hepatocyte-Kupffer cell coculture system and evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids on liver cultures. LPS was introduced to the cultures to elicit an inflammatory response and was assessed by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α. A sensitive and specific reversed-phase-ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight-mass spectrometry method was used to evaluate hydrocortisone disappearance and metabolism at near physiologic levels. For this, the systems were dosed with 100 nM hydrocortisone and circulated for 2 days; hydrocortisone was depleted to approximately 30 nM, with first-order kinetics. Phase I metabolites, including tetrahydrocortisone and dihydrocortisol, accounted for 8-10% of the loss, and 45-52% consisted of phase II metabolites, including glucuronides of tetrahydrocortisol and tetrahydrocortisone. Pharmacokinetic parameters, i.e., half-life, rate of elimination, clearance, and area under the curve, were 23.03 hours, 0.03 hour(-1), 6.6 × 10(-5) l⋅hour(-1), and 1.03 (mg/l)*h, respectively. The ability of the bioreactor to predict the in vivo clearance of hydrocortisone was characterized, and the obtained intrinsic clearance values correlated with human data. This system offers a physiologically relevant tool for investigating hepatic function in an inflamed liver. PMID:25926431

  5. Effects of Idazoxan on Alcohol Pharmacokinetics and Intoxication: A Preliminary Human Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L.; Leggio, Lorenzo; Davidson, Dena; Swift, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Preliminary basic and human studies suggest that the α2-adrenergic antagonist idazoxan may represent a novel medication for alcohol dependence (AD). The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of the co-administration of idazoxan with alcohol and explore whether pharmacokinetics (PK) and biobehavioral (Pharmacodynamics, PD) mechanisms of idazoxan may alter alcohol's effects. Methods This was a preliminary double-blind, single-dose, placebo-controlled, cross-over, randomized human laboratory study. Ten social drinkers were dosed, in two different alcohol challenge sessions (ACS), with a single oral dose of idazoxan (40-mg) or placebo, followed by a fixed alcohol dose 60 minutes later. Participants returned after a one-week wash-out and they were crossed over to the opposite medication condition. Results There were no significant differences in adverse events (AEs) between idazoxan and placebo. Moreover, during the ACS paradigm, 40-mg idazoxan was well tolerated with no significant autonomic effects compared to placebo; idazoxan reduced the peak blood alcohol level (Cmax) (p<.01) and time to peak (tmax) (p<.05) compared to placebo. A PK/PD model aligned the biobehavioral effects, demonstrating that the co-administration of 40-mg idazoxan with alcohol, decreased alcohol-related stimulation (p<.05) and increased alcohol-related sedation (p<.05). Conclusions This study supports the safety and tolerability of 40-mg idazoxan when co-administered with alcohol. Additionally, this study suggests that idazoxan may alter the biphasic effects of alcohol by decreasing stimulation and increasing sedation. These findings have implications for further investigation of using idazoxan as a probe to develop potential novel medications to treat alcoholic patients. PMID:25833022

  6. Determination of Acyclovir in Human Plasma Samples by HPLC Method with UV Detection: Application to Single-Dose Pharmacokinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Zendelovska, Dragica; Simeska, Suzana; Atanasovska, Emilija; Georgievska, Kalina; Kikerkov, Igor; Labachevski, Nikola; Jakovski, Krume; Balkanov, Trajan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is estimation of pharmacokinetic parameters: Cmax, tmax, t1/2, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞ with the two-way analysis of variance, single observation (ANOVA) for two preparations containing acyclovir. OBJECTIVE: In order to evaluate pharmacokinetic study of acyclovir, method for quantitative determination of acyclovir in human plasma should be simple, rapid and reproducible. Therefore, the method is developed, validated and applied for analysis of acyclovir in plasma samples obtained from healthy volunteers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: High performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with UV-detection for the determination of acyclovir in human plasma is presented. This method involves protein precipitation with 20 % (V/V) perchloric acid. The chromatographic separation was accomplished on a reversed phase C8 column with a mobile phase composed of 0.1 % (V/V) triethylamine in water (pH 2.5). No internal standard is required. UV detection was set at 255 nm. The method was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetic profiles of acyclovir tablets in 24 healthy volunteers. RESULTS: The validation results shows that proposed method is rugged, precise (RSDs for intra- and inter-day precision ranged from 1.02 to 8.37 %) and accurate (relative errors are less than 6.66 %). The calibration curve was linear in the concentration range of 0.1-2.0 µg/ml and the limit of quantification was 0.1 µg/ml. The Cmax, tmax and AUCs for the two products were not statistically different (p>0.05), suggesting that the plasma profiles generated by Zovirax were comparable to those produced by acyclovir manufactured by Jaka 80 company. CONCLUSION: Good precision, accuracy, simplicity, sensitivity and shorter time of analysis of the method makes it particularly useful for processing of multiple samples in a limited period of time for pharmacokinetic study of acyclovir. PMID:27275193

  7. Cannabinoids and atherosclerotic coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Singla, Sandeep; Sachdeva, Rajesh; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2012-06-01

    Marijuana is the most abused recreational drug in the United States. Cannabinoids, the active ingredients of marijuana, affect multiple organ systems in the human body. The pharmacologic effects of marijuana, based on stimulation of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, which are widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, have been well described. Activation of these receptors modulates the function of various cellular elements of the vessel wall, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Clinically, there are reports linking marijuana smoking to the precipitation of angina and acute coronary syndromes. Recently, large published clinical trials with CB1 antagonist rimonabant did not show any significant benefit of this agent in preventing progression of atherosclerosis. In light of these findings and emerging data on multiple pathways linking cannabinoids to atherosclerosis, we discuss the literature on the role of cannabinoids in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We also propose a marijuana paradox, which implies that inhalation of marijuana may be linked to precipitation of acute coronary syndromes, but modulation of the endocannabinoid system by a noninhalation route may have a salutary effect on the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22278660

  8. Effects of chlorophyll and chlorophyllin on low-dose aflatoxin B1 pharmacokinetics in human volunteers: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Jubert, C; Mata, J; Bench, G; Dashwood, R; Pereira, C; Tracewell, W; Turteltaub, K; Williams, D; Bailey, G

    2009-04-20

    Chlorophyll (Chla) and chlorophyllin (CHL) were shown previously to reduce carcinogen bioavailability, biomarker damage, and tumorigenicity in trout and rats. These findings were partially extended to humans (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98, 14601-14606 (2001)), where CHL reduced excretion of aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-DNA repair products in Chinese unavoidably exposed to dietary AFB{sub 1}. However, neither AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetics nor Chla effects were examined. We conducted a small unblinded crossover study to establish AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters in human volunteers, and to explore possible effects of CHL or Chla co-treatment on those parameters. For protocol 1, fasted subjects received an IRB-approved dose of 14C-AFB{sub 1} (30 ng, 5 nCi) by capsule with 100 ml water, followed by normal eating and drinking after hr 2. Blood and cumulative urine samples were collected over 72 hr, and {sup 14}C-AFB{sub 1} equivalents were determined by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. Protocols 2 and 3 were similar except capsules also contained 150 mg of purified Chla, or CHL, respectively. All protocols were repeated 3 times for each of three volunteers. The study revealed rapid human AFB{sub 1} uptake (plasma ka 5.05 {+-} 1.10 hr-1, Tmax 1.0 hr) and urinary elimination (95% complete by 24 hr) kinetics. Chla and CHL treatment each significantly impeded AFB{sub 1} absorption and reduced Cmax and AUC's (plasma and urine) in one or more subjects. These initial results provide AFB{sub 1} pharmacokinetic parameters previously unavailable for humans, and suggest that Chla or CHL co-consumption may limit the bioavailability of ingested aflatoxin in humans, as they do in animal models.

  9. An indirect sandwich ELISA for the determination of agkisacutacin in human serum: application to pharmacokinetic study in Chinese healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-Nan; Dai, Xiang-Rong; Liu, Juan-Juan; Li, Xiang-Hong; Yang, Jing-Jing; Sun, Hua; Wu, Ping; Shen, Jie; Lu, Jian-Ping; Xie, Hai-Tang; Liu, Xiao-Quan

    2012-11-01

    The platelet receptor glycoprotein Ib-IX-V complex (GPIb-IX-V) plays a dominant role in the first step of platelet adhesion and arterial thrombus formation. Agkisacutacin, a C-type lectin-like protein (CLP) from Agkistrodon acutus venom, had been previously identified as an antagonist of platelet aggregation and a membrane glycoprotein Ib-binding protein (GPIb-bp). For the analysis of pharmacokinetics of agkisacutacin, an indirect sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was established and validated to quantify agkisacutacin in human serum. The method was precise and accurate over the entire linear range of 1.0 and 1000 pg/mL with a lower limit of quantification of 1.0 pg/mL. The intra- and inter-assay coefficient of variation ranged from 0.7 to 4.2% and 1.1 to 4.1%, respectively. Recovery obtained from the accuracy test, using three concentration levels, varied between 96.1 and 110.6%, confirming the assay's reliability. The long-term study showed agkisacutacin was stable at -70 °C up to 46 days. This ELISA was first used to assess the pharmacokinetics of agkisacutacin in healthy volunteers. The characteristics of pharmacokinetic showed that agkisacutacin could rapidly combine with GPIb and slowly dissociate from GPIb-bound form in the body. PMID:22738788

  10. Determination of phenazopyridine in human plasma via LC-MS and subsequent development of a pharmacokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Shang, Erxin; Xiang, Bingren; Liu, Guangyu; Xie, Shaofei; Wei, Wenyan; Lu, Jun

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes a new LC-MS method for the determination of phenazopyridine and the subsequent development of a pharmacokinetic model for phenazopyridine in vivo. Phenazopyridine hydrochloride is a strong analgesic used in the treatment of urinary tract infections. Although it has been used as a clinical treatment for a very long time, pharmacokinetic data and suitable methods for its determination in plasma are currently lacking. The study described in this paper used high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, HPLC-MS, to determine the plasma concentrations of phenazopyridine in human subjects after oral administration. After liquid-liquid extraction, the phenazopyridine in the plasma was analyzed on a C18 column under SIM mode. A double-peak phenomenon was observed in most of the concentration-time profiles of the subjects. Although some drugs are known to cause this phenomenon, phenazopyridine has not been reported to do so. Several possible causes were analyzed in order to obtain an explanation. We proposed a two-site absorption compartment model to fit the concentration data in vivo, which has one more absorption site than the classical one-compartment model. The model describes the concentration profiles in different dose groups well and could provide an explanation for the double-peak phenomenon. The three dose groups exhibited similar model parameters and a linear pharmacokinetic process over the dose range used.

  11. Pharmacokinetic modeling of a gel-delivered dapivirine microbicide in humans.

    PubMed

    Halwes, Michael E; Steinbach-Rankins, Jill M; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2016-10-10

    Although a number of drugs have been developed for the treatment and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, it has proven difficult to optimize the drug and dosage parameters. The vaginal tissue, comprised of epithelial, stromal and blood compartments presents a complex system which challenges evaluation of drug kinetics solely through empirical effort. To provide insight into the underlying processes, mathematical modeling and computational simulation have been applied to the study of retroviral microbicide pharmacokinetics. Building upon previous pioneering work that modeled the delivery of Tenofovir (TFV) via topical delivery to the vaginal environment, here we computationally evaluate the performance of the retroviral inhibitor dapivirine released from a microbicide gel. We adapt the TFV model to simulate the multicompartmental diffusion and uptake of dapivirine into the blood plasma and vaginal compartments. The results show that dapivirine is expected to accumulate at the interface between the gel and epithelium compartments due to its hydrophobic characteristics. Hydrophobicity also results in decreased diffusivity, which may impact distribution by up to 2 orders of magnitude compared to TFV. Maximum concentrations of dapivirine in the epithelium, stroma, and blood were 9.9e7, 2.45e6, and 119pg/mL, respectively. This suggests that greater initial doses or longer time frames are required to obtain higher drug concentrations in the epithelium. These observations may have important ramifications if a specific time frame is required for efficacy, or if a minimum/maximum concentration is needed in the mucus, epithelium, or stroma based on combined efficacy and safety data. PMID:27559026

  12. Effects of probenecid on the pharmacokinetics and elimination of acyclovir in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Laskin, O L; de Miranda, P; King, D H; Page, D A; Longstreth, J A; Rocco, L; Lietman, P S

    1982-01-01

    The effects of probenecid on the pharmacokinetics and renal clearance of acyclovir were studied in humans. Acyclovir (5 mg/kg) was given as a 1-h infusion to three volunteers with normal renal function both before and after oral administration of probenecid (1 g). The kinetics were well described by a two-compartment open model with zero-order infusion. The mean acyclovir concentrations at all time points after 1.0 h from the end of acyclovir infusion following probenecid administration were statistically higher than the corresponding mean acyclovir concentrations following the acyclovir infusion without probenecid administration. In the absence of probenecid, the renal clearance (248 +/- 80 ml/min per 1.73 m2) accounted for 83% of the total clearance (300 +/- 69 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and was almost threefold greater than the estimated creatinine clearance (90 +/- 48 ml/min per 1.73 m2). After probenecid administration, there was a 32% decline in renal clearance (248 to 168 ml/min per 1.73 m2; P less than or equal to 0.05), a 40% increase in the area under the curve (91.3 to 127.6 nmol.h/ml; P less than 0.05), and an 18% increase in the terminal plasma half-life (2.3 to 2.7 h; P less than 0.01). Although statistically significant, these effects due to the influence of probenecid probably have only limited clinical importance. In this study we confirmed that acyclovir is eliminated predominantly by renal clearance, both by glomerular filtration and tubular secretion; our results suggested that at least part of the tubular secretion is inhibited by probenecid. PMID:7103460

  13. The pharmacokinetic profile of crocetin in healthy adult human volunteers after a single oral administration.

    PubMed

    Umigai, N; Murakami, K; Ulit, M V; Antonio, L S; Shirotori, M; Morikawa, H; Nakano, T

    2011-05-15

    Crocetin, a unique carotenoid with a short carbon chain length, is an active compound of saffron and Gardenia jasminoides Ellis used as traditional herbal medicine. The present study was undertaken to investigate the pharmacokinetic profiles of crocetin in healthy adult subjects. The study was conducted as an open-label, single dose escalation with 10 Filipino volunteers (5 men and 5 women). The subjects received a single dose of crocetin at three doses (7.5, 15 and 22.5 mg) in one week interval. Blood samples were collected from the brachial vein before and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 24 h after administration. Plasma concentrations of crocetin were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Crocetin was rapidly absorbed and detected within an hour of administration with a mean time to reach maximum concentration (T(max)) of crocetin ranging from 4.0 to 4.8 h. The mean values of C(max) and AUC(0-24h) ranged from 100.9 to 279.7 ng/ml and 556.5 to 1720.8 ng. h/ml respectively. C(max) and AUC values increased with dose proportional manner. Crocetin was eliminated from human plasma with a mean elimination half life (T(½) of 6.1 to 7.5 h. In summary, there were no serious adverse events up to 22.5 mg dose of crocetin while crocetin was found to be absorbed more quickly than the other carotenoids such as β-carotene, lutein and lycopene. PMID:21112749

  14. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Efficacy of a Novel Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone: Fc Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Kwak, Hyun-Hee; Cho, Sung Yoon; Sohn, Young Bae; Park, Sung Won; Huh, Rimm; Kim, Jinsup; Ko, Ah-Ra; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2015-10-01

    The current recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy requires daily subcutaneous (sc) injections, which results in poor patient compliance, especially in young children. To reduce the dosing frequency, we generated a chimeric protein of rhGH and the Fc-domain of immunoglobulin G (IgG) (rhGH-Fc). The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of sc-injected rhGH-Fc were assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats and hypophysectomized rats, respectively. A single sc injection of rhGH-Fc at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg slowly reached a Cmax of 16.80 ng/mL and remained for 7 days with a half-life of 51.1 h. Conversely, a single sc injection of rhGH 0.2 mg/kg rapidly reached a Cmax of 46.88 ng/mL and declined with a half-life of 0.55 h to baseline values in 4 h. In the efficacy study, the sc-injected rhGH-Fc induced rapid weight gain and tibial width growth at a dose of 240 μg/animal. The effect of two injections of rhGH-Fc separated by 1 week was comparable to that of the same dose of 14 daily injections of rhGH. The rhGH-Fc is a novel candidate for long-acting rhGH therapy with more convenient weekly administration, as it reduces glomerular filtration and receptor-mediated clearance while allowing for the rapid reversal of potential adverse events.

  15. Recombinant human interleukin-3: pharmacokinetics after intravenous and subcutaneous bolus injection and effects on granulocyte kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hovgaard, D J; Folke, M; Mortensen, B T; Nissen, N I

    1994-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics of E. coli derived recombinant human interleukin-3 (rhIL-3) was studied following intravenous (i.v.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) bolus injection of rhIL-3. After i.v. bolus injection in eight patients, serum peak levels of 34.5-135.0 ng/ml were reached, followed by a rapid decline with a t1/2 alpha of 17 +/- 2 min and a t1/2 beta of 59 +/- 7 min. After s.c. bolus injection in five patients, the absorption was more prolonged with peak serum levels reached at 2.8 +/- 0.4 h. Elimination was also more protracted, and serum base-line levels were reached at 14-24 h. The immediate effect of rhIL-3 on peripheral white blood cells was less pronounced and more variable than previously found for G- or GM-CSF. Following i.v. administration, neutrophils showed a moderate drop to median 64% of initial values (range 42-85%) at median 30 min after injection (range 15-60 min) followed by an increase at 24 h to 69-288% of initial values. Eosinophils dropped to a median nadir of 34% and then gradually increased to maximum values in the range 135-720% at 18-24 h. The effect of rhIL-3 was further examined following i.v. injection of autologous 111Indium-labelled granulocytes in six patients. In steady state, i.v. injection of rhIL-3 caused a moderate drop in 111Indium activity of peripheral blood within 20 min without tendency to subsequent recovery. No change occurred in the activity recorded over the lungs and liver. The activity over the spleen decreased moderately in two patients. These results are strikingly different from those previously obtained after i.v. injection of rhGM-CSF.

  16. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  17. Framework selection can influence pharmacokinetics of a humanized therapeutic antibody through differences in molecule charge

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Tesar, Devin; Boswell, C Andrew; Cahaya, Hendry S; Wong, Anne; Zhang, Jianhuan; Meng, Y Gloria; Eigenbrot, Charles; Pantua, Homer; Diao, Jinyu; Kapadia, Sharookh B; Deng, Rong; Kelley, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) testing of a humanized (κI, VH3 framework) and affinity matured anti-hepatitis C virus E2-glycoprotein (HCV-E2) antibody (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v3) in rats revealed unexpected fast clearance (34.9 mL/day/kg). This antibody binds to the rat recycling receptor FcRn as expected for a human IgG1 antibody and does not display non-specific binding to baculovirus particles in an assay that is correlated with fast clearance in cynomolgus monkey. The antigen is not expressed in rat so target-dependent clearance does not contribute to PK. Removal of the affinity maturation changes (hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1) did not restore normal clearance. The antibody was re-humanized on a κ4, VH1 framework and the non-affinity matured version (hu5B3.κ4VH1.v1) was shown to have normal clearance (8.5 mL/day/kg). Since the change in framework results in a lower pI, primarily due to more negative charge on the κ4 template, the effect of additional charge variation on antibody PK was tested by incorporating substitutions obtained through phage display affinity maturation of hu5B3.κ1VH3.v1. A variant having a pI of 8.61 gave very fast clearance (140 mL/day/kg) whereas a molecule with pI of 6.10 gave slow clearance (5.8 mL/kg/day). Both antibodies exhibited comparable binding to rat FcRn, but biodistribution experiments showed that the high pI variant was catabolized in liver and spleen. These results suggest antibody charge can have an effect on PK through alterations in antibody catabolism independent of FcRn-mediated recycling. Furthermore, introduction of affinity maturation changes into the lower pI framework yielded a candidate with PK and virus neutralization properties suitable for clinical development. PMID:25517310

  18. Cannabinoid receptor CB2 is expressed on vascular cells, but not astroglial cells in the post-mortem human Huntington's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Dowie, Megan J; Grimsey, Natasha L; Hoffman, Therri; Faull, Richard L M; Glass, Michelle

    2014-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurological disease with motor, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Characterised by neuronal degeneration, HD pathology is initially apparent in the striatum and cortex. Considerable research has recently suggested that the neurological immune response apparent in brain injury and disease may provide a valuable therapeutic target. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors are localised and up-regulated on a number of peripheral immune cell types following inflammation and injury. However, their cellular location within the human brain during inflammation has not been well characterised. The present study shows CB2 is expressed in human post-mortem striatum in HD. Quantification revealed a trend towards an increase in CB2 staining with disease, but no significant difference was measured compared to neurologically normal controls. In HD striatal tissue, there is an up-regulation of the brains' resident immune cells, with a significant increase in GFAP-positive astrocyte staining at both grade 1 (685±118%) and grade 3 (1145±163%) and Iba1-positive microglia at grade 1 (299±27%) but not grade 3 (119±48%), compared to neurologically normal controls. Both cell types exhibit irregular cell morphology, particularly at higher grades. Using double-labelled immunohistochemistry CB2 receptors are demonstrated not to be expressed on microglia or astrocytes and instead appear to be localised on CD31-positive blood vessel endothelium and vascular smooth muscle. Co-expression analysis suggests that CB2 may be more highly expressed on CD31 positive cells in HD brains than in control brains. Contrasting with evidence from rodent studies suggesting CB2 glial cell localisation, our observation that CB2 is present on blood vessel cells, with increased CD31 co-localisation in HD may represent a new context for CB2 therapeutic approaches to neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Effects of pomegranate juice on human cytochrome p450 3A (CYP3A) and carbamazepine pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Muneaki; Okumura, Manabu; Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Ogikubo, Tetsuya; Yamasaki, Keishi; Iwakiri, Tomomi; Setoguchi, Nao; Arimori, Kazuhiko

    2005-05-01

    In this study, we investigated whether components of pomegranate could inhibit CYP3A-mediated drug metabolism. The ability of pomegranate to inhibit the carbamazepine 10,11-epoxidase activity of CYP3A was examined using human liver microsomes, and pomegranate juice was shown to be a potent inhibitor of human CYP3A. Addition of 25 microl (5.0% v/v) of pomegranate juice resulted in almost complete inhibition of the carbamazepine 10,11-epoxidase activity of human CYP3A (1.8%). The inhibition potency of pomegranate juice was similar to that of grapefruit juice. In addition, we investigated the in vivo interaction between pomegranate juice and carbamazepine pharmacokinetics using rats. In comparison with water, the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of carbamazepine was approximately 1.5-fold higher when pomegranate juice (2 ml) was orally injected 1 h before the oral administration of the carbamazepine (50 mg/kg). On the other hand, the elimination half-life of carbamazepine and the AUC ratio of carbamazepine 10,11-epoxide to carbamazepine were not altered by the injection of pomegranate juice. These data suggest that pomegranate juice component(s) impairs the function of enteric but not hepatic CYP3A. Thus, we discovered that a component(s) of pomegranate inhibits the human CYP3A-mediated metabolism of carbamazepine. Furthermore, pomegranate juice alters the carbamazepine pharmacokinetics in rats.

  20. Species differences in the pharmacokinetics of cefadroxil as determined in wildtype and humanized PepT1 mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongjun; Smith, David E

    2016-05-01

    PepT1 (SLC15A1) is a high-capacity low-affinity transporter that is important in the absorption of digested di/tripeptides from dietary protein in the small intestine. PepT1 is also crucial for the intestinal uptake and absorption of therapeutic agents such as the β-lactam aminocephalosporins and antiviral prodrugs. Species differences, however, have been observed in PepT1-mediated intestinal absorption and pharmacokinetics, thereby, making it more difficult to predict systemic drug exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the in situ intestinal permeability of the PepT1 substrate cefadroxil in wildtype and humanized PepT1 (huPepT1) mice, and the in vivo absorption and disposition of drug after escalating oral doses. The in situ perfusions indicated that cefadroxil had a twofold higher affinity (i.e., twofold lower Km) for jejunal PepT1 in huPepT1 mice, lower but substantial permeability in all regions of the small intestine, and low but measureable permeability in the colon as compared to wildtype animals. The in vivo experiments indicated almost superimposable pharmacokinetic profiles between the two genotypes after intravenous bolus dosing of cefadroxil. In contrast, after oral dose escalation, the systemic exposure of cefadroxil was reduced in huPepT1 mice as compared to wildtype animals. Moreover, the AUC and Cmax versus dose relationships were nonlinear for huPepT1 but not wildtype mice, and similar to that observed from human subjects. In conclusion, our findings indicate that huPepT1 mice may provide a valuable tool in the drug discovery process by better predicting the oral pharmacokinetic profiles of PepT1 substrates in humans. PMID:26979860

  1. Assessment of juvenile pigs to serve as human pediatric surrogates for preclinical formulation pharmacokinetic testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pediatric drug development is hampered by the various biological, clinical, and formulation challenges associated with age-based populations. A primary cause for this lack of development is the inability to accurately predict ontogenic changes that affect pharmacokinetics (PK) in children using trad...

  2. Dosimetry and pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibody A6H with human renal cell carcinoma xenografts: single dose study.

    PubMed

    Palme, D F; Berkopec, J M; Wessels, B W; Elson, M K; Lange, P H; Vessella, R L

    1991-01-01

    Implantable miniature thermoluminescent dosimeters and conventional biodistribution analysis were used to determine the locally absorbed radiation dose delivered to three morphologically distinct human renal cell carcinoma xenografts (TK-39, TK-82 and TK-177C; N = 87) following a 50 microCi infusion of 131iodine-labeled monoclonal antibody A6H. Xenografts were clearly detected by radioimmuno-scintigraphy. Pronounced differences were noted among the three xenografts in MAb pharmacokinetics and in the locally absorbed irradiation doses which ranged from 2 to 5 cGy per injected microCi of 131iodine-labelled A6H. PMID:1917523

  3. The pharmacokinetics of 8-methoxypsoralen following i.v. administration in humans.

    PubMed

    Billard, V; Gambus, P L; Barr, J; Minto, C F; Corash, L; Tessman, J W; Stickney, J L; Shafer, S L

    1995-10-01

    1. 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) is a naturally occurring photoreactive substance which, in the presence of u.v. light, forms covalent adducts with pyrimidine bases in nucleic acids. For many years, 8-MOP has been used in PUVA therapy for treatment of psoriasis. Recently, the drug has been found to inactivate effectively bacteria spiked into platelet concentrates. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetics and safety of 8-MOP administered intravenously in the bactericidal dosage range. 2. Eighteen volunteers were divided into three treatment groups to receive, respectively, 5, 10, and 15 mg 8-MOP infused over 60 min. Frequent arterial samples were gathered, and the blood and plasma were assayed for 8-MOP concentration. The pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by moment and compartmental population analysis, the latter performed with the program NONMEM. Haemodynamics, ventilatory pattern, and subjective effects were recorded throughout the study. 3. The intravenously administered 8-MOP was well tolerated in all individuals, and no acute toxicity was observed. 4. The pharmacokinetics of 8-MOP were best described by a three-compartment mammillary model in which the volumes and clearances were proportional to weight. The mean pharmacokinetic parameters for the plasma concentrations were: V1 = 0.045 1 kg-1, V2 = 0.57 1 kg-1, V3 = 0.15 1 kg-1, CL1 (systemic) = 0.010 1 kg-1 min-1, CL2 = 0.0067 1 kg-1 min-1, CL3 = 0.012 1 kg-1 min-1. The mean pharmacokinetic parameters for the blood concentrations were: V1 = 0.061 1 kg-1, V2 = 1.15 1 kg-1, V3 = 0.21 1 kg-1, CL1 (systemic) = 0.015 1 kg-1 min-1, CL2 = 0.011 1 kg-1 min-1 and CL3 = 0.015 1 kg-1 min-1. 5. The plasma pharmacokinetic model described the observations with a median absolute error of 17%, and the blood pharmacokinetic model described the observations with a median absolute error of 18%. Analysis of the relative concentration of 8-MOP between plasma and red blood cells suggested concentration

  4. Pharmacokinetic modeling: Prediction and evaluation of route dependent dosimetry of bisphenol A in monkeys with extrapolation to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Jeffrey W. Twaddle, Nathan C.; Vanlandingham, Michelle; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2011-11-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys using intravenous (iv) and oral bolus doses of 100 {mu}g d6-BPA/kg (). This calibrated PBPK adult monkey model for BPA was then evaluated against published monkey kinetic studies with BPA. Using two versions of the adult monkey model based on monkey BPA kinetic data from and , the aglycone BPA pharmacokinetics were simulated for human oral ingestion of 5 mg d16-BPA per person (Voelkel et al., 2002). Voelkel et al. were unable to detect the aglycone BPA in plasma, but were able to detect BPA metabolites. These human model predictions of the aglycone BPA in plasma were then compared to previously published PBPK model predictions obtained by simulating the Voelkel et al. kinetic study. Our BPA human model, using two parameter sets reflecting two adult monkey studies, both predicted lower aglycone levels in human serum than the previous human BPA PBPK model predictions. BPA was metabolized at all ages of monkey (PND 5 to adult) by the gut wall and liver. However, the hepatic metabolism of BPA and systemic clearance of its phase II metabolites appear to be slower in younger monkeys than adults. The use of the current non-human primate BPA model parameters provides more confidence in predicting the aglycone BPA in serum levels in humans after oral ingestion of BPA. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A bisphenol A (BPA) PBPK model for the infant and adult monkey was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hepatic metabolic rate of BPA increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The systemic clearance rate of metabolites increased with age of the monkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gut wall metabolism of orally administered BPA was substantial across all ages of monkeys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aglycone BPA plasma concentrations were predicted in humans orally given oral doses of deuterated BPA.

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Concentration-Effect Relationship of Oral LSD in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dolder, Patrick C.; Schmid, Yasmin; Haschke, Manuel; Rentsch, Katharina M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pharmacokinetics of oral lysergic acid diethylamide are unknown despite its common recreational use and renewed interest in its use in psychiatric research and practice. Methods: We characterized the pharmacokinetic profile, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship, and urine recovery of lysergic acid diethylamide and its main metabolite after administration of a single oral dose of lysergic acid diethylamide (200 μg) in 8 male and 8 female healthy subjects. Results: Plasma lysergic acid diethylamide concentrations were quantifiable (>0.1ng/mL) in all the subjects up to 12 hours after administration. Maximal concentrations of lysergic acid diethylamide (mean±SD: 4.5±1.4ng/mL) were reached (median, range) 1.5 (0.5–4) hours after administration. Concentrations then decreased following first-order kinetics with a half-life of 3.6±0.9 hours up to 12 hours and slower elimination thereafter with a terminal half-life of 8.9±5.9 hours. One percent of the orally administered lysergic acid diethylamide was eliminated in urine as lysergic acid diethylamide, and 13% was eliminated as 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-lysergic acid diethylamide within 24 hours. No sex differences were observed in the pharmacokinetic profiles of lysergic acid diethylamide. The acute subjective and sympathomimetic responses to lysergic acid diethylamide lasted up to 12 hours and were closely associated with the concentrations in plasma over time and exhibited no acute tolerance. Conclusions: These first data on the pharmacokinetics and concentration-effect relationship of oral lysergic acid diethylamide are relevant for further clinical studies and serve as a reference for the assessment of intoxication with lysergic acid diethylamide. PMID:26108222

  6. Effect of green tea on pharmacokinetics of 5-fluorouracil in rats and pharmacodynamics in human cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jinping; Gu, Chenxin; Shang, Weihu; Du, Jinglei; Yin, Wei; Zhu, Meilin; Wang, Wei; Han, Mei; Lu, Weidong

    2011-06-01

    Tea drinking is widely practiced in the world and has recently increased among cancer patients. However, the effects of concurrent consumption of tea on the bioavailability and the net therapeutic potential of co-administered chemical drugs are not clear. In this study, the effects of green tea on the pharmacokinetics of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in rats and the pharmacodynamics in human cell lines in vitro were studied. The pharmacokinetic experiment indicated that there was an approximately 151% increase in the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and an approximately 425% increase in the area under the plasma concentration curve (AUC) of 5-FU in the green tea-treated group compared with the control group. Green tea consumption increased the plasma concentration of 5-FU. In addition, the pharmacodynamics experiment showed that at the moderate dose level (equivalent to <6 cups daily in human), neither fresh green tea extract nor (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) showed significant additive effects on the cytotoxicity of 5-FU in human cell lines. The results showed that it is crucial to perform therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) when the cancer patients have a habit of drinking green tea. PMID:21440026

  7. Assessment of chimeric mice with humanized livers in new drug development: generation of pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity data for selecting the final candidate compound.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    1. Chimeric mice with humanized livers are expected to be a novel tool for new drug development. This review discusses four applications where these animals can be used efficiently to collect supportive data for selecting the best compound in the final stage of drug discovery. 2. The first application is selection of the final compound based on estimated pharmacokinetic parameters in humans. Since chimeric mouse livers are highly repopulated with human hepatocytes, hepatic clearance values in vivo could be used preferentially to estimate pharmacokinetic profiles for humans. 3. The second is prediction of human-specific or disproportionate metabolites. Chimeric mice reproduce human-specific metabolites of drugs under development to conform to ICH guidance M3(R2), except for compounds that were extensively eliminated by co-existing mouse hepatocytes. 4. The third is identifying metabolites with distinct pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Slow metabolite elimination specifically in humans increases its exposure level, but if its elimination is faster in laboratory animals, the animal exposure level might not satisfy ICH guidance M3(R2). 5. Finally, two examples of reproducing acute liver toxicity in chimeric mice are introduced. Integrated pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity information are expected to assist pharmaceutical scientists in selecting the best candidate compound in new drug development.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of flavanone glycosides after ingestion of single doses of fresh-squeezed orange juice versus commercially processed orange juice in healthy humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange juice is a rich source of flavonoids known to be beneficial to cardiovascular health in humans. The objective of this study was to analyze the pharmacokinetics of the main flavanone glycosides, hesperidin and narirutin, in humans after the consumption of two types of orange juice, fresh squee...

  9. Human serum butyrylcholinesterase: in vitro and in vivo stability, pharmacokinetics, and safety in mice.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashima; Sun, Wei; Luo, Chunyuan; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2005-12-15

    The use of exogenously administered cholinesterases (ChEs) as bioscavengers of highly toxic organophosphate (OP) nerve agents is now sufficiently well documented to make them a highly viable prophylactic treatment against this potential threat. Of the ChEs evaluated so far, human serum butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) is most suitable for human use. A dose of 200 mg (3 mg/kg) of HuBChE is envisioned as a prophylactic treatment in humans that can protect from an exposure of up to 2 x LD50 of soman. In addition to its use as a prophylactic for a variety of wartime scenarios, including covert actions, it also has potential use for first responders (civilians) reacting to terrorist nerve gas release. We recently, developed a procedure for the large-scale purification of HuBChE, which yielded approximately 6 g of highly purified enzyme from 120 kg of Cohn fraction IV-4. The enzyme had a specific activity of 700-750 U/mg and migrated as a single band on SDS-PAGE. To provide data for initiating an investigational new drug (IND) application for the use of this enzyme as a bioscavenger in humans, we established its pharmacokinetic properties, examined its safety in mice, and evaluated its shelf life at various temperatures. In mice administered various doses up to 90 mg/kg, enzyme activity reached peak levels in circulation at 10 and 24 h following i.p. and i.m. injections, respectively. The enzyme displayed a mean residence time (MRT) of 40-50 h, regardless of the route of administration or dose of injected enzyme. Mice were euthanized 2 weeks following enzyme administration and tissues were examined grossly or microscopically for possible toxic effects. Results suggest that HuBChE does not exhibit any toxicity in mice as measured by general observation, serum chemistry, hematology, gross or histologic tissue changes. The shelf life of this enzyme stored at 4, 25, 37, and 45 degrees C was determined in lyophilized form. The enzyme was found to be stable when stored in

  10. Population pharmacokinetics of recombinant human C1 inhibitor in patients with hereditary angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Colm; Hayes, Siobhan; Relan, Anurag; van Amersfoort, Edwin S; Pijpstra, Rienk; Hack, C Erik

    2013-01-01

    Aims To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of recombinant human C1 inhibitor (rhC1INH) in healthy volunteers and hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients. Methods Plasma levels of C1INH following 294 administrations of rhC1INH in 133 subjects were fitted using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. The model was used to simulate maximal C1INH levels for the proposed dosing scheme. Results A one-compartment model with Michaelis–Menten elimination kinetics described the data. Baseline C1INH levels were 0.901 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.839–0.968] and 0.176 U ml−1 (95% CI: 0.154–0.200) in healthy volunteers and HAE patients, respectively. The volume of distribution of rhC1INH was 2.86 l (95% CI: 2.68–3.03). The maximal rate of elimination and the concentration corresponding to half this maximal rate were 1.63 U ml−1 h−1 (95% CI: 1.41–1.88) and 1.60 U ml−1 (95% CI: 1.14–2.24), respectively, for healthy volunteers and symptomatic HAE patients. The maximal elimination rate was 36% lower in asymptomatic HAE patients. Peak C1INH levels did not change upon repeated administration of rhC1INH. Bodyweight was found to be an important predictor of the volume of distribution. Simulations of the proposed dosing scheme predicted peak C1INH concentrations above the lower level of the normal range (0.7 U ml−1) for at least 94% of all patients. Conclusions The population PK model for C1INH supports a dosing scheme on a 50 U kg−1 basis up to 84 kg, with a fixed dose of 4200 U above 84 kg. The PK of rhC1INH following repeat administration are consistent with the PK following the first administration. PMID:23594263

  11. Pharmacokinetics of quercetin absorption from apples and onions in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyun; Mitchell, Alyson E

    2012-04-18

    A high-throughput method for the extraction and analysis of quercetin in human plasma using 96-well SPE and LC-(ESI)MS/MS (7 min/run) is described. Quercetin exists as a range of glycosides in foods. The dominant types of quercetin glycosides vary depending on genetics (i.e., species and cultivar). Dietary sources include onions and apples (i.e., the peel). Herein the quercetin glycoside composition was determined in a composite standard of dried apple peel and in onion powder. The predominant forms of quercetin in apple peel include quercetin O-arabinoside, 3-O-galactoside, 3-O-glucoside, and 3-O-rhamnoside. In the onion powder, quercetin occurred as the quercetin 3,4'-O-glucoside and 4'-O-glucoside. Pharmacokinetics relating to absorption (C(max), t(max), and AUC(0-24 h)) and elimination (k(el) and t(1/2)) were compared after the consumption of apple peel powder (AP), onion powder (OP), or a mixture of the apple peel and onion powder enriched applesauce (MP) by healthy volunteers (eight females and eight males). The enriched applesauce delivered ∼100 mg of quercetin aglycone equivalents. Consumption of the OP resulted in C(max) = 273.2 ± 93.7 ng/mL, t(max) = 2.0 ± 1.7 h, and t(1/2) = 14.8 ± 4.8 h, whereas the AP resulted in C(max) = 63.8 ± 22.4 ng/mL, t(max) = 2.9 ± 2.0 h, and t(1/2) = 65.4 ± 80.0 h. The MP resulted in an intermediate response with C(max) = 136.5 ± 45.8 ng/mL, t(max) = 2.4 ± 1.5 h, and t(1/2) = 18.7 ± 6.8 h. Consumption of the OP led to faster absorption, higher concentration, and greater bioavailability as compared to the AP. No significant gender-related differences were observed in the absorption of quercetin, whereas significant gender-related differences in the elimination half-time (t(1/2)) were observed. PMID:22439822

  12. Cannabinoids excite circadian clock neurons.

    PubMed

    Acuna-Goycolea, Claudio; Obrietan, Karl; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2010-07-28

    Cannabinoids, the primary active agent in drugs of abuse such as marijuana and hashish, tend to generate a distorted sense of time. Here we study the effect of cannabinoids on the brain's circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), using patch clamp and cell-attached electrophysiological recordings, RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and behavioral analysis. The SCN showed strong expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1R, as detected with RT-PCR. SCN neurons, including those using GABA as a transmitter, and axons within the SCN, expressed CB1R immunoreactivity. Behaviorally, cannabinoids did not alter the endogenous free-running circadian rhythm in the mouse brain, but did attenuate the ability of the circadian clock to entrain to light zeitgebers. In the absence of light, infusion of the CB1R antagonist AM251 caused a modest phase shift, suggesting endocannabinoid modulation of clock timing. Interestingly, cannabinoids had no effect on glutamate release from the retinohypothalamic projection, suggesting a direct action of cannabinoids on the retinohypothalamic tract was unlikely to explain the inhibition of the phase shift. Within the SCN, cannabinoids were excitatory by a mechanism based on presynaptic CB1R attenuation of axonal GABA release. These data raise the possibility that the time dissociation described by cannabinoid users may result in part from altered circadian clock function and/or entrainment to environmental time cues. PMID:20668190

  13. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 regulates STAT3 activity and its expression dictates the responsiveness to SR141716 treatment in human glioma patients' cells

    PubMed Central

    Ciaglia, Elena; Torelli, Giovanni; Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; D'Alessandro, Alba; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Fiore, Donatella; Zottola, Antonio Christian Pagano; Proto, Maria Chiara; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Herein we show that a majority of human brain tumor samples and cell lines over-expressed cannabinoid receptor CB1 as compared to normal human astrocytes (NHA), while uniformly expressed low levels of CB2. This finding prompted us to investigate the therapeutic exploitation of CB1 inactivation by SR141716 treatment, with regard to its direct and indirect cell-mediated effects against gliomas. Functional studies, using U251MG glioma cells and primary tumor cell lines derived from glioma patients expressing different levels of CB1, highlighted SR141716 efficacy in inducing apoptosis via G1 phase stasis and block of TGF-β1 secretion through a mechanism that involves STAT3 inhibition. According to the multivariate role of STAT3 in the immune escape too, interestingly SR141716 lead also to the functional and selective expression of MICA/B on the surface of responsive malignant glioma cells, but not on NHA. This makes SR141716 treated-glioma cells potent targets for allogeneic NK cell-mediated recognition through a NKG2D restricted mechanism, thus priming them for NK cell antitumor reactivity. These results indicate that CB1 and STAT3 participate in a new oncogenic network in the complex biology of glioma and their expression levels in patients dictate the efficacy of the CB1 antagonist SR141716 in multimodal glioma destruction. SIGNIFICANCE CB1 is implicated in the regulation of cellular processes linked to survival, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in several physio-pathological conditions. We shed light on previously unrecognized molecular mechanism of CB1-mediated modulation of human glioma progression and provide the first and original demonstration of CB1-STAT3 axis as a new target and predictor biomarkers of the benefit from specific therapies. Indeed CB1 antagonism capable of tumoral cell division' control while making the glioma immunovisible and engaging the immune system to fight it may represent a hopeful alternative to other established

  14. Ebola Virus Infection: Review of the Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Properties of Drugs Considered for Testing in Human Efficacy Trials.

    PubMed

    Madelain, Vincent; Nguyen, Thi Huyen Tram; Olivo, Anaelle; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Guedj, Jérémie; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Mentré, France

    2016-08-01

    The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease is the largest epidemic to date in terms of the number of cases, deaths, and affected areas. In October 2015, no antiviral agents had proven antiviral efficacy in patients. However, in September 2014, the World Health Organization inventoried and has since regularly updated a list of potential drug candidates with demonstrated antiviral efficacy in in vitro or animal models. This includes agents belonging to various therapeutic classes, namely direct antiviral agents (favipiravir and BCX4430), a combination of antibodies (ZMapp), type I interferons, RNA interference-based drugs (TKM-Ebola and AVI-7537), and anticoagulant drugs (rNAPc2). Here, we review the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information presently available for these drugs, using data obtained in healthy volunteers for pharmacokinetics and data obtained in human clinical trials or animal models for pharmacodynamics. Future studies evaluating these drugs in clinical trials are critical to confirm their efficacy in humans, propose appropriate doses, and evaluate the possibility of treatment combinations.

  15. UPLC-MS-MS Method for the Determination of Vilazodone in Human Plasma: Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    El-Bagary, Ramzia; Hashem, Hanaa; Fouad, Marwa; Tarek, Sally

    2016-09-01

    A sensitive, rapid and simple liquid chromatographic-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric (LC-ESI-MS-MS) method was developed for the quantitative determination of vilazodone in human plasma and for the study of the pharmacokinetic behavior of vilazodone in healthy Egyptian volunteers. With escitalopram as internal standard (IS), liquid-liquid extraction was used for the purification and preconcentration of analytes from human plasma matrix using diethyl ether. The separation was performed on an Acquity UPLC BEH shield RP C18 column (1.7 µm, 2.1 × 150 mm). Isocratic elution was applied using methanol-0.2% formic acid (90:10, v/v). Detection was performed on a triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer with multiple reaction monitoring mode via an electrospray ionization source at m/z 442.21 → 155.23 for vilazodone and m/z 325.14 → 109.2 for escitalopram. Linear calibration curves were obtained over the range of 1-200 ng/mL with the lower limit of quantification at 1 ng/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision showed relative standard deviation ≤3.3%. The total run time was 1.5 min. This method was successfully applied for clinical pharmacokinetic investigation, and a preliminary metabolic study was also carried out. PMID:27209054

  16. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and its Metabolite Triandimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Pharmacokinetic data for par...

  17. Use of biological markers and pharmacokinetics in human health risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hattis, D. )

    1991-01-01

    There are two reasons to connect discussions of biological markers and pharmacokinetics. First, both tend to open up the black box between exposure and effect. Doing this promises more complete scientific understanding than simple input-output analysis, the possibility of better mechanism-based projection of risk beyond the range of possible direct observations, and the possibility of greater sensitivity of analysis, in some cases going from the organism to the cell as the unit of analysis. Second, pharmacokinetic (or similar pharmacodynamic) analysis will often be essential for appropriate interpretation of biological marker information. One needs some sort of dynamic model of the generation and loss of the marker in relation to exposure in order to use a biological marker, either to form a better measure of dosage (either accumulated past dose, or biologically relevant dose), or to make an improved prediction of effect. (For example, the use of a blood cadmium level alone to predict kidney affects might be inferior to predictions based on aggregate past accumulation of cadmium in the kidney, based on the past history of cadmium blood levels {times} time). Several examples will be discussed of the use of biomarkers and pharmacokinetics in risk assessments for both carcinogenesis and other effects.

  18. [Cannabinoid-induced hyperemesis].

    PubMed

    Lieb, Martin; Palm, Ulrich; Nicolaus, Mathias; Reibke, Roland; Baghai, Thomas C

    2011-04-01

    In this case report, we describe a 29 year-old male patient with a history of chronic cannabis abuse presenting with recurrent vomiting, intense nausea and abdominal pain. Abstinence from cannabis resolved both vomiting and abdominal pain. We conclude that in case of chronic cannabis abuse, patients presenting with severe and chronic nausea, vomiting, accompanied by abdominal pain and compulsive behaviour (hot bathing), in the absence of other obvious causes, the diagnosis of cannabinoid-induced hyperemesis syndrome should be considered. PMID:21462097

  19. HPLC method for the determination of rosiglitazone in human plasma and its application in a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Mamidi, Rao N V S; Chaluvadi, Madhusudana R; Benjamin, Biju; Ramesh, Mullangi; Katneni, Kasiram; Babu, Aravinda P; Bhanduri, Jaydip; Rao, Naidu M U; Rajagopalan, Ramanujam

    2002-01-01

    Rosiglitazone (CAS 155141-29-0, Avandia) is a novel insulin sensitizer used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A sensitive high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for its determination in human plasma using fluorescence detection (excitation: 247 nm, emission: 367 nm) with a suitable internal standard (I. S.) is described. Ethyl acetate was used as extraction solvent. A mobile phase consisting of phosphate buffer, acetonitrile and methanol was used at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min on a C18 column. The absolute recovery was > 90% and the lower limit of quantitation was 5 ng/ml. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations ranged from 0.58-6.69% and 0.82-6.63%, respectively. The method described is simple, economical, precise and accurate and has been successfully applied in a pharmacokinetic study conducted in healthy human volunteers. PMID:12189780

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR ETHYLENE GLYCOL AND ITS MAJOR METABOLITE, GLYCOLIC ACID, IN RATS AND HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Bartels, M J.; Carney, E W.; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Gies, Richard A.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2005-05-19

    An extensive database on the toxicity and modes of action of the major industrial chemical, ethylene glycol (EG), has been developed over the past several decades. These studies have consistently identified the kidney as a primary target organ, with rats being more sensitive than mice and males more sensitive than females following chronic exposure. Renal toxicity has been associated with the terminal metabolite, oxalic acid which can precipitate with calcium to form crystals. EG also induces developmental toxicity, although these effects appear to require high-doses or accelerated dose-rates, and have been reported only in rats and mice. The developmental toxicity of EG has been attributed to the intermediate metabolite, glycolic acid (GA). The developmental toxicity of EG has been the subject of extensive research and regulatory review in recent years. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to integrate the extensive mode of action and pharmacokinetic data on EG and GA for use in developmental risk assessment. Metabolic rate constants and partition coefficients for EG and GA were estimated from in vitro studies. Other biochemical constants were optimized from appropriate in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The resulting PBPK model includes inhalation, oral, dermal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration. Metabolism of EG and GA were described in the liver with elimination via the kidneys. Several rat and human metabolism studies were used to validate the resulting PBPK model. Consistent with these studies, simulations indicated that the metabolism of EG to GA was essentially first-order (linear) up to 2500 mg/kg/day while the metabolism of GA saturated between bolus ethylene glycol doses of 200 and 1000 mg/kg/day. This saturation results in non-linear increases in blood GA concentrations, correlating with the developmental toxicity of EG. Pregnancy had no effect on maternal EG and GA kinetics over a broad dose

  1. A pilot, first-in-human, pharmacokinetic study of 9cUAB30 in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kolesar, Jill M; Hoel, Ryan; Pomplun, Marcia; Havighurst, Tom; Stublaski, Jeanne; Wollmer, Barbara; Krontiras, Helen; Brouillette, Wayne; Muccio, Donald; Kim, Kyungmann; Grubbs, Clinton J; Bailey, Howard E

    2010-12-01

    9cUAB30 is a synthetic analog of 9-cis-retinoic acid with chemopreventive activity in cell lines and in animal models. The purpose of this first-in-human evaluation of 9cUAB30 was to evaluate the single-dose pharmacokinetic profile and toxicity of the compound in healthy volunteers at 3 dose levels. This study enrolled 14 patients to receive a single dose of 5, 10, or 20 mg of 9cUAB30. Plasma and urine samples were collected to assess 9cUAB30 concentrations by a validated LC/MS MS method. 9cUAB30 was well tolerated, with 1 patient experiencing grade 2 toxicity and no grade 3 or 4 toxicities reported. T(max) occurred approximately 3 hours after dose administration with the plasma half-life ranging from 2.79 to 7.21 hours. AUC increased linearly across the examined dose range of 5 to 20 mg; C(max) was proportional to the log of the dose. The plasma clearance ranged from 25 to 39 L/h compared to the renal clearance which ranged from 0.018 to 0.103 L/h. 9cUAB30 has a favorable toxicity and pharmacokinetic profile, with oral availability and primarily hepatic metabolism. Further dose ranging studies with once a day dosing are underway.

  2. Human plasma-derived FVIII/VWD concentrate (Biostate): a review of experimental and clinical pharmacokinetic, efficacy and safety data

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Paul; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.; Curtin, Julie; Barnes, Chris; Dunkley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Human plasma-derived factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex concentrates are used to control bleeding in patients with von Willebrand disease (VWD) or haemophilia A (HA). The properties of these haemostatic factor concentrates vary widely, which can have significant clinical implications. This review provides an extensive overview of the molecular properties, in addition to pharmacokinetic, efficacy and safety data, and case studies of clinical experience of one such concentrate, Biostate. These data are discussed in the context of various therapeutic applications and compared with other factor concentrate products. Data are presented from data on file from the manufacturer; product information and published experimental and clinical pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy study data; and example case studies of clinical experience. The data discussed herein demonstrate that Biostate has well-established efficacy profiles in the treatment of patients with VWD or HA, with the control of bleeding rated as ‘excellent’, ‘good’ or ‘moderate’ in >90% of patients. In an immune-tolerance induction setting, 73% of patients achieved a complete response following treatment with Biostate. Biostate was generally well tolerated in patients with HA or VWD, with infrequent minor adverse events reported and no reported cases of clinically relevant thrombosis. PMID:27114741

  3. Pharmacokinetics and Disposition of the Thiouracil Derivative PF-06282999, an Orally Bioavailable, Irreversible Inactivator of Myeloperoxidase Enzyme, Across Animals and Humans.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jennifer Q; Varma, Manthena V; Wolford, Angela; Ryder, Tim; Di, Li; Feng, Bo; Terra, Steven G; Sagawa, Kazuko; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2016-02-01

    The thiouracil derivative PF-06282999 [2-(6-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide] is an irreversible inactivator of myeloperoxidase and is currently in clinical trials for the potential treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Concerns over idiosyncratic toxicity arising from bioactivation of the thiouracil motif to reactive species in the liver have been largely mitigated through the physicochemical (molecular weight, lipophilicity, and topological polar surface area) characteristics of PF-06282999, which generally favor elimination via nonmetabolic routes. To test this hypothesis, pharmacokinetics and disposition studies were initiated with PF-06282999 using animals and in vitro assays, with the ultimate goal of predicting human pharmacokinetics and elimination mechanisms. Consistent with its physicochemical properties, PF-06282999 was resistant to metabolic turnover from liver microsomes and hepatocytes from animals and humans and was devoid of cytochrome P450 inhibition. In vitro transport studies suggested moderate intestinal permeability and minimal transporter-mediated hepatobiliary disposition. PF-06282999 demonstrated moderate plasma protein binding across all of the species. Pharmacokinetics in preclinical species characterized by low to moderate plasma clearances, good oral bioavailability at 3- to 5-mg/kg doses, and renal clearance as the projected major clearance mechanism in humans. Human pharmacokinetic predictions using single-species scaling of dog and/or monkey pharmacokinetics were consistent with the parameters observed in the first-in-human study, conducted in healthy volunteers at a dose range of 20-200 mg PF-06282999. In summary, disposition characteristics of PF-06282999 were relatively similar across preclinical species and humans, with renal excretion of the unchanged parent emerging as the principal clearance mechanism in humans, which was anticipated based on its physicochemical properties and

  4. Synthetic Cannabinoids: Epidemiology, Pharmacodynamics, and Clinical Implications*

    PubMed Central

    Castaneto, Marisol S.; Gorelick, David A.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Hartman, Rebecca L.; Pirard, Sandrine; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthetic cannabinoids (SC) are a heterogeneous group of compounds developed to probe the endogenous cannabinoid system or as potential therapeutics. Clandestine laboratories subsequently utilized published data to develop SC variations marketed as abuseable “designer drugs.” In the early 2000’s, SC became popular as “legal highs” under brand names such as “Spice” and “K2,” in part due to their ability to escape detection by standard cannabinoid screening tests. The majority of SC detected in herbal products have greater binding affinity to the cannabinoid CB1 receptor than does Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive compound in the cannabis plant, and greater affinity at the CB1 than the CB2 receptor. In-vitro and animal in-vivo studies show SC pharmacological effects 2-100 times more potent than THC, including analgesic, anti-seizure, weight-loss, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer growth effects. SC produce physiological and psychoactive effects similar to THC, but with greater intensity, resulting in medical and psychiatric emergencies. Human adverse effects include nausea and vomiting, shortness of breath or depressed breathing, hypertension, tachycardia, chest pain, muscle twitches, acute renal failure, anxiety, agitation, psychosis, suicidal ideation, and cognitive impairment. Long-term or residual effects are unknown. Due to these public health consequences, many SC are classified as controlled substances. However, frequent structural modification by clandestine laboratories results in a stream of novel SC that may not be legally controlled or detectable by routine laboratory tests. Methods We present here a comprehensive review, based on a systematic electronic literature search, of SC epidemiology and pharmacology and their clinical implications. PMID:25220897

  5. Cannabinoid disposition in oral fluid after controlled cannabis smoking in frequent and occasional smokers.

    PubMed

    Newmeyer, Matthew N; Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Lee, Dayong; Mendu, Damodara R; Barnes, Allan J; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-10-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is an increasingly popular alternative matrix for drug testing, with cannabinoids being the most commonly identified illicit drug. Quantification of multiple OF cannabinoids and understanding differences in OF cannabinoid pharmacokinetics between frequent and occasional smokers improve test interpretation. The new Oral-Eze® OF collection device has an elution buffer that stabilizes analytes and improves drug recovery from the collection pad; however, its performance has not been independently evaluated. After controlled smoking of a 6.8% Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) cannabis cigarette by frequent and occasional smokers, OF was collected with the Oral-Eze device for up to 30 h. Samples were analyzed for multiple cannabinoids by a validated 2D-GC-MS method. Frequent smokers had significantly greater OF THCCOOH concentrations than occasional smokers at all times, and showed positive results for a significantly longer time. We evaluated multiple cannabinoid cut-offs; the shortest last detection times were observed when THC ≥ 1 μg/L was combined with CBD or CBN ≥ 1 μg/L. With these cut-offs, last detection times(1-13.5 h) were not significantly different between groups, demonstrating suitability for short-term cannabinoid detection independent of smoking history. Cut-offs utilizing THC alone or combined with THCCOOH showed significantly different last detection times between groups. The widest detection windows were observed with THC ≥ 1 or 2 μg/L or THCCOOH ≥ 20 ng/L. Our data illustrate the effectiveness of the Oral-Eze® device for OF collection, the impact of self-administered smoked cannabis history on OF cannabinoid results, and the ability to improve interpretation and tailor OF cannabinoid cut-offs to fulfill the detection window needs of a given program.

  6. Effect of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and kava kava (Piper methysticum) supplementation on digoxin pharmacokinetics in humans

    PubMed Central

    Gurley, Bill J.; Swain, Ashley; Barone, Gary W.; Williams, D. Keith; Breen, Philip; Yates, C. Ryan; Stuart, Leslie B.; Hubbard, Martha A.; Tong, Yudong; Cheboyina, Sreekhar

    2007-01-01

    Phytochemical-mediated modulation of p-glycoprotein (P-gp) and other drug transporters may give rise to many herb-drug interactions. Serial plasma concentration-time profiles of the P-gp substrate, digoxin, were used to determine whether supplementation with goldenseal or kava kava modified P-gp activity in vivo. Twenty healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to receive a standardized goldenseal (3210 mg daily) or kava kava (1227 mg daily) supplement for 14 days, followed by a 30-day washout period. Subjects were also randomized to receive rifampin (600 mg daily, 7 days) and clarithromycin (1000 mg daily, 7 days) as positive controls for P-gp induction and inhibition, respectively. Digoxin (Lanoxin®, 0.5 mg) was administered orally before and at the end of each supplementation and control period. Serial digoxin plasma concentrations were obtained over 24 hours and analyzed by chemiluminescent immunoassay. Comparisons of AUC(0–3), AUC(0–24), Cmax,, CL/F, and elimination half-life were used to assess the effects of goldenseal, kava kava, rifampin, and clarithromycin on digoxin pharmacokinetics. Rifampin produced significant reductions (p<0.01) in AUC(0–3), AUC(0–24), CL/F, T1/2, and Cmax, while clarithromycin increased these parameters significantly (p<0.01). With the exception of goldenseal’s effect on Cmax (14% increase), no statistically significant effects on digoxin pharmacokinetics were observed following supplementation with either goldenseal or kava kava. When compared to rifampin and clarithromycin, supplementation with these specific formulations of goldenseal or kava kava did not appear to affect digoxin pharmacokinetics, suggesting that these supplements are not potent modulators of P-gp in vivo. PMID:16221754

  7. Cannabinoids as pharmacotherapies for neuropathic pain: from the bench to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2009-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus, multiple sclerosis, and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) agonists, CB(2) selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e., inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Delta(9)-THC analogs (e.g., Marinol, Cesamet) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Delta(9)-THC and cannabidiol (e.g., Sativex, Cannador) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e., rating scales) and objective (i.e., stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research. PMID:19789075

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A HUMAN PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ITS MONO- AND DI-METHYLATED METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to estimate levels of arsenic and its metabolites in human tissues and urine after oral exposure to either arsenate (AsV) or arsnite (AsIII). The model consists of interconnected individual ...

  9. A model-based approach to predicting the human pharmacokinetics of a monoclonal antibody exhibiting target-mediated drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Luu, Kenneth T; Bergqvist, Simon; Chen, Enhong; Hu-Lowe, Dana; Kraynov, Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    In the drug discovery and development setting, the ability to accurately predict the human pharmacokinetics (PK) of a candidate compound from preclinical data is critical for informing the effective design of the first-in-human trial. PK prediction is especially challenging for monoclonal antibodies exhibiting nonlinear PK attributed to target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD). Here, we present a model-based method for predicting the PK of PF-03446962, an IgG2 antibody directed against human ALK1 (activin receptor-like kinase 1) receptor. Systems parameters as determined experimentally or obtained from the literature, such as binding affinity (k(on) and k(off)), internalization of the drug-target complex (k(int)), target degradation rate (k(deg)), and target abundance (R(0)), were directly integrated into the modeling and prediction. NONMEM 7 was used to model monkey PK data and simulate human PK profiles based on the construct of a TMDD model using a population-based approach. As validated by actual patient data from a phase I study, the human PK of PF-03446962 were predicted within 1- to 2-fold of observations. Whereas traditional approaches fail, this approach successfully predicted the human PK of a monoclonal antibody exhibiting nonlinearity because of TMDD. PMID:22414855

  10. A model-based approach to predicting the human pharmacokinetics of a monoclonal antibody exhibiting target-mediated drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Luu, Kenneth T; Bergqvist, Simon; Chen, Enhong; Hu-Lowe, Dana; Kraynov, Eugenia

    2012-06-01

    In the drug discovery and development setting, the ability to accurately predict the human pharmacokinetics (PK) of a candidate compound from preclinical data is critical for informing the effective design of the first-in-human trial. PK prediction is especially challenging for monoclonal antibodies exhibiting nonlinear PK attributed to target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD). Here, we present a model-based method for predicting the PK of PF-03446962, an IgG2 antibody directed against human ALK1 (activin receptor-like kinase 1) receptor. Systems parameters as determined experimentally or obtained from the literature, such as binding affinity (k(on) and k(off)), internalization of the drug-target complex (k(int)), target degradation rate (k(deg)), and target abundance (R(0)), were directly integrated into the modeling and prediction. NONMEM 7 was used to model monkey PK data and simulate human PK profiles based on the construct of a TMDD model using a population-based approach. As validated by actual patient data from a phase I study, the human PK of PF-03446962 were predicted within 1- to 2-fold of observations. Whereas traditional approaches fail, this approach successfully predicted the human PK of a monoclonal antibody exhibiting nonlinearity because of TMDD.

  11. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of use of the synthetic cannabinoid agonists UR-144 and XLR-11 in human urine.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Amanda L A; Ofsa, Bill; Keil, Alyssa Marie; Simon, John R; McMullin, Matthew; Logan, Barry K

    2014-09-01

    Ongoing changes in the synthetic cannabinoid drug market create the need for relevant targeted immunoassays for rapid screening of biological samples. We describe the validation and performance characteristics of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay designed to detect use of one of the most prevalent synthetic cannabinoids in urine, UR-144, by targeting its pentanoic acid metabolite. Fluorinated UR-144 (XLR-11) has been demonstrated to metabolize to this common product. The assay has significant cross-reactivity with UR-144-5-OH, UR-144-4-OH and XLR-11-4-OH metabolites, but <10% cross-reactivity with the parent compounds, and no measurable cross-reactivity with other synthetic cannabinoids and their metabolites at concentrations of <1,000 ng/mL. The assay's cutoff is 5 ng/mL relative to the pentanoic acid metabolite of UR-144, which is used as the calibrator. The method was validated with 90 positive and negative control urine samples for UR-144, XLR-11 and its metabolites tested versus liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were determined to be 100% for the assay at the specified cutoff. PMID:24908262

  12. Synthetic cannabinoids as drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John C

    2012-06-01

    In the last decade a number of products have appeared in various countries that contain synthetic cannabinoids. This article reviews the history of the sale of these drugs, and the evidence that they contain synthetic cannabinoids. The biochemistry of the synthetic cannabinoids identified thus far is discussed, including a discussion of chemical structures and biochemical targets. The cannabinoid receptor targets for these drugs are discussed, as well as other possible targets such as serotonin receptors. Evidence for the abuse potential of these drugs is reviewed. The toxicity of synthetic cannabinoids and cannabinoid products is reviewed and compared to that of the phytocannabinoid Δ9- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). As cannabinoids are a structurally diverse class of drugs, it is concluded that synthetic cannabinoids should be classified by biological activity rather than by structure, and that if this isn't done, novel synthetic cannabinoids will continue to emerge that fall outside of current regulatory classification models.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Oral Heparin Solid Dosage Form in Healthy Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mousa, Shaker A.; Zhang, Fuming; Aljada, Ahmad; Chaturvedi, Seema; Takieddin, Majde; Zhang, Haifeng; Chi, Lianli; Castelli, M. Cristina; Friedman, Kristen; Goldberg, Michael M.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation determined the molecular structure and the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of oral unfractionated heparin containing oral absorption enhancer sodium N-[8-(2-hydroxybenzoyl) amino]caprylate, salcaprozate sodium (SNAC) and assessed the safety and tolerability of the orally dosed heparin solid dosage form versus other routes. Sixteen healthy men were included in this single-dose, 3-way crossover, randomized, open-label study. Disaccharide compositional analysis was performed using capillary high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry detection. The pharmacodynamics of heparin were obtained from analysis of plasma anti–factor Xa, anti–factor IIa, activated partial thromboplastin time, and total tissue factor pathway inhibitor data. The molecular weight properties and the disaccharide composition of orally administered unfractionated heparin/SNAC and parenterally administered unfractionated heparin are identical and consistent with the starting pharmaceutical standard heparin. Furthermore, the anti–factor Xa/anti–factor IIa ratio achieved is of approximately 1:1. This is the first true pharmacokinetic study to measure the chemical compositions of heparin administered by different routes. PMID:18048572

  14. High-dose short-term administration of naringin did not alter talinolol pharmacokinetics in humans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, M A; Staubach, P; Tamai, I; Langguth, P

    2015-02-20

    Naringin is considered the major causative ingredient of the inhibition of intestinal drug uptake by grapefruit juice. Moreover, it is contained in highly dosed nutraceuticals available on the market. A controlled, open, randomized, crossover study was performed in 10 healthy volunteers to investigate the effect of high-dose naringin on the bioavailability of talinolol, a substrate of intestinal organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP)-mediated uptake. Following 6-day supplementation with 3 capsules of 350 mg naringin daily, 100mg talinolol were administered orally with 3 capsules of the same dietary supplement (1050 mg naringin) on the seventh day. This test treatment was compared to 100mg talinolol only (control). The results showed that short-term high-dose naringin supplementation did not significantly affect talinolol pharmacokinetics. Geometric mean ratios of test versus control ranged between 0.90 and 0.98 for talinolol c(max), AUC(0-48 h), AUC(0-∞), t(1/2) and A(e(0-48 h)). The high dose may provoke inhibition of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) which counteracts the uptake inhibition. As disintegration and dissolution processes are required for the solid dosage form, dissolved naringin may arrive at the site of interaction after talinolol is already absorbed. In conclusion, the effect of nutraceuticals on drug pharmacokinetics can deviate from that observed when administered as food component due to the different dose and dosage form.

  15. Simultaneous quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using WAX-S tips.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Maria; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Sempio, Cristina; Barnes, Allan J; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive cannabinoid urine quantification method may improve clinical and forensic result interpretation and is necessary to support our clinical research. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry quantification method for ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCAA), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THCV (THCVCOOH), THC-glucuronide (THC-gluc), and THCCOOH-glucuronide (THCCOOH-gluc) in urine was developed and validated according to the Scientific Working Group on Toxicology guidelines. Sample preparation consisted of disposable pipette extraction (WAX-S) of 200 μL urine. Separation was achieved on a Kinetex C18 column using gradient elution with flow rate 0.5 mL/min, mobile phase A (10 mM ammonium acetate in water), and mobile phase B (15 % methanol in acetonitrile). Total run time was 14 min. Analytes were monitored in both positive and negative ionization modes by scheduled multiple reaction monitoring. Linear ranges were 0.5-100 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH; 0.5-50 μg/L for 11-OH-THC, CBD, CBN, THCAA, and THC-gluc; 1-100 μg/L for CBG, THCV, and THCVCOOH; and 5-500 μg/L for THCCOOH-gluc (R (2) > 0.99). Analytical biases were 88.3-113.7 %, imprecisions 3.3-14.3 %, extraction efficiencies 42.4-81.5 %, and matrix effect -10 to 32.5 %. We developed and validated a comprehensive, simple, and rapid LC-MS/MS cannabinoid urine method for quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites. This method is being used in a controlled cannabis administration study, investigating urine cannabinoid markers documenting recent cannabis use, chronic frequent smoking, or route of drug administration and potentially improving urine cannabinoid result interpretation. PMID:27422645

  16. Simultaneous quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using WAX-S tips.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Maria; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Sempio, Cristina; Barnes, Allan J; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive cannabinoid urine quantification method may improve clinical and forensic result interpretation and is necessary to support our clinical research. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry quantification method for ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCAA), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THCV (THCVCOOH), THC-glucuronide (THC-gluc), and THCCOOH-glucuronide (THCCOOH-gluc) in urine was developed and validated according to the Scientific Working Group on Toxicology guidelines. Sample preparation consisted of disposable pipette extraction (WAX-S) of 200 μL urine. Separation was achieved on a Kinetex C18 column using gradient elution with flow rate 0.5 mL/min, mobile phase A (10 mM ammonium acetate in water), and mobile phase B (15 % methanol in acetonitrile). Total run time was 14 min. Analytes were monitored in both positive and negative ionization modes by scheduled multiple reaction monitoring. Linear ranges were 0.5-100 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH; 0.5-50 μg/L for 11-OH-THC, CBD, CBN, THCAA, and THC-gluc; 1-100 μg/L for CBG, THCV, and THCVCOOH; and 5-500 μg/L for THCCOOH-gluc (R (2) > 0.99). Analytical biases were 88.3-113.7 %, imprecisions 3.3-14.3 %, extraction efficiencies 42.4-81.5 %, and matrix effect -10 to 32.5 %. We developed and validated a comprehensive, simple, and rapid LC-MS/MS cannabinoid urine method for quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites. This method is being used in a controlled cannabis administration study, investigating urine cannabinoid markers documenting recent cannabis use, chronic frequent smoking, or route of drug administration and potentially improving urine cannabinoid result interpretation.

  17. Effects of pomegranate juice on human cytochrome P450 2C9 and tolbutamide pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Masashi; Hidaka, Muneaki; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Kawano, Yohei; Yamasaki, Keishi; Okumura, Manabu; Arimori, Kazuhiko

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we investigated whether pomegranate juice could inhibit CYP2C9 activity. The ability of pomegranate juice to inhibit the diclofenac 4'-hydroxylase activity of human CYP2C9 was examined using human liver microsomes. Pomegranate juice was shown to be a potent inhibitor of human CYP2C9. The addition of 25 microl (5% v/v) of pomegranate juice resulted in almost complete inhibition of human CYP2C9 activity. In addition, we investigated the effect of pomegranate juice on the pharmacokinetics of tolbutamide (substrate for CYP2C9) in rats. Relative to the control group, the area under the concentration-time curve was approximately 1.2-fold greater when pomegranate juice (3 ml) was injected p.o. 1 h before the p.o. administration of the tolbutamide (20 mg/kg). The elimination half-life of tolbutamide was not altered by pomegranate juice administration. These results suggest pomegranate juice ingestion inhibits the intestinal metabolism of tolbutamide without inhibiting the hepatic metabolism in rats. Thus, we discovered that pomegranate juice inhibited human CYP2C9 activity and furthermore increased tolbutamide bioavailability in rats.

  18. The Molecular Engineering of an Anti-Idiotypic Antibody for Pharmacokinetic Analysis of a Fully Human Anti-Infective.

    PubMed

    Lim, She Yah; Chan, Conrad E Z; Lisowska, Malgorzata M; Hanson, Brendon J; MacAry, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Anti-idiotype monoclonal antibodies represent a class of reagents that are potentially optimal for analyzing the pharmacokinetics of fully human, anti-infective antibodies that have been developed as therapeutic candidates. This is particularly important where direct pathogen binding assays are complicated by requirements for biosafety level III or IV for pathogen handling. In this study, we describe the development of a recombinant, anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody termed E1 for the detection of a fully human, serotype-specific, therapeutic antibody candidate for the BSLIII pathogen Dengue virus termed 14c10 hG1. E1 was generated by naïve human Fab phage library panning technology and subsequently engineered as a monoclonal antibody. We show that E1 is highly specific for the fully-folded form of 14c10 hG1 and can be employed for the detection of this antibody in healthy human subjects' serum by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, we show that E1 is capable of blocking the binding of 14c10 hG1 to dengue virus serotype 1. Finally, we show that E1 can detect 14c10 hG1 in mouse serum after the administration of the therapeutic antibody in vivo. E1 represents an important new form of ancillary reagent that can be utilized in the clinical development of a therapeutic human antibody candidate. PMID:26700297

  19. Determination of underivatized glucosamine in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection: application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Pashkova, E; Pirogov, A; Bendryshev, A; Ivanaynen, E; Shpigun, O

    2009-11-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method with electrochemical detection was developed for the determination of glucosamine in human plasma. Plasma samples were analyzed after a simple two-step procedure of protein precipitation with subsequent dilution. The chromatographic separation was performed on a Carbopack column (3 mm x 150 mm) with a mobile phase consisting of water and 200 mM sodium hydroxide. Detection was performed electrochemically in a pulsed voltammetry mode. The limit of detection was 2.0 ng/ml, inter- and intra-day precision were less than 10%. The method was successfully applied to the investigation of the pharmacokinetics of glucosamine in healthy man volunteers.

  20. Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Cerebral Metabolism: Potential Applications in Stroke and Disorders of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Julius Gene S; Schmidt, Elena B

    2015-09-01

    No compound has generated more attention in both the scientific and recently in the political arena as much as cannabinoids. These diverse groups of compounds referred collectively as cannabinoids have both been vilified due to its dramatic and potentially harmful psychotropic effects and glorified due to its equally dramatic and potential application in a number of acute and chronic neurological conditions. Previously illegal to possess, cannabis, the plant where natural form of cannabinoids are derived, is now accepted in a growing number of states for medicinal purpose, and some even for recreational use, increasing opportunities for more scientific experimentation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the growing body of literature on cannabinoids and to present an overview of our current state of knowledge of the human endocannabinoid system in the hope of defining the future of cannabinoids and its potential applications in disorders of the central nervous system, focusing on stroke. PMID:26238742

  1. Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Cerebral Metabolism: Potential Applications in Stroke and Disorders of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Julius Gene S; Schmidt, Elena B

    2015-09-01

    No compound has generated more attention in both the scientific and recently in the political arena as much as cannabinoids. These diverse groups of compounds referred collectively as cannabinoids have both been vilified due to its dramatic and potentially harmful psychotropic effects and glorified due to its equally dramatic and potential application in a number of acute and chronic neurological conditions. Previously illegal to possess, cannabis, the plant where natural form of cannabinoids are derived, is now accepted in a growing number of states for medicinal purpose, and some even for recreational use, increasing opportunities for more scientific experimentation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the growing body of literature on cannabinoids and to present an overview of our current state of knowledge of the human endocannabinoid system in the hope of defining the future of cannabinoids and its potential applications in disorders of the central nervous system, focusing on stroke.

  2. Human in Vivo Pharmacokinetics of [(14)C]Dibenzo[def,p]chrysene by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Following Oral Microdosing.

    PubMed

    Madeen, Erin; Corley, Richard A; Crowell, Susan; Turteltaub, Kenneth; Ognibene, Ted; Malfatti, Mike; McQuistan, Tammie J; Garrard, Mary; Sudakin, Dan; Williams, David E

    2015-01-20

    Dibenzo(def,p)chrysene (DBC), (also known as dibenzo[a,l]pyrene), is a high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) found in the environment, including food, produced by the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. DBC, classified by IARC as a 2A probable human carcinogen, has a relative potency factor (RPF) in animal cancer models 30-fold higher than benzo[a]pyrene. No data are available describing the disposition of high molecular weight (>4 rings) PAHs in humans to compare to animal studies. Pharmacokinetics of DBC was determined in 3 female and 6 male human volunteers following oral microdosing (29 ng, 5 nCi) of [(14)C]-DBC. This study was made possible with highly sensitive accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), capable of detecting [(14)C]-DBC equivalents in plasma and urine following a dose considered of de minimus risk to human health. Plasma and urine were collected over 72 h. The plasma Cmax was 68.8 ± 44.3 fg·mL(-1) with a Tmax of 2.25 ± 1.04 h. Elimination occurred in two distinct phases: a rapid (α)-phase, with a T1/2 of 5.8 ± 3.4 h and an apparent elimination rate constant (Kel) of 0.17 ± 0.12 fg·h(-1), followed by a slower (β)-phase, with a T1/2 of 41.3 ± 29.8 h and an apparent Kel of 0.03 ± 0.02 fg·h(-1). In spite of the high degree of hydrophobicity (log Kow of 7.4), DBC was eliminated rapidly in humans, as are most PAHs in animals, compared to other hydrophobic persistent organic pollutants such as, DDT, PCBs and TCDD. Preliminary examination utilizing a new UHPLC-AMS interface, suggests the presence of polar metabolites in plasma as early as 45 min following dosing. This is the first in vivo data set describing pharmacokinetics in humans of a high molecular weight PAH and should be a valuable addition to risk assessment paradigms.

  3. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shusen; Zimmermann, Anthony E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this review is to describe cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS), which is thought to be induced by long-term cannabis use, and provide clinical pharmacists with information to manage the hyperemetic phase of CHS. Method: Published literature was searched and reviewed using PubMed. Results: CHS is characterized by intractable nausea and vomiting without an obvious organic cause and associated learned compulsive hot water bathing behavior. Patients often seek care in the emergency department (ED) for symptomatic relief. Conclusion: CHS is potentially underrecognized and underdiagnosed in the ED, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis in long-term cannabis use patients with CHS symptoms to avoid unnecessary extensive diagnostic workup including invasive radiologic imaging. Pharmacists have an important role in CHS recognition, education, and symptom management. PMID:24421535

  4. Cross-species pharmacokinetic comparison from mouse to man of a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide, ISIS 301012, targeting human apolipoprotein B-100.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rosie Z; Kim, Tae-Won; Hong, An; Watanabe, Tanya A; Gaus, Hans J; Geary, Richard S

    2007-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl)-modified oligonucleotide, ISIS 301012 [targeting human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100)], was characterized in mouse, rat, monkey, and human. Plasma pharmacokinetics following parental administration was similar across species, exhibiting a rapid distribution phase with t(1/2alpha) of several hours and a prolonged elimination phase with t(1/2beta) of days. The prolonged elimination phase represents equilibrium between tissues and circulating drug due to slow elimination from tissues. Absorption was nearly complete following s.c. injection, with bioavailability ranging from 80 to 100% in monkeys. Plasma clearance scaled well across species as a function of body weight alone, and this correlation was improved when corrected for plasma protein binding. In all of the animal models studied, the highest tissue concentrations of ISIS 301012 were observed in kidney and liver. Urinary excretion was less than 3% in monkeys and human in the first 24 h. ISIS 301012 is highly bound to plasma proteins, probably preventing rapid removal by renal filtration. However, following 25 mg/kg s.c. administration in mouse and 5-mg/kg i.v. bolus administration in rat, plasma concentrations of ISIS 301012 exceeded their respective protein binding capacity. Thus, urinary excretion increased to 16% or greater within the first 24 h. Albeit slow, urinary excretion of ISIS 301012 and its shortened metabolites is the ultimate elimination pathway of this compound, as demonstrated by 32% of dose recovered in total excreta by 14 days in a rat mass balance study. The pharmacokinetics of ISIS 301012 in human is predictable from the pharmacokinetics measured in animals. The pharmacokinetic properties of ISIS 301012 provide guidance for clinical development and support infrequent dose administration.

  5. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of hydrogen cyanide levels in human breath.

    PubMed

    Stamyr, Kristin; Mörk, Anna-Karin; Johanson, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a potent and fast-acting toxin increasingly recognized as an important cause of death in fire victims. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of cyanide poisoning are essential to avoid fatalities. Unfortunately, there are at present few rapid diagnostic methods. A noninvasive methodology would be to use HCN in exhaled air as a marker for systemic exposure. To explore this possibility, we developed a preliminary physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. The model suggests that breath HCN levels following inhalation exposure at near-lethal and lethal conditions are 0.1-1 ppm, i.e., one to two orders of magnitude higher than the background breath level of about 0.01 ppm in unexposed subjects. Hence, our results imply that breath analysis may be used as a rapid diagnostic method for cyanide poisoning.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Dapsone Administered Daily and Weekly in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Mirochnick, Mark; Cooper, Ellen; McIntosh, Ken; Xu, Jing; Lindsey, Jane; Jacobus, David; Mofenson, Lynne; Sullivan, John L.; Dankner, Wayne; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Nachman, Sharon; Wara, Diane W.; Johnson, Daniel; Bonagura, Vincent R.; Rathore, Mobeen H.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; McNamara, James

    1999-01-01

    Although dapsone is a commonly used alternative agent for prophylaxis against Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in children intolerant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, there are few data that describe dapsone pharmacokinetics in children. We studied dapsone pharmacokinetics in 30 children (median age, 2.8 years; age range, 0.3 to 12 years) receiving a new proprietary liquid preparation by three dosing regimens (1 mg/kg of body weight daily, 2 mg/kg daily, or 4 mg/kg weekly). Dosing of children with 2 mg/kg daily or 4 mg/kg weekly resulted in peak concentrations equivalent to those reached in adults receiving 100-mg tablets daily. For the entire population, the median half-life was 22.2 h (range, 7.1 to 40.3 h), the median oral clearance was 0.0365 liter/kg/h (range, 0.0104 to 0.1021 liter/kg/h), and the median oral apparent volume of distribution was 1.13 liters/kg (range, 0.50 to 2.32 liters/kg). The median dapsone oral clearance was significantly increased in those infants less than 2 years of age compared to the oral clearance in those over 2 years of age (0.0484 versus 0.0278 liter/kg/h; P = 0.011). These data suggest that absorption of this liquid preparation is adequate and that the concentrations in the sera of children receiving 2 mg/kg daily or 4 mg/kg weekly are equivalent to those seen in adults receiving standard dapsone dosing. Dapsone oral clearance appears to be increased in children under 2 years of age. PMID:10543733

  7. Effect of MAO-A inhibition on the pharmacokinetics of almotriptan, an antimigraine agent in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fleishaker, Joseph C; Ryan, Kristi K; Jansat, Josep M; Carel, Barabara J; Bell, David J A; Burke, Moira T; Azie, Nkechi E

    2001-01-01

    Aims To assess the effect of a reversible MAO-A inhibitor, moclobemide, on the single-dose pharmacokinetics of almotriptan and assess the clinical consequences of any interaction. Methods Twelve healthy volunteers received the following treatments in a randomized, open-label, two-way crossover design (with a 1 week washout between treatments): (A) one 150 mg moclobemide tablet every 12 h for 8 days and one 12.5 mg almotriptan tablet on the morning of day 8; and (B) one 12.5 mg almotriptan tablet on day 8. Plasma almotriptan was quantified by h.p.l.c.-MS-MS, while urinary concentrations were measured by h.p.l.c.-u.v. Vital signs, ECGs, and adverse events were evaluated after almotriptan administration. Treatment effects on pharmacokinetics and vital signs were assessed by analysis of variance. Results Mean almotriptan AUC was higher (483 ± 99.9 vs 352 ± 75.4 ng ml−1 h, P = 0.0001) and oral clearance was lower (26.6 ± 4.00 vs 36.6 ± 5.89 l h−1, P = 0.0001) when almotriptan was administered with moclobemide. Mean half-life was longer (4.22 ± 0.78 vs 3.41 ± 0.45 h, P = 0.0002) after coadministration with moclobemide. Renal clearance of almotriptan was unaffected by moclobemide. No serious adverse events occurred and no clinically significant vital sign changes were observed. Conclusions Moclobemide increased plasma concentrations of almotriptan on average by 37%, but the combined administration of these two compounds was well tolerated. The degree of interaction was much less than that seen previously for sumatriptan or zolmitriptan given with moclobemide. PMID:11422001

  8. Pharmacokinetics of Cannabis in Cancer Cachexia-Anorexia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Stephanie E; Martin, Jennifer H

    2016-07-01

    Anorexia can affect up to 90 % of people with advanced cancer. It is a complex symptom associated with changes in taste, lack of hunger at mealtimes and lack of food enjoyment. Associated weight loss is part of the physical decline that occurs as cancer worsens. Weight loss can also occur from cachexia, the increased metabolism of energy due to raised inflammatory cytokines, liver metastases and other factors seen in several advanced cancers. Independent of anorexia, although frequently associated (where it is referred to as the cachexia-anorexia syndrome), it accounts for a significant amount of morbidity and deaths in people with cancer. In particular, quality of life for the patient and the family is significantly affected with this syndrome as it causes anxiety and distress. Therefore, it is important that research into therapies is undertaken, particularly focusing on an understanding of the pharmacokinetic properties of compounds in this cachexic population. Cannabinoids are one such group of therapies that have received a large amount of media focus recently. However, there appears to be a lack on rigorous pharmacokinetic data of these complex and varied compounds in the cachexic population. Similarly, there is a lack of pharmacokinetic data in any population group for the non- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) cannabinoids (often due to the lack of analytical standards for quantification). This review will thus examine the pharmacokinetics of major cannabinoids i.e. THC and CBD in a cancer population. Overall, based on the current literature, evidence for the use of cannabinoids for the treatment of cancer-related cachexia-anorexia syndrome remains equivocal. A high-quality, rigorous, phase I/II study to elicit pharmacokinetic dose-concentration and concentration-response data, with a clinically acceptable mode of delivery to reduce intrapatient variability and enable more consistent bioavailability is needed in this population.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of Cannabis in Cancer Cachexia-Anorexia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Stephanie E; Martin, Jennifer H

    2016-07-01

    Anorexia can affect up to 90 % of people with advanced cancer. It is a complex symptom associated with changes in taste, lack of hunger at mealtimes and lack of food enjoyment. Associated weight loss is part of the physical decline that occurs as cancer worsens. Weight loss can also occur from cachexia, the increased metabolism of energy due to raised inflammatory cytokines, liver metastases and other factors seen in several advanced cancers. Independent of anorexia, although frequently associated (where it is referred to as the cachexia-anorexia syndrome), it accounts for a significant amount of morbidity and deaths in people with cancer. In particular, quality of life for the patient and the family is significantly affected with this syndrome as it causes anxiety and distress. Therefore, it is important that research into therapies is undertaken, particularly focusing on an understanding of the pharmacokinetic properties of compounds in this cachexic population. Cannabinoids are one such group of therapies that have received a large amount of media focus recently. However, there appears to be a lack on rigorous pharmacokinetic data of these complex and varied compounds in the cachexic population. Similarly, there is a lack of pharmacokinetic data in any population group for the non- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) cannabinoids (often due to the lack of analytical standards for quantification). This review will thus examine the pharmacokinetics of major cannabinoids i.e. THC and CBD in a cancer population. Overall, based on the current literature, evidence for the use of cannabinoids for the treatment of cancer-related cachexia-anorexia syndrome remains equivocal. A high-quality, rigorous, phase I/II study to elicit pharmacokinetic dose-concentration and concentration-response data, with a clinically acceptable mode of delivery to reduce intrapatient variability and enable more consistent bioavailability is needed in this population. PMID

  10. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  11. Population pharmacokinetic model of THC integrates oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dosing and characterizes short- and long-term pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Jules A A C; Guan, Zheng; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Klumpers, Linda; Morrison, Paul D; Beumer, Tim L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Cohen, Adam F; Freijer, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannobinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound of Cannabis, is known to have a long terminal half-life. However, this characteristic is often ignored in pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of THC, which may affect the accuracy of predictions in different pharmacologic areas. For therapeutic use for example, it is important to accurately describe the terminal phase of THC to describe accumulation of the drug. In early clinical research, the THC challenge test can be optimized through more accurate predictions of the dosing sequence and the wash-out between occasions in a crossover setting, which is mainly determined by the terminal half-life of the compound. The purpose of this study is to better quantify the long-term pharmacokinetics of THC. A population-based PK model for THC was developed describing the profile up to 48 h after an oral, intravenous, and pulmonary dose of THC in humans. In contrast to earlier models, the current model integrates all three major administration routes and covers the long terminal phase of THC. Results show that THC has a fast initial and intermediate half-life, while the apparent terminal half-life is long (21.5 h), with a clearance of 38.8 L/h. Because the current model characterizes the long-term pharmacokinetics, it can be used to assess the accumulation of THC in a multiple-dose setting and to forecast concentration profiles of the drug under many different dosing regimens or administration routes. Additionally, this model could provide helpful insights into the THC challenge test used for the development of (novel) compounds targeting the cannabinoid system for different therapeutic applications and could improve decision making in future clinical trials.

  12. Albumin-deficient mouse models for studying metabolism of human albumin and pharmacokinetics of albumin-based drugs

    PubMed Central

    Roopenian, Derry C; Low, Benjamin E; Christianson, Gregory J; Proetzel, Gabriele; Sproule, Thomas J; Wiles, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    Serum albumin is the major determinant of blood colloidal osmotic pressure acting as a depot and distributor of compounds including drugs. In humans, serum albumin exhibits an unusually long half-life mainly due to protection from catabolism by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn)-mediated recycling. These properties make albumin an attractive courier of therapeutically-active compounds. However, pharmaceutical research and development of albumin-based therapeutics has been hampered by the lack of appropriate preclinical animal models. To overcome this, we developed and describe the first mouse with a genetic deficiency in albumin and its incorporation into an existing humanized FcRn mouse model, B6.Cg-Fcgrttm1Dcr Tg(FCGRT)32Dcr/DcrJ (Tg32). Albumin-deficient strains (Alb-/-) were created by TALEN-mediated disruption of the albumin (Alb) gene directly in fertilized oocytes derived from Tg32 mice and its non-transgenic background control, C57BL/6J (B6). The resulting Alb-/- strains are analbuminemic but healthy. Intravenous administration of human albumin to Tg32-Alb-/- mFcRn-/- hFcRnTg/Tg) mice results in a remarkably extended human albumin serum half-life of ∼24 days, comparable to that found in humans, and in contrast to half-lives of 2.6–5.8 d observed in B6, B6-Alb-/- and Tg32 strains. This striking increase can be explained by the absence of competing endogenous mouse albumin and the presence of an active human FcRn. These novel albumin-deficient models provide unique tools for investigating the biology and pathobiology of serum albumin and are a more appropriate rodent surrogates for evaluating human serum albumin pharmacokinetics and albumin-based compounds. PMID:25654695

  13. Modification of pharmacokinetic and abuse-related effects of cocaine by human-derived cocaine hydrolase in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Charles W.; Justinova, Zuzana; Lafleur, David; Woods, Doug; Roschke, Viktor; Hallak, Hussein; Sklair-Tavron, Liora; Redhi, Godfrey H.; Yasar, Sevil; Bergman, Jack; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Although substantial research effort has focused on developing pharmacological treatments for cocaine abuse, no effective medications have been developed. Recent studies show that enzymes that metabolize cocaine in the periphery, forestalling its entry into the brain, can prevent cocaine toxicity and its behavioral effects in rodents. Here we report on effects of one such enzyme (Albu-CocH) on the pharmacokinetic and behavioral effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys. Albu-CocH was developed from successive mutations of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and has 1000-fold greater catalytic activity against cocaine than naturally occurring BChE. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that Albu-CocH (5 mg/kg) had a half-life of 56.6 hours in squirrel monkeys. In these studies, plasma levels of cocaine following i.v. 1 mg/kg cocaine were reduced two hours after administration of Albu-CocH, whereas plasma levels of the cocaine metabolite ecgonine methyl ester were increased. These effects were still evident 72 hrs following Albu-CocH administration. In behavioral experiments in monkeys, pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH dramatically decreased self-administration of a reinforcing dose of i.v. cocaine (30 μg/kg/injection) for over 24 hours. Pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH also attenuated the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine self-administration by an i.v. priming injection of cocaine (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) and, in separate studies, attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine. The ability of Albu-CocH to attenuate the abuse-related effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys indicates that further investigation of BChE mutants as potential treatment for cocaine abuse and toxicity is warranted. PMID:22264200

  14. A Population Pharmacokinetic Model for Disposition in Plasma, Saliva and Urine of Scopolamine after Intranasal Administration to Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Tam, V. H.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intranasal gel formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated under the Food and Drug Administration guidelines for clinical trials with an Investigative New Drug (IND) protocol. The aim of this project was to develop a PK model that can predict the relationship between plasma, saliva and urinary scopolamine concentrations using data collected from the IND clinical trials with INSCOP. Methods: Twelve healthy human subjects were administered three dose levels (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 mg) of INSCOP. Serial blood, saliva and urine samples were collected between 5 min and 24 h after dosing and scopolamine concentrations were measured by using a validated LC-MS-MS assay. Pharmacokinetic Compartmental models, using actual dosing and sampling times, were built using Phoenix (version 1.2). Model selection was based on the likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL) and comparison of the quality of fit plots. Results: The best structural model for INSCOP (minimal -2LL= 502.8) was established. It consisted of one compartment each for plasma, saliva and urine, respectively, which were connected with linear transport processes except the nonlinear PK process from plasma to saliva compartment. The best-fit estimates of PK parameters from individual PK compartmental analysis and Population PK model analysis were shown in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: A population PK model that could predict population and individual PK of scopolamine in plasma, saliva and urine after dosing was developed and validated. Incorporating a non-linear transfer from plasma to saliva compartments resulted in a significantly improved model fitting. The model could be used to predict scopolamine plasma concentrations from salivary and urinary drug levels, allowing non-invasive therapeutic monitoring of scopolamine in space and other remote environments.

  15. Pharmacokinetic Properties and Human Use Characteristics of an FDA-Approved Intranasal Naloxone Product for the Treatment of Opioid Overdose.

    PubMed

    Krieter, Philip; Chiang, Nora; Gyaw, Shwe; Skolnick, Phil; Crystal, Roger; Keegan, Fintan; Aker, Julie; Beck, Melissa; Harris, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Parenteral naloxone has been approved to treat opiate overdose for over 4 decades. Intranasal naloxone, administered "off label" using improvised devices, has been widely used by both first responders and the lay public to treat overdose. However, these improvised devices require training for effective use, and the recommended volumes (2 to 4 mL) exceed those considered optimum for intranasal administration. The present study compared the pharmacokinetic properties of intranasal naloxone (2 to 8 mg) delivered in low volumes (0.1 to 0.2 mL) using an Aptar Unit-Dose device to an approved (0.4 mg) intramuscular dose. A parallel study assessed the ease of use of this device in a simulated overdose situation. All doses of intranasal naloxone resulted in plasma concentrations and areas under the curve greater than those observed following the intramuscular dose; the time to reach maximum plasma concentrations was not different following intranasal and intramuscular administration. Plasma concentrations of naloxone were dose proportional between 2 and 8 mg and independent of whether drug was administered to 1 or both nostrils. In a study using individuals representative of the general population, >90% were able to perform both critical tasks (inserting nozzle into a nostril and pressing plunger) needed to deliver a simulated dose of naloxone without prior training. Based on both pharmacokinetic and human use studies, a 4-mg dose delivered in a single device (0.1 mL) was selected as the final product. This product can be used by first responders and the lay public, providing an important and potentially life-saving intervention for victims of an opioid overdose. PMID:27145977

  16. A multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of polyethylene glycol recombinant human interleukin-6 (PEG-rhIL-6) in rats*

    PubMed Central

    He, Xue-ling; Yin, Hai-lin; Wu, Jiang; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Yan; Yuan, Tao; Rao, Hai-lin; Li, Liang; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Xue-mei

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been widely applied in cancer treatment. However, it often causes thrombocytopenia (deficiency of white blood cells) as an adverse effect. Recombinant human interleukin-6 (rhIL-6) has been found to be a very effective way against this thrombocytopenia, but IL-6 has low stability in blood, which reduces its efficacy. To increases the stability and half-life of rhIL-6, it was modified by polyethylene glycol (PEG). The pharmacokinetics and the tissue distribution of PEG-rhIL-6 labeled with 125I were examined after subcutaneous injection in rats. The pharmacokinetic pattern of PEG-rhIL-6 was defined with linear-kinetics, and we fitted a one-compartment model with half-lives of 10.44–11.37 h (absorption, t 1/2Ka) and 19.77–21.53 h (elimination, t 1/2Ke), and peak concentrations at 20.51–21.96 h (t peak) in rats. Half-lives and t peak of PEG-rhIL-6 were longer than those of rhIL-6 previously reported. In the present study, for deposition of PEG-rhIL-6 in rats, the tissue distribution examination showed that blood was the major organ involved, rather than liver. However, as to the elimination of PEG-rhIL-6, the major organ was the kidney. The excretion fraction of the injection dose recovered from urine was 23.32% at 192 h after subcutaneous administration. Less than 6% of PEG-rhIL-6 was eliminated via the feces at 192 h. These results indicate that PEG-rhIL-6 is a good candidate drug formulation for patients with cancer. PMID:21194184

  17. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of 99mTc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor humanized monoclonal antibody R3 in rats.

    PubMed

    Iznaga Escobar, N; Morales, A M; Ducongé, J; Torres, I C; Fernández, E; Gómez, J A

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of 99mTc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-hEGF-r) humanized monoclonal antibody (MAb) R3 was investigated following intravenous injection in normal Wistar rats. Serum disappearance curves were best fit by a two-compartment model having a mean distribution half-life (t 1/2alpha) of 0.250 h and a mean elimination (t 1/2beta) of 13.89 h. Among the various organs, a little accumulation of the radiolabeled antibody was found only in kidneys. Biodistribution and dosimetry studies in humans were performed by extrapolation of the animal data to humans. Absorbed dose to normal organs and the remainder of the whole body were estimated using the medical internal radiation dose formula, and dose contributions from radioactivity in transit through the gastrointestinal tract were estimated using a compartment model. Extrapolated values of radiation absorbed dose to normal organs in rads per millicurie administered were whole body, 0.0085; lower large intestine wall, 0.0898; small intestine, 0.0530; upper large intestine wall, 0.0731; and kidneys, 0.0455. The effective dose equivalent predicted was 0.0162 rem/mCi and the effective dose was found to be 0.015 rem/mCi. On the basis of the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry information obtained in this study, a diagnostic phase I clinical trial with 99mTc-labeled humanized MAb R3 conjugate in patients should be supported.

  18. A sensitive LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of febuxostat in human plasma and its pharmacokinetic application.

    PubMed

    Vaka, Venkata Rami Reddy; Inamadugu, Jaswanth Kumar; Pilli, Nageswara Rao; Ramesh, Mullangi; Katreddi, Hussain Reddy

    2013-11-01

    An improved, simple and highly sensitive LC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated for quantification of febuxostat with 100 μL human plasma using febuxostat-d7 as an internal standard (IS) according to regulatory guidelines. The analyte and IS were extracted from human plasma via liquid-liquid extraction using diethyl ether. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Zorbax C18 column using a mixture of acetonitrile and 5 mm ammonium formate (60:40, v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The total run time was 5.0 min and the elution of febuxostat and IS occurred at 1.0 and 1.5 min, respectively. A linear response function was established for the range of concentrations 1-6000 ng/mL (r > 0.99). The precursor to product ion transitions monitored for febuxostat and IS were m/z 317.1 → 261.1 and 324.2 → 262.1, respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions (%RSD) were within 1.29-9.19 and 2.85-7.69%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic studies in humans.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of flavanone glycosides after ingestion of single doses of fresh-squeezed orange juice versus commercially processed orange juice in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Jacqueline Q; Cesar, Thais B; Manthey, John A; Baldwin, Elizabeth A; Bai, Jinhe; Raithore, Smita

    2014-12-31

    Orange juice is a rich source of flavonoids considered beneficial to cardiovascular health in humans. The objective of this study was to analyze the pharmacokinetics of the main flavanone glycosides, hesperidin and narirutin, in humans after the consumption of two styles of orange juice, fresh-squeezed (FOJ) and commercially processed (POJ), differing in their amounts of soluble and insoluble forms of these compounds. Healthy human subjects consumed 11.5 mL/kg body weight of FOJ, and after an interval of 30 days, consumed the same quantity of POJ. The results showed that there were no significant differences in the Tmax of the pharmacokinetic curves for the metabolites of hesperidin and narirutin following the consumption of the two styles of juices, and corrected for differences in doses in the POJ and FOJ, there were also no significant differences in the AUC and Cmax values and percent absorption of these compounds.

  20. Comparative Inter-Species Pharmacokinetics of Phenoxyacetic Acid Herbicides and Related Organic Acids. Evidence that the Dog is Not a Relevant Species for Evaluation of Human Health Risk.

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Chuck

    2004-07-15

    Phenoxyacetic acids including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) are widely utilized organic acid herbicides that have undergone extensive toxicity and pharmacokinetic analyses. The dog is particularly susceptible to the toxicity of phenoxyacetic acids and related organic acids relative to other species. Active renal clearance mechanisms for organic acids are ubiquitous in mammalian species, and thus a likely mechanism responsible for the increased sensitivity of the dog to these agents is linked to a lower capacity to secrete organic acids from the kidney. Using published data describing the pharmacokinetics of phenoxyacetic and structurally related organic acids in a variety of species including humans, inter-species comparative pharmacokinetics were evaluated using allometic parameter scaling. For both 2,4-D and MCPA the dog plasma half-life (t1/2) and renal clearance (Clr; ml hr-1) rates did not scale as a function of body weight across species; whereas for all other species evaluated, including humans, these pharmacokinetic parameters reasonably scaled. This exceptional response in the dog is clearly illustrated by comparing the plasma t1/2 at comparable doses of 2,4-D and MCPA, across several species. At a dosage of 5 mg/kg, in dogs the plasma t1/2 for 2,4-D and MCPA were {approx}92 - 106 hr and 63 hr, respectively, which is substantially longer than in the rat ({approx}1 and 6 hr, respectively) or in humans (12 and 11 hr, respectively). This longer t1/2, and slower elimination in the dog, results in substantially higher body burdens of these organic acids, at comparable doses, relative to other species. Although these results indicate the important role of renal transport clearance mechanisms as determinants of the clearance and potential toxicity outcomes of phenoxyacetic acid herbicides across several species, other contributing mechanisms such as reabsorption from the renal tubules is highly likely. These

  1. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of the (99m)Tc labeled human elastase inhibitor, elafin, in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaschwich, Mark; Lützen, Ulf; Zhao, Yi; Tjiong, Angelina; Marx, Marlies; Haenisch, Sierk; Wiedow, Oliver; Preuss, Stefanie; Culman, Juraj; Zuhayra, Maaz

    2016-04-01

    Elafin is a potent reversible inhibitor of the pro-inflammatory proteases leukocyte elastase and protease 3. It is currently in clinical development for the use in postoperative inflammatory diseases. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of (99m)Tc-labeled elafin ((99m)Tc-Elafin) in blood and individual organs in rat after bolus intravenous injection using the single photon emission tomography (SPECT). (99m)Tc-Elafin predominantly accumulated in the kidney reaching a maximum of 8.5% ± 0.1% of the injected dose per gram (ID/g) at 5 min post injection (p.i) and decreased only slowly during 24 h. In contrast, the initially high radio activity recorded in the other organs rapidly decreased parallel to the radioactivity detected in blood. The blood kinetics fits to a two compartment kinetics model. The radio activity in the dissected kidney was 4.98 ± 1.24%ID/g 24 h p.i, while in other organs, including the brain, no accumulation of (99m)Tc-Elafin was detected. At this time point 30% of the detected radioactivity in the kidney was identified to be not metabolized (99m)Tc-Elafin. In conclusion, the blood and organ-specific kinetic data provide a basis for planning of adequate dosing regimens and the high accumulation of intact elafin in the kidney favors clinical developments targeting inflammatory kidney diseases, such as chronic allograft nephropathy after kidney transplantation. PMID:26948953

  2. Enantioselective analysis of etodolac in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: Application to clinical pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    de Miranda Silva, Carolina; Rocha, Adriana; Tozatto, Eduardo; da Silva, Lucienir Maria; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Lanchote, Vera Lucia

    2016-02-20

    Etodolac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with preferential inhibition of cyclooxigenase-2 and is widely used in the management of pain in patients with inflammatory arthritis. Etodolac is available as a racemic mixture of (-)-(R)-Etodolac and (+)-(S)-Etodolac; cyclooxigenases inhibition is attributed to (+)-(S)-Etodolac. According to our knowledge, this is the first method for determination of etodolac enantiomers in plasma using LC-MS/MS. Plasma extraction were performed with 25μL of plasma and 1mL of n-hexane:ethyl acetate (95:5); racemic ibuprofen was used as internal standard. Resolution of enantiomers were performed in a Chiralcel(®)OD-H column; deprotonated [M-H](-) and their respective ion products were monitored at transitions of 286>242 for etodolac enantiomers and 205>161 for ibuprofen. The quantitation limit was 3.2ng/mL for both enantiomers in plasma. The method was applied to study the pharmacokinetics of etodolac enantiomers after the administration of a 300 and 400mg dose of racemic drug to a healthy volunteer. Analysis of plasma samples showed higher plasma concentration of (-)-(R)-Etodolacfor both doses (300mg dose: AUC(0-∞)49.80 versus 4.55ugh/mL;400mg dose: AUC(0-∞) 63.90 versus 6.00ugh/mL) with an (R)-(+)/(S)-(-) ratio of approximately 11.

  3. Effect of antacids on the pharmacokinetics of raltegravir in human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kiser, Jennifer J; Bumpass, J Brock; Meditz, Amie L; Anderson, Peter L; Bushman, Lane; Ray, Michelle; Predhomme, Julie A; Rower, Joseph; Mawhinney, Sam; Brundage, Richard

    2010-12-01

    Raltegravir's divalent metal ion chelating motif may predispose the drug to interactions with divalent cations. We determined whether a divalent cation-containing antacid interacted with raltegravir. Twelve HIV-1-seronegative subjects were enrolled in this randomized, prospective, crossover study of single-dose raltegravir (400 mg) with and without an antacid. Subjects underwent two intensive pharmacokinetic visits in the fasted state separated by a 5- to 12-day washout period. With simultaneous antacid administration, time to peak raltegravir concentration occurred 2 h sooner (P = 0.002) and there was a 67% lower raltegravir concentration at 12 h postdose (P < 0.0001) than with administration of raltegravir alone. The raltegravir area under the-concentration-time curve from 0 to 12 h and maximum concentration were unchanged with the addition of an antacid. Studies are needed to determine the clinical relevance of this interaction, whether it remains after multiple dosing to steady state, whether it is mitigated by temporal separation, and whether raltegravir interacts with divalent cation-containing vitamins, supplements, or foods.

  4. Edoxaban administration following enoxaparin: a pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and tolerability assessment in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Zahir, Hamim; Matsushima, Nobuko; Halim, Abdel-Baset; He, Ling; Zhang, George; Lee, Frank; Worland, Valerie; Mendell, Jeanne

    2012-07-01

    Edoxaban is an oral direct factor (F)Xa inhibitor in advanced stages of clinical development. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the pharmacodynamics (PD) and safety of enoxaparin 1 mg/kg followed 12 hours (h) post-dose by edoxaban 60 mg, which is the regimen being used in the phase III study of edoxaban for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (Hokusai-VTE). This was a phase I, open-label, randomised, four-period, four-treatment cross-over study. Treatments were edoxaban alone (EDOX), enoxaparin alone (ENOX), edoxaban plus enoxaparin (EDOX+ENOX), and enoxaparin followed by edoxaban 12 h later (ENOX12-EDOX). Serial blood samples were collected for PD (thrombin generation, anti-FXa) and pharmacokinetic (PK) variables (edoxaban and its principal metabolite M4 by LC-MS/MS, and anti-FIIa as a surrogate of enoxaparin). The highest effect on thrombin AUC (endogenous thrombin potential, or ETP), thrombin (peak), thrombin generation lag time, and velocity index was observed for EDOX+ENOX, followed by ENOX, ENOX12-EDOX, and EDOX. The greatest effect on anti-FXa activity was observed for EDOX+ENOX, followed by ENOX12-EDOX. As expected, neither edoxaban nor enoxaparin significantly altered the PK of the other drug. There were no serious adverse events during the study. It is concluded that a 60-mg dose of edoxaban can be safely administered 12 h following enoxaparin 1 mg/kg. PMID:22628060

  5. Quantitation and pharmacokinetic modeling of therapeutic antibody quality attributes in human studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinyin; Monine, Michael; Huang, Yu; Swann, Patrick; Nestorov, Ivan; Lyubarskaya, Yelena

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A thorough understanding of drug metabolism and disposition can aid in the assessment of efficacy and safety. However, analytical methods used in pharmacokinetics (PK) studies of protein therapeutics are usually based on ELISA, and therefore can provide a limited perspective on the quality of the drug in concentration measurements. Individual post-translational modifications (PTMs) of protein therapeutics are rarely considered for PK analysis, partly because it is technically difficult to recover and quantify individual protein variants from biological fluids. Meanwhile, PTMs may be directly linked to variations in drug efficacy and safety, and therefore understanding of clearance and metabolism of biopharmaceutical protein variants during clinical studies is an important consideration. To address such challenges, we developed an affinity-purification procedure followed by peptide mapping with mass spectrometric detection, which can profile multiple quality attributes of therapeutic antibodies recovered from patient sera. The obtained data enable quantitative modeling, which allows for simulation of the PK of different individual PTMs or attribute levels in vivo and thus facilitate the assessment of quality attributes impact in vivo. Such information can contribute to the product quality attribute risk assessment during manufacturing process development and inform appropriate process control strategy. PMID:27216574

  6. Intranasal absorption of rizatriptan--in vivo pharmacokinetics and bioavailability study in humans.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Jiang, X G; Jiang, W M; Gao, X L; Mei, N

    2005-01-01

    Rizatriptan nasal spray was developed to achieve fast a high effectiveness and to overcome limitations associated with oral formulation. The objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of a rizatriptan nasal spray compared with an oral formulation in a two treatments, two periods, randomized crossover design. At each phase, each subject received 5 mg rizatriptan as a nasal spray or an oral tablet. Plasma concentrations of rizatriptan were determined by HPLC. Rizatriptan was absorbed more rapidly following nasal spray with detectable plasma concentrations 5 min after dosing. There was no statistically significant difference for AUC or Cmax values between the nasal spray and the oral tablet. The relative bioavailability of nasal formulation to oral formulation was 96%+/-16%. All the formulations were well tolerated and adverse events were generally of short duration and of mild intensity. Thus, rizatriptan nasal spray offers more rapidly absorption compared to the oral route, which may be particularly beneficial to those patients who have gastrointestinal disturbances during their migraine attack or who have difficulty in swallowing a tablet. PMID:15702515

  7. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of the (99m)Tc labeled human elastase inhibitor, elafin, in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaschwich, Mark; Lützen, Ulf; Zhao, Yi; Tjiong, Angelina; Marx, Marlies; Haenisch, Sierk; Wiedow, Oliver; Preuss, Stefanie; Culman, Juraj; Zuhayra, Maaz

    2016-04-01

    Elafin is a potent reversible inhibitor of the pro-inflammatory proteases leukocyte elastase and protease 3. It is currently in clinical development for the use in postoperative inflammatory diseases. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of (99m)Tc-labeled elafin ((99m)Tc-Elafin) in blood and individual organs in rat after bolus intravenous injection using the single photon emission tomography (SPECT). (99m)Tc-Elafin predominantly accumulated in the kidney reaching a maximum of 8.5% ± 0.1% of the injected dose per gram (ID/g) at 5 min post injection (p.i) and decreased only slowly during 24 h. In contrast, the initially high radio activity recorded in the other organs rapidly decreased parallel to the radioactivity detected in blood. The blood kinetics fits to a two compartment kinetics model. The radio activity in the dissected kidney was 4.98 ± 1.24%ID/g 24 h p.i, while in other organs, including the brain, no accumulation of (99m)Tc-Elafin was detected. At this time point 30% of the detected radioactivity in the kidney was identified to be not metabolized (99m)Tc-Elafin. In conclusion, the blood and organ-specific kinetic data provide a basis for planning of adequate dosing regimens and the high accumulation of intact elafin in the kidney favors clinical developments targeting inflammatory kidney diseases, such as chronic allograft nephropathy after kidney transplantation.

  8. The Analgesic Potential of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Elikottil, Jaseena; Gupta, Pankaj; Gupta, Kalpna

    2013-01-01

    Historically and anecdotally cannabinoids have been used as analgesic agents. In recent years, there has been an escalating interest in developing cannabis-derived medications to treat severe pain. This review provides an overview of the history of cannabis use in medicine, cannabinoid signaling pathways, and current data from preclinical as well as clinical studies on using cannabinoids as potential analgesic agents. Clinical and experimental studies show that cannabis-derived compounds act as anti-emetic, appetite modulating and analgesic agents. However, the efficacy of individual products is variable and dependent upon the route of administration. Since opioids are the only therapy for severe pain, analgesic ability of cannabinoids may provide a much-needed alternative to opioids. Moreover, cannabinoids act synergistically with opioids and act as opioid sparing agents, allowing lower doses and fewer side effects from chronic opioid therapy. Thus, rational use of cannabis based medications deserves serious consideration to alleviate the suffering of patients due to severe pain. PMID:20073408

  9. It's All in the Rhythm: The Role of Cannabinoids in Neural Oscillations and Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Skosnik, Patrick D; Cortes-Briones, Jose A; Hajós, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Evidence has accumulated over the past several decades suggesting that both exocannabinoids and endocannabinoids play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The current article presents evidence suggesting that one of the mechanisms whereby cannabinoids induce psychosis is through the alteration in synchronized neural oscillations. Neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma (30-80 Hz) and theta (4-7 Hz) ranges, are disrupted in schizophrenia and are involved in various areas of perceptual and cognitive function. Regarding cannabinoids, preclinical evidence from slice and local field potential recordings has shown that central cannabinoid receptor (cannabinoid receptor type 1) agonists decrease the power of neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma and theta bands. Further, the administration of cannabinoids during critical stages of neural development has been shown to disrupt the brain's ability to generate synchronized neural oscillations in adulthood. In humans, studies examining the effects of chronic cannabis use (utilizing electroencephalography) have shown abnormalities in neural oscillations in a pattern similar to those observed in schizophrenia. Finally, recent studies in humans have also shown disruptions in neural oscillations after the acute administration of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the primary psychoactive constituent in cannabis. Taken together, these data suggest that both acute and chronic cannabinoids can disrupt the ability of the brain to generate synchronized oscillations at functionally relevant frequencies. Hence, this may represent one of the primary mechanisms whereby cannabinoids induce disruptions in attention, working memory, sensory-motor integration, and many other psychosis-related behavioral effects. PMID:26850792

  10. Analysis of rocuronium in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with application in clinical pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Natália Valadares; Lauretti, Gabriela Rocha; Filgueira, Gabriela Campos de Oliveira; Lopes, Bruno Carvalho Portes; Lanchote, Vera Lucia

    2014-03-01

    Rocuronium (ROC) is a neuromuscular blocking agent used in surgical procedures which is eliminated primarily by biliary excretion. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for analysis of ROC in human plasma. Separation of ROC and IS (verapamil) was performed using an endcapped C-18 column and a mixture of water:acetonitrile:trifluoracetic acid (50:50:0.1, v/v) as mobile phase. Aliquots of 100 μL of human plasma were extracted at pH 3, using dichloromethane. The lower limit of quantification of 5 ng/mL shows the high sensitivity of this method. Intra- and inter-assay precision (as relative standard deviation) was all ≤14.2% and accuracy (as relative standard error) did not exceed 10.1%. The validated method was successfully applied to quantify ROC concentrations in patients under surgical procedures up to 6h after the administration of the 0.4-0.9 mg/kg ROC. The pharmacokinetic parameter estimations of ROC showed AUC/dose of 563 μg min/mL, total clearance of 2.5 mL/min/kg, volume of distribution at steady state of 190 mL/kg and mean residence time of 83 min. PMID:24370612

  11. Analysis of rocuronium in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with application in clinical pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Natália Valadares; Lauretti, Gabriela Rocha; Filgueira, Gabriela Campos de Oliveira; Lopes, Bruno Carvalho Portes; Lanchote, Vera Lucia

    2014-03-01

    Rocuronium (ROC) is a neuromuscular blocking agent used in surgical procedures which is eliminated primarily by biliary excretion. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for analysis of ROC in human plasma. Separation of ROC and IS (verapamil) was performed using an endcapped C-18 column and a mixture of water:acetonitrile:trifluoracetic acid (50:50:0.1, v/v) as mobile phase. Aliquots of 100 μL of human plasma were extracted at pH 3, using dichloromethane. The lower limit of quantification of 5 ng/mL shows the high sensitivity of this method. Intra- and inter-assay precision (as relative standard deviation) was all ≤14.2% and accuracy (as relative standard error) did not exceed 10.1%. The validated method was successfully applied to quantify ROC concentrations in patients under surgical procedures up to 6h after the administration of the 0.4-0.9 mg/kg ROC. The pharmacokinetic parameter estimations of ROC showed AUC/dose of 563 μg min/mL, total clearance of 2.5 mL/min/kg, volume of distribution at steady state of 190 mL/kg and mean residence time of 83 min.

  12. Synthetic cannabinoids: analysis and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Wanas, Amira S; Radwan, Mohamed M

    2014-02-27

    Cannabimimetics (commonly referred to as synthetic cannabinoids), a group of compounds encompassing a wide range of chemical structures, have been developed by scientists with the hope of achieving selectivity toward one or the other of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The goal was to have compounds that could possess high therapeutic activity without many side effects. However, underground laboratories have used the information generated by the scientific community to develop these compounds for illicit use as marijuana substitutes. This chapter reviews the different classes of these "synthetic cannabinoids" with particular emphasis on the methods used for their identification in the herbal products with which they are mixed and identification of their metabolites in biological specimens.

  13. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system.

  14. Human pharmacokinetics of xanthohumol, an anti-hyperglycemic flavonoid from hops

    PubMed Central

    Legette, LeeCole; Karnpracha, Chanida; Reed, Ralph L.; Choi, Jaewoo; Bobe, Gerd; Christensen, J. Mark; Rodriguez-Proteau, Rosita; Purnell, Jonathan; Stevens, Jan F.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Xanthohumol (XN) is a bioactive prenylflavonoid from hops. A single-dose pharmacokinetic (PK) study was conducted in men (n=24) and women (n=24) to determine dose-concentration relationships. Methods and results Subjects received a single oral dose of 20, 60, or 180 mg XN. Blood was collected at 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h. Plasma levels of XN and its metabolites, isoxanthohumol (IX), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and 6-prenylnaringenin (6PN) were measured by LC-MS/MS. Xanthohumol and IX conjugates were dominant circulating flavonoids among all subjects. Levels of 8PN and 6PN were undetectable in most subjects. The XN PK profile showed peak concentrations around 1h and between 4-5h after ingestion. The maximum XN concentrations (Cmax) were 45±7 μg/L, 67±11 μg/L, and 133±23 μg/L for the 20, 60, and180 mg dose, respectively. Using non-compartmental modeling, the area under the curves (AUC0→∞) for XN were 92±68 h×μg/L, 323±160 h×μg/L, and 863±388 h×μg/L for the 20, 60, and 180 mg dose, respectively. The mean half-life of XN was 20 h for the 60 and 18 h for the 180 mg dose. Conclusion Xanthohumol has a distinct biphasic absorption pattern with XN and IX conjugates being the major circulating metabolites. PMID:24038952

  15. Safety and pharmacokinetics of oral cannabidiol when administered concomitantly with intravenous fentanyl in humans

    PubMed Central

    Manini, Alex F.; Yiannoulos, Georgia; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Hernandez, Stephanie; Olmedo, Ruben; Barnes, Allan J.; Winkel, Gary; Sinha, Rajita; Jutras-Aswad, Didier; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cannabidiol (CBD) is hypothesized as a potential treatment for opioid addiction, with safety studies an important first step for medication development. We determined CBD safety and pharmacokinetics when administered concomitantly with a high-potency opioid in healthy subjects. Methods This double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study of CBD co-administered with intravenous fentanyl, was conducted at the Clinical Research Center in Mount Sinai Hospital, a tertiary care medical center in New York City. Participants were healthy volunteers aged 21–65 years with prior opioid exposure, regardless of route. Blood samples were obtained before and after 400 or 800 mg CBD pretreatment, followed by a single 0.5 (Session 1) or 1.0mcg/Kg (Session 2) intravenous fentanyl dose. The primary outcome was the Systematic Assessment for Treatment Emergent Events (SAFTEE) to assess safety and adverse effects. CBD peak plasma concentrations, time to reach peak plasma concentrations (tmax), and area under the curve (AUC) were measured. Results SAFTEE data were similar between groups without respiratory depression or cardiovascular complications during any test session. Following low dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 1.5h (Sessions 1 and 2, respectively). Following high dose CBD, tmax occurred at 3 and 4h in Sessions 1 and 2, respectively. There were no significant differences in plasma CBD or cortisol (AUC p=NS) between sessions. Conclusions CBD does not exacerbate adverse effects associated with intravenous fentanyl administration. Co-administration of CBD and opioids was safe and well tolerated. These data provide the foundation for future studies examining CBD as a potential treatment for opioid abuse. PMID:25748562

  16. Pharmacokinetics of silybin nanoparticles in mice bearing SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma xenocraft

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xin-Lei; Zhao, Shu-Zhen; Hou, Rui-Jie; Yang, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Quan-Le; Yin, Shan-Lan; Wang, Shi-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The particle fabrication technique was used to fabricate monodisperse size and shape specific poly (lactide-co-glycolide) particles loaded with the silybin. Response surface methodology (RSM) using the central composite rotatable design (CCRD) model was used to optimize formulations of silybin nanoparticles. Further the optimized nanoparticles are characterized for particle size, zeta potential, surface morphology, entrapment efficiency, in-vitro drug release, silybin availability for tumor, plasma, lung, spleen, liver were determined. The significant findings were the optimal formulation of PLGA concentration 10 mg, PVA concentration 2000 and PET width of 6 gave rise to the EE of 88%, mean diameter of 223 nm and zeta potential of 25-mV. Release studies were investigated at pH 1.2 and pH 6.8. It was studied that lower the pH, faster the release of sylibin. The nanoparticles had~15-fold higher plasma exposure as measured by AUC contrasted to pure silybin. The nanoparticles had a 60% increase altogether tumor silybin presentation contrasted with pure silybin. Nanoparticles had higher silybin presentation in the spleen and liver contrasted with pure silybin suspension as expected for a nanoparticle formulation. The lung silybin presentation for the nanoparticle was additionally 2-fold higher than that of the pure silybin suspension. The results of pharmacokinetic parameters and oral bioavailability data exhibited that drug-nanoparticle complex could enhance the oral absorption of silybin and as well as the use of particles with smaller feature size may be preferred to decrease clearance by organs of the mononuclear phagocyte system. PMID:26770331

  17. Urinary pharmacokinetics of betalains following consumption of red beet juice in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Frank, Thomas; Stintzing, Florian Conrad; Carle, Reinhold; Bitsch, Irmgard; Quaas, Daniela; Strass, Gabriele; Bitsch, Roland; Netzel, Michael

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present pilot study was to characterise the renal elimination of betalains after consumption of red beet juice (RBJ). Six healthy, non-smoking female volunteers were given a single oral dose of either 500 mL of a commercial RBJ containing 362.7 mg of betalains and 500 mL of tap water, respectively, in a sequential manner. Urine was collected in intervals up to 24 h post-dose. Renal excretion of betalains was determined spectrophotometrically and quantified as betanin-equivalents. In addition, the identity of individual compounds was confirmed by HPLC coupled with diode-array detection and positive ion electrospray mass spectrometry, respectively. The amount (mean+/-S.D.) of intact betalains (betanin and isobetanin) recovered in urine was 1001+/-273 microg corresponding to 0.28+/-0.08% of the administered dose. Maximum excretion rates were observed after a median tmax,R of 3.0 h (range 2.5-8.0 h) amounting to 91.7+/-30.1 microg/h. The terminal elimination rate constant (lambdaz) and the corresponding half-life were 0.097+/-0.021 h(-1) and 7.43+/-1.47 h, respectively. Using the lambdaz estimates obtained the expected total betalain amount excreted in urine was 1228+/-291 microg. Based on the results obtained it is assumed that either the bioavailability of the betalains is low or that renal clearance is a minor route of systemic elimination for these compounds. The urinary excretion rates of unmetabolised betalains were fast and appeared to be monoexponential suggesting a one-compartment model. In order to get a more complete picture of the pharmacokinetics and health-promoting properties of red beet betalains, quantitative data on betalain bioavailability should include measurements of unchanged compounds and their corresponding metabolites in plasma, urine and bile.

  18. Beta-caryophyllene is a dietary cannabinoid

    PubMed Central

    Gertsch, Jürg; Leonti, Marco; Raduner, Stefan; Racz, Ildiko; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Karsak, Meliha; Zimmer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The psychoactive cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. and the arachidonic acid-derived endocannabinoids are nonselective natural ligands for cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors. Although the CB1 receptor is responsible for the psychomodulatory effects, activation of the CB2 receptor is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammation, pain, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis. Here, we report that the widespread plant volatile (E)-β-caryophyllene [(E)-BCP] selectively binds to the CB2 receptor (Ki = 155 ± 4 nM) and that it is a functional CB2 agonist. Intriguingly, (E)-BCP is a common constituent of the essential oils of numerous spice and food plants and a major component in Cannabis. Molecular docking simulations have identified a putative binding site of (E)-BCP in the CB2 receptor, showing ligand π–π stacking interactions with residues F117 and W258. Upon binding to the CB2 receptor, (E)-BCP inhibits adenylate cylcase, leads to intracellular calcium transients and weakly activates the mitogen-activated kinases Erk1/2 and p38 in primary human monocytes. (E)-BCP (500 nM) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression in peripheral blood and attenuates LPS-stimulated Erk1/2 and JNK1/2 phosphorylation in monocytes. Furthermore, peroral (E)-BCP at 5 mg/kg strongly reduces the carrageenan-induced inflammatory response in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking CB2 receptors, providing evidence that this natural product exerts cannabimimetic effects in vivo. These results identify (E)-BCP as a functional nonpsychoactive CB2 receptor ligand in foodstuff and as a macrocyclic antiinflammatory cannabinoid in Cannabis. PMID:18574142

  19. The influence of cannabinoids on learning and memory processes of the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G

    2015-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the mammalian endocannabinoid system plays an integral role in learning and memory. Our understanding of how cannabinoids influence memory comes predominantly from studies examining cognitive and emotional memory systems mediated by the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. However, recent evidence suggests that cannabinoids also affect habit or stimulus-response (S-R) memory mediated by the dorsal striatum. Studies implementing a variety of maze tasks in rats indicate that systemic or intra-dorsolateral striatum infusions of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists impair habit memory. In mice, cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor knockdown can enhance or impair habit formation, whereas Δ(9)THC tolerance enhances habit formation. Studies in human cannabis users also suggest an enhancement of S-R/habit memory. A tentative conclusion based on the available data is that acute disruption of the endocannabinoid system with either agonists or antagonists impairs, whereas chronic cannabinoid exposure enhances, dorsal striatum-dependent S-R/habit memory. CB1 receptors are required for multiple forms of striatal synaptic plasticity implicated in memory, including short-term and long-term depression. Interactions with the hippocampus-dependent memory system may also have a role in some of the observed effects of cannabinoids on habit memory. The impairing effect often observed with acute cannabinoid administration argues for cannabinoid-based treatments for human psychopathologies associated with a dysfunctional habit memory system (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction/relapse). In addition, the enhancing effect of repeated cannabinoid exposure on habit memory suggests a novel neurobehavioral mechanism for marijuana addiction involving the dorsal striatum-dependent memory system. PMID:26092091

  20. The influence of cannabinoids on learning and memory processes of the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G

    2015-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the mammalian endocannabinoid system plays an integral role in learning and memory. Our understanding of how cannabinoids influence memory comes predominantly from studies examining cognitive and emotional memory systems mediated by the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. However, recent evidence suggests that cannabinoids also affect habit or stimulus-response (S-R) memory mediated by the dorsal striatum. Studies implementing a variety of maze tasks in rats indicate that systemic or intra-dorsolateral striatum infusions of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists impair habit memory. In mice, cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor knockdown can enhance or impair habit formation, whereas Δ(9)THC tolerance enhances habit formation. Studies in human cannabis users also suggest an enhancement of S-R/habit memory. A tentative conclusion based on the available data is that acute disruption of the endocannabinoid system with either agonists or antagonists impairs, whereas chronic cannabinoid exposure enhances, dorsal striatum-dependent S-R/habit memory. CB1 receptors are required for multiple forms of striatal synaptic plasticity implicated in memory, including short-term and long-term depression. Interactions with the hippocampus-dependent memory system may also have a role in some of the observed effects of cannabinoids on habit memory. The impairing effect often observed with acute cannabinoid administration argues for cannabinoid-based treatments for human psychopathologies associated with a dysfunctional habit memory system (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction/relapse). In addition, the enhancing effect of repeated cannabinoid exposure on habit memory suggests a novel neurobehavioral mechanism for marijuana addiction involving the dorsal striatum-dependent memory system.

  1. Preclinical and Clinical Assessment of Cannabinoids as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ladin, Daniel A.; Soliman, Eman; Griffin, LaToya; Van Dross, Rukiyah

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States with 1.7 million new cases estimated to be diagnosed in 2016. This disease remains a formidable clinical challenge and represents a substantial financial burden to the US health care system. Therefore, research and development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of cancer is of high priority. Cannabinoids and their derivatives have been utilized for their medicinal and therapeutic properties throughout history. Cannabinoid activity is regulated by the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is comprised of cannabinoid receptors, transporters, and enzymes involved in cannabinoid synthesis and breakdown. More recently, cannabinoids have gained special attention for their role in cancer cell proliferation and death. However, many studies investigated these effects using in vitro models which may not adequately mimic tumor growth and metastasis. As such, this article aims to review study results which evaluated effects of cannabinoids from plant, synthetic and endogenous origins on cancer development in preclinical animal models and to examine the current standing of cannabinoids that are being tested in human cancer patients. PMID:27774065

  2. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2012-12-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released 'endocannabinoids' or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive 'multi-targeting'. PMID:23108552

  3. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors that can be activated by endogenously released ‘endocannabinoids’ or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)) and Sativex (Δ9-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive ‘multi-targeting’. PMID:23108552

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR PROPYLENE GLYCOL MONOMETHYL ETHER AND ITS ACETATE IN RATS AND HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Gies, Richard A.; Wu, Hong; Weitz, Karl K.

    2005-03-05

    Propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PM), along with its acetate, is the most widely used of the propylene glycol ether family of solvents. The most common toxic effects of PM observed in animal studies include sedation, very slight alpha2u globulin-mediated nephropathy (male rats only) and hepatomegally at high exposures (typically >1000 ppm). Sedation in animal studies usually resolves within a few exposures to 3000 ppm (the highest concentration used in subchronic and chronic inhalation studies) due to the induction of metabolizing enzymes. Data from a variety of pharmacokinetic and mechanistic studies have been incorporated into a PBPK model for PM and its acetate in rats and mice. Published controlled exposure and workplace biomonitoring studies have also been included for comparisons of the internal dosimetry of PM and its acetate between laboratory animals and humans. PM acetate is rapidly hydrolyzed to PM, which is further metabolized to either glucuronide or sulphate conjugates (minor pathways) or propylene glycol (major pathway). In vitro half-lives for PM acetate range from 14-36 min depending upon the tissue and species. In vivo half-lives are considerably faster, reflecting the total contributions of esterases in the blood and tissues of the body, and are on the order of just a few minutes. Thus, very little PM acetate is found in vivo and, other than potential portal of entry irritation, the toxicity of PM acetate is related to PM. Regardless of the source for PM (either PM or its acetate), rats were predicted to have a higher Cmax and AUC for PM in blood than humans, especially at concentrations greater than the current ACGIH TLV of 100 ppm. This would indicate that the major systemic effects of PM would be expected to be less severe in humans than rats at comparable inhalation exposures.

  5. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester exhibiting distinctive binding interaction with human serum albumin implies the pharmacokinetic basis of propolis bioactive components.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Wu, Fan; Tan, Jing; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Cuiping; Zheng, Huoqing; Hu, Fuliang

    2016-04-15

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), as one of the major bioactive components present in propolis, exhibits versatile bioactivities, especially for its potent cytotoxic effects on several cancer cell models. To understand the pharmacokinetic characteristics of CAPE, the binding interaction between CAPE and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated in vitro using multiple spectroscopic methods and molecular docking. The results reveal that CAPE exhibits a distinctive binding interaction with HSA comparing with other propolis components. The association constant K(A) (L mol(-1)) of the binding reaches 10(6) order of magnitude, which is significantly stronger than the other components of propolis. Based on the theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the binding distance was calculated as 5.7 nm, which is longer than that of the other components of propolis. The thermodynamic results indicate that the binding is mainly driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. The docking and drugs (warfarin and ibuprofen) competitive results show that CAPE is located in the subdomain IIA (Sudlow's site I, FA7) of HSA, and Gln196 and Lys199 contribute to the hydrogen bonds. Circular dichroism spectra suggest an alteration of the secondary structure of HSA due to its partial unfolding in the presence of CAPE.

  6. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester exhibiting distinctive binding interaction with human serum albumin implies the pharmacokinetic basis of propolis bioactive components.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Wu, Fan; Tan, Jing; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Cuiping; Zheng, Huoqing; Hu, Fuliang

    2016-04-15

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), as one of the major bioactive components present in propolis, exhibits versatile bioactivities, especially for its potent cytotoxic effects on several cancer cell models. To understand the pharmacokinetic characteristics of CAPE, the binding interaction between CAPE and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated in vitro using multiple spectroscopic methods and molecular docking. The results reveal that CAPE exhibits a distinctive binding interaction with HSA comparing with other propolis components. The association constant K(A) (L mol(-1)) of the binding reaches 10(6) order of magnitude, which is significantly stronger than the other components of propolis. Based on the theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the binding distance was calculated as 5.7 nm, which is longer than that of the other components of propolis. The thermodynamic results indicate that the binding is mainly driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. The docking and drugs (warfarin and ibuprofen) competitive results show that CAPE is located in the subdomain IIA (Sudlow's site I, FA7) of HSA, and Gln196 and Lys199 contribute to the hydrogen bonds. Circular dichroism spectra suggest an alteration of the secondary structure of HSA due to its partial unfolding in the presence of CAPE. PMID:26829518

  7. Physiologically based pharmacokinetics of radioiodinated human beta-endorphin in rats. An application of the capillary membrane-limited model

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, H.; Sugiyama, Y.; Sawada, Y.; Iga, T.; Hanano, M.

    1987-07-01

    In order to simulate the distribution and elimination of radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-EP) after iv bolus injection in rats, we proposed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model incorporating diffusional transport of /sup 125/I-beta-EP across the capillary membrane. This model assumes that the distribution of /sup 125/I-beta-EP is restricted only within the blood and the tissue interstitial fluid, and that a diffusional barrier across the capillary membrane exists in each tissue except the liver. The tissue-to-blood partition coefficients were estimated from the ratios of the concentration in tissues to that in arterial plasma at the terminal (pseudoequilibrium) phase. The total body plasma clearance (9.0 ml/min/kg) was appropriately assigned to the liver and kidney. The transcapillary diffusion clearances of /sup 125/I-beta-EP were also estimated and shown to correlate linearly with that of inulin in several tissues. Numerically solving the mass-balance differential equations as to plasma and each tissue simultaneously, simulated concentration curves of /sup 125/I-beta-EP corresponded well with the observed data. It was suggested by the simulation that the initial rapid disappearance of /sup 125/I-beta-EP from plasma after iv injection could be attributed in part to the transcapillary diffusion of the peptide.

  8. An inhibition study of beauvericin on human and rat cytochrome P450 enzymes and its pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Mei, Li; Zhang, Lixin; Dai, Renke

    2009-06-01

    Beauvericin is a secondary metabolite natural product from microorganisms and has been shown to have a new potential antifungal activity. In this study, the metabolism and inhibition of beauvericin in human liver microsomes (HLM) and rat liver microsomes (RLM) were investigated. The apparent K(m) and V(max) of beauvericin in HLM were determined by substrate depletion approach and its inhibitory effects on cytochromes P450 (CYP) activities were evaluated using probe substrates, with IC(50) and the (K(i)) values were 1.2 microM (0.5 microM) and 1.3 microM (1.9 microM), respectively for CYP3A4/5 (midazolam) and CYP2C19 (mephenytoin). Similarly, beauvericin was also a potent inhibitor for CYP3A1/2 (IC(50): 1.3 microM) in RLM. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of beauvericin in the rat were studied after p.o administration alone and co-administration with ketoconazole, which indicated a pharmacodynamic function may play a role in the synergistic effect on antifungal activity.

  9. Determination and pharmacokinetic study of hydrocodone in human plasma by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Benjie; Wei, Chunmin; Yuan, Guiyan; Guo, Ruichen

    2009-01-01

    A rapid, highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS) quantitation method was developed and validated for the determination of hydrocodone in human plasma. Sample was extracted from 0.5mL heparinized plasma by a simple liquid-liquid extraction method and analyzed on a C18 column with a mobile phase of acetonitrile-water (78:22,v/v,0.1% acetic acid). Detection was carried out by positive elevtrospray ionization (ESI) in multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) mode of 300.3-->199.2 (m/z) for hydrocodone and 341.2-->107.2 (m/z) for canrenone (I.S.), respectively. A good linearity was obtained from 0.5 to 60 ng x mL(-1) and the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 0.1 ng x mL(-1). Compared to an existing method, the extraction method, internal standard and chromatographic conditions were modified and the cost of a large amount of samples determination was decreased obviously. The method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic and bioequivalence studies in healthy Chinese volunteers. PMID:19728188

  10. A pilot human pharmacokinetic study and influence of formulation factors on orodispersible tablet incorporating meloxicam solid dispersion using factorial design.

    PubMed

    Aboelwafa, Ahmed A; Fahmy, Rania H

    2012-01-01

    Meloxicam (MLX) suffers from poor aqueous solubility leading to slow absorption following oral administration; hence, immediate release MLX tablet is unsuitable in the treatment of acute pain. This study aims to overcome such a drawback by increasing MLX solubility and dissolution using PEG solid dispersion (SD), then, to investigate the feasibility of incorporating the SD into orodispersible tablets (ODTs). A 2(3) full factorial design was employed to investigate the influence of three formulation variables on MLX ODTs. The selected factors: camphor (X(1)) as pore-forming material, and croscarmellose sodium (X(2)) as superdisintegrant, showed significant positive influence, while PEG content (X(3)) was proved to negatively affect both disintegration and wetting times. In addition, isomalt increased disintegration and wetting times when compared to mannitol as diluents. The pharmacokinetic assessment of the optimum ODT formulation in healthy human subjects proved that the faster MLX dissolution by using PEG solid dispersion at pH 6.8 resulted in more rapid absorption of MLX. The rate of absorption of MLX from ODT was significantly faster (p = 0.030) with a significantly higher peak plasma concentration (P = 0.037) when compared to the marketed immediate release MLX tablet with a mean oral disintegration time of 17 ± 3 s.

  11. Rapid determination of apixaban concentration in human plasma by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry: application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Delavenne, Xavier; Mismetti, Patrick; Basset, Thierry

    2013-05-01

    We described the development and full validation of a rapid, high throughput sensible and accurate LC method using tandem mass spectrometry detection for determining apixaban concentration with [(¹³C, ²H₇]-apixaban as internal standard in human plasma. Plasma pretreatment involved a one-step protein precipitation with methanol. The separation was performed by reverse-phase chromatography on a Luna MercuryMS C18 column (20 mm × 4 mm × 3 μm) column. The multiple reaction monitoring transitions used for quantification were m/z 460.20→443.27 and 460.20→198.99 for apixaban, 468.22→451.30 for [(¹³C, ²H₇]-apixaban in the electrospray positive ionization mode. The method was linear over the concentration range of 5-500 μg/L. The intra- and inter-day precision values were below 14% and accuracy was from 90.0 to 105.8% at all quality control levels. Sample analysis time was less than 10 min including sample preparation. The present method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study following oral administration of apixaban. PMID:23499913

  12. Application of a sensitive liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric method to pharmacokinetic study of nalmefene in humans.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Chen, Xiaoyan; Dai, Xiaojian; Wen, Aidong; Zhang, Yifan; Zhong, Dafang

    2007-06-01

    A sensitive, specific and rapid liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) method was developed and validated for quantification of nalmefene in human plasma. An aliquot of 200 microL plasma sample was simply precipitated by 400 microL methanol. Separation of nalmefene and the internal standard hydromorphone from the interferences was achieved on a C(18) column followed by MS/MS detection. The analytes were monitored in the positive ionization mode with a TurboIonspray source. The method had a total chromatographic run time of 4.5 min and linear calibration curves over the concentration range of 10-5000 pg/mL. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 10 pg/mL. The intra- and inter-day precision was less than 10.1% determined from QC samples at concentrations of 30, 300 and 4500 pg/mL, and the accuracy was within +/-3.4%. As the method was more sensitive (10 times higher) than those reported previously, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of nalmefene in healthy volunteers after a single intravenous injection of low dose (30 microg) of nalmefene hydrochloride for the first time.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of inositol hexaphosphate in C.B17 SCID mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Eiseman, Julie; Lan, Jing; Guo, Jianxia; Joseph, Erin; Vucenik, Ivana

    2011-10-01

    Inositol hexaphosphate (IP(6)) is effective in preclinical cancer prevention and chemotherapy. In addition to cancer, IP(6) has many other beneficial effects for human health, such as reduction in risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes and inhibition of kidney stone formation. Studies presented here describe the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and metabolism of IP(6) following intravenous (IV) or per os (PO) administration to mice. SCID mice bearing MDA-MB-231 xenografts were treated with 20 mg/kg IP(6) (3 μCi per mouse [(14)C]-uniformly ring-labeled IP(6)) and euthanized at various times after IP(6) treatment. Plasma and tissues were analyzed for [(14)C]-IP(6) and metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography with radioactivity detection. Following IV administration of IP(6), plasma IP(6) concentrations peaked at 5 minutes and were detectable until 45 minutes. Liver IP(6) concentrations were more than 10-fold higher than plasma concentrations, whereas other normal tissue concentrations were similar to plasma. Only inositol was detected in xenografts. After PO administration, IP(6) was detected in liver; but only inositol was detectable in other tissues. After both IV and PO administration, exogenous IP(6) was rapidly dephosphorylated to inositol; however, alterations in endogenous IPs were not examined.

  14. Simultaneous determination of amoxicillin and ambroxol in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: validation and application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wen, Aidong; Hang, Taijun; Chen, Suning; Wang, Zhirui; Ding, Likun; Tian, Yun; Zhang, Meng; Xu, Xinxin

    2008-11-01

    A rapid, simple and sensitive LC-MS/MS method was developed for simultaneous determination of amoxicillin and ambroxol in human plasma using clenbuterol as internal standard (IS). The plasma samples were subjected to a simple protein precipitation with methanol. Separation was achieved on a Lichrospher C(18) column (150 mm x 4.6mm ID, dp 5 microm) using methanol (containing 0.2% of formic acid) and water (containing 0.2% of formic acid) as a mobile phase by gradient elution at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Detection was performed using electrospray ionization in positive ion multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode by monitoring the ion transitions from m/z 365.9-->348.9 (amoxicillin), m/z 378.9-->263.6 (ambroxol) and m/z 277.0-->203.0 (IS). Calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 5-20,000 ng/mL for amoxicillin, and 1-200 ng/mL for ambroxol, with the intra- and inter-run precisions of <9% and the accuracies of 100+/-7%. The method has been validated and applied to pharmacokinetic studies of compound amoxicillin and ambroxol hydrochloride tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of a 13-mer LNA-inhibitor-miR-221 in Mice and Non-human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Gallo Cantafio, Maria Eugenia; Nielsen, Boye Schnack; Mignogna, Chiara; Arbitrio, Mariamena; Botta, Cirino; Frandsen, Niels M; Rolfo, Christian; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Di Martino, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) oligonucleotides have been successfully used to efficiently inhibit endogenous small noncoding RNAs in vitro and in vivo. We previously demonstrated that the direct miR-221 inhibition by the novel 13-mer LNA-i-miR-221 induces significant antimyeloma activity and upregulates canonical miR-221 targets in vitro and in vivo. To evaluate the LNA-i-miR-221 pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, novel assays for oligonucleotides quantification in NOD.SCID mice and Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) plasma, urine and tissues were developed. To this aim, a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method, after solid-phase extraction, was used for the detection of LNA-i-miR-221 in plasma and urine, while a specific in situ hybridization assay for tissue uptake analysis was designed. Our analysis revealed short half-life, optimal tissue biovailability and minimal urine excretion of LNA-i-miR-221 in mice and monkeys. Up to 3 weeks, LNA-i-miR-221 was still detectable in mice vital organs and in xenografted tumors, together with p27 target upregulation. Importantly, no toxicity in the pilot monkey study was observed. Overall, our findings indicate the suitability of LNA-i-miR-221 for clinical use and we provide here pilot data for safety analysis and further development of LNA-miRNA-based therapeutics for human cancer. PMID:27327137

  16. Determination of rizatriptan in human plasma by liquid chromatographic-eletrospray tandem mass spectrometry: application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ji-fen; Zhang, Ai-jun; Zhao, Ling; Sun, Xiao-hong; Zhao, Yi-min; Gao, Hong-zhi; Liu, Ze-yuan; Qiao, Shan-yi

    2006-01-01

    A sensitive liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometry(LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of rizatriptan in human plasma. The analytes were extracted from plasma samples by liquid-liquid extraction, separated on a Zorbax XDB C8 column (150 x 4.6 mm i.d.) and detected by tandem mass spectrometry with an electrospray ionization interface. Zomitriptan was used as the internal standard. The method had a lower limit of quantitation of 50 pg/mL for rizatriptan, which showed more sensitivity and speed of analysis compared with reported methods. The within- and between-day precision was measured to be below 11.71% and accuracy between -5.87 and 0.86% for all quality control samples. This quantitation method was successfully applied to the evaluation of the pharmacokinetic profiles of rizatriptan after single oral administration of 5, 10 and 15 mg rizatriptan tablets to 10 healthy volunteers (five males and five females). PMID:15954161

  17. In vitro enantioselective human liver microsomal metabolism and prediction of in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters of tetrabenazine by DLLME-CE.

    PubMed

    Bocato, Mariana Zuccherato; de Lima Moreira, Fernanda; de Albuquerque, Nayara Cristina Perez; de Gaitani, Cristiane Masetto; de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo Moraes

    2016-09-01

    A new capillary electrophoresis method for the enantioselective analysis of cis- and trans- dihydrotetrabenazine (diHTBZ) after in vitro metabolism by human liver microsomes (HLMs) was developed. The chiral electrophoretic separations were performed by using tris-phosphate buffer (pH 2.5) containing 1% (w/v) carboxymethyl-β-CD as background electrolyte with an applied voltage of +15kV and capillary temperature kept at 15°C. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was employed to extract the analytes from HLMs. Dichloromethane was used as extraction solvent (75μL) and acetone as disperser solvent (150μL). The method was validated according to official guidelines and showed to be linear over the concentration range of 0.29-19.57μmolL(-1) (r=0.9955) for each metabolite enantiomer. Within- and between-day precision and accuracy evaluated by relative standard deviation and relative error were lower than 15% for all enantiomers. The stability assay showed that the analytes kept stable under handling, storage and in metabolism conditions. After method validation, an enantioselective in vitro metabolism and in vivo pharmacokinetic prediction was carried out. This study showed a stereoselective metabolism and the observed kinetic profile indicated a substrate inhibition behavior. DiHTBZ enantiomers were catalyzed mainly by CYP2C19 and the predicted clearance suggests that liver metabolism is the main route for TBZ elimination which supports the literature data. PMID:27381871

  18. In vitro enantioselective human liver microsomal metabolism and prediction of in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters of tetrabenazine by DLLME-CE.

    PubMed

    Bocato, Mariana Zuccherato; de Lima Moreira, Fernanda; de Albuquerque, Nayara Cristina Perez; de Gaitani, Cristiane Masetto; de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo Moraes

    2016-09-01

    A new capillary electrophoresis method for the enantioselective analysis of cis- and trans- dihydrotetrabenazine (diHTBZ) after in vitro metabolism by human liver microsomes (HLMs) was developed. The chiral electrophoretic separations were performed by using tris-phosphate buffer (pH 2.5) containing 1% (w/v) carboxymethyl-β-CD as background electrolyte with an applied voltage of +15kV and capillary temperature kept at 15°C. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was employed to extract the analytes from HLMs. Dichloromethane was used as extraction solvent (75μL) and acetone as disperser solvent (150μL). The method was validated according to official guidelines and showed to be linear over the concentration range of 0.29-19.57μmolL(-1) (r=0.9955) for each metabolite enantiomer. Within- and between-day precision and accuracy evaluated by relative standard deviation and relative error were lower than 15% for all enantiomers. The stability assay showed that the analytes kept stable under handling, storage and in metabolism conditions. After method validation, an enantioselective in vitro metabolism and in vivo pharmacokinetic prediction was carried out. This study showed a stereoselective metabolism and the observed kinetic profile indicated a substrate inhibition behavior. DiHTBZ enantiomers were catalyzed mainly by CYP2C19 and the predicted clearance suggests that liver metabolism is the main route for TBZ elimination which supports the literature data.

  19. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  20. Pharmacokinetics of IDX184, a liver-targeted oral prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, in the monkey and formulation optimization for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Pan-Zhou, Xin-Ru; Mayes, Benjamin A; Rashidzadeh, Hassan; Gasparac, Rahela; Smith, Steven; Bhadresa, Sanjeev; Gupta, Kusum; Cohen, Marita Larsson; Bu, Charlie; Good, Steven S; Moussa, Adel; Rush, Roger

    2016-10-01

    IDX184 is a phosphoramidate prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, developed to treat patients infected with hepatitis C virus. A mass balance study of radiolabeled IDX184 and pharmacokinetic studies of IDX184 in portal vein-cannulated monkeys revealed relatively low IDX184 absorption but higher exposure of IDX184 in the portal vein than in the systemic circulation, indicating >90 % of the absorbed dose was subject to hepatic extraction. Systemic exposures to the main metabolite, 2'-methylguanosine (2'-MeG), were used as a surrogate for liver levels of the pharmacologically active entity 2'-MeG triphosphate, and accordingly, systemic levels of 2'-MeG in the monkey were used to optimize formulations for further clinical development of IDX184. Capsule formulations of IDX184 delivered acceptable levels of 2'-MeG in humans; however, the encapsulation process introduced low levels of the genotoxic impurity ethylene sulfide (ES), which necessitated formulation optimization. Animal pharmacokinetic data guided the development of a tablet with trace levels of ES and pharmacokinetic performance equal to that of the clinical capsule in the monkey. Under fed conditions in humans, the new tablet formulation showed similar exposure to the capsule used in prior clinical trials. PMID:25898809

  1. Pharmacokinetics of IDX184, a liver-targeted oral prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, in the monkey and formulation optimization for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Pan-Zhou, Xin-Ru; Mayes, Benjamin A; Rashidzadeh, Hassan; Gasparac, Rahela; Smith, Steven; Bhadresa, Sanjeev; Gupta, Kusum; Cohen, Marita Larsson; Bu, Charlie; Good, Steven S; Moussa, Adel; Rush, Roger

    2016-10-01

    IDX184 is a phosphoramidate prodrug of 2'-methylguanosine-5'-monophosphate, developed to treat patients infected with hepatitis C virus. A mass balance study of radiolabeled IDX184 and pharmacokinetic studies of IDX184 in portal vein-cannulated monkeys revealed relatively low IDX184 absorption but higher exposure of IDX184 in the portal vein than in the systemic circulation, indicating >90 % of the absorbed dose was subject to hepatic extraction. Systemic exposures to the main metabolite, 2'-methylguanosine (2'-MeG), were used as a surrogate for liver levels of the pharmacologically active entity 2'-MeG triphosphate, and accordingly, systemic levels of 2'-MeG in the monkey were used to optimize formulations for further clinical development of IDX184. Capsule formulations of IDX184 delivered acceptable levels of 2'-MeG in humans; however, the encapsulation process introduced low levels of the genotoxic impurity ethylene sulfide (ES), which necessitated formulation optimization. Animal pharmacokinetic data guided the development of a tablet with trace levels of ES and pharmacokinetic performance equal to that of the clinical capsule in the monkey. Under fed conditions in humans, the new tablet formulation showed similar exposure to the capsule used in prior clinical trials.

  2. Cannabinoids and hallucinogens for headache.

    PubMed

    McGeeney, Brian E

    2013-03-01

    Hallucinogens and most cannabinoids are classified under schedule 1 of the Federal Controlled Substances Act 1970, along with heroin and ecstacy. Hence they cannot be prescribed by physicians, and by implication, have no accepted medical use with a high abuse potential. Despite their legal status, hallucinogens and cannabinoids are used by patients for relief of headache, helped by the growing number of American states that have legalized medical marijuana. Cannabinoids in particular have a long history of use in the abortive and prophylactic treatment of migraine before prohibition and are still used by patients as a migraine abortive in particular. Most practitioners are unaware of the prominence cannabis or "marijuana" once held in medical practice. Hallucinogens are being increasingly used by cluster headache patients outside of physician recommendation mainly to abort a cluster period and maintain quiescence for which there is considerable anecdotal success. The legal status of cannabinoids and hallucinogens has for a long time severely inhibited medical research, and there are still no blinded studies on headache subjects, from which we could assess true efficacy.

  3. Nicotine Delivery to Rats via Lung Alveolar Region-Targeted Aerosol Technology Produces Blood Pharmacokinetics Resembling Human Smoking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nicotine is a heavily used addictive drug acquired through smoking tobacco. Nicotine in cigarette smoke is deposited and absorbed in the lungs, which results in a rapidly peaked slowly declining arterial concentration. This pattern plays an important role in initiation of nicotine addiction. Methods: A method and device were developed for delivering nicotine to rodents with lung alveolar region-targeted aerosol technology. The dose of delivery can be controlled by the nicotine aerosol concentration and duration of exposure. Results: Our data showed that, in the breathing zone of the nose-only exposure chamber, the aerosol droplet size distribution was within the respirable diameter range. Rats were exposed to nicotine aerosol for 2min. The arterial blood nicotine concentration reached 43.2±15.7ng/ml (mean ± SD) within 1–4min and declined over the next 20min, closely resembling the magnitude and early pharmacokinetics of a human smoking a cigarette. The acute inhalation toxicity of nicotine: LC50 = 2.3mg/L was determined; it was affected by pH, suggesting that acidification decreases nicotine absorption and/or bioavailability. Conclusions: A noninvasive method and toolkit were developed for delivering nicotine to rodents that enable rapid delivery of a controllable amount of nicotine into the systemic circulation and brain-inducing dose-dependent pharmacological effects, even a lethal dose. Aerosol inhalation can produce nicotine kinetics in both arterial and venous blood resembling human smoking. This method can be applied to studies of the effects of chronic intermittent nicotine exposure, nicotine addiction, toxicology, tobacco-related diseases, teratogenicity, and for discovery of pharmacological therapeutics. PMID:23239844

  4. Using dietary exposure and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling in human risk extrapolations for acrylamide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Doerge, Daniel R; Young, John F; Chen, James J; Dinovi, Michael J; Henry, Sara H

    2008-08-13

    The discovery of acrylamide (AA) in many common cooked starchy foods has presented significant challenges to toxicologists, food scientists, and national regulatory and public health organizations because of the potential for producing neurotoxicity and cancer. This paper reviews some of the underlying experimental bases for AA toxicity and earlier risk assessments. Then, dietary exposure modeling is used to estimate probable AA intake in the U.S. population, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) modeling is used to integrate the findings of rodent neurotoxicity and cancer into estimates of risks from human AA exposure through the diet. The goal of these modeling techniques is to reduce the uncertainty inherent in extrapolating toxicological findings across species and dose by comparing common exposure biomarkers. PBPK/PD modeling estimated population-based lifetime excess cancer risks from average AA consumption in the diet in the range of 1-4 x 10 (-4); however, modeling did not support a link between dietary AA exposure and human neurotoxicity because marginal exposure ratios were 50-300 lower than in rodents. In addition, dietary exposure modeling suggests that because AA is found in so many common foods, even big changes in concentration for single foods or groups of foods would probably have a small impact on overall population-based intake and risk. These results suggest that a more holistic analysis of dietary cancer risks may be appropriate, by which potential risks from AA should be considered in conjunction with other risks and benefits from foods. PMID:18624435

  5. Determination of levocetirizine in human plasma by LC-MS-MS: validation and application in a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wichitnithad, Wisut; Jithavech, Ponsiree; Sanphanya, Kingkan; Vicheantawatchai, Petploy; Rojsitthisak, Pornchai

    2015-01-01

    A fast and simple sample cleanup approach for levocetirizine in human was developed using protein precipitation coupled with LC-MS-MS. Samples were treated with 6% trichloroacetic acid in water prior to LC-MS-MS analysis. Chromatographic separation was performed on a reverse phase column with an isocratic mobile phase of acetonitrile and 10 mM ammonium formate pH 3.5 (80:20, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The run time was 3.5 min. Mass parameters were optimized to monitor transitions at m/z [M+H](+) 389.0→201.0 for levocetirizine and m/z [M+H](+) 375.3→201.0 for hydroxyzine as internal standard. The lower limit of quantification and the dynamic range were 1.00 and 1.00-500 ng/mL, respectively. Linearity was good for intraday and interday validations (r(2) ≥ 0.995). The mean recoveries were 59 and 69% for levocetirizine and hydroxyzine, respectively. Matrix effect was acceptable with %CV < 15. Hemolytic effect was negligible. Levocetirizine was stable in human plasma for 27 h at room temperature (25°C), for 16 weeks frozen at -70°C, 4 weeks frozen at -20°C, for 24 h in an autosampler at 15°C and for three freeze/thaw cycles. The validated method was applied in a pharmacokinetic study to determine the concentration of levocetirizine in plasma samples. The study provides a fast and simple bioanalytical method for routine analysis and may be particularly useful for bioequivalence studies. PMID:26084706

  6. PhRMA CPCDC initiative on predictive models of human pharmacokinetics, part 2: comparative assessment of prediction methods of human volume of distribution.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rhys Do; Jones, Hannah M; Rowland, Malcolm; Gibson, Christopher R; Yates, James W T; Chien, Jenny Y; Ring, Barbara J; Adkison, Kimberly K; Ku, M Sherry; He, Handan; Vuppugalla, Ragini; Marathe, Punit; Fischer, Volker; Dutta, Sandeep; Sinha, Vikash K; Björnsson, Thorir; Lavé, Thierry; Poulin, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of various empirical, semimechanistic and mechanistic methodologies with and without protein binding corrections for the prediction of human volume of distribution at steady state (Vss ). PhRMA member companies contributed a set of blinded data from preclinical and clinical studies, and 18 drugs with intravenous clinical pharmacokinetics (PK) data were available for the analysis. In vivo and in vitro preclinical data were used to predict Vss by 24 different methods. Various statistical and outlier techniques were employed to assess the predictability of each method. There was not simply one method that predicts Vss accurately for all compounds. Across methods, the maximum success rate in predicting human Vss was 100%, 94%, and 78% of the compounds with predictions falling within tenfold, threefold, and twofold error, respectively, of the observed Vss . Generally, the methods that made use of in vivo preclinical data were more predictive than those methods that relied solely on in vitro data. However, for many compounds, in vivo data from only two species (generally rat and dog) were available and/or the required in vitro data were missing, which meant some methods could not be properly evaluated. It is recommended to initially use the in vitro tissue composition-based equations to predict Vss in preclinical species and humans, putting the assumptions and compound properties into context. As in vivo data become available, these predictions should be reassessed and rationalized to indicate the level of confidence (uncertainty) in the human Vss prediction. The top three methods that perform strongly at integrating in vivo data in this way were the Øie-Tozer, the rat -dog-human proportionality equation, and the lumped-PBPK approach. Overall, the scientific benefit of this study was to obtain greater characterization of predictions of human Vss from several methods available in the literature.

  7. Gastric acid inhibitory and gastric protective effects of Cannabis and cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis sativa has long been known for its psychotropic effect. Only recently with the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous legends and the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation, the role of this 'endocannabinoid system' in different pathophysiologic processes is beginning to be delineated. There is evidence that CB1 receptor stimulation with synthetic cannabinoids or Cannabis sativa extracts rich in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibit gastric acid secretion in humans and experimental animals. This is specially seen when gastric acid secretion is stimulated by pentagastrin, carbachol or 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Cannabis and/or cannabinoids protect the gastric mucosa against noxious challenge with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ethanol as well as against stress-induced mucosal damage. Cannabis/cannabinoids might protect the gastric mucosa by virtue of its antisecretory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilator properties. PMID:27261847

  8. Gastric acid inhibitory and gastric protective effects of Cannabis and cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis sativa has long been known for its psychotropic effect. Only recently with the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous legends and the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation, the role of this 'endocannabinoid system' in different pathophysiologic processes is beginning to be delineated. There is evidence that CB1 receptor stimulation with synthetic cannabinoids or Cannabis sativa extracts rich in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibit gastric acid secretion in humans and experimental animals. This is specially seen when gastric acid secretion is stimulated by pentagastrin, carbachol or 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Cannabis and/or cannabinoids protect the gastric mucosa against noxious challenge with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ethanol as well as against stress-induced mucosal damage. Cannabis/cannabinoids might protect the gastric mucosa by virtue of its antisecretory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilator properties.

  9. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  10. The use of cannabinoids as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Guillermo; Hernández-Tiedra, Sonia; Dávila, David; Lorente, Mar

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that cannabinoids exert palliative effects on some cancer-associated symptoms. In addition evidences obtained during the last fifteen years support that these compounds can reduce tumor growth in animal models of cancer. Cannabinoids have been shown to activate an ER-stress related pathway that leads to the stimulation of autophagy-mediated cancer cell death. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit tumor angiogenesis and decrease cancer cell migration. The mechanisms of resistance to cannabinoid anticancer action as well as the possible strategies to develop cannabinoid-based combinational therapies to fight cancer have also started to be explored. In this review we will summarize these observations (that have already helped to set the bases for the development of the first clinical studies to investigate the potential clinical benefit of using cannabinoids in anticancer therapies) and will discuss the possible future avenues of research in this area.

  11. Combined image guided monitoring the pharmacokinetics of rapamycin loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles with a split luciferase reporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Zhe; Ma, Ying; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Tian, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery carriers upon administration in the blood circulation, which complicates the interpretation of image findings. Herein we applied a genetically encoded luciferase reporter in conjunction with near infrared (NIR) fluorophores to investigate the respective PK profiles of a drug and its carrier in a biodegradable drug delivery system. In this system, a prototype hydrophobic agent, rapamycin (Rapa), was encapsulated into human serum albumin (HSA) to form HSA Rapa nanoparticles, which were then labeled with Cy5 fluorophore to facilitate the fluorescence imaging of HSA carrier. Meanwhile, we employed transgenetic HN12 cells that were modified with a split luciferase reporter, whose bioluminescence function is regulated by Rapa, to reflect the PK profile of the encapsulated agent. It was interesting to discover that there existed an obvious inconsistency of PK behaviors between HSA carrier and rapamycin in vitro and in vivo through near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIFRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) after treatment with Cy5 labeled HSA Rapa. Nevertheless, HSA Rapa nanoparticles manifested favorable in vivo PK and tumor suppression efficacy in a follow-up therapeutic study. The developed strategy of combining a molecular reporter and a fluorophore in this study could be extended to other drug delivery systems to provide profound insights for non-invasive real-time evaluation of PK profiles of drug-loaded nanoparticles in pre-clinical studies.Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery

  12. Preclinical Studies on the Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Toxicology of Oxfendazole: Toward First in Human Studies

    PubMed Central

    Codd, Ellen E.; Ng, Hanna H.; McFarlane, Claire; Riccio, Edward S.; Doppalapudi, Rupa; Mirsalis, Jon C.; Horton, R. John; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, H. Hugo; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    A two-week study in rats identified target organs of oxfendazole toxicity to be bone marrow, epididymis, liver, spleen, testis, and thymus. Female rats had greater oxfendazole exposure and exhibited toxicities at lower doses than did males. Decreased WBC levels, a class effect of benzimidazole anthelminthics, returned to normal during the recovery period. The NOAEL was determined to be >5 but < 25 mg/kg/d and the MTD 100 mg/kg/d. The highest dose, 200 mg/kg/d resulted in significant toxicity and mortality, leading to euthanization of the main study animals in this group after seven days. Oxfendazole did not exhibit genetic toxicology signals in standard Ames bacterial, mouse lymphoma or rat micronucleus assays, nor did it provoke safety concerns when evaluated for behavioral effects in rats or cardiovascular safety effects in dogs. These results support the transition of oxfendazole to First in Human safety studies preliminary to its evaluation in human helminth diseases. PMID:25701764

  13. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic modeling of the temperature-dependent dermal absorption of chloroform by humans following bath water exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A. ); Gordon, Syd M.; Wallace, Lance A.

    2000-01-14

    The kinetics of chloroform in the exhaled breath of human volunteers exposed skin-only via bath water (concentrations < 100 ppb) were analyzed using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Significant increases in exhaled chloroform (and thus bioavailability) were observed as exposure temperatures were increased from 30 to 40?C. The blood flows to the skin and effective skin permeability coefficients (Kp) were both varied to reflect the temperature-dependent changes in physiology and exhalation kinetics. At 40?C, no differences were observed between males and females. Therefore, Kp?s were determined ({approx}0.06 cm/hr) at a skin blood flow rate of 18% of the cardiac output. At 30 and 35?C, males exhaled more chloroform than females resulting in lower effective Kp?s calculated for females. At these lower temperatures, the blood flow to the skin was also reduced. Total amounts of chloroform absorbed averaged 41.9 and 43.6 mg for males and 11.5 and 39.9 mg for females exposed at 35 and 40?C, respectively. At 30?C, only 2/5 males and 1/5 females had detectable concentrations of chloroform in their exhaled breath. For perspective, the total intake of chloroform would have ranged from 79 - 194 mg if the volunteers had consumed 2 L of water orally at the concentrations used in this study. Thus, the relative contribution of dermal uptake of chloroform to the total body burdens associated with bathing for 30 min and drinking 2 L of water (ignoring contributions from inhalation exposures) was predicted to range from 1-28% depending on the temperature of the bath.

  14. Investigation of omeprazole and phenacetin first-pass metabolism in humans using a microscale bioreactor and pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Bricks, Thibault; Hamon, Jérémy; Fleury, Marie José; Jellali, Rachid; Merlier, Franck; Herpe, Yves Edouard; Seyer, Alexandre; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Bois, Frédéric; Leclerc, Eric

    2015-07-01

    A new in vitro microfluidic platform (integrated insert dynamic microfluidic platform, IIDMP) allowing the co-culture of intestinal Caco-2 TC7 cells and of human primary hepatocytes was used to test the absorption and first-pass metabolism of two drugs: phenacetin and omeprazole. The metabolism of these drugs by CYP1A2, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 was evaluated by the calculation of bioavailabilities and of intrinsic clearances using a pharmacokinetic (PK) model. To demonstrate the usefulness of the device and of the PK model, predictions were compared with in vitro and in vivo results from the literature. Based on the IIDMP experiments, hepatic in vivo clearances of phenacetin and omeprazole in the IIDMP were predicted to be 3.10 ± 0.36 and 1.46 ± 0.25 ml/min/kg body weight, respectively. This appeared lower than the in vivo observed data with values ranging between 11.9-19.6 and 5.8-7.5 ml/min/kg body weight, respectively. Then the calculated hepatic and intestinal clearances led to predicting an oral bioavailability of 0.85 and 0.77 for phenacetin and omeprazole versus 0.92 and 0.78 using separate data from the simple monoculture of Caco-2 TC7 cells and hepatocytes in Petri dishes. When compared with the in vivo data, the results of oral bioavailability were overestimated (0.37 and 0.71, respectively). The feasibility of co-culture in a device allowing the integration of intestinal absorption, intestinal metabolism and hepatic metabolism in a single model was demonstrated. Nevertheless, further experiments with other drugs are needed to extend knowledge of the device to predict oral bioavailability and intestinal first-pass metabolism.

  15. A model-based meta-analysis of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics to guide optimal first-in-human study design.

    PubMed

    Davda, Jasmine P; Dodds, Michael G; Gibbs, Megan A; Wisdom, Wendy; Gibbs, John

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective analysis were (1) to characterize the population pharmacokinetics (popPK) of four different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in a combined analysis of individual data collected during first-in-human (FIH) studies and (2) to provide a scientific rationale for prospective design of FIH studies with mAbs. The data set was composed of 171 subjects contributing a total of 2716 mAb serum concentrations, following intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SC) doses. mAb PK was described by an open 2-compartment model with first-order elimination from the central compartment and a depot compartment with first-order absorption. Parameter values obtained from the popPK model were further used to generate optimal sampling times for a single dose study. A robust fit to the combined data from four mAbs was obtained using the 2-compartment model. Population parameter estimates for systemic clearance and central volume of distribution were 0.20 L/day and 3.6 L with intersubject variability of 31% and 34%, respectively. The random residual error was 14%. Differences (> 2-fold) in PK parameters were not apparent across mAbs. Rich designs (22 samples/subject), minimal designs for popPK (5 samples/subject), and optimal designs for non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and popPK (10 samples/subject) were examined by stochastic simulation and estimation. Single-dose PK studies for linear mAbs executed using the optimal designs are expected to yield high-quality model estimates, and accurate capture of NCA estimations. This model-based meta-analysis has determined typical popPK values for four mAbs with linear elimination and enabled prospective optimization of FIH study designs, potentially improving the efficiency of FIH studies for this class of therapeutics.

  16. First-in-human pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of the dual m-TORC 1/2 inhibitor, AZD2014

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Bristi; Dean, Emma; Puglisi, Martina; Greystoke, Alastair; Ong, Michael; Burke, Wendy; Cavallin, Maria; Bigley, Graham; Womack, Christopher; Harrington, Elizabeth A; Green, Stephen; Oelmann, Elisabeth; de Bono, Johann S; Ranson, Malcolm; Banerji, Udai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose AZD2014 is a novel, oral, m-TORC 1/2 inhibitor which has shown in-vitro and in-vivo efficacy across a range of preclinical human cancer models. Experimental Design A rolling six dose escalation was performed to define a maximal tolerated dose (MTD) (Part A) and at MTD a further cohort of patients was treated to further characterize toxicities and perform pre- and post-treatment biopsies (Part B). AZD2014 was administered orally twice a day (BD) continuously. Flow cytometry, ELISA and immunohistochemistry were used to quantify pharmacodynamic biomarkers. Pharmacokinetic analysis was carried out by mass spectrometry. Results A total of 56 patients were treated across a dose range of 25 -100 mg. The MTD was 50 mg BD. The dose limiting toxicities were fatigue and mucositis. At the MTD the most common AEs were fatigue (78%), nausea (51%) and mucositis (49%) but these were equal to or greater than grade 3 in only 5% of patients. Drug levels achieved at the MTD (AUCss 6686 ng.hr/mL, Cmaxss 1664 ng/mL) were consistent with activity in pre-clinical models. A reduction in p-S6 levels and Ki67 staining was observed in 8/8 and 5/9 evaluable paired biopsy samples. Partial responses were seen in a patient with pancreatic cancer and a patient with breast cancer who were found to have a PDGFR and ERBB2 mutation, respectively. Conclusions The recommended phase II dose for further evaluation of AZD2014 is 50 mg BD and at this dose it has been possible to demonstrate pharmacologically relevant plasma concentrations, target inhibition in tumor and clinical responses. PMID:25805799

  17. A model-based meta-analysis of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics to guide optimal first-in-human study design

    PubMed Central

    Davda, Jasmine P; Dodds, Michael G; Gibbs, Megan A; Wisdom, Wendy; Gibbs, John P

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective analysis were (1) to characterize the population pharmacokinetics (popPK) of four different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in a combined analysis of individual data collected during first-in-human (FIH) studies and (2) to provide a scientific rationale for prospective design of FIH studies with mAbs. The data set was composed of 171 subjects contributing a total of 2716 mAb serum concentrations, following intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SC) doses. mAb PK was described by an open 2-compartment model with first-order elimination from the central compartment and a depot compartment with first-order absorption. Parameter values obtained from the popPK model were further used to generate optimal sampling times for a single dose study. A robust fit to the combined data from four mAbs was obtained using the 2-compartment model. Population parameter estimates for systemic clearance and central volume of distribution were 0.20 L/day and 3.6 L with intersubject variability of 31% and 34%, respectively. The random residual error was 14%. Differences (> 2-fold) in PK parameters were not apparent across mAbs. Rich designs (22 samples/subject), minimal designs for popPK (5 samples/subject), and optimal designs for non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and popPK (10 samples/subject) were examined by stochastic simulation and estimation. Single-dose PK studies for linear mAbs executed using the optimal designs are expected to yield high-quality model estimates, and accurate capture of NCA estimations. This model-based meta-analysis has determined typical popPK values for four mAbs with linear elimination and enabled prospective optimization of FIH study designs, potentially improving the efficiency of FIH studies for this class of therapeutics. PMID:24837591

  18. Gemcitabine/cannabinoid combination triggers autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells through a ROS-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Donadelli, M; Dando, I; Zaniboni, T; Costanzo, C; Dalla Pozza, E; Scupoli, M T; Scarpa, A; Zappavigna, S; Marra, M; Abbruzzese, A; Bifulco, M; Caraglia, M; Palmieri, M

    2011-01-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM, 2′,2′-difluorodeoxycytidine) is currently used in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with a response rate of < 20%. The purpose of our work was to improve GEM activity by addition of cannabinoids. Here, we show that GEM induces both cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptors by an NF-κB-dependent mechanism and that its association with cannabinoids synergistically inhibits pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell growth and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by single treatments. The antiproliferative synergism is prevented by the radical scavenger N-acetyl--cysteine and by the specific NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7085, demonstrating that the induction of ROS by GEM/cannabinoids and of NF-κB by GEM is required for this effect. In addition, we report that neither apoptotic nor cytostatic mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic cell growth inhibition, which is strictly associated with the enhancement of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Noteworthy, the antiproliferative synergism is stronger in GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with GEM-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines. The combined treatment strongly inhibits growth of human pancreatic tumor cells xenografted in nude mice without apparent toxic effects. These findings support a key role of the ROS-dependent activation of an autophagic program in the synergistic growth inhibition induced by GEM/cannabinoid combination in human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:21525939

  19. Gemcitabine/cannabinoid combination triggers autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells through a ROS-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Donadelli, M; Dando, I; Zaniboni, T; Costanzo, C; Dalla Pozza, E; Scupoli, M T; Scarpa, A; Zappavigna, S; Marra, M; Abbruzzese, A; Bifulco, M; Caraglia, M; Palmieri, M

    2011-04-28

    Gemcitabine (GEM, 2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine) is currently used in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with a response rate of < 20%. The purpose of our work was to improve GEM activity by addition of cannabinoids. Here, we show that GEM induces both cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptors by an NF-κB-dependent mechanism and that its association with cannabinoids synergistically inhibits pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell growth and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by single treatments. The antiproliferative synergism is prevented by the radical scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine and by the specific NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7085, demonstrating that the induction of ROS by GEM/cannabinoids and of NF-κB by GEM is required for this effect. In addition, we report that neither apoptotic nor cytostatic mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic cell growth inhibition, which is strictly associated with the enhancement of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Noteworthy, the antiproliferative synergism is stronger in GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with GEM-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines. The combined treatment strongly inhibits growth of human pancreatic tumor cells xenografted in nude mice without apparent toxic effects. These findings support a key role of the ROS-dependent activation of an autophagic program in the synergistic growth inhibition induced by GEM/cannabinoid combination in human pancreatic cancer cells.

  20. Metabolism of classical cannabinoids and the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018.

    PubMed

    Su, M K; Seely, K A; Moran, J H; Hoffman, R S

    2015-06-01

    Although the putative pharmacological targets of synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) abused in "K2" and "Spice" are similar to Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC), it remains unclear why SCB toxicity is similar yet different from marijuana. There are obvious potency and efficacy differences, but also important metabolic differences that help explain the unique adverse reactions associated with SCBs. This brief review discusses the limited research on the metabolism of the SCB JWH-018 and contrasts that with the metabolism of Δ(9) -THC.

  1. Behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of chronic alcohol or cannabinoids on HIV/AIDs: Studies in the Non-Human Primate SIV model

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Patricia E.; Amedee, Angela M.; Winsauer, Peter; Nelson, Steve; Bagby, Gregory; Simon, Liz

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated mortality has been significantly reduced with antiretroviral therapy (ART), and HIV infection has become a chronic disease that frequently coexists with many disorders, including substance abuse (Azar et al. 2010; Phillips et al. 2001). Alcohol and drugs of abuse may modify host-pathogen interactions at various levels including behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of HIV infection, as well as the ability of the virus to integrate into the genome and replicate in host cells. Identifying mechanisms responsible for these interactions is complicated by many factors, such as the tissue specific responses to viral infection, multiple cellular mechanisms involved in inflammatory responses, neuroendocrine and localized responses to infection, and kinetics of viral replication. An integrated physiological analysis of the biomedical consequences of chronic alcohol and drug use or abuse on disease progression is possible using rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a relevant model of HIV infection. This review will provide an overview of the data gathered using this model to show that chronic administration of two of the most commonly abused substances, alcohol and cannabinoids (Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol; THC), affect host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25795088

  2. Cannabinoids as Pharmacotherapies for Neuropathic Pain: From the Bench to the Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, Elizabeth J.; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), multiple sclerosis (MS), and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB1/CB2 agonists, CB2-selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e. inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Δ9-THC analogs (e.g. Marinol®, Cesamet®) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Δ9-THC and cannabidiol (e.g. Sativex®, Cannador®) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e. rating scales) and objective (i.e. stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research. PMID:19789075

  3. Loss of striatal type 1 cannabinoid receptors is a key pathogenic factor in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Cristina; Chiarlone, Anna; Sagredo, Onintza; Aguado, Tania; Pazos, M Ruth; Resel, Eva; Palazuelos, Javier; Julien, Boris; Salazar, María; Börner, Christine; Benito, Cristina; Carrasco, Carolina; Diez-Zaera, María; Paoletti, Paola; Díaz-Hernández, Miguel; Ruiz, Carolina; Sendtner, Michael; Lucas, José J; de Yébenes, Justo G; Marsicano, Giovanni; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat; Romero, Julián; Alberch, Jordi; Ginés, Silvia; Kraus, Jürgen; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Guzmán, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Endocannabinoids act as neuromodulatory and neuroprotective cues by engaging type 1 cannabinoid receptors. These receptors are highly abundant in the basal ganglia and play a pivotal role in the control of motor behaviour. An early downregulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptors has been documented in the basal ganglia of patients with Huntington's disease and animal models. However, the pathophysiological impact of this loss of receptors in Huntington's disease is as yet unknown. Here, we generated a double-mutant mouse model that expresses human mutant huntingtin exon 1 in a type 1 cannabinoid receptor-null background, and found that receptor deletion aggravates the symptoms, neuropathology and molecular pathology of the disease. Moreover, pharmacological administration of the cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol to mice expressing human mutant huntingtin exon 1 exerted a therapeutic effect and ameliorated those parameters. Experiments conducted in striatal cells show that the mutant huntingtin-dependent downregulation of the receptors involves the control of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor gene promoter by repressor element 1 silencing transcription factor and sensitizes cells to excitotoxic damage. We also provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that supports type 1 cannabinoid receptor control of striatal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and the decrease in brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels concomitant with type 1 cannabinoid receptor loss, which may contribute significantly to striatal damage in Huntington's disease. Altogether, these results support the notion that downregulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptors is a key pathogenic event in Huntington's disease, and suggest that activation of these receptors in patients with Huntington's disease may attenuate disease progression.

  4. Simultaneous determination of carisoprodol and aspirin in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in polarity switch mode: application to a human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasulu, Vudagandla; Ramesh, Mullangi; Kumar, Inamadugu Jaswanth; Babu, Ravi Vasu; Pilli, Nageswara Rao; Krishnaiah, Abburi

    2013-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid LC-MS/MS-ESI method has been developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of the carisoprodol and aspirin in human plasma. Carisoprodol was detected in positive ion mode, whereas aspirin was detected in negative ion mode. Carbamazepine and furosemide were used as internal standards (IS) for quantification of carisoprodol and aspirin, respectively. The extraction procedure involves a liquid-liquid extraction method with ter-butyl methyl ether. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Zorbax XDB-Phenyl (4.6 × 75 mm, 3.5 µm) column using an isocratic mobile phase (5 mm ammonium acetate:methanol, 20:80, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min with a total run time of 2.2 min. A detailed method validation was performed as per the FDA guidelines. The standard curves found to be linear in the range of 25.5-4900 and 15.3-3000 ng/mL for carisoprodol and aspirin, respectively. The results met the acceptance criteria. Carisoprodol and aspirin were found to be stable in various stability studies. The validated method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study following co-administration of carisoprodol (250 mg) and aspirin (75 mg) tablets by oral route to human volunteers. PMID:22674769

  5. Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results

    SciTech Connect

    Redding, Laurel E.; Sohn, Michael D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Wang, Shu-Li; Hsieh, Dennis P. H.; Yang, Raymond S. H.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of PCB 153 in women, and predict its transfer via lactation to infants. The model is the first human, population-scale lactational model for PCB 153. Data in the literature provided estimates for model development and for performance assessment. Physiological parameters were taken from a cohort in Taiwan and from reference values in the literature. We estimated partition coefficients based on chemical structure and the lipid content in various body tissues. Using exposure data in Japan, we predicted acquired body burden of PCB 153 at an average childbearing age of 25 years and compare predictions to measurements from studies in multiple countries. Forward-model predictions agree well with human biomonitoring measurements, as represented by summary statistics and uncertainty estimates. The model successfully describes the range of possible PCB 153 dispositions in maternal milk, suggesting a promising option for back estimating doses for various populations. One example of reverse dosimetry modeling was attempted using our PBPK model for possible exposure scenarios in Canadian Inuits who had the highest level of PCB 153 in their milk in the world.

  6. The role of cannabinoids in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Prenderville, Jack A; Kelly, Áine M; Downer, Eric J

    2015-08-01

    The processes underpinning post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain continue to be defined. Such processes involve the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neuronal migration, differentiation and integration into a network of functional synapses within the brain. Both intrinsic (cell signalling cascades) and extrinsic (neurotrophins, neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones) signalling molecules are intimately associated with adult neurogenesis and largely dictate the proliferative activity and differentiation capacity of neural cells. Cannabinoids are a unique class of chemical compounds incorporating plant-derived cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa), the endogenous cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid ligands, and these compounds are becoming increasingly recognized for their roles in neural developmental processes. Indeed, cannabinoids have clear modulatory roles in adult neurogenesis, probably through activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, a large body of literature has deciphered the signalling networks involved in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of neurogenesis. This timely review summarizes the evidence that the cannabinoid system is intricately associated with neuronal differentiation and maturation of NPCs and highlights intrinsic/extrinsic signalling mechanisms that are cannabinoid targets. Overall, these findings identify the central role of the cannabinoid system in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and the lateral ventricles and hence provide insight into the processes underlying post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain.

  7. Cannabinoids for the treatment of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John C

    2007-05-01

    Cannabinoids are effective at suppressing immune and inflammation functions in leukocytes in vitro, and in animal models of acute inflammation, such as the mouse hind paw, ear and air pouch models, as well as gastrointestinal, pulmonary, myocardial, vascular, periodontal, neural, hepatic, pancreatic and arthritic inflammation models. The non-psychoactive cannabinoid receptor CB2 is emerging as a critical target for cannabinoid regulation of inflammation, and thus CB2-selective agonists are undergoing intense investigation and research. This review discusses the evidence for cannabinoid regulation of inflammation across a range of models and highlights the most promising drug candidates.

  8. The role of cannabinoids in adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Prenderville, Jack A; Kelly, Áine M; Downer, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    The processes underpinning post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain continue to be defined. Such processes involve the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neuronal migration, differentiation and integration into a network of functional synapses within the brain. Both intrinsic (cell signalling cascades) and extrinsic (neurotrophins, neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones) signalling molecules are intimately associated with adult neurogenesis and largely dictate the proliferative activity and differentiation capacity of neural cells. Cannabinoids are a unique class of chemical compounds incorporating plant-derived cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa), the endogenous cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid ligands, and these compounds are becoming increasingly recognized for their roles in neural developmental processes. Indeed, cannabinoids have clear modulatory roles in adult neurogenesis, probably through activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, a large body of literature has deciphered the signalling networks involved in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of neurogenesis. This timely review summarizes the evidence that the cannabinoid system is intricately associated with neuronal differentiation and maturation of NPCs and highlights intrinsic/extrinsic signalling mechanisms that are cannabinoid targets. Overall, these findings identify the central role of the cannabinoid system in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and the lateral ventricles and hence provide insight into the processes underlying post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. PMID:25951750

  9. Preclinical studies on the pharmacokinetics, safety, and toxicology of oxfendazole: toward first in human studies.

    PubMed

    Codd, Ellen E; Ng, Hanna H; McFarlane, Claire; Riccio, Edward S; Doppalapudi, Rupa; Mirsalis, Jon C; Horton, R John; Gonzalez, Armando E; Garcia, H Hugo; Gilman, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    A 2-week study in rats identified target organs of oxfendazole toxicity to be bone marrow, epididymis, liver, spleen, testis, and thymus. Female rats had greater oxfendazole exposure and exhibited toxicities at lower doses than did males. Decreased white blood cell levels, a class effect of benzimidazole anthelmintics, returned to normal during the recovery period. The no observed adverse effect level was determined to be >5 but <25 mg/kg/d and the maximum tolerated dose 100 mg/kg/d. The highest dose, 200 mg/kg/d, resulted in significant toxicity and mortality, leading to euthanization of the main study animals in this group after 7 days. Oxfendazole did not exhibit genetic toxicology signals in standard Ames bacterial, mouse lymphoma, or rat micronucleus assays nor did it provoke safety concerns when evaluated for behavioral effects in rats or cardiovascular safety effects in dogs. These results support the transition of oxfendazole to First in Human safety studies preliminary to its evaluation in human helminth diseases.

  10. MicroRNA let-7d is a target of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and controls cannabinoid signaling.

    PubMed

    Chiarlone, Anna; Börner, Christine; Martín-Gómez, Laura; Jiménez-González, Ada; García-Concejo, Adrián; García-Bermejo, María L; Lorente, Mar; Blázquez, Cristina; García-Taboada, Elena; de Haro, Amador; Martella, Elisa; Höllt, Volker; Rodríguez, Raquel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Kraus, Jürgen; Guzmán, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor, the molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is one of the most abundant metabotropic receptors in the brain. Cannabis is widely used for both recreational and medicinal purposes. Despite the ever-growing fundamental roles of microRNAs in the brain, the possible molecular connections between the CB1 receptor and microRNAs are surprisingly unknown. Here, by using reporter gene constructs that express interaction sequences for microRNAs in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that CB1 receptor activation enhances the expression of several microRNAs, including let-7d. This was confirmed by measuring hsa-let-7d expression levels. Accordingly, knocking-down CB1 receptor in zebrafish reduced dre-let-7d levels, and knocking-out CB1 receptor in mice decreased mmu-let-7d levels in the cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Conversely, knocking-down let-7d increased CB1 receptor mRNA expression in zebrafish, SH-SY5Y cells and primary striatal neurons. Likewise, in primary striatal neurons chronically exposed to a cannabinoid or opioid agonist, a let-7d-inhibiting sequence facilitated not only cannabinoid or opioid signaling but also cannabinoid/opioid cross-signaling. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence for a bidirectional link between the CB1 receptor and a microRNA, namely let-7d, and thus unveil a new player in the complex process of cannabinoid action. PMID:27179908

  11. MicroRNA let-7d is a target of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and controls cannabinoid signaling.

    PubMed

    Chiarlone, Anna; Börner, Christine; Martín-Gómez, Laura; Jiménez-González, Ada; García-Concejo, Adrián; García-Bermejo, María L; Lorente, Mar; Blázquez, Cristina; García-Taboada, Elena; de Haro, Amador; Martella, Elisa; Höllt, Volker; Rodríguez, Raquel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Kraus, Jürgen; Guzmán, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor, the molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is one of the most abundant metabotropic receptors in the brain. Cannabis is widely used for both recreational and medicinal purposes. Despite the ever-growing fundamental roles of microRNAs in the brain, the possible molecular connections between the CB1 receptor and microRNAs are surprisingly unknown. Here, by using reporter gene constructs that express interaction sequences for microRNAs in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that CB1 receptor activation enhances the expression of several microRNAs, including let-7d. This was confirmed by measuring hsa-let-7d expression levels. Accordingly, knocking-down CB1 receptor in zebrafish reduced dre-let-7d levels, and knocking-out CB1 receptor in mice decreased mmu-let-7d levels in the cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Conversely, knocking-down let-7d increased CB1 receptor mRNA expression in zebrafish, SH-SY5Y cells and primary striatal neurons. Likewise, in primary striatal neurons chronically exposed to a cannabinoid or opioid agonist, a let-7d-inhibiting sequence facilitated not only cannabinoid or opioid signaling but also cannabinoid/opioid cross-signaling. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence for a bidirectional link between the CB1 receptor and a microRNA, namely let-7d, and thus unveil a new player in the complex process of cannabinoid action.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and molecular detoxication.

    PubMed Central

    Cashman, J R; Perotti, B Y; Berkman, C E; Lin, J

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive overview of the pharmacokinetic parameters used from in vivo and in vitro studies that are important in order to understand the major conceptual approaches of toxicokinetics and the disposition of environmental chemicals. In vitro biochemical information concerning the detoxication of environmental chemicals is also presented. The discussion leads to a more complete appreciation for the use of in vitro measurements for in vivo correlations. The concept of interspecies scaling in the interpolation and extrapolation of fundamental biochemical metabolic processes is illustrated with a number of examples. Additional examples of in vitro-in vivo correlations are presented in the evaluation of the impact of chemical exposure to humans. Finally, several important metabolic detoxication enzymes are presented, including the mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 and flavin-containing monooxygenases as well as carboxylesterases and glucuronosyltransferases, to provide insight into the processes of chemical detoxication in mammalian tissue and blood. Because interspecies scaling and the pharmacokinetics of chemical disposition have already shown their usefulness in understanding some examples of chemical disposition, our summary focuses on showing the usefulness of the pharmacokinetic equations and providing confidence in using the approach for in vitro-in vivo correlations. Ultimately, the presentation may provide the reader with a conceptual framework for future evaluation of the human health risks associated with environmental toxicants. PMID:8722108

  13. A novel expression cassette delivers efficient production of exclusively tetrameric human butyrylcholinesterase with improved pharmacokinetics for protection against organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Stanislav; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatiana; Shamborant, Olga; Zenkova, Marina; Chernolovskaya, Elena; Gladkikh, Danil; Murashev, Arkadii; Dyachenko, Igor; Palikov, Viktor; Palikova, Yulia; Knorre, Vera; Belogurov, Alexey; Ponomarenko, Natalie; Blackburn, G Michael; Masson, Patrick; Gabibov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase is a stoichiometric bioscavenger against poisoning by organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. The low level of expression and extremely rapid clearance of monomeric recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE) from bloodstream (t½≈2 min) limits its pharmaceutical application. Recently (Ilyushin at al., PNAS, 2013) we described a long-acting polysialylated recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE-CAO), stable in the bloodstream, that protects mice against 4.2 LD50 of VR. Here we report a set of modifications of the initial rhBChE expression vector to improve stability of the enzyme in the bloodstream and increase its production in CHO cells by introducing in the expression cassette: (i) the sequence of the natural human PRAD-peptide in frame with rhBChE gene via "self-processing" viral F2A peptide under control of an hEF/HTLV promoter, and (ii) previously predicted in silico MAR 1-68 and MAR X-29 sequences. This provides fully tetrameric rhBChE (4rhBChE) at 70 mg/l, that displays improved pharmacokinetics (t½ = 32 ± 1.2 h, MRT = 43 ± 2 h). 3D Fluorescent visualization and distribution of (125)I-labeled enzyme reveals similar low level 4rhBChE and rhBChE-CAO accumulation in muscle, fat, and brain. Administered 4rhBChE was mainly catabolized in the liver and breakdown products were excreted in kidney. Injection of 1.2 LD50 and 1.1 LD50 of paraoxon to BALB/c and knockout BChE-/- mice pre-treated with 4rhBChE (50 mg/kg) resulted in 100% and 78% survival, respectively, without perturbation of long-term behavior. In contrast, 100% mortality of non-pre-treated mice was observed. The high expression level of 4rhBChE in CHO cells permits consideration of this new expression system for manufacturing BChE as a biopharmaceutical. PMID:26239905

  14. A novel expression cassette delivers efficient production of exclusively tetrameric human butyrylcholinesterase with improved pharmacokinetics for protection against organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Stanislav; Smirnov, Ivan; Bobik, Tatiana; Shamborant, Olga; Zenkova, Marina; Chernolovskaya, Elena; Gladkikh, Danil; Murashev, Arkadii; Dyachenko, Igor; Palikov, Viktor; Palikova, Yulia; Knorre, Vera; Belogurov, Alexey; Ponomarenko, Natalie; Blackburn, G Michael; Masson, Patrick; Gabibov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase is a stoichiometric bioscavenger against poisoning by organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. The low level of expression and extremely rapid clearance of monomeric recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE) from bloodstream (t½≈2 min) limits its pharmaceutical application. Recently (Ilyushin at al., PNAS, 2013) we described a long-acting polysialylated recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE-CAO), stable in the bloodstream, that protects mice against 4.2 LD50 of VR. Here we report a set of modifications of the initial rhBChE expression vector to improve stability of the enzyme in the bloodstream and increase its production in CHO cells by introducing in the expression cassette: (i) the sequence of the natural human PRAD-peptide in frame with rhBChE gene via "self-processing" viral F2A peptide under control of an hEF/HTLV promoter, and (ii) previously predicted in silico MAR 1-68 and MAR X-29 sequences. This provides fully tetrameric rhBChE (4rhBChE) at 70 mg/l, that displays improved pharmacokinetics (t½ = 32 ± 1.2 h, MRT = 43 ± 2 h). 3D Fluorescent visualization and distribution of (125)I-labeled enzyme reveals similar low level 4rhBChE and rhBChE-CAO accumulation in muscle, fat, and brain. Administered 4rhBChE was mainly catabolized in the liver and breakdown products were excreted in kidney. Injection of 1.2 LD50 and 1.1 LD50 of paraoxon to BALB/c and knockout BChE-/- mice pre-treated with 4rhBChE (50 mg/kg) resulted in 100% and 78% survival, respectively, without perturbation of long-term behavior. In contrast, 100% mortality of non-pre-treated mice was observed. The high expression level of 4rhBChE in CHO cells permits consideration of this new expression system for manufacturing BChE as a biopharmaceutical.

  15. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid medicines.

    PubMed

    Robson, P J

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis was extensively used as a medicine throughout the developed world in the nineteenth century but went into decline early in the twentieth century ahead of its emergence as the most widely used illicit recreational drug later that century. Recent advances in cannabinoid pharmacology alongside the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) have re-ignited interest in cannabis-based medicines. The ECS has emerged as an important physiological system and plausible target for new medicines. Its receptors and endogenous ligands play a vital modulatory role in diverse functions including immune response, food intake, cognition, emotion, perception, behavioural reinforcement, motor co-ordination, body temperature, wake/sleep cycle, bone formation and resorption, and various aspects of hormonal control. In disease it may act as part of the physiological response or as a component of the underlying pathology. In the forefront of clinical research are the cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and their contrasting pharmacology will be briefly outlined. The therapeutic potential and possible risks of drugs that inhibit the ECS will also be considered. This paper will then go on to review clinical research exploring the potential of cannabinoid medicines in the following indications: symptomatic relief in multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, intractable nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight in the context of cancer or AIDS, psychosis, epilepsy, addiction, and metabolic disorders. PMID:24006213

  16. High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Determination of Rivastigmine in Human Plasma for Application in Pharmacokinetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Hossein; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan

    2010-01-01

    A simple and reproducible HPLC method with spectrophotometric detection was developed for determination of rivastigmine in human plasma. Liquid-liquid extraction of rivastigmine and donepezil (as internal standard) from plasma samples was performed with 1-butanol/n-hexane (2:98 v/v) in alkaline condition followed by back-extraction into diluted acetic acid. Chromatography was carried out using a Silica column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) under isocratic elution with acetonitrile-50 mM aqueous sodium dihydrogen phosphate (17: 83 v/v, pH 3.1. Analyses were run at a flow-rate of 1.3 mL/min at of 50°C. The recovery was 90.8% and 95.7% for rivastigmine and the internal standard donepezil, respectively. The precision of the method was 2.6% to 9.1% over the concentration range of 0.5-16 ng/mL for rivastigmine in plasma with a linearity greater than 0.999. The method was specific and sensitive, with a quantification limit of 0.5 ng/mL and a detection limit of 0.2 ng/mL in plasma. The method was used for a bioequivalence study in healthy subjects. PMID:24363716

  17. Liquid chromatographic assay for metronidazole and tinidazole: pharmacokinetic and metabolic studies in human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson-Ehle, I; Ursing, B; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1981-01-01

    We developed methods for measuring metronidazole, its two major metabolites, and tinidazole in serum and urine. After treatment of each sample with an equal volume of 5% perchloric acid, the drugs were separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (retention times, 6 to 18 min). Quantitation was based on spectrometry at 320 nm. These assays were sensitive, rapid, and specific, and recoveries from biological samples were quantitative. Metronidazole and tinidazole were given as rapid intravenous infusions to four healthy human volunteers. The biological half-lives of these two compounds were 5.4 and 11.1 h, respectively. The hydroxy metabolite of metronidazole appeared quickly in serum and was eliminated at a slow rate. The acetic acid metabolite of metronidazole was detected in serum at very low levels and only for a limited time. No metabolic products of tinidazole were found in serum samples. In urine, 43.7% of the administered dose of metronidazole was recovered over a period of 24 h (24.1% of the dose as the hydroxy metabolite, 12.0% as the acetic acid metabolite, and 7.6% as unchanged drug). Only 18.4% of the infused dose of tinidazole was eliminated in urine over a period of 72 h, and no metabolic products were detected. PMID:7294765

  18. Distribution and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in the human body: clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.-J.; Shumay, E.; Telang, F.; Thanos, P.; Alexoff, D.

    2010-12-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most toxic of the drugs of abuse, which may reflect its distribution and accumulation in the body. However no studies have measured methamphetamine's organ distribution in the human body. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was used in conjunction with [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine to measure its whole-body distribution and bioavailability as assessed by peak uptake (% Dose/cc), rate of clearance (time to reach 50% peak-clearance) and accumulation (area under the curve) in healthy participants (9 Caucasians and 10 African Americans). Methamphetamine distributed through most organs. Highest uptake (whole organ) occurred in lungs (22% Dose; weight {approx}1246 g), liver (23%; weight {approx}1677 g) and intermediate in brain (10%; weight {approx}1600 g). Kidneys also showed high uptake (per/cc basis) (7%; weight 305 g). Methamphetamine's clearance was fastest in heart and lungs (7-16 minutes), slowest in brain, liver and stomach (>75 minutes), and intermediate in kidneys, spleen and pancreas (22-50 minutes). Lung accumulation of [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine was 30% higher for African Americans than Caucasians (p < 0.05) but did not differ in other organs. The high accumulation of methamphetamine, a potent stimulant drug, in most body organs is likely to contribute to the medical complications associated with methamphetamine abuse. In particular, we speculate that methamphetamine's high pulmonary uptake could render this organ vulnerable to infections (tuberculosis) and pathology (pulmonary hypertension). Our preliminary findings of a higher lung accumulation of methamphetamine in African Americans than Caucasians merits further investigation and questions whether it could contribute to the infrequent use of methamphetamine among African Americans.

  19. Determination of Cefalothin and Cefazolin in Human Plasma, Urine and Peritoneal Dialysate by UHPLC-MS/MS: application to a pilot pharmacokinetic study in humans.

    PubMed

    Parker, Suzanne L; Guerra Valero, Yarmarly C; Roberts, Darren M; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A; Wallis, Steven C

    2016-06-01

    An ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the analysis of cefazolin and cefalothin in human plasma (total and unbound), urine and peritoneal dialysate has been developed and validated. Total plasma concentrations are measured following protein precipitation and are suitable for the concentration range of 1-500 µg/mL. Unbound concentrations are measured from ultra-filtered plasma acquired using Centrifree(®) devices and are suitable for the concentration range of 0.1-500 µg/mL for cefazolin and 1-500 µg/mL for cefalothin. The urine method is suitable for a concentration range of 0.1-20 mg/mL for cefazolin and 0.2-20 mg/mL for cefalothin. Peritoneal dialysate concentrations are measured using direct injection, and are suitable for the concentration range of 0.2-100 µg/mL for both cefazolin and cefalothin. The cefazolin and cefalothin plasma (total and unbound), urine and peritoneal dialysate results are reported for recovery, inter-assay precision and accuracy, and the lower limit of quantification, linearity, stability and matrix effects, with all results meeting acceptance criteria. The method was used successfully in a pilot pharmacokinetic study with patients with peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis, receiving either intraperitoneal cefazolin or cefalothin. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Cannabinoid receptors in brain: pharmacogenetics, neuropharmacology, neurotoxicology, and potential therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Onaivi, Emmanuel S

    2009-01-01

    Much progress has been achieved in cannabinoid research. A major breakthrough in marijuana-cannabinoid research has been the discovery of a previously unknown but elaborate endogenous endocannabinoid system (ECS), complete with endocannabinoids and enzymes for their biosynthesis and degradation with genes encoding two distinct cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) receptors (CBRs) that are activated by endocannabinoids, cannabinoids, and marijuana use. Physical and genetic localization of the CBR genes CNR1 and CNR2 have been mapped to chromosome 6 and 1, respectively. A number of variations in CBR genes have been associated with human disorders including osteoporosis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), drug dependency, obesity, and depression. Other family of lipid receptors including vanilloid (VR1) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors appear to be related to the CBRs at the phylogenetic level. The ubiquitous abundance and differential distribution of the ECS in the human body and brain along with the coupling to many signal transduction pathways may explain the effects in most biological system and the myriad behavioral effects associated with smoking marijuana. The neuropharmacological and neuroprotective features of phytocannabinoids and endocannabinoid associated neurogenesis have revealed roles for the use of cannabinoids in neurodegenerative pathologies with less neurotoxicity. The remarkable progress in understanding the biological actions of marijuana and cannabinoids have provided much richer results than previously appreciated cannabinoid genomics and raised a number of critical issues on the molecular mechanisms of cannabinoid induced behavioral and biochemical alterations. These advances will allow specific therapeutic targeting of the different components of the ECS in health and disease. This review focuses on these recent advances in cannabinoid genomics and the surprising new fundamental roles that the

  1. Elucidating cannabinoid biology in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Krug, Randall G; Clark, Karl J

    2015-10-10

    The number of annual cannabinoid users exceeds 100,000,000 globally and an estimated 9% of these individuals will suffer from dependency. Although exogenous cannabinoids, like those contained in marijuana, are known to exert their effects by disrupting the endocannabinoid system, a dearth of knowledge exists about the potential toxicological consequences on public health. Conversely, the endocannabinoid system represents a promising therapeutic target for a plethora of disorders because it functions to endogenously regulate a vast repertoire of physiological functions. Accordingly, the rapidly expanding field of cannabinoid biology has sought to leverage model organisms in order to provide both toxicological and therapeutic insights about altered endocannabinoid signaling. The primary goal of this manuscript is to review the existing field of cannabinoid research in the genetically tractable zebrafish model-focusing on the cannabinoid receptor genes, cnr1 and cnr2, and the genes that produce enzymes for synthesis and degradation of the cognate ligands anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol. Consideration is also given to research that has studied the effects of exposure to exogenous phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids that are known to interact with cannabinoid receptors. These results are considered in the context of either endocannabinoid gene expression or endocannabinoid gene function, and are integrated with findings from rodent studies. This provides the framework for a discussion of how zebrafish may be leveraged in the future to provide novel toxicological and therapeutic insights in the field of cannabinoid biology, which has become increasingly significant given recent trends in cannabis legislation.

  2. Elucidating Cannabinoid Biology in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Randall G.; Clark, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    The number of annual cannabinoid users exceeds 100,000,000 globally and an estimated 9 % of these individuals will suffer from dependency. Although exogenous cannabinoids, like those contained in marijuana, are known to exert their effects by disrupting the endocannabinoid system, a dearth of knowledge exists about the potential toxicological consequences on public health. Conversely, the endocannabinoid system represents a promising therapeutic target for a plethora of disorders because it functions to endogenously regulate a vast repertoire of physiological functions. Accordingly, the rapidly expanding field of cannabinoid biology has sought to leverage model organisms in order to provide both toxicological and therapeutic insights about altered endocannabinoid signaling. The primary goal of this manuscript is to review the existing field of cannabinoid research in the genetically tractable zebrafish model—focusing on the cannabinoid receptor genes, cnr1 and cnr2, and the genes that produce enzymes for synthesis and degradation of the cognate ligands anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol. Consideration is also given to research that has studied the effects of exposure to exogenous phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids that are known to interact with cannabinoid receptors. These results are considered in the context of either endocannabinoid gene expression or endocannabinoid gene function, and are integrated with findings from rodent studies. This provides the framework for a discussion of how zebrafish may be leveraged in the future to provide novel toxicological and therapeutic insights in the field of cannabinoid biology, which has become increasingly significant given recent trends in cannabis legislation. PMID:26192460

  3. Pharmacokinetics and disposition of monoterpene glycosides derived from Paeonia lactiflora roots (Chishao) after intravenous dosing of antiseptic XueBiJing injection in human subjects and rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chen; Lin, Jia-zhen; Li, Li; Yang, Jun-ling; Jia, Wei-wei; Huang, Yu-hong; Du, Fei-fei; Wang, Feng-qing; Li, Mei-juan; Li, Yan-fen; Xu, Fang; Zhang, Na-ting; Olaleye, Olajide E.; Sun, Yan; Li, Jian; Sun, Chang-hai; Zhang, Gui-ping; Li, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Monoterpene glycosides derived from Paeonia lactiflora roots (Chishao) are believed to be pharmacologically important for the antiseptic herbal injection XueBiJing. This study was designed to characterize the pharmacokinetics and disposition of monoterpene glycosides. Methods: Systemic exposure to Chishao monoterpene glycosides was assessed in human subjects receiving an intravenous infusion and multiple infusions of XueBiJing injection, followed by assessment of the pharmacokinetics of the major circulating compounds. Supportive rat studies were also performed. Membrane permeability and plasma-protein binding were assessed in vitro. Results: A total of 18 monoterpene glycosides were detected in XueBiJing injection (content levels, 0.001–2.47 mmol/L), and paeoniflorin accounted for 85.5% of the total dose of monoterpene glycosides detected. In human subjects, unchanged paeoniflorin exhibited considerable levels of systemic exposure with elimination half-lives of 1.2–1.3 h; no significant metabolite was detected. Oxypaeoniflorin and albiflorin exhibited low exposure levels, and the remaining minor monoterpene glycosides were negligible or undetected. Glomerular-filtration-based renal excretion was the major elimination pathway of paeoniflorin, which was poorly bound to plasma protein. In rats, the systemic exposure level of paeoniflorin increased proportionally as the dose was increased. Rat lung, heart, and liver exposure levels of paeoniflorin were lower than the plasma level, with the exception of the kidney level, which was 4.3-fold greater than the plasma level; brain penetration was limited by the poor membrane permeability. Conclusion: Due to its significant systemic exposure and appropriate pharmacokinetic profile, as well as previously reported antiseptic properties, paeoniflorin is a promising XueBiJing constituent of therapeutic importance. PMID:26838074

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Fosamprenavir plus Ritonavir in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Adult Subjects with Hepatic Impairment▿

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Elías, María J.; Morellon, María Larrousse; Ortega, Enrique; Hernández-Quero, José; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Clotet, Bonaventura; Felizarta, Franco; Gutiérrez, Felix; Pineda, Juan A.; Nichols, Garrett; Lou, Yu; Wire, Mary Beth

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hepatic impairment on fosamprenavir/ritonavir pharmacokinetics was investigated. Sixty human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected subjects, including 13, 20, and 10 subjects with mild, moderate, and severe hepatic impairment, respectively, and a comparator group of 17 subjects with normal hepatic function, were enrolled. Subjects with normal hepatic function received fosamprenavir at 700 mg plus ritonavir at 100 mg twice daily, whereas subjects with hepatic impairment received adjusted doses in anticipation of increased exposures. For subjects with mild hepatic impairment, the studied regimen of fosamprenavir 700 mg twice daily plus ritonavir 100 mg once daily delivered 17% higher values for the maximum plasma amprenavir concentration at the steady state (Cmax), 22% higher values for the area under the plasma concentration versus time curve over the dosing interval at the steady state [AUC(0-τ)], similar values for the concentration at the end of the dosing interval (Cτ), and 114% higher unbound Cτ values. For subjects with moderate hepatic impairment, the studied dosage regimen of fosamprenavir at 300 mg twice daily plus ritonavir at 100 mg once daily delivered 27% lower plasma amprenavir Cmax values, 27% lower AUC(0-24) values, 57% lower Cτ values, and 21% higher unbound amprenavir Cτ values. For subjects with severe hepatic impairment, the studied dosage regimen of fosamprenavir at 300 mg twice daily plus ritonavir at 100 mg once daily delivered 19% lower plasma amprenavir Cmax values, 23% lower AUC(0-24) values, 38% lower Cτ values, and similar unbound amprenavir Cτ values. With a reduced ritonavir dosing frequency of 100 mg once daily, the plasma ritonavir AUC(0-24) values were 39% lower, similar, and 40% higher for subjects with mild, moderate, and severe hepatic impairment, respectively. The results of the study support the use of reduced fosamprenavir/ritonavir doses or dosing frequencies in the treatment of patients with hepatic

  5. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870....3870 Cannabinoid test system. (a) Identification. A cannabinoid test system is a device intended to..., saliva, and urine. Cannabinoid compounds include delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol,...

  6. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child's hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke. PMID:26443501

  7. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption

    PubMed Central

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child’s hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke. PMID:26443501

  8. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-10-07

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child's hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of High-Dose Human Regular U-500 Insulin Versus Human Regular U-100 Insulin in Healthy Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Amparo; Riddle, Matthew; Morrow, Linda A.; Jiang, Honghua H.; Linnebjerg, Helle; Scott, Adam; Win, Khin M.; Hompesch, Marcus; Mace, Kenneth F.; Jacobson, Jennie G.; Jackson, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Human regular U-500 (U-500R) insulin (500 units/mL) is increasingly being used clinically, yet its pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) have not been well studied. Therefore, we compared PK and PD of clinically relevant doses of U-500R with the same doses of human regular U-100 (U-100R) insulin (100 units/mL). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a single-site, randomized, double-blind, crossover euglycemic clamp study. Single subcutaneous injections of 50- and 100-unit doses of U-500R and U-100R were administered to 24 healthy obese subjects. RESULTS Both overall insulin exposure (area under the serum insulin concentration versus time curve from zero to return to baseline [AUC0-t’]) and overall effect (total glucose infused during a clamp) were similar between formulations at both 50- and 100-unit doses (90% [CI] of ratios contained within [0.80, 1.25]). However, peak concentration and effect were significantly lower for U-500R at both doses (P < 0.05). Both formulations produced relatively long durations of action (18.3 to 21.5 h). Time-to-peak concentration and time to maximum effect were significantly longer for U-500R than U-100R at the 100-unit dose (P < 0.05). Time variables reflective of duration of action (late tRmax50, tRlast) were prolonged for U-500R versus U-100R at both doses (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Overall exposure to and action of U-500R insulin after subcutaneous injection were no different from those of U-100R insulin. For U-500R, peaks of concentration and action profiles were blunted and the effect after the peak was prolonged. These findings may help guide therapy with U-500R insulin for highly insulin-resistant patients with diabetes. PMID:21994429

  10. Mastering tricyclic ring systems for desirable functional cannabinoid activity

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ravil R.; Knight, Lindsay; Chen, Shao-Rui; Wager-Miller, Jim; McDaniel, Steven W.; Diaz, Fanny; Barth, Francis; Pan, Hui-Lin; Mackie, Ken; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Diaz, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in using cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) agonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain and other indications. In continuation of our ongoing program aiming for the development of new small molecule cannabinoid ligands, we have synthesized a novel series of carbazole and γ-carboline derivatives. The affinities of the newly synthesized compounds were determined by a competitive radioligand displacement assay for human CB2 cannabinoid receptor and rat CB1 cannabinoid receptor. Functional activity and selectivity at human CB1 and CB2 receptors were characterized using receptor internalization and [35S]GTP-γ-S assays. The structure-activity relationship and optimization studies of the carbazole series have led to the discovery of a non-selective CB1 and CB2 agonist, compound 4. Our subsequent research efforts to increase CB2 selectivity of this lead compound have led to the discovery of CB2 selective compound 64, which robustly internalized CB2 receptors. Compound 64 had potent inhibitory effects on pain hypersensitivity in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Other potent and CB2 receptor–selective compounds, including compounds 63 and 68, and a selective CB1 agonist, compound 74 were also discovered. In addition, we identified the CB2 ligand 35 which failed to promote CB2 receptor internalization and inhibited compound CP55,940-induced CB2 internalization despite a high CB2 receptor affinity. The present study provides novel tricyclic series as a starting point for further investigations of CB2 pharmacology and pain treatment. PMID:24125850

  11. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of Bisphenol A following ingestion in soup: Individual pharmacokinetic data and emographics

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Churchwell, Mona I.; Yang, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Seryak, Liesel M.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2015-09-01

    Here we present data to evaluate potential absorption of Bisphenol A through non-metabolizing tissues of the upper digestive tract. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 h period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. The pharmacokinetic behavior of BPA and its metabolites in this cohort (rapid absorption, complete elimination, evidence against sublingual absorption) was reported. This Data in Brief article contains the corresponding individual pharmacokinetic data, reports the demographics of the cohort and provides additional details related to the analytical methods employed and is related to [4].

  12. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of Bisphenol A following ingestion in soup: Individual pharmacokinetic data and emographics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Churchwell, Mona I.; Yang, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Seryak, Liesel M.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2015-09-01

    Here we present data to evaluate potential absorption of Bisphenol A through non-metabolizing tissues of the upper digestive tract. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 h period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. The pharmacokinetic behavior of BPA and its metabolites in this cohort (rapid absorption, complete elimination, evidence against sublingual absorption) was reported. This Data in Brief article contains the corresponding individual pharmacokinetic data, reports the demographics of the cohort and provides additional details related to the analyticalmore » methods employed and is related to [4].« less

  13. Didanosine Population Pharmacokinetics in West African Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children Administered Once-Daily Tablets in Relation to Efficacy after One Year of Treatment▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hirt, Déborah; Bardin, Christophe; Diagbouga, Serge; Nacro, Boubacar; Hien, Hervé; Zoure, Emmanuelle; Rouet, François; Ouiminga, Adama; Urien, Saik; Foulongne, Vincent; Van De Perre, Philippe; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Msellati, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to study didanosine pharmacokinetics in children after the administration of tablets, the only formulation available in Burkina Faso for which data are missing, and to establish relationships between doses, plasma drug concentrations, and treatment effects (efficacy/toxicity). Didanosine concentrations were measured for 40 children after 2 weeks and for 9 children after 2 to 5 months of treatment with a didanosine-lamivudine-efavirenz combination. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed with NONMEM. The link between the maximal concentration of the drug in plasma (Cmax), the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), and the decrease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 RNA levels after 12 months of treatment was evaluated. The threshold AUC that improved efficacy was determined by the use of a Wilcoxon test for HIV RNA, and an optimized dosing schedule was simulated. Didanosine pharmacokinetics was best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. The apparent clearance and volume of distribution were higher for tablets, probably due to a lower bioavailability with tablets than with pediatric powder. The decrease in the viral load after 12 months of treatment was significantly correlated with the didanosine AUC and Cmax (P ≤ 0.02) during the first weeks of treatment. An AUC of >0.60 mg/liter·h was significantly linked to a greater decrease in the viral load (a decrease of 3 log10 versus 2.4 log10 copies/ml; P = 0.03) than that with a lower AUC. A didanosine dose of 360 mg/m2 administered as tablets should be a more appropriate dose than 240 mg/m2 to improve efficacy for these children. However, data on adverse events with this dosage are missing. PMID:19581461

  14. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Panel met on 29-30 Aug. 1988 at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas to discuss pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic implications of space flight and make recommendations for operational and research strategies. Based on the knowledge available on the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the dependence of pharmacokinetics on physiological factors, and the therapeutic requirements for future space missions, the panel made several recommendations for research. It was suggested that using medications available with a large (wide) therapeutic window will avoid unforeseen therapeutic consequences during flight. The sequence for conducting research was outlined as follows: (1) identify ground-based simulation models (e.g., antiorthostatic bed rest) for conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic research; (2) estimate parametric changes in these models using pharmacologic agents that have different pharmacokinetic characteristics and a narrow therapeutic index; (3) verify these findings during flight; and (4) develop and identify appropriate and effective drug delivery systems, dosage forms, and regimens. The panel recommended gaining a thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetic deviations of medications that have a narrow therapeutic index (e.g. cardiovascular drugs and sedative hypnotics) in order to ensure safe and effective treatment during flight with these agents. It was also suggested that basic information on physiological factors such as organ blood flow, protein composition and binding, tissue distribution, and metabolism by hepatic enzymes must be accumulated by conducting ground-based animal and human studies using models of weightlessness. This information will be useful to construct and identify physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that can provide valuable information on the pharmacodynamic consequences of space flight and aid in identifying appropriate therapeutic

  15. Cannabinoid system in the budgerigar brain.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Ferrero, M E; Paniagua, M A; Mostany, R; Pilar-Cuéllar, F; Díez-Alarcia, R; Pazos, A; Fernández-López, A

    2006-05-01

    Cannabinoid receptor density and cannabinoid receptor-mediated G protein stimulation were studied by autoradiographic techniques throughout the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) brain. The maximal CB(1) receptor density value (using [(3)H]CP55,940 as radioligand) was found in the molecular layer of the cerebellum (Mol), and high binding values were observed in the nucleus taeniae amygdalae (TnA), nucleus preopticus medialis, and nucleus pretectalis. The highest net-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding values induced by the selective CB(1) receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 were observed in the nucleus paramedianus internus thalami, and high values of [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding were observed in the TnA, Mol, arcopallium dorsale and arcopallium intermedium. The distribution data suggest that in the budgerigar, as previously indicated in mammals, cannabinoid receptors may be related to the control of several brain functions in the motor system, memory, visual system, and reproductive behavior. The discrepancies between the cannabinoid receptor densities and the cannabinoid receptor-mediated stimulation found in several budgerigar brain nuclei support the hypothesis, previously described for mammals, of the existence of different G(i/o) protein populations able to associate with the cannabinoid receptors, depending on the brain structure, and could reflect the relative importance that cannabinoid transmission could exerts in each cerebral area.

  16. Signal transduction activated by cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery that cannabinoids exert biological actions through binding to specific receptors, signal mechanisms triggered by these receptors have been focus of extensive study. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signalling events produced by cannabinoids from membrane receptors to downstream regulators. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: CB(1) and CB(2) both belonging to the heptahelichoidal receptor family but with different tissue distribution and signalling mechanisms. Coupling to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and thus inhibition of adenylyl cyclase has been observed in both receptors but other signal transduction pathways that are regulated or not by these G proteins are differently activated upon ligand-receptor binding including ion channels, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, ceramide generation, phospholipases activation and downstream targets as MAP kinase cascade, PI3K, FAK or NOS regulation. Cannabinoids may also act independently of CB(1)or CB(2) receptors. The existence of new unidentified putative cannabinoid receptors has been claimed by many investigators. Endocannabinoids activate vanilloid TRPV1 receptors that may mediate some of the cannabinoid effects. Other actions of cannabinoids can occur through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  17. Estimation of the binding modes with important human cytochrome P450 enzymes, drug interaction potential, pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity of ginger components using molecular docking, computational, and pharmacokinetic modeling studies

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for the treatment of numerous ailments and improvement of body functions. It may be used in combination with prescribed drugs. The coadministration of ginger with therapeutic drugs raises a concern of potential deleterious drug interactions via the modulation of the expression and/or activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, resulting in unfavorable therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to determine the molecular interactions between 12 main active ginger components (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, ar-curcumene, β-bisabolene, β-sesquiphelandrene, 6-gingerdione, (−)-zingiberene, and methyl-6-isogingerol) and human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) of the 12 ginger components using computational approaches and comprehensive literature search. Docking studies showed that ginger components interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 mainly through hydrogen bond formation, to a lesser extent, via π–π stacking. The pharmacokinetic simulation studies showed that the [I]/[Ki] value for CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 ranged from 0.0002 to 19.6 and the R value ranged from 1.0002 to 20.6 and that ginger might exhibit a high risk of drug interaction via inhibition of the activity of human CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, but a low risk of drug interaction toward CYP2C19-mediated drug metabolism. Furthermore, it has been evaluated that the 12 ginger components possessed a favorable ADMET profiles with regard to the solubility, absorption, permeability across the blood–brain barrier, interactions with CYP2D6, hepatotoxicity, and plasma protein binding. The validation results showed that there was no remarkable effect of ginger on the metabolism of warfarin in humans, whereas concurrent use of ginger and nifedipine exhibited

  18. Estimation of the binding modes with important human cytochrome P450 enzymes, drug interaction potential, pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity of ginger components using molecular docking, computational, and pharmacokinetic modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for the treatment of numerous ailments and improvement of body functions. It may be used in combination with prescribed drugs. The coadministration of ginger with therapeutic drugs raises a concern of potential deleterious drug interactions via the modulation of the expression and/or activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, resulting in unfavorable therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to determine the molecular interactions between 12 main active ginger components (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, ar-curcumene, β-bisabolene, β-sesquiphelandrene, 6-gingerdione, (-)-zingiberene, and methyl-6-isogingerol) and human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) of the 12 ginger components using computational approaches and comprehensive literature search. Docking studies showed that ginger components interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 mainly through hydrogen bond formation, to a lesser extent, via π-π stacking. The pharmacokinetic simulation studies showed that the [I]/[Ki ] value for CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 ranged from 0.0002 to 19.6 and the R value ranged from 1.0002 to 20.6 and that ginger might exhibit a high risk of drug interaction via inhibition of the activity of human CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, but a low risk of drug interaction toward CYP2C19-mediated drug metabolism. Furthermore, it has been evaluated that the 12 ginger components possessed a favorable ADMET profiles with regard to the solubility, absorption, permeability across the blood-brain barrier, interactions with CYP2D6, hepatotoxicity, and plasma protein binding. The validation results showed that there was no remarkable effect of ginger on the metabolism of warfarin in humans, whereas concurrent use of ginger and nifedipine exhibited a

  19. Cannabinoids as novel anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Prakash; Pandey, Rupal; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Hegde, Venkatesh L; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2009-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds that mediate their effects through cannabinoid receptors. The discovery of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as the major psychoactive principle in marijuana, as well as the identification of cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, has led to a significant growth in research aimed at understanding the physiological functions of cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptors include CB1, which is predominantly expressed in the brain, and CB2, which is primarily found on the cells of the immune system. The fact that both CB1 and CB2 receptors have been found on immune cells suggests that cannabinoids play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Recent studies demonstrated that administration of THC into mice triggered marked apoptosis in T cells and dendritic cells, resulting in immunosuppression. In addition, several studies showed that cannabinoids downregulate cytokine and chemokine production and, in some models, upregulate T-regulatory cells (Tregs) as a mechanism to suppress inflammatory responses. The endocannabinoid system is also involved in immunoregulation. For example, administration of endocannabinoids or use of inhibitors of enzymes that break down the endocannabinoids, led to immunosuppression and recovery from immune-mediated injury to organs such as the liver. Manipulation of endocannabinoids and/or use of exogenous cannabinoids in vivo can constitute a potent treatment modality against inflammatory disorders. This review will focus on the potential use of cannabinoids as a new class of anti-inflammatory agents against a number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases that are primarily triggered by activated T cells or other cellular immune components. PMID:20191092

  20. Peripheral cannabinoid receptor, CB2, regulates bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Orr; Karsak, Meliha; Leclerc, Nathalie; Fogel, Meirav; Frenkel, Baruch; Wright, Karen; Tam, Joseph; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kram, Vardit; Shohami, Esther; Mechoulam, Raphael; Zimmer, Andreas; Bab, Itai

    2006-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoids bind to and activate two G protein-coupled receptors, the predominantly central cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peripheral cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2). Whereas CB1 mediates the cannabinoid psychotropic, analgesic, and orectic effects, CB2 has been implicated recently in the regulation of liver fibrosis and atherosclerosis. Here we show that CB2-deficient mice have a markedly accelerated age-related trabecular bone loss and cortical expansion, although cortical thickness remains unaltered. These changes are reminiscent of human osteoporosis and may result from differential regulation of trabecular and cortical bone remodeling. The CB2–/– phenotype is also characterized by increased activity of trabecular osteoblasts (bone-forming cells), increased osteoclast (the bone-resorbing cell) number, and a markedly decreased number of diaphyseal osteoblast precursors. CB2 is expressed in osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts. A CB2-specific agonist that does not have any psychotropic effects enhances endocortical osteoblast number and activity and restrains trabecular osteoclastogenesis, apparently by inhibiting proliferation of osteoclast precursors and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression in bone marrow-derived osteoblasts/stromal cells. The same agonist attenuates ovariectomy-induced bone loss and markedly stimulates cortical thickness through the respective suppression of osteoclast number and stimulation of endocortical bone formation. These results demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system is essential for the maintenance of normal bone mass by osteoblastic and osteoclastic CB2 signaling. Hence, CB2 offers a molecular target for the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis, the most prevalent degenerative disease in developed countries. PMID:16407142

  1. Pharmacokinetics of human-mouse chimeric anti-GD2 mAb ch14.18 in a phase I trial in neuroblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Uttenreuther-Fischer, M M; Huang, C S; Yu, A L

    1995-12-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the pharmacokinetics of human-mouse chimeric anti-ganglioside GD2 antibody mAb ch14.18 was performed during a phase I clinical trial of ten children with neuroblastoma and one adult with osteosarcoma. The patients received a total of 20 courses of ch14.18 at dose levels from 10 mg/m2 to 200 mg/m2. The plasma clearance of ch14.18 was biphasic. Following the first course of treatment t1/2,alpha was 3.4 +/- 3.1 h and t1/2,beta 66.6 +/- 27.4 h in 9/10 children. The t1/2,beta values were significantly less than those of 181 +/- 73 h previously reported in adult melanoma patients (P < or = 0.001), and 147.5 h in the adult osteosarcoma patient in our trial. The latter suggests different pharmacokinetics of mAb ch14.18 in children and adults. After a second course of treatment, administered to 5/10 children, t1/2,beta decreased significantly from 72.9 +/- 19.8 h to 31.7 +/- 18.4 h (P = 0.015). We therefore conclude that the elimination kinetics of mAbs ch14.18 in children and adults are different, and furthermore that repeated administration of mAb ch14.18 to children with neuroblastoma leads to accelerated antibody clearance.

  2. Phase I/II Trial of the Pharmacokinetics, Safety, and Antiretroviral Activity of Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Barditch-Crovo, Patricia; Deeks, Steven G.; Collier, Ann; Safrin, Sharon; Coakley, Dion F.; Miller, Michael; Kearney, Brian P.; Coleman, Rebecca L.; Lamy, Patrick D.; Kahn, James O.; McGowan, Ian; Lietman, Paul S.

    2001-01-01

    Tenofovir DF is an antiviral nucleotide with activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The pharmacokinetics, safety, and activity of oral tenofovir DF in HIV-1-infected adults were evaluated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, escalating-dose study of four doses (75, 150, 300, and 600 mg given once daily). Subjects received a single dose of tenofovir DF or a placebo, followed by a 7-day washout period. Thereafter, subjects received their assigned study drug once daily for 28 days. Pharmacokinetic parameters were dose proportional and demonstrated no change with repeated dosing. Reductions in plasma HIV-1 RNA were dose related at tenofovir DF doses of 75 to 300 mg, but there was no increase in virus suppression between the 300- and 600-mg dose cohorts, despite dose-proportional increases in drug exposure. Grade III or IV adverse events were limited to laboratory abnormalities, including elevated creatine phosphokinase and liver function tests, which resolved with or without drug discontinuation and without sequelae. No patients developed detectable sequence changes in the reverse transcriptase gene. PMID:11557462

  3. Role of the Endogenous Cannabinoid System in Nicotine Addiction: Novel Insights

    PubMed Central

    Gamaleddin, Islam Hany; Trigo, Jose M.; Gueye, Aliou B.; Zvonok, Alexander; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Goldberg, Steven R.; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that the endogenous cannabinoids are implicated in several neuropsychiatric diseases. Notably, preclinical and human clinical studies have shown a pivotal role of the cannabinoid system in nicotine addiction. The CB1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist rimonabant (also known as SR141716) was effective to decrease nicotine-taking and nicotine-seeking in rodents, as well as the elevation of dopamine induced by nicotine in brain reward area. Rimonabant has been shown to improve the ability of smokers to quit smoking in randomized clinical trials. However, rimonabant was removed from the market due to increased risk of psychiatric side-effects observed in humans. Recently, other components of the endogenous cannabinoid system have been explored. Here, we present the recent advances on the understanding of the role of the different components of the cannabinoid system on nicotine’s effects. Those recent findings suggest possible alternative ways of modulating the cannabinoid system that could have implication for nicotine dependence treatment. PMID:25859226

  4. Cannabinoids reduce ErbB2-driven breast cancer progression through Akt inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background ErbB2-positive breast cancer is characterized by highly aggressive phenotypes and reduced responsiveness to standard therapies. Although specific ErbB2-targeted therapies have been designed, only a small percentage of patients respond to these treatments and most of them eventually relapse. The existence of this population of particularly aggressive and non-responding or relapsing patients urges the search for novel therapies. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cannabinoids might constitute a new therapeutic tool for the treatment of ErbB2-positive breast tumors. We analyzed their antitumor potential in a well established and clinically relevant model of ErbB2-driven metastatic breast cancer: the MMTV-neu mouse. We also analyzed the expression of cannabinoid targets in a series of 87 human breast tumors. Results Our results show that both Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the most abundant and potent cannabinoid in marijuana, and JWH-133, a non-psychotropic CB2 receptor-selective agonist, reduce tumor growth, tumor number, and the amount/severity of lung metastases in MMTV-neu mice. Histological analyses of the tumors revealed that cannabinoids inhibit cancer cell proliferation, induce cancer cell apoptosis, and impair tumor angiogenesis. Cannabinoid antitumoral action relies, at least partially, on the inhibition of the pro-tumorigenic Akt pathway. We also found that 91% of ErbB2-positive tumors express the non-psychotropic cannabinoid receptor CB2. Conclusions Taken together, these results provide a strong preclinical evidence for the use of cannabinoid-based therapies for the management of ErbB2-positive breast cancer. PMID:20649976

  5. Development of nano alpha-ketoglutarate nebulization formulation and its pharmacokinetic and safety evaluation in healthy human volunteers for cyanide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Shaheen; Singh, Thakuri; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Mittal, Gaurav

    2011-05-01

    Development of nano alpha-ketoglutarate (A-KG) nebulization formulation for neutralization of inhaled cyanide ion toxicity. Objectives of the present study were to (a) develop a novel A-KG nebulization formulation against cyanide poisoning, particularly hydrogen cyanide gas (b) validate its respiratory fraction in vitro and in vivo, and (c) create its pharmacokinetic data in human volunteers. The formulation was optimized on the basis of particle size of aerosolized droplets after nebulization in 6 volunteers. Gamma scintigraphy was used to quantify total and regional lung deposition of nebulized A-KG after radiolabeling it with Technetium-99m. The formulation was optimized using 30% ethanol-saline with particle size in the range of 300-500 nm. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that drug nebulization resulted in a significant respirable fraction of 65 ± 0.6% with whole lung deposition of 13 ± 1%. Human pharmacokinetic data was derived in 6 healthy human volunteers with peak serum concentration (C(max)) of 39 ± 3 μg/ml, while the area under curve (AUC) after inhalation was 376 ± 23 μg × h/ml indicating that the drug was rapidly and completely absorbed when targeted directly to lungs. Significant lung deposition of A-KG was achieved with the developed formulation. The formulation appears to have several advantages, including the potential of neutralizing inhaled CN(-) ions in the lungs themselves. It is a safe and efficacious procedure, suitable for hospital or ambulance use in accidental cyanide poisoning cases, or as a preventive approach for fire-rescue teams.

  6. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling of an antagonist (SM-406/AT-406) of multiple inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Yanyan; Zou, Peng; Yu, Jing-yu; McEachern, Donna; Wang, Shaomeng; Sun, Duxin

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) are a class of key apoptosis regulators overexpressed or dysregulated in cancer. SM-406/AT-406 is a potent and selective small molecule mimetic of Smac that antagonizes the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) model was developed to predict the tissue concentration-time profiles of SM-406, the related onco-protein levels in tumor, and the tumor growth inhibition in a mouse model bearing human breast cancer xenograft. In the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for pharmacokinetics characterization, a well stirred (perfusion rate-limited) model was used to describe SM-406 pharmacokinetics in the lung, heart, kidney, intestine, liver and spleen, and a diffusion rate-limited (permeability limited) model was used for tumor. Pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to correlate the SM-406 concentration in tumor to the cIAP1 degradation, pro-caspase 8 decrease, CL-PARP accumulation and tumor growth inhibition. The PBPK-PD model well described the experimental pharmacokinetic data, the pharmacodynamic biomarker responses and tumor growth. This model may be helpful to predict tumor and plasma SM-406 concentrations in the clinic.

  7. Toxicological profiles of selected synthetic cannabinoids showing high binding affinities to the cannabinoid receptor subtype CB₁.

    PubMed

    Koller, Verena J; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Auwärter, Volker; Fuchs, Sabine; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2013-07-01

    Products containing synthetic cannabinoids are consumed as a surrogate for marihuana due to their non-detectability with commonly used drug tests and their strong cannabimimetic effects. Because data concerning their toxicological properties are scarce, the cytotoxic, genotoxic, immunomodulatory, and hormonal activities of four naphthoylindole compounds (JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-122 and JWH-210) and of one benzoylindole (AM-694) were studied in human cell lines and primary cells; tetrahydrocannabinol was included as the classical non-endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand. All compounds induced damage to the cell membranes of buccal (TR146) and breast (MCF-7) derived cells at concentrations of ≥75-100 μM. No cytotoxic responses were seen in other assays which reflect mitochondrial damage, protein synthesis, and lysosomal activities. JWH-073 and JWH-122 induced DNA migration in buccal and liver cells (HepG2) in single cell gel electrophoresis assays, while JWH-210 was only in the latter cell line active. No estrogenic activities were detected in bone marrow cells (U2-OS), but all compounds caused anti-estrogenic effects at levels between 2.1 and 23.0 μM. Furthermore, no impact on cytokine release (i.e., on IL-10, IL-6, IL-12/23p40 and TNFα levels) was seen in LPS-stimulated human PBMCs, except with JWH-210 and JWH-122 which caused a decrease of TNFα and IL-12/23p40. All toxic effects were observed with concentrations higher than those expected in body fluids of users. Since genotoxic effects are in general linear over a wide concentration range and the exposure levels may be higher in epithelial cells than [corrected] in serum, further experimental work is required to find out if DNA damage takes place in drug users.

  8. [Cannabinoids for symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Husseini, L; Leussink, V I; Warnke, C; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity represents a common troublesome symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Treatment of spasticity remains difficult, which has prompted some patients to self-medicate with and perceive benefits from cannabis. Advances in the understanding of cannabinoid biology support these anecdotal observations. Various clinical reports as well as randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have now demonstrated clinical efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of spasticity in MS patients. Sativex is a 1:1 mix of delta-9-tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol extracted from cloned Cannabis sativa chemovars, which recently received a label for treating MS-related spasticity in Germany. The present article reviews the current understanding of cannabinoid biology and the value of cannabinoids as a symptomatic treatment option in MS. PMID:22080198

  9. The pharmacokinetics of the antidepressant tianeptine and its main metabolite in healthy humans--influence of alcohol co-administration.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, C; Ward, C; Defrance, R; Hopkins, R

    1990-01-01

    A balanced 3 way cross-over study involving 12 young healthy volunteers (6 men and 6 women) was used to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of the antidepressant tianeptine following a single dose administered by oral and intravenous route. The influence of alcohol on the pharmacokinetics of tianeptine when given per os was also investigated. Kinetic parameters of metabolite MC5, the C5 side chain beta-oxidation product of tianeptine, were simultaneously determined. Following intravenous administration total clearance and volume of distribution of tianeptine were 230 +/- 59 ml.min-1 and 0.47 +/- 0.14 l.kg-1 respectively. When given orally, tianeptine was absorbed rapidly (tmax = 0.94 +/- 0.47 h). The mean systemic availability was estimated to be 99 +/- 29%. Tianeptine was eliminated from plasma with a half-life of 2.5 +/- 1.1 h, mainly via extrarenal route since its renal clearance averaged 0.38 +/- 0.47 ml.min-1. Plasma levels of metabolite MC5 were lower than those of the parent drug but decreased with a longer half-life (7.2 +/- 5.7 h). Alcohol co-administration decreased tianeptine absorption rate and lowered tianeptine plasma levels by about 30% but did not affect those of the MC5 metabolite.

  10. Safety, bioavailability, and pharmacokinetics of VGX-1027-A novel oral anti-inflammatory drug in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica C; Menacherry, Stanley; Diehl, Malissa C; Giffear, Mary D; White, C Jo; Juba, Rob; Bagarazzi, Mark L; Muthumani, Karuppiah; Boyer, Jean; Agarwal, Vipin; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Bart, Stephen; Kim, J Joseph; Weiner, David B; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2016-03-01

    VGX-1027, a novel oral immune modulator, is under development for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single (1-800 mg) and multiple (40-400 mg) oral doses were evaluated in 2 clinical studies. The doses were well tolerated up to 800 mg in a single dose and 200 mg twice daily in multiple doses. Adverse events were mild to moderate in severity with no identifiable dose-related pattern. There were no clinically significant physical or laboratory findings. The pharmacokinetic data indicated that increases in Cmax and AUC0-inf were dose-proportional, and AUC0- τ was approximately dose-proportional. For the single-dose study, median Tmax ranged from 0.5 to 2 hours and mean t1/2 ranged from 4.9 to 8.7 hours. For the multiple-dose study, median Tmax ranged from 0.5 to 2.0 hours and mean t1/2 ranged from 7.05 to 10.05 hours. No accumulation of the drug was observed after day 1, indicating that steady-state concentrations were attained with single and multiple dosing for 5 days. Approximately 90% of the administered dose was excreted in urine as unchanged drug. PMID:27138022

  11. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    PubMed Central

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Background Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Methods Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half

  12. Simultaneous bioanalysis of rasagiline and its major metabolites in human plasma by LC-MS/MS: Application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Yang, Leting; Hua, Jing; Xie, Huiru; Jiang, Xuehua; Wang, Ling

    2016-06-01

    Rasagiline is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase type-B (MAO-B) and has been used both as a monotherapy and in addition to levodopa in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rasagiline is metabolized by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system, and the following three major metabolites with potential neuroprotective activity have been identified: 1-aminoindan (AI), 3-hydroxy-N-propargyl-1-aminoindan (3-OH-PAI) and 3-hydroxy-1-aminoindan (3-OH-AI). In this study, a novel liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of rasagiline and its major metabolites in human plasma. This method was validated in terms of specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, recovery, matrix effect and stability. The validated method was then applied to a clinical pharmacokinetic study after the oral administration of 1mg rasagiline mesylate tablets to six healthy Chinese volunteers. PMID:27060436

  13. Alcohol Versus Cannabinoids: A Review of Their Opposite Neuro-Immunomodulatory Effects and Future Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Madhavan P.; Figueroa, Gloria; Casteleiro, Gianna; Muñoz, Karla; Agudelo, Marisela

    2015-01-01

    Due to the legalization of marijuana and the increased demand for cannabis and alcohol consumption, research efforts highlighting the biomedical consequences of the use of alcohol and cannabinoids are not only relevant to the substance abuse scientific field, but are also of public health interest. Moreover, an overview of the recent literature about alcohol and cannabinoids neuro-immunomodulatory effects highlighting their future therapeutic potentials will provide a significant contribution to science and medicine. Therefore, in the current review, we will first discuss briefly the prevalence of alcohol and marijuana abuse, followed by a discussion on the individual effects of alcohol and cannabinoids on the immune system; then, we will focus on the role of endocannabinoids on the alcohol-induced inflammatory effects. In addition, the review also incorporates cytokine array data obtained from human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, providing a different perspective on the alcohol and cannabinoid abuse divergent effects on cytokine production. The final section will highlight the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid receptors and the novel strategies to treat alcohol dependence as determined by in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies. PMID:26478902

  14. Analysis of nifedipine in human plasma and amniotic fluid by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its application to clinical pharmacokinetics in hypertensive pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Filgueira, Gabriela Campos de Oliveira; Filgueira, Osmany Alberto Silva; Carvalho, Daniela Miarelli; Marques, Maria Paula; Moisés, Elaine Christine Dantas; Duarte, Geraldo; Lanchote, Vera Lucia; Cavalli, Ricardo Carvalho

    2015-07-01

    Nifedipine is a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker used for the treatment of hypertension in pregnant women. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for analysis of nifedipine in human plasma and amniotic fluid. Separation of nifedipine and nitrendipine (IS) was performed using a LiChroCART(®) RP-Select B column and a mixture of water:acetonitrile:glacial acetic acid (30:70:0.5 v/v) as the mobile phase. Aliquots of 500μL of biological samples were extracted at pH 13 using dichloromethane:n-pentane (3:7 v/v). The validated method was applied to a study of the pharmacokinetics of nifedipine in human plasma and amniotic fluid samples collected up to 12h after administration of the last slow-release nifedipine (20mg/12h) dose to 12 hypertensive pregnant women. The estimated pharmacokinetic parameters of nifedipine showed a mean AUC(0-12) of 250.2ngh/mL, ClT/F of 89.2L/h, Vd/F of 600.0L and t1/2 5.1h. The mean amniotic fluid/plasma concentration ratio was 0.05. The methods proved to be highly sensitive by showing a lower quantification limit of 0.1ng/mL for both matrices. And this study reports for the first time the complete development and validation of the method to quantify nifedipine in amniotic fluid using LC-MS-MS.

  15. Effect of Short-Term Drinking Water Exposure to Dichloroacetate on its Pharmacokinetics and Oral Bioavailability in Human Volunteers: A Stable Isotope Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Irv R.; Shangraw, Robert E.

    2006-06-21

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) is a by-product of drinking water disinfection, a known rodent hepatocarcinogen and is also used therapeutically to treat a variety of metabolic disorders in humans. We measured DCAA bioavailability in 16 human volunteers (8 male, 8 female) after simultaneous administration of oral and iv DCAA doses. Volunteers consumed DCAA-free bottled water for 2 weeks to wash out background effects of DCAA. Subsequently, each subject drank 12C-DCAA (2 mg/kg) in 500 ml water over three minutes. Five minutes after the start of the 12C-DCAA consumption, 13C-labeled DCAA (0.3 mg/kg) was administered iv over 20 seconds, and plasma 12C/13C-DCAA concentrations measured at predetermined time points over 4 h. Volunteers subsequently consumed DCAA 0.02 mg/kg/day in 500 ml water for 14 consecutive days to simulate a low-level chronic DCAA intake. Afterwards, the 12C/13C-DCAA administrations was repeated. Study endpoints were calculation of AUC0??, apparent volume of distribution (Vss), total body clearance (Clb), plasma elimination half-life (t?,?), oral absorption rate (Ka), and oral bioavailability. Oral bioavailability was estimated from dose-adjusted AUC ratios, and by using a compartmental pharmacokinetic model after simultaneous fitting of oral and iv DCAA concentration-time profiles. DCAA bioavailability had large inter-individual variation, ranging from 28 ? 100 %. In the absence of prior DCAA intake, there were no significant differences (p>0.05) in any pharmacokinetic parameters between male and female volunteers, although there was a trend that women absorbed DCAA was more rapidly (increased Ka), and cleared DCAA more slowly (decreased Clb), than men. Only women were affected by previous 14 d DCAA exposure, which increased the AUC0?? for both oral and i.v. DCAA doses (P<0.04; 0.014 respectively) with a corresponding decrease in the Clb.

  16. Identification and pharmacokinetics of novel alkylresorcinol metabolites in human urine, new candidate biomarkers for whole-grain wheat and rye intake.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingdong; Shurlknight, Kelly L; Chen, Xiaoxin; Sang, Shengmin

    2014-02-01

    Biomarkers of dietary intake are prominent tools in nutritional research. The alkylresorcinol metabolites 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,5-DHBA) and 3-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid (3,5-DHPPA) have been proposed as exposure biomarkers of whole-grain (WG) wheat and rye intake. However, the profile of alkylresorcinol metabolites is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the metabolism of alkylresorcinols in mice and in humans, while further determining urinary pharmacokinetics of the novel alkylresorcinol metabolites to explore their potential as biomarkers of WG wheat intake. Utilization of the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry approach resulted in 10 alkylresorcinol metabolites identified in mice and in humans, including 3 phenolic acids and 7 of their phase II conjugates. Among them, 2 novel metabolites were discovered: 5-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)pentanoic acid (3,5-DHPPTA) and 2-(3,5-dihydroxybenzamido)acetic acid (3,5-DHBA glycine). The structures of these 2 metabolites were confirmed by comparing with authentic standards synthesized in-house. In the pharmacokinetic study, a group of 12 volunteers consumed a polyphenolic-restricted diet for 4 d before ingesting WG wheat bread containing 61 mg of alkylresorcinols. Urine samples were collected for 32 h, and alkylresorcinol metabolites were quantified with HPLC-coulometric electrode array detection. The mean urinary excretion rates and mean apparent half-life of 3,5-DHPPTA, 3,5-DHBA glycine, 3,5-DHBA, and 3,5-DHPPA at each time point were determined. Our results suggest that 3,5-DHPPTA and 3,5-DHBA glycine may be used in combination with 3,5-DHBA and 3,5-DHPPA as potential biomarkers to increase the accuracy of recording WG wheat and rye intake in epidemiologic studies. Further validation of 3,5-DHPPTA and 3,5-DHBA glycine as potential biomarkers is warranted. PMID:24259554

  17. Cannabinoids: novel medicines for the treatment of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Sagredo, Onintza; Pazos, M Ruth; Valdeolivas, Sara; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier

    2012-04-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has experienced a notable increase in the last 3 decades which is allowing the development of novel cannabinoid-based medicines for the treatment of different human pathologies, for example, Cesamet® (nabilone) or Marinol® (synthetic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol for oral administration) that were approved in 80s for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy treatment in cancer patients and in 90s for anorexiacachexia associated with AIDS therapy. Recently, the british company GW Pharmaceuticals plc has developed an oromucosal spray called Sativex®, which is constituted by an equimolecular combination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol- and cannabidiol- enriched botanical extracts. Sativex® has been approved for the treatment of specific symptoms (i.e. spasticity and pain) of multiple sclerosis patients in various countries (i.e. Canada, UK, Spain, New Zealand). However, this cannabis- based medicine has been also proposed to be useful in other neurological disorders given the analgesic, antitumoral, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties of their components demonstrated in preclinical models. Numerous clinical trials are presently being conducted to confirm this potential in patients. We are particularly interested in the case of Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder caused by an excess of CAG repeats in the genomic allele resulting in a polyQ expansion in the encoded protein called huntingtin, and that affects primarily striatal and cortical neurons thus producing motor abnormalities (i.e. chorea) and dementia. Cannabinoids have been studied for alleviation of hyperkinetic symptoms, given their inhibitory effects on movement, and, in particular, as disease-modifying agents due to their anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties. This potential has been corroborated in different experimental models of HD and using different types of cannabinoid agonists

  18. Prediction of clinical pharmacokinetics of AMG 181, a human anti-α4β7 monoclonal antibody for treating inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Köck, Kathleen; Wisler, John A; Rees, William A; Prince, Peter J; Reynhardt, Kai O; Hsu, Hailing; Yu, Zhigang; Borie, Dominic C; Salinger, David H; Pan, Wei-Jian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict a safe starting dose of AMG 181, a human anti-α4β7 antibody for treating inflammatory bowel diseases, based on cynomolgus monkey pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data. A two-compartment model with parallel linear and target-mediated drug disposition for AMG 181 PK in cynomolgus monkey was developed. The estimated parameters were allometrically scaled to predict human PK. An Emax PD model was used to relate AMG 181 concentration and free α4β7 receptor data in cynomolgus monkey. AMG 181 clinical doses were selected based on observed exposures at the no adverse effect level of 80 mg·kg−1 in monkeys, the predicted human exposures, and AMG 181 concentration expected to produce greater than 50% α4β7 receptor occupancy in humans. The predicted human AMG 181 clearance and central volume of distribution were 144 mL·day−1 and 2900 mL, respectively. The estimated EC50 for free α4β7 receptor was 14 ng·mL−1. At the 0.7 mg starting dose in humans, the predicted exposure margins were greater than 490,000 and AMG 181 concentrations were predicted to only briefly cover the free α4β7 receptor EC10. Predictions for both Cmax and AUC matched with those observed in the first-in-human study within the 7 mg subcutaneous to 420 mg intravenous dose range. The developed model aided in selection of a safe starting dose and a pharmacological relevant dose escalation strategy for testing of AMG 181 in humans. The clinically observed human AMG 181 PK data validated the modeling approach based on cynomolgus monkey data alone. PMID:25692016

  19. Comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a PEGylated recombinant human growth hormone and daily recombinant human growth hormone in growth hormone-deficient children

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ling; Chen, Zhi-hang; Liu, Dong; Cheng, Yuan-guo; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement therapy in children generally requires daily subcutaneous (sc) injections, which may be inconvenient for patients. Jintrolong® is a PEGylated rhGH with the purpose of weekly sc injections. The aim of the current study was to examine the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, safety, and tolerability of multiple sc doses of Jintrolong® vs daily doses of rhGH. Design and methods Twelve children with growth hormone deficiency participated in this single-center, open-label, crossover Phase I trial. All subjects received daily sc injections of rhGH at 0.0286 mg/kg/d for 7 days, followed by a 4-week washout period and six weekly doses of Jintrolong® at 0.2 mg/kg/w. Results In comparison with rhGH, sc injection of Jintrolong® produced a noticeably higher Cmax, significantly longer half-life (t1/2), and slower plasma clearance, signifying a profile suitable for long-term treatment. The ratio of the area under the concentration vs time curve (AUC) after the seventh and first injections (AUC(0–∞)7th/AUC(0–∞)1st) of rhGH was 1.02, while the AUC(0–∞)6th/AUC(0–∞)1st of Jintrolong ® was 1.03, indicating no accumulation of circulating growth hormone. There was no significant difference in the change in insulin-like growth factor-1 expression produced by 7 days of sc rhGH and weekly Jintrolong® injections. There were no severe adverse events during the trial. Conclusion The elimination rate of Jintrolong® was slower than that of sc rhGH. No progressive serum accumulation of Jintrolong® was found. The changes in insulin-like growth factor-1 expression produced by rhGH and Jintrolong® were comparable, indicating similar pharmacodynamics. Our results demonstrate that Jintrolong® is suitable for long-term growth hormone treatment in children with growth hormone deficiency. PMID:26719670

  20. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in predicting drug–drug interactions for sarpogrelate hydrochloride in humans

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jee Sun; Kim, Doyun; Park, Jung Bae; Heo, Hyunjin; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Seo, Jae Hong; Oh, Euichaul; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluating the potential risk of metabolic drug–drug interactions (DDIs) is clinically important. Objective To develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for sarpogrelate hydrochloride and its active metabolite, (R,S)-1-{2-[2-(3-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]-phenoxy}-3-(dimethylamino)-2-propanol (M-1), in order to predict DDIs between sarpogrelate and the clinically relevant cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 substrates, metoprolol, desipramine, dextromethorphan, imipramine, and tolterodine. Methods The PBPK model was developed, incorporating the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of sarpogrelate hydrochloride, and M-1 based on the findings from in vitro and in vivo studies. Subsequently, the model was verified by comparing the predicted concentration-time profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters of sarpogrelate and M-1 to the observed clinical data. Finally, the verified model was used to simulate clinical DDIs between sarpogrelate hydrochloride and sensitive CYP2D6 substrates. The predictive performance of the model was assessed by comparing predicted results to observed data after coadministering sarpogrelate hydrochloride and metoprolol. Results The developed PBPK model accurately predicted sarpogrelate and M-1 plasma concentration profiles after single or multiple doses of sarpogrelate hydrochloride. The simulated ratios of area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration of metoprolol in the presence of sarpogrelate hydrochloride to baseline were in good agreement with the observed ratios. The predicted fold-increases in the area under the curve ratios of metoprolol, desipramine, imipramine, dextromethorphan, and tolterodine following single and multiple sarpogrelate hydrochloride oral doses were within the range of ≥1.25, but <2-fold, indicating that sarpogrelate hydrochloride is a weak inhibitor of CYP2D6 in vivo. Collectively, the predicted low DDIs suggest that sarpogrelate hydrochloride has limited potential for causing

  1. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in predicting drug–drug interactions for sarpogrelate hydrochloride in humans

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jee Sun; Kim, Doyun; Park, Jung Bae; Heo, Hyunjin; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Seo, Jae Hong; Oh, Euichaul; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluating the potential risk of metabolic drug–drug interactions (DDIs) is clinically important. Objective To develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for sarpogrelate hydrochloride and its active metabolite, (R,S)-1-{2-[2-(3-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]-phenoxy}-3-(dimethylamino)-2-propanol (M-1), in order to predict DDIs between sarpogrelate and the clinically relevant cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 substrates, metoprolol, desipramine, dextromethorphan, imipramine, and tolterodine. Methods The PBPK model was developed, incorporating the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of sarpogrelate hydrochloride, and M-1 based on the findings from in vitro and in vivo studies. Subsequently, the model was verified by comparing the predicted concentration-time profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters of sarpogrelate and M-1 to the observed clinical data. Finally, the verified model was used to simulate clinical DDIs between sarpogrelate hydrochloride and sensitive CYP2D6 substrates. The predictive performance of the model was assessed by comparing predicted results to observed data after coadministering sarpogrelate hydrochloride and metoprolol. Results The developed PBPK model accurately predicted sarpogrelate and M-1 plasma concentration profiles after single or multiple doses of sarpogrelate hydrochloride. The simulated ratios of area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration of metoprolol in the presence of sarpogrelate hydrochloride to baseline were in good agreement with the observed ratios. The predicted fold-increases in the area under the curve ratios of metoprolol, desipramine, imipramine, dextromethorphan, and tolterodine following single and multiple sarpogrelate hydrochloride oral doses were within the range of ≥1.25, but <2-fold, indicating that sarpogrelate hydrochloride is a weak inhibitor of CYP2D6 in vivo. Collectively, the predicted low DDIs suggest that sarpogrelate hydrochloride has limited potential for causing

  2. Incorporation of Therapeutic Interventions in Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Human Clinical Case Reports of Accidental or Intentional Overdosing with Ethylene Glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; McMartin, K. E.

    2005-05-16

    Ethylene glycol is a high production volume chemical used in the manufacture of resins and fibers, antifreeze, deicing fluids, heat transfer and hydraulic fluids. Although occupational uses of ethylene glycol have not been associated with adverse effects, there are case reports where humans have either intentionally or accidentally ingested large quantities of ethylene glycol, primarily from antifreeze. The acute toxicity of ethylene glycol in humans and animals and can proceed through three stages, each associated with a different metabolite: central nervous system depression (ethylene glycol), cardiopulmonary effects associated with metabolic acidosis (glycolic acid) and ultimately renal toxicity (oxalic acid), depending upon the total amounts consumed and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model developed in a companion paper (Corley et al., 2004) was refined in this study to include clinically relevant treatment regimens for ethylene glycol poisoning such as hemodialysis or metabolic inhibition with either ethanol or fomepizole. Such modifications enabled the model to describe several human case reports which included analysis of ethylene glycol and/or glycolic acid. Such data and model simulations provide important confirmation that the PBPK model developed previously can adequately describe the pharmacokinetics of ethylene glycol in humans following low, occupational or environmentally relevant inhalation exposures, as well as massive oral doses even under conditions where treatments have been employed that markedly affect the disposition of ethylene glycol and glycolic acid. By integrating the case report data sets with controlled studies in this PBPK model, it was demonstrated that fomepizole, if administered early enough in a clinical situation, can be more effective than ethanol or hemodialysis in preventing the metabolism of ethylene glycol to more toxic metabolites. Hemodialysis remains an

  3. A New Differential Diagnosis: Synthetic Cannabinoids-Associated Acute Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Gudsoorkar, Vineet S; Perez, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are herbal blends that use plant material with varying concentrations of synthetic analogues of cannabinoids. These products are sold as incense or potpourri and are labeled "Not for human use." Even so, rates of abuse are rapidly increasing worldwide, especially in the young adult population. An extensive network of users exists, and the products can easily be ordered on the Internet under various brand names, including the most popular ones, "K2" and "Spice." Not much is known about their spectrum of toxicity and no specific antidote is available at present. Renal failure is a rare complication associated with SC abuse. We describe a case of acute kidney injury associated with use of SCs and present a review of the current literature, including the history and some key pharmacologic and epidemiologic findings related to synthetic cannabinoid compounds. PMID:26634029

  4. A New Differential Diagnosis: Synthetic Cannabinoids-Associated Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gudsoorkar, Vineet S.; Perez, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are herbal blends that use plant material with varying concentrations of synthetic analogues of cannabinoids. These products are sold as incense or potpourri and are labeled “Not for human use.” Even so, rates of abuse are rapidly increasing worldwide, especially in the young adult population. An extensive network of users exists, and the products can easily be ordered on the Internet under various brand names, including the most popular ones, “K2” and “Spice.” Not much is known about their spectrum of toxicity and no specific antidote is available at present. Renal failure is a rare complication associated with SC abuse. We describe a case of acute kidney injury associated with use of SCs and present a review of the current literature, including the history and some key pharmacologic and epidemiologic findings related to synthetic cannabinoid compounds. PMID:26634029

  5. [Interspecies differences of noopept pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, S S; Korotkov, S A; Zherdev, V P; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2004-01-01

    Significant interspecific differences in the pharmacokinetics of noopept are manifested by a decrease in the drug elimination rate on the passage from rats to rabbits and humans. Very intensive metabolism of noopept was observed upon intravenous administration in rats. In these animals, presystemic elimination mechanisms lead to the formation of a specific metabolite representing a product of drug biotransformation hydroxylated at the phenyl ring. In rabbits, unchanged noopept circulates in the blood for a longer time upon both intravenous and peroral introduction, biotransformation proceeds at a much slower rate, and no metabolites analogous to that found in rats are detected. The noopept pharmacokinetics in humans differs from that in animals by still slower elimination and considerable individual variability. No drug metabolites are found in the human blood plasma, probably because of a relatively small dose and low concentration. PMID:15079908

  6. Nicotine and cannabinoids: parallels, contrasts and interactions.

    PubMed

    Viveros, Maria-Paz; Marco, Eva M; File, Sandra E

    2006-01-01

    After a brief outline of the nicotinic and cannabinoid systems, we review the interactions between the pharmacological effects of nicotine and cannabis, two of the most widely used drugs of dependence. These drugs are increasingly taken in combination, particularly among the adolescents and young adults. The review focuses on addiction-related processes, gateway and reverse gateway theories of addiction and therapeutic implications. It then reviews studies on the important period of adolescence, an area that is in urgent need of further investigation and in which the importance of sex differences is emerging. Three other areas of research, which might be particularly relevant to the onset and/or maintenance of dependence, are then reviewed. Firstly, the effects of the two drugs on anxiety-related behaviours are discussed and then their effects on food intake and cognition, two areas in which they have contrasting effects. Certain animal studies suggest that reinforcing effects are likely to be enhanced by joint consumption of nicotine and cannabis, as also may be anxiolytic effects. If this was the case in humans, the latter might be viewed as an advantage particularly by adolescent girls, although the increased weight gain associated with cannabis would be a disadvantage. The two drugs also have opposite effects on cognition and the possibility of long-lasting cognitive impairments resulting from adolescent consumption of cannabis is of particular concern.

  7. Therapeutic Potential of Cannabinoids in Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Leweke, F Markus; Mueller, Juliane K; Lange, Bettina; Rohleder, Cathrin

    2016-04-01

    Over recent years, the interest in the endocannabinoid system (ECS) as a new target for the treatment of schizophrenia has evolved. The ECS represents one of the most relevant neurotransmitter systems in the brain and mainly fulfills a homeostatic role in terms of neurotransmission but also with respect to inflammatory processes. Two main approaches to the modulation of endocannabinoid functioning have been chosen so far. First, the selective blockade or inverse agonism of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor has been tested for the improvement of acute psychotic symptoms, as well as for the improvement of cognitive functions in schizophrenia. This was not effective in either case. Second, the modulation of endocannabinoid levels by use of the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol and selective fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors has been proposed, and the antipsychotic properties of cannabidiol are currently being investigated in humans. Unfortunately, for most of these trials that have focused on psychopathological and cognitive effects of cannabidiol, no published data are available. However, there is first evidence that cannabidiol may ameliorate psychotic symptoms with a superior side-effect profile compared with established antipsychotics. In conclusion, several clinical trials targeting the ECS in acute schizophrenia have either been completed or are underway. Although publicly available results are currently limited, preliminary data indicate that selected compounds modulating the ECS may be effective in acute schizophrenia. Nevertheless, so far, sample sizes of patients investigated are not sufficient to come to a final judgment, and no maintenance studies are available to ensure long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26852073

  8. Pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of zidovudine and its glucuronidated metabolite in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection and hepatic disease (AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol 062).

    PubMed Central

    Moore, K H; Raasch, R H; Brouwer, K L; Opheim, K; Cheeseman, S H; Eyster, E; Lemon, S M; van der Horst, C M

    1995-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of zidovudine (ZDV) are established in patients with various stages of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. This study was conducted to determine the pharmacokinetic parameters of ZDV in patients with asymptomatic HIV infection and liver disease. HIV-infected volunteers with normal renal function were stratified according to the severity of liver disease (seven of eight were classified as mild). Each subject received a single intravenous dose of ZDV (120 mg) on the first day, followed by a single oral dose of ZDV (200 mg) on the second day. Blood samples were obtained over a 8-h collection interval, and concentrations of ZDV and its glucuronidated metabolite (GZDV) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The following pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained after oral administration of ZDV to HIV-infected patients with mild hepatic disease; these values were compared with previously reported data in healthy volunteers. The area under the curve (AUC) (1,670 +/- 192 ng.h/ml), maximum concentration of drug in serum (1,751 +/- 180 ng/ml), and half-life (2.04 +/- 0.38 h) of ZDV were increased, while the apparent oral clearance (1.57 +/- 0.31 liter/h/kg of body weight) was decreased; AUC (7,685 +/- 1,222 ng.h/ml) and maximum concentration of drug in serum (5,220 +/- 1,350 ng/ml) of GZDV and the AUC ratio of GZDV to ZDV (2.79 +/- 0.43) after oral administration were decreased. ZDV absolute bioavailability was 0.75 +/- 0.15 in HIV-infected patients with hepatic disease. Although the ZDV apparent oral clearance was not impaired as significantly as in patients with biopsy-proven cirrhosis, our results suggest that ZDV, could accumulate in HIV-infected patients with mild hepatic disease because of impaired formation of GZDV. Patients with mild hepatic disease may require dosage adjustment to avoid accumulation of ZDV after extended therapy. PMID:8593010

  9. [What sense in cannabinoid use as regulated by Italian DM 18/04/07? Pharmacological and legal considerations].

    PubMed

    Molinelli, A; Grossi, S; Bonsignore, A; Martelli, A

    2008-06-01

    The present article relates to the Italian Ministerial Decree (DM) 18/04/2007 referring to what was established by the Financial Law 2007 on the matter of the use of drugs for the so called ''off-label'' uses. This law introduces three cannabinoid substances, with the common name of Delta 9 and Trans-delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol and Nabilone, within the possible therapies for the treatment of ''severe pain''. The authors underline the absence of a sufficient pharmacokinetical and pharmacodynamical knowledge supporting the use of cannabinoid substances in the ''severe pain'' therapy. Further more the professional prescriber could go against judicial consequences if the drugs causes as verified the onset of collateral effects even severe that, for the scientific knowledge in possess at the present state, the authors know could take place. PMID:18497729

  10. [What sense in cannabinoid use as regulated by Italian DM 18/04/07? Pharmacological and legal considerations].

    PubMed

    Molinelli, A; Grossi, S; Bonsignore, A; Martelli, A

    2008-06-01

    The present article relates to the Italian Ministerial Decree (DM) 18/04/2007 referring to what was established by the Financial Law 2007 on the matter of the use of drugs for the so called ''off-label'' uses. This law introduces three cannabinoid substances, with the common name of Delta 9 and Trans-delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol and Nabilone, within the possible therapies for the treatment of ''severe pain''. The authors underline the absence of a sufficient pharmacokinetical and pharmacodynamical knowledge supporting the use of cannabinoid substances in the ''severe pain'' therapy. Further more the professional prescriber could go against judicial consequences if the drugs causes as verified the onset of collateral effects even severe that, for the scientific knowledge in possess at the present state, the authors know could take place.

  11. Phenol-Explorer 2.0: a major update of the Phenol-Explorer database integrating data on polyphenol metabolism and pharmacokinetics in humans and experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Joseph A; Urpi-Sarda, Mireia; Boto-Ordoñez, Maria; Knox, Craig; Llorach, Rafael; Eisner, Roman; Cruz, Joseph; Neveu, Vanessa; Wishart, David; Manach, Claudine; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Scalbert, Augustin

    2012-01-01

    Phenol-Explorer, launched in 2009, is the only comprehensive web-based database on the content in foods of polyphenols, a major class of food bioactives that receive considerable attention due to their role in the prevention of diseases. Polyphenols are rarely absorbed and excreted in their ingested forms, but extensively metabolized in the body, and until now, no database has allowed the recall of identities and concentrations of polyphenol metabolites in biofluids after the consumption of polyphenol-rich sources. Knowledge of these metabolites is essential in the planning of experiments whose aim is to elucidate the effects of polyphenols on health. Release 2.0 is the first major update of the database, allowing the rapid retrieval of data on the biotransformations and pharmacokinetics of dietary polyphenols. Data on 375 polyphenol metabolites identified in urine and plasma were collected from 236 peer-reviewed publications on polyphenol metabolism in humans and experimental animals and added to the database by means of an extended relational design. Pharmacokinetic parameters have been collected and can be retrieved in both tabular and graphical form. The web interface has been enhanced and now allows the filtering of information according to various criteria. Phenol-Explorer 2.0, which will be periodically updated, should prove to be an even more useful and capable resource for polyphenol scientists because bioactivities and health effects of polyphenols are dependent on the nature and concentrations of metabolites reaching the target tissues. The Phenol-Explorer database is publicly available and can be found online at http://www.phenol-explorer.eu. Database URL: http://www.phenol-explorer.eu.

  12. Pharmacokinetic comparison to determine the mechanisms underlying the differential efficacies of cationic diamidines against first- and second-stage human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sihyung; Wenzler, Tanja; Miller, Patrik N; Wu, Huali; Boykin, David W; Brun, Reto; Wang, Michael Zhuo

    2014-07-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), a neglected tropical disease, is fatal without treatment. Pentamidine, a cationic diamidine, has been used to treat first-stage (hemolymphatic) HAT since the 1940s, but it is ineffective against second-stage (meningoencephalitic, or central nervous system [CNS]) infection. Novel diamidines (DB75, DB820, and DB829) have shown promising efficacy in both mouse and monkey models of first-stage HAT. However, only DB829 cured animals with second-stage infection. In this study, we aimed to determine the mechanisms underlying the differential efficacies of these diamidines against HAT by conducting a comprehensive pharmacokinetic characterization. This included the determination of metabolic stability in liver microsomes, permeability across MDCK and MDR1-MDCK cell monolayers, interaction with the efflux transporter MDR1 (P-glycoprotein 1 or P-gp), drug binding in plasma and brain, and plasma and brain concentration-time profiles after a single dose in mice. The results showed that DB829, an azadiamidine, had the highest systemic exposure and brain-to-plasma ratio, whereas pentamidine and DB75 had the lowest. None of these diamidines was a P-gp substrate, and the binding of each to plasma proteins and brain differed greatly. The brain-to-plasma ratio best predicted the relative efficacies of these diamidines in mice with second-stage infection. In conclusion, pharmacokinetics and CNS penetration influenced the in vivo efficacies of cationic diamidines against first- and second-stage HAT and should be considered when developing CNS-active antitrypanosomal diamidines.

  13. Preliminary efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and quality of life study of pegylated recombinant human arginase 1 in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yau, Thomas; Cheng, Paul N; Chan, Pierre; Chen, Li; Yuen, Jimmy; Pang, Roberta; Fan, Sheung Tat; Wheatley, Denys N; Poon, Ronnie T

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy, safety profile, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and quality of life of pegylated recombinant human arginase 1 (Peg-rhAgr1) in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients were given weekly doses of Peg-rhAgr1 (1600 U/kg). Tumour response was assessed every 8 weeks using RECIST 1.1 and modified RECIST criteria. A total of 20 patients were recruited, of whom 15 were deemed evaluable for treatment efficacy. Eighteen patients (90%) were hepatitis B carriers. Median age was 61.5 (range 30-75). Overall disease control rate was 13%, with 2 of the 15 patients achieving stable disease for >8 weeks. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 1.7 (95% CI: 1.67-1.73) months, with median overall survival (OS) of all 20 enrolled patients being 5.2 (95% CI: 3.3-12.0) months. PFS was significantly prolonged in patients with adequate arginine depletion (ADD) >2 months versus those who had ≤2 months of ADD (6.4 versus 1.7 months; p = 0.01). The majority of adverse events (AEs) were grade 1/2 non-hematological toxicities. Transient liver dysfunctions (25%) were the most commonly reported serious AEs and likely due to disease progression. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data showed that Peg-rhAgr1 induced rapid and sustained arginine depletion. The overall quality of life of the enrolled patients was well preserved. Peg-rhAgr1 is well tolerated with a good toxicity profile in patients with advanced HCC. A weekly dose of 1600 U/kg is sufficient to induce ADD. Significantly longer PFS times were recorded for patients who had ADD for >2 months.

  14. Cannabinoids inhibit angiogenic capacities of endothelial cells via release of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 from lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Robert; Fischer, Sascha; Haustein, Maria; Manda, Katrin; Hinz, Burkhard

    2014-09-15

    Cannabinoids inhibit tumor neovascularization as part of their tumorregressive action. However, the underlying mechanism is still under debate. In the present study the impact of cannabinoids on potential tumor-to-endothelial cell communication conferring anti-angiogenesis was studied. Cellular behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) associated with angiogenesis was evaluated by Boyden chamber, two-dimensional tube formation and fibrin bead assay, with the latter assessing three-dimensional sprout formation. Viability was quantified by the WST-1 test. Conditioned media (CM) from A549 lung cancer cells treated with cannabidiol, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, R(+)-methanandamide or the CB2 agonist JWH-133 elicited decreased migration as well as tube and sprout formation of HUVEC as compared to CM of vehicle-treated cancer cells. Inhibition of sprout formation was further confirmed for cannabinoid-treated A549 cells co-cultured with HUVEC. Using antagonists to cannabinoid-activated receptors the antimigratory action was shown to be mediated via cannabinoid receptors or transient receptor potential vanilloid 1. SiRNA approaches revealed a cannabinoid-induced expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) as well as its upstream trigger, the intercellular adhesion molecule-1, to be causally linked to the observed decrease of HUVEC migration. Comparable anti-angiogenic effects were not detected following direct exposure of HUVEC to cannabinoids, but occurred after addition of recombinant TIMP-1 to HUVEC. Finally, antimigratory effects were confirmed for CM of two other cannabinoid-treated lung cancer cell lines (H460 and H358). Collectively, our data suggest a pivotal role of the anti-angiogenic factor TIMP-1 in intercellular tumor-endothelial cell communication resulting in anti-angiogenic features of endothelial cells.

  15. The Role of Cannabinoids in Neuroanatomic Alterations in Cannabis Users.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Valentina; Solowij, Nadia; Yücel, Murat

    2016-04-01

    The past few decades have seen a marked change in the composition of commonly smoked cannabis. These changes primarily involve an increase of the psychoactive compound ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and a decrease of the potentially therapeutic compound cannabidiol (CBD). This altered composition of cannabis may be linked to persistent neuroanatomic alterations typically seen in regular cannabis users. In this review, we summarize recent findings from human structural neuroimaging investigations. We examine whether neuroanatomic alterations are 1) consistently observed in samples of regular cannabis users, particularly in cannabinoid receptor-high areas, which are vulnerable to the effects of high circulating levels of THC, and 2) associated either with greater levels of cannabis use (e.g., higher dosage, longer duration, and earlier age of onset) or with distinct cannabinoid compounds (i.e., THC and CBD). Across the 31 studies selected for inclusion in this review, neuroanatomic alterations emerged across regions that are high in cannabinoid receptors (i.e., hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, cerebellum). Greater dose and earlier age of onset were associated with these alterations. Preliminary evidence shows that THC exacerbates, whereas CBD protects from, such harmful effects. Methodologic differences in the quantification of levels of cannabis use prevent accurate assessment of cannabis exposure and direct comparison of findings across studies. Consequently, the field lacks large "consortium-style" data sets that can be used to develop reliable neurobiological models of cannabis-related harm, recovery, and protection. To move the field forward, we encourage a coordinated approach and suggest the urgent development of consensus-based guidelines to accurately and comprehensively quantify cannabis use and exposure in human studies. PMID:26858212

  16. A simple, rapid and sensitive UFLC-MS/MS method for the quantification of oral contraceptive norgestrel in human plasma and its pharmacokinetic applications.

    PubMed

    Batta, N; Pigili, R K; Pallapothu, L M K; Yejella, R P

    2014-09-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive ultra flow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UFLC-MS/MS) assay for the determination of norgestrel in human plasma was developed using levonorgestrel D6 as an internal standard (IS). Norgestrel and IS were extracted from human plasma via liquid-liquid extraction. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Zorbax XDB-Phenyl column under isocratic conditions. Detection was done by tandem mass spectrometry, operating in positive ion mode. The protonated precursor to product ion transitions monitored for norgestrel and IS were at m/z 313.30→245.40 and 319.00→251.30 respectively. The method was fully validated as per current regulatory guidelines. Anticoagulant counter ion effect was also assessed with K2EDTA and K3EDTA. The method was validated with a linearity range of 304.356-50 807.337 pg/mL having run time of 2.0 min per sample. The method has shown tremendous reproducibility with intra- and inter-day precision (%CV) less than 11.0% and intra- and inter-day accuracy less than 9.0% of nominal values. The validated method was applied to a pharmacokinetic study in human plasma samples generated after administrating a single oral dose of 0.3 mg norgestrel tablets to healthy female volunteers and has proved to be highly reliable for the analysis of clinical samples. PMID:24310360

  17. Concurrent determination of olanzapine, risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone in human plasma by ultra performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection method: application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Siva Selva Kumar, M; Ramanathan, M

    2016-02-01

    A simple and sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method has been developed and validated for simultaneous estimation of olanzapine (OLZ), risperidone (RIS) and 9-hydroxyrisperidone (9-OHRIS) in human plasma in vitro. The sample preparation was performed by simple liquid-liquid extraction technique. The analytes were chromatographed on a Waters Acquity H class UPLC system using isocratic mobile phase conditions at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min and Acquity UPLC BEH shield RP18 column maintained at 40°C. Quantification was performed on a photodiode array detector set at 277 nm and clozapine was used as internal standard (IS). OLZ, RIS, 9-OHRIS and IS retention times were found to be 0.9, 1.4, .1.8 and 3.1 min, respectively, and the total run time was 4 min. The method was validated for selectivity, specificity, recovery, linearity, accuracy, precision and sample stability. The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range 1-100 ng/mL for OLZ, RIS and 9-OHRIS. Intra- and inter-day precisions for OLZ, RIS and 9-OHRIS were found to be good with the coefficient of variation <6.96%, and the accuracy ranging from 97.55 to 105.41%, in human plasma. The validated UPLC method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of RIS and 9-OHRIS in human plasma.

  18. Allometric scaling of pharmacokinetic parameters in drug discovery: can human CL, Vss and t1/2 be predicted from in-vivo rat data?

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Gary W; Masucci, John A; Yan, Zhengyin; Hageman, William

    2004-01-01

    In a drug discovery environment, reasonable go/no-go human in-vivo pharmacokinetic (PK) decisions must be made in a timely manner with a minimum amount of animal in-vivo or in-vitro data. We have investigated the accuracy of the in-vivo correlation between rat and human for the prediction of the total systemic clearance (CL), the volume of distribution at steady state (Vss), and the half-life (t1/2) using simple allometric scaling techniques. We have shown, using a large diverse set of drugs, that a fixed exponent allometric scaling approach can be used to predict human in-vivo PK parameters CL, Vss and t(1/2) solely from rat in-vivo PK data with acceptable accuracy for making go/no-go decisions in drug discovery. Human in-vivo PK predictions can be obtained using the simple allometric scaling relationships CL(Human) approximately = 40 CL(Rat) (L/hr), Vss(Human) approximately = 200 Vss(Rat) (L), and t1/2(Human) approximately = 4 t1/2(Rat) (hr). The average fold error for human CL predictions for N = 176 drugs was 2.25 with 79% of the drugs having a fold error less than 3. The average fold error for human Vss predictions for N = 144 drugs was 1.85 with 84% of the drugs having a fold error less than 3. The average fold error for human t1/2 predictions for N = 145 drugs was 2.05 with 76% of the drugs having a fold error less than 3. Using these simple allometric relationships, the sorting of drug candidates into a low/medium/high/very high human classification scheme was also possible from rat data. Since these simple allometric relationships between rat and human CL, Vss, and t1/2 are reasonably accurate, easy to remember and simple to calculate, these equations should be useful for making early go/no-go in-vivo human PK decisions for drug discovery candidates.

  19. Ligands for cannabinoid receptors, promising anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Nikan, Marjan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Manayi, Azadeh

    2016-02-01

    Cannabinoid compounds are unique to cannabis and provide some interesting biological properties. These compounds along with endocannabinoids, a group of neuromodulator compounds in the body especially in brain, express their effects by activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. There are several physiological properties attributed to the endocannabinoids including pain relief, enhancement of appetite, blood pressure lowering during shock, embryonic development, and blocking of working memory. On the other hand, activation of endocannabinoid system may be suppresses evolution and progression of several types of cancer. According to the results of recent studies, CB receptors are over-expressed in cancer cell lines and application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds reduce tumor size through decrease of cell proliferation or induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis along with desirable effect on decrease of tumor-evoked pain. Therefore, modulation of endocannabinoid system by inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme, which metabolized endocannabinoids, or application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds, may be appropriate for the treatment of several cancer subtypes. This review focuses on how cannabinoid affect different types of cancers. PMID:26764235

  20. Potentiation of the antitumor activity of adriamycin against osteosarcoma by cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2

    PubMed Central

    NIU, FENG; ZHAO, SONG; XU, CHANG-YAN; SHA, HUI; BI, GUI-BIN; CHEN, LIN; YE, LONG; GONG, PING; NIE, TIAN-HONG

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumor that occurs in children and adolescents. The present study aimed to identify novel therapeutic strategies for osteosarcoma, by assessing the antitumor activity of the cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 and its combined effect with adriamycin (ADM) against the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line. To evaluate the antiproliferative action of these molecules, a Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used. The ability of cannabinoid to inhibit the migration, invasion and angiogenic activity of MG-63 cells were assessed by scratch, Transwell® chamber and angiogenesis assays, respectively, in vitro. To examine the alterations in expression of targeted genes, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used. The administration of cannabinoid combined with ADM was demonstrated to inhibit the growth of MG-63 cells, resulting in a cell viability of 32.12±3.13%, which was significantly lower (P<0.05) compared with the cell viability following treatment with cannabinoid (70.86±7.55%) and ADM (62.87±5.98%) alone. Greater antimetastasis and antiangiogenic activities were also observed following the coadministration of the two agents compared with individual treatments and controls. In addition, the expression levels of Notch-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in MG-63 cells were downregulated following the treatments with cannabinoid alone or in combination with ADM. In conclusion, the present findings demonstrated that cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 may significantly potentiate the antiproliferative, antimetastasis and antiangiogenic effects of ADM against MG-63 cells via the downregulation of Notch-1, MMP-2 and VEGF. These findings may offer a novel strategy for the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:26622862

  1. 1-Pentyl-3-Phenylacetylindoles and JWH-018 Share In Vivo Cannabinoid Profiles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Marusich, Julie A.; Martin, Billy R.; Huffman, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Smoking of synthetic cannabinoid-enhanced “herbal incense” is an emerging substance abuse problem. The indole-derived cannabinoids identified in these products were originally developed as research tools and are structurally distinct from cannabinoids in the cannabis plant. Although abused by humans, most published research on this class of compounds has been performed in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel series of 1-pentyl-3-phenylacetylindoles in mice. Methods The potencies of these analogs to produce the cannabinoid agonist effects of antinociception, hypothermia and suppression of locomotion were evaluated in ICR mice. The major structural manipulations in the present series included the type of substituent (i.e., unsubstituted, methyl, methoxy, chloro, bromo, and fluoro) and the position of the substituent on the phenyl ring (i.e., 2-, 3- or 4-position). Results Potencies of this series of phenylacetylindoles for each cannabinoid effect were highly correlated with CB1 receptor affinities reported previously. Active compounds produced a profile of effects that resembled that exhibited by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The most critical factor affecting in vivo potency was the position of the substituent. Whereas compounds with 2- and 3-phenylacetyl substituents were efficacious with good potencies, 4-substituents resulted in compounds that had poor potency or were inactive. Conclusions These results suggest that phenylacetylindoles with good CB1 binding affinity share pharmacological properties with THC in mice; however, they also emphasize the complexity of molecular interactions of synthetic cannabinoids with CB1 receptors and suggest that scheduling efforts based solely upon structural features should proceed with caution. PMID:22127210

  2. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of the novel γ-secretase modulator, E2212, in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanke; Logovinsky, Veronika; Schuck, Edgar; Kaplow, June; Chang, Min-Kun; Miyagawa, Takehiko; Wong, Nancy; Ferry, Jim

    2014-05-01

    E2212, a novel γ-secretase modulator, is under development for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of single ascending oral doses (10-250 mg, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized) of E2212 were evaluated. In this phase I clinical trial, E2212 was found to be well tolerated in single doses. Maximum tolerated dose was not achieved up to 250 mg. Most AEs were mild to moderate in severity with no identifiable dose related pattern. There were no clinically significant findings on physical and ophthalmologic examinations as well as vital signs, laboratory, ECG and C-SSRS assessments. E2212 was rapidly absorbed, with median tmax values ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 h. E2212 exhibited biphasic disposition with the terminal t1/2 of 12.5-19.0 h. Renal excretion was the minor pathway for E2212 elimination. Increased PD response (reduction in plasma concentrations of Aβ(x-42)) was observed with increasing doses. The maximum PD response was observed in the highest dose 250 mg cohort, with ΔAUAC(0-24 h) of 44.1% and Amax of 53.6%. These results support further clinical development of E2212.

  3. Population Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model-Based Comparability Assessment of a Recombinant Human Epoetin Alfa and the Biosimilar HX575

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Lowe, Philip J.; Fink, Martin; Berghout, Alexander; Balser, Sigrid; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an integrated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model and assess the comparability between epoetin alfa HEXAL/Binocrit (HX575) and a comparator epoetin alfa by a model-based approach. PK/PD data—including serum drug concentrations, reticulocyte counts, red blood cells, and hemoglobin levels—were obtained from 2 clinical studies. In sum, 149 healthy men received multiple intravenous or subcutaneous doses of HX575 (100 IU/kg) and the comparator 3 times a week for 4 weeks. A population model based on pharmacodynamics-mediated drug disposition and cell maturation processes was used to characterize the PK/PD data for the 2 drugs. Simulations showed that due to target amount changes, total clearance may increase up to 2.4-fold as compared with the baseline. Further simulations suggested that once-weekly and thrice-weekly subcutaneous dosing regimens would result in similar efficacy. The findings from the model-based analysis were consistent with previous results using the standard noncompartmental approach demonstrating PK/PD comparability between HX575 and comparator. However, due to complexity of the PK/PD model, control of random effects was not straightforward. Whereas population PK/PD model-based analyses are suited for studying complex biological systems, such models have their limitations (statistical), and their comparability results should be interpreted carefully. PMID:22162538

  4. Pharmacoscintigraphic and pharmacokinetic evaluation on healthy human volunteers of sustained-release floating minitablets containing levodopa and carbidopa.

    PubMed

    Goole, J; Van Gansbeke, B; Pilcer, G; Deleuze, Ph; Blocklet, D; Goldman, S; Pandolfo, M; Vanderbist, F; Amighi, K

    2008-11-19

    In this study, scintigraphic and pharmacokinetic studies were conducted on 10 healthy, fed volunteers. Two concepts of sustained-release floating minitablets--Levo-Form 1 (matrix) and 2 (coated)--were evaluated and compared to the marketed product Prolopa HBS 125. All the floating forms were radiolabelled with (111)In in order to evaluate their gastric residence time using gamma-scintigraphy. It was shown that the three formulations offered almost the same mean gastric residence time, which was about 240 min. Prolopa HBS 125 and Levo-Form 2 presented intragastric disintegration, which can lead to a more pronounced "peak & valley" effect on the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa. In contrast, the plasma concentration-time profile of levodopa following the administration of Levo-Form 1 was more evenly distributed. Moreover, Levo-Form 1 provided the lowest variations between men and women in terms of AUC and C(max) values. Finally, when the same amount of inhibitors of extracerebral dopa decarboxylase--carbidopa and benserazide--had been administrated, the mean AUC, C(max) and T(max) values obtained for benserazide were lower than those obtained for carbidopa. PMID:18778758

  5. Cannabinoids: Glutamatergic Transmission and Kynurenines.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Aguilera, Gabriela; Santamaría, Abel

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) comprises a complex of receptors, enzymes, and endogenous agonists that are widely distributed in the central nervous system of mammals and participates in a considerable number of neuromodulatory functions, including neurotransmission, immunological control, and cell signaling. In turn, the kynurenine pathway (KP) is the most relevant metabolic route for tryptophan degradation to form the metabolic precursor NAD(+). Recent studies demonstrate that the control exerted by the pharmacological manipulation of the ECS on the glutamatergic system in the brain may offer key information not only on the development of psychiatric disorders like psychosis and schizophrenia-like symptoms, but it also may constitute a solid basis for the development of therapeutic strategies to combat excitotoxic events occurring in neurological disorders like Huntington's disease (HD). Part of the evidence pointing to the last approach is based on experimental protocols demonstrating the efficacy of cannabinoids to prevent the deleterious actions of the endogenous neurotoxin and KP metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN). These findings intuitively raise the question about what is the precise role of the ECS in tryptophan metabolism through KP and vice versa. In this chapter, we will review basic concepts on the physiology of both the ECS and the KP to finally describe those recent findings combining the components of these two systems and hypothesize the future course that the research in this emerging field will take in the next years. PMID:27651254

  6. Cannabinoids: Glutamatergic Transmission and Kynurenines.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Aguilera, Gabriela; Santamaría, Abel

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) comprises a complex of receptors, enzymes, and endogenous agonists that are widely distributed in the central nervous system of mammals and participates in a considerable number of neuromodulatory functions, including neurotransmission, immunological control, and cell signaling. In turn, the kynurenine pathway (KP) is the most relevant metabolic route for tryptophan degradation to form the metabolic precursor NAD(+). Recent studies demonstrate that the control exerted by the pharmacological manipulation of the ECS on the glutamatergic system in the brain may offer key information not only on the development of psychiatric disorders like psychosis and schizophrenia-like symptoms, but it also may constitute a solid basis for the development of therapeutic strategies to combat excitotoxic events occurring in neurological disorders like Huntington's disease (HD). Part of the evidence pointing to the last approach is based on experimental protocols demonstrating the efficacy of cannabinoids to prevent the deleterious actions of the endogenous neurotoxin and KP metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN). These findings intuitively raise the question about what is the precise role of the ECS in tryptophan metabolism through KP and vice versa. In this chapter, we will review basic concepts on the physiology of both the ECS and the KP to finally describe those recent findings combining the components of these two systems and hypothesize the future course that the research in this emerging field will take in the next years.

  7. Assessment of the percutaneous absorption of trichloroethylene in rats and humans using MS/MS real-time breath analysis and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Poet, T S; Corley, R A; Thrall, K D; Edwards, J A; Tanojo, H; Weitz, K K; Hui, X; Maibach, H I; Wester, R C

    2000-07-01

    The development and validation of noninvasive techniques for estimating the dermal bioavailability of solvents in contaminated soil and water can facilitate the overall understanding of human health risk. To assess the dermal bioavailability of trichloroethylene (TCE), exhaled breath was monitored in real time using an ion trap mass spectrometer (MS/MS) to track the uptake and elimination of TCE from dermal exposures in rats and humans. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to estimate total bioavailability. Male F344 rats were exposed to TCE in water or soil under occluded or nonoccluded conditions by applying a patch to a clipper-shaved area of the back. Rats were placed in off-gassing chambers and chamber air TCE concentration was quantified for 3-5 h postdosing using the MS/MS. Human volunteers were exposed either by whole-hand immersion or by attaching patches containing TCE in soil or water on each forearm. Volunteers were provided breathing air via a face mask to eliminate inhalation exposure, and exhaled breath was analyzed using the MS/MS. The total TCE absorbed and the dermal permeability coefficient (K(P)) were estimated for each individual by optimization of the PBPK model to the exhaled breath data and the changing media and/or dermal patch concentrations. Rat skin was significantly more permeable than human skin. Estimates for K(P) in a water matrix were 0.31 +/- 0.01 cm/h and 0.015 +/- 0.003 cm/h in rats and humans, respectively. K(P) estimates were more than three times higher from water than soil matrices in both species. K(P) values calculated using the standard Fick's Law equation were strongly affected by exposure length and volatilization of TCE. In comparison, K(P) values estimated using noninvasive real-time breath analysis coupled with the PBPK model were consistent, regardless of volatilization, exposure concentration, or duration.

  8. The application of global sensitivity analysis in the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans.

    PubMed

    Loizou, George D; McNally, Kevin; Jones, Kate; Cocker, John

    2015-01-01

    Global sensitivity analysis (SA) was used during the development phase of a binary chemical physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model used for the analysis of m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans. SA was used to identify those parameters which had the most significant impact on variability of venous blood and exhaled m-xylene and urinary excretion of the major metabolite of m-xylene metabolism, 3-methyl hippuric acid. This analysis informed the selection of parameters for estimation/calibration by fitting to measured biological monitoring (BM) data in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. Data generated in controlled human studies were shown to be useful for investigating the structure and quantitative outputs of PBPK models as well as the biological plausibility and variability of parameters for which measured values were not available. This approach ensured that a priori knowledge in the form of prior distributions was ascribed only to those parameters that were identified as having the greatest impact on variability. This is an efficient approach which helps reduce computational cost. PMID:26175688

  9. Development and validation of an RP-HPLC method for the quantitation of odanacatib in rat and human plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Police, Anitha; Gurav, Sandip; Dhiman, Vinay; Zainuddin, Mohd; Bhamidipati, Ravi Kanth; Rajagopal, Sriram; Mullangi, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    A simple, specific, sensitive and reproducible high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay method has been developed and validated for the estimation of odanacatib in rat and human plasma. The bioanalytical procedure involves extraction of odanacatib and itraconazole (internal standard, IS) from a 200 μL plasma aliquot with simple liquid-liquid extraction process. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Symmetry Shield RP18 using an isocratic mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min. The UV detection wave length was 268 nm. Odanacatib and IS eluted at 5.5 and 8.6 min, respectively with a total run time of 10 min. Method validation was performed as per US Food and Drug Administration guidelines and the results met the acceptance criteria. The calibration curve was linear over a concentration range of 50.9-2037 ng/mL (r(2) = 0.994). The intra- and inter-day precisions were in the range of 2.06-5.11 and 5.84-13.1%, respectively, in rat plasma and 2.38-7.90 and 6.39-10.2%, respectively, in human plasma. The validated HPLC method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study in rats. PMID:25914381

  10. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of a Single Oral Dose of Polymorph Form I versus Form V Capsules of the Antiorthopoxvirus Compound ST-246 in Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chinsangaram, Jarasvech; Honeychurch, Kady M.; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar R.; Bolken, Tove' C.; Jordan, Robert; Jones, Kevin F.; Marbury, Thomas; Lichtenstein, Israel; Pickens, Margaret; Corrado, Michael; Landis, Patrick; Clarke, Jean M.; Frimm, Annie M.

    2012-01-01

    ST-246, a novel compound that inhibits egress of orthopoxvirus from mammalian cells, is being tested as a treatment for pathogenic orthopoxvirus infections in humans. This phase I, double-blind, randomized, crossover, exploratory study was conducted to compare the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a single daily 400-mg oral dose of ST-246 polymorph form I versus polymorph form V administered to fed, healthy human volunteers. Both forms appeared to be well tolerated, with no serious adverse events. The order of administration of the two forms had no effect on the results of the PK analyses. Form I and form V both exhibited comparable plasma concentration versus time profiles, but complete bioequivalence between the two forms was not found. Maximum drug concentration (Cmax) met the bioequivalence criteria, as the 90% confidence interval (CI) was 80.6 to 96.9%. However, the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to time t (AUC0-t) and AUC0-∞ did not meet the bioequivalence criteria (CIs of 67.8 to 91.0% and 73.9 to 104.7%, respectively). The extent of absorption of form I, as defined by AUC0-∞, was 11.7% lower than that of form V. Since ST-246 form I is more thermostable than form V, form I was selected for further development and use in all future studies. PMID:22526314

  11. The application of global sensitivity analysis in the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, George D.; McNally, Kevin; Jones, Kate; Cocker, John

    2015-01-01

    Global sensitivity analysis (SA) was used during the development phase of a binary chemical physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model used for the analysis of m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans. SA was used to identify those parameters which had the most significant impact on variability of venous blood and exhaled m-xylene and urinary excretion of the major metabolite of m-xylene metabolism, 3-methyl hippuric acid. This analysis informed the selection of parameters for estimation/calibration by fitting to measured biological monitoring (BM) data in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. Data generated in controlled human studies were shown to be useful for investigating the structure and quantitative outputs of PBPK models as well as the biological plausibility and variability of parameters for which measured values were not available. This approach ensured that a priori knowledge in the form of prior distributions was ascribed only to those parameters that were identified as having the greatest impact on variability. This is an efficient approach which helps reduce computational cost. PMID:26175688

  12. Development of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of 2-phenoxyethanol and its metabolite phenoxyacetic acid in rats and humans to address toxicokinetic uncertainty in risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Troutman, John A; Rick, David L; Stuard, Sharon B; Fisher, Jeffrey; Bartels, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    2-Phenoxyethanol (PhE) has been shown to induce hepatotoxicity, renal toxicity, and hemolysis at dosages ≥ 400 mg/kg/day in subchronic and chronic studies in multiple species. To reduce uncertainty associated with interspecies extrapolations and to evaluate the margin of exposure (MOE) for use of PhE in cosmetics and baby products, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of PhE and its metabolite 2-phenoxyacetic acid (PhAA) was developed. The PBPK model incorporated key kinetic processes describing the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of PhE and PhAA following oral and dermal exposures. Simulations of repeat dose rat studies facilitated the selection of systemic AUC as the appropriate dose metric for evaluating internal exposures to PhE and PhAA in rats and humans. Use of the PBPK model resulted in refinement of the total default UF for extrapolation of the animal data to humans from 100 to 25. Based on very conservative assumptions for product composition and aggregate product use, model-predicted exposures to PhE and PhAA resulting from adult and infant exposures to cosmetic products are significantly below the internal dose of PhE observed at the NOAEL dose in rats. Calculated MOEs for all exposure scenarios were above the PBPK-refined UF of 25.

  13. Simultaneous determination of apatinib and its four major metabolites in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Juefang; Chen, Xiaoyan; Dai, Xiaojian; Zhong, Dafang

    2012-05-01

    Apatinib, also known as YN968D1, is a novel antiangiogenic agent that selectively inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. Currently, apatinib is undergoing phase II/III clinical trials in China for the treatment of solid tumors. Apatinib is extensively metabolized in humans, and its major metabolites in circulation include cis-3-hydroxy-apatinib (M1-1), trans-3-hydroxy-apatinib (M1-2), apatinib-25-N-oxide (M1-6), and cis-3-hydroxy-apatinib-O-glucuronide (M9-2). To investigate the pharmacokinetics of apatinib and its four major metabolites in patients with advanced colorectal cancer, a sensitive and selective liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of apatinib, M1-1, M1-2, M1-6, and M9-2 in human plasma. After a simple protein precipitation using acetonitrile as the precipitation solvent, all the analytes and the internal standard vatalanib were separated on a Zorbax Eclipse XDB C(18) column (50 mm × 4.6 mm, 1.8 μm, Agilent) using acetonitrile: 5 mmol/L ammonium acetate with 0.1% formic acid as the mobile phase with gradient elution. A chromatographic total run time of 9 min was achieved. Mass spectrometry detection was conducted through electrospray ionization in positive ion multiple reaction monitoring modes. The method was linear over the concentration range of 3.00-2000 ng/mL for each analyte. The lower limit of quantification for each analyte was 3.00 ng/mL. The intra-assay precision for all the analytes was less than 11.3%, the inter-assay precision was less than 13.8%, and the accuracy was between -5.8% and 3.3%. The validated method was successfully applied to a clinical pharmacokinetic study following oral administration of 500 mg apatinib mesylate in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. PMID:22503745

  14. Pregnancy influences the plasma pharmacokinetics but not the cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics of raltegravir: a preclinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Mahat, Mahamad Yunnus A; Thippeswamy, B S; Khan, Farhin R; Edunuri, Ramya; Nidhyanandan, Saranya; Chaudhary, Shilpee

    2014-12-18

    Alterations in antiretroviral pharmacokinetics during pregnancy must be understood for the drugs to be used safely and effectively. Present study is an attempt to understand the potential changes in raltegravir plasma and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics during pregnancy in late pregnant and non-pregnant rats. In vitro plasma protein binding, metabolic stability, intravenous blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and oral pharmacokinetic studies were performed. Raltegravir concentrations in different matrices were measured using LC-MS/MS. Raltegravir plasma protein binding remained similar in both groups, whereas, metabolic stability was significantly lower in pregnant rats than the non-pregnant rats liver microsomes. In oral pharmacokinetic study, peak plasma concentrations and systemic exposures were significantly lower (∼37%) and clearance was significantly higher (∼61%) in late pregnant rats compared to non-pregnant rats. However, unlike plasma pharmacokinetics, CSF pharmacokinetic profile of raltegravir was similar in both pregnant and non-pregnant rats. Following intravenous administration, raltegravir showed higher BBB permeability in pregnant rats compared to non-pregnant rats. But the mean CSF-to-plasma ratio was significantly higher in pregnant rats compared to non-pregnant rats suggesting higher brain penetration in pregnant rats. In conclusion, pregnancy significantly affected the plasma pharmacokinetics, whereas cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetics remained fairly similar in pregnant and non-pregnant rats. Although current plasma pharmacokinetic data is in contradiction to the reported human data, pregnancy-specific pharmacokinetic changes observed in the current study emphasize the need for close therapeutic monitoring while treating the pregnant population and also warrants the need for additional clinical data with larger group of patients.

  15. Comparative Risks of Aldehyde Constituents in Cigarette Smoke Using Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics/Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models of the Rat and Human Respiratory Tracts.

    PubMed

    Corley, Richard A; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P; Carson, James P; Jacob, Richard E; Minard, Kevin R; Teeguarden, Justin G; Timchalk, Charles; Pipavath, Sudhakar; Glenny, Robb; Einstein, Daniel R

    2015-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is well suited for addressing species-specific anatomy and physiology in calculating respiratory tissue exposures to inhaled materials. In this study, we overcame prior CFD model limitations to demonstrate the importance of realistic, transient breathing patterns for predicting site-specific tissue dose. Specifically, extended airway CFD models of the rat and human were coupled with airway region-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) tissue models to describe the kinetics of 3 reactive constituents of cigarette smoke: acrolein, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. Simulations of aldehyde no-observed-adverse-effect levels for nasal toxicity in the rat were conducted until breath-by-breath tissue concentration profiles reached steady state. Human oral breathing simulations were conducted using representative aldehyde yields from cigarette smoke, measured puff ventilation profiles and numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. As with prior steady-state CFD/PBPK simulations, the anterior respiratory nasal epithelial tissues received the greatest initial uptake rates for each aldehyde in the rat. However, integrated time- and tissue depth-dependent area under the curve (AUC) concentrations were typically greater in the anterior dorsal olfactory epithelium using the more realistic transient breathing profiles. For human simulations, oral and laryngeal tissues received the highest local tissue dose with greater penetration to pulmonary tissues than predicted in the rat. Based upon lifetime average daily dose comparisons of tissue hot-spot AUCs (top 2.5% of surface area-normalized AUCs in each region) and numbers of cigarettes smoked/day, the order of concern for human exposures was acrolein > formaldehyde > acetaldehyde even though acetaldehyde yields were 10-fold greater than formaldehyde and acrolein.

  16. Comparative Risks of Aldehyde Constituents in Cigarette Smoke Using Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics/Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models of the Rat and Human Respiratory Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Richard E.; Minard, Kevin R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Timchalk, Charles; Pipavath, Sudhakar; Glenny, Robb; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is well suited for addressing species-specific anatomy and physiology in calculating respiratory tissue exposures to inhaled materials. In this study, we overcame prior CFD model limitations to demonstrate the importance of realistic, transient breathing patterns for predicting site-specific tissue dose. Specifically, extended airway CFD models of the rat and human were coupled with airway region-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) tissue models to describe the kinetics of 3 reactive constituents of cigarette smoke: acrolein, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. Simulations of aldehyde no-observed-adverse-effect levels for nasal toxicity in the rat were conducted until breath-by-breath tissue concentration profiles reached steady state. Human oral breathing simulations were conducted using representative aldehyde yields from cigarette smoke, measured puff ventilation profiles and numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. As with prior steady-state CFD/PBPK simulations, the anterior respiratory nasal epithelial tissues received the greatest initial uptake rates for each aldehyde in the rat. However, integrated time- and tissue depth-dependent area under the curve (AUC) concentrations were typically greater in the anterior dorsal olfactory epithelium using the more realistic transient breathing profiles. For human simulations, oral and laryngeal tissues received the highest local tissue dose with greater penetration to pulmonary tissues than predicted in the rat. Based upon lifetime average daily dose comparisons of tissue hot-spot AUCs (top 2.5% of surface area-normalized AUCs in each region) and numbers of cigarettes smoked/day, the order of concern for human exposures was acrolein > formaldehyde > acetaldehyde even though acetaldehyde yields were 10-fold greater than formaldehyde and acrolein. PMID:25858911

  17. Cannabinoids and post-traumatic stress disorder: clinical and preclinical evidence for treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Mizrachi Zer-Aviv, Tomer; Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2016-10-01

    There is substantial evidence from studies in humans and animal models for a role of the endocannabinoid system in the control of emotional states. Several studies have shown an association between exposure to trauma and substance use. Specifically, it has been shown that there is increased prevalence of cannabis use in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients and vice versa. Clinical studies suggest that PTSD patients may cope with their symptoms by using cannabis. This treatment-seeking strategy may explain the high prevalence of cannabis use among individuals with PTSD. Preliminary studies in humans also suggest that treatment with cannabinoids may decrease PTSD symptoms including sleep quality, frequency of nightmares, and hyperarousal. However, there are no large-scale, randomized, controlled studies investigating this specifically. Studies in animal models have shown that cannabinoids can prevent the effects of stress on emotional function and memory processes, facilitate fear extinction, and have an anti-anxiety-like effect in a variety of tasks. Moreover, cannabinoids administered shortly after exposure to a traumatic event were found to prevent the development of PTSD-like phenotype. In this article, we review the existing literature on the use of cannabinoids for treating and preventing PTSD in humans and animal models. There is a need for large-scale clinical trials examining the potential decrease in PTSD symptomatology with the use of cannabis. In animal models, there is a need for a better understanding of the mechanism of action and efficacy of cannabis. Nevertheless, the end result of the current clinical and preclinical data is that cannabinoid agents may offer therapeutic benefits for PTSD.

  18. Cannabinoids and post-traumatic stress disorder: clinical and preclinical evidence for treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Mizrachi Zer-Aviv, Tomer; Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2016-10-01

    There is substantial evidence from studies in humans and animal models for a role of the endocannabinoid system in the control of emotional states. Several studies have shown an association between exposure to trauma and substance use. Specifically, it has been shown that there is increased prevalence of cannabis use in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients and vice versa. Clinical studies suggest that PTSD patients may cope with their symptoms by using cannabis. This treatment-seeking strategy may explain the high prevalence of cannabis use among individuals with PTSD. Preliminary studies in humans also suggest that treatment with cannabinoids may decrease PTSD symptoms including sleep quality, frequency of nightmares, and hyperarousal. However, there are no large-scale, randomized, controlled studies investigating this specifically. Studies in animal models have shown that cannabinoids can prevent the effects of stress on emotional function and memory processes, facilitate fear extinction, and have an anti-anxiety-like effect in a variety of tasks. Moreover, cannabinoids administered shortly after exposure to a traumatic event were found to prevent the development of PTSD-like phenotype. In this article, we review the existing literature on the use of cannabinoids for treating and preventing PTSD in humans and animal models. There is a need for large-scale clinical trials examining the potential decrease in PTSD symptomatology with the use of cannabis. In animal models, there is a need for a better understanding of the mechanism of action and efficacy of cannabis. Nevertheless, the end result of the current clinical and preclinical data is that cannabinoid agents may offer therapeutic benefits for PTSD. PMID:27551883

  19. In vitro metabolism of canagliflozin in human liver, kidney, intestine microsomes, and recombinant uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) and the effect of genetic variability of UGT enzymes on the pharmacokinetics of canagliflozin in humans.

    PubMed

    Francke, Stephan; Mamidi, Rao N V S; Solanki, Bhavna; Scheers, Ellen; Jadwin, Andrew; Favis, Reyna; Devineni, Damayanthi

    2015-09-01

    O-glucuronidation is the major metabolic elimination pathway for canagliflozin. The objective was to identify enzymes and tissues involved in the formation of 2 major glucuronidated metabolites (M7 and M5) of canagliflozin and subsequently to assess the impact of genetic variations in these uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) on in vivo pharmacokinetics in humans. In vitro incubations with recombinant UGTs revealed involvement of UGT1A9 and UGT2B4 in the formation of M7 and M5, respectively. Although M7 and M5 were formed in liver microsomes, only M7 was formed in kidney microsomes. Participants from 7 phase 1 studies were pooled for pharmacogenomic analyses. A total of 134 participants (mean age, 41 years; men, 63%; white, 84%) were included in the analysis. In UGT1A9*3 carriers, exposure of plasma canagliflozin (Cmax,ss , 11%; AUCτ,ss , 45%) increased relative to the wild type. An increase in exposure of plasma canagliflozin (Cmax,ss , 21%; AUCt,ss , 18%) was observed in participants with UGT2B4*2 genotype compared with UGT2B4*2 noncarriers. Metabolites further delineate the role of both enzymes. The pharmacokinetic findings in participants carrying the UGT1A9*3 and UGT2B4*2 allele implicate that UGT1A9 and UGT2B4 are involved in the metabolism of canagliflozin to M7 and M5, respectively. PMID:25827774

  20. Pharmacokinetic modeling of P-glycoprotein function at the rat and human blood–brain barriers studied with (R)-[11C]verapamil positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study investigated the influence of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor tariquidar on the pharmacokinetics of P-gp substrate radiotracer (R)-[11C]verapamil in plasma and brain of rats and humans by means of positron emission tomography (PET). Methods Data obtained from a preclinical and clinical study, in which paired (R)-[11C]verapamil PET scans were performed before, during, and after tariquidar administration, were analyzed using nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) modeling. Administration of tariquidar was included as a covariate on the influx and efflux parameters (Qin and Qout) in order to investigate if tariquidar increased influx or decreased outflux of radiotracer across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Additionally, the influence of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) was tested on all model parameters, and the brain-to-plasma partition coefficient (VT-NLME) was calculated. Results Our model indicated that tariquidar enhances brain uptake of (R)-[11C]verapamil by decreasing Qout. The reduction in Qout in rats during and immediately after tariquidar administration (sevenfold) was more pronounced than in the second PET scan acquired 2 h after tariquidar administration (fivefold). The effect of tariquidar on Qout in humans was apparent during and immediately after tariquidar administration (twofold reduction in Qout) but was negligible in the second PET scan. SE was found to influence the pharmacological volume of distribution of the central brain compartment Vbr1. Tariquidar treatment lead to an increase in VT-NLME, and pilocarpine-induced SE lead to increased (R)-[11C]verapamil distribution to the peripheral brain compartment. Conclusions Using NLME modeling, we were able to provide mechanistic insight into the effects of tariquidar and SE on (R)-[11C]verapamil transport across the BBB in control and 48 h post SE rats as well as in humans. PMID:23072492

  1. A sensitive and specific liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for determination of pinaverium bromide in human plasma: application to a pharmacokinetic study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jin-Min; Zhao, Xi; Wang, Chuan-Ping; Sun, Qian; Yin, Li-Xin; Zhang, Zhi-Qing

    2011-12-01

    A sensitive and specific method using liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the determination of pinaverium bromide in human plasma was developed and validated. Pinaverium bromide and an internal standard (paclitaxel) were isolated from plasma samples by precipitating plasma, and determined by LC-MS/MS in multiple-reaction monitoring mode. The main metabolite of pinaverium bromide and endogenous substances in plasma did not show any interference. The calibration curve was linear over the plasma concentration range of 10.0-10000.0 pg/mL with a correlation coefficient of 0.9979. The relative standard derivations intra- and inter-day at 30.0, 300.0 and 8000.0 pg/mL in plasma were less than 15%. The absolute recoveries of pinaverium bromide and the internal standard were 99.7-111.7 and 106.2%, respectively. The lower limit of quantitation was 10 pg/mL. The analytical method was successfully applied to study the pharmacokinetics of pinaverium bromide tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers. PMID:21308709

  2. Determination of Pinaverium Bromide in Human Plasma by a Sensitive and Robust UPLC-MS-MS Method and Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study in Mexican Subjects.

    PubMed

    Patiño-Rodríguez, Omar; Zapata-Morales, Juan Ramón; Escobedo-Moratilla, Abraham; Díaz de León-Cabrero, Manuel; Torres-Roque, Irma; Pérez-Urizar, José

    2015-09-01

    A high-throughput ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS) method was developed for the determination of pinaverium bromide in human plasma. Protein precipitation with acetonitrile was used to extract pinaverium and itraconazole (as internal standard) from 500 µL plasma samples. The chromatographic separation was achieved with an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column (1.7 µm, 2.1 × 100 mm) using a mixture of acetonitrile-5 mM ammonium formate (80:20, v/v) as mobile phase. Isocratic elution at 0.3 mL/min was used. Detection was performed by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry on a XEVO TQ-S by multiple reaction monitoring mode. The mass transitions monitorized were as follows: m/z 511.2 → 230 for pinaverium bromide, and m/z 705.29 → 392.18 for the itraconazole. The method was validated over a concentration range of 12-12,000 pg/mL. The chromatographic method runtime is 2.5 min and was applied to characterize the pharmacokinetics of pinaverium bromide after the oral administration of 100 mg to healthy Mexican subjects. PMID:25862744

  3. Sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of cefixime in human plasma: application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fang; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Yalin; Zhong, Dafang

    2005-05-25

    A sensitive and selective liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS-MS) method was developed to determine cefixime ((6R,7R)-7-[(Z)-2-(2-amino-4-thiazolyl)-2-(carboxymethoxyimino)acetamido]-8-oxo-3-vinyl-5-thia-1-azabicyclo-[4,2,0]-oct-2-ene-2-carboxylic acid) in human plasma. After a simple protein precipitation using acetonitrile, the post-treatment samples were analyzed on a C(8) column interfaced with a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer. Positive electrospray ionization was employed as the ionization source. The mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile-water-formic acid (40:60:0.5, v/v/v). The analyte and internal standard cefetamet were both detected by use of selected reaction monitoring mode. The method was linear in the concentration range of 0.05-8.0 microg/ml. The lower limit of quantification was 0.05 microg/ml. The intra- and inter-day relative standard deviation across three validation runs over the entire concentration range was less than 12.7%. The accuracy determined at three concentrations (0.05, 0.80 and 7.2 microg/ml for cefixime) was within +/-2.0% in terms of relative error. Each plasma sample was chromatographed within 3.5 min. The method herein described was successfully applied for the evaluation of pharmacokinetic profiles of cefixime capsule in 24 healthy volunteers.

  4. Development and Validation of Amisulpride in Human Plasma by HPLC Coupled with Tandem Mass Spectrometry and its Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Mogili, Ramakotaiah; Kanala, Kanchanamala; Challa, Balasekhara Reddy; Chandu, Babu Rao; Bannoth, Chandrasekhar Kottapalli

    2011-01-01

    In this study, authors developed a simple, sensitive and specific liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) method for quantification of Amisulpride in human plasma using Amisulpride-d5 as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on Zorbax Bonus-RP C18, 4.6 × 75 mm, 3.5 μm column with an isocratic mobile phase composed of 0.2% formic acid:methanol (35:65 v/v), at a flow-rate of 0.5 mL/min. Amisulpride, Amisulpride-d5 was detected at m/z 370.1→242.1 and 375.1→242.1. The drug and the IS were extracted by a liquid-liquid extraction method. The method was validated over a linear concentration range of 2.0–2500.0 ng/mL for Amisulpride with a correlation coefficient of (r2) ≥ 0.9982. This method demonstrated intra- and inter-day precision within 0.9 to 1.7 and 1.5 to 2.8 % and intra- and inter-day accuracy within 98.3 to 101.5 and 96.0 to 101.0 % for Amisulpride. Amisulpride was found to be stable at 3 freeze–thaw cycles, bench top and auto sampler stability studies. The developed method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study. PMID:21886905

  5. Development and validation of amisulpride in human plasma by HPLC coupled with tandem mass spectrometry and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Mogili, Ramakotaiah; Kanala, Kanchanamala; Challa, Balasekhara Reddy; Chandu, Babu Rao; Bannoth, Chandrasekhar Kottapalli

    2011-09-01

    In this study, authors developed a simple, sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for quantification of Amisulpride in human plasma using Amisulpride-d(5) as an internal standard (IS). Chromatographic separation was performed on Zorbax Bonus-RP C18, 4.6 × 75 mm, 3.5 μm column with an isocratic mobile phase composed of 0.2% formic acid:methanol (35:65 v/v), at a flow-rate of 0.5 mL/min. Amisulpride, Amisulpride-d(5) was detected at m/z 370.1→242.1 and 375.1→242.1. The drug and the IS were extracted by a liquid-liquid extraction method. The method was validated over a linear concentration range of 2.0-2500.0 ng/mL for Amisulpride with a correlation coefficient of (r(2)) ≥ 0.9982. This method demonstrated intra- and inter-day precision within 0.9 to 1.7 and 1.5 to 2.8 % and intra- and inter-day accuracy within 98.3 to 101.5 and 96.0 to 101.0 % for Amisulpride. Amisulpride was found to be stable at 3 freeze-thaw cycles, bench top and auto sampler stability studies. The developed method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study.

  6. Development, validation of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of rosuvastatin and metformin in human plasma and its application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P Pavan; Murthy, T E G K; Basaveswara Rao, M V

    2015-01-01

    A new, simple and accurate liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous determination of rosuvastatin (ROS) and metformin (MET) in human plasma was developed. The assay procedure involved simple protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Following precipitation, fraction of supernatant was decanted and evaporated under gentle stream of nitrogen at 40°C. The residue was reconstituted in mobile phase and injected. The chromatographic separation was achieved with Thermo Hypurity C18 column (50 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μ) using a mobile phase composition containing 0.1% v/v formic acid in water and acetonitrile (30:70, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min. The total run time was 3.5 min. The method showed good linearity in the range 0.5-200 ng/mL for ROS and 2-2000 ng/mL for MET with correlation coefficient (r) >0.9994 for both the analytes. The intra and inter-day precision values for ROS and MET met the acceptance criteria as per regulatory guidelines. The battery of stability studies viz., bench-top, freeze-thaw and long term stability were performed. The developed method was applied to a pharmacokinetic study. PMID:26317076

  7. LC-MS/MS assay for the determination of lurasidone and its active metabolite, ID-14283 in human plasma and its application to a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Katteboina, Mahitej Yadav; Pilli, Nageswara Rao; Mullangi, Ramesh; Seelam, Raghunadha Reddy; Satla, Shobha Rani

    2016-07-01

    The authors proposed a sensitive, selective and rapid liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) assay procedure for the quantification of lurasidone and its active metabolite, i.e. ID-14283 in human plasma simultaneously using corresponding isotope labeled compounds as internal standards as per regulatory guidelines. After liquid-liquid extraction with tert-butyl methyl ether, the analytes were chromatographed on a C18 column using an optimized mobile phase composed of 5 mm ammonium acetate (pH 5.0) and acetonitrile (15:85, v/v) and delivered at a flow rate of 1.00 mL/min. The assay exhibits excellent linearity in the concentration ranges of 0.25-100 and 0.10-14.1 ng/mL for lurasidone and ID-14283, respectively. The precision and accuracy results over five concentration levels in four different batches were well within the acceptance limits. Lurasidone and ID-14283 were found to be stable in battery of stability studies. The method was rapid with the chromatographic run time 2.5 min, which made it possible to analyze 300 samples in a single day. Additionally, this method was successfully used to estimate the in vivo plasma concentrations of lurasidone and ID-14283 obtained from a pharmacokinetic study in south Indian male subjects and the results were authenticated by conducting incurred samples reanalysis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26577488

  8. Determination of Pinaverium Bromide in Human Plasma by a Sensitive and Robust UPLC-MS-MS Method and Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study in Mexican Subjects.

    PubMed

    Patiño-Rodríguez, Omar; Zapata-Morales, Juan Ramón; Escobedo-Moratilla, Abraham; Díaz de León-Cabrero, Manuel; Torres-Roque, Irma; Pérez-Urizar, José

    2015-09-01

    A high-throughput ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS) method was developed for the determination of pinaverium bromide in human plasma. Protein precipitation with acetonitrile was used to extract pinaverium and itraconazole (as internal standard) from 500 µL plasma samples. The chromatographic separation was achieved with an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column (1.7 µm, 2.1 × 100 mm) using a mixture of acetonitrile-5 mM ammonium formate (80:20, v/v) as mobile phase. Isocratic elution at 0.3 mL/min was used. Detection was performed by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry on a XEVO TQ-S by multiple reaction monitoring mode. The mass transitions monitorized were as follows: m/z 511.2 → 230 for pinaverium bromide, and m/z 705.29 → 392.18 for the itraconazole. The method was validated over a concentration range of 12-12,000 pg/mL. The chromatographic method runtime is 2.5 min and was applied to characterize the pharmacokinetics of pinaverium bromide after the oral administration of 100 mg to healthy Mexican subjects.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and metabolic profile of free, conjugated, and total silymarin flavonolignans in human plasma after oral administration of milk thistle extract.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhiming; Dumas, Todd E; Schrieber, Sarah J; Hawke, Roy L; Fried, Michael W; Smith, Philip C

    2008-01-01

    Silymarin, a mixture of polyphenolic flavonoids extracted from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), is composed mainly of silychristin, silydianin, silybin A, silybin B (SB(B)), isosilybin A (ISB(A)), and isosilybin B. In this study, the plasma concentrations of free (unconjugated), conjugated (sulfated and glucuronidated), and total (free and conjugated) silymarin flavonolignans were measured using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, after a single oral dose of 600 mg of standardized milk thistle extracts to three healthy volunteers. Pharmacokinetic analysis indicated that silymarin flavonolignans were rapidly eliminated with short half-lives (1-3 and 3-8 h for free and conjugated, respectively). The AUC(0-->infinity) values of the conjugated silymarin flavonolignans were 4- to 30-fold higher than those of their free fractions, with SB(B) (mean AUC(0-->infinity) = 51 and 597 microg x h/l for free and conjugated, respectively) and ISB(A) (mean AUC(0-->infinity) = 30 and 734 microg x h/l for free and conjugated, respectively) exhibiting higher AUC(0-->infinity) values in comparison with other flavonolignans. Near the plasma peak times (1-3 h), the free, sulfated, and glucuronidated flavonolignans represented approximately 17, 28, and 55% of the total silymarin, respectively. In addition, the individual silymarin flavonolignans exhibited quite different plasma profiles for both the free and conjugated fractions. These data suggest that, after oral administration, silymarin flavonolignans are quickly metabolized to their conjugates, primarily forming glucuronides, and the conjugates are primary components present in human plasma.

  10. Plasma, tumor and tissue pharmacokinetics of Docetaxel delivered via nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes in mice bearing SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Kevin S.; Hasan, Warefta; Rawal, Sumit; Walsh, Mark D.; Enlow, Elizabeth M.; Luft, J. Christopher; Bridges, Arlene S.; Kuijer, Jennifer L.; Napier, Mary E.; Zamboni, William C.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    The particle fabrication technique PRINT® was used to fabricate monodisperse size and shape specific poly(lactide-co-glycolide) particles loaded with the chemotherapeutic Docetaxel. The pharmacokinetics of two cylindrical shaped particles with diameter=80nm; height=320nm (PRINT-Doc-80×320) and d=200nm; h=200nm (PRINT-Doc-200×200) were compared to Docetaxel in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma SKOV-3 flank xenografts. The Docetaxel plasma exposure was ~20-fold higher for both particles compared to docetaxel. Additionally, the volume of distribution (Vd) of Docetaxel in PRINT formulations was ~18-fold (PRINT-Doc-80×320) and ~33-fold (PRINT-Doc-200×200) lower than Docetaxel. The prolonged duration of Docetaxel in plasma when dosed with PRINT formulations subsequently lead to increased tumor exposure of Docetaxel from 0-168 hours (~53% higher for PRINT-Doc-80×320 and ~76% higher for PRINT-Doc-200×200 particles). PRINT-Doc-80×320 had lower exposures in the liver, spleen and lung compared with PRINT-Doc-200×200. Thus, the use of particles with smaller feature size may be preferred to decrease clearance by organs of the mononuclear phagocyte system. PMID:23219874

  11. Comparison of LC-UV and LC-MS methods for simultaneous determination of teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and fampridine in human plasma: application to rat pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Suneetha, A; Raja, Rajeswari K

    2016-09-01

    This study describes a comparison between LC-UV and LC-MS method for the simultaneous analyses of a few disease-modifying agents of multiple sclerosis. Quantitative determination of fampridine (FAM), teriflunomide (TFM) and dimethyl fumarate (DMF) was performed in human plasma with the recovery values in the range of 85-115%. A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV as well as MS detection is used. The method utilizes an XBridge C18 silica column and a gradient elution with mobile phase consisting of ammonium formate and acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.5 mL min(-1) . The method adequately resolves FAM, TFM and DMF within a run time of 15 min. Owing to low molecular weights, the estimation of DMF and FAM is more versatile in UV than MS detection. With LC-UV, the detection limits of FAM, TFM and DMF were 0.1, 0.05, 0.05 μg and the quantification limit for all the analytes was 1 μg. With LC-MS, the detection and quantification limits for all of the analytes were 1 and 5 ng, respectively. The two techniques were completely validated and shown to be reproducible and sensitive. They were applied to a pharmacokinetic study in rats by a single oral dose. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26849839

  12. Simple and sensitive LC-MS/MS-based assay for the quantification of dimemorfan in human plasma for use in a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hongyi; Peng, Jinfu; Pei, Qi; Yang, Liu; Chen, Jun; Guo, Chengxian; Hua, Ye; Yuan, Hong; Yang, Guoping

    2015-05-01

    Dimemorfan phosphate has been widely used for 40 years throughout the world for the treatment of coughs. This is the first report on the use of an LC-MS/MS-based assay for the determination of dimemorfan in human plasma using estazolam as an internal standard after one-step protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Phenomenex Luna C18 column (3 µm, 50 × 2.0 mm) using a fast gradient method, which involves water and methanol as the mobile phase (both containing 0.1% formic acid). Dimemorfan and estazolam were detected with proton adducts at m/z values of 255.8 → 155.1 and 295.0 → 267.0, respectively, in the selected reaction monitoring positive mode. The linear dynamic range of the assay was 0.04-5.00 ng/mL. The chromatographic run time for each plasma sample was <5 min. The method was proven to be accurate, precise, and repeatable. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the determination of dimemorfan in a pharmacokinetic study using healthy Chinese subjects.

  13. Comparative pharmacokinetics of single-dose administration of mammalian and bacterially-derived recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Hovgaard, D; Mortensen, B T; Schifter, S; Nissen, N I

    1993-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of recombinant human non-glycosylated bacterially-synthesized (E. coli) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were studied following single intravenous (i.v.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) bolus injection, and compared to equivalent doses of glycosylated mammalian-derived CHO-GM-CSF. Each route of administration gave a different GM-CSF concentration-time profile. The highest peak serum concentrations (Cmax) were observed following i.v. bolus injection. After i.v. administration, a two-phase decline in concentration was noted for both types of GM-CSF with a significantly shorter t1/2 alpha of 7.8 minutes for the E. coli GM-CSF versus 20.0 min for the CHO-GM-CSF, while no significant difference was observed for the terminal phase. Following s.c. administration of equivalent doses, a higher peak serum concentration was observed in the E. coli-treated patients and, again, a faster elimination where pretreatment serum levels were reached after 16-20 h, versus more than 48 h after administration of CHO-GM-CSF. Although the non-glycosylated E. coli GM-CSF thus seems to undergo a faster elimination that the glycosylated CHO-GM-CSF no significant difference could be demonstrated in the in vivo effect of corresponding doses of the two compounds with respect to stimulation of granulopoiesis--with reservation for small patient numbers and a large individual variations in response.

  14. Simultaneous determination of niacin and its metabolites--nicotinamide, nicotinuric acid and N-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide--in human plasma by LC-MS/MS and its application to a human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Inamadugu, Jaswanth Kumar; Damaramadugu, Rajasekhar; Mullangi, Ramesh; Ponneri, Venkateswarlu

    2010-10-01

    An LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous quantitation of niacin (NA) and its metabolites, i.e. nicotinamide (NAM), nicotinuric acid (NUA) and N-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (2-Pyr), in human plasma (1 mL) was developed and validated using nevirapine as an internal standard (IS). Extraction of the NA and its metabolites along with the IS from human plasma was accomplished using a simple liquid-liquid extraction. The chromatographic separation of NA, NAM, NUA, 2-Pyr and IS was achieved on a Hypersil-BDS column (150 x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) column using a mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid : acetonitrile (20:80 v/v) at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The total run time of analysis was 2 min and elution of NA, NAM, NUA, 2-Pyr and IS occurred at 1.37, 1.46, 1.40, 1.06 and 1.27 min, respectively. A detailed validation of the method was performed as per the FDA guidelines and the standard curves were found to be linear in the range of 100-20000 ng/mL for NA; 10-1600 ng/mL for NUA and NAM and 50-5000 ng/mL for 2-Pyr with mean correlation coefficient of ≥ 0.99 for each analyte. The method was sensitive, specific, precise, accurate and suitable for bioequivalence and pharmacokinetic studies. The developed assay method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study in humans.

  15. Combined cannabinoid therapy via an oromucosal spray.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jordi

    2006-08-01

    Extensive basic science research has identified the potential therapeutic benefits of active compounds extracted from the Cannabis sativa L. plant (the cannabinoids). It is recognized that a significant proportion of patients suffering with the debilitating symptoms of pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis or other conditions smoke cannabis despite the legal implications and stigma associated with this controlled substance. GW Pharmaceuticals have developed Sativex (GW- 1,000-02), a combined cannabinoid medicine that delivers and maintains therapeutic levels of two principal cannabinoids, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), via an oromucosal pump spray, that aims to minimize psychotropic side effects. Sativex has proved to be well tolerated and successfully self-administered and self-titrated in both healthy volunteers and patient cohorts. Clinical assessment of this combined cannabinoid medicine has demonstrated efficacy in patients with intractable pain (chronic neuropathic pain, pain due to brachial plexus nerve injury, allodynic peripheral neuropathic pain and advanced cancer pain), rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (bladder problems, spasticity and central pain), with no significant intoxication-like symptoms, tolerance or withdrawal syndrome. PMID:16969427

  16. Paediatric pharmacokinetics: key considerations

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Hannah Katharine; Marriott, John Francis

    2015-01-01

    A number of anatomical and physiological factors determine the pharmacokinetic profile of a drug. Differences in physiology in paediatric populations compared with adults can influence the concentration of drug within the plasma or tissue. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of anatomical and physiological changes that affect pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs to understand consequences of dose adjustments in infants and children. Pharmacokinetic clinical trials in children are complicated owing to the limitations on blood sample volumes and perception of pain in children resulting from blood sampling. There are alternative sampling techniques that can minimize the invasive nature of such trials. Population based models can also limit the sampling required from each individual by increasing the overall sample size to generate robust pharmacokinetic data. This review details key considerations in the design and development of paediatric pharmacokinetic clinical trials. PMID:25855821

  17. A survey study to characterize use of Spice products (synthetic cannabinoids)

    PubMed Central

    Vandrey, Ryan; Dunn, Kelly E.; Fry, Jeannie A.; Girling, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthetic cannabinoids are a rapidly emerging class of abused drugs. Synthetic cannabinoids are typically sold as “herbal blends” or “incense,” commonly referred to as Spice products. No controlled human experiments have been conducted on the effects of Spice products or the synthetic cannabinoids they often contain. Methods An internet-based survey study was conducted with adults reporting at least one lifetime use of a Spice product. Results Respondents were primarily male, Caucasian and ≥12 yrs of education. Use of other psychoactive drugs was common, though 21% identified Spice products as their preferred drug. Spice products were most frequently obtained from retail vendors and smoked, though other forms of ingestion were endorsed. Mean age of first use was 26 and mean frequency of use in the past year was 67 days (range 0–365). Primary reasons for use were curiosity, positive drug effect, relaxation, and to get high without having a positive drug test. Acute subjective effects were similar to known effects of cannabis, and a subset of users met DSM criteria for abuse and dependence on Spice products. Conclusions Participants exhibited a diverse profile of use patterns as is typical for other drugs of abuse. There was evidence that users continued to seek and use these drugs after being banned by local authorities. This study should be interpreted with caution due to methodological limitations. Controlled laboratory research is needed to further examine the behavioral pharmacology of individual synthetic cannabinoids found in Spice products. PMID:21835562

  18. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor-mediated anti-nociception in models of acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Maulik D; Sagar, Devi R; Elmes, Steven J R; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2007-08-01

    The endocannabinoid system consists of cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors, endogenous ligands and their synthesising/metabolising enzymes. Cannabinoid receptors are present at key sites involved in the relay and modulation of nociceptive information. The analgesic effects of cannabinoids have been well documented. The usefulness of nonselective cannabinoid agonists can, however, be limited by psychoactive side effects associated with activation of CB(1) receptors. Following the recent evidence for CB(2) receptors existing in the nervous system and reports of their up-regulation in chronic pain states and neurodegenerative diseases, much research is now aimed at shedding light on the role of the CB(2) receptor in human disease. Recent studies have demonstrated anti-nociceptive effects of selective CB(2) receptor agonists in animal models of pain in the absence of CNS side effects. This review focuses on the analgesic potential of CB(2) receptor agonists for inflammatory, post-operative and neuropathic pain states and discusses their possible sites and mechanisms of action.

  19. Cannabinoids for Symptom Management and Cancer Therapy: The Evidence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P

    2016-07-01

    Cannabinoids bind not only to classical receptors (CB1 and CB2) but also to certain orphan receptors (GPR55 and GPR119), ion channels (transient receptor potential vanilloid), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Cannabinoids are known to modulate a multitude of monoamine receptors. Structurally, there are 3 groups of cannabinoids. Multiple studies, most of which are of moderate to low quality, demonstrate that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and oromucosal cannabinoid combinations of THC and cannabidiol (CBD) modestly reduce cancer pain. Dronabinol and nabilone are better antiemetics for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) than certain neuroleptics, but are not better than serotonin receptor antagonists in reducing delayed emesis, and cannabinoids have largely been superseded by neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists and olanzapine; both cannabinoids have been recommended for breakthrough nausea and vomiting among other antiemetics. Dronabinol is ineffective in ameliorating cancer anorexia but does improve associated cancer-related dysgeusia. Multiple cancers express cannabinoid receptors directly related to the degree of anaplasia and grade of tumor. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that cannabinoids may have anticancer activity. Paradoxically, cannabinoid receptor antagonists also have antitumor activity. There are few randomized smoked or vaporized cannabis trials in cancer on which to judge the benefits of these forms of cannabinoids on symptoms and the clinical course of cancer. Smoked cannabis has been found to contain Aspergillosis. Immunosuppressed patients should be advised of the risks of using "medical marijuana" in this regard. PMID:27407130

  20. Quantification of trabectedin in human plasma: validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method and its application in a clinical pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Zangarini, Monique; Ceriani, Laura; Sala, Federica; Marangon, Elena; Bagnati, Renzo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Grosso, Federica; Zucchetti, Massimo

    2014-07-01

    A rapid, sensitive and specific HPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the quantification of trabectedin in human plasma after using deuterated trabectedin as Internal Standard (IS). After the addition of ammonium sulphate, the analyte was extracted from human plasma with acidified methanol (0.1 M HCl). Chromatographic separation was done on an Accucore XL C₁₈ column (4 μm; 50 mm × 2.1 mm) using a Mobile Phase (MP) consisting of CH₃COONH₄ 10 mM, pH 6.8 (MP A) and CH₃OH (MP B). The mass spectrometer worked with electrospray ionization in positive ion mode and Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM), using target ions at [M-H₂O+H]⁺ m/z 744.4 for trabectedin and [M-H₂O+H]⁺m/z 747.5 for the IS. The standard curve was linear (R² ≥ 0.9955) over the concentration range 0.025-1.0 ng/ml and had good back-calculated accuracy and precision. The intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy determined on three quality control samples (0.04, 0.08 and 0.80 ng/ml) were <9.9% and between 98.3% and 105.3%, respectively. The extraction recovery was >81% and the lower limit of quantification 0.025 ng/ml. The method was successfully applied to study trabectedin pharmacokinetics in a patient with a liposarcoma who received 1.3 mg/m² as a 24 h continuous i.v. infusion.

  1. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of the antitumor effect of TM208 and EGFR-TKI resistance in human breast cancer xenograft mice

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xi-wei; Ji, Shuang-min; Li, Run-tao; Wu, Ke-hua; Zhu, Xiao; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The novel anticancer compound TM208 is an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI). Since the development of resistance to EGFR-TKIs is a major challenge in their clinical usage, we investigated the profiles of resistance following continuous treatment with TM208 in human breast cancer xenograft mice, and identified the relationship between the tumor pEGFR levels and tumor growth inhibition. Methods: Female BALB/c nude mice were implanted with human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and the xenograft mice received TM208 (50 or 150 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or vehicle for 18 d. The pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of TM208 were evaluated. Results: The PK properties of TM208 were described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption kinetics. Our study showed the inhibitory effects of TM208 on tumor pEGFR levels gradually reached a maximum effect, after which it became weaker over time, which was characterized by a combined tolerance/indirect response PD model with an estimated EC50 (55.9 μg/L), as well as three parameters ('a' of 27.2%, 'b' of 2730%, 'c' of 0.58 h−1) denoting the maximum, extent and rate of resistance, respectively. The relationship between the tumor pEGFR levels and tumor growth inhibition was characterized by a combined logistic tumor growth/transit compartment model with estimated parameters associated with tumor growth characteristics kng (0.282 day−1), drug potency kTM208 (0.0499 cm3/day) and the kinetics of tumor cell death k1 (0.141 day−1), which provided insight into drug mechanisms and behaviors. Conclusion: The proposed PK/PD model provides a better understanding of the pharmacological properties of TM208 in the treatment of breast cancer. Furthermore, simulation based on a tolerance model allows prediction of the occurrence of resistance. PMID:27133303

  2. Phase I Study Evaluating the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of MDX-1303, a Fully Human Monoclonal Antibody against Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen, in Healthy Volunteers▿

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Valerie; Leese, Phillip; Blanset, Diann; Adamcio, Melany; Meldorf, Matthew; Lowy, Israel

    2011-01-01

    MDX-1303 (Valortim) is a fully human monoclonal antibody (hMAb) with a high affinity for Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA). MDX-1303 binds to PA and interferes with the activity of the anthrax toxin; it was selected based on its superior functional activity in the toxin neutralization activity (TNA) assay. MDX-1303 has demonstrated efficacy in the postexposure and therapeutic settings in New Zealand White rabbits, cynomolgus monkeys, and African green monkeys. This phase I study sought to characterize the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity, and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) of MDX-1303 in healthy human subjects. Cohorts of 3 to 10 subjects were administered MDX-1303 as either a single intravenous (i.v.) dose at dose levels of 0.3, 1, 3, 10, and 20 mg/kg of body weight or as a single intramuscular (i.m.) dose at 100 mg. Forty-six subjects were enrolled, and 16 (35%) of these subjects experienced one or more grade 1 adverse events considered to be related to treatment with MDX-1303. There were no grade 2 to 4 adverse events or serious adverse events (SAEs) considered to be related to treatment. The mean half-life of MDX-1303 ranged from 22 to 33 days across the i.v. administration cohorts and was approximately 32 days following i.m. administration. Systemic exposure following 100-mg i.m. administration was within the range of exposure following 1-mg/kg i.v. administration with a relative bioavailability of approximately 65%. MDX-1303 was generally well tolerated, and no anti-MDX-1303 antibodies were detected following a single dose. PMID:21976227

  3. Protective efficacy and pharmacokinetics of human/mouse chimeric anti-Stx1 and anti-Stx2 antibodies in mice.

    PubMed

    Melton-Celsa, Angela R; Carvalho, H M; Thuning-Roberson, Claire; O'Brien, A D

    2015-04-01

    In the United States, Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is the most frequent infectious cause of hemorrhagic colitis. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a serious sequela that may develop after STEC infection that can lead to renal failure and death in up to 10% of cases. STEC can produce one or more types of Stx, Stx1 and/or Stx2, and Stx1 and Stx2 are responsible for HUS-mediated kidney damage. We previously generated two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that neutralize the toxicity of Stx1 or Stx2. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of human/mouse chimeric versions of those monoclonal antibodies, named cαStx1 and cαStx2. Mice given an otherwise lethal dose of Stx1 were protected from death when injected with cαStx1 either 1 h before or 1 h after toxin injection. Additionally, streptomycin-treated mice fed the mouse-lethal STEC strain B2F1 that produces the Stx2 variant Stx2d were protected when given a dose of 0.1 mg of cαStx2/kg of body weight administered up to 72 h post-oral bacterial challenge. Since many STEC strains produce both Stx1 and Stx2 and since either toxin may lead to the HUS, we also assessed the protective efficacy of the combined MAbs. We found that both antibodies were required to protect mice from the presence of both Stx1 and Stx2. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that cαStx1 and cαStx2 had serum half-lives (t1/2) of about 50 and 145 h, respectively. We propose that cαStx1 and cαStx2, both of which have been tested for safety in humans, could be used therapeutically for prevention or treatment early in the development of HUS. PMID:25716230

  4. Development and Validation of an LC-MS-MS Method for Determination of Simvastatin and Simvastatin Acid in Human Plasma: Application to a Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Partani, Pankaj; Verma, Saurabh Manaswita; Monif, Tausif

    2016-09-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of simvastatin (SV) and simvastatin acid (SVA) in human plasma. To improve assay sensitivity and achieve simultaneous analysis, SVA monitored in (-)ESI (electrospray ionization) mode within the first 4.5 min and SV thereafter in (+)ESI mode. The separation of all compounds was achieved in about 6.2 min using a C18 reverse-phase fused-core(®) column (Ascentis(®) Express C18) and a mobile phase, which was composed of 2.00 ± 0.05 mM ammonium acetate buffer titrated to pH 3.8 with glacial acetic acid-acetonitrile (25:75, v/v), in isocratic mode at a flow rate of 0.500 mL/min. Additionally, a solid-phase extraction step was performed to reduce any ion-suppression and/or enhancement effects. The developed method was linear in the concentration range of 0.100-74.626 ng/mL for SV, and 0.100-48.971 ng/mL for SVA, with correlation coefficient greater than 0.99 for both analytes. The method has shown tremendous reproducibility, with intra- and inter-day precision <7.6%, and intra- an