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Sample records for human cannabinoid receptor-1

  1. Failure to extinguish fear and genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Heitland, I; Klumpers, F; Oosting, R S; Evers, D J J; Leon Kenemans, J; Baas, J M P

    2012-01-01

    Failure to extinguish fear can lead to persevering anxiety and has been postulated as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of human anxiety disorders. In animals, it is well documented that the endogenous cannabinoid system has a pivotal role in the successful extinction of fear, most importantly through the cannabinoid receptor 1. However, no human studies have reported a translation of this preclinical evidence yet. Healthy medication-free human subjects (N=150) underwent a fear conditioning and extinction procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex was measured to assess fear-conditioned responding, and subjective fear ratings were collected. Participants were genotyped for two polymorphisms located within the promoter region (rs2180619) and the coding region (rs1049353) of cannabinoid receptor 1. As predicted from the preclinical literature, acquisition and expression of conditioned fear did not differ between genotypes. Crucially, whereas both homozygote (G/G, N=23) and heterozygote (A/G, N=68) G-allele carriers of rs2180619 displayed robust extinction of fear, extinction of fear-potentiated startle was absent in A/A homozygotes (N=51). Additionally, this resistance to extinguish fear left A/A carriers of rs2180619 with significantly higher levels of fear-potentiated startle at the end of the extinction training. No effects of rs1049353 genotype were observed regarding fear acquisition and extinction. These results suggest for the first time involvement of the human endocannabinoid system in fear extinction. Implications are that genetic variability in this system may underlie individual differences in anxiety, rendering cannabinoid receptor 1 a potential target for novel pharmacological treatments of anxiety disorders. PMID:23010766

  2. Genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG theta power in humans.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Kenemans, J L; Böcker, K B E; Baas, J M P

    2014-11-01

    It has long been postulated that exogenous cannabinoids have a profound effect on human cognitive functioning. These cannabinoid effects are thought to depend, at least in parts, on alterations of phase-locking of local field potential neuronal firing. The latter can be measured as activity in the theta frequency band (4-7Hz) by electroencephalogram. Theta oscillations are supposed to serve as a mechanism in neural representations of behaviorally relevant information. However, it remains unknown whether variability in endogenous cannabinoid activity is involved in theta rhythms and therefore, may serve as an individual differences index of human cognitive functioning. To clarify this issue, we recorded resting state EEG activity in 164 healthy human subjects and extracted EEG power across frequency bands (δ, θ, α, and β). To assess variability in the endocannabinoid system, two genetic polymorphisms (rs1049353, rs2180619) within the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) were determined in all participants. As expected, we observed significant effects of rs1049353 on EEG power in the theta band at frontal, central and parietal electrode regions. Crucially, these effects were specific for the theta band, with no effects on activity in the other frequency bands. Rs2180619 showed no significant associations with theta power after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, we provide novel evidence in humans showing that genetic variability in the cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG power in the theta frequency band. This extends prior findings of exogenous cannabinoid effects on theta power to the endogenous cannabinoid system.

  3. Genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG theta power in humans.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Kenemans, J L; Böcker, K B E; Baas, J M P

    2014-11-01

    It has long been postulated that exogenous cannabinoids have a profound effect on human cognitive functioning. These cannabinoid effects are thought to depend, at least in parts, on alterations of phase-locking of local field potential neuronal firing. The latter can be measured as activity in the theta frequency band (4-7Hz) by electroencephalogram. Theta oscillations are supposed to serve as a mechanism in neural representations of behaviorally relevant information. However, it remains unknown whether variability in endogenous cannabinoid activity is involved in theta rhythms and therefore, may serve as an individual differences index of human cognitive functioning. To clarify this issue, we recorded resting state EEG activity in 164 healthy human subjects and extracted EEG power across frequency bands (δ, θ, α, and β). To assess variability in the endocannabinoid system, two genetic polymorphisms (rs1049353, rs2180619) within the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) were determined in all participants. As expected, we observed significant effects of rs1049353 on EEG power in the theta band at frontal, central and parietal electrode regions. Crucially, these effects were specific for the theta band, with no effects on activity in the other frequency bands. Rs2180619 showed no significant associations with theta power after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, we provide novel evidence in humans showing that genetic variability in the cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG power in the theta frequency band. This extends prior findings of exogenous cannabinoid effects on theta power to the endogenous cannabinoid system. PMID:25116250

  4. Involvement of cannabinoid receptor-1 activation in mitochondrial depolarizing effect of lipopolysaccharide in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Barbonetti, A; Vassallo, M R C; Costanzo, M; Battista, N; Maccarrone, M; Francavilla, S; Francavilla, F

    2014-07-01

    Gram-negative bacteria frequently involved in urogenital tract infections release the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS); its receptor, toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), has been recently identified in human spermatozoa, and its direct activation has been suggested in mediating adverse effects of LPS on human spermatozoa. However, the underlying signal transduction remains to be clarified. In other cell types, LPS induces the generation of endocannabinoids, which are involved in mediating endotoxin effects. In human spermatozoa, which exhibit a completely functional endocannabinoid system, the activation of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) inhibited sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). In this study, we tested the hypothesis of a contribution of CB1 activation by sperm-generated endocannabinoids in the adverse effects exerted by LPS on human spermatozoa. The exposure of motile sperm suspensions to E. coli LPS produced a significant decrease in sperm ΔΨm, assessed at flow cytometry with JC-1, similar to that induced by Metanandamide (Met-AEA), a non-hydrolyzable analogue of the endocannabinoid AEA. The LPS-induced inhibition of ΔΨm was prevented by the selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR141716. However, the inhibition of ΔΨm induced by either LPS or Met-AEA did not affect sperm motility. Consistent with this finding, the CB1-mediated inhibition of ΔΨm was neither associated to mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species as evaluated by flow cytometry with MytoSox Red nor to apoptosis pathway activation as evaluated with cytoflorimetric assay for activated caspase-9 and caspase-3. Any oxidative genomic damage was also ruled out with the cytoflorimetric quantification of the oxidized base adduct 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. In conclusion, E. coli LPS inhibited sperm ΔΨm through the activation of CB1, but this effect was not accompanied to the activation of mitochondrial dysfunction-related apoptotic/oxidative mechanisms, which could

  5. Bioactivation pathways of the cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist rimonabant.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Moa Andresen; Isin, Emre M; Castagnoli, Neal; Milne, Claire E

    2011-10-01

    In the present work, the characterization of the biotransformation and bioactivation pathways of the cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist rimonabant (Acomplia) is described. Rimonabant was approved in Europe in 2006 for the treatment of obesity but was withdrawn in 2008 because of a significant drug-related risk of serious psychiatric disorders. The aim of the present work is to characterize the biotransformation and potential bioactivation pathways of rimonabant in vitro in human and rat liver microsomes. The observation of a major iminium ion metabolite led us to perform reactive metabolite trapping, covalent binding to proteins, and time-dependent inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4 studies. The major biotransformation pathways were oxidative dehydrogenation of the piperidinyl ring to an iminium ion, hydroxylation of the 3 position of the piperidinyl ring, and cleavage of the amide linkage. In coincubations with potassium cyanide, three cyanide adducts were detected. A high level of covalent binding of rimonabant in human liver microsomes was observed (920 pmol equivalents/mg protein). In coincubations with potassium cyanide and methoxylamine, the covalent binding was reduced by approximately 40 and 30%, respectively, whereas GSH had no significant effect on covalent binding levels. Rimonabant was also found to inhibit cytochrome P450 3A4 irreversibly in a time-dependent manner. In view of these findings, it is noteworthy that, to date, no toxicity findings related to the formation of reactive metabolites from rimonabant have been reported. PMID:21733882

  6. Distribution of cannabinoid receptor 1 in the CNS of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Lam, C S; Rastegar, S; Strähle, U

    2006-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cb1) mediates the psychoactive effect of marijuana. In mammals, there is abundant evidence advocating the importance of cannabinoid signaling; activation of Cb1 exerts diverse functions, chiefly by its ability to modulate neurotransmission. Thus, much attention has been devoted to understand its role in health and disease and to evaluate its therapeutic potential. Here, we have cloned zebrafish cb1 and investigated its expression in developing and adult zebrafish brain. Sequence analysis showed that there is a high degree of conservation, especially in residues demonstrated to be critical for function in mammals. In situ hybridization revealed that zebrafish cb1 appears first in the preoptic area at 24 hours post-fertilization. Subsequently, transcripts are detected in the dorsal telencephalon, hypothalamus, pretectum and torus longitudinalis. A similar pattern of expression is recapitulated in the adult brain. While cb1 is intensively stained in the medial zone of the dorsal telencephalon, expression elsewhere is weak by comparison. In particular, localization of cb1 in the telencephalic periventricular matrix is suggestive of the involvement of Cb1 in neurogenesis, bearing strong resemblance in terms of expression and function to the proliferative mammalian hippocampal formation. In addition, a gradient-like expression of cb1 is detected in the torus longitudinalis, a teleost specific neural tissue. In relation to dopaminergic neurons in the diencephalic posterior tuberculum (considered to be the teleostean homologue of the mammalian midbrain dopaminergic system), both cb1 and tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing cells occupy non-overlapping domains. However there is evidence that they are co-localized in the caudal zone of the hypothalamus, implying a direct modulation of dopamine release in this particular region. Collectively, our data indicate the propensity of zebrafish cb1 to participate in multiple neurological processes.

  7. Cannabinoid receptor 1 is a major mediator of renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lecru, Lola; Desterke, Christophe; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Vandermeersch, Sophie; Devocelle, Aurore; Vernochet, Amelia; Ivanovski, Ninoslav; Ledent, Catherine; Ferlicot, Sophie; Dalia, Meriem; Saïd, Myriam; Beaudreuil, Séverine; Charpentier, Bernard; Vazquez, Aimé; Giron-Michel, Julien; Azzarone, Bruno; Durrbach, Antoine; François, Hélène

    2015-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease, secondary to renal fibrogenesis, is a burden on public health. There is a need to explore new therapeutic pathways to reduce renal fibrogenesis. To study this, we used unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in mice as an experimental model of renal fibrosis and microarray analysis to compare gene expression in fibrotic and normal kidneys. The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) was among the most upregulated genes in mice, and the main endogenous CB1 ligand (2-arachidonoylglycerol) was significantly increased in the fibrotic kidney. Interestingly, CB1 expression was highly increased in kidney biopsies of patients with IgA nephropathy, diabetes, and acute interstitial nephritis. Both genetic and pharmacological knockout of CB1 induced a profound reduction in renal fibrosis during UUO. While CB2 is also involved in renal fibrogenesis, it did not potentiate the role of CB1. CB1 expression was significantly increased in myofibroblasts, the main effector cells in renal fibrogenesis, upon TGF-β1 stimulation. The decrease in renal fibrosis during CB1 blockade could be explained by a direct action on myofibroblasts. CB1 blockade reduced collagen expression in vitro. Rimonabant, a selective CB1 endocannabinoid receptor antagonist, modulated the macrophage infiltrate responsible for renal fibrosis in UUO through a decrease in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 synthesis. Thus, CB1 has a major role in the activation of myofibroblasts and may be a new target for treating chronic kidney disease.

  8. Cannabinoid receptor 1-expressing neurons in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Winters, Bradley D; Krüger, Juliane M; Huang, Xiaojie; Gallaher, Zachary R; Ishikawa, Masago; Czaja, Krzysztof; Krueger, James M; Huang, Yanhua H; Schlüter, Oliver M; Dong, Yan

    2012-10-01

    Endocannabinoid signaling critically regulates emotional and motivational states via activation of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the brain. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) functions to gate emotional and motivational responses. Although expression of CB1 in the NAc is low, manipulation of CB1 signaling within the NAc triggers robust emotional/motivational alterations related to drug addiction and other psychiatric disorders, and these effects cannot be exclusively attributed to CB1 located at afferents to the NAc. Rather, CB1-expressing neurons in the NAc, although sparse, appear to be critical for emotional and motivational responses. However, the cellular properties of these neurons remain largely unknown. Here, we generated a knock-in mouse line in which CB1-expressing neurons expressed the fluorescent protein td-Tomato (tdT). Using these mice, we demonstrated that tdT-positive neurons within the NAc were exclusively fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs). These FSIs were electrically coupled with each other, and thus may help synchronize populations/ensembles of NAc neurons. CB1-expressing FSIs also form GABAergic synapses on adjacent medium spiny neurons (MSNs), providing feed-forward inhibition of NAc output. Furthermore, the membrane excitability of tdT-positive FSIs in the NAc was up-regulated after withdrawal from cocaine exposure, an effect that might increase FSI-to-MSN inhibition. Taken together with our previous findings that the membrane excitability of NAc MSNs is decreased during cocaine withdrawal, the present findings suggest that the basal functional output of the NAc is inhibited during cocaine withdrawal by multiple mechanisms. As such, CB1-expressing FSIs are targeted by cocaine exposure to influence the overall functional output of the NAc. PMID:23012412

  9. Cannabinoid receptor 1 signaling in cardiovascular regulating nuclei in the brainstem: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Badr M.; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids elicit complex hemodynamic responses in experimental animals that involve both peripheral and central sites. Centrally administered cannabinoids have been shown to predominantly cause pressor response. However, very little is known about the mechanism of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R)-centrally evoked pressor response. In this review, we provided an overview of the contemporary knowledge regarding the cannabinoids centrally elicited cardiovascular responses and the possible underlying signaling mechanisms. The current review focuses on the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) as the primary brainstem nucleus implicated in CB1R-evoked pressor response. PMID:25685481

  10. Synthetic cannabinoids: In silico prediction of the cannabinoid receptor 1 affinity by a quantitative structure-activity relationship model.

    PubMed

    Paulke, Alexander; Proschak, Ewgenij; Sommer, Kai; Achenbach, Janosch; Wunder, Cora; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-03-14

    The number of new synthetic psychoactive compounds increase steadily. Among the group of these psychoactive compounds, the synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) are most popular and serve as a substitute of herbal cannabis. More than 600 of these substances already exist. For some SCBs the in vitro cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) affinity is known, but for the majority it is unknown. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was developed, which allows the determination of the SCBs affinity to CB1 (expressed as binding constant (Ki)) without reference substances. The chemically advance template search descriptor was used for vector representation of the compound structures. The similarity between two molecules was calculated using the Feature-Pair Distribution Similarity. The Ki values were calculated using the Inverse Distance Weighting method. The prediction model was validated using a cross validation procedure. The predicted Ki values of some new SCBs were in a range between 20 (considerably higher affinity to CB1 than THC) to 468 (considerably lower affinity to CB1 than THC). The present QSAR model can serve as a simple, fast and cheap tool to get a first hint of the biological activity of new synthetic cannabinoids or of other new psychoactive compounds.

  11. Functional Genetic Variation of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Cannabis Use Interact on Prefrontal Connectivity and Related Working Memory Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Colizzi, Marco; Fazio, Leonardo; Ferranti, Laura; Porcelli, Annamaria; Masellis, Rita; Marvulli, Daniela; Bonvino, Aurora; Ursini, Gianluca; Blasi, Giuseppe; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid signaling is involved in different brain functions and it is mediated by the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1), which is encoded by the CNR1 gene. Previous evidence suggests an association between cognition and cannabis use. The logical interaction between genetically determined cannabinoid signaling and cannabis use has not been determined. Therefore, we investigated whether CNR1 variation predicts CNR1 prefrontal mRNA expression in postmortem prefrontal human tissue. Then, we studied whether functional variation in CNR1 and cannabis exposure interact in modulating prefrontal function and related behavior during working memory processing. Thus, 208 healthy subjects (113 males) were genotyped for the relevant functional SNP and were evaluated for cannabis use by the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire. All individuals performed the 2-back working memory task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. CNR1 rs1406977 was associated with prefrontal mRNA and individuals carrying a G allele had reduced CNR1 prefrontal mRNA levels compared with AA subjects. Moreover, functional connectivity MRI demonstrated that G carriers who were also cannabis users had greater functional connectivity in the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and reduced working memory behavioral accuracy during the 2-back task compared with the other groups. Overall, our results indicate that the deleterious effects of cannabis use are more evident on a specific genetic background related to its receptor expression. PMID:25139064

  12. Functional genetic variation of the cannabinoid receptor 1 and cannabis use interact on prefrontal connectivity and related working memory behavior.

    PubMed

    Colizzi, Marco; Fazio, Leonardo; Ferranti, Laura; Porcelli, Annamaria; Masellis, Rita; Marvulli, Daniela; Bonvino, Aurora; Ursini, Gianluca; Blasi, Giuseppe; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2015-02-01

    Cannabinoid signaling is involved in different brain functions and it is mediated by the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1), which is encoded by the CNR1 gene. Previous evidence suggests an association between cognition and cannabis use. The logical interaction between genetically determined cannabinoid signaling and cannabis use has not been determined. Therefore, we investigated whether CNR1 variation predicts CNR1 prefrontal mRNA expression in postmortem prefrontal human tissue. Then, we studied whether functional variation in CNR1 and cannabis exposure interact in modulating prefrontal function and related behavior during working memory processing. Thus, 208 healthy subjects (113 males) were genotyped for the relevant functional SNP and were evaluated for cannabis use by the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire. All individuals performed the 2-back working memory task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. CNR1 rs1406977 was associated with prefrontal mRNA and individuals carrying a G allele had reduced CNR1 prefrontal mRNA levels compared with AA subjects. Moreover, functional connectivity MRI demonstrated that G carriers who were also cannabis users had greater functional connectivity in the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and reduced working memory behavioral accuracy during the 2-back task compared with the other groups. Overall, our results indicate that the deleterious effects of cannabis use are more evident on a specific genetic background related to its receptor expression. PMID:25139064

  13. Mutation of putative GRK phosphorylation sites in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) confers resistance to cannabinoid tolerance and hypersensitivity to cannabinoids in mice.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Daniel J; Davis, Brian J; Kearn, Chris S; Marcus, David; Cook, Alex J; Wager-Miller, Jim; Straiker, Alex; Myoga, Michael H; Karduck, Jeffrey; Leishman, Emma; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Czyzyk, Traci A; Bradshaw, Heather B; Selley, Dana E; Mackie, Ken

    2014-04-01

    For many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R), desensitization has been proposed as a principal mechanism driving initial tolerance to agonists. GPCR desensitization typically requires phosphorylation by a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) and interaction of the phosphorylated receptor with an arrestin. In simple model systems, CB1R is desensitized by GRK phosphorylation at two serine residues (S426 and S430). However, the role of these serine residues in tolerance and dependence for cannabinoids in vivo was unclear. Therefore, we generated mice where S426 and S430 were mutated to nonphosphorylatable alanines (S426A/S430A). S426A/S430A mutant mice were more sensitive to acutely administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), have delayed tolerance to Δ(9)-THC, and showed increased dependence for Δ(9)-THC. S426A/S430A mutants also showed increased responses to elevated levels of endogenous cannabinoids. CB1R desensitization in the periaqueductal gray and spinal cord following 7 d of treatment with Δ(9)-THC was absent in S426A/S430A mutants. Δ(9)-THC-induced downregulation of CB1R in the spinal cord was also absent in S426A/S430A mutants. Cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons from S426A/S430A mice showed enhanced endocannabinoid-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and reduced agonist-mediated desensitization of DSE. These results indicate that S426 and S430 play major roles in the acute response to, tolerance to, and dependence on cannabinoids. Additionally, S426A/S430A mice are a novel model for studying pathophysiological processes thought to involve excessive endocannabinoid signaling such as drug addiction and metabolic disease. These mice also validate the approach of mutating GRK phosphorylation sites involved in desensitization as a general means to confer exaggerated signaling to GPCRs in vivo.

  14. Design and Synthesis of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Antagonists for Peripheral Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Fulp, Alan; Bortoff, Katherine; Seltzman, Herbert; Zhang, Yanan; Mathews, James; Snyder, Rodney; Fennell, Tim; Maitra, Rangan

    2012-01-01

    Antagonists of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) have potential for the treatment of several diseases such as obesity, liver disease and diabetes. Recently, development of several CB1 antagonists was halted due to adverse central nervous system (CNS) related side effects observed with rimonabant, the first clinically approved CB1 inverse agonist. However, recent studies indicate that regulation of peripherally expressed CB1 with CNS-sparing compounds is a viable strategy to treat several important disorders. Our efforts aimed at rationally designing peripherally restricted CB1 antagonists have resulted in compounds that have limited blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and CNS exposure in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models. Typically, compounds with high topological polar surface areas (TPSAs) do not cross the BBB passively. Compounds with TPSAs higher than rimonabant (rimonabant TPSA = 50) and excellent functional activity with limited CNS penetration were identified. These compounds will serve as templates for further optimization. PMID:22372835

  15. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene variant moderates neural index of cognitive disruption during nicotine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Evans, D E; Sutton, S K; Jentink, K G; Lin, H-Y; Park, J Y; Drobes, D J

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine withdrawal-related disruption of cognitive control may contribute to the reinforcement of tobacco use. Identification of gene variants that predict this withdrawal phenotype may lead to tailored pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation. Variation on the cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) has been related to nicotine dependence, and CNR1 antagonists may increase attention and memory functioning. We targeted CNR1 variants as moderators of a validated neural marker of nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption. CNR1 polymorphisms comprising the 'TAG' haplotype (rs806379, rs1535255 and rs2023239) were tested independently, as no participants in this sample possessed this haplotype. Nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption was indexed as increased resting electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha-1 power density across 17 electrodes. Seventy-three Caucasian Non-Hispanic smokers (≥15 cigarettes per day) visited the laboratory on two occasions following overnight smoking/nicotine deprivation. Either two nicotine or two placebo cigarettes were smoked prior to collecting EEG data at each session. Analyses showed that rs806379 moderated the effects of nicotine deprivation increasing slow wave EEG (P = 0.004). Smokers homozygous for the major allele exhibited greater nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption. The current findings suggest potential efficacy of cannabinoid receptor antagonism as a pharmacotherapy approach for smoking cessation among individuals who exhibit greater nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption. PMID:27453054

  16. Brain structural and clinical changes after first episode psychosis: Focus on cannabinoid receptor 1 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pinilla, Paula; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Ortiz-García de la Foz, Víctor; Guest, Paul C; Ayesa-Arriola, Rosa; Córdova-Palomera, Aldo; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto

    2015-08-30

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene polymorphisms have been associated with central and peripheral effects of cannabis and schizophrenia pathophysiology. Here, we have tested whether three CNR1 variants (rs1049353, rs1535255 and rs2023239) are associated with changes in brain volumes, body mass index (BMI) or psychopathological scores in a 3-year longitudinal study of 65 first-episode psychosis patients. The rs1049353 at-risk allele was significantly associated with a greater reduction of caudate volume, and the rs2023239 T/C polymorphism showed a significant decrease in thalamic volume after the 3-year period. For those who were not cannabis users, the rs1535255 and rs2023239 polymorphisms had effects in lateral ventricle (LV), and LV and white matter, respectively. The rs2023239 variant also was associated with significant improvements in positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. There was no significant effect of any of the variants on changes in BMI over the 3-year study. Finally, an interaction between all three polymorphisms was found involving evolution of positive symptoms. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid pathway is associated with schizophrenia evolution over time. However, further studies using larger cohorts are needed to confirm these results. If confirmed, the present findings could lead in subsequent investigations for identification of novel drug targets for improved treatment of patients suffering from schizophrenia.

  17. Brain structural and clinical changes after first episode psychosis: Focus on cannabinoid receptor 1 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pinilla, Paula; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Ortiz-García de la Foz, Víctor; Guest, Paul C; Ayesa-Arriola, Rosa; Córdova-Palomera, Aldo; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto

    2015-08-30

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene polymorphisms have been associated with central and peripheral effects of cannabis and schizophrenia pathophysiology. Here, we have tested whether three CNR1 variants (rs1049353, rs1535255 and rs2023239) are associated with changes in brain volumes, body mass index (BMI) or psychopathological scores in a 3-year longitudinal study of 65 first-episode psychosis patients. The rs1049353 at-risk allele was significantly associated with a greater reduction of caudate volume, and the rs2023239 T/C polymorphism showed a significant decrease in thalamic volume after the 3-year period. For those who were not cannabis users, the rs1535255 and rs2023239 polymorphisms had effects in lateral ventricle (LV), and LV and white matter, respectively. The rs2023239 variant also was associated with significant improvements in positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. There was no significant effect of any of the variants on changes in BMI over the 3-year study. Finally, an interaction between all three polymorphisms was found involving evolution of positive symptoms. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid pathway is associated with schizophrenia evolution over time. However, further studies using larger cohorts are needed to confirm these results. If confirmed, the present findings could lead in subsequent investigations for identification of novel drug targets for improved treatment of patients suffering from schizophrenia. PMID:26071625

  18. Steroidogenic Factor 1 Regulates Expression of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 in the Ventromedial Hypothalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Woo; Jo, Young-Hwan; Zhao, Liping; Stallings, Nancy R.; Chua, Streamson C.; Parker, Keith L.

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) plays essential roles in the development and function of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH). Considerable evidence links the VMH and SF-1 with the regulation of energy homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that SF-1 colocalizes in VMH neurons with the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) and that a specific CB1R agonist modulates electrical activity of SF-1 neurons in hypothalamic slice preparations. We further show that SF-1 directly regulates CB1R gene expression via a SF-1-responsive element at −101 in its 5′-flanking region. Finally, we show that knockout mice with selective inactivation of SF-1 in the brain have decreased expression of CB1R in the region of the VMH and exhibit a blunted response to systemically administered CB1R agonists. These studies suggest that SF-1 directly regulates the expression of CB1R, which has been implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis and anxiety-like behavior. PMID:18511494

  19. Human Laboratory Studies on Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Mohamed; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Ranganathan, Mohini

    2016-04-01

    Some of the most compelling evidence supporting an association between cannabinoid agonists and psychosis comes from controlled laboratory studies in humans. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover laboratory studies demonstrate that cannabinoid agonists, including phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids, produce a wide range of positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms and psychophysiologic deficits in healthy human subjects that resemble the phenomenology of schizophrenia. These effects are time locked to drug administration, are dose related, and are transient and rarely necessitate intervention. The magnitude of effects is similar to the effects of ketamine but qualitatively distinct from other psychotomimetic drugs, including ketamine, amphetamine, and salvinorin A. Cannabinoid agonists have also been shown to transiently exacerbate symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia in laboratory studies. Patients with schizophrenia are more vulnerable than healthy control subjects to the acute behavioral and cognitive effects of cannabinoid agonists and experience transient exacerbation of symptoms despite treatment with antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, laboratory studies have failed to demonstrate any "beneficial" effects of cannabinoid agonists in individuals with schizophrenia-challenging the cannabis self-medication hypothesis. Emerging evidence suggests that polymorphisms of several genes related to dopamine metabolism (e.g., COMT, DAT1, and AKT1) may moderate the effects of cannabinoid agonists in laboratory studies. Cannabinoid agonists induce dopamine release, although the magnitude of release does not appear to be commensurate to the magnitude and spectrum of their acute psychotomimetic effects. Interactions between the endocannabinoid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and glutamate systems and their individual and interactive effects on neural oscillations provide a plausible mechanism underlying the psychotomimetic effects of

  20. Regulatory Role of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 in Stress-Induced Excitotoxicity and Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zoppi, Silvia; Pérez Nievas, Beatriz G; Madrigal, José L M; Manzanares, Jorge; Leza, Juan C; García-Bueno, Borja

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to stress elicits excitoxicity and neuroinflammation in the brain, contributing to cell death and damage in stress-related neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. The endocannabinoid system is present in stress-responsive neural circuits and has been proposed as an endogenous neuroprotective system activated in some neuropathological scenarios to restore homeostasis. To elucidate the possible regulatory role of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in stress-induced excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation, both genetic and pharmacological approaches were used alternatively: (1) wild-type (WT) and CB1 knockout mice (CB1-KO) were exposed to immobilization/acoustic stress (2 h/day for 4 days) and (2) to specifically activate CB1, the selective CB1 agonist Arachidonyl-2′-chloroethylamide (ACEA) (2.5 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered daily to some groups of animals. Stress exposure increased CB1 mRNA and protein expression in the prefrontal cortex of WT mice in a mechanism related to N-methyl--aspartate glutamate receptor activation. Daily ACEA pretreatment prevented stress-induced: (1) upregulation of CB1 mRNA and protein, (2) decrease in glutamate uptake and glutamate astroglial transporter excitatory amino acid transporter 2 expression, (3) increase in consecutive proinflammatory molecules, such as cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and MCP-1), nuclear factor kappa B, and enzymatic sources, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS-2) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), (4) increase in lipid peroxidation; although having no effect on plasma corticosterone. Interestingly, a possible related mechanism could be the positive ACEA modulation of the antiinflammatory pathway deoxyprostaglandin/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (15d-PGJ2/PPARγ). Conversely, KO animal experiments indicated that a lack of CB1 produces hypothalamic/pituitary/adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation and exacerbates stress-induced excitotoxic/neuroinflammatory responses. These

  1. Genetic variations in the human cannabinoid receptor gene are associated with happiness.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  2. Cannabinoid receptor 1 suppresses transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-induced inflammatory responses to corneal injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Yang, H.; Wang, Z.; Varadaraj, K.; Kumari, S.S.; Mergler, S.; Okada, Y.; Saika, S.; Kingsley, P.J.; Marnett, L.J.; Reinach, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1)-induced suppression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) activation provides a therapeutic option to reduce inflammation and pain in different animal disease models through mechanisms involving dampening of TRPV1 activation and signaling events. As we found in both mouse corneal epithelium and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) that there is CB1 and TRPV1 expression colocalization based on overlap of coimmunostaining, we determined in mouse corneal wound healing models and in human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) if they interact with one another to reduce TRPV1-induced inflammatory and scarring responses. Corneal epithelial debridement elicited in vivo a more rapid wound healing response in wildtype (WT) than in CB1−/− mice suggesting functional interaction between CB1 and TRPV1. CB1 activation by injury is tenable based on the identification in mouse corneas of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) with tandem LC–MS/MS, a selective endocannabinoid CB1 ligand. Suppression of corneal TRPV1 activation by CB1 is indicated since following alkali burning, CB1 activation with WIN55,212-2 (WIN) reduced immune cell stromal infiltration and scarring. Western blot analysis of coimmunoprecipitates identified protein–protein interaction between CB1 and TRPV1. Other immunocomplexes were also identified containing transforming growth factor kinase 1 (TAK1), TRPV1 and CB1. CB1 siRNA gene silencing prevented suppression by WIN of TRPV1-induced TAK1–JNK1 signaling. WIN reduced TRPV1-induced Ca2+ transients in fura2-loaded HCEC whereas pertussis toxin (PTX) preincubation obviated suppression by WIN of such rises caused by capsaicin (CAP). Whole cell patch clamp analysis of HCEC showed that WIN blocked subsequent CAP-induced increases in nonselective outward currents. Taken together, CB1 activation by injury-induced release of endocannabinoids such as 2-AG downregulates TRPV1 mediated inflammation and corneal opacification

  3. A pivotal role for enhanced brainstem Orexin receptor 1 signaling in the central cannabinoid receptor 1-mediated pressor response in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2015-10-01

    Orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) signaling is implicated in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) modulation of feeding. Further, our studies established the dependence of the central CB1R-mediated pressor response on neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in the RVLM. Here, we tested the novel hypothesis that brainstem orexin-A/OX1R signaling plays a pivotal role in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response. Our multiple labeling immunofluorescence findings revealed co-localization of CB1R, OX1R and the peptide orexin-A within the C1 area of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Activation of central CB1R following intracisternal (i.c.) WIN55,212-2 (15μg/rat) in conscious rats caused significant increases in BP and orexin-A level in RVLM neuronal tissue. Additional studies established a causal role for orexin-A in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response because (i) selective blockade of central CB1R (AM251, 30μg/rat; i.c.) abrogated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM orexin-A level, (ii) the selective OX1R antagonist SB-408124 (10nmol/rat; i.c.) attenuated orexin-A (3nmol/rat; i.c.) or WIN55,212-2 (15μg/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response while selective CB1R blockade (AM251) had no effect on orexin-A (3nmol/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response, (iii) direct CB1R activation in the RVLM (WIN55,212-2; 0.1μg/rat) increased RVLM orexin-A and BP. Finally, SB-408124 attenuated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM nNOS and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and BP. Our findings suggest that orexin-A/OX1R dependent activation of the RVLM nNOS/ERK1/2 cascade is essential neurochemical mechanism for the central CB1R-mediated pressor response in conscious rats.

  4. Acute Overactive Endocannabinoid Signaling Induces Glucose Intolerance, Hepatic Steatosis, and Novel Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, Maxwell A.; Nomura, Daniel K.; Hudak, Carolyn S. S.; Barber, Anne; Casida, John E.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Endocannabinoids regulate energy balance and lipid metabolism by stimulating the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). Genetic deletion and pharmacological antagonism have shown that CB1 signaling is necessary for the development of obesity and related metabolic disturbances. However, the sufficiency of endogenously produced endocannabinoids to cause hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance, independent of food intake, has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that a single administration of isopropyl dodecylfluorophosphonate (IDFP), perhaps the most potent pharmacological inhibitor of endocannabinoid degradation, increases hepatic triglycerides (TG) and induces insulin resistance in mice. These effects involve increased CB1 signaling, as they are mitigated by pre-administration of a CB1 antagonist (AM251) and in CB1 knockout mice. Despite the strong physiological effects of CB1 on hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism, little is known about the downstream targets responsible for these effects. To elucidate transcriptional targets of CB1 signaling, we performed microarrays on hepatic RNA isolated from DMSO (control), IDFP and AM251/IDFP-treated mice. The gene for the secreted glycoprotein lipocalin 2 (lcn2), which has been implicated in obesity and insulin resistance, was among those most responsive to alterations in CB1 signaling. The expression pattern of IDFP mice segregated from DMSO mice in hierarchal cluster analysis and AM251 pre-administration reduced (>50%) the majority (303 of 533) of the IDFP induced alterations. Pathway analysis revealed that IDFP altered expression of genes involved in lipid, fatty acid and steroid metabolism, the acute phase response, and amino acid metabolism in a CB1-dependent manner. PCR confirmed array results of key target genes in multiple independent experiments. Overall, we show that acute IDFP treatment induces hepatic TG accumulation and insulin resistance, at least in part through the CB1 receptor, and identify novel

  5. The endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyldopamine (NADA) exerts neuroprotective effects after excitotoxic neuronal damage via cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)).

    PubMed

    Grabiec, Urszula; Koch, Marco; Kallendrusch, Sonja; Kraft, Robert; Hill, Kerstin; Merkwitz, Claudia; Ghadban, Chalid; Lutz, Beat; Straiker, Alex; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2012-03-01

    Endocannabinoids exert numerous effects in the CNS under physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyldopamine (NADA) may protect neurons in excitotoxically lesioned organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC). OHSC were excitotoxically lesioned by application of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 50 μM) for 4 h and subsequently treated with different NADA concentrations (0.1 pM-50 μM) alone or in combination with cannabinoid receptor antagonists. NADA protected dentate gyrus granule cells and caused a slight reduction in the number of microglial cells. The number of degenerated neurons significantly decreased between 100 pM and 10 μM NADA (p < 0.05). To identify the responsive receptor type of NADA mediated neuroprotection, we applied the cannabinoid (CB) receptor 1 (CB(1)) inverse agonist/antagonist AM251, CB(2) inverse agonist/antagonist AM630, abnormal-cannabidiol (abn-CBD)-sensitive receptor antagonist O-1918, transient receptor potential channel V1 (TRPV1) antagonist 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin and A1 (TRPA1) antagonist HC-030031. Neuroprotective properties of low (1 nM) but not high (10 μM) NADA concentrations were solely blocked by AM251 and were absent in CB(1)(-/-) mice. AM630, O-1918, 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin and HC-030031 showed no effects at all NADA concentrations applied. Our findings demonstrate that NADA protects dentate gyrus granule cells by acting via CB(1). NADA reduced the number of microglial cells at distinct concentrations. TRPV1 and TRPA1 were not involved in NADA mediated neuroprotection. Thus, our data implicate that NADA mediated activation of neuronal CB(1) may serve as a novel pharmacological target to mitigate symptoms of neuronal damage.

  6. Induction of proteinuria by cannabinoid receptors 1 signaling activation in CB1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Shih, Ya-Hsueh; Ho, Cheng; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2015-02-01

    Proteinuria is not only a sign of kidney damage but is also involved in the progression of renal disease as an independent pathologic factor. Although patients with mutated type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1) polymorphism are associated with renal microvascular damage, the biologic role of CB1 signaling in proteinuria remains uncharacterized till now. Herein, we investigate whether CB1 participates in glomerular proteinuria in CB1 transgenic mice and treatment with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 rat, neither of which are diabetic models. The CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher kidney weight and urinary protein concentrations but not blood glucose levels compared with the wild-type group. A combination of laser-capture microsdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunohistochemical validation revealed that CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in renal glomeruli than that of the wild-type group. Geneticorpharmacological activation of CB1 by transgenic CB1 mice or treatment with WIN55212-2 reduced nephrin expression in the renal glomeruli compared with that of the wild-type group in the glomerular mesanglium. Taken together, CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 induced proteinuria with upregulation of CB1 resulting in impaired nephrin expression, by inducing excess VEGF reaction in the renal glomeruli. Genetic and pharmacological manipulation of CB1 signaling revealed VEGF-dependent nephrin depression of glomerulopathy. Controlling CB1 activity can be used an alternative strategy for sustaining renal function in the presence of CB1 activation.

  7. Evaluation of Phytocannabinoids from High Potency Cannabis sativa using In Vitro Bioassays to Determine Structure-Activity Relationships for Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Cannabinoid Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Husni, Afeef S.; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Radwan, Mohamed M.; Ahmed, Safwat A.; Slade, Desmond; Ross, Samir A.; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Cutler, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis has been around for thousands of years and has been used recreationally, medicinally, and for fiber. Over 500 compounds have been isolated from Cannabis sativa with approximately 105 being cannabinoids. Of those 105 compounds, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol has been determined as the primary constituent, which is also responsible for the psychoactivity associated with Cannabis. Cannabinoid receptors belong to the large superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. Targeting the cannabinoid receptors has the potential to treat a variety of conditions such as pain, neurodegeneration, appetite, immune function, anxiety, cancer, and others. Developing in vitro bioassays to determine binding and functional activity of compounds has the ability to lead researchers to develop a safe and effective drug that may target the cannabinoid receptors. Using radioligand binding and functional bioassays, a structure-activity relationship for major and minor cannabinoids was developed. PMID:25419092

  8. Impaired Ethanol-Induced Sensitization and Decreased Cannabinoid Receptor-1 in a Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Matchynski-Franks, Jessica J.; Susick, Laura L.; Schneider, Brandy L.; Perrine, Shane A.; Conti, Alana C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Impaired striatal neuroplasticity may underlie increased alcoholism documented in those with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) is sensitive to the effects of ethanol (EtOH) and traumatic stress, and is a critical regulator of striatal plasticity. To investigate CB1 involvement in the PTSD-alcohol interaction, this study measured the effects of traumatic stress using a model of PTSD, mouse single-prolonged stress (mSPS), on EtOH-induced locomotor sensitization and striatal CB1 levels. Methods Mice were exposed to mSPS, which includes: 2-h restraint, 10-min group forced swim, 15-min exposure to rat bedding odor, and diethyl ether exposure until unconsciousness or control conditions. Seven days following mSPS exposure, the locomotor sensitizing effects of EtOH were assessed. CB1, post-synaptic density-95 (PSD95), and dopamine-2 receptor (D2) protein levels were then quantified in the dorsal striatum using standard immunoblotting techniques. Results Mice exposed to mSPS-EtOH demonstrated impaired EtOH-induced locomotor sensitization compared to Control-EtOH mice, which was accompanied by reduced striatal CB1 levels. EtOH increased striatal PSD95 in control and mSPS-exposed mice. Additionally, mSPS-Saline exposure increased striatal PSD95 and decreased D2 protein expression, with mSPS-EtOH exposure alleviating these changes. Conclusions These data indicate that the mSPS model of PTSD blunts the behavioral sensitizing effects of EtOH, a response that suggests impaired striatal neuroplasticity. Additionally, this study demonstrates that mice exposed to mSPS and repeated EtOH exposure decreases CB1 in the striatum, providing a mechanism of interest for understanding the effects of EtOH following severe, multimodal stress exposure. PMID:27186643

  9. Cannabinoid receptor 1 gene polymorphisms and marijuana misuse interactions on white matter and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Beng-Choon; Wassink, Thomas H; Ziebell, Steven; Andreasen, Nancy C

    2011-05-01

    Marijuana exposure during the critical period of adolescent brain maturation may disrupt neuro-modulatory influences of endocannabinoids and increase schizophrenia susceptibility. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1/CNR1) is the principal brain receptor mediating marijuana effects. No study to-date has systematically investigated the impact of CNR1 on quantitative phenotypic features in schizophrenia and inter-relationships with marijuana misuse. We genotyped 235 schizophrenia patients using 12 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) that account for most of CB1 coding region genetic variability. Patients underwent a high-resolution anatomic brain magnetic resonance scan and cognitive assessment. Almost a quarter of the sample met DSM marijuana abuse (14%) or dependence (8%) criteria. Effects of CNR1 tSNPs and marijuana abuse/dependence on brain volumes and neurocognition were assessed using ANCOVA, including co-morbid alcohol/non-marijuana illicit drug misuse as covariates. Significant main effects of CNR1 tSNPs (rs7766029, rs12720071, and rs9450898) were found in white matter (WM) volumes. Patients with marijuana abuse/dependence had smaller fronto-temporal WM volumes than patients without heavy marijuana use. More interestingly, there were significant rs12720071 genotype-by-marijuana use interaction effects on WM volumes and neurocognitive impairment; suggestive of gene-environment interactions for conferring phenotypic abnormalities in schizophrenia. In this comprehensive evaluation of genetic variants distributed across the CB1 locus, CNR1 genetic polymorphisms were associated with WM brain volume variation among schizophrenia patients. Our findings suggest that heavy cannabis use in the context of specific CNR1 genotypes may contribute to greater WM volume deficits and cognitive impairment, which could in turn increase schizophrenia risk.

  10. Vagal anandamide signaling via cannabinoid receptor 1 contributes to luminal 5-HT modulation of visceral nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chen-Chen; Yan, Xiu-Juan; Chen, Xin; Wang, Er-Man; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Li-Yan; Chen, Jun; Fang, Jing-Yuan; Chen, Sheng-Liang

    2014-08-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) plays pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS), and luminal 5-HT time-dependently modulates visceral nociception. We found that duodenal biopsies from PI-IBS patients exhibited increased 5-HT and decreased anandamide levels and that decreased anandamide was associated with abdominal pain severity, indicating a link between 5-HT and endocannabinoid signaling pathways in PI-IBS. To understand this, we investigated the role of endocannabinoids in 5-HT modulation of visceral nociception in a rat model. Acute intraduodenally applied 5-HT attenuated the visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distention, and this was reversed by the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonist AM251. Duodenal anandamide (but not 2-arachidonoylglycerol) content was greatly increased after luminal 5-HT treatment. This effect was abrogated by the 5-HT 3 receptor (5-HT3R) antagonist granisetron, which was luminally delivered to preferentially target vagal terminals. Chemical denervation of vagal afferents blocked 5-HT-evoked antinociception and anandamide release. Chronic luminal 5-HT exposure for 5 days increased baseline VMR and VMR post-5-HT (days 4 and 5). Duodenal levels of anandamide and N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD, the anandamide-synthesizing enzyme) protein gradually declined from day 1 to 5. The time-dependent effects of 5-HT were abolished by daily granisetron pretreatment. Daily pretreatment with CB1 agonists or anandamide from day 3 attenuated 5-HT-induced hyperalgesia. These data suggest that vagal 5-HT3R-mediated duodenal anandamide release contributes to acute luminal 5-HT-induced antinociception via CB1 signaling, whereas decreased anandamide is associated with hyperalgesia upon chronic 5-HT treatment. Further understanding of peripheral vagal anandamide signaling may provide insights into the mechanisms underlying 5-HT-related IBS.

  11. Effect of the cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist rimonabant on inflammation in mice with diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied whether cannabinoid receptor (CB1) blockade with rimonabant has an anti-inflammatory effect in obese mice, and whether this effect depends on weight loss and/or diet consumption. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice were treated orally with rimonabant (HFD-R) or vehicle (HFD-V) for 4 we...

  12. Vascular targets for cannabinoids: animal and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2014-01-01

    Application of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids to perfused vascular beds or individual isolated arteries results in changes in vascular resistance. In most cases, the result is vasorelaxation, although vasoconstrictor responses are also observed. Cannabinoids also modulate the actions of vasoactive compounds including acetylcholine, methoxamine, angiotensin II and U46619 (thromboxane mimetic). Numerous mechanisms of action have been proposed including receptor activation, potassium channel activation, calcium channel inhibition and the production of vasoactive mediators such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, prostanoids, NO, endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor and hydrogen peroxide. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence for the range of receptors now known to be activated by cannabinoids. Direct activation by cannabinoids of CB1, CBe, TRPV1 (and potentially other TRP channels) and PPARs in the vasculature has been observed. A potential role for CB2, GPR55 and 5-HT1A has also been identified in some studies. Indirectly, activation of prostanoid receptors (TP, IP, EP1 and EP4) and the CGRP receptor is involved in the vascular responses to cannabinoids. The majority of this evidence has been obtained through animal research, but recent work has confirmed some of these targets in human arteries. Vascular responses to cannabinoids are enhanced in hypertension and cirrhosis, but are reduced in obesity and diabetes, both due to changes in the target sites of action. Much further work is required to establish the extent of vascular actions of cannabinoids and the application of this research in physiological and pathophysiological situations. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:24329566

  13. Mice Expressing a "Hyper-Sensitive" Form of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) Are Neither Obese Nor Diabetic

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Mary-Jeanette; Amin, Randa; Henderson-Redmond, Angela N.; Mackie, Ken; Czyzyk, Traci A.; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence implicate the endocannabinoid signaling system in the modulation of metabolic disease. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of CB1 in rodents leads to reduced body weight, resistance to diet-induced obesity, decreased intake of highly palatable food, and increased energy expenditure. Cannabinoid agonists stimulate feeding in rodents and increased levels of endocannabinoids can disrupt lipid metabolism. Therefore, the hypothesis that sustained endocannabinoid signaling can lead to obesity and diabetes was examined in this study using S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing a desensitization-resistant CB1 receptor. These mice display exaggerated and prolonged responses to acute administration of phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and endocannabinoids. As a consequence these mice represent a novel model for determining the effect of enhanced endocannabinoid signaling on metabolic disease. S426A/S430A mutants consumed equivalent amounts of both high fat (45%) and low fat (10%) chow control diet compared to wild-type littermate controls. S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice fed either high or low fat control diet displayed similar fasting blood glucose levels and normal glucose clearance following a 2 g/kg glucose challenge. Furthermore, S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice consumed similar amounts of chow following an overnight fast. While both THC and JZL195 significantly increased food intake two hours after injection, this increase was similar between the S426A/S430A mutant and wildtype control mice Our results indicate that S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing the desensitization-resistant form of CB1 do not exhibit differences in body weight, food intake, glucose homeostasis, or re-feeding following a fast. PMID:27501235

  14. Mice Expressing a "Hyper-Sensitive" Form of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) Are Neither Obese Nor Diabetic.

    PubMed

    Marcus, David J; Zee, Michael L; Davis, Brian J; Haskins, Chris P; Andrews, Mary-Jeanette; Amin, Randa; Henderson-Redmond, Angela N; Mackie, Ken; Czyzyk, Traci A; Morgan, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence implicate the endocannabinoid signaling system in the modulation of metabolic disease. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of CB1 in rodents leads to reduced body weight, resistance to diet-induced obesity, decreased intake of highly palatable food, and increased energy expenditure. Cannabinoid agonists stimulate feeding in rodents and increased levels of endocannabinoids can disrupt lipid metabolism. Therefore, the hypothesis that sustained endocannabinoid signaling can lead to obesity and diabetes was examined in this study using S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing a desensitization-resistant CB1 receptor. These mice display exaggerated and prolonged responses to acute administration of phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and endocannabinoids. As a consequence these mice represent a novel model for determining the effect of enhanced endocannabinoid signaling on metabolic disease. S426A/S430A mutants consumed equivalent amounts of both high fat (45%) and low fat (10%) chow control diet compared to wild-type littermate controls. S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice fed either high or low fat control diet displayed similar fasting blood glucose levels and normal glucose clearance following a 2 g/kg glucose challenge. Furthermore, S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice consumed similar amounts of chow following an overnight fast. While both THC and JZL195 significantly increased food intake two hours after injection, this increase was similar between the S426A/S430A mutant and wildtype control mice Our results indicate that S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing the desensitization-resistant form of CB1 do not exhibit differences in body weight, food intake, glucose homeostasis, or re-feeding following a fast. PMID:27501235

  15. Mechanical and material properties of cortical and trabecular bone from cannabinoid receptor-1-null (Cnr1(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Aysha B; Goodyear, Simon R; Ross, Ruth A; Aspden, Richard M

    2016-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system is known for its regulatory effects on bone metabolism through the cannabinoid receptors, Cnr1 and Cnr2. In this study we analysed the mechanical and material properties of long bones from Cnr1(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6 background. Tibiae and femora from 5- and 12-week-old mice were subjected to three-point bending to measure bending stiffness and yield strength. Elastic modulus, density and mineral content were measured in the diaphysis. Second moment of area (MOA2), inner and outer perimeters of the cortical shaft and trabecular fractional bone volume (BV/TV) were measured using micro-CT. In Cnr1(-/-) males and females at both ages the bending stiffness was reduced due to a smaller MOA2. Bone from Cnr1(-/-) females had a greater modulus than wild-type controls, although no differences were observed in males. BV/TV of 12-week-old Cnr1(-/-) females was greater than controls, although no difference was seen at 5-weeks. On the contrary, Cnr1(-/-) males had the same BV/TV as controls at 12-weeks while they had significantly lower values at 5-weeks. This study shows that deleting Cnr1 decreases the amount of cortical bone in both males and females at 12-weeks, but increases the amount of trabecular bone only in females.

  16. Electroacupuncture Inhibition of Hyperalgesia in Rats with Adjuvant Arthritis: Involvement of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Dopamine Receptor Subtypes in Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yin; Yang, Yang; Xu, Ming-Shu; Zhao, Ying-Qian; Ge, Lin-Bao; Zhang, Bi-Meng

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been regarded as an alternative treatment for inflammatory pain for several decades. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effect of EA have not been thoroughly clarified. Previous studies have shown that cannabinoid CB1 receptors are related to pain relief. Accumulating evidence has shown that the CB1 and dopamine systems sometimes interact and may operate synergistically in rat striatum. To our knowledge, dopamine D1/D2 receptors are involved in EA analgesia. In this study, we found that repeated EA at Zusanli (ST36) and Kunlun (BL60) acupoints resulted in marked improvements in thermal hyperalgesia. Both western blot assays and FQ-PCR analysis results showed that the levels of CB1 expression in the repeated-EA group were much higher than those in any other group (P = 0.001). The CB1-selective antagonist AM251 inhibited the effects of repeated EA by attenuating the increases in CB1 expression. The two kinds of dopamine receptors imparted different actions on the EA-induced CB1 upregulation in AA rat model. These results suggested that the strong activation of the CB1 receptor after repeated EA resulted in the concomitant phenomenon of the upregulation of D1 and D2 levels of gene expression. PMID:23762129

  17. The localization and physiological effects of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the brain stem auditory system of the chick

    PubMed Central

    Stincic, Todd L.; Hyson, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Fast, temporally-precise, and consistent synaptic transmission is required to encode features of acoustic stimuli. Neurons of nucleus magnocellularis (NM) in the auditory brain stem of the chick possess numerous adaptations to optimize the coding of temporal information. One potential problem for the system is the depression of synaptic transmission during a prolonged stimulus. The present studies tested the hypothesis that cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) signaling may limit synaptic depression at the auditory nerve-NM synapse. In situ hybridization was used to confirm that CB1 mRNA is expressed in the cochlear ganglion; immunohistochemistry was used to confirm the presence of CB1 protein in NM. These findings are consistent with the common presynaptic locus of CB1 in the brain. Rate-dependent synaptic depression was then examined in a brain slice preparation before and after administration of WIN 55,212-2 (WIN), a potent CB1 agonist. WIN decreased the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents and also reduced depression across a train of stimuli. The effect was most obvious late in the pulse train and during high rates of stimulation. This CB1-mediated influence could allow for lower, but more consistent activation of NM neurons, which could be of importance for optimizing the coding of prolonged, temporally-locked acoustic stimuli. PMID:21703331

  18. Effect of the cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist rimonabant on inflammation in mice with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qun; Perrard, Xiaoyuan D; Perrard, Jerry L; Mansoori, Amir; Smith, C Wayne; Ballantyne, Christie M; Wu, Huaizhu

    2011-03-01

    We studied whether cannabinoid receptor (CB1) blockade with rimonabant has an anti-inflammatory effect in obese mice, and whether this effect depends on weight loss and/or diet consumption. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice were treated orally with rimonabant (HFD-R) or vehicle (HFD-V) for 4 weeks. Paired-feeding was conducted in two additional groups of obese mice to achieve either the same body weight (HFD-BW) or the same HFD intake (HFD DI) as HFD-R. All these groups of mice were maintained on HFD throughout, with mice on normal diet (ND) throughout as lean controls. Rimonabant treatment of obese mice induced marked diet-intake reduction and weight loss during the first week, which was followed by maintenance of low body weight but not diet-intake reduction. Lower HFD intake was required to reach the same degree of weight loss in HFD-BW. HFD-DI had similar weight loss initially, but then started to gain weight, reaching a higher body weight than HFD-R. Despite the same degree of weight loss, HFD-R had less fat mass and lower adipogenic gene expression than HFD-BW. Compared to HFD-V or HFD-DI, HFD-R had reduced inflammation in adipose tissue (AT) and/or liver indicated primarily by lower monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels. However, MCP-1 levels were not significantly different between HFD-R and HFD-BW. In vitro incubation of rimonabant with AT explants did not change MCP-1 levels. Thus, rimonabant induced weight loss in obese mice by diet-intake-dependent and -independent fashions. Rimonabant decreased inflammation in obese mice, possibly through a primary effect on weight reduction.

  19. Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Mediates Homing of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Triggered by Chronic Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Yang, Le; Tian, Lei; Mai, Ping; Jia, Shuangshuang; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2017-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors (CBs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of various liver diseases, including liver fibrosis. Our previous studies have demonstrated that after liver injury, mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) can migrate to the injured liver and differentiate to myofibroblasts, contributing to hepatic fibrogenesis. However, the role of CBs in the homing of BMSCs in liver injury is yet unclear. In this study, we found that both CB1 and CB2 were expressed in BMSCs. Migration assays were performed by transwell chambers. CB1 agonist ACEA promoted the migration of BMSCs, but CB2 agonist JWH133 had no effect. Pharmacological or genetic ablation of CB1 reduced ACEA-induced migration, whereas CB2 did not. Moreover, activation of CB1 increased active GTP-bound Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42 protein levels. The elevated GTP-bound Rac1 and RhoA protein levels were decreased by CB1 antagonist AM281 treatment, but not Cdc42. In addition, ACEA-induced migration was suppressed by NSC23766 (Rac1 inhibitor) or C3 transferase (RhoA inhibitor), whereas MLS-573151 (Cdc42 inhibitor) had no effect. Consistent with these data, Rac1 or RhoA knock-down significantly blocked CB1-mediated migration. Meanwhile, CB1-mediated migration was associated with cytoskeletal remodeling. In vivo, administration of CB1 antagonist AM281 markedly inhibited the recruitment of BMSCs to the injured liver using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Furthermore, blockade of CB1 significantly attenuated liver fibrosis. In conclusion, our results suggest that CB1 plays a crucial role in liver fibrosis through mediating the homing of BMSCs to damaged liver, which may provide new insight into the pathogenesis and treatment of liver fibrosis. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 110-121, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Effects of cannabinoid receptor 1 (brain) on lipid accumulation by transcriptional control of CPT1A and CPT1B.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-F; Yuan, Z-Q; Song, D-G; Zhou, X-H; Wang, Y-Z

    2014-02-01

    CB1 (also known as CNR1), a main receptor for cannabinoids acting at PPARs, can enhance fat deposition. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT1), an enzyme responsible for the transport of long-chain fatty acids for β-oxidation, is closely related to fat deposition. Whether CB1 can regulate intramuscular adipocytes lipid accumulation through regulation of CPT1 is unclear. Based on the investigation of tissue- and breed-specific CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA expression levels in Jinhua and Landrace pigs, we studied the effects of CB1 on lipid accumulation and CPT1B expression by treating porcine intramuscular adipocytes with CB1 antagonist Δ9-THC and antagonist SR141716. Results showed that muscle CPT1 mRNA was expressed at higher levels in the longissimus dorsi and subcutaneous fat. Liver CPT1A mRNA expression levels were higher in the pancreas, duodenum and liver. Compared with Landrace pigs, CPT1A and CPT1B in the longissimus dorsi of Jinhua pigs were significantly higher and positively correlated with intramuscular fat content. However, for subcutaneous fat, CPT1 levels were significantly lower and negatively correlated with body fat percentage. Δ9-THC significantly increased CB1 mRNA levels and lipid accumulation but decreased CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA levels. Conversely, SR141716 reduced CB1 mRNA levels but increased CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA levels, resulting in decreased lipid accumulation. The CPT1 antagonist etomoxir did not affect CB1 expression, suggesting that CB1 is likely upstream of CPT1A and CPT1B. Meanwhile, PPARA expression was greatly decreased when CPT1A and CPT1B were inhibited and enhanced when CPT1A and CPT1B were activated. Taken together, these data indicate that CB1 can affect intramuscular fat deposition by regulating both CPT1A and CPT1B mRNA expression, with the PPARA signal pathway likely playing a major role in this process. PMID:23914904

  1. Associations between Cannabinoid Receptor-1 (CNR1) Variation and Hippocampus and Amygdala Volumes in Heavy Cannabis Users

    PubMed Central

    Schacht, Joseph P; Hutchison, Kent E; Filbey, Francesca M

    2012-01-01

    Heavy cannabis users display smaller amygdalae and hippocampi than controls, and genetic variation accounts for a large proportion of variance in liability to cannabis dependence (CD). A single nucleotide polymorphism in the cannabis receptor-1 gene (CNR1), rs2023239, has been associated with CD diagnosis and intermediate phenotypes, including abstinence-induced withdrawal, cue-elicited craving, and parahippocampal activation to cannabis cues. This study compared hippocampal and amygdalar volumes (potential CD intermediate phenotypes) between heavy cannabis users and healthy controls, and analyzed interactions between group, rs2023239 variation, and the volumes of these structures. Ninety-four heavy cannabis users participated, of whom 37 (14 men, 23 women; mean age=27.8) were matched to 37 healthy controls (14 men, 23 women; mean age=27.3) for case-control analyses. Controlling for total intracranial volume and other confounding variables, matched cannabis users had smaller bilateral hippocampi (left, p=0.002; right, p=0.001) and left amygdalae (p=0.01) than controls. When genotype was considered in the case-control analyses, there was a group by genotype interaction, such that the rs2023239 G allele predicted lower volume of bilateral hippocampi among cannabis users relative to controls (both p<0.001). This interaction persisted when all 94 cannabis users were compared to controls. There were no group by genotype interactions on amygdalar volume. These data replicate previous findings of reduced hippocampal and amygdalar volume among heavy cannabis users, and suggest that CNR1 rs2023239 variation may predispose smaller hippocampal volume after heavy cannabis use. This association should be tested in future studies of brain volume differences in CD. PMID:22669173

  2. Cannabinoid receptor 1 but not 2 mediates macrophage phagocytosis by G(α)i/o /RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mai, Ping; Tian, Lei; Yang, Le; Wang, Lin; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2015-07-01

    Phagocytosis is critical to macrophages linking innate and adaptive immune reaction. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) mediate immune modulation. However, the role of cannabinoid receptors in macrophage phagocytosis is undefined. In this study, we found that two murine macrophage lines (J774A.1 and RAW264.7) and peripheral blood macrophages all expressed CB1 and CB2 by immunofluorescence-staining, real time RT-PCR and Western blot. Macrophage phagocytic activity was determined by quantifying fluorescent intensity of the engulfed BioParticles or fluorescence-activated cell sorting. mAEA (CB1 agonist) enhanced phagocytosis of macrophages, but JWH133 (CB2 agonist) had no influence. Pharmacological or genetic ablation of CB1 inhibited mAEA-enhanced phagocytosis, while CB2 had no such effects. Meanwhile, activation of CB1 increased GTP-bounding active form of small GTPase RhoA, but not Rac1 or Cdc42. AM281 (CB1 antagonist) and pertussis toxin (PTX, G((α)i/o) protein inhibitor) decreased GTP-bound RhoA protein level with mAEA. In addition, PTX, C3 Transferase (RhoA inhibitor) or Y27632 (Rho-associated kinase ROCK inhibitor) attenuated CB1-mediated phagocytosis. These results confirm that activation of CB1 regulates macrophage phagocytosis through G((α)i/o)/RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. Moreover, activation of CB1 induced significant up-regulation of CB1 expression by real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, but not CB2. It indicated the existence of a positive feedback between CB1 activation and CB1 expression. The up-regulation of CB1 was RhoA-independent but it may contribute to maintaining high phagocytic activity of macrophages for a longer time. In conclusion, CB1 mediates macrophage phagocytosis by G((α)i/o)/RhoA/ROCK signal axis. These data further underline the role of CB1 in macrophage phagocytic process.

  3. The effects of cannabinoid administration on sleep: a systematic review of human studies.

    PubMed

    Gates, Peter J; Albertella, Lucy; Copeland, Jan

    2014-12-01

    This paper reviews the literature regarding the effects of cannabinoid administration on sleep in humans. A literature search using a set of cannabinoid and sleep-related terms was conducted across eight electronic databases. Human studies that involved the administration of cannabinoids and at least one quantitative sleep-related measure were included. Review papers, opinion pieces, letters or editorials, case studies (final N < 7), published abstracts, posters, and non-English papers were excluded. Thirty-nine publications were included in the review. Findings were mixed and showed various effects of cannabinoid administration on several aspects of sleep. Methodological issues in the majority of studies to date, however, preclude any definitive conclusion.

  4. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  5. Cannabinoid facilitation of fear extinction memory recall in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Sripada, Chandra S.; Abelson, James L.; Liberzon, Israel; Milad, Mohammed R.; Phan, K. Luan

    2012-01-01

    A first-line approach to treat anxiety disorders is exposure-based therapy, which relies on extinction processes such as repeatedly exposing the patient to stimuli (conditioned stimuli; CS) associated with the traumatic, fear-related memory. However, a significant number of patients fail to maintain their gains, partly attributed to the fact that this inhibitory learning and its maintenance is temporary and conditioned fear responses can return. Animal studies have shown that activation of the cannabinoid system during extinction learning enhances fear extinction and its retention. Specifically, CB1 receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC), can facilitate extinction recall by preventing recovery of extinguished fear in rats. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in humans. We conducted a study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design, coupling a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and simultaneous skin conductance response (SCR) recording with an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) or placebo (PBO) 2 hours prior to extinction learning in 29 healthy adult volunteers (THC = 14; PBO = 15) and tested extinction retention 24 hours after extinction learning. Compared to subjects that received PBO, subjects that received THC showed low SCR to a previously extinguished CS when extinction memory recall was tested 24 hours after extinction learning, suggesting that THC prevented the recovery of fear. These results provide the first evidence that pharmacological enhancement of extinction learning is feasible in humans using cannabinoid system modulators, which may thus warrant further development and clinical testing. PMID:22796109

  6. Characterization of two cloned human CB1 cannabinoid receptor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi-Carmona, M; Calandra, B; Shire, D; Bouaboula, M; Oustric, D; Barth, F; Casellas, P; Ferrara, P; Le Fur, G

    1996-08-01

    We have investigated the pharmacology of two central human cannabinoid receptor isoforms, designated CB1 and CB1A, stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, designated as CHO-CB1 and CHO-CB1A, respectively. In direct binding assays on isolated membranes the agonist [3H]CP 55,940 bound in a saturable and highly specific manner to both cannabinoid receptor isoforms. Competition binding experiments performed with other commonly used receptor agonists showed the following rank order of potency: CP 55,940 > tetrahydrocannabinol > WIN 55212-2 > anandamide. Except for the endogenous ligand anandamide (CB1, Ki = 359.6 nM vs. CB1A, Ki = 298 nM), these agonists bound to CB1A (CP 55,940, WIN 55212-2 and delta 9-THC, Ki = 7.24,345 and 26.7 nM, respectively) with about 3-fold less affinity than to CB1 (CP 55,940, WIN 55212-2 and delta 9-THC, Ki = 2.26, 93 and 7.1 nM, respectively). The cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716A also bound to CB1A (Ki = 43.3 nM) with slightly less affinity than to CB1 (Ki = 4.9 nM). Cannabinoid receptor-linked second messenger system studies performed in the CHO-CB1 and CHO-CB1A cells showed that both receptors mediated their action through the agonist-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. This activity was totally blocked by pretreatment with PTX. Additionally, both isoforms activated mitogen-activated protein kinase. The selective antagonist SR 141716A was able to selectively block these responses in both cell lines, to an extent that reflected its binding characteristics. Our results show that the amino-truncated and -modified CB1 isoform CB1A exhibits all the properties of CB1 to a slightly attenuated extent.

  7. Enhancement of Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla Neuronal Nitric-Oxide Synthase–Nitric-Oxide Signaling Mediates the Central Cannabinoid Receptor 1-Evoked Pressor Response in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Our recent studies implicated brainstem GABAergic signaling in the central cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R)-mediated pressor response in conscious rats. Given the well established link between neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling and GABAergic transmission in brainstem cardiovascular regulating areas, we elucidated the role of nNOS-generated NO in the central CB1R-elicited pressor response. Compared with vehicle, intracisternal (i.c.) microinjection of the CB1R agonist (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl) methanone mesylate (WIN55212-2) (15 μg/rat) significantly enhanced nNOS phosphorylation as well as the total nitrate and nitrite content in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) at 5, 10, and 30 min, which paralleled the elicited pressor response. These findings were corroborated by: 1) the parallel dose-related increases in blood pressure and RVLM-NO levels, measured in real time by in vivo electrochemistry, elicited by intra-RVLM WIN55212-2 (100, 200, or 300 pmol /80 nl; n = 5) in conscious rats; and 2) the significantly higher phosphorylated nNOS (p-nNOS) levels in the WIN55212-2-injected RVLM compared with the contralateral RVLM. Subsequent neurochemical studies showed that WIN55212-2 (15 μg/rat i.c.) significantly increased the number and percentage of neurons immunostained for nNOS (nitroxidergic neurons) and c-Fos (marker of neuronal activity) within the RVLM. The increases in blood pressure and the neurochemical responses elicited by intracisternal WIN55212-2 were attenuated by prior central CB1R blockade by N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 30 μg/rat i.c.) or selective nNOS inhibition by Nω-propyl-L-arginine (1 μg/rat i.c.). These findings implicate RVLM p-nNOS/NO signaling as a molecular mechanism in the central CB1R-evoked pressor effect in conscious rats. PMID:22366659

  8. Expression of Angiotensin II Receptor-1 in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yuki; Matsuo, Kosuke; Murata, Minako; Yudoh, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Inaba, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Kato, Tomohiro; Masuko, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Besides its involvement in the cardiovascular system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAS) system has also been suggested to play an important role in inflammation. To explore the role of this system in cartilage damage in arthritis, we investigated the expression of angiotensin II receptors in chondrocytes. Methods. Articular cartilage was obtained from patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic fractures who were undergoing arthroplasty. Chondrocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro with or without interleukin (IL-1). The expression of angiotensin II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R) mRNA by the chondrocytes was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AT1R expression in cartilage tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The effect of IL-1 on AT1R/AT2R expression in the chondrocytes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry. Results. Chondrocytes from all patient types expressed AT1R/AT2R mRNA, though considerable variation was found between samples. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed AT1R expression at the protein level. Stimulation with IL-1 enhanced the expression of AT1R/AT2R mRNA in OA and RA chondrocytes. Conclusions. Human articular chondrocytes, at least partially, express angiotensin II receptors, and IL-1 stimulation induced AT1R/AT2R mRNA expression significantly. PMID:23346400

  9. Cannabinoid facilitation of fear extinction memory recall in humans.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Sripada, Chandra S; Abelson, James L; Liberzon, Israel; Milad, Mohammed R; Phan, K Luan

    2013-01-01

    A first-line approach to treat anxiety disorders is exposure-based therapy, which relies on extinction processes such as repeatedly exposing the patient to stimuli (conditioned stimuli; CS) associated with the traumatic, fear-related memory. However, a significant number of patients fail to maintain their gains, partly attributed to the fact that this inhibitory learning and its maintenance is temporary and conditioned fear responses can return. Animal studies have shown that activation of the cannabinoid system during extinction learning enhances fear extinction and its retention. Specifically, CB1 receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC), can facilitate extinction recall by preventing recovery of extinguished fear in rats. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in humans. We conducted a study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design, coupling a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and simultaneous skin conductance response (SCR) recording with an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) or placebo (PBO) 2 h prior to extinction learning in 29 healthy adult volunteers (THC = 14; PBO = 15) and tested extinction retention 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects that received PBO, subjects that received THC showed low SCR to a previously extinguished CS when extinction memory recall was tested 24 h after extinction learning, suggesting that THC prevented the recovery of fear. These results provide the first evidence that pharmacological enhancement of extinction learning is feasible in humans using cannabinoid system modulators, which may thus warrant further development and clinical testing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'. PMID:22796109

  10. Synthetic Cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Mills, Brooke; Yepes, Andres; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs), also known under the brand names of "Spice," "K2," "herbal incense," "Cloud 9," "Mojo" and many others, are becoming a large public health concern due not only to their increasing use but also to their unpredictable toxicity and abuse potential. There are many types of SCBs, each having a unique binding affinity for cannabinoid receptors. Although both Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and SCBs stimulate the same receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), studies have shown that SCBs are associated with higher rates of toxicity and hospital admissions than is natural cannabis. This is likely due to SCBs being direct agonists of the cannabinoid receptors, whereas THC is a partial agonist. Furthermore, the different chemical structures of SCBs found in Spice or K2 may interact in unpredictable ways to elicit previously unknown, and the commercial products may have unknown contaminants. The largest group of users is men in their 20s who participate in polydrug use. The most common reported toxicities with SCB use based on studies using Texas Poison Control records are tachycardia, agitation and irritability, drowsiness, hallucinations, delusions, hypertension, nausea, confusion, dizziness, vertigo and chest pain. Acute kidney injury has also been strongly associated with SCB use. Treatment mostly involves symptom management and supportive care. More research is needed to identify which contaminants are typically found in synthetic marijuana and to understand the interactions between different SBCs to better predict adverse health outcomes.

  11. WIN55, 212-2 promotes differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and improve remyelination through regulation of the phosphorylation level of the ERK 1/2 via cannabinoid receptor 1 after stroke-induced demyelination.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Fang, Yinquan; Chen, Tao; Guo, Jingjing; Yan, Jun; Song, Shu; Zhang, Luyong; Liao, Hong

    2013-01-23

    In stroke, a common cause of neurological disability in adults is that the myelin sheaths are lost through the injury or death of mature oligodendrocytes, and the failure of remyelination may be often due to insufficient proliferation and differentiation of oligodendroglial progenitors. In the current study, we used middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) to induced transient focal cerebral ischemia, and found that WIN55, 212-2 augmented actively proliferating oligodendrocytes measured by CC1 immunoreactive cells within the peri-infarct areas. To establish whether these effects were associated with changes in myelin formation, we analyzed the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and myelin ultrastructure. We found that WIN55, 212-2 showed more extensive remyelination than vehicle at 14 days post injection (dpi). The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) signaling pathway may be involved in OPCs differentiation. To determine the regulatory effect of WIN55, 212-2 post-treatment on phospho-ERK 1/2 (p-ERK 1/2) after ischemia/reperfusion, Western blot analysis was performed. We found that WIN55, 212-2 regulated the phosphorylation level of the ERK 1/2 to promote OPCs survival and differentiation. Notably, cannabinoid receptor 1 is coupled to the activation of the ERK cascade. Following rimonabant combined treatment, the effect of WIN55, 212-2 on regulating the phosphorylation level of the ERK 1/2 was reversed, and the effect of accelerated myelin formation was partially inhibited. Together, we first found that WIN55, 212-2 promoted OPCs differentiation and remyelination through regulation of the level of the p-ERK 1/2 via cannabinoid receptor 1.

  12. Variation in the human cannabinoid receptor CNR1 gene modulates gaze duration for happy faces

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background From an early age, humans look longer at preferred stimuli and also typically look longer at facial expressions of emotion, particularly happy faces. Atypical gaze patterns towards social stimuli are common in autism spectrum conditions (ASC). However, it is unknown whether gaze fixation patterns have any genetic basis. In this study, we tested whether variations in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene are associated with gaze duration towards happy faces. This gene was selected because CNR1 is a key component of the endocannabinoid system, which is involved in processing reward, and in our previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we found that variations in CNR1 modulate the striatal response to happy (but not disgust) faces. The striatum is involved in guiding gaze to rewarding aspects of a visual scene. We aimed to validate and extend this result in another sample using a different technique (gaze tracking). Methods A total of 30 volunteers (13 males and 17 females) from the general population observed dynamic emotional expressions on a screen while their eye movements were recorded. They were genotyped for the identical four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CNR1 gene tested in our earlier fMRI study. Results Two SNPs (rs806377 and rs806380) were associated with differential gaze duration for happy (but not disgust) faces. Importantly, the allelic groups associated with a greater striatal response to happy faces in the fMRI study were associated with longer gaze duration at happy faces. Conclusions These results suggest that CNR1 variations modulate the striatal function that underlies the perception of signals of social reward, such as happy faces. This suggests that CNR1 is a key element in the molecular architecture of perception of certain basic emotions. This may have implications for understanding neurodevelopmental conditions marked by atypical eye contact and facial emotion processing, such as ASC. PMID

  13. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB2Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB2Rs (hCB2Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB2Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB2Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB2Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB2R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB2Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB2Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB1 and CB2Rs. PMID:23537664

  14. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K; Franks, Lirit N; Moran, Jeffery H; Prather, Paul L

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB2Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB2Rs (hCB2Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB2Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB2Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB2Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB2R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB2Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB2Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB1 and CB2Rs.

  15. Cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist treatment induces glucagon release and shows an additive therapeutic effect with GLP-1 agonist in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kartikkumar Navinchandra; Joharapurkar, Amit Arvind; Patel, Vishal; Kshirsagar, Samadhan Govind; Bahekar, Rajesh; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Jain, Mukul R

    2014-12-01

    Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists reduce body weight and improve insulin sensitivity. Preclinical data indicates that an acute dose of CB1 antagonist rimonabant causes an increase in blood glucose. A stable analog of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), exendin-4 improves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreas, and reduces appetite through activation of GLP-1 receptors in the central nervous system and liver. We hypothesized that the insulin secretagogue effect of GLP-1 agonist exendin-4 may synergize with the insulin-sensitizing action of rimonabant. Intraperitoneal as well as intracerebroventricular administration of rimonabant increased serum glucose upon glucose challenge in overnight fasted, diet-induced obese C57 mice, with concomitant rise in serum glucagon levels. Exendin-4 reversed the acute hyperglycemia induced by rimonabant. The combination of exendin-4 and rimonabant showed an additive effect in the food intake, and sustained body weight reduction upon repeated dosing. The acute efficacy of both the compounds was additive for inducing nausea-like symptoms in conditioned aversion test in mice, whereas exendin-4 treatment antagonized the effect of rimonabant on forced swim test upon chronic dosing. Thus, the addition of exendin-4 to rimonabant produces greater reduction in food intake owing to increased aversion, but reduces the other central nervous system side effects of rimonabant. The hyperglucagonemia induced by rimonabant is partially responsible for enhancing the antiobesity effect of exendin-4. PMID:25361428

  16. Proteinase-activated receptors 1 and 2 mediate contraction of human oesophageal muscularis mucosae.

    PubMed

    Chang, B-S; Chang, J-C; Huang, S-C

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors 1 and 2 mediate contraction of the human gallbladder. In the present study, we investigated effects mediated by proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) in the human oesophagus by measuring contraction of muscularis mucosae strips isolated from the human oesophagus. Both PAR(1) agonists (thrombin, SFLLRN-NH(2) and TFLLR-NH(2)) and PAR(2) agonists (trypsin, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH(2) and SLIGKV-NH(2)) caused concentration-dependent contraction. In contrast, PAR(1) and PAR(2) control peptides did not cause contraction. The existence of PAR(1) and PAR(2) in the human oesophageal muscularis mucosae was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. On the other hand, PAR(4) agonists, GYPGKF-NH(2), GYPGQV-NH(2) and AYPGKF-NH(2), did not cause contraction or relaxation in resting or carbachol-contracted muscularis mucosae strips, suggesting that PAR(4) is not involved in human oesophageal motility. The contractile responses to SFLLRN-NH(2) and trypsin in the human oesophagus were insensitive to atropine and tetrodotoxin, indicating that the contractile response was not neurally mediated. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PAR(1) and PAR(2) but not PAR(4) mediate contraction in human oesophageal muscularis mucosae. PAR(1) and PAR(2) may influence human oesophageal motility. PMID:19694963

  17. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K Luan

    2014-09-01

    Pre-extinction administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely occurs via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders.

  18. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  19. Alcohol and Cannabinoids Differentially Affect HIV Infection and Function of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells (MDDC)

    PubMed Central

    Agudelo, Marisela; Figueroa, Gloria; Yndart, Adriana; Casteleiro, Gianna; Muñoz, Karla; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2015-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, alcohol has been known to induce inflammation while cannabinoids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory role. For instance cannabinoids have been shown to reduce susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and attenuate HIV replication in macrophages. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol induces cannabinoid receptors and regulates cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). However, the ability of alcohol and cannabinoids to alter MDDC function during HIV infection has not been clearly elucidated yet. In order to study the potential impact of alcohol and cannabinoids on differentiated MDDC infected with HIV, monocytes were cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-4, differentiated MDDC were infected with HIV-1Ba-L and treated with EtOH (0.1 and 0.2%), THC (5 and 10 μM), or JWH-015 (5 and 10 μM) for 4–7 days. HIV infection of MDDC was confirmed by p24 and Long Terminal Repeats (LTR) estimation. MDDC endocytosis assay and cytokine array profiles were measured to investigate the effects of HIV and substances of abuse on MDDC function. Our results show the HIV + EtOH treated MDDC had the highest levels of p24 production and expression when compared with the HIV positive controls and the cannabinoid treated cells. Although both cannabinoids, THC and JWH-015 had lower levels of p24 production and expression, the HIV + JWH-015 treated MDDC had the lowest levels of p24 when compared to the HIV + THC treated cells. In addition, MDDC endocytic function and cytokine production were also differentially altered after alcohol and cannabinoid treatments. Our results show a differential effect of alcohol and cannabinoids, which may provide insights into the divergent inflammatory role of alcohol and cannabinoids to modulate MDDC function in the context of HIV infection. PMID:26733986

  20. Machupo Virus Glycoprotein Determinants for Human Transferrin Receptor 1 Binding and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Longobardi, Lindsay E.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Retterer, Cary; Dong, Lian; Clester, Jeremiah C.; Kota, Krishna; Carra, John; Bavari, Sina

    2011-01-01

    Machupo virus (MACV) is a highly pathogenic New World arenavirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans. MACV, as well as other pathogenic New World arenaviruses, enter cells after their GP1 attachment glycoprotein binds to their cellular receptor, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1). TfR1 residues essential for this interaction have been described, and a co-crystal of MACV GP1 bound to TfR1 suggests GP1 residues important for this association. We created MACV GP1 variants and tested their effect on TfR1 binding and virus entry to evaluate the functional significance of some of these and additional residues in human and simian cells. We found residues R111, D123, Y122, and F226 to be essential, D155, and P160 important, and D114, S116, D140, and K169 expendable for the GP1-TfR1 interaction and MACV entry. Several MACV GP1 residues that are critical for the interaction with TfR1 are conserved among other New World arenaviruses, indicating a common basis of receptor interaction. Our findings also open avenues for the rational development of viral entry inhibitors. PMID:21750710

  1. Plasmin is involved in inflammation via protease-activated receptor-1 activation in human dental pulp.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Naoto; Hashizume, Hideki; Nakao, Sumi; Matsushima, Kiyoshi; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2008-05-15

    Plasmin is a proteolytic enzyme produced from plasminogen by plasminogen activators. We investigated the function of plasmin in human dental pulp fibroblast-like cells. Plasmin induced an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of mRNA for protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) was detected, and the PAR-1 activating peptide SFLLRN induced an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in the cells. The plasmin-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was inhibited in the presence of the PAR-1 antagonist SCH79797. Plasmin stimulated the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA and prostaglandin E(2) release, which are involved in inflammation. These effects of plasmin on expression of IL-8 mRNA and prostaglandin E(2) release were inhibited in the presence of the PAR-1 antagonist SCH79797. These results suggest that plasmin activates PAR-1 and is involved in inflammation in human dental pulp. PMID:18384756

  2. Machupo virus glycoprotein determinants for human transferrin receptor 1 binding and cell entry.

    PubMed

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Longobardi, Lindsay E; Kuhn, Jens H; Retterer, Cary; Dong, Lian; Clester, Jeremiah C; Kota, Krishna; Carra, John; Bavari, Sina

    2011-01-01

    Machupo virus (MACV) is a highly pathogenic New World arenavirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans. MACV, as well as other pathogenic New World arenaviruses, enter cells after their GP1 attachment glycoprotein binds to their cellular receptor, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1). TfR1 residues essential for this interaction have been described, and a co-crystal of MACV GP1 bound to TfR1 suggests GP1 residues important for this association. We created MACV GP1 variants and tested their effect on TfR1 binding and virus entry to evaluate the functional significance of some of these and additional residues in human and simian cells. We found residues R111, D123, Y122, and F226 to be essential, D155, and P160 important, and D114, S116, D140, and K169 expendable for the GP1-TfR1 interaction and MACV entry. Several MACV GP1 residues that are critical for the interaction with TfR1 are conserved among other New World arenaviruses, indicating a common basis of receptor interaction. Our findings also open avenues for the rational development of viral entry inhibitors.

  3. Human and Host Species Transferrin Receptor 1 Use by North American Arenaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Min; Fofana, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT At least five New World (NW) arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fevers in South America. These pathogenic clade B viruses, as well as nonpathogenic arenaviruses of the same clade, use transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) of their host species to enter cells. Pathogenic viruses are distinguished from closely related nonpathogenic ones by their additional ability to utilize human TfR1 (hTfR1). Here, we investigate the receptor usage of North American arenaviruses, whose entry proteins share greatest similarity with those of the clade B viruses. We show that all six North American arenaviruses investigated utilize host species TfR1 orthologs and present evidence consistent with arenavirus-mediated selection pressure on the TfR1 of the North American arenavirus host species. Notably, one of these viruses, AV96010151, closely related to the prototype Whitewater Arroyo virus (WWAV), entered cells using hTfR1, consistent with a role for a WWAV-like virus in three fatal human infections whose causative agent has not been identified. In addition, modest changes were sufficient to convert hTfR1 into a functional receptor for most of these viruses, suggesting that a minor alteration in virus entry protein may allow these viruses to use hTfR1. Our data establish TfR1 as a cellular receptor for North American arenaviruses, highlight an “arms race” between these viruses and their host species, support the association of North American arenavirus with fatal human infections, and suggest that these viruses have a higher potential to emerge and cause human diseases than has previously been appreciated. IMPORTANCE hTfR1 use is a key determinant for a NW arenavirus to cause hemorrhagic fevers in humans. All known pathogenic NW arenaviruses are transmitted in South America by their host rodents. North American arenaviruses are generally considered nonpathogenic, but some of these viruses have been tentatively implicated in human fatalities. We show that these North American

  4. Exogenous cannabinoids as substrates, inhibitors, and inducers of human drug metabolizing enzymes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stout, Stephen M; Cimino, Nina M

    2014-02-01

    Exogenous cannabinoids are structurally and pharmacologically diverse compounds that are widely used. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the data characterizing the potential for these compounds to act as substrates, inhibitors, or inducers of human drug metabolizing enzymes, with the aim of clarifying the significance of these properties in clinical care and drug interactions. In vitro data were identified that characterize cytochrome P-450 (CYP-450) enzymes as potential significant contributors to the primary metabolism of several exogenous cannabinoids: tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; CYPs 2C9, 3A4); cannabidiol (CBD; CYPs 2C19, 3A4); cannabinol (CBN; CYPs 2C9, 3A4); JWH-018 (CYPs 1A2, 2C9); and AM2201 (CYPs 1A2, 2C9). CYP-450 enzymes may also contribute to the secondary metabolism of THC, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases have been identified as capable of catalyzing both primary (CBD, CBN) and secondary (THC, JWH-018, JWH-073) cannabinoid metabolism. Clinical pharmacogenetic data further support CYP2C9 as a significant contributor to THC metabolism, and a pharmacokinetic interaction study using ketoconazole with oromucosal cannabis extract further supports CYP3A4 as a significant metabolic pathway for THC and CBD. However, the absence of interaction between CBD from oromucosal cannabis extract with omeprazole suggests a less significant role of CYP2C19 in CBD metabolism. Studies of THC, CBD, and CBN inhibition and induction of major human CYP-450 isoforms generally reflect a low risk of clinically significant drug interactions with most use, but specific human data are lacking. Smoked cannabis herb (marijuana) likely induces CYP1A2 mediated theophylline metabolism, although the role of cannabinoids specifically in eliciting this effect is questionable.

  5. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R.; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K. Luan

    2013-01-01

    Pre-extinction administration of ∆9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely involves via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 hours after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders. PMID:24055595

  6. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A R; Harkness, John H; Neve, Kim A; Williams, Robert W; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K; Eshleman, Amy J; Phillips, Tamara J; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30-40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  7. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A. R.; Harkness, John H.; Neve, Kim A.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K.; Eshleman, Amy J.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30–40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  8. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A R; Harkness, John H; Neve, Kim A; Williams, Robert W; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K; Eshleman, Amy J; Phillips, Tamara J; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30-40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options.

  9. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  10. Antagonism of Human Formyl Peptide Receptor 1 (FPR1) by Chromones and Related Isoflavones

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Cheng, Ni; Ye, Richard D.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on a variety of cell types. Because FPRs play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions implicated in disease pathogenesis, FPR antagonists may represent novel therapeutics for modulating innate immunity. Previously, 4H-chromones were reported to be potent and competitive FPR1 antagonists. In the present studies, 96 additional chromone analogs, including related synthetic and natural isoflavones were evaluated for FPR1 antagonist activity. We identified a number of novel competitive FPR1 antagonists that inhibited fMLF-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in FPR1-HL60 cells and effectively competed with WKYMVm-FITC for binding to FPR1 in FPR1-HL60 and FPR1-RBL cells. Compound 10 (6-hexyl-2-methyl-3-(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromen-7-yl acetate) was found to be the most potent FPR1-specific antagonist, with binding affinity Ki~100 nM. These chromones inhibited Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis in human neutrophils with nanomolar-micromolar IC50 values. In addition, the most potent novel FPR1 antagonists inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) in FPR1-RBL cells. These antagonists were specific for FPR1 and did not inhibit WKYMVM/WKYMVm-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in FPR2-HL60 cells, FPR3-HL60 cells, RBL cells transfected with murine Fpr1, or interleukin 8-induced Ca2+ flux in human neutrophils and RBL cells transfected with CXC chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1). Moreover, pharmacophore modeling showed that the active chromones had a significantly higher degree of similarity with the pharmacophore template as compared to inactive analogs. Thus, the chromone/isoflavone scaffold represents a relevant backbone for development of novel FPR1 antagonists. PMID:25450672

  11. Cannabinoid receptor 1 signaling in embryo neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Psychoyos, Delphine; Vinod, K Yaragudri; Cao, Jin; Xie, Shan; Hyson, Richard L; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; He, Weimin; Cooper, Thomas B; Hungund, Basalingappa L; Finnell, Richard H

    2012-04-01

    In utero exposure to tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of marijuana, is associated with an increased risk for neurodevelopmental defects in the offspring by interfering with the functioning of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system. At the present time, it is not clearly known whether the eCB system is present before neurogenesis. Using an array of biochemical techniques, we analyzed the levels of CB1 receptors, eCBs (AEA and 2-AG), and the enzymes (NAPE-PLD, DAGLα, DAGLβ, MAGL, and FAAH) involved in the metabolism of the eCBs in chick and mouse models during development. The findings demonstrate the presence of eCB system in early embryo before neurogenesis. The eCB system might play a critical role in early embryogenesis and there might be adverse developmental consequences of in utero exposure to marijuana and other drugs of abuse during this period.

  12. Medicinal chemistry of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Vemuri, V Kiran; Makriyannis, A

    2015-06-01

    The endocannabinoid system comprises the two well characterized Gi/o -protein coupled receptors (cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and CB2), their endogenous lipid ligands, and the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and biotransformation. Drug discovery efforts relating to the endocannabinoid system have been focused mainly on the two cannabinoid receptors and the two endocannabinoid deactivating enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). This review provides an overview of cannabinergic agents used in drug research and those being explored clinically.

  13. Medicinal Chemistry of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Vemuri, V Kiran; Makriyannis, A

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system comprises the two well characterized Gi/o-protein coupled receptors (cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and CB2), their endogenous lipid ligands, and the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and biotransformation. Drug discovery efforts relating to the endocannabinoid system have been focused mainly on the two cannabinoid receptors and the two endocannabinoid deactivating enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). This review provides an overview of cannabinergic agents used in drug research and those being explored clinically. PMID:25801236

  14. Medicinal chemistry of cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Vemuri, V Kiran

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system comprises the two well characterized Gi/o‐protein coupled receptors (cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and CB2), their endogenous lipid ligands, and the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis and biotransformation. Drug discovery efforts relating to the endocannabinoid system have been focused mainly on the two cannabinoid receptors and the two endocannabinoid deactivating enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL). This review provides an overview of cannabinergic agents used in drug research and those being explored clinically. PMID:25801236

  15. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-12-04

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1(HIGH) cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1(HIGH) cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions.

  16. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1HIGH cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1HIGH cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions. PMID:26634814

  17. Endocannabinoids Stimulate Human Melanogenesis via Type-1 Cannabinoid Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Mariangela; Pasquariello, Nicoletta; Battista, Natalia; Di Tommaso, Monia; Rapino, Cinzia; Fezza, Filomena; Zuccolo, Michela; Jourdain, Roland; Finazzi Agrò, Alessandro; Breton, Lionel; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    We show that a fully functional endocannabinoid system is present in primary human melanocytes (normal human epidermal melanocyte cells), including anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the respective target receptors (CB1, CB2, and TRPV1), and their metabolic enzymes. We also show that at higher concentrations AEA induces normal human epidermal melanocyte apoptosis (∼3-fold over controls at 5 μm) through a TRPV1-mediated pathway that increases DNA fragmentation and p53 expression. However, at lower concentrations, AEA and other CB1-binding endocannabinoids dose-dependently stimulate melanin synthesis and enhance tyrosinase gene expression and activity (∼3- and ∼2-fold over controls at 1 μm). This CB1-dependent activity was fully abolished by the selective CB1 antagonist SR141716 or by RNA interference of the receptor. CB1 signaling engaged p38 and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases, which in turn activated the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Silencing of tyrosinase or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor further demonstrated the involvement of these proteins in AEA-induced melanogenesis. In addition, CB1 activation did not engage the key regulator of skin pigmentation, cyclic AMP, showing a major difference compared with the regulation of melanogenesis by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone through melanocortin 1 receptor. PMID:22431736

  18. The Effect of Chronic Cannabinoids on Broadband EEG Neural Oscillations in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Skosnik, Patrick D; D'Souza, Deepak C; Steinmetz, Adam B; Edwards, Chad R; Vollmer, Jennifer M; Hetrick, William P; O'Donnell, Brian F

    2012-01-01

    Animal and cellular work has shown that central cannabinoid-1 receptors modulate neural oscillations in the gamma range (40 Hz), which may be important for normal perceptual and cognitive processes. In order to assess the effect of cannabinoids on broadband-frequency neural oscillations in humans, the current study examined the effect of chronic cannabis use on auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) utilizing electroencephalography (EEG). Passive ASSRs were assessed using varying rates of binaural stimulation (auditory click-trains; 10–50 Hz in increments of 5 Hz; 80 dB SPL) in carefully screened cannabis users and controls. Chronic cannabis users (n=22; 12 h abstinence before study; positive 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol urine levels) and cannabis naïve controls (n=24) were evaluated. Time X frequency analyses on EEG data were performed using Fourier-based mean trial power (MTP) and phase-locking (inter-trial coherence; ITC). Transient ERPs to stimulus onset (auditory N100 components) were also evaluated. As predicted, a decrease in spectral power (MTP) at 40 Hz was observed in the cannabis group (p<0.018). No effects on phase-locking (ITC) or the N100 were observed. Further, within the cannabis group, lower 40 Hz power correlated with an earlier age of onset of cannabis use (p<0.04). These data suggest that chronic exposure to exogenous cannabinoids can alter the ability to generate neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma range. This is consistent with preclinical animal and cellular data, which may have implications for understanding the short- and long-term psychopharmacological effects of cannabis. PMID:22713908

  19. Targeted metabolomic approach for assessing human synthetic cannabinoid exposure and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Patton, Amy L; Seely, Kathryn A; Chimalakonda, Krishna C; Tran, Johnny P; Trass, Matthew; Miranda, Art; Fantegrossi, William E; Kennedy, Paul D; Dobrowolski, Paul; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; McCain, Keith R; James, Laura P; Endres, Gregory W; Moran, Jeffery H

    2013-10-01

    Designer synthetic cannabinoids like JWH-018 and AM2201 have unique clinical toxicity. Cytochrome-P450-mediated metabolism of each leads to the generation of pharmacologically active (ω)- and (ω-1)-monohydroxyl metabolites that retain high affinity for cannabinoid type-1 receptors, exhibit Δ(9)-THC-like effects in rodents, and are conjugated with glucuronic acid prior to excretion in human urine. Previous studies have not measured the contribution of the specific (ω-1)-monohydroxyl enantiomers in human metabolism and toxicity. This study uses a chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy approach (LC-MS/MS) to quantify each specific enantiomer and other nonchiral, human metabolites of JWH-018 and AM2201 in human urine. The accuracy (average % RE = 18.6) and reproducibility (average CV = 15.8%) of the method resulted in low-level quantification (average LLQ = 0.99 ng/mL) of each metabolite. Comparisons with a previously validated nonchiral method showed strong correlation between the two approaches (average r(2) = 0.89). Pilot data from human urine samples demonstrate enantiospecific excretion patterns. The (S)-isomer of the JWH-018-(ω-1)-monohydroxyl metabolite was predominantly excreted (>87%) in human urine as the glucuronic acid conjugate, whereas the relative abundance of the corresponding AM2201-(ω-1)-metabolite was low (<5%) and did not demonstrate enantiospecificity (approximate 50:50 ratio of each enantiomer). The new chiral method provides a comprehensive, targeted metabolomic approach for studying the human metabolism of JWH-018 and AM2201. Preliminary evaluations of specific enantiomeric contributions support the use of this approach in future studies designed to understand the pharmacokinetic properties of JWH-018 and/or AM2201.

  20. Spicing thing up: Synthetic cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. Objectives The availability, acute subjective effects—including self-reports posted on Erowid—laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Results Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike THC, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid-receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. Conclusions There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug-detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available. PMID:23836028

  1. Astrocytic expression of cannabinoid type 1 receptor in rat and human sclerotic hippocampi

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xian-Dong; Wei, Dong; Li, Juan; Kang, Jun-Jun; Wu, Chen; Ma, Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhu, Ge-Min; Ou-Yang, Tang-Peng; Liu, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), which is traditionally located on axon terminals, plays an important role in the pathology of epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases by modulating synaptic transmission. Using the pilocarpine model of chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures, which mimics the main features of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) in humans, we examined the expression of CB1R in hippocampal astrocytes of epileptic rats. Furthermore, we also examined the expression of astrocytic CB1R in the resected hippocampi from patients with medically refractory mesial TLE. Using immunofluorescent double labeling, we found increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in hippocampi of epileptic rats, whereas expression of astrocytic CB1R was not detectable in hippocampi of saline treated animals. Furthermore, CB1R was also found in some astrocytes in sclerotic hippocampi in a subset of patients with intractable mesial TLE. Detection with immune electron microscopy showed that the expression of CB1R was increased in astrocytes of epileptic rats and modest levels of CB1R were also found on the astrocytic membrane of sclerotic hippocampi. These results suggest that increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in sclerotic hippocampi might be involved in the cellular basis of the effects of cannabinoids on epilepsy. PMID:25031702

  2. Evaluation of commercial antibodies against human sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Talmont, Franck; Moulédous, Lionel

    2014-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1), also called endothelial differentiation gene 1, plays an important role in migration, proliferation, and survival of several types of cells including endothelial cells and lymphocytes and is involved in multiple sclerosis. Two commercial rabbit anti-S1P1 antibodies (polyclonal and monoclonal) were tested on CHO cells expressing S1P1 receptors fused to the green fluorescent protein at the C-terminal end and on Pichia pastoris and HEK cells expressing cmyc-tagged S1P1. Polyclonal antibodies did not give any signal by Western blot, immunofluorescence, and flow cytofluorometry. Monoclonal antibodies were able to reveal an unspecific band by Western blot performed on various cell types. Consequently, in our hands and using our protocols, we show that these antibodies did not specifically detect S1P1 receptors.

  3. Simultaneous Quantification of Free and Glucuronidated Cannabinoids in Human Urine by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cannabis is the most commonly abused drug of abuse and is commonly quantified during urine drug testing. We conducted a controlled drug administration studies investigating efficacy of urinary cannabinoid glucuronide metabolites for documenting recency of cannabis intake and for determining stability of urinary cannabinoids. Methods A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated quantifying Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), cannabidiol, cannabinol, THC-glucuronide and THCCOOH-glucuronide in 0.5 ml human urine via supported-liquid extraction. Chromatography was performed on an Ultra Biphenyl column with a gradient of 10 mmol/l ammonium acetate, pH 6.15 and 15% methanol in acetonitrile at 0. 4ml/min. Analytes were monitored by positive and negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. Results Linear ranges were 0.5–50 ng/ml for THC-glucuronide, 1–100 ng/ml for THCCOOH, 11-OH-THC and cannabidiol, 2–100 ng/ml for THC and cannabinol, and 5–500 ng/ml for THCCOOH-glucuronide (R2>0.99). Mean extraction efficiencies were 34–73% with analytical recovery (bias) 80.5–118.0% and total imprecision 3.0–10.2% coefficient of variation. Conclusion This method simultaneously quantifies urinary cannabinoids and phase II glucuronide metabolites, and enables evaluation of urinary cannabinoid glucuronides for documenting recency of cannabis intake and cannabinoid stability. The assay is applicable for routine urine cannabinoid testing. PMID:22771478

  4. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol attenuates allogeneic host-versus-graft response and delays skin graft rejection through activation of cannabinoid receptor 1 and induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sido, Jessica M.; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2015-01-01

    Immune cells have been shown to express cannabinoid receptors and to produce endogenous ligands. Moreover, activation of cannabinoid receptors on immune cells has been shown to trigger potent immunosuppression. Despite such studies, the role of cannabinoids in transplantation, specifically to prevent allograft rejection, has not, to our knowledge, been investigated previously. In the current study, we tested the effect of THC on the suppression of HvGD as well as rejection of skin allografts. To this end, we studied HvGD by injecting H-2k splenocytes into H-2b mice and analyzing the immune response in the draining ingLNs. THC treatment significantly reduced T cell proliferation and activation in draining LNs of the recipient mice and decreased early stage rejection-indicator cytokines, including IL-2 and IFN-γ. THC treatment also increased the allogeneic skin graft survival. THC treatment in HvGD mice led to induction of MDSCs. Using MDSC depletion studies as well as adoptive transfer experiments, we found that THC-induced MDSCs were necessary for attenuation of HvGD. Additionally, using pharmacological inhibitors of CB1 and CB2 receptors and CB1 and CB2 knockout mice, we found that THC was working preferentially through CB1. Together, our research shows, for the first time to our knowledge, that targeting cannabinoid receptors may provide a novel treatment modality to attenuate HvGD and prevent allograft rejection. PMID:26034207

  5. Reduced bioenergetics and toll-like receptor 1 function in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in aging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Guo, Xiuyang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yuan, Xiaoling; Chen, Shu; Malawista, Stephen E; Bockenstedt, Linda K; Allore, Heather G; Montgomery, Ruth R

    2014-02-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decline in immune function (immunosenescence) resulting in an increased susceptibility to viral and bacterial infections. Here we show reduced expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and an underlying age-dependent deficiency in PMN bioenergetics. In older (>65 years) adults, stimulation through TLR1 led to lower activation of integrins (CD11b and CD18), lower production of the chemokine IL-8, and lower levels of the phosphorylated signaling intermediate p38 MAP kinase than in PMN from younger donors (21-30 years). In addition, loss of CD62L, a marker of PMN activation, was reduced in PMN of older adults stimulated through multiple pathways. Rescue of PMN from apoptosis by stimulation with TLR1 was reduced in PMN from older adults. In seeking an explanation for effects of aging across multiple pathways, we examined PMN energy utilization and found that glucose uptake after stimulation through TLR1 was dramatically lower in PMN of older adults. Our results demonstrate a reduction in TLR1 expression and TLR1-mediated responses in PMN with aging, and reduced efficiency of bioenergetics in PMN. These changes likely contribute to reduced PMN efficiency in aging through multiple aspects of PMN function and suggest potential therapeutic opportunities.

  6. Screening for the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and its major metabolites in human doping controls.

    PubMed

    Möller, Ines; Wintermeyer, Annette; Bender, Katja; Jübner, Martin; Thomas, Andreas; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2011-09-01

    Referred to as 'spice', several new drugs, advertised as herbal blends, have appeared on the market in the last few years, in which the synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and a C(8) homologue of CP 47,497 were identified as major active ingredients. Due to their reported cannabis-like effects, many European countries have banned these substances. The World Anti-Doping Agency has also explicitly prohibited synthetic cannabinoids in elite sport in-competition. Since urine specimens have been the preferred doping control samples, the elucidation of the metabolic pathways of these substances is of particular importance to implement them in sports drug testing programmes. In a recent report, an in vitro phase-I metabolism study of JWH-018 was presented yielding mainly hydroxylated and N-dealkylated metabolites. Due to these findings, a urine sample of a healthy man declaring to have smoked a 'spice' product was screened for potential phase-I and -II metabolites by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry in the present report. The majority of the phase-I metabolites observed in earlier in vitro studies of JWH-018 were detected in this urine specimen and furthermore most of their respective monoglucuronides. As no intact JWH-018 was detectable, the monohydroxylated metabolite being the most abundant one was chosen as a target analyte for sports drug testing purposes; a detection method was subsequently developed and validated in accordance to conventional screening protocols based on enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The method was applied to approximately 7500 urine doping control samples yielding two JWH-018 findings and demonstrated its capability for a sensitive and selective identification of JWH-018 and its metabolites in human urine.

  7. Gemcitabine/cannabinoid combination triggers autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells through a ROS-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Donadelli, M; Dando, I; Zaniboni, T; Costanzo, C; Dalla Pozza, E; Scupoli, M T; Scarpa, A; Zappavigna, S; Marra, M; Abbruzzese, A; Bifulco, M; Caraglia, M; Palmieri, M

    2011-01-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM, 2′,2′-difluorodeoxycytidine) is currently used in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with a response rate of < 20%. The purpose of our work was to improve GEM activity by addition of cannabinoids. Here, we show that GEM induces both cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptors by an NF-κB-dependent mechanism and that its association with cannabinoids synergistically inhibits pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell growth and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by single treatments. The antiproliferative synergism is prevented by the radical scavenger N-acetyl--cysteine and by the specific NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7085, demonstrating that the induction of ROS by GEM/cannabinoids and of NF-κB by GEM is required for this effect. In addition, we report that neither apoptotic nor cytostatic mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic cell growth inhibition, which is strictly associated with the enhancement of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Noteworthy, the antiproliferative synergism is stronger in GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with GEM-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines. The combined treatment strongly inhibits growth of human pancreatic tumor cells xenografted in nude mice without apparent toxic effects. These findings support a key role of the ROS-dependent activation of an autophagic program in the synergistic growth inhibition induced by GEM/cannabinoid combination in human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:21525939

  8. Gemcitabine/cannabinoid combination triggers autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells through a ROS-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Donadelli, M; Dando, I; Zaniboni, T; Costanzo, C; Dalla Pozza, E; Scupoli, M T; Scarpa, A; Zappavigna, S; Marra, M; Abbruzzese, A; Bifulco, M; Caraglia, M; Palmieri, M

    2011-04-28

    Gemcitabine (GEM, 2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine) is currently used in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with a response rate of < 20%. The purpose of our work was to improve GEM activity by addition of cannabinoids. Here, we show that GEM induces both cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptors by an NF-κB-dependent mechanism and that its association with cannabinoids synergistically inhibits pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell growth and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by single treatments. The antiproliferative synergism is prevented by the radical scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine and by the specific NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7085, demonstrating that the induction of ROS by GEM/cannabinoids and of NF-κB by GEM is required for this effect. In addition, we report that neither apoptotic nor cytostatic mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic cell growth inhibition, which is strictly associated with the enhancement of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Noteworthy, the antiproliferative synergism is stronger in GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with GEM-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines. The combined treatment strongly inhibits growth of human pancreatic tumor cells xenografted in nude mice without apparent toxic effects. These findings support a key role of the ROS-dependent activation of an autophagic program in the synergistic growth inhibition induced by GEM/cannabinoid combination in human pancreatic cancer cells.

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 in human cancer: concise review and rationale for development of IMC-18F1 (Human antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1).

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jonathan D; Rowinsky, Eric K; Youssoufian, Hagop; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Wu, Yan

    2010-02-15

    The human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1, or Flt-1) is widely expressed in normal and pathologic tissue and contributes to the pathogenesis of both neoplastic and inflammatory diseases. In human cancer, VEGFR-1 mediated signaling is responsible for both direct tumor activation and angiogenesis. VEGFR-1 mediated activation of nonmalignant supporting cells, particularly stromal, dendritic, hematopoietic cells, and macrophages, is also likely important for cancer pathogenesis. VEGFR-1 is also hypothesized to enable the development of cancer metastases by means of activation and premetastatic localization in distant organs of bone marrow-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells, which express VEGFR-1. IMC-18F1 is a fully human IgG(1) antibody that binds to VEGFR-1 and has been associated with the inhibition of cancer growth in multiple in vitro and human tumor xenograft models. The preliminary results of phase 1 investigations have also indicated a favorable safety profile for IMC-18F1 at doses that confer antibody concentrations that are associated with relevant antitumor activity in preclinical models.

  10. Cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors and tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    One hypothesis suggests that tinnitus is a form of sensory epilepsy, arising partly from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory regions of the brain such as the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus. Although there is currently no effective drug treatment for tinnitus, anti-epileptic drugs are used in some cases as a potential treatment option. There is increasing evidence to suggest that cannabinoid drugs, i.e. cannabinoid receptor agonists, can also have anti-epileptic effects, at least in some cases and in some parts of the brain. It has been reported that cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and that they are involved in the regulation of plasticity. This review explores the question of whether cannabinoid receptor agonists are likely to be pro- or anti-epileptic in the cochlear nucleus and therefore whether cannabinoids and Cannabis itself are likely to make tinnitus better or worse.

  11. The effects of leptin in combination with a cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist, AM 251, or cannabidiol on food intake and body weight in rats fed a high-fat or a free-choice high sugar diet.

    PubMed

    Wierucka-Rybak, M; Wolak, M; Bojanowska, E

    2014-08-01

    High intake of fats and sugars has prompted a rapid growth in the number of obese individuals worldwide. To further investigate whether simultaneous pharmacological intervention in the leptin and cannabinoid system might change food and water intake, preferences for palatable foods, and body weight, we have examined the effects of concomitant intraperitoneal administration of leptin and AM 251, a cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonist, or cannabidiol (CBD), a plant cannabinoid, in rats maintained on either a high-fat (HF) diet (45% energy from fat) or free-choice (FC) diet consisting of high-sucrose and normal rat chow (83% and 61% energy from carbohydrates, respectively). Leptin at a dose of 100 μg/kg injected individually for 3 subsequent days to rats fed a HF diet reduced significantly the daily caloric intake and inhibited body weight gain. The hormone had no significant effects, however, on either caloric intake, body weight or food preferences in rats fed an FC diet. Co-injection of leptin and 1 mg/kg AM 251 resulted in a further significant decrease in HF diet intake and a profound reduction in body weight gain both in HF diet- and FC diet-fed rats. This drug combination, however, had no effect on the consumption of high-sucrose chow. In contrast, 3mg/kg of CBD co-injected with leptin did not modify leptin effects on food intake in rats maintained on an FC or HF diet. None of the drug combinations affected water consumption. It is concluded that the concomitant treatment with leptin and AM 251 attenuated markedly body weight gain in rats maintained on high-calorie diets rich in fat and carbohydrates but did not affect preferences for sweet food. PMID:25179081

  12. The effects of leptin in combination with a cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist, AM 251, or cannabidiol on food intake and body weight in rats fed a high-fat or a free-choice high sugar diet.

    PubMed

    Wierucka-Rybak, M; Wolak, M; Bojanowska, E

    2014-08-01

    High intake of fats and sugars has prompted a rapid growth in the number of obese individuals worldwide. To further investigate whether simultaneous pharmacological intervention in the leptin and cannabinoid system might change food and water intake, preferences for palatable foods, and body weight, we have examined the effects of concomitant intraperitoneal administration of leptin and AM 251, a cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonist, or cannabidiol (CBD), a plant cannabinoid, in rats maintained on either a high-fat (HF) diet (45% energy from fat) or free-choice (FC) diet consisting of high-sucrose and normal rat chow (83% and 61% energy from carbohydrates, respectively). Leptin at a dose of 100 μg/kg injected individually for 3 subsequent days to rats fed a HF diet reduced significantly the daily caloric intake and inhibited body weight gain. The hormone had no significant effects, however, on either caloric intake, body weight or food preferences in rats fed an FC diet. Co-injection of leptin and 1 mg/kg AM 251 resulted in a further significant decrease in HF diet intake and a profound reduction in body weight gain both in HF diet- and FC diet-fed rats. This drug combination, however, had no effect on the consumption of high-sucrose chow. In contrast, 3mg/kg of CBD co-injected with leptin did not modify leptin effects on food intake in rats maintained on an FC or HF diet. None of the drug combinations affected water consumption. It is concluded that the concomitant treatment with leptin and AM 251 attenuated markedly body weight gain in rats maintained on high-calorie diets rich in fat and carbohydrates but did not affect preferences for sweet food.

  13. Metabolite profiling of RCS-4, a novel synthetic cannabinoid designer drug, using human hepatocyte metabolism and TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Adarsh S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2009, scheduling legislation of synthetic cannabinoids prompted new compound emergence to circumvent legal restrictions. 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-indol-3-yl)methanone (RCS-4) is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist sold in herbal smoking blends. Absence of parent synthetic cannabinoids in urine suggests the importance of metabolite identification for detecting RCS-4 consumption in clinical and forensic investigations. Materials & methods & Results With 1 h human hepatocyte incubation and TOF high-resolution MS, we identified 18 RCS-4 metabolites, many not yet reported. Most metabolites were hydroxylated with or without demethylation, carboxylation and dealkylation followed by glucuronidation. One additional sulfated metabolite was also observed. O-demethylation was the most common biotransformation and generated the major metabolite. Conclusion For the first time, we present a metabolic scheme of RCS-4 obtained from human hepatocytes, including Phase I and II metabolites. Metabolite structural information and associated high-resolution mass spectra can be employed for developing clinical and forensic laboratory RCS-4 urine screening methods. PMID:25046048

  14. Sulfonylurea Receptor 1 in Humans with Post-Traumatic Brain Contusions.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Valverde, Tamara; Vidal-Jorge, Marian; Martínez-Saez, Elena; Castro, Lidia; Arikan, Fuat; Cordero, Esteban; Rădoi, Andreea; Poca, Maria-Antonia; Simard, J Marc; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2015-10-01

    Post-traumatic brain contusions (PTBCs) are traditionally considered primary injuries and can increase in size, generate perilesional edema, cause mass effect, induce neurological deterioration, and cause death. Most patients experience a progressive increase in pericontusional edema, and nearly half, an increase in the hemorrhagic component itself. The underlying molecular pathophysiology of contusion-induced brain edema and hemorrhagic progression remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate sulfonylurea 1/transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (SUR1-TRPM4) ion channel SUR1 expression in various cell types (neurons, astrocytes, endothelial cells, microglia, macrophages, and neutrophils) of human brain contusions and whether SUR1 up-regulation was related to time postinjury. Double immunolabeling of SUR1 and cell-type- specific proteins was performed in 26 specimens from traumatic brain injury patients whose lesions were surgically evacuated. Three samples from limited brain resections performed for accessing extra-axial skull-base tumors or intraventricular lesions were controls. We found SUR1 was significantly overexpresed in all cell types and was especially prominent in neurons and endothelial cells (ECs). The temporal pattern depended on cell type: 1) In neurons, SUR1 increased within 48 h of injury and stabilized thereafter; 2) in ECs, there was no trend; 3) in glial cells and microglia/macrophages, a moderate increase was observed over time; and 4) in neutrophils, it decreased with time. Our results suggest that up-regulation of SUR1 in humans point to this channel as one of the important molecular players in the pathophysiology of PTBCs. Our findings reveal opportunities to act therapeutically on the mechanisms of growth of traumatic contusions and therefore reduce the number of patients with neurological deterioration and poor neurological outcomes. PMID:26398596

  15. Leprosy and the Adaptation of Human Toll-Like Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sunny H.; Gochhait, Sailesh; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Pettersson, Fredrik H.; Teo, Yik Y.; Khor, Chiea C.; Rautanen, Anna; Chapman, Stephen J.; Mills, Tara C.; Srivastava, Amit; Rudko, Aleksey; Freidin, Maxim B.; Puzyrev, Valery P.; Ali, Shafat; Aggarwal, Shweta; Chopra, Rupali; Reddy, Belum S. N.; Garg, Vijay K.; Roy, Suchismita; Meisner, Sarah; Hazra, Sunil K.; Saha, Bibhuti; Floyd, Sian; Keating, Brendan J.; Kim, Cecilia; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Knight, Julian C.; Hill, Philip C.; Adegbola, Richard A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Fine, Paul E. M.; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M.; Bamezai, Rameshwar N. K.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Vannberg, Fredrik O.

    2010-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and remains endemic in many parts of the world. Despite several major studies on susceptibility to leprosy, few genomic loci have been replicated independently. We have conducted an association analysis of more than 1,500 individuals from different case-control and family studies, and observed consistent associations between genetic variants in both TLR1 and the HLA-DRB1/DQA1 regions with susceptibility to leprosy (TLR1 I602S, case-control P = 5.7×10−8, OR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.20–0.48, and HLA-DQA1 rs1071630, case-control P = 4.9×10−14, OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.35–0.54). The effect sizes of these associations suggest that TLR1 and HLA-DRB1/DQA1 are major susceptibility genes in susceptibility to leprosy. Further population differentiation analysis shows that the TLR1 locus is extremely differentiated. The protective dysfunctional 602S allele is rare in Africa but expands to become the dominant allele among individuals of European descent. This supports the hypothesis that this locus may be under selection from mycobacteria or other pathogens that are recognized by TLR1 and its co-receptors. These observations provide insight into the long standing host-pathogen relationship between human and mycobacteria and highlight the key role of the TLR pathway in infectious diseases. PMID:20617178

  16. Conjugation of Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073, Metabolites by Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Chimalakonda, Krishna C.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Le, Vi-Huyen; Yiew, Kan Hui; Dineva, Anna; Moran, Cindy L.; James, Laura P.; Moran, Jeffery H.

    2011-01-01

    K2, a synthetic cannabinoid (SC), is an emerging drug of abuse touted as “legal marijuana” and marketed to young teens and first-time drug users. Symptoms associated with K2 use include extreme agitation, syncope, tachycardia, and visual and auditory hallucinations. One major challenge to clinicians is the lack of clinical, pharmacological, and metabolic information for the detection and characterization of K2 and its metabolites in human samples. Information on the metabolic pathway of SCs is very limited. However, previous reports have shown the metabolites of these compounds are excreted primarily as glucuronic acid conjugates. Based on this information, this study evaluates nine human recombinant uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms and human liver and intestinal microsomes for their ability to glucuronidate hydroxylated metabolites of 1-naphthalenyl-1(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-methanone (JWH-018) and (1-butyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (JWH-073), the two most common SCs found in K2 products. Conjugates were identified and characterized using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, whereas kinetic parameters were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-UV-visible methods. UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A9, UGT1A10, and UGT2B7 were shown to be the major enzymes involved, showing relatively high affinity with Km ranging from 12 to 18 μM for some hydroxylated K2s. These UGTs also exhibited a high metabolic capacity for these compounds, which indicates that K2 metabolites may be rapidly glucuronidated and eliminated from the body. Studies of K2 metabolites will help future development and validation of a specific assay for K2 and its metabolites and will allow researchers to fully explore their pharmacological actions. PMID:21746969

  17. Conjugation of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073, metabolites by human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Chimalakonda, Krishna C; Bratton, Stacie M; Le, Vi-Huyen; Yiew, Kan Hui; Dineva, Anna; Moran, Cindy L; James, Laura P; Moran, Jeffery H; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2011-10-01

    K2, a synthetic cannabinoid (SC), is an emerging drug of abuse touted as "legal marijuana" and marketed to young teens and first-time drug users. Symptoms associated with K2 use include extreme agitation, syncope, tachycardia, and visual and auditory hallucinations. One major challenge to clinicians is the lack of clinical, pharmacological, and metabolic information for the detection and characterization of K2 and its metabolites in human samples. Information on the metabolic pathway of SCs is very limited. However, previous reports have shown the metabolites of these compounds are excreted primarily as glucuronic acid conjugates. Based on this information, this study evaluates nine human recombinant uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms and human liver and intestinal microsomes for their ability to glucuronidate hydroxylated metabolites of 1-naphthalenyl-1(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-methanone (JWH-018) and (1-butyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (JWH-073), the two most common SCs found in K2 products. Conjugates were identified and characterized using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, whereas kinetic parameters were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-UV-visible methods. UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A9, UGT1A10, and UGT2B7 were shown to be the major enzymes involved, showing relatively high affinity with K(m) ranging from 12 to 18 μM for some hydroxylated K2s. These UGTs also exhibited a high metabolic capacity for these compounds, which indicates that K2 metabolites may be rapidly glucuronidated and eliminated from the body. Studies of K2 metabolites will help future development and validation of a specific assay for K2 and its metabolites and will allow researchers to fully explore their pharmacological actions.

  18. Expression and Prognostic Significance of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors 1 and 3 in Gastric and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hedner, Charlotta; Borg, David; Nodin, Björn; Karnevi, Emelie; Jirström, Karin; Eberhard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas are major global cancer burdens. These cancer forms are characterized by a poor prognosis and a modest response to chemo- radio- and targeted treatment. Hence there is an obvious need for further enhanced diagnostic and treatment strategies. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and prognostic impact of human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (HER1/EGFR) and 3 (HER3), as well as the occurrence of EGFR and KRAS mutations in gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Methods Immunohistochemical expression of EGFR and HER3 was analysed in all primary tumours and a subset of lymph node metastases in a consecutive cohort of 174 patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach, cardia and esophagus. The anti-HER3 antibody used was validated by siRNA-mediated knockdown, immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR. EGFR and KRAS mutation status was analysed by pyrosequencing tecchnology. Results and Discussion High EGFR expression was an independent risk factor for shorter overall survival (OS), whereas high HER3 expression was associated with a borderline significant trend towards a longer OS. KRAS mutations were present in only 4% of the tumours and had no prognostic impact. All tumours were EGFR wild-type. These findings contribute to the ongoing efforts to decide on the potential clinical value of different HERs and druggable mutations in gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas, and attention is drawn to the need for more standardised investigational methods. PMID:26844548

  19. Asialoglycoprotein receptor 1 is a specific cell-surface marker for isolating hepatocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Derek T; Henderson, Christopher A; Warren, Curtis R; Friesen, Max; Xia, Fang; Becker, Caroline E; Musunuru, Kiran; Cowan, Chad A

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) are derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in vitro, but differentiation protocols commonly give rise to a heterogeneous mixture of cells. This variability confounds the evaluation of in vitro functional assays performed using HLCs. Increased differentiation efficiency and more accurate approximation of the in vivo hepatocyte gene expression profile would improve the utility of hPSCs. Towards this goal, we demonstrate the purification of a subpopulation of functional HLCs using the hepatocyte surface marker asialoglycoprotein receptor 1 (ASGR1). We analyzed the expression profile of ASGR1-positive cells by microarray, and tested their ability to perform mature hepatocyte functions (albumin and urea secretion, cytochrome activity). By these measures, ASGR1-positive HLCs are enriched for the gene expression profile and functional characteristics of primary hepatocytes compared with unsorted HLCs. We have demonstrated that ASGR1-positive sorting isolates a functional subpopulation of HLCs from among the heterogeneous cellular population produced by directed differentiation. PMID:27143754

  20. Cannabinoids: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Le Foll, B; Tyndale, R F

    2015-06-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on cannabinoids. Our understanding of these interesting endogenous and synthetic compounds, and their role in the cannabinoid system, has evolved dramatically, in part because of the acquisition of new research tools. Cannabis has been used for centuries by humans for recreational and medicinal purposes, however, there is substantial evidence that cannabis use can expose people to varying complications (e.g., risk of addiction, cognitive impairment), thus, it is important to determine the benefit/risk of cannabis with precision and to implement policy measures based on evidence to maximize the benefits and minimize the harm. Novel cannabinoid drugs are emerging for medicinal use (e.g., dronabinol, nabiximols) and as illicit drugs (e.g., Spice, K2) perpetuating the perception that cannabinoid drugs can be a friend or foe. This special issue will cover these various aspects of cannabinoid pharmacology and therapeutics ranging from basic chemistry, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical trial results, to policy and education efforts in this area. PMID:25801347

  1. Cannabinoids: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Le Foll, B; Tyndale, R F

    2015-06-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on cannabinoids. Our understanding of these interesting endogenous and synthetic compounds, and their role in the cannabinoid system, has evolved dramatically, in part because of the acquisition of new research tools. Cannabis has been used for centuries by humans for recreational and medicinal purposes, however, there is substantial evidence that cannabis use can expose people to varying complications (e.g., risk of addiction, cognitive impairment), thus, it is important to determine the benefit/risk of cannabis with precision and to implement policy measures based on evidence to maximize the benefits and minimize the harm. Novel cannabinoid drugs are emerging for medicinal use (e.g., dronabinol, nabiximols) and as illicit drugs (e.g., Spice, K2) perpetuating the perception that cannabinoid drugs can be a friend or foe. This special issue will cover these various aspects of cannabinoid pharmacology and therapeutics ranging from basic chemistry, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical trial results, to policy and education efforts in this area.

  2. Simultaneous determination of five naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites and their deposition in human and rat hair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Park, Yuran; Park, Meejung; Kim, Eunmi; Yang, Wonkyung; Baeck, Seungkyung; Lee, Sooyeun; Han, Sangbeom

    2015-01-01

    The continuing appearance of new synthetic cannabinoids has been a major issue in the field of forensic and clinical toxicology. In response to that, analytical methods for synthetic cannabinoids have been increasingly established in a variety of biological matrices. Since most of synthetic cannabinoids with structure similarity share some enzymatic metabolites, making the interpretation of analytical results and the discovery of the parent drug actually ingested very complicated, the investigation on metabolites of the first generation of synthetic cannabinoids with their relatively short side chains in chemical structure could be more important. Therefore, in the present study, we developed the analytical method for AM-2201, JWH-122 and MAM-2201 with JWH-018 as a precursor and their monohydroxylated metabolites in hair matrix. Also, using a rat model, AM-2201 and its monohydroxylated metabolites were identified and then the ratios of metabolite-to-parent drug were estimated to be used as criteria on external contamination. All analytes were extracted with methanol from washed and cut hair samples and the extracts were injected into LC-MS/MS with electrospray ion source in the positive ionization mode. Matrix effect and recovery were evaluated in hair matrices and no significant variations were observed. The validation results for precision and accuracy were satisfactory in both human and rat hair. The LOD and LOQ were 0.5 pg/10mg and 1.0 pg/10mg in human hair and 0.5 pg/20mg and 1.0 pg/20mg in pigmented and non-pigmented rat hair, respectively. Additionally, as a result of the animal study, there were not significant differences in the effect of pigmentation on the distribution of AM-2201 and its monohydroxylated metabolites in hair. Wide variations were observed for the concentrations of the naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites in authentic hair samples from nine cases; those were 0.4-59.2 pg/mg for JWH-018, 0.1-0.8 pg/mg for JWH-073, 1

  3. Methamphetamine induces trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) expression in human T lymphocytes: role in immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Uma; Cenna, Jonathan M; Haldar, Bijayesh; Fernandes, Nicole C; Razmpour, Roshanak; Fan, Shongshan; Ramirez, Servio H; Potula, Raghava

    2016-01-01

    The novel transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor, trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), represents a potential, direct target for drugs of abuse and monoaminergic compounds, including amphetamines. For the first time, our studies have illustrated that there is an induction of TAAR1 mRNA expression in resting T lymphocytes in response to methamphetamine. Methamphetamine treatment for 6 h significantly increased TAAR1 mRNA expression (P < 0.001) and protein expression (P < 0.01) at 24 h. With the use of TAAR1 gene silencing, we demonstrate that methamphetamine-induced cAMP, a classic response to methamphetamine stimulation, is regulated via TAAR1. We also show by TAAR1 knockdown that the down-regulation of IL-2 in T cells by methamphetamine, which we reported earlier, is indeed regulated by TAAR1. Our results also show the presence of TAAR1 in human lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected patients, with or without a history of methamphetamine abuse. TAAR1 expression on lymphocytes was largely in the paracortical lymphoid area of the lymph nodes with enhanced expression in lymph nodes of HIV-1-infected methamphetamine abusers rather than infected-only subjects. In vitro analysis of HIV-1 infection of human PBMCs revealed increased TAAR1 expression in the presence of methamphetamine. In summary, the ability of methamphetamine to activate trace TAAR1 in vitro and to regulate important T cell functions, such as cAMP activation and IL-2 production; the expression of TAAR1 in T lymphocytes in peripheral lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes; and our in vitro HIV-1 infection model in PBMCs suggests that TAAR1 may play an important role in methamphetamine -mediated immune-modulatory responses.

  4. Binding of Hepatitis A Virus to its Cellular Receptor 1 Inhibits T-Regulatory Cell Functions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Manangeeswaran, Mohanraj; Jacques, Jérôme; Tami, Cecilia; Konduru, Krishnamurthy; Amharref, Nadia; Perrella, Oreste; Casasnovas, Jose M.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Perrella, Alessandro; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims CD4+ T regulatory (Treg) cells suppress immune responses and control self-tolerance and immunity to pathogens, cancer, and alloantigens. Most pathogens activate Treg cells to minimize immune-mediated tissue damage and prevent clearance, which promotes chronic infections. However, hepatitis A virus (HAV) temporarily inhibits Treg-cell functions. We investigated whether the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), a T-cell co-stimulatory molecule, inhibits the function of Treg cells to control HAV infection. Methods We studied the effects of HAV interaction with HAVCR1 on human T cells using binding, signal transduction, apoptosis, activation, suppression, cytokine production, and confocal microscopy analyses. Cytokines were analyzed in sera from 14 patients with HAV infection using bead arrays. Results Human Treg cells constitutively express HAVCR1. Binding of HAV to HAVCR1 blocked phosphorylation of Akt, prevented activation of the T-cell receptor, and inhibited function of Treg cells. At the peak viremia, patients with acute HAV infection had no Treg-cell suppression function, produced low levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF–β), which limited leukocyte recruitment and survival, and high levels of interleukin-22, which prevented liver damage. Conclusions Interaction between HAV and its receptor HAVCR1 inhibits Treg cell function, resulting in an immune imbalance that allows viral expansion with limited hepatocellular damage during early stages of infection—a characteristic of HAV pathogenesis. The mechanism by which HAV is cleared in the absence of Treg-cell function could be used as a model to develop anti-cancer therapies, modulate autoimmune and allergic responses, and prevent transplant rejection. PMID:22430395

  5. Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signalling desensitization is counteracted via PAR4 signalling in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Fälker, Knut; Haglund, Linda; Gunnarsson, Peter; Nylander, Martina; Lindahl, Tomas L; Grenegård, Magnus

    2011-06-01

    PARs (protease-activated receptors) 1 and 4 belong to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors which induce both G(α12/13) and G(αq) signalling. By applying the specific PAR1- and PAR4-activating hexapeptides, SFLLRN and AYPGKF respectively, we found that aggregation of isolated human platelets mediated via PAR1, but not via PAR4, is abolished upon homologous receptor activation in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. This effect was not due to receptor internalization, but to a decrease in Ca²⁺ mobilization, PKC (protein kinase C) signalling and α-granule secretion, as well as to a complete lack of dense granule secretion. Interestingly, subthreshold PAR4 activation rapidly abrogated PAR1 signalling desensitization by differentially reconstituting these affected signalling events and functional responses, which was sufficient to re-establish aggregation. The lack of ADP release and P2Y₁₂ receptor-induced G(αi) signalling accounted for the loss of the aggregation response, as mimicking G(αi/z) signalling with 2-MeS-ADP (2-methylthioadenosine-5'-O-diphosphate) or epinephrine (adrenaline) could substitute for intermediate PAR4 activation. Finally, we found that the re-sensitization of PAR1 signalling-induced aggregation via PAR4 relied on PKC-mediated release of both ADP from dense granules and fibrinogen from α-granules. The present study elucidates further differences in human platelet PAR signalling regulation and provides evidence for a cross-talk in which PAR4 signalling counteracts mechanisms involved in PAR1 signalling down-regulation. PMID:21391917

  6. Pitfall in cannabinoid analysis--detection of a previously unrecognized interfering compound in human serum.

    PubMed

    Toennes, Stefan W; Hanisch, Stephanie; Pogoda, Werner; Wunder, Cora; Paulke, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In clinical and forensic toxicology, high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is increasingly used since it allows the development of sensitive and fast drug analysis procedures. During development of a LC-MS/MS method for determination of the psychoactive cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and of its two metabolites 11-hydroxy-THC (THCOH) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in serum, a previously unrecognized interfering compound was detected. Extending the fast gradient elution program by an isocratic phase leads to sufficient separation of the interfering compound, initially co-eluting with THCCOOH and exhibiting the same fragments. For characterization, product ion scans and precursor ion scans were performed. Samples from cannabis users were analyzed to estimate the abundance of the interfering compound. The mass spectrometric experiments showed that the interfering compound exhibited the same molecular mass as THCCOOH and a similar fragmentation pattern except for relative fragment intensities. This compound was exclusively detectable in authentic samples. Concentrations were in the range of 4.5 to 51 % (median 14.6 %, n = 73) of those of THCCOOH. After further optimization of the gradient, the method was sufficiently selective and sensitive and validation parameters were within acceptance limits. A new compound related to cannabis use was detected in human serum, and data suggest an isomeric structure to THCCOOH. Considering the rather high amounts observed, it was surprising that this compound had not been detected previously. Further studies on its structure and origin are necessary. PMID:25391576

  7. Structure and chromosomal assignment of the human lectin-like oxidized low-density-lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, T; Sawamura, T; Furutani, Y; Matsuoka, R; Yoshida, M C; Fujiwara, H; Masaki, T

    1999-01-01

    We have reported the cDNA cloning of a modified low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, designated lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), which is postulated to be involved in endothelial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Here, we determined the organization of the human LOX-1 gene, including the 5'-regulatory region. The 5'-regulatory region contained several potential cis-regulatory elements, such as GATA-2 binding element, c-ets-1 binding element, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-responsive element and shear-stress-responsive elements, which may mediate the endothelium-specific and inducible expression of LOX-1. The major transcription-initiation site was found to be located 29 nucleotides downstream of the TATA box and 61 nucleotides upstream from the translation-initiation codon. The minor initiation site was found to be 5 bp downstream from the major site. Most of the promoter activity of the LOX-1 gene was ascribed to the region (-150 to -90) containing the GC and CAAT boxes. The coding sequence was divided into 6 exons by 5 introns. The first 3 exons corresponded to the different functional domains of the protein (cytoplasmic, transmembrane and neck domains), and the residual 3 exons encoded the carbohydrate-recognition domain similar to the case of other C-type lectin genes. The LOX-1 gene was a single-copy gene and assigned to the p12.3-p13.2 region of chromosome 12. Since the locus for a familial hypertension has been mapped to the overlapping region, LOX-1 might be the gene responsible for the hypertension. PMID:10085242

  8. Metabolism of RCS-8, a synthetic cannabinoid with cyclohexyl structure, in human hepatocytes by high-resolution MS

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Zhu, Mingshe; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-01-01

    Background Since 2008, synthetic cannabinoids are major new designer drugs of abuse. They are extensively metabolized and excreted in urine, but limited human metabolism data are available. As there are no reports on the metabolism of RCS-8, a scheduled phenylacetylindole synthetic cannabinoid with an N-cyclohexylethyl moiety, we investigated metabolism of this new designer drug by human hepatocytes and high resolution MS. Methods After human hepatocyte incubation with RCS-8, samples were analyzed on a TripleTOF 5600+ mass spectrometer with time-of-flight survey scan and information-dependent acquisition triggered product ion scans. Data mining of the accurate mass full scan and product ion spectra employed different data processing algorithms. Results and Conclusion More than 20 RCS-8 metabolites were identified, products of oxidation, demethylation, and glucuronidation. Major metabolites and targets for analytical methods were hydroxyphenyl RCS - 8 glucuronide, a variety of hydroxycyclohexyl-hydroxyphenyl RCS-8 glucuronides, hydroxyphenyl RCS-8, as well as the demethyl-hydroxycyclohexyl RCS-8 glucuronide. PMID:24946920

  9. Dendritic Cell Regulation by Cannabinoid-Based Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Mattias; Chen, Puran; Hammarfjord, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the cannabinoid system was discovered. Studies in experimental models and in humans have produced promising results using cannabinoid-based drugs for the treatment of obesity and cancer, as well as neuroinflammatory and chronic inflammatory diseases. Moreover, as we discuss here, additional studies also indicates that these drugs have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties including modulation of immune cell function. Thus, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies against inflammatory disorders. At least two types of cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid 1 and cannabinoid 2 receptors are expressed on immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC). Dendritic cells are recognized for their critical role in initiating and maintaining immune responses. Therefore, DC are potential targets for cannabinoid-mediated modulation. Here, we review the effects of cannabinoids on DC and provide some perspective concerning the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for the treatment of human diseases involving aberrant inflammatory processes.

  10. First characterization of AKB-48 metabolism, a novel synthetic cannabinoid, using human hepatocytes and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Adarsh S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Liu, Hua-Fen; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-10-01

    Since the federal authorities scheduled the first synthetic cannabinoids, JWH-018 and JWH-073, new synthetic cannabinoids were robustly marketed. N-(1-Adamantyl)-1-pentylindazole-3-carboxamide (AKB-48), also known as APINACA, was recently observed in Japanese herbal smoking blends. The National Forensic Laboratory Information System registered 443 reports of AKB-48 cases in the USA from March 2010 to January 2013. In May 2013, the Drug Enforcement Administration listed AKB-48 as a Schedule I drug. Recently, AKB-48 was shown to have twice the CB1 receptor binding affinity than CB2. These pharmacological effects and the difficulty in detecting the parent compound in urine highlight the importance of metabolite identification for developing analytical methods for clinical and forensic investigations. Using human hepatocytes and TripleTOF mass spectrometry, we identified 17 novel phase I and II AKB-48 metabolites, products of monohydroxylation, dihydroxylation, or trihydroxylation on the aliphatic adamantane ring or N-pentyl side chain. Glucuronide conjugation of some mono- and dihydroxylated metabolites also occurred. Oxidation and dihydroxylation on the adamantane ring and N-pentyl side chain formed a ketone. More metabolites were identified after 3 h of incubation than at 1 h. For the first time, we present a AKB-48 metabolic scheme obtained from human hepatocytes and high-resolution mass spectrometry. These data are needed to develop analytical methods to identify AKB-48 consumption in clinical and forensic testing.

  11. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    PubMed

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects.

  12. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    PubMed

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects. PMID:26912385

  13. [Function of cannabinoids in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Rudź, Radosław; Baranowska, Urszula; Malinowska, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids, substances derived from Cannabis sativa, have been used by humans as therapeutic agents for thousands of years. They act through the cannabinoid CB(1), CB(2), vanilloid TRPV1, and the as yet undefined putative endothelial cannabinoid receptors. Intensive research on the influence of cannabinoids on the cardiovascular system has been conducted since the 1990s after the discovery that cannabinoids are involved in hypotension connected with septic, cardiogenic, and hemorrhagic shock. One cannot exclude the future possibility of using cannabinoids as new therapeutic agents in diseases of the cardiovascular system. In the present paper the mechanisms of cannabinoids on heart failure are described. In the acute phase of myocardial infarction, cannabinoids protect the endothelium of coronary vessels and decrease the heart's necrotic area and the risk of arrhythmia. Cannabinoids also act in the chronic phase of myocardial infarction in the process of the heart remodeling. However, the present knowledge of the effects of cannabinoids on the acute and chronic phases of myocardial infarction and the possibility of using these agents in cardiovascular disease therapy is still insufficient. PMID:18464680

  14. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes by inhibiting expression of syndecan-1

    PubMed Central

    KONG, YING; WANG, WANCHUN; ZHANG, CHANGJIE; WU, YI; LIU, YANG; ZHOU, XIAORONG

    2016-01-01

    A central feature of osteoarthritis (OA) is the loss of articular cartilage, which is primarily attributed to cartilage breakdown. A group of metalloproteinases termed the A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family are reported to be important in cartilage breakdown. Recent studies have suggested that ADAMTS-4 is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of OA and that syndecan-1 is closely associated with activation of ADAMTS-4 in human chondrocytes. Accumulating evidence also suggests that cannabinoids have chondroprotective effects. The current study explored the effects of synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) on the expression of syndecan-1 and ADAMTS-4, as well as ADAMTS-4 activity, in unstimulated and interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Primary human OA articular chondrocytes were treated with WIN-55 in the presence or absence of IL-1β and cannabinoid receptor antagonists. The results of the present study demonstrated that WIN-55 inhibited ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated primary human OA articular chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) were constitutively expressed in human OA articular chondrocytes. Furthermore, selective CB2 antagonist, JTE907, but not selective CB1 antagonist, MJ15, abolished the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on ADAMTS-4 activity. WIN55 inhibited the expression of syndecan-1 but not ADAMTS-4, and overexpression of syndecan-1 reversed the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on the ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated human OA articular chondrocytes. Despite having no significant effect on syndecan-1 gene promoter activity, WIN-55 markedly decreased the stability of syndecan-1 mRNA via CB2. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first in vitro evidence supporting that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55 inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1

  15. The endocannabinoid/endovanilloid N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) and synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 abate the inflammatory activation of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Khakpour, Samira; Tran, Alphonso; Sheehan, Kayla; Schumacher, Mark; Xu, Fengyun; Hellman, Judith

    2014-05-01

    Although cannabinoids, such as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, have been studied extensively for their psychoactive effects, it has become apparent that certain cannabinoids possess immunomodulatory activity. Endothelial cells (ECs) are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of organ injury in acute inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, because they express cytokines and chemokines, which facilitate the trafficking of leukocytes to organs, and they modulate vascular barrier function. In this study, we find that primary human ECs from multiple organs express the cannabinoid receptors CB1R, GPR18, and GPR55, as well as the ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1. In contrast to leukocytes, CB2R is only minimally expressed in some EC populations. Furthermore, we show that ECs express all of the known endocannabinoid (eCB) metabolic enzymes. Examining a panel of cannabinoids, we demonstrate that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 and the eCB N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA), but neither anandamide nor 2-arachidonoylglycerol, reduce EC inflammatory responses induced by bacterial lipopeptide, LPS, and TNFα. We find that endothelial CB1R/CB2R are necessary for the effects of NADA, but not those of WIN55,212-2. Furthermore, transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1 appears to counter the anti-inflammatory properties of WIN55,212-2 and NADA, but conversely, in the absence of these cannabinoids, its inhibition exacerbates the inflammatory response in ECs activated with LPS. These data indicate that the eCB system can modulate inflammatory activation of the endothelium and may have important implications for a variety of acute inflammatory disorders that are characterized by EC activation.

  16. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. )

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  17. Detection and quantification of new designer drugs in human blood: Part 1 - Synthetic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Julia; McLaren, Jenna M; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Beyer, Jochen

    2012-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids sprayed on herbal mixtures have been abused as a new designer drug all over the world since 2004. In 2008, the first compounds, CP 47,497 and JWH-018, were identified as active ingredients in these mixtures. Most of the compounds have been synthesized for research purposes and are potent CB1 and/or CB2 receptor agonists. To investigate the presence of synthetic cannabinoids in blood samples, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method was developed using only 100 µL of blood. After the addition of 0.2 mL of trizma buffer, the blood was extracted using liquid-liquid extraction with 1 mL of 1-chlorobutane containing 10% of isopropanol for 5 min on a shaker at 1,500 rpm. After centrifugation at 12,000 rpm for 1 min, the separated solvent layer was transferred to an autosampler vial and evaporated to dryness under N₂. The residue was reconstituted in methanol and injected into a Shimadzu 8030 LC-MS-MS system to separate and detect 25 synthetic cannabinoids. The method has been validated according to international guidelines and was found to be selective for all tested compounds. Calibration was satisfactory from 0.5-100 ng/mL, and from 5.0-500 ng/mL. for HU-210, CP 47,497 and the CP 47,497 C-8 homolog, respectively. The extraction efficiencies ranged from 30-101% and the matrix effects from 67-112%. Accuracy data were within the acceptance interval of ±15% (±20% at the lower limit of quantification) of the nominal values for all drugs.

  18. Cannabinoids: potential targets for bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Cannabinoids are the active chemical components of Cannabis sativa (marijuana). The medical use of cannabis goes back over 5,000 years. Cannabinoids produce a very wide array of central and peripheral effects, some of which may have beneficial clinical applications. The discovery of cannabinoid receptors has spawned great interest within the pharmaceutical industry with the hopes of capitalizing on the beneficial effects of cannabis without the unwanted psychotropic effects on the central and peripheral nervous system. This chapter presents an overview of the pharmacology of cannabinoids and their derivatives. It reviews the current literature on central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors as related to effects on the lower urinary tract and the role of these receptors in normal and abnormal urinary tract function. An objective evaluation of the published results of clinical trials of cannabis extracts for the treatment of bladder dysfunction resulting from multiple sclerosis is also presented. It is clear that cannabinoid receptors are present in the lower urinary tract as well as spinal and higher centers involved in lower urinary tract control. Systemic cannabinoids have effects on the lower urinary tract that may be able to become clinically useful; however, a much greater understanding of the mechanisms of cannabinoid receptors in control of the human lower urinary tract is necessary to facilitate development of novel cannabinoid drugs for treatment of pelvic disorders.

  19. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jäntti, Maria H.; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  20. New ursane triterpenoids from Ficus pandurata and their binding affinity for human cannabinoid and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Amgad I M; Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A; Ahmed, Hany E A; Ahmad, Amany S; Ramadan, Mahmoud A; El-Baky, Atef E Abd; Yamada, Koji; Ross, Samir A

    2016-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Ficus pandurata Hance (Moraceae) fruits has led to the isolation of two new triterpenoids, ficupanduratin A [1β-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (11) and ficupanduratin B [21α-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (17), along with 20 known compounds: α-amyrin acetate (1), α-amyrin (2), 3β-acetoxy-20-taraxasten-22-one (3), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (4), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-12-ursene (5), 11-oxo-α-amyrin acetate (6), 11-oxo-β-amyrin acetate (7), palmitic acid (8), stigmast-4,22-diene-3,6-dione (9), stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione (10), stigmasterol (12), β-sitosterol (13), stigmast-22-ene-3,6-dione (14), stigmastane-3,6-dione (15), 3β,21β-dihydroxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (16), 3β-hydroxy-11α-methoxyurs-12-ene (18), 6-hydroxystigmast-4,22-diene-3-one (19), 6-hydroxystigmast-4-ene-3-one (20), 11α,21α-dihydroxy-3β-acetoxy-urs-12-ene (21), and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22). Compound 21 is reported for the first time from a natural source. The structures of the 20 compounds were elucidated on the basis of IR, 1D ((1)H and (13)C), 2D ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY) NMR and MS spectroscopic data, in addition to comparison with literature data. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-leishmanial, and cytotoxic activities. In addition, their radioligand displacement affinity on opioid and cannabinoid receptors was assessed. Compounds 4, 11, and 15 exhibited good affinity towards the CB2 receptor, with displacement values of 69.7, 62.5 and 86.5 %, respectively. Furthermore, the binding mode of the active compounds in the active site of the CB2 cannabinoid receptors was investigated through molecular modelling. PMID:27350550

  1. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Broyd, Samantha J; van Hell, Hendrika H; Beale, Camilla; Yücel, Murat; Solowij, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    Cannabis use has been associated with impaired cognition during acute intoxication as well as in the unintoxicated state in long-term users. However, the evidence has been mixed and contested, and no systematic reviews of the literature on neuropsychological task-based measures of cognition have been conducted in an attempt to synthesize the findings. We systematically review the empirical research published in the past decade (from January 2004 to February 2015) on acute and chronic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids and on persistence or recovery after abstinence. We summarize the findings into the major categories of the cognitive domains investigated, considering sample characteristics and associations with various cannabis use parameters. Verbal learning and memory and attention are most consistently impaired by acute and chronic exposure to cannabis. Psychomotor function is most affected during acute intoxication, with some evidence for persistence in chronic users and after cessation of use. Impaired verbal memory, attention, and some executive functions may persist after prolonged abstinence, but persistence or recovery across all cognitive domains remains underresearched. Associations between poorer performance and a range of cannabis use parameters, including a younger age of onset, are frequently reported. Little further evidence has emerged for the development of tolerance to the acutely impairing effects of cannabis. Evidence for potential protection from harmful effects by cannabidiol continues to increase but is not definitive. In light of increasing trends toward legalization of cannabis, the knowledge gained from this body of research needs to be incorporated into strategies to minimize harm. PMID:26858214

  2. Expression of lectin-like oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 in human and murine macrophages: upregulated expression by TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, H; Kume, N; Kataoka, H; Murase, T; Nishi, E; Sawamura, T; Masaki, T; Kita, T

    1998-11-27

    Uptake of oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) and subsequent foam cell transformation have been implicated in early atherogenesis. Although multiple molecules, including class A and B scavenger receptors, have been identified as Ox-LDL receptors, additional receptors may also be involved in this process. Here, we provide evidence that lectin-like Ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), a novel Ox-LDL receptor initially identified in vascular endothelial cells, is also expressed in macrophages in humans and mice. Expression of LOX-1 can be induced after macrophage-like differentiation in vitro in human peripheral blood monocytes and the related cell line THP-1 cells. Furthermore, LOX-1 expression can also be detected in resident peritoneal macrophages, and can be upregulated by an inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha. These results suggest that LOX-1 in macrophages may play an important role in Ox-LDL uptake and subsequent foam cell formation in this cell type.

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Human Metabolism of Synthetic Cannabinoids FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Kronstrand, Robert; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22, two novel synthetic cannabinoids, were detected in herbal blends in Japan, Russia, and Germany and were quickly added to their scheduled drugs list. Unfortunately, no human metabolism data are currently available, making it challenging to confirm their intake. The present study aims to identify appropriate analytical markers by investigating FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 metabolism in human hepatocytes and confirm the results in authentic urine specimens. For metabolic stability, 1 μM FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 was incubated with human liver microsomes for up to 1 h; for metabolite profiling, 10 μM was incubated with human hepatocytes for 3 h. Two authentic urine specimens from FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 positive cases were analyzed after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. Metabolite identification in hepatocyte samples and urine specimens was accomplished by high-resolution mass spectrometry using information-dependent acquisition. Both FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 were rapidly metabolized in HLM with half-lives of 12.4 and 11.5 min, respectively. In human hepatocyte samples, we identified seven metabolites for both compounds, generated by ester hydrolysis and further hydroxylation and/or glucuronidation. After ester hydrolysis, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 yielded the same metabolite M7, fluorobenzylindole-3-carboxylic acid (FBI-COOH). M7 and M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) were the major metabolites. In authentic urine specimens after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis, M6 and M7 also were the predominant metabolites. Based on our study, we recommend M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) and M7 (FBI-COOH) as suitable urinary markers for documenting FDU-PB-22 and/or FUB-PB-22 intake.

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Human Metabolism of Synthetic Cannabinoids FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Kronstrand, Robert; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22, two novel synthetic cannabinoids, were detected in herbal blends in Japan, Russia, and Germany and were quickly added to their scheduled drugs list. Unfortunately, no human metabolism data are currently available, making it challenging to confirm their intake. The present study aims to identify appropriate analytical markers by investigating FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 metabolism in human hepatocytes and confirm the results in authentic urine specimens. For metabolic stability, 1 μM FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 was incubated with human liver microsomes for up to 1 h; for metabolite profiling, 10 μM was incubated with human hepatocytes for 3 h. Two authentic urine specimens from FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 positive cases were analyzed after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. Metabolite identification in hepatocyte samples and urine specimens was accomplished by high-resolution mass spectrometry using information-dependent acquisition. Both FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 were rapidly metabolized in HLM with half-lives of 12.4 and 11.5 min, respectively. In human hepatocyte samples, we identified seven metabolites for both compounds, generated by ester hydrolysis and further hydroxylation and/or glucuronidation. After ester hydrolysis, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 yielded the same metabolite M7, fluorobenzylindole-3-carboxylic acid (FBI-COOH). M7 and M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) were the major metabolites. In authentic urine specimens after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis, M6 and M7 also were the predominant metabolites. Based on our study, we recommend M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) and M7 (FBI-COOH) as suitable urinary markers for documenting FDU-PB-22 and/or FUB-PB-22 intake. PMID:26810398

  5. Abnormal immune complex processing and spontaneous glomerulonephritis in complement factor H-deficient mice with human complement receptor 1 on erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jessy J; Hack, Bradley K; Jacob, Alexander; Chang, Anthony; Haas, Mark; Finberg, Robert W; Quigg, Richard J

    2010-09-15

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) on human erythrocytes (Es) and complement factor H (CFH) on rodent platelets perform immune adherence, which is a function that allows the processing of immune complexes (ICs) bearing C3 by the mononuclear phagocyte system. Similar immune adherence occurs in the glomerular podocyte by CR1 in humans and CFH in rodents. As a model for human IC processing, we studied transgenic mice lacking CFH systemically but with human CR1 on Es. These CR1(hu)Tg/CFH(-/-) mice spontaneously developed proliferative glomerulonephritis, which was accelerated in a chronic serum sickness model by active immunization with heterologous apoferritin. ICs containing Ag, IgG and C3 bound to Es in CR1(hu)Tg/CFH(-/-) mice. In this setting, there was increased IC deposition in glomeruli, attributable to the presence of CR1 on Es, together with the absence of CFH on platelets and podocytes. In the absence of plasma CFH, the accumulated ICs activated complement, which led to spontaneous and chronic serum sickness-induced proliferative glomerulonephritis. These findings illustrate the complexities of complement-dependent IC processing by blood cells and in the glomerulus, and the importance of CFH as a plasma complement regulator.

  6. Mouse mammary tumor virus uses mouse but not human transferrin receptor 1 to reach a low pH compartment and infect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Enxiu; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Ying Qihua; Davey, Robert A.; Ross, Susan R.

    2008-11-25

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a pH-dependent virus that uses mouse transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) for entry into cells. Previous studies demonstrated that MMTV could induce pH 5-dependent fusion-from-with of mouse cells. Here we show that the MMTV envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion requires both the entry receptor and low pH (pH 5). Although expression of the MMTV envelope and TfR1 was sufficient to mediate low pH-dependent syncytia formation, virus infection required trafficking to a low pH compartment; infection was independent of cathepsin-mediated proteolysis. Human TfR1 did not support virus infection, although envelope-mediated syncytia formation occurred with human cells after pH 5 treatment and this fusion depended on TfR1 expression. However, although the MMTV envelope bound human TfR1, virus was only internalized and trafficked to a low pH compartment in cells expressing mouse TfR1. Thus, while human TfR1 supported cell-cell fusion, because it was not internalized when bound to MMTV, it did not function as an entry receptor. Our data suggest that MMTV uses TfR1 for all steps of entry: cell attachment, induction of the conformational changes in Env required for membrane fusion and internalization to an appropriate acidic compartment.

  7. Preclinical and first-in-human phase I studies of KW-2450, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor with insulin-like growth factor receptor-1/insulin receptor selectivity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gary K; Dickson, Mark A; LoRusso, Patricia M; Sausville, Edward A; Maekawa, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Yasuo; Kashima, Naomi; Nakashima, Daisuke; Akinaga, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Numerous solid tumors overexpress or have excessively activated insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R). We summarize preclinical studies and the first-in-human study of KW-2450, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor with IGF-1R and insulin receptor (IR) inhibitory activity. Preclinical activity of KW-2450 was evaluated in various in vitro and in vivo models. It was then evaluated in a phase I clinical trial in 13 patients with advanced solid tumors (NCT00921336). In vitro, KW-2450 inhibited human IGF-1R and IR kinases (IC50 7.39 and 5.64 nmol/L, respectively) and the growth of various human malignant cell lines. KW-2450 40 mg/kg showed modest growth inhibitory activity and inhibited IGF-1-induced signal transduction in the murine HT-29/GFP colon carcinoma xenograft model. The maximum tolerated dose of KW-2450 was 37.5 mg once daily continuously; dose-limiting toxicity occurred in two of six patients at 50 mg/day (both grade 3 hyperglycemia) and in one of seven patients at 37.5 mg/day (grade 3 rash). Four of 10 evaluable patients showed stable disease. Single-agent KW-2450 was associated with modest antitumor activity in heavily pretreated patients with solid tumors and is being further investigated in combination therapy with lapatinib/letrozole in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-postive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26850678

  8. Proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR(1)) and PAR(2) but not PAR(4) mediate contraction in human and guinea-pig gallbladders.

    PubMed

    Lee, M-C; Huang, S-C

    2008-04-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR(1)) and PAR(2) mediate contraction in the guinea-pig gallbladder. To investigate and compare the effects mediated by PARs in the human gallbladder with those in the guinea-pig gallbladder, we measured contractions of isolated human and guinea-pig gallbladder strips caused by PAR agonists. Results in human were similar to those in guinea-pig gallbladder. The PAR(1) agonists, thrombin, TFLLR-NH2 and SFLLRN-NH2, as well as the PAR(2) agonists, trypsin, SLIGKV-NH2 and SLIGRL-NH2, caused contraction in both human and guinea-pig gallbladders. These indicate the existence of PAR(1) and PAR(2) mediating gallbladder contraction. Furthermore, the existence of PAR(1) and PAR(2) in the human gallbladder was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. In contrast, FSLLR-NH2, a PAR(1) control peptide, and VKGILS-NH2, a PAR(2) control peptide, as well as three PAR(4) agonists, GYPGKF-NH2, GYPGQV-NH2 and AYPGKF-NH2, did not cause any contraction or relaxation. The contractile responses to TFLLR-NH2, SFLLRN-NH2 and trypsin in both human and guinea-pig gallbladders were insensitive to atropine and tetrodotoxin, suggesting direct effects. These results demonstrate that, similar to the guinea-pig gallbladder, both PAR(1) and PAR(2) but not PAR(4) mediate muscle contraction in the human gallbladder. PAR(1) and PAR(2) may play important roles in the control of both human and guinea-pig gallbladder motility. PMID:18179608

  9. Identification of human liver cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the metabolism of SCH 530348 (Vorapaxar), a potent oral thrombin protease-activated receptor 1 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Anima; Lu, Xiaowen; Penner, Natalia; Gao, Lan; Ramanathan, Ragu; Chowdhury, Swapan K; Kishnani, Narendra S; Alton, Kevin B

    2011-01-01

    Vorapaxar (SCH 530348), a potent oral thrombin protease-activated receptor 1 antagonist, is being developed as an antiplatelet agent for patients with established vascular disease. The objective of this study was to identify the human liver cytochrome P450 (P450) enzyme(s) responsible for the metabolism of SCH 530348. Human liver microsomes metabolized SCH 530348 to M19, an amine metabolite formed via carbamate cleavage, and M20 (monohydroxy-SCH 530348). Recombinant human CYP3A4 exhibited the most activity (11.5% profiled radioactivity) for the formation of M19, followed by markedly less substrate conversion with CYP1A1 and CYP2C19. Trace levels of M19, a major excreted human metabolite, were detected with CYP1A2, CYP3A5, and CYP4F3A. Formation of M19 by human liver microsomes was inhibited 89% by ketoconazole (IC(50), 0.73 μM), 34% by tranylcypromine, and 89% by anti-CYP3A4 monoclonal antibody. There was a significant correlation between the rate of M19 formation and midazolam 1'-hydroxylation (r = 0.75) or M19 formation and testosterone 6β-hydroxylation (r = 0.92). The results of screening, inhibition, and correlation studies confirmed that CYP3A4 is the major P450 enzyme responsible for M19 formation from SCH 530348. In contrast, formation of M20, a major circulating human metabolite at steady state, was primarily catalyzed by CYP3A4 and CYP2J2. M20 is pharmacologically equipotent to SCH 530348, whereas M19 is an inactive metabolite. Formation of M20 by human liver microsomes was inhibited 89% by ketoconazole, 75% by astemizole (a CYP2J2 inhibitor), and 43% by CYP3A4 monoclonal antibody. These results suggest that CYP3A4 and CYP2J2 are both involved in the formation of M20 metabolite. PMID:20926621

  10. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  11. Differential recruitment of co-regulatory proteins to the human estrogen receptor 1 in response to xenoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Smith, L Cody; Clark, Jessica C; Bisesi, Joseph H; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2016-09-01

    The diverse biological effects of xenoestrogens may be explained by their ability to differentially recruit co-regulatory proteins to the estrogen receptor (ER). We employed high-throughput receptor affinity binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment screening assays based on fluorescence polarization and time resolved florescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), respectively, to assess xenoestrogen-specific binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment to the ER. Then we used a functional proteomic assay based on co-immunoprecipitation of ER-bound proteins to isolate and identify intact co-regulatory proteins recruited to a ligand-activated ER. Through these approaches, we revealed differential binding affinity of bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein (GEN) to the human ERα (ESR1) and ligand-dependent recruitment of SRC-1 and SRC-3 peptides. Recruitment profiles were variable for each ligand and in some cases were distinct compared to 17β-estradiol (E2). For example, E2 and GEN recruited both SRC-1 and -3 peptides whereas BPA recruited only SRC-1 peptides. Results of the functional proteomic assay showed differential recruitment between ligands where E2 recruited the greatest number of proteins followed by BPA then GEN. A number of proteins share previously identified relationships with ESR1 as determined by STRING analysis. Although there was limited overlap in proteins identified between treatments, all ligands recruited proteins involved in cell growth as determined by subnetwork enrichment analysis (p<0.05). A comparative, in silico analysis revealed that fewer interactions exist between zebrafish (Danio rerio) esr1 and zebrafish orthologs of proteins identified in our functional proteomic analysis. Taken together these results identify recruitment of known and previously unknown co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 and highlight new methods to assay recruitment of low abundant and intact, endogenous co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 or other nuclear receptors, in

  12. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 (IRF6) and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1) Contribute to Human Tooth Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Modesto, Adriana; Meira, Raquel; Barbosa, Anna Renata Schneider; Lidral, Andrew C.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-01

    Phenotypic characteristics expressed in syndromes give clues to the factors involved in the cause of isolated forms of the same defects. We investigated two genes responsible for craniofacial syndromes, FGFR1 and IRF6, in a collection of families with isolated tooth agenesis. Cheek swab samples were obtained for DNA analysis from 116 case/parent trios. Probands had at least one developmentally missing tooth, excluding third molars. In addition, we studied 89 cases and 50 controls from Ohio to replicate any positive findings. Genotyping was performed by kinetic polymerase chain-reaction or TaqMan assays. Linkage disequilibrium analysis and transmission distortion of the marker alleles were performed. The same variants in the IRF6 gene that are associated with isolated orofacial clefts are also associated with human tooth agenesis (rs861019, P = 0.058; rs17015215—V274I, P = 0.0006; rs7802, P = 0.004). Mutations in IRF6 cause Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndromes. The craniofacial phenotypic characteristics of these syndromes include oral clefts and preferential tooth agenesis of incisors and premolars, besides pits on the lower lips. Also it appears that preferential premolar agenesis is associated with FGFR1 (P = 0.014) and IRF6 (P = 0.002) markers. There were statistically significant data suggesting that IRF6 interacts not only with MSX1 (P = 0.001), but also with TGFA (P = 0.03). PMID:17318851

  13. Nontargeted SWATH acquisition for identifying 47 synthetic cannabinoid metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography-high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheidweiler, Karl B; Jarvis, Michael J Y; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-01-01

    Clandestine laboratories constantly produce new synthetic cannabinoids to circumvent legislative scheduling efforts, challenging and complicating toxicological analysis. Sundstrom et al. (Anal Bioanal Chem 405(26):8463-8474, [9]) and Kronstrand et al. (Anal Bioanal Chem 406(15):3599-3609, [10]) published nontargeted liquid chromatography, high-resolution, quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometric (LC-QTOF) assays with validated detection of 18 and 38 urinary synthetic cannabinoid metabolites, respectively. We developed and validated a LC-QTOF urine method for simultaneously identifying the most current 47 synthetic cannabinoid metabolites from 21 synthetic cannabinoid families (5-fluoro AB-PINACA, 5-fluoro-AKB48, 5-fluoro PB-22, AB-PINACA, ADB-PINACA, AKB48, AM2201, JWH-018, JWH-019, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-200, JWH-210, JWH-250, JWH-398, MAM2201, PB-22, RCS-4, UR-144, and XLR11). β-Glucuronidase-hydrolyzed urine was extracted with 1-mL Biotage SLE+ columns. Specimens were reconstituted in 150-μL mobile phase consisting of 80% A (0.1% formic acid in water) and 20% B (0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile). Fifty microliters was injected, and SWATH™ MS data were acquired in positive electrospray mode. The LC-QTOF instrument consisted of a Shimadzu UFLCxr system and an ABSciex 5600+ TripleTOF® mass spectrometer. Gradient chromatographic separation was achieved with a Restek Ultra Biphenyl column with a 0.5-mL/min flow rate and an overall run time of 15 min. Identification criteria included molecular ion mass error, isotopic profiles, retention time, and library fit criteria. Limits of detection were 0.25-5 μg/L (N = 10 unique fortified urine samples), except for two PB-22 metabolites with limits of 10 and 20 μg/L. Extraction efficiencies and matrix effects (N = 10) were 55-104 and -65-107%, respectively. We present a highly useful novel LC-QTOF method for simultaneously confirming 47 synthetic cannabinoid metabolites in human urine.

  14. Coordinate activation of human platelet protease-activated receptor-1 and -4 in response to subnanomolar alpha-thrombin.

    PubMed

    Ofosu, Frederick A; Dewar, Lori; Craven, Sharon J; Song, Yingqi; Cedrone, Aisha; Freedman, John; Fenton, John W

    2008-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that human platelets activated with SFLLRN release PAR-1 activation peptide, PAR-1-(1-41), even in the presence of hirudin. This observation suggests that during their activation, platelets generate a protease that activates PAR-1. In this study, PAR-1 and -4 activation peptides were detected 10 s after

  15. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia. PMID:26539529

  16. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions.

    PubMed

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia.

  17. Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 is expressed on human megakaryocytes and negatively regulates the maturation of primary megakaryocytic progenitors and cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Jiangnan; Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Haiya; Fu, Qiang; Cao, Yanning; Wang, Yuesi; Feng, Xiaoying; Fu, Aili

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} LAIR-1 is expressed on human megakaryocytes from an early stage. {yields} Up-regulation of LAIR-1 negatively regulates megakaryocytic differentiation of cell line. {yields} LAIR-1 negatively regulates the differentiation of primary megakaryocytic progenitors. -- Abstract: Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is an inhibitory collagen receptor which belongs to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily. Although the inhibitory function of LAIR-1 has been extensively described in multiple leukocytes, its role in megakaryocyte (MK) has not been explored so far. Here, we show that LAIR-1 is expressed on human bone marrow CD34{sup +}CD41a{sup +} and CD41a{sup +}CD42b{sup +} cells. LAIR-1 is also detectable in a fraction of human cord blood CD34{sup +} cell-derived MK that has morphological characteristics of immature MK. In megakaryoblastic cell line Dami, the membrane protein expression of LAIR-1 is up-regulated significantly when cells are treated with phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Furthermore, cross-linking of LAIR-1 in Dami cells with its natural ligand or anti-LAIR-1 antibody leads to the inhibition of cell proliferation and PMA-promoted differentiation when examined by the MK lineage-specific markers (CD41a and CD42b) and polyploidization. In addition, we also observed that cross-linking of LAIR-1 results in decreased MK generation from primary human CD34{sup +} cells cultured in a cytokines cocktail that contains TPO. These results suggest that LAIR-1 is a likely candidate for an early marker of MK differentiation, and provide initial evidence indicating that LAIR-1 serves as a negative regulator of megakaryocytopoiesis.

  18. Synthetic cannabinoids and potential reproductive consequences

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofei; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2013-01-01

    Increases in emergency room visits due to abuse of designer drugs, popularly known by the street names “K2” and “Spice,” are a cause for social, judicial, and clinical concerns. The psychoactive components in these herbal drugs mainly consist of different synthetic cannabinoids, and users of these street drugs are primarily within the age group of 12 to 20 years old. The abusive use of synthetic cannabinoids results in anxiety, nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, elevated blood pressure, tremors, seizures, hallucinations, and paranoid behavior, but the effects of maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids during pregnancy are ambiguous due to limited studies in humans and a relative short history of the drugs. In this review, we discuss the known and potential adverse effects of synthetic cannabinoids on human pregnancy using knowledge gathered from studies in mice and limited studies in humans. In mice, multiple sites and stages of pregnancy are potential targets of synthetic cannabinoids, including preimplantation embryo development, oviductal embryo transport, implantation, placentation, and parturition. It is anticipated that maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids would result in severely compromised female fertility and pregnancy outcome. PMID:23827241

  19. Oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor-1 mediates oxidized low density lipoprotein-induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu-ping; Xun, Ke-li; Wu, Qin; Zhang, Tian-tai; Shi, Jing-shan; Du, Guan-hua

    2007-07-01

    Studies have shown that oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) elicits both necrotic and apoptotic cell death and several mechanisms have been proposed. Ox-LDL induces reactive oxygen species (ROS), a second messenger that might be involved in apoptosis, formation in different types of cells including endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). As lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) was the main receptor for ox-LDL, this study was designed to determine whether the apoptosis induced by ox-LDL was mediated by LOX-1 in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and whether there is an association between LOX-1 mediated apoptosis and the production of ROS. After exposure to ox-LDL (50,100, and 150 microg/ml for 18 h), HUVECs exhibit typical apoptotic characteristics as determined by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry analysis in a dose-dependent pattern. Ox-LDL increases intracellular ROS formation including superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Pretreatment with anti-LOX-1 mAb, Vitamin C, apocynin or catalase significantly reduced ROS production and prevented ox-LDL-induced apoptosis, while indomethacin or allopurinol had no effect. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells and that ROS production and NADPH oxidase might play an important role in ox-LDL-induced apoptosis.

  20. Binding affinity and agonist activity of putative endogenous cannabinoids at the human neocortical CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Marc; Zentner, Josef; Honegger, Jürgen; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the affinity of putative endocannabinoids (2-arachidonylglycerol, 2-AG; noladin ether, virodhamine) for the human neocortical CB1 receptor. Functional activity of these compounds (including anandamide, AEA) was determined by examining basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation. Assays were performed with synaptosomes, prepared from fresh human neocortical tissue. Receptor affinity was assessed from competition binding experiments with the CB1/2 agonist [3H]-CP55.940 in absence or presence of a protease inhibitor to assess enzymatic stability. Noladin ether and virodhamine inhibited [3H]-CP55.940 binding (Ki: 98, 1740 nM, respectively). Protease inhibition decreased the Ki value of virodhamine (Ki: 912 nM), but left that of noladin ether unchanged. 2-AG almost lacked affinity (Ki lymphoblasic )10 microM). Basal cAMP formation was unaffected by AEA and noladin ether, but strongly enhanced by 2-AG and virodhamine. Forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation was inhibited by AEA and noladin ether (IC50: 69, 427 nM, respectively) to the same extent as by CP55.940 (Imax each approximately 30%). Inhibitions by AEA or noladin ether were blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251. Virodhamine increased forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation, also in presence of AM251, by approximately 20%. 2-AG had no effect; in presence of AM251, however, 10 microM 2-AG stimulated cAMP formation by approximately 15%. Our results suggest, that AEA and noladin ether are full CB1 receptor agonists in human neocortex, whereas virodhamine may act as a CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Particularly the (patho)physiological role of 2-AG should be further investigated, since its CB1 receptor affinity and agonist activity especially in humans might be lower than generally assumed. PMID:15588725

  1. Impact of Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Endocannabinoids in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Caroline; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laviolette, Michel; Flamand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Since the identification of cannabinoid receptors in the 1990s, a research field has been dedicated to exploring the role of the cannabinoid system in immunity and the inflammatory response in human tissues and animal models. Although the cannabinoid system is present and crucial in many human tissues, studying the impact of cannabinoids on the lungs is particularly relevant because of their contact with exogenous cannabinoids in the context of marijuana consumption. In the past two decades, the scientific community has gathered a large body of evidence supporting that the activation of the cannabinoid system alleviates pain and reduces inflammation. In the context of lung inflammation, exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids have shown therapeutic potential because of their inhibitory effects on immune cell recruitment and functions. On the other hand, cannabinoids were shown to be deleterious to lung function and to impact respiratory pathogen clearance. In this review, we present the existing data on the regulation of lung immunity and inflammation by phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids and endocannabinoids. PMID:27695418

  2. Impact of Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Endocannabinoids in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Caroline; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laviolette, Michel; Flamand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Since the identification of cannabinoid receptors in the 1990s, a research field has been dedicated to exploring the role of the cannabinoid system in immunity and the inflammatory response in human tissues and animal models. Although the cannabinoid system is present and crucial in many human tissues, studying the impact of cannabinoids on the lungs is particularly relevant because of their contact with exogenous cannabinoids in the context of marijuana consumption. In the past two decades, the scientific community has gathered a large body of evidence supporting that the activation of the cannabinoid system alleviates pain and reduces inflammation. In the context of lung inflammation, exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids have shown therapeutic potential because of their inhibitory effects on immune cell recruitment and functions. On the other hand, cannabinoids were shown to be deleterious to lung function and to impact respiratory pathogen clearance. In this review, we present the existing data on the regulation of lung immunity and inflammation by phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids and endocannabinoids.

  3. The PET Radioligand 18F-FIMX Images and Quantifies Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 in Proportion to the Regional Density of Its Gene Transcript in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Xu, Rong; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Liow, Jeih-San; Fujita, Masahiro; Veronese, Mattia; Gladding, Robert L.; Rallis-Frutos, Denise; Hong, Jinsoo; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    A recent study from our laboratory found that 18F-FIMX is an excellent PET radioligand for quantifying metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) in monkey brain. This study evaluated the ability of 18F-FIMX to quantify mGluR1 in humans. A second goal was to use the relative density of mGluR1 gene transcripts in brain regions to estimate specific uptake and nondisplaceable uptake (VND) in each brain region. Methods After injection of 189 ± 3 MBq of 18F-FIMX, 12 healthy volunteers underwent a dynamic PET scan over 120 min. For 6 volunteers, images were acquired until 210 min. A metabolite-corrected arterial input function was measured from the radial artery. Four other subjects underwent whole-body scanning to estimate radiation exposure. Results 18F-FIMX uptake into the human brain was high (SUV = 4–6 in the cerebellum), peaked at about 10 min, and washed out rapidly. An unconstrained 2-tissue-compartment model fitted the data well, and distribution volume (VT) (mL·cm−3) values ranged from 1.5 in the caudate to 11 in the cerebellum. A 120-min scan provided stable VT values in all regions except the cerebellum, for which an acquisition time of at least 170 min was necessary. VT values in brain regions correlated well with mGluR1 transcript density, and the correlation suggested that VND of 18F-FIMX was quite low (0.5 mL·cm−3). This measure of VND in humans was similar to that from a receptor blocking study in monkeys, after correcting for differences in plasma protein binding. Similar to other 18F-labeled ligands, the effective dose was about 23 µSv/MBq. Conclusion 18F-FIMX can quantify mGluR1 in the human brain with a 120- to 170-min scan. Correlation of brain uptake with the relative density of mGluR1 transcript allows specific receptor binding of a radioligand to be quantified without injecting pharmacologic doses of a blocking agent. PMID:26514176

  4. Identification of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-histidine adducts that serve as ligands for human lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Kumano-Kuramochi, Miyuki; Shimozu, Yuuki; Wakita, Chika; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Shibata, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Takano-Ishikawa, Yuko; Watanabe, Jun; Goto, Masao; Xie, Qiuhong; Komba, Shiro; Uchida, Koji; Machida, Sachiko

    2012-02-15

    LOX-1 (lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1) is an endothelial scavenger receptor that is important for the uptake of OxLDL (oxidized low-density lipoprotein) and contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. However, the precise structural motifs of OxLDL that are recognized by LOX-1 are unknown. In the present study, we have identified products of lipid peroxidation of OxLDL that serve as ligands for LOX-1. We used CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cells that stably express LOX-1 to evaluate the ability of BSA modified by lipid peroxidation to compete with AcLDL (acetylated low-density lipoprotein). We found that HNE (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal)-modified proteins most potently inhibited the uptake of AcLDL. On the basis of the findings that HNE-modified BSA and oxidation of LDL resulted in the formation of HNE-histidine Michael adducts, we examined whether the HNE-histidine adducts could serve as ligands for LOX-1. The authentic HNE-histidine adduct inhibited the uptake of AcLDL in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found the interaction of LOX-1 with the HNE-histidine adduct to have a dissociation constant of 1.22×10(-8) M using a surface plasmon resonance assay. Finally, we showed that the HNE-histidine adduct stimulated the formation of reactive oxygen species and activated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) in HAECs (human aortic endothelial cells); these signals initiate endothelial dysfunction and lead to atherosclerosis. The present study provides intriguing insights into the molecular details of LOX-1 recognition of OxLDL.

  5. Pharmacological characterization of emerging synthetic cannabinoids in HEK293T cells and hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Costain, Willard J; Tauskela, Joseph S; Rasquinha, Ingrid; Comas, Tanya; Hewitt, Melissa; Marleau, Vincent; Soo, Evelyn C

    2016-09-01

    There has been a worldwide proliferation of synthetic cannabinoids that have become marketed as legal alternatives to cannabis (marijuana). Unfortunately, there is a dearth of information about the pharmacological effects of many of these emerging synthetic cannabinoids (ESCs), which presents a challenge for regulatory authorities that need to take such scientific evidence into consideration in order to regulate ECSs as controlled substances. We aimed to characterize the pharmacological properties of ten ESCs using two cell based assays that enabled the determination of potency and efficacy relative to a panel of well-characterized cannabinoids. Agonist-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels was monitored in live HEK293T cells transfected with human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) and pGloSensor-22F. Pharmacological analysis of this data indicated that all of the ESCs tested were full agonists, with the following rank order of potency: Win 55212-2≈5F-PB-22≈AB-PINACA≈EAM-2201≈MAM-2201>JWH-250≈ PB-22>AKB48 N-(5FP)>AKB-48≈STS-135>XLR-11. Assessment of agonist-stimulated depression of Ca(2+) transients was also used to confirm the efficacy of five ESCs (XLR-11, JWH-250, AB-PINACA, 5F-PB-22, and MAM-2201) in cultured primary hippocampal neurons. This work aims to help inform decisions made by regulatory agencies concerned with the profusion of these poorly characterized recreational drugs. PMID:27260125

  6. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum,...

  7. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum,...

  8. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum,...

  9. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum,...

  10. 76 FR 71351 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Cannabinoid(s) and Cannabidiol(s) Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... practice the invention embodied in U.S. Patent 6,630,507, entitled ``Cannabinoids as antioxidants and... ``Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants'' to KannaLife Sciences Inc., which has offices in New York... antioxidants and neuroprotectants for use and delivery in humans, for the treatment of hepatic...

  11. A Compartment Model of VEGF Distribution in Humans in the Presence of Soluble VEGF Receptor-1 Acting as a Ligand Trap

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Florence T. H.; Stefanini, Marianne O.; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), through its activation of cell surface receptor tyrosine kinases including VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, is a vital regulator of stimulatory and inhibitory processes that keep angiogenesis – new capillary growth from existing microvasculature – at a dynamic balance in normal physiology. Soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR1) – a naturally-occurring truncated version of VEGFR1 lacking the transmembrane and intracellular signaling domains – has been postulated to exert inhibitory effects on angiogenic signaling via two mechanisms: direct sequestration of angiogenic ligands such as VEGF; or dominant-negative heterodimerization with surface VEGFRs. In pre-clinical studies, sVEGFR1 gene and protein therapy have demonstrated efficacy in inhibiting tumor angiogenesis; while in clinical studies, sVEGFR1 has shown utility as a diagnostic or prognostic marker in a widening array of angiogenesis–dependent diseases. Here we developed a novel computational multi-tissue model for recapitulating the dynamic systemic distributions of VEGF and sVEGFR1. Model features included: physiologically-based multi-scale compartmentalization of the human body; inter-compartmental macromolecular biotransport processes (vascular permeability, lymphatic drainage); and molecularly-detailed binding interactions between the ligand isoforms VEGF121 and VEGF165, signaling receptors VEGFR1 and VEGFR2, non-signaling co-receptor neuropilin-1 (NRP1), as well as sVEGFR1. The model was parameterized to represent a healthy human subject, whereupon we investigated the effects of sVEGFR1 on the distribution and activation of VEGF ligands and receptors. We assessed the healthy baseline stability of circulating VEGF and sVEGFR1 levels in plasma, as well as their reliability in indicating tissue-level angiogenic signaling potential. Unexpectedly, simulated results showed that sVEGFR1 – acting as a diffusible VEGF sink alone, i.e., without sVEGFR1-VEGFR heterodimerization

  12. Modulation of breast cancer cell viability by a cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist, JWH-015, is calcium dependent

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Katherine E; Lozano-Ondoua, Alysia N; Umaretiya, Puja J; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M; Chandramouli, Anupama; Moy, Jamie K; Kwass, William K; Mantyh, Patrick W; Nelson, Mark A; Vanderah, Todd W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cannabinoid compounds, both nonspecific as well as agonists selective for either cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) or cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), have been shown to modulate the tumor microenvironment by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells in several model systems. The mechanism of this modulation remains only partially delineated, and activity induced via the CB1 and CB2 receptors may be distinct despite significant sequence homology and structural similarity of ligands. Methods The CB2-selective agonist JWH-015 was used to investigate mechanisms downstream of CB2 activation in mouse and human breast cancer cell lines in vitro and in a murine mammary tumor model. Results JWH-015 treatment significantly reduced primary tumor burden and metastasis of luciferase-tagged murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells in immunocompetent mice in vivo. Furthermore, JWH-015 reduced the viability of murine 4T1 and human MCF7 mammary carcinoma cells in vitro by inducing apoptosis. JWH-015-mediated reduction of breast cancer cell viability was not dependent on Gαi signaling in vitro or modified by classical pharmacological blockade of CB1, GPR55, TRPV1, or TRPA1 receptors. JWH-015 effects were calcium dependent and induced changes in MAPK/ERK signaling. Conclusion The results of this work characterize the actions of a CB2-selective agonist on breast cancer cells in a syngeneic murine model representing how a clinical presentation of cancer progression and metastasis may be significantly modulated by a G-protein-coupled receptor. PMID:27186076

  13. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Jonathan A.; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2013-01-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation. PMID:22150623

  14. Severe Toxicity Following Synthetic Cannabinoid Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    LAPOINT, J.; JAMES, L. P.; MORAN, C. L.; NELSON, L. S.; HOFFMAN, R. S.; MORAN, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report a case of seizures and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) following confirmed synthetic cannabinoid ingestion. Background Despite widespread use of legal synthetic cannabinoids, reports of serious toxicity following confirmed use of synthetic cannabinoids are rare. We report severe toxicity including seizures following intentional ingestion of the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and detail confirmation by laboratory analysis. Case Report A healthy 48 year old man had a generalized seizure within thirty minutes of ingesting an ethanol mixture containing a white powder he purchased from the Internet in an attempt to get high. Seizures recurred and abated with lorazepam. Initial vital signs were: pulse, 106/min; BP, 140/88 mmHg; respirations, 22/min; temperature, 37.7 °C. A noncontrast computed tomography of the brain and EEG were negative, and serum chemistry values were normal. The blood ethanol concentration was 3.8 mg/dL and the CPK 2,649 U/L. Urine drug screening by EMIT was negative for common drugs of abuse, including tetrahydrocannabinol. On hospital day 1, he developed medically refractory SVT. The patient had no further complications and was discharged in his normal state of health 10 days after admission. The original powder was confirmed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to be JWH-018, and a primary JWH-018 metabolite was detected in the patient’s urine (200 nM) using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Discussion Synthetic cannabinoids are legal in many parts of the world and easily obtained over the Internet. Data on human toxicity are limited and real-time confirmatory testing is unavailable to clinicians. The potential for toxicity exists for users mistakenly associating the dose and side effect profiles of synthetic cannabinoids to those of marijuana. Conclusion Ingestion of JWH-018 can produce seizures and tachyarrhythmias. Clinicians, lawmakers, and the general public need to be aware of the potential for

  15. Impact of a synthetic cannabinoid (CP-47,497-C8) on protein expression in human cells: evidence for induction of inflammation and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bileck, Andrea; Ferk, Franziska; Al-Serori, Halh; Koller, Verena J; Muqaku, Besnik; Haslberger, Alexander; Auwärter, Volker; Gerner, Christopher; Knasmüller, Siegfried

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are marketed worldwide as legal surrogates for marihuana. In order to predict potential health effects in consumers and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action, we investigated the impact of a representative of the cyclohexylphenols, CP47,497-C8, which binds to both cannabinoid receptors, on protein expression patterns, genomic stability and on induction of inflammatory cytokines in human lymphocytes. After treatment of the cells with the drug, we found pronounced up-regulation of a variety of enzymes in nuclear extracts which are involved in lipid metabolism and inflammatory signaling; some of the identified proteins are also involved in the endogenous synthesis of endocannabinoids. The assumption that the drug causes inflammation is further supported by results obtained in additional experiments with cytosols of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes which showed that the SC induces pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL12p40 and IL-6) as well as TNF-α. Furthermore, the proteome analyses revealed that the drug causes down-regulation of proteins which are involved in DNA repair. This observation provides an explanation for the formation of comets which was seen in single-cell gel electrophoresis assays and for the induction of micronuclei (which reflect structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations) by the drug. These effects were seen in experiments with human lymphocytes which were conducted under identical conditions as the proteome analysis. Taken together, the present findings indicate that the drug (and possibly other structurally related SCs) may cause DNA damage and inflammation in directly exposed cells of consumers. PMID:26194647

  16. A runner's high depends on cannabinoid receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Johannes; Steinle, Jörg; Bindila, Laura; Auer, Matthias K; Kirchherr, Hartmut; Lutz, Beat; Gass, Peter

    2015-10-20

    Exercise is rewarding, and long-distance runners have described a runner's high as a sudden pleasant feeling of euphoria, anxiolysis, sedation, and analgesia. A popular belief has been that endogenous endorphins mediate these beneficial effects. However, running exercise increases blood levels of both β-endorphin (an opioid) and anandamide (an endocannabinoid). Using a combination of pharmacologic, molecular genetic, and behavioral studies in mice, we demonstrate that cannabinoid receptors mediate acute anxiolysis and analgesia after running. We show that anxiolysis depends on intact cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptors on forebrain GABAergic neurons and pain reduction on activation of peripheral CB1 and CB2 receptors. We thus demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system is crucial for two main aspects of a runner's high. Sedation, in contrast, was not influenced by cannabinoid or opioid receptor blockage, and euphoria cannot be studied in mouse models. PMID:26438875

  17. Cellular approaches to the interaction between cannabinoid receptor ligands and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Oz, Murat; Al Kury, Lina; Keun-Hang, Susan Yang; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Galadari, Sehamuddin

    2014-05-15

    Cannabinoids are among the earliest known drugs to humanity. Cannabis plant contains various phytochemicals that bind to cannabinoid receptors. In addition, synthetic and endogenously produced cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) constitute other classes of cannabinoid receptor ligands. Although many pharmacological effects of these cannabinoids are mediated by the activation of cannabinoid receptors, recent studies indicate that cannabinoids also modulate the functions of various integral membrane proteins including ion channels, receptors, neurotransmitter transporters, and enzymes by mechanism(s) not involving the activation of known cannabinoid receptors. Currently, the mechanisms of these effects were not fully understood. However, it is likely that direct actions of cannabinoids are closely linked to their lipophilic structures. This report will focus on the actions of cannabinoids on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and will examine the results of recent studies in this field. In addition some mechanistic approaches will be provided. The results discussed in this review indicate that, besides cannabinoid receptors, further molecular targets for cannabinoids exist and that these targets may represent important novel sites to alter neuronal excitability.

  18. Anticancer mechanisms of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Velasco, G; Sánchez, C; Guzmán, M

    2016-03-01

    In addition to the well-known palliative effects of cannabinoids on some cancer-associated symptoms, a large body of evidence shows that these molecules can decrease tumour growth in animal models of cancer. They do so by modulating key cell signalling pathways involved in the control of cancer cell proliferation and survival. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit angiogenesis and decrease metastasis in various tumour types in laboratory animals. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of cannabinoids as antitumour agents, focusing on recent discoveries about their molecular mechanisms of action, including resistance mechanisms and opportunities for their use in combination therapy. Those observations have already contributed to the foundation for the development of the first clinical studies that will analyze the safety and potential clinical benefit of cannabinoids as anticancer agents.

  19. Anticancer mechanisms of cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, G.; Sánchez, C.; Guzmán, M.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the well-known palliative effects of cannabinoids on some cancer-associated symptoms, a large body of evidence shows that these molecules can decrease tumour growth in animal models of cancer. They do so by modulating key cell signalling pathways involved in the control of cancer cell proliferation and survival. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit angiogenesis and decrease metastasis in various tumour types in laboratory animals. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of cannabinoids as antitumour agents, focusing on recent discoveries about their molecular mechanisms of action, including resistance mechanisms and opportunities for their use in combination therapy. Those observations have already contributed to the foundation for the development of the first clinical studies that will analyze the safety and potential clinical benefit of cannabinoids as anticancer agents. PMID:27022311

  20. What Are Synthetic Cannabinoids?

    MedlinePlus

    ... those produced by marijuana: elevated mood relaxation altered perception —awareness of surrounding objects and conditions symptoms of ... those produced by marijuana: elevated mood relaxation altered perception symptoms of psychosis Synthetic cannabinoids can also cause ...

  1. Endogenous cannabinoid system as a modulator of food intake.

    PubMed

    Cota, D; Marsicano, G; Lutz, B; Vicennati, V; Stalla, G K; Pasquali, R; Pagotto, U

    2003-03-01

    The ability of Cannabis sativa (marijuana) to increase hunger has been noticed for centuries, although intensive research on its molecular mode of action started only after the characterization of its main psychoactive component Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in the late 1960s. Despite the public concern related to the abuse of marijuana and its derivatives, scientific studies have pointed to the therapeutic potentials of cannabinoid compounds and have highlighted their ability to stimulate appetite, especially for sweet and palatable food. Later, the discovery of specific receptors and their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids) suggested the existence of an endogenous cannabinoid system, providing a physiological basis for biological effects induced by marijuana and other cannabinoids. Epidemiological reports describing the appetite-stimulating properties of cannabinoids and the recent insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cannabinoid action have proposed a central role of the cannabinoid system in obesity. The aim of this review is to provide an extensive overview on the role of this neuromodulatory system in feeding behavior by summarizing the most relevant data obtained from human and animal studies and by elucidating the interactions of the cannabinoid system with the most important neuronal networks and metabolic pathways involved in the control of food intake. Finally, a critical evaluation of future potential therapeutical applications of cannabinoid antagonists in the therapy of obesity and eating disorders will be discussed.

  2. Cannabinoids and haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzeska, Agnieszka; Grędziński, Tomasz; Kisiel, Wioleta; Chabielska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system (cannabinoid receptors CB1, CB2, CBPT and CBED, endocannabinoids, enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of endocannabinoids) are located on the structures involved in the process of hemostasis. An increasing level of endocannabinoids was also observed in some pathological conditions, which may occur in disorders of hemostasis. At the same time, disconcertingly, there is an increased number of reports about incidents of cardiovascular events in smokers of marijuana. Experimental and clinical studies demonstrated multidirectional, often contradictory, effects of cannabinoids on hemostasis, including effects of the compounds on platelets, vascular endothelium, fibrinolysis and plasma coagulation systems. The mechanisms of action of cannabinoids on homeostasis depend on the cannabinoid receptors CB1, CB2, CBPT and CBED, receptors of other systems stimulated by endocannabinoids, as well as metabolites of endocannabinoids and nitrogen oxide. The range of biological functions of endo- and plant cannabinoids, expanded to include the process of hemostasis, may constitute a condition for their recognition as a new factor responsible for thromboembolism in smokers of marijuana, in pathological disorders with increased levels of endocannabinoids and in individuals with polymorphisms of FAAH C385A and A385A. On the other hand, there are compelling reasons for anti‑hemostatic action of cannabinoids. PMID:27383573

  3. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2003-01-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the consumption of cannabis, both the marijuana-like action and the medicinal benefits of the plant. However, its acid metabolite THC-COOH, the non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), several cannabinoid analogues and newly discovered modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoids exert many effects through activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral tissues. Additionally, there is evidence for non-receptor-dependent mechanisms. Natural cannabis products and single cannabinoids are usually inhaled or taken orally; the rectal route, sublingual administration, transdermal delivery, eye drops and aerosols have only been used in a few studies and are of little relevance in practice today. The pharmacokinetics of THC vary as a function of its route of administration. Pulmonary assimilation of inhaled THC causes a maximum plasma concentration within minutes, psychotropic effects start within seconds to a few minutes, reach a maximum after 15-30 minutes, and taper off within 2-3 hours. Following oral ingestion, psychotropic effects set in with a delay of 30-90 minutes, reach their maximum after 2-3 hours and last for about 4-12 hours, depending on dose and specific effect. At doses exceeding the psychotropic threshold, ingestion of cannabis usually causes enhanced well-being and relaxation with an intensification of ordinary sensory experiences. The most important acute adverse effects caused by overdosing are anxiety and panic attacks, and with regard to somatic effects increased heart rate and changes in blood pressure. Regular use of cannabis may lead to dependency and to a mild withdrawal syndrome. The existence and the intensity of possible long-term adverse effects on psyche and cognition, immune system, fertility and pregnancy remain controversial

  4. First Metabolic Profile of XLR-11, a Novel Synthetic Cannabinoid, Obtained by Using Human Hepatocytes and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Zhu, Mingshe; Gandhi, Adarsh S.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Liu, Hua-fen; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Since the mid-2000s synthetic cannabinoids have been abused as recreational drugs, prompting scheduling of these substances in many countries. To circumvent legislation, manufacturers constantly market new compounds; [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (XLR-11), the fluorinated UR-144 analog, is one of the most recent and widely abused drugs, and its use is now linked with acute kidney injury. Our goal was to investigate XLR-11 metabolism for identification of major urinary targets in analytical methods and to clarify the origin of metabolites when one or more parent synthetic cannabinoids can be the source. METHODS We incubated 10 μmol/L XLR-11 with pooled human hepatocytes and sampled after 1 and 3 h. Samples were analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry with a TOF scan followed by information-dependent acquisition triggered product ion scans with dynamic background subtraction and mass defect filters. Scans were thoroughly data mined with different data processing algorithms (Metabolite Pilot 1.5). RESULTS XLR-11 underwent phase I and II metabolism, producing more than 25 metabolites resulting from hydroxylation, carboxylation, hemiketal and hemiacetal formation, internal dehydration, and further glucuronidation of some oxidative metabolites. No sulfate or glutathione conjugation was observed. XLR-11 also was defluorinated, forming UR-144 metabolites. On the basis of mass spectrometry peak areas, we determined that the major metabolites were 2′-carboxy-XLR-11, UR-144 pentanoic acid, 5-hydroxy-UR-144, hydroxy-XLR-11 glucuronides, and 2′-carboxy-UR-144 pentanoic acid. Minor metabolites were combinations of the biotransformations mentioned above, often glucuronidated. CONCLUSIONS These are the first data defining major urinary targets of XLR-11 metabolism that could document XLR-11 intake in forensic and clinical investigations. PMID:24014837

  5. Expression of the Endocannabinoid Receptors in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; Caro, R. De; Stecco, C.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1) and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2) in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies) and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:27349320

  6. Detection Times of Carboxylic Acid Metabolites of the Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 in Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Hegstad, Solfrid; Westin, Andreas A; Spigset, Olav

    2015-05-01

    Over the past years, use of synthetic cannabinoids has become increasingly popular. To draw the right conclusions regarding new intake of these substances in situations of repeated urinary drug testing, knowledge of their elimination rate in urine is essential. We report data from consecutive urine specimens from five subjects after ingestion of synthetic cannabinoids. Urinary concentrations of the carboxylic acid metabolites JWH-018-COOH and JWH-073-COOH were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) with a limit of quantification of 0.1 ng/mL. In these subjects, specimens remained positive over a period of 20-43 (mean 27) days for JWH-018-COOH and over a period of 11-25 (mean 19) days for JWH-073-COOH. Detection times were shorter for subjects that appeared to have ingested only one, or a few, doses prior to urine collection in the study. Creatinine-normalized concentrations (CN-concentrations) slowly declined throughout the follow-up period in all subjects, suggesting that no new intake had taken place during this period. Mean elimination half-lives in urine were 14.0 (range 4.4-23.8) days for CN-JWH-018-COOH and 9.3 (range 3.6-16.8) days for CN-JWH-073-COOH. These data show that urine specimens could be positive for JWH-018-COOH for more than 6 weeks and JWH-073-COOH for more than 3 weeks after ingestion. However, such long detection periods require a low limit of quantification.

  7. Cannabinoids and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Katchan, Valeria; David, Paula; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-06-01

    Cannabinoids have shown to have a variety effects on body systems. Through CB1 and CB2 receptors, amongst other, they exert an effect by modulating neurotransmitter and cytokine release. Current research in the role of cannabinoids in the immune system shows that they possess immunosuppressive properties. They can inhibit proliferation of leucocytes, induce apoptosis of T cells and macrophages and reduce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In mice models, they are effective in reducing inflammation in arthritis, multiple sclerosis, have a positive effect on neuropathic pain and in type 1 diabetes mellitus. They are effective as treatment for fibromyalgia and have shown to have anti-fibrotic effect in scleroderma. Studies in human models are scarce and not conclusive and more research is required in this field. Cannabinoids can be therefore promising immunosuppressive and anti-fibrotic agents in the therapy of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26876387

  8. Autophagy activation by novel inducers prevents BECN2-mediated drug tolerance to cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Kenta; Wang, Nan; Fan, Yuying; Zhang, Weiran; Schoenen, Frank J; Frankowski, Kevin J; Marugan, Juan; Zhou, Yifa; Huang, Sui; He, Congcong

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoids and related drugs generate profound behavioral effects (such as analgesic effects) through activating CNR1 (cannabinoid receptor 1 [brain]). However, repeated cannabinoid administration triggers lysosomal degradation of the receptor and rapid development of drug tolerance, limiting the medical use of marijuana in chronic diseases. The pathogenic mechanisms of cannabinoid tolerance are not fully understood, and little is known about its prevention. Here we show that a protein involved in macroautophagy/autophagy (a conserved lysosomal degradation pathway), BECN2 (beclin 2), mediates cannabinoid tolerance by preventing CNR1 recycling and resensitization after prolonged agonist exposure, and deletion of Becn2 rescues CNR1 activity in mouse brain and conveys resistance to analgesic tolerance to chronic cannabinoids. To target BECN2 therapeutically, we established a competitive recruitment model of BECN2 and identified novel synthetic, natural or physiological stimuli of autophagy that sequester BECN2 from its binding with GPRASP1, a receptor protein for CNR1 degradation. Co-administration of these autophagy inducers effectively restores the level and signaling of brain CNR1 and protects mice from developing tolerance to repeated cannabinoid usage. Overall, our findings demonstrate the functional link among autophagy, receptor signaling and animal behavior regulated by psychoactive drugs, and develop a new strategy to prevent tolerance and improve medical efficacy of cannabinoids by modulating the BECN2 interactome and autophagy activity. PMID:27305347

  9. Comparison of the pharmacology and signal transduction of the human cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Felder, C C; Joyce, K E; Briley, E M; Mansouri, J; Mackie, K; Blond, O; Lai, Y; Ma, A L; Mitchell, R L

    1995-09-01

    The recently cloned CB2 cannabinoid receptor subtype was stably transfected into AtT-20 and Chinese hamster ovary cells to compare the binding and signal transduction properties of this receptor with those of the CB1 receptor subtype. The binding of [3H]CP 55,940 to both CB1 and CB2 was of similar high affinity (2.6 and 3.7 nM, respectively) and saturable. In competitive binding experiments, (-)-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and CP 55,940 were equipotent at the CB1 and CB2 receptors, but WIN 55212-2 and cannabinol bound with higher affinity to the CB2 than the CB1 receptor. HU 210 had a higher affinity for the CB1 receptor. Anandamide, a recently identified endogenous cannabinoid agonist, was essentially equipotent at both receptor subtypes. The structurally related fatty acid ethanolamides dihomo-gamma-linolenylethanolamide and mead ethanolamide also bound with relatively equal affinity to both receptors, but adrenylethanolamide had a higher affinity for the CB1 receptor. The rank order of potency and efficacy for binding of the selected agonists to the CB1 and CB2 receptors was mimicked in functional inhibition of cAMP accumulation experiments for all compounds tested. Both CB1 and CB2 receptors couple to the inhibition of cAMP accumulation that was pertussis toxin sensitive. SR141716A, a CB1 receptor antagonist, was a poor antagonist at the CB2 receptor in both binding and functional inhibition of cAMP accumulation experiments. When expressed in AtT-20 cells, the CB1 receptor mediated an inhibition of Q-type calcium channels and an activation of inward rectifying potassium channels. In contrast, the CB2 receptor did not modulate the activity of either channel under identical assay conditions. Similar to results obtained for CB1 receptor, the CB2 receptor did not couple to the activation of phospholipases A2, C, or D or to the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Except for its inability to couple to the modulation of Q-type calcium channels or inwardly rectifying

  10. Qualitative Confirmation of 9 Synthetic Cannabinoids and 20 Metabolites in Human Urine Using LC–MS/MS and Library Search

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Hua-fen; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Synthetic cannabinoids are an emerging illicit drug class. The variety of available substances is large and ever-changing, making it difficult for laboratories to remain current. We present a qualitative LC–MS/MS method identifying urinary metabolites of JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-200, JWH-210, JWH-250, RCS-4, and AM2201 and the parent compounds JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-210, JWH-250, RCS-4, AM2201, and MAM2201. Methods After enzymatic hydrolysis, urinary proteins were precipitated with acetonitrile. Chromatography utilized a 10 min gradient on a Kinetex XB-C18 column with 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile. Scheduled multiple reaction monitoring “survey scans” were followed by information-dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion scan experiments on an ABSciex 5500 QTRAP mass spectrometer. Analytes were identified by software-assisted library searching against reference spectra. Results The method was fully validated, including proof of selectivity (no exogenous or endogenous interferences were observed), assessment of matrix effects (95–122%) and recovery (53–95%), determination of limits of detection (0.5–10 ng/mL), carry-over studies (thresholds between 100 and 1000 ng/mL), and determination of autosampler stability (samples were stable for at least 3 days). Hydrolysis efficiency was thoroughly investigated for a wide range of glucuronides and for the reference standard, JWH-018 5-hydroxypentyl glucuronide PMID:23458260

  11. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 regulates STAT3 activity and its expression dictates the responsiveness to SR141716 treatment in human glioma patients' cells.

    PubMed

    Ciaglia, Elena; Torelli, Giovanni; Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; D'Alessandro, Alba; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Fiore, Donatella; Pagano Zottola, Antonio Christian; Proto, Maria Chiara; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2015-06-20

    Herein we show that a majority of human brain tumor samples and cell lines over-expressed cannabinoid receptor CB1 as compared to normal human astrocytes (NHA), while uniformly expressed low levels of CB2. This finding prompted us to investigate the therapeutic exploitation of CB1 inactivation by SR141716 treatment, with regard to its direct and indirect cell-mediated effects against gliomas. Functional studies, using U251MG glioma cells and primary tumor cell lines derived from glioma patients expressing different levels of CB1, highlighted SR141716 efficacy in inducing apoptosis via G1 phase stasis and block of TGF-β1 secretion through a mechanism that involves STAT3 inhibition. According to the multivariate role of STAT3 in the immune escape too, interestingly SR141716 lead also to the functional and selective expression of MICA/B on the surface of responsive malignant glioma cells, but not on NHA. This makes SR141716 treated-glioma cells potent targets for allogeneic NK cell-mediated recognition through a NKG2D restricted mechanism, thus priming them for NK cell antitumor reactivity. These results indicate that CB1 and STAT3 participate in a new oncogenic network in the complex biology of glioma and their expression levels in patients dictate the efficacy of the CB1 antagonist SR141716 in multimodal glioma destruction.

  12. Molecular imaging of human tumor cells that naturally overexpress type 2 cannabinoid receptors using a quinolone-based near-infrared fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Shao, Pin; Zhang, Shaojuan; Ling, Xiaoxi; Bai, Mingfeng

    2014-07-01

    Cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2R) hold promise as therapeutic targets for treating diverse diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders, addiction, and immune disorders. However, the fundamental role of CBR in the regulation of diseases remains unclear, largely due to a lack of reliable imaging tools for the receptors. The goal of this study was to develop a CBR-targeted molecular imaging probe and evaluate the specificity of the probe using human tumor cells that naturally overexpress CBR. To synthesize the CBR-targeted probe (NIR760-Q), a conjugable CBR ligand based on the quinolone structure was first prepared, followed by bioconjugation with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, NIR760. In vitro fluorescence imaging and competitive binding studies showed higher uptake of NIR760-Q than free NIR760 dye in Jurkat human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In addition, the high uptake of NIR760-Q was significantly inhibited by the blocking agent, 4-quinolone-3-carboxamide, indicating specific binding of NIR760-Q to the target receptors. These results indicate that the NIR760-Q has potential in diagnostic imaging of CBR positive cancers and elucidating the role of CBR in the regulation of disease progression.

  13. Cannabinoid Receptors Are Overexpressed in CLL but of Limited Potential for Therapeutic Exploitation.

    PubMed

    Freund, Patricia; Porpaczy, Edit A; Le, Trang; Gruber, Michaela; Pausz, Clemens; Staber, Philipp; Jäger, Ulrich; Vanura, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CNR1&2) are overexpressed in a variety of malignant diseases and cannabinoids can have noteworthy impact on tumor cell viability and tumor growth. Patients diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) present with very heterogeneous disease characteristics translating into highly differential risk properties. To meet the urgent need for refinement in risk stratification at diagnosis and the search for novel therapies we studied CNR expression and response to cannabinoid treatment in CLL. Expression levels of CNR1&2 were determined in 107 CLL patients by real-time PCR and analyzed with regard to prognostic markers and survival. Cell viability of primary CLL cells was determined in suspension and co-culture after incubation in increasing cannabinoid concentrations under normal and reduced serum conditions and in combination with fludarabine. Impact of cannabinoids on migration of CLL cells towards CXCL12 was determined in transwell plates. We found CNR1&2 to be overexpressed in CLL compared to healthy B-cells. Discriminating between high and low expressing subgroups, only high CNR1 expression was associated with two established high risk markers and conferred significantly shorter overall and treatment free survival. Viability of CLL primary cells was reduced in a dose dependent fashion upon incubation with cannabinoids, however, healthy cells were similarly affected. Under serum reduced conditions, no significant differences were observed within suspension and co-culture, respectively, however, the feeder layer contributed significantly to the survival of CLL cells compared to suspension culture conditions. No significant differences were observed when treating CLL cells with cannabinoids in combination with fludarabine. Interestingly, biologic activity of cannabinoids was independent of both CNR1&2 expression. Finally, we did not observe an inhibition of CXCL12-induced migration by cannabinoids. In contrast to other tumor

  14. Cannabinoid Receptors Are Overexpressed in CLL but of Limited Potential for Therapeutic Exploitation

    PubMed Central

    Le, Trang; Gruber, Michaela; Pausz, Clemens; Staber, Philipp; Jäger, Ulrich; Vanura, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CNR1&2) are overexpressed in a variety of malignant diseases and cannabinoids can have noteworthy impact on tumor cell viability and tumor growth. Patients diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) present with very heterogeneous disease characteristics translating into highly differential risk properties. To meet the urgent need for refinement in risk stratification at diagnosis and the search for novel therapies we studied CNR expression and response to cannabinoid treatment in CLL. Expression levels of CNR1&2 were determined in 107 CLL patients by real-time PCR and analyzed with regard to prognostic markers and survival. Cell viability of primary CLL cells was determined in suspension and co-culture after incubation in increasing cannabinoid concentrations under normal and reduced serum conditions and in combination with fludarabine. Impact of cannabinoids on migration of CLL cells towards CXCL12 was determined in transwell plates. We found CNR1&2 to be overexpressed in CLL compared to healthy B-cells. Discriminating between high and low expressing subgroups, only high CNR1 expression was associated with two established high risk markers and conferred significantly shorter overall and treatment free survival. Viability of CLL primary cells was reduced in a dose dependent fashion upon incubation with cannabinoids, however, healthy cells were similarly affected. Under serum reduced conditions, no significant differences were observed within suspension and co-culture, respectively, however, the feeder layer contributed significantly to the survival of CLL cells compared to suspension culture conditions. No significant differences were observed when treating CLL cells with cannabinoids in combination with fludarabine. Interestingly, biologic activity of cannabinoids was independent of both CNR1&2 expression. Finally, we did not observe an inhibition of CXCL12-induced migration by cannabinoids. In contrast to other tumor

  15. Identification of small molecule agonists of human relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) by utilizing a homogenous cell-based cAMP assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Catherine Z.; Southall, Noel; Xiao, Jingbo; Marugan, Juan J.; Ferrer, Marc; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E.; Feng, Shu; Agoulnik, Irina U.

    2016-01-01

    The relaxin hormone is involved in a variety of biological functions including female reproduction and parturition, regulation of cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, and hepatic functions. It regulates extracellular matrix remodeling, cell invasiveness, proliferation, differentiation, and overall tissue homeostasis. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) RXFP1, relaxin family receptor 1, is a cognate relaxin receptor that mainly signals through cyclic AMP second messenger. While agonists of the receptor could have a wide range of pharmacological utility, up to date, there are no reported small molecule agonists for relaxin receptors. Here, we report the development of quantitative high-throughput platform for RXFP1 agonist screen based on homogenous cell-based HTRF cAMP assay technology. Two small molecules of similar structure were independently identified from a screen of more than 365,677 compounds. Neither compound showed activity in a counter screen with HEK293T cells transfected with an unrelated GPCR vasopressin 1b receptor. These small molecule agonists also demonstrated selectivity against the RXFP2 receptor, providing a basis for future medicinal chemistry optimization of selective relaxin receptor agonists. PMID:23212924

  16. Cannabinoids and atherosclerotic coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Singla, Sandeep; Sachdeva, Rajesh; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2012-06-01

    Marijuana is the most abused recreational drug in the United States. Cannabinoids, the active ingredients of marijuana, affect multiple organ systems in the human body. The pharmacologic effects of marijuana, based on stimulation of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, which are widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, have been well described. Activation of these receptors modulates the function of various cellular elements of the vessel wall, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Clinically, there are reports linking marijuana smoking to the precipitation of angina and acute coronary syndromes. Recently, large published clinical trials with CB1 antagonist rimonabant did not show any significant benefit of this agent in preventing progression of atherosclerosis. In light of these findings and emerging data on multiple pathways linking cannabinoids to atherosclerosis, we discuss the literature on the role of cannabinoids in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We also propose a marijuana paradox, which implies that inhalation of marijuana may be linked to precipitation of acute coronary syndromes, but modulation of the endocannabinoid system by a noninhalation route may have a salutary effect on the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22278660

  17. Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor 1-Expressing Human Natural Killer Cell Subsets Differentially Recognize Isolates of Human Cytomegalovirus through the Viral Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Homolog UL18

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin C.; Banat, Jareer J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immune responses of natural killer (NK) cell are controlled by the balance between activating and inhibitory receptors, but the expression of these receptors varies between cells within an individual. Although NK cells are a component of the innate immune system, particular NK cell subsets expressing Ly49H are positively selected and increase in frequency in response to cytomegalovirus infection in mice. Recent evidence suggests that in humans certain NK subsets also have an increased frequency in the blood of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected individuals. However, whether these subsets differ in their capacity of direct control of HCMV-infected cells remains unclear. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro assay to assess whether human NK cell subsets have differential abilities to inhibit HCMV growth and dissemination. NK cells expressing or lacking NKG2C did not display any differences in controlling viral dissemination. However, when in vitro-expanded NK cells were used, cells expressing or lacking the inhibitory receptor leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor 1 (LIR1) were differentially able to control dissemination. Surprisingly, the ability of LIR1+ NK cells to control virus spread differed between HCMV viral strains, and this phenomenon was dependent on amino acid sequences within the viral ligand UL18. Together, the results here outline an in vitro technique to compare the long-term immune responses of different human NK cell subsets and suggest, for the first time, that phenotypically defined human NK cell subsets may differentially recognize HCMV infections. IMPORTANCE HCMV infection is ubiquitous in most populations; it is not cleared by the host after primary infection but persists for life. The innate and adaptive immune systems control the spread of virus, for which natural killer (NK) cells play a pivotal role. NK cells can respond to HCMV infection by rapid, short-term, nonspecific innate responses, but evidence from murine

  18. Cannabinoid receptor CB2 is expressed on vascular cells, but not astroglial cells in the post-mortem human Huntington's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Dowie, Megan J; Grimsey, Natasha L; Hoffman, Therri; Faull, Richard L M; Glass, Michelle

    2014-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurological disease with motor, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. Characterised by neuronal degeneration, HD pathology is initially apparent in the striatum and cortex. Considerable research has recently suggested that the neurological immune response apparent in brain injury and disease may provide a valuable therapeutic target. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors are localised and up-regulated on a number of peripheral immune cell types following inflammation and injury. However, their cellular location within the human brain during inflammation has not been well characterised. The present study shows CB2 is expressed in human post-mortem striatum in HD. Quantification revealed a trend towards an increase in CB2 staining with disease, but no significant difference was measured compared to neurologically normal controls. In HD striatal tissue, there is an up-regulation of the brains' resident immune cells, with a significant increase in GFAP-positive astrocyte staining at both grade 1 (685±118%) and grade 3 (1145±163%) and Iba1-positive microglia at grade 1 (299±27%) but not grade 3 (119±48%), compared to neurologically normal controls. Both cell types exhibit irregular cell morphology, particularly at higher grades. Using double-labelled immunohistochemistry CB2 receptors are demonstrated not to be expressed on microglia or astrocytes and instead appear to be localised on CD31-positive blood vessel endothelium and vascular smooth muscle. Co-expression analysis suggests that CB2 may be more highly expressed on CD31 positive cells in HD brains than in control brains. Contrasting with evidence from rodent studies suggesting CB2 glial cell localisation, our observation that CB2 is present on blood vessel cells, with increased CD31 co-localisation in HD may represent a new context for CB2 therapeutic approaches to neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Cannabinoids excite circadian clock neurons.

    PubMed

    Acuna-Goycolea, Claudio; Obrietan, Karl; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2010-07-28

    Cannabinoids, the primary active agent in drugs of abuse such as marijuana and hashish, tend to generate a distorted sense of time. Here we study the effect of cannabinoids on the brain's circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), using patch clamp and cell-attached electrophysiological recordings, RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and behavioral analysis. The SCN showed strong expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1R, as detected with RT-PCR. SCN neurons, including those using GABA as a transmitter, and axons within the SCN, expressed CB1R immunoreactivity. Behaviorally, cannabinoids did not alter the endogenous free-running circadian rhythm in the mouse brain, but did attenuate the ability of the circadian clock to entrain to light zeitgebers. In the absence of light, infusion of the CB1R antagonist AM251 caused a modest phase shift, suggesting endocannabinoid modulation of clock timing. Interestingly, cannabinoids had no effect on glutamate release from the retinohypothalamic projection, suggesting a direct action of cannabinoids on the retinohypothalamic tract was unlikely to explain the inhibition of the phase shift. Within the SCN, cannabinoids were excitatory by a mechanism based on presynaptic CB1R attenuation of axonal GABA release. These data raise the possibility that the time dissociation described by cannabinoid users may result in part from altered circadian clock function and/or entrainment to environmental time cues. PMID:20668190

  20. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 regulates STAT3 activity and its expression dictates the responsiveness to SR141716 treatment in human glioma patients' cells

    PubMed Central

    Ciaglia, Elena; Torelli, Giovanni; Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; D'Alessandro, Alba; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Fiore, Donatella; Zottola, Antonio Christian Pagano; Proto, Maria Chiara; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Herein we show that a majority of human brain tumor samples and cell lines over-expressed cannabinoid receptor CB1 as compared to normal human astrocytes (NHA), while uniformly expressed low levels of CB2. This finding prompted us to investigate the therapeutic exploitation of CB1 inactivation by SR141716 treatment, with regard to its direct and indirect cell-mediated effects against gliomas. Functional studies, using U251MG glioma cells and primary tumor cell lines derived from glioma patients expressing different levels of CB1, highlighted SR141716 efficacy in inducing apoptosis via G1 phase stasis and block of TGF-β1 secretion through a mechanism that involves STAT3 inhibition. According to the multivariate role of STAT3 in the immune escape too, interestingly SR141716 lead also to the functional and selective expression of MICA/B on the surface of responsive malignant glioma cells, but not on NHA. This makes SR141716 treated-glioma cells potent targets for allogeneic NK cell-mediated recognition through a NKG2D restricted mechanism, thus priming them for NK cell antitumor reactivity. These results indicate that CB1 and STAT3 participate in a new oncogenic network in the complex biology of glioma and their expression levels in patients dictate the efficacy of the CB1 antagonist SR141716 in multimodal glioma destruction. SIGNIFICANCE CB1 is implicated in the regulation of cellular processes linked to survival, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in several physio-pathological conditions. We shed light on previously unrecognized molecular mechanism of CB1-mediated modulation of human glioma progression and provide the first and original demonstration of CB1-STAT3 axis as a new target and predictor biomarkers of the benefit from specific therapies. Indeed CB1 antagonism capable of tumoral cell division' control while making the glioma immunovisible and engaging the immune system to fight it may represent a hopeful alternative to other established

  1. Mouse and human eosinophils degranulate in response to PAF and lysoPAF via a PAF-receptor independent mechanism: evidence for a novel receptor1

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, Kimberly D.; Percopo, Caroline M.; Xie, Zhihui; Yang, Zhao; Kim, John Dongil; Davoine, Francis; Lacy, Paige; Moqbel, Redwan; Druey, Kirk M.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF; 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a phospholipid mediator released from activated macrophages, mast cells, and basophils that promotes pathophysiologic inflammation. Eosinophil responses to PAF are complex and incompletely elucidated. We show here that PAF and its 2-deacetylated metabolite, lysoPAF, promote degranulation (release of eosinophil peroxidase), via a mechanism that is independent of the characterized PAF receptor (PAFR). Specifically, we demonstrate that receptor antagonists CV-3988 and WEB-2086, and pertussis toxin have no impact on PAF- or lysoPAF-mediated degranulation. Furthermore, cultured mouse eosinophils from PAFR−/− bone marrow progenitors degranulate in response to PAF and lysoPAF in a manner indistinguishable from their wild-type counterparts. In addition to PAF and lysoPAF, human eosinophils degranulate in response to lysophosphatidylcholine, but not phosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylethanolamine, demonstrating selective responses to phospholipids with a choline head-group and minimal substitution at the sn-2 hydroxyl. Human eosinophils release preformed cytokines in response to PAF, but not lysoPAF, also via a PAFR-independent mechanism. Mouse eosinophils do not release cytokines in response to PAF or lysoPAF, but are capable of doing so in response to IL-6. Overall, our work provides the first direct evidence for a role for PAF in activating and inducing degranulation of mouse eosinophils, a crucial feature for the interpretation of mouse models of PAF-mediated asthma and anaphylaxis. Likewise, we document and define PAF and lysoPAF-mediated activities that are not dependent on signaling via PAFR, suggesting the existence of other, as yet to be explored, molecular signaling pathways mediating responses from PAF, lysoPAF and closely-related phospholipid mediators. [250 words] PMID:20421642

  2. [Cannabinoid-induced hyperemesis].

    PubMed

    Lieb, Martin; Palm, Ulrich; Nicolaus, Mathias; Reibke, Roland; Baghai, Thomas C

    2011-04-01

    In this case report, we describe a 29 year-old male patient with a history of chronic cannabis abuse presenting with recurrent vomiting, intense nausea and abdominal pain. Abstinence from cannabis resolved both vomiting and abdominal pain. We conclude that in case of chronic cannabis abuse, patients presenting with severe and chronic nausea, vomiting, accompanied by abdominal pain and compulsive behaviour (hot bathing), in the absence of other obvious causes, the diagnosis of cannabinoid-induced hyperemesis syndrome should be considered. PMID:21462097

  3. Sustained Brown Fat Stimulation and Insulin Sensitization by a Humanized Bispecific Antibody Agonist for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1/βKlotho Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kolumam, Ganesh; Chen, Mark Z.; Tong, Raymond; Zavala-Solorio, Jose; Kates, Lance; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Ross, Jed; Wyatt, Shelby K.; Gandham, Vineela D.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Dunshee, Diana Ronai; Wu, Ai-Luen; Haley, Benjamin; Anderson, Keith; Warming, Søren; Rairdan, Xin Y.; Lewin-Koh, Nicholas; Zhang, Yingnan; Gutierrez, Johnny; Baruch, Amos; Gelzleichter, Thomas R.; Stevens, Dale; Rajan, Sharmila; Bainbridge, Travis W.; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Meng, Y. Gloria; Ziai, James; Soriano, Robert H.; Brauer, Matthew J.; Chen, Yongmei; Stawicki, Scott; Kim, Hok Seon; Comps-Agrar, Laëtitia; Luis, Elizabeth; Spiess, Christoph; Wu, Yan; Ernst, James A.; McGuinness, Owen P.; Peterson, Andrew S.; Sonoda, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Dissipating excess calories as heat through therapeutic stimulation of brown adipose tissues (BAT) has been proposed as a potential treatment for obesity-linked disorders. Here, we describe the generation of a humanized effector-less bispecific antibody that activates fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) 1/βKlotho complex, a common receptor for FGF21 and FGF19. Using this molecule, we show that antibody-mediated activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex in mice induces sustained energy expenditure in BAT, browning of white adipose tissue, weight loss, and improvements in obesity-associated metabolic derangements including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hepatosteatosis. In mice and cynomolgus monkeys, FGFR1/βKlotho activation increased serum high-molecular-weight adiponectin, which appears to contribute over time by enhancing the amplitude of the metabolic benefits. At the same time, insulin sensitization by FGFR1/βKlotho activation occurs even before the onset of weight loss in a manner that is independent of adiponectin. Together, selective activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex with a long acting therapeutic antibody represents an attractive approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and other obesity-linked disorders through enhanced energy expenditure, insulin sensitization and induction of high-molecular-weight adiponectin. PMID:26288846

  4. Soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 and IL-6 plasma levels in humans subjected to the sleep deprivation model of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, W. T.; Reuben, J. M.; Mullington, J. M.; Price, N. J.; Lee, B. N.; Smith, E. O.; Szuba, M. P.; Van Dongen, H. P.; Dinges, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent to which sleep loss may predispose astronauts to a state of altered immunity during extended space travel prompts evaluation with ground-based models. OBJECTIVE: We sought to measure plasma levels of selected cytokines and their receptors, including the putative sleep-regulation proteins soluble TNF-alpha receptor (sTNF-alpha R) I and IL-6, in human subjects undergoing 2 types of sleep deprivation during environmental confinement with performance demands. METHODS: Healthy adult men (n = 42) were randomized to schedules that varied in severity of sleep loss: 4 days (88 hours) of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) involving two 2-hour naps per day or 4 days of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Plasma samples were obtained every 6 hours across 5 days and analyzed by using enzyme-linked immunoassays for sTNF-alpha RI, sTNF-alpha RII, IL-6, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-10, and TNF-alpha. RESULTS: Interactions between the effects of time and sleep deprivation level were detected for sTNF-alpha RI and IL-6 but not for sTNF-alpha RII, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-10, and TNF-alpha. Relative to the PSD condition, subjects in the TSD condition had elevated plasma levels of sTNF-alpha RI on day 2 (P =.04), day 3 (P =.01), and across days 2 to 4 of sleep loss (P =.01) and elevated levels of IL-6 on day 4 (P =.04). CONCLUSIONS: Total sleep loss produced significant increases in plasma levels of sTNF-alpha RI and IL-6, messengers that connect the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. These changes appeared to reflect elevations of the homeostatic drive for sleep because they occurred in TSD but not PSD, suggesting that naps may serve as the basis for a countermeasures approach to prolonged spaceflight.

  5. Peptide length and folding state govern the capacity of staphylococcal β-type phenol-soluble modulins to activate human formyl-peptide receptors 1 or 2.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Dorothee; Rautenberg, Maren; Linke, Dirk; Peschel, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Most staphylococci produce short α-type PSMs and about twice as long β-type PSMs that are potent leukocyte attractants and toxins. PSMs are usually secreted with the N-terminal formyl group but are only weak agonists for the leukocyte FPR1. Instead, the FPR1-related FPR2 senses PSMs efficiently and is crucial for leukocyte recruitment in infection. Which structural features distinguish FPR1 from FPR2 ligands has remained elusive. To analyze which peptide properties may govern the capacities of β-type PSMs to activate FPRs, full-length and truncated variants of such peptides from Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus lugdunensis were synthesized. FPR2 activation was observed even for short N- or C-terminal β-type PSM variants once they were longer than 18 aa, and this activity increased with length. In contrast, the shortest tested peptides were potent FPR1 agonists, and this property declined with increasing peptide length. Whereas full-length β-type PSMs formed α-helices and exhibited no FPR1-specific activity, the truncated peptides had less-stable secondary structures, were weak agonists for FPR1, and required N-terminal formyl-methionine residues to be FPR2 agonists. Together, these data suggest that FPR1 and FPR2 have opposed ligand preferences. Short, flexible PSM structures may favor FPR1 but not FPR2 activation, whereas longer peptides with α-helical, amphipathic properties are strong FPR2 but only weak FPR1 agonists. These findings should help to unravel the ligand specificities of 2 critical human PRRs, and they may be important for new, anti-infective and anti-inflammatory strategies.

  6. Synthetic Cannabinoids: Epidemiology, Pharmacodynamics, and Clinical Implications*

    PubMed Central

    Castaneto, Marisol S.; Gorelick, David A.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Hartman, Rebecca L.; Pirard, Sandrine; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthetic cannabinoids (SC) are a heterogeneous group of compounds developed to probe the endogenous cannabinoid system or as potential therapeutics. Clandestine laboratories subsequently utilized published data to develop SC variations marketed as abuseable “designer drugs.” In the early 2000’s, SC became popular as “legal highs” under brand names such as “Spice” and “K2,” in part due to their ability to escape detection by standard cannabinoid screening tests. The majority of SC detected in herbal products have greater binding affinity to the cannabinoid CB1 receptor than does Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive compound in the cannabis plant, and greater affinity at the CB1 than the CB2 receptor. In-vitro and animal in-vivo studies show SC pharmacological effects 2-100 times more potent than THC, including analgesic, anti-seizure, weight-loss, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer growth effects. SC produce physiological and psychoactive effects similar to THC, but with greater intensity, resulting in medical and psychiatric emergencies. Human adverse effects include nausea and vomiting, shortness of breath or depressed breathing, hypertension, tachycardia, chest pain, muscle twitches, acute renal failure, anxiety, agitation, psychosis, suicidal ideation, and cognitive impairment. Long-term or residual effects are unknown. Due to these public health consequences, many SC are classified as controlled substances. However, frequent structural modification by clandestine laboratories results in a stream of novel SC that may not be legally controlled or detectable by routine laboratory tests. Methods We present here a comprehensive review, based on a systematic electronic literature search, of SC epidemiology and pharmacology and their clinical implications. PMID:25220897

  7. Cannabinoids as pharmacotherapies for neuropathic pain: from the bench to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2009-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus, multiple sclerosis, and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) agonists, CB(2) selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e., inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Delta(9)-THC analogs (e.g., Marinol, Cesamet) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Delta(9)-THC and cannabidiol (e.g., Sativex, Cannador) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e., rating scales) and objective (i.e., stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research. PMID:19789075

  8. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of use of the synthetic cannabinoid agonists UR-144 and XLR-11 in human urine.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Amanda L A; Ofsa, Bill; Keil, Alyssa Marie; Simon, John R; McMullin, Matthew; Logan, Barry K

    2014-09-01

    Ongoing changes in the synthetic cannabinoid drug market create the need for relevant targeted immunoassays for rapid screening of biological samples. We describe the validation and performance characteristics of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay designed to detect use of one of the most prevalent synthetic cannabinoids in urine, UR-144, by targeting its pentanoic acid metabolite. Fluorinated UR-144 (XLR-11) has been demonstrated to metabolize to this common product. The assay has significant cross-reactivity with UR-144-5-OH, UR-144-4-OH and XLR-11-4-OH metabolites, but <10% cross-reactivity with the parent compounds, and no measurable cross-reactivity with other synthetic cannabinoids and their metabolites at concentrations of <1,000 ng/mL. The assay's cutoff is 5 ng/mL relative to the pentanoic acid metabolite of UR-144, which is used as the calibrator. The method was validated with 90 positive and negative control urine samples for UR-144, XLR-11 and its metabolites tested versus liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were determined to be 100% for the assay at the specified cutoff. PMID:24908262

  9. Synthetic cannabinoids as drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John C

    2012-06-01

    In the last decade a number of products have appeared in various countries that contain synthetic cannabinoids. This article reviews the history of the sale of these drugs, and the evidence that they contain synthetic cannabinoids. The biochemistry of the synthetic cannabinoids identified thus far is discussed, including a discussion of chemical structures and biochemical targets. The cannabinoid receptor targets for these drugs are discussed, as well as other possible targets such as serotonin receptors. Evidence for the abuse potential of these drugs is reviewed. The toxicity of synthetic cannabinoids and cannabinoid products is reviewed and compared to that of the phytocannabinoid Δ9- tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). As cannabinoids are a structurally diverse class of drugs, it is concluded that synthetic cannabinoids should be classified by biological activity rather than by structure, and that if this isn't done, novel synthetic cannabinoids will continue to emerge that fall outside of current regulatory classification models.

  10. A runner’s high depends on cannabinoid receptors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Johannes; Steinle, Jörg; Bindila, Laura; Auer, Matthias K.; Kirchherr, Hartmut; Lutz, Beat; Gass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is rewarding, and long-distance runners have described a runner’s high as a sudden pleasant feeling of euphoria, anxiolysis, sedation, and analgesia. A popular belief has been that endogenous endorphins mediate these beneficial effects. However, running exercise increases blood levels of both β-endorphin (an opioid) and anandamide (an endocannabinoid). Using a combination of pharmacologic, molecular genetic, and behavioral studies in mice, we demonstrate that cannabinoid receptors mediate acute anxiolysis and analgesia after running. We show that anxiolysis depends on intact cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptors on forebrain GABAergic neurons and pain reduction on activation of peripheral CB1 and CB2 receptors. We thus demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system is crucial for two main aspects of a runner's high. Sedation, in contrast, was not influenced by cannabinoid or opioid receptor blockage, and euphoria cannot be studied in mouse models. PMID:26438875

  11. Simultaneous quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using WAX-S tips.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Maria; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Sempio, Cristina; Barnes, Allan J; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive cannabinoid urine quantification method may improve clinical and forensic result interpretation and is necessary to support our clinical research. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry quantification method for ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCAA), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THCV (THCVCOOH), THC-glucuronide (THC-gluc), and THCCOOH-glucuronide (THCCOOH-gluc) in urine was developed and validated according to the Scientific Working Group on Toxicology guidelines. Sample preparation consisted of disposable pipette extraction (WAX-S) of 200 μL urine. Separation was achieved on a Kinetex C18 column using gradient elution with flow rate 0.5 mL/min, mobile phase A (10 mM ammonium acetate in water), and mobile phase B (15 % methanol in acetonitrile). Total run time was 14 min. Analytes were monitored in both positive and negative ionization modes by scheduled multiple reaction monitoring. Linear ranges were 0.5-100 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH; 0.5-50 μg/L for 11-OH-THC, CBD, CBN, THCAA, and THC-gluc; 1-100 μg/L for CBG, THCV, and THCVCOOH; and 5-500 μg/L for THCCOOH-gluc (R (2) > 0.99). Analytical biases were 88.3-113.7 %, imprecisions 3.3-14.3 %, extraction efficiencies 42.4-81.5 %, and matrix effect -10 to 32.5 %. We developed and validated a comprehensive, simple, and rapid LC-MS/MS cannabinoid urine method for quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites. This method is being used in a controlled cannabis administration study, investigating urine cannabinoid markers documenting recent cannabis use, chronic frequent smoking, or route of drug administration and potentially improving urine cannabinoid result interpretation. PMID:27422645

  12. Simultaneous quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using WAX-S tips.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Maria; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Sempio, Cristina; Barnes, Allan J; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive cannabinoid urine quantification method may improve clinical and forensic result interpretation and is necessary to support our clinical research. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry quantification method for ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCAA), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THCV (THCVCOOH), THC-glucuronide (THC-gluc), and THCCOOH-glucuronide (THCCOOH-gluc) in urine was developed and validated according to the Scientific Working Group on Toxicology guidelines. Sample preparation consisted of disposable pipette extraction (WAX-S) of 200 μL urine. Separation was achieved on a Kinetex C18 column using gradient elution with flow rate 0.5 mL/min, mobile phase A (10 mM ammonium acetate in water), and mobile phase B (15 % methanol in acetonitrile). Total run time was 14 min. Analytes were monitored in both positive and negative ionization modes by scheduled multiple reaction monitoring. Linear ranges were 0.5-100 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH; 0.5-50 μg/L for 11-OH-THC, CBD, CBN, THCAA, and THC-gluc; 1-100 μg/L for CBG, THCV, and THCVCOOH; and 5-500 μg/L for THCCOOH-gluc (R (2) > 0.99). Analytical biases were 88.3-113.7 %, imprecisions 3.3-14.3 %, extraction efficiencies 42.4-81.5 %, and matrix effect -10 to 32.5 %. We developed and validated a comprehensive, simple, and rapid LC-MS/MS cannabinoid urine method for quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites. This method is being used in a controlled cannabis administration study, investigating urine cannabinoid markers documenting recent cannabis use, chronic frequent smoking, or route of drug administration and potentially improving urine cannabinoid result interpretation.

  13. Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Cerebral Metabolism: Potential Applications in Stroke and Disorders of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Julius Gene S; Schmidt, Elena B

    2015-09-01

    No compound has generated more attention in both the scientific and recently in the political arena as much as cannabinoids. These diverse groups of compounds referred collectively as cannabinoids have both been vilified due to its dramatic and potentially harmful psychotropic effects and glorified due to its equally dramatic and potential application in a number of acute and chronic neurological conditions. Previously illegal to possess, cannabis, the plant where natural form of cannabinoids are derived, is now accepted in a growing number of states for medicinal purpose, and some even for recreational use, increasing opportunities for more scientific experimentation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the growing body of literature on cannabinoids and to present an overview of our current state of knowledge of the human endocannabinoid system in the hope of defining the future of cannabinoids and its potential applications in disorders of the central nervous system, focusing on stroke. PMID:26238742

  14. Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Cerebral Metabolism: Potential Applications in Stroke and Disorders of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Julius Gene S; Schmidt, Elena B

    2015-09-01

    No compound has generated more attention in both the scientific and recently in the political arena as much as cannabinoids. These diverse groups of compounds referred collectively as cannabinoids have both been vilified due to its dramatic and potentially harmful psychotropic effects and glorified due to its equally dramatic and potential application in a number of acute and chronic neurological conditions. Previously illegal to possess, cannabis, the plant where natural form of cannabinoids are derived, is now accepted in a growing number of states for medicinal purpose, and some even for recreational use, increasing opportunities for more scientific experimentation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the growing body of literature on cannabinoids and to present an overview of our current state of knowledge of the human endocannabinoid system in the hope of defining the future of cannabinoids and its potential applications in disorders of the central nervous system, focusing on stroke.

  15. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shusen; Zimmermann, Anthony E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this review is to describe cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS), which is thought to be induced by long-term cannabis use, and provide clinical pharmacists with information to manage the hyperemetic phase of CHS. Method: Published literature was searched and reviewed using PubMed. Results: CHS is characterized by intractable nausea and vomiting without an obvious organic cause and associated learned compulsive hot water bathing behavior. Patients often seek care in the emergency department (ED) for symptomatic relief. Conclusion: CHS is potentially underrecognized and underdiagnosed in the ED, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis in long-term cannabis use patients with CHS symptoms to avoid unnecessary extensive diagnostic workup including invasive radiologic imaging. Pharmacists have an important role in CHS recognition, education, and symptom management. PMID:24421535

  16. Neuronal protease-activated receptor 1 drives synaptic retrograde signaling mediated by the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Hashimotodani, Yuki; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako; Yamazaki, Maya; Sakimura, Kenji; Kano, Masanobu

    2011-02-23

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a member of the G-protein coupled receptors that are proteolytically activated by serine proteases. Recent studies suggest a definite contribution of PAR1 to brain functions, including learning and memory. However, cellular mechanisms by which PAR1 activation influences neuronal activity are not well understood. Here we show that PAR1 activation drives retrograde endocannabinoid signaling and thereby regulates synaptic transmission. In cultured hippocampal neurons from rat, PAR1 activation by thrombin or PAR1-specific peptide agonists transiently suppressed inhibitory transmission at cannabinoid-sensitive, but not cannabinoid-insensitive, synapses. The PAR1-induced suppression of synaptic transmission was accompanied by an increase in paired-pulse ratio, and was blocked by a cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist. The PAR1-induced suppression was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of postsynaptic diacylglycerol lipase (DGL), a key enzyme for biosynthesis of the major endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and was absent in knock-out mice lacking the α isoform of DGL. The PAR1-induced IPSC suppression remained intact under the blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptors and was largely resistant to the treatment that blocked Ca(2+) elevation in glial cells following PAR1 activation, which excludes the major contribution of glial PAR1 in IPSC suppression. We conclude that activation of neuronal PAR1 triggers retrograde signaling mediated by 2-AG, which activates presynaptic CB(1) receptors and suppresses transmitter release at hippocampal inhibitory synapses.

  17. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  18. Towards rational design of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists for peripheral selectivity.

    PubMed

    Fulp, Alan; Bortoff, Katherine; Zhang, Yanan; Seltzman, Herbert; Snyder, Rodney; Maitra, Rangan

    2011-10-01

    CB1 receptor antagonists that are peripherally restricted were targeted. Compounds with permanent charge as well as compounds that have increased polar surface area were made and tested against CB1 for binding and activity. Sulfonamide and sulfamide with high polar surface area and good activity at CB1 were rationally designed and pharmacologically tested. Further optimization of these compounds and testing could lead to the development of a new class of therapeutics to treat disorders where the CB1 receptor system has been implicated. PMID:21875798

  19. Towards rational design of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists for peripheral selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Fulp, Alan; Bortoff, Katherine; Zhang, Yanan; Seltzman, Herbert; Snyder, Rodney; Maitra, Rangan

    2011-01-01

    CB1 receptor antagonists that are peripherally restricted were targeted. Compounds with permanent charge as well as compounds that have increased polar surface area were made and tested against CB1 for binding and activity. Sulfonamide and sulfamide with high polar surface area and good activity at CB1 were rationally designed and pharmacologically tested. Further optimization of these compounds and testing could lead to the development of a new class of therapeutics to treat disorders where the CB1 receptor system has been implicated. PMID:21875798

  20. Cannabinoids in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Natalya M; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds. In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable--instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and--in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity--just to monitor these side effects carefully.

  1. Cannabinoids in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Natalya M.; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds. In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable - instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and - in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity - just to monitor these side effects carefully. PMID:18286801

  2. The Analgesic Potential of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Elikottil, Jaseena; Gupta, Pankaj; Gupta, Kalpna

    2013-01-01

    Historically and anecdotally cannabinoids have been used as analgesic agents. In recent years, there has been an escalating interest in developing cannabis-derived medications to treat severe pain. This review provides an overview of the history of cannabis use in medicine, cannabinoid signaling pathways, and current data from preclinical as well as clinical studies on using cannabinoids as potential analgesic agents. Clinical and experimental studies show that cannabis-derived compounds act as anti-emetic, appetite modulating and analgesic agents. However, the efficacy of individual products is variable and dependent upon the route of administration. Since opioids are the only therapy for severe pain, analgesic ability of cannabinoids may provide a much-needed alternative to opioids. Moreover, cannabinoids act synergistically with opioids and act as opioid sparing agents, allowing lower doses and fewer side effects from chronic opioid therapy. Thus, rational use of cannabis based medications deserves serious consideration to alleviate the suffering of patients due to severe pain. PMID:20073408

  3. It's All in the Rhythm: The Role of Cannabinoids in Neural Oscillations and Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Skosnik, Patrick D; Cortes-Briones, Jose A; Hajós, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Evidence has accumulated over the past several decades suggesting that both exocannabinoids and endocannabinoids play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The current article presents evidence suggesting that one of the mechanisms whereby cannabinoids induce psychosis is through the alteration in synchronized neural oscillations. Neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma (30-80 Hz) and theta (4-7 Hz) ranges, are disrupted in schizophrenia and are involved in various areas of perceptual and cognitive function. Regarding cannabinoids, preclinical evidence from slice and local field potential recordings has shown that central cannabinoid receptor (cannabinoid receptor type 1) agonists decrease the power of neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma and theta bands. Further, the administration of cannabinoids during critical stages of neural development has been shown to disrupt the brain's ability to generate synchronized neural oscillations in adulthood. In humans, studies examining the effects of chronic cannabis use (utilizing electroencephalography) have shown abnormalities in neural oscillations in a pattern similar to those observed in schizophrenia. Finally, recent studies in humans have also shown disruptions in neural oscillations after the acute administration of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the primary psychoactive constituent in cannabis. Taken together, these data suggest that both acute and chronic cannabinoids can disrupt the ability of the brain to generate synchronized oscillations at functionally relevant frequencies. Hence, this may represent one of the primary mechanisms whereby cannabinoids induce disruptions in attention, working memory, sensory-motor integration, and many other psychosis-related behavioral effects. PMID:26850792

  4. Synthetic cannabinoids: analysis and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Wanas, Amira S; Radwan, Mohamed M

    2014-02-27

    Cannabimimetics (commonly referred to as synthetic cannabinoids), a group of compounds encompassing a wide range of chemical structures, have been developed by scientists with the hope of achieving selectivity toward one or the other of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The goal was to have compounds that could possess high therapeutic activity without many side effects. However, underground laboratories have used the information generated by the scientific community to develop these compounds for illicit use as marijuana substitutes. This chapter reviews the different classes of these "synthetic cannabinoids" with particular emphasis on the methods used for their identification in the herbal products with which they are mixed and identification of their metabolites in biological specimens.

  5. Beta-caryophyllene is a dietary cannabinoid

    PubMed Central

    Gertsch, Jürg; Leonti, Marco; Raduner, Stefan; Racz, Ildiko; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Karsak, Meliha; Zimmer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The psychoactive cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. and the arachidonic acid-derived endocannabinoids are nonselective natural ligands for cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors. Although the CB1 receptor is responsible for the psychomodulatory effects, activation of the CB2 receptor is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammation, pain, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis. Here, we report that the widespread plant volatile (E)-β-caryophyllene [(E)-BCP] selectively binds to the CB2 receptor (Ki = 155 ± 4 nM) and that it is a functional CB2 agonist. Intriguingly, (E)-BCP is a common constituent of the essential oils of numerous spice and food plants and a major component in Cannabis. Molecular docking simulations have identified a putative binding site of (E)-BCP in the CB2 receptor, showing ligand π–π stacking interactions with residues F117 and W258. Upon binding to the CB2 receptor, (E)-BCP inhibits adenylate cylcase, leads to intracellular calcium transients and weakly activates the mitogen-activated kinases Erk1/2 and p38 in primary human monocytes. (E)-BCP (500 nM) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression in peripheral blood and attenuates LPS-stimulated Erk1/2 and JNK1/2 phosphorylation in monocytes. Furthermore, peroral (E)-BCP at 5 mg/kg strongly reduces the carrageenan-induced inflammatory response in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking CB2 receptors, providing evidence that this natural product exerts cannabimimetic effects in vivo. These results identify (E)-BCP as a functional nonpsychoactive CB2 receptor ligand in foodstuff and as a macrocyclic antiinflammatory cannabinoid in Cannabis. PMID:18574142

  6. The influence of cannabinoids on learning and memory processes of the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G

    2015-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the mammalian endocannabinoid system plays an integral role in learning and memory. Our understanding of how cannabinoids influence memory comes predominantly from studies examining cognitive and emotional memory systems mediated by the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. However, recent evidence suggests that cannabinoids also affect habit or stimulus-response (S-R) memory mediated by the dorsal striatum. Studies implementing a variety of maze tasks in rats indicate that systemic or intra-dorsolateral striatum infusions of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists impair habit memory. In mice, cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor knockdown can enhance or impair habit formation, whereas Δ(9)THC tolerance enhances habit formation. Studies in human cannabis users also suggest an enhancement of S-R/habit memory. A tentative conclusion based on the available data is that acute disruption of the endocannabinoid system with either agonists or antagonists impairs, whereas chronic cannabinoid exposure enhances, dorsal striatum-dependent S-R/habit memory. CB1 receptors are required for multiple forms of striatal synaptic plasticity implicated in memory, including short-term and long-term depression. Interactions with the hippocampus-dependent memory system may also have a role in some of the observed effects of cannabinoids on habit memory. The impairing effect often observed with acute cannabinoid administration argues for cannabinoid-based treatments for human psychopathologies associated with a dysfunctional habit memory system (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction/relapse). In addition, the enhancing effect of repeated cannabinoid exposure on habit memory suggests a novel neurobehavioral mechanism for marijuana addiction involving the dorsal striatum-dependent memory system. PMID:26092091

  7. The influence of cannabinoids on learning and memory processes of the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G

    2015-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the mammalian endocannabinoid system plays an integral role in learning and memory. Our understanding of how cannabinoids influence memory comes predominantly from studies examining cognitive and emotional memory systems mediated by the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. However, recent evidence suggests that cannabinoids also affect habit or stimulus-response (S-R) memory mediated by the dorsal striatum. Studies implementing a variety of maze tasks in rats indicate that systemic or intra-dorsolateral striatum infusions of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists impair habit memory. In mice, cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor knockdown can enhance or impair habit formation, whereas Δ(9)THC tolerance enhances habit formation. Studies in human cannabis users also suggest an enhancement of S-R/habit memory. A tentative conclusion based on the available data is that acute disruption of the endocannabinoid system with either agonists or antagonists impairs, whereas chronic cannabinoid exposure enhances, dorsal striatum-dependent S-R/habit memory. CB1 receptors are required for multiple forms of striatal synaptic plasticity implicated in memory, including short-term and long-term depression. Interactions with the hippocampus-dependent memory system may also have a role in some of the observed effects of cannabinoids on habit memory. The impairing effect often observed with acute cannabinoid administration argues for cannabinoid-based treatments for human psychopathologies associated with a dysfunctional habit memory system (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction/relapse). In addition, the enhancing effect of repeated cannabinoid exposure on habit memory suggests a novel neurobehavioral mechanism for marijuana addiction involving the dorsal striatum-dependent memory system.

  8. Preclinical and Clinical Assessment of Cannabinoids as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ladin, Daniel A.; Soliman, Eman; Griffin, LaToya; Van Dross, Rukiyah

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States with 1.7 million new cases estimated to be diagnosed in 2016. This disease remains a formidable clinical challenge and represents a substantial financial burden to the US health care system. Therefore, research and development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of cancer is of high priority. Cannabinoids and their derivatives have been utilized for their medicinal and therapeutic properties throughout history. Cannabinoid activity is regulated by the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is comprised of cannabinoid receptors, transporters, and enzymes involved in cannabinoid synthesis and breakdown. More recently, cannabinoids have gained special attention for their role in cancer cell proliferation and death. However, many studies investigated these effects using in vitro models which may not adequately mimic tumor growth and metastasis. As such, this article aims to review study results which evaluated effects of cannabinoids from plant, synthetic and endogenous origins on cancer development in preclinical animal models and to examine the current standing of cannabinoids that are being tested in human cancer patients. PMID:27774065

  9. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2012-12-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released 'endocannabinoids' or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive 'multi-targeting'. PMID:23108552

  10. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors that can be activated by endogenously released ‘endocannabinoids’ or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)) and Sativex (Δ9-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive ‘multi-targeting’. PMID:23108552

  11. Cannabinoids and hallucinogens for headache.

    PubMed

    McGeeney, Brian E

    2013-03-01

    Hallucinogens and most cannabinoids are classified under schedule 1 of the Federal Controlled Substances Act 1970, along with heroin and ecstacy. Hence they cannot be prescribed by physicians, and by implication, have no accepted medical use with a high abuse potential. Despite their legal status, hallucinogens and cannabinoids are used by patients for relief of headache, helped by the growing number of American states that have legalized medical marijuana. Cannabinoids in particular have a long history of use in the abortive and prophylactic treatment of migraine before prohibition and are still used by patients as a migraine abortive in particular. Most practitioners are unaware of the prominence cannabis or "marijuana" once held in medical practice. Hallucinogens are being increasingly used by cluster headache patients outside of physician recommendation mainly to abort a cluster period and maintain quiescence for which there is considerable anecdotal success. The legal status of cannabinoids and hallucinogens has for a long time severely inhibited medical research, and there are still no blinded studies on headache subjects, from which we could assess true efficacy.

  12. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides ‘proof of principle’ for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. PMID:26703965

  13. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides 'proof of principle' for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia.

  14. Gastric acid inhibitory and gastric protective effects of Cannabis and cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis sativa has long been known for its psychotropic effect. Only recently with the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous legends and the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation, the role of this 'endocannabinoid system' in different pathophysiologic processes is beginning to be delineated. There is evidence that CB1 receptor stimulation with synthetic cannabinoids or Cannabis sativa extracts rich in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibit gastric acid secretion in humans and experimental animals. This is specially seen when gastric acid secretion is stimulated by pentagastrin, carbachol or 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Cannabis and/or cannabinoids protect the gastric mucosa against noxious challenge with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ethanol as well as against stress-induced mucosal damage. Cannabis/cannabinoids might protect the gastric mucosa by virtue of its antisecretory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilator properties. PMID:27261847

  15. Gastric acid inhibitory and gastric protective effects of Cannabis and cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis sativa has long been known for its psychotropic effect. Only recently with the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous legends and the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation, the role of this 'endocannabinoid system' in different pathophysiologic processes is beginning to be delineated. There is evidence that CB1 receptor stimulation with synthetic cannabinoids or Cannabis sativa extracts rich in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibit gastric acid secretion in humans and experimental animals. This is specially seen when gastric acid secretion is stimulated by pentagastrin, carbachol or 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Cannabis and/or cannabinoids protect the gastric mucosa against noxious challenge with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ethanol as well as against stress-induced mucosal damage. Cannabis/cannabinoids might protect the gastric mucosa by virtue of its antisecretory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilator properties.

  16. The use of cannabinoids as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Guillermo; Hernández-Tiedra, Sonia; Dávila, David; Lorente, Mar

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that cannabinoids exert palliative effects on some cancer-associated symptoms. In addition evidences obtained during the last fifteen years support that these compounds can reduce tumor growth in animal models of cancer. Cannabinoids have been shown to activate an ER-stress related pathway that leads to the stimulation of autophagy-mediated cancer cell death. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit tumor angiogenesis and decrease cancer cell migration. The mechanisms of resistance to cannabinoid anticancer action as well as the possible strategies to develop cannabinoid-based combinational therapies to fight cancer have also started to be explored. In this review we will summarize these observations (that have already helped to set the bases for the development of the first clinical studies to investigate the potential clinical benefit of using cannabinoids in anticancer therapies) and will discuss the possible future avenues of research in this area.

  17. Cannabinoid receptor signaling regulates liver development and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Leah Y; Alexa, Kristen; Cortes, Mauricio; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Kim, Andrew J; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; North, Trista E; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-02-15

    Endocannabinoid (EC) signaling mediates psychotropic effects and regulates appetite. By contrast, potential roles in organ development and embryonic energy consumption remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that genetic or chemical inhibition of cannabinoid receptor (Cnr) activity disrupts liver development and metabolic function in zebrafish (Danio rerio), impacting hepatic differentiation, but not endodermal specification: loss of cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) and cnr2 activity leads to smaller livers with fewer hepatocytes, reduced liver-specific gene expression and proliferation. Functional assays reveal abnormal biliary anatomy and lipid handling. Adult cnr2 mutants are susceptible to hepatic steatosis. Metabolomic analysis reveals reduced methionine content in Cnr mutants. Methionine supplementation rescues developmental and metabolic defects in Cnr mutant livers, suggesting a causal relationship between EC signaling, methionine deficiency and impaired liver development. The effect of Cnr on methionine metabolism is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factors (Srebfs), as their overexpression rescues Cnr mutant liver phenotypes in a methionine-dependent manner. Our work describes a novel developmental role for EC signaling, whereby Cnr-mediated regulation of Srebfs and methionine metabolism impacts liver development and function.

  18. Hypothalamic POMC neurons promote cannabinoid-induced feeding.

    PubMed

    Koch, Marco; Varela, Luis; Kim, Jae Geun; Kim, Jung Dae; Hernández-Nuño, Francisco; Simonds, Stephanie E; Castorena, Carlos M; Vianna, Claudia R; Elmquist, Joel K; Morozov, Yury M; Rakic, Pasko; Bechmann, Ingo; Cowley, Michael A; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Diano, Sabrina; Horvath, Tamas L

    2015-03-01

    Hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons promote satiety. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is critical for the central regulation of food intake. Here we test whether CB1R-controlled feeding in sated mice is paralleled by decreased activity of POMC neurons. We show that chemical promotion of CB1R activity increases feeding, and notably, CB1R activation also promotes neuronal activity of POMC cells. This paradoxical increase in POMC activity was crucial for CB1R-induced feeding, because designer-receptors-exclusively-activated-by-designer-drugs (DREADD)-mediated inhibition of POMC neurons diminishes, whereas DREADD-mediated activation of POMC neurons enhances CB1R-driven feeding. The Pomc gene encodes both the anorexigenic peptide α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, and the opioid peptide β-endorphin. CB1R activation selectively increases β-endorphin but not α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone release in the hypothalamus, and systemic or hypothalamic administration of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone blocks acute CB1R-induced feeding. These processes involve mitochondrial adaptations that, when blocked, abolish CB1R-induced cellular responses and feeding. Together, these results uncover a previously unsuspected role of POMC neurons in the promotion of feeding by cannabinoids. PMID:25707796

  19. Hypothalamic POMC neurons promote cannabinoid-induced feeding

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Marco; Varela, Luis; Kim, Jae Geun; Kim, Jung Dae; Hernandez, Francisco; Simonds, Stephanie E; Castorena, Carlos M; Vianna, Claudia R; Elmquist, Joel K; Morozov, Yury M; Rakic, Pasko; Bechmann, Ingo; Cowley, Michael A; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Diano, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons promote satiety. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is critical for central regulation of food intake. We interrogated whether CB1R-controlled feeding is paralleled by decreased activity of POMC neurons. Chemical promotion of CB1R activity increased feeding, and strikingly, CB1R activation also promoted neuronal activity of POMC cells. This paradoxical increase in POMC activity was crucial for CB1R-induced feeding, because Designer-Receptors-Exclusively-Activated-by-Designer-Drugs (DREADD)-mediated inhibition of POMC neurons diminished, while DREADD-mediated activation of POMC neurons enhanced CB1R-driven feeding. The Pomc gene encodes both the anorexigenic peptide, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and the peptide, β-endorphin. CB1R activation selectively increased β-endorphin but not α-MSH release in the hypothalamus, and, systemic or hypothalamic administration of the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, blocked acute CB1R-induced feeding. These processes involved mitochondrial adaptations, which, when blocked, abolished CB1R-induced cellular responses and feeding. Together, these results unmasked a previously unsuspected role of POMC neurons in promotion of feeding by cannabinoids. PMID:25707796

  20. The role of cannabinoids in regulation of nausea and vomiting, and visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Malik, Zubair; Baik, Daniel; Schey, Ron

    2015-02-01

    Marijuana derived from the plant Cannabis sativa has been used for the treatment of many gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and others. However, its psychotropic side effects have often limited its use. Several cannabinoid receptors, which include the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), CB2, and possibly GPR55, have been identified throughout the GI tract. These receptors may play a role in the regulation of food intake, nausea and emesis, gastric secretion and gastroprotection, GI motility, ion transport, visceral sensation, intestinal inflammation, and cell proliferation in the gut. However, the regulation of nausea and vomiting by cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system has shed new knowledge in this field. Thus far, despite evidence of visceral sensitivity inhibition in animal models, data in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients is scarce and not supportive. Furthermore, many compounds that either act directly at the receptor or increase (or reduce) ligand availability have the potential to affect other brain functions and cause side effects. Novel drug targets such as FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitors appear to be promising in animal models, but more studies are necessary to prove their efficiency. The promise of emerging drugs that are more selective and peripherally acting suggest that, in the near future, cannabinoids will play a major role in managing an array of GI diseases.

  1. The role of cannabinoids in regulation of nausea and vomiting, and visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Malik, Zubair; Baik, Daniel; Schey, Ron

    2015-02-01

    Marijuana derived from the plant Cannabis sativa has been used for the treatment of many gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and others. However, its psychotropic side effects have often limited its use. Several cannabinoid receptors, which include the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), CB2, and possibly GPR55, have been identified throughout the GI tract. These receptors may play a role in the regulation of food intake, nausea and emesis, gastric secretion and gastroprotection, GI motility, ion transport, visceral sensation, intestinal inflammation, and cell proliferation in the gut. However, the regulation of nausea and vomiting by cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system has shed new knowledge in this field. Thus far, despite evidence of visceral sensitivity inhibition in animal models, data in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients is scarce and not supportive. Furthermore, many compounds that either act directly at the receptor or increase (or reduce) ligand availability have the potential to affect other brain functions and cause side effects. Novel drug targets such as FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitors appear to be promising in animal models, but more studies are necessary to prove their efficiency. The promise of emerging drugs that are more selective and peripherally acting suggest that, in the near future, cannabinoids will play a major role in managing an array of GI diseases. PMID:25715910

  2. Metabolism of classical cannabinoids and the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018.

    PubMed

    Su, M K; Seely, K A; Moran, J H; Hoffman, R S

    2015-06-01

    Although the putative pharmacological targets of synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) abused in "K2" and "Spice" are similar to Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC), it remains unclear why SCB toxicity is similar yet different from marijuana. There are obvious potency and efficacy differences, but also important metabolic differences that help explain the unique adverse reactions associated with SCBs. This brief review discusses the limited research on the metabolism of the SCB JWH-018 and contrasts that with the metabolism of Δ(9) -THC.

  3. Behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of chronic alcohol or cannabinoids on HIV/AIDs: Studies in the Non-Human Primate SIV model

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Patricia E.; Amedee, Angela M.; Winsauer, Peter; Nelson, Steve; Bagby, Gregory; Simon, Liz

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated mortality has been significantly reduced with antiretroviral therapy (ART), and HIV infection has become a chronic disease that frequently coexists with many disorders, including substance abuse (Azar et al. 2010; Phillips et al. 2001). Alcohol and drugs of abuse may modify host-pathogen interactions at various levels including behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of HIV infection, as well as the ability of the virus to integrate into the genome and replicate in host cells. Identifying mechanisms responsible for these interactions is complicated by many factors, such as the tissue specific responses to viral infection, multiple cellular mechanisms involved in inflammatory responses, neuroendocrine and localized responses to infection, and kinetics of viral replication. An integrated physiological analysis of the biomedical consequences of chronic alcohol and drug use or abuse on disease progression is possible using rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a relevant model of HIV infection. This review will provide an overview of the data gathered using this model to show that chronic administration of two of the most commonly abused substances, alcohol and cannabinoids (Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol; THC), affect host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25795088

  4. Cannabinoids as Pharmacotherapies for Neuropathic Pain: From the Bench to the Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, Elizabeth J.; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), multiple sclerosis (MS), and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB1/CB2 agonists, CB2-selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e. inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Δ9-THC analogs (e.g. Marinol®, Cesamet®) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Δ9-THC and cannabidiol (e.g. Sativex®, Cannador®) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e. rating scales) and objective (i.e. stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research. PMID:19789075

  5. Loss of striatal type 1 cannabinoid receptors is a key pathogenic factor in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Cristina; Chiarlone, Anna; Sagredo, Onintza; Aguado, Tania; Pazos, M Ruth; Resel, Eva; Palazuelos, Javier; Julien, Boris; Salazar, María; Börner, Christine; Benito, Cristina; Carrasco, Carolina; Diez-Zaera, María; Paoletti, Paola; Díaz-Hernández, Miguel; Ruiz, Carolina; Sendtner, Michael; Lucas, José J; de Yébenes, Justo G; Marsicano, Giovanni; Monory, Krisztina; Lutz, Beat; Romero, Julián; Alberch, Jordi; Ginés, Silvia; Kraus, Jürgen; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Guzmán, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Endocannabinoids act as neuromodulatory and neuroprotective cues by engaging type 1 cannabinoid receptors. These receptors are highly abundant in the basal ganglia and play a pivotal role in the control of motor behaviour. An early downregulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptors has been documented in the basal ganglia of patients with Huntington's disease and animal models. However, the pathophysiological impact of this loss of receptors in Huntington's disease is as yet unknown. Here, we generated a double-mutant mouse model that expresses human mutant huntingtin exon 1 in a type 1 cannabinoid receptor-null background, and found that receptor deletion aggravates the symptoms, neuropathology and molecular pathology of the disease. Moreover, pharmacological administration of the cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol to mice expressing human mutant huntingtin exon 1 exerted a therapeutic effect and ameliorated those parameters. Experiments conducted in striatal cells show that the mutant huntingtin-dependent downregulation of the receptors involves the control of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor gene promoter by repressor element 1 silencing transcription factor and sensitizes cells to excitotoxic damage. We also provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that supports type 1 cannabinoid receptor control of striatal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and the decrease in brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels concomitant with type 1 cannabinoid receptor loss, which may contribute significantly to striatal damage in Huntington's disease. Altogether, these results support the notion that downregulation of type 1 cannabinoid receptors is a key pathogenic event in Huntington's disease, and suggest that activation of these receptors in patients with Huntington's disease may attenuate disease progression.

  6. The role of cannabinoids in adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Prenderville, Jack A; Kelly, Áine M; Downer, Eric J

    2015-08-01

    The processes underpinning post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain continue to be defined. Such processes involve the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neuronal migration, differentiation and integration into a network of functional synapses within the brain. Both intrinsic (cell signalling cascades) and extrinsic (neurotrophins, neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones) signalling molecules are intimately associated with adult neurogenesis and largely dictate the proliferative activity and differentiation capacity of neural cells. Cannabinoids are a unique class of chemical compounds incorporating plant-derived cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa), the endogenous cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid ligands, and these compounds are becoming increasingly recognized for their roles in neural developmental processes. Indeed, cannabinoids have clear modulatory roles in adult neurogenesis, probably through activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, a large body of literature has deciphered the signalling networks involved in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of neurogenesis. This timely review summarizes the evidence that the cannabinoid system is intricately associated with neuronal differentiation and maturation of NPCs and highlights intrinsic/extrinsic signalling mechanisms that are cannabinoid targets. Overall, these findings identify the central role of the cannabinoid system in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and the lateral ventricles and hence provide insight into the processes underlying post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain.

  7. Cannabinoids for the treatment of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John C

    2007-05-01

    Cannabinoids are effective at suppressing immune and inflammation functions in leukocytes in vitro, and in animal models of acute inflammation, such as the mouse hind paw, ear and air pouch models, as well as gastrointestinal, pulmonary, myocardial, vascular, periodontal, neural, hepatic, pancreatic and arthritic inflammation models. The non-psychoactive cannabinoid receptor CB2 is emerging as a critical target for cannabinoid regulation of inflammation, and thus CB2-selective agonists are undergoing intense investigation and research. This review discusses the evidence for cannabinoid regulation of inflammation across a range of models and highlights the most promising drug candidates.

  8. The role of cannabinoids in adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Prenderville, Jack A; Kelly, Áine M; Downer, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    The processes underpinning post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain continue to be defined. Such processes involve the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neuronal migration, differentiation and integration into a network of functional synapses within the brain. Both intrinsic (cell signalling cascades) and extrinsic (neurotrophins, neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones) signalling molecules are intimately associated with adult neurogenesis and largely dictate the proliferative activity and differentiation capacity of neural cells. Cannabinoids are a unique class of chemical compounds incorporating plant-derived cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa), the endogenous cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid ligands, and these compounds are becoming increasingly recognized for their roles in neural developmental processes. Indeed, cannabinoids have clear modulatory roles in adult neurogenesis, probably through activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, a large body of literature has deciphered the signalling networks involved in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of neurogenesis. This timely review summarizes the evidence that the cannabinoid system is intricately associated with neuronal differentiation and maturation of NPCs and highlights intrinsic/extrinsic signalling mechanisms that are cannabinoid targets. Overall, these findings identify the central role of the cannabinoid system in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and the lateral ventricles and hence provide insight into the processes underlying post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. PMID:25951750

  9. MicroRNA let-7d is a target of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and controls cannabinoid signaling.

    PubMed

    Chiarlone, Anna; Börner, Christine; Martín-Gómez, Laura; Jiménez-González, Ada; García-Concejo, Adrián; García-Bermejo, María L; Lorente, Mar; Blázquez, Cristina; García-Taboada, Elena; de Haro, Amador; Martella, Elisa; Höllt, Volker; Rodríguez, Raquel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Kraus, Jürgen; Guzmán, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor, the molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is one of the most abundant metabotropic receptors in the brain. Cannabis is widely used for both recreational and medicinal purposes. Despite the ever-growing fundamental roles of microRNAs in the brain, the possible molecular connections between the CB1 receptor and microRNAs are surprisingly unknown. Here, by using reporter gene constructs that express interaction sequences for microRNAs in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that CB1 receptor activation enhances the expression of several microRNAs, including let-7d. This was confirmed by measuring hsa-let-7d expression levels. Accordingly, knocking-down CB1 receptor in zebrafish reduced dre-let-7d levels, and knocking-out CB1 receptor in mice decreased mmu-let-7d levels in the cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Conversely, knocking-down let-7d increased CB1 receptor mRNA expression in zebrafish, SH-SY5Y cells and primary striatal neurons. Likewise, in primary striatal neurons chronically exposed to a cannabinoid or opioid agonist, a let-7d-inhibiting sequence facilitated not only cannabinoid or opioid signaling but also cannabinoid/opioid cross-signaling. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence for a bidirectional link between the CB1 receptor and a microRNA, namely let-7d, and thus unveil a new player in the complex process of cannabinoid action. PMID:27179908

  10. MicroRNA let-7d is a target of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and controls cannabinoid signaling.

    PubMed

    Chiarlone, Anna; Börner, Christine; Martín-Gómez, Laura; Jiménez-González, Ada; García-Concejo, Adrián; García-Bermejo, María L; Lorente, Mar; Blázquez, Cristina; García-Taboada, Elena; de Haro, Amador; Martella, Elisa; Höllt, Volker; Rodríguez, Raquel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Kraus, Jürgen; Guzmán, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor, the molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is one of the most abundant metabotropic receptors in the brain. Cannabis is widely used for both recreational and medicinal purposes. Despite the ever-growing fundamental roles of microRNAs in the brain, the possible molecular connections between the CB1 receptor and microRNAs are surprisingly unknown. Here, by using reporter gene constructs that express interaction sequences for microRNAs in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that CB1 receptor activation enhances the expression of several microRNAs, including let-7d. This was confirmed by measuring hsa-let-7d expression levels. Accordingly, knocking-down CB1 receptor in zebrafish reduced dre-let-7d levels, and knocking-out CB1 receptor in mice decreased mmu-let-7d levels in the cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Conversely, knocking-down let-7d increased CB1 receptor mRNA expression in zebrafish, SH-SY5Y cells and primary striatal neurons. Likewise, in primary striatal neurons chronically exposed to a cannabinoid or opioid agonist, a let-7d-inhibiting sequence facilitated not only cannabinoid or opioid signaling but also cannabinoid/opioid cross-signaling. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence for a bidirectional link between the CB1 receptor and a microRNA, namely let-7d, and thus unveil a new player in the complex process of cannabinoid action.

  11. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid medicines.

    PubMed

    Robson, P J

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis was extensively used as a medicine throughout the developed world in the nineteenth century but went into decline early in the twentieth century ahead of its emergence as the most widely used illicit recreational drug later that century. Recent advances in cannabinoid pharmacology alongside the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) have re-ignited interest in cannabis-based medicines. The ECS has emerged as an important physiological system and plausible target for new medicines. Its receptors and endogenous ligands play a vital modulatory role in diverse functions including immune response, food intake, cognition, emotion, perception, behavioural reinforcement, motor co-ordination, body temperature, wake/sleep cycle, bone formation and resorption, and various aspects of hormonal control. In disease it may act as part of the physiological response or as a component of the underlying pathology. In the forefront of clinical research are the cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and their contrasting pharmacology will be briefly outlined. The therapeutic potential and possible risks of drugs that inhibit the ECS will also be considered. This paper will then go on to review clinical research exploring the potential of cannabinoid medicines in the following indications: symptomatic relief in multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, intractable nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight in the context of cancer or AIDS, psychosis, epilepsy, addiction, and metabolic disorders. PMID:24006213

  12. Cannabinoid receptors in brain: pharmacogenetics, neuropharmacology, neurotoxicology, and potential therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Onaivi, Emmanuel S

    2009-01-01

    Much progress has been achieved in cannabinoid research. A major breakthrough in marijuana-cannabinoid research has been the discovery of a previously unknown but elaborate endogenous endocannabinoid system (ECS), complete with endocannabinoids and enzymes for their biosynthesis and degradation with genes encoding two distinct cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) receptors (CBRs) that are activated by endocannabinoids, cannabinoids, and marijuana use. Physical and genetic localization of the CBR genes CNR1 and CNR2 have been mapped to chromosome 6 and 1, respectively. A number of variations in CBR genes have been associated with human disorders including osteoporosis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), drug dependency, obesity, and depression. Other family of lipid receptors including vanilloid (VR1) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors appear to be related to the CBRs at the phylogenetic level. The ubiquitous abundance and differential distribution of the ECS in the human body and brain along with the coupling to many signal transduction pathways may explain the effects in most biological system and the myriad behavioral effects associated with smoking marijuana. The neuropharmacological and neuroprotective features of phytocannabinoids and endocannabinoid associated neurogenesis have revealed roles for the use of cannabinoids in neurodegenerative pathologies with less neurotoxicity. The remarkable progress in understanding the biological actions of marijuana and cannabinoids have provided much richer results than previously appreciated cannabinoid genomics and raised a number of critical issues on the molecular mechanisms of cannabinoid induced behavioral and biochemical alterations. These advances will allow specific therapeutic targeting of the different components of the ECS in health and disease. This review focuses on these recent advances in cannabinoid genomics and the surprising new fundamental roles that the

  13. Elucidating cannabinoid biology in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Krug, Randall G; Clark, Karl J

    2015-10-10

    The number of annual cannabinoid users exceeds 100,000,000 globally and an estimated 9% of these individuals will suffer from dependency. Although exogenous cannabinoids, like those contained in marijuana, are known to exert their effects by disrupting the endocannabinoid system, a dearth of knowledge exists about the potential toxicological consequences on public health. Conversely, the endocannabinoid system represents a promising therapeutic target for a plethora of disorders because it functions to endogenously regulate a vast repertoire of physiological functions. Accordingly, the rapidly expanding field of cannabinoid biology has sought to leverage model organisms in order to provide both toxicological and therapeutic insights about altered endocannabinoid signaling. The primary goal of this manuscript is to review the existing field of cannabinoid research in the genetically tractable zebrafish model-focusing on the cannabinoid receptor genes, cnr1 and cnr2, and the genes that produce enzymes for synthesis and degradation of the cognate ligands anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol. Consideration is also given to research that has studied the effects of exposure to exogenous phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids that are known to interact with cannabinoid receptors. These results are considered in the context of either endocannabinoid gene expression or endocannabinoid gene function, and are integrated with findings from rodent studies. This provides the framework for a discussion of how zebrafish may be leveraged in the future to provide novel toxicological and therapeutic insights in the field of cannabinoid biology, which has become increasingly significant given recent trends in cannabis legislation.

  14. Elucidating Cannabinoid Biology in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Randall G.; Clark, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    The number of annual cannabinoid users exceeds 100,000,000 globally and an estimated 9 % of these individuals will suffer from dependency. Although exogenous cannabinoids, like those contained in marijuana, are known to exert their effects by disrupting the endocannabinoid system, a dearth of knowledge exists about the potential toxicological consequences on public health. Conversely, the endocannabinoid system represents a promising therapeutic target for a plethora of disorders because it functions to endogenously regulate a vast repertoire of physiological functions. Accordingly, the rapidly expanding field of cannabinoid biology has sought to leverage model organisms in order to provide both toxicological and therapeutic insights about altered endocannabinoid signaling. The primary goal of this manuscript is to review the existing field of cannabinoid research in the genetically tractable zebrafish model—focusing on the cannabinoid receptor genes, cnr1 and cnr2, and the genes that produce enzymes for synthesis and degradation of the cognate ligands anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol. Consideration is also given to research that has studied the effects of exposure to exogenous phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids that are known to interact with cannabinoid receptors. These results are considered in the context of either endocannabinoid gene expression or endocannabinoid gene function, and are integrated with findings from rodent studies. This provides the framework for a discussion of how zebrafish may be leveraged in the future to provide novel toxicological and therapeutic insights in the field of cannabinoid biology, which has become increasingly significant given recent trends in cannabis legislation. PMID:26192460

  15. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cannabinoid test system. 862.3870 Section 862.3870....3870 Cannabinoid test system. (a) Identification. A cannabinoid test system is a device intended to..., saliva, and urine. Cannabinoid compounds include delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol,...

  16. Cannabinoids in late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aia; van der Marck, M A; van den Elsen, Gah; Olde Rikkert, Mgm

    2015-06-01

    Given the lack of effective treatments for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and the substantial burden on patients, families, health care systems, and economies, finding an effective therapy is one of the highest medical priorities. The past few years have seen a growing interest in the medicinal uses of cannabinoids, the bioactive components of the cannabis plant, including the treatment of LOAD and other physical conditions that are common in older people. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids can reduce oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the key hallmarks of LOAD. In addition, in population-based studies, cannabinoids reduced dementia-related symptoms (e.g., behavioral disturbances). The current article provides an overview of the potential of cannabinoids in the treatment of LOAD and related neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people. We also discuss the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of cannabinoid-based drugs in older people with dementia.

  17. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child's hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke. PMID:26443501

  18. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption

    PubMed Central

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child’s hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke. PMID:26443501

  19. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-10-07

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child's hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke.

  20. Mastering tricyclic ring systems for desirable functional cannabinoid activity

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ravil R.; Knight, Lindsay; Chen, Shao-Rui; Wager-Miller, Jim; McDaniel, Steven W.; Diaz, Fanny; Barth, Francis; Pan, Hui-Lin; Mackie, Ken; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Diaz, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in using cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) agonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain and other indications. In continuation of our ongoing program aiming for the development of new small molecule cannabinoid ligands, we have synthesized a novel series of carbazole and γ-carboline derivatives. The affinities of the newly synthesized compounds were determined by a competitive radioligand displacement assay for human CB2 cannabinoid receptor and rat CB1 cannabinoid receptor. Functional activity and selectivity at human CB1 and CB2 receptors were characterized using receptor internalization and [35S]GTP-γ-S assays. The structure-activity relationship and optimization studies of the carbazole series have led to the discovery of a non-selective CB1 and CB2 agonist, compound 4. Our subsequent research efforts to increase CB2 selectivity of this lead compound have led to the discovery of CB2 selective compound 64, which robustly internalized CB2 receptors. Compound 64 had potent inhibitory effects on pain hypersensitivity in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Other potent and CB2 receptor–selective compounds, including compounds 63 and 68, and a selective CB1 agonist, compound 74 were also discovered. In addition, we identified the CB2 ligand 35 which failed to promote CB2 receptor internalization and inhibited compound CP55,940-induced CB2 internalization despite a high CB2 receptor affinity. The present study provides novel tricyclic series as a starting point for further investigations of CB2 pharmacology and pain treatment. PMID:24125850

  1. Cannabinoid system in the budgerigar brain.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Ferrero, M E; Paniagua, M A; Mostany, R; Pilar-Cuéllar, F; Díez-Alarcia, R; Pazos, A; Fernández-López, A

    2006-05-01

    Cannabinoid receptor density and cannabinoid receptor-mediated G protein stimulation were studied by autoradiographic techniques throughout the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) brain. The maximal CB(1) receptor density value (using [(3)H]CP55,940 as radioligand) was found in the molecular layer of the cerebellum (Mol), and high binding values were observed in the nucleus taeniae amygdalae (TnA), nucleus preopticus medialis, and nucleus pretectalis. The highest net-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding values induced by the selective CB(1) receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 were observed in the nucleus paramedianus internus thalami, and high values of [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding were observed in the TnA, Mol, arcopallium dorsale and arcopallium intermedium. The distribution data suggest that in the budgerigar, as previously indicated in mammals, cannabinoid receptors may be related to the control of several brain functions in the motor system, memory, visual system, and reproductive behavior. The discrepancies between the cannabinoid receptor densities and the cannabinoid receptor-mediated stimulation found in several budgerigar brain nuclei support the hypothesis, previously described for mammals, of the existence of different G(i/o) protein populations able to associate with the cannabinoid receptors, depending on the brain structure, and could reflect the relative importance that cannabinoid transmission could exerts in each cerebral area.

  2. Signal transduction activated by cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery that cannabinoids exert biological actions through binding to specific receptors, signal mechanisms triggered by these receptors have been focus of extensive study. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signalling events produced by cannabinoids from membrane receptors to downstream regulators. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: CB(1) and CB(2) both belonging to the heptahelichoidal receptor family but with different tissue distribution and signalling mechanisms. Coupling to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and thus inhibition of adenylyl cyclase has been observed in both receptors but other signal transduction pathways that are regulated or not by these G proteins are differently activated upon ligand-receptor binding including ion channels, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, ceramide generation, phospholipases activation and downstream targets as MAP kinase cascade, PI3K, FAK or NOS regulation. Cannabinoids may also act independently of CB(1)or CB(2) receptors. The existence of new unidentified putative cannabinoid receptors has been claimed by many investigators. Endocannabinoids activate vanilloid TRPV1 receptors that may mediate some of the cannabinoid effects. Other actions of cannabinoids can occur through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  3. Cannabinoids as novel anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Nagarkatti, Prakash; Pandey, Rupal; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Hegde, Venkatesh L; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2009-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds that mediate their effects through cannabinoid receptors. The discovery of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as the major psychoactive principle in marijuana, as well as the identification of cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, has led to a significant growth in research aimed at understanding the physiological functions of cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptors include CB1, which is predominantly expressed in the brain, and CB2, which is primarily found on the cells of the immune system. The fact that both CB1 and CB2 receptors have been found on immune cells suggests that cannabinoids play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Recent studies demonstrated that administration of THC into mice triggered marked apoptosis in T cells and dendritic cells, resulting in immunosuppression. In addition, several studies showed that cannabinoids downregulate cytokine and chemokine production and, in some models, upregulate T-regulatory cells (Tregs) as a mechanism to suppress inflammatory responses. The endocannabinoid system is also involved in immunoregulation. For example, administration of endocannabinoids or use of inhibitors of enzymes that break down the endocannabinoids, led to immunosuppression and recovery from immune-mediated injury to organs such as the liver. Manipulation of endocannabinoids and/or use of exogenous cannabinoids in vivo can constitute a potent treatment modality against inflammatory disorders. This review will focus on the potential use of cannabinoids as a new class of anti-inflammatory agents against a number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases that are primarily triggered by activated T cells or other cellular immune components. PMID:20191092

  4. Peripheral cannabinoid receptor, CB2, regulates bone mass

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Orr; Karsak, Meliha; Leclerc, Nathalie; Fogel, Meirav; Frenkel, Baruch; Wright, Karen; Tam, Joseph; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kram, Vardit; Shohami, Esther; Mechoulam, Raphael; Zimmer, Andreas; Bab, Itai

    2006-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoids bind to and activate two G protein-coupled receptors, the predominantly central cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peripheral cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2). Whereas CB1 mediates the cannabinoid psychotropic, analgesic, and orectic effects, CB2 has been implicated recently in the regulation of liver fibrosis and atherosclerosis. Here we show that CB2-deficient mice have a markedly accelerated age-related trabecular bone loss and cortical expansion, although cortical thickness remains unaltered. These changes are reminiscent of human osteoporosis and may result from differential regulation of trabecular and cortical bone remodeling. The CB2–/– phenotype is also characterized by increased activity of trabecular osteoblasts (bone-forming cells), increased osteoclast (the bone-resorbing cell) number, and a markedly decreased number of diaphyseal osteoblast precursors. CB2 is expressed in osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts. A CB2-specific agonist that does not have any psychotropic effects enhances endocortical osteoblast number and activity and restrains trabecular osteoclastogenesis, apparently by inhibiting proliferation of osteoclast precursors and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression in bone marrow-derived osteoblasts/stromal cells. The same agonist attenuates ovariectomy-induced bone loss and markedly stimulates cortical thickness through the respective suppression of osteoclast number and stimulation of endocortical bone formation. These results demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system is essential for the maintenance of normal bone mass by osteoblastic and osteoclastic CB2 signaling. Hence, CB2 offers a molecular target for the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis, the most prevalent degenerative disease in developed countries. PMID:16407142

  5. Cannabinoid system and cyclooxygenases inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Coman, OA; Coman, L; Ghiţă, I; Georgescu, SR; Drăia, F; Fulga, I

    2011-01-01

    Rationale. The cannabinoid system consists of a complex array of receptors, substances with agonist/antagonist properties for those receptors, biosynthetic machineries and mechanisms for cellular uptake and degradation for endocannabinoids. This system is in interrelation with other systems that comprise lipid mediators like prostaglandins/leukotrienes systems. A clear antagonist, additive or synergic effect of nonsteroidal anti–inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)–cannabinoid associations was not yet demonstrated. Aim. The present study tried to summarize the existent data on NSAIDS-cannabinoid system interactions. Methods and results A bibliographic research in Medline, Scirus, Embase was made using as keywords cannabinoid, nonsteroidal anti–inflammatory drugs, aspirin, ibuprofen, flurbiprofen, diclofenac, indomethacin, acetaminophen, coxibs, antinociceptive, antinociception, analgesia DiscussionsA systematization of the results focusing on the NSAIDs drugs interaction with the cannabinoid system was presented. Out of all the substances analyzed in the present review, acetaminophen was studied the most regarding its interferences with the cannabinoid system, mainly due to contradictory results. Conclusions Some NSAIDs have additional influences on the cannabinoid system either by inhibiting fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) or by inhibiting a possible intracellular transporter of endocannabinoids. All the NSAIDs that inhibit COX2 can influence the cannabinoid system because a possible important degradative pathway for anandamide and 2–arachidonoyl glycerol might involve COX 2. One of the causes for the variety of experimental results presented might be due to pharmacokinetic mechanisms, depending on the route of administration and the dose Abbreviationsdelta9 THC, (–)–(6aR,10aR)–6,6,9–trimethyl–3–pentyl–6a,7,8,10a–tetrahydro–6H–benzo[c]chromen–1–ol; delta9–THC–11–oic acid, 1–hydroxy–6,6–dimethyl–3–pentyl–6a,7,8,10a

  6. Role of the Endogenous Cannabinoid System in Nicotine Addiction: Novel Insights

    PubMed Central

    Gamaleddin, Islam Hany; Trigo, Jose M.; Gueye, Aliou B.; Zvonok, Alexander; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Goldberg, Steven R.; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that the endogenous cannabinoids are implicated in several neuropsychiatric diseases. Notably, preclinical and human clinical studies have shown a pivotal role of the cannabinoid system in nicotine addiction. The CB1 receptor inverse agonist/antagonist rimonabant (also known as SR141716) was effective to decrease nicotine-taking and nicotine-seeking in rodents, as well as the elevation of dopamine induced by nicotine in brain reward area. Rimonabant has been shown to improve the ability of smokers to quit smoking in randomized clinical trials. However, rimonabant was removed from the market due to increased risk of psychiatric side-effects observed in humans. Recently, other components of the endogenous cannabinoid system have been explored. Here, we present the recent advances on the understanding of the role of the different components of the cannabinoid system on nicotine’s effects. Those recent findings suggest possible alternative ways of modulating the cannabinoid system that could have implication for nicotine dependence treatment. PMID:25859226

  7. Cannabinoids reduce ErbB2-driven breast cancer progression through Akt inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background ErbB2-positive breast cancer is characterized by highly aggressive phenotypes and reduced responsiveness to standard therapies. Although specific ErbB2-targeted therapies have been designed, only a small percentage of patients respond to these treatments and most of them eventually relapse. The existence of this population of particularly aggressive and non-responding or relapsing patients urges the search for novel therapies. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cannabinoids might constitute a new therapeutic tool for the treatment of ErbB2-positive breast tumors. We analyzed their antitumor potential in a well established and clinically relevant model of ErbB2-driven metastatic breast cancer: the MMTV-neu mouse. We also analyzed the expression of cannabinoid targets in a series of 87 human breast tumors. Results Our results show that both Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the most abundant and potent cannabinoid in marijuana, and JWH-133, a non-psychotropic CB2 receptor-selective agonist, reduce tumor growth, tumor number, and the amount/severity of lung metastases in MMTV-neu mice. Histological analyses of the tumors revealed that cannabinoids inhibit cancer cell proliferation, induce cancer cell apoptosis, and impair tumor angiogenesis. Cannabinoid antitumoral action relies, at least partially, on the inhibition of the pro-tumorigenic Akt pathway. We also found that 91% of ErbB2-positive tumors express the non-psychotropic cannabinoid receptor CB2. Conclusions Taken together, these results provide a strong preclinical evidence for the use of cannabinoid-based therapies for the management of ErbB2-positive breast cancer. PMID:20649976

  8. Toxicological profiles of selected synthetic cannabinoids showing high binding affinities to the cannabinoid receptor subtype CB₁.

    PubMed

    Koller, Verena J; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Auwärter, Volker; Fuchs, Sabine; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2013-07-01

    Products containing synthetic cannabinoids are consumed as a surrogate for marihuana due to their non-detectability with commonly used drug tests and their strong cannabimimetic effects. Because data concerning their toxicological properties are scarce, the cytotoxic, genotoxic, immunomodulatory, and hormonal activities of four naphthoylindole compounds (JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-122 and JWH-210) and of one benzoylindole (AM-694) were studied in human cell lines and primary cells; tetrahydrocannabinol was included as the classical non-endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand. All compounds induced damage to the cell membranes of buccal (TR146) and breast (MCF-7) derived cells at concentrations of ≥75-100 μM. No cytotoxic responses were seen in other assays which reflect mitochondrial damage, protein synthesis, and lysosomal activities. JWH-073 and JWH-122 induced DNA migration in buccal and liver cells (HepG2) in single cell gel electrophoresis assays, while JWH-210 was only in the latter cell line active. No estrogenic activities were detected in bone marrow cells (U2-OS), but all compounds caused anti-estrogenic effects at levels between 2.1 and 23.0 μM. Furthermore, no impact on cytokine release (i.e., on IL-10, IL-6, IL-12/23p40 and TNFα levels) was seen in LPS-stimulated human PBMCs, except with JWH-210 and JWH-122 which caused a decrease of TNFα and IL-12/23p40. All toxic effects were observed with concentrations higher than those expected in body fluids of users. Since genotoxic effects are in general linear over a wide concentration range and the exposure levels may be higher in epithelial cells than [corrected] in serum, further experimental work is required to find out if DNA damage takes place in drug users.

  9. [Cannabinoids for symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Husseini, L; Leussink, V I; Warnke, C; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity represents a common troublesome symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Treatment of spasticity remains difficult, which has prompted some patients to self-medicate with and perceive benefits from cannabis. Advances in the understanding of cannabinoid biology support these anecdotal observations. Various clinical reports as well as randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have now demonstrated clinical efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of spasticity in MS patients. Sativex is a 1:1 mix of delta-9-tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol extracted from cloned Cannabis sativa chemovars, which recently received a label for treating MS-related spasticity in Germany. The present article reviews the current understanding of cannabinoid biology and the value of cannabinoids as a symptomatic treatment option in MS. PMID:22080198

  10. Alcohol Versus Cannabinoids: A Review of Their Opposite Neuro-Immunomodulatory Effects and Future Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Madhavan P.; Figueroa, Gloria; Casteleiro, Gianna; Muñoz, Karla; Agudelo, Marisela

    2015-01-01

    Due to the legalization of marijuana and the increased demand for cannabis and alcohol consumption, research efforts highlighting the biomedical consequences of the use of alcohol and cannabinoids are not only relevant to the substance abuse scientific field, but are also of public health interest. Moreover, an overview of the recent literature about alcohol and cannabinoids neuro-immunomodulatory effects highlighting their future therapeutic potentials will provide a significant contribution to science and medicine. Therefore, in the current review, we will first discuss briefly the prevalence of alcohol and marijuana abuse, followed by a discussion on the individual effects of alcohol and cannabinoids on the immune system; then, we will focus on the role of endocannabinoids on the alcohol-induced inflammatory effects. In addition, the review also incorporates cytokine array data obtained from human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, providing a different perspective on the alcohol and cannabinoid abuse divergent effects on cytokine production. The final section will highlight the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid receptors and the novel strategies to treat alcohol dependence as determined by in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies. PMID:26478902

  11. Cannabinoids: novel medicines for the treatment of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Sagredo, Onintza; Pazos, M Ruth; Valdeolivas, Sara; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier

    2012-04-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has experienced a notable increase in the last 3 decades which is allowing the development of novel cannabinoid-based medicines for the treatment of different human pathologies, for example, Cesamet® (nabilone) or Marinol® (synthetic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol for oral administration) that were approved in 80s for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy treatment in cancer patients and in 90s for anorexiacachexia associated with AIDS therapy. Recently, the british company GW Pharmaceuticals plc has developed an oromucosal spray called Sativex®, which is constituted by an equimolecular combination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol- and cannabidiol- enriched botanical extracts. Sativex® has been approved for the treatment of specific symptoms (i.e. spasticity and pain) of multiple sclerosis patients in various countries (i.e. Canada, UK, Spain, New Zealand). However, this cannabis- based medicine has been also proposed to be useful in other neurological disorders given the analgesic, antitumoral, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties of their components demonstrated in preclinical models. Numerous clinical trials are presently being conducted to confirm this potential in patients. We are particularly interested in the case of Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder caused by an excess of CAG repeats in the genomic allele resulting in a polyQ expansion in the encoded protein called huntingtin, and that affects primarily striatal and cortical neurons thus producing motor abnormalities (i.e. chorea) and dementia. Cannabinoids have been studied for alleviation of hyperkinetic symptoms, given their inhibitory effects on movement, and, in particular, as disease-modifying agents due to their anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties. This potential has been corroborated in different experimental models of HD and using different types of cannabinoid agonists

  12. Chemotherapy-induced antitumor immunity requires formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Ma, Yuting; Baracco, Elisa E; Sistigu, Antonella; Enot, David P; Pietrocola, Federico; Yang, Heng; Adjemian, Sandy; Chaba, Kariman; Semeraro, Michaela; Signore, Michele; De Ninno, Adele; Lucarini, Valeria; Peschiaroli, Francesca; Businaro, Luca; Gerardino, Annamaria; Manic, Gwenola; Ulas, Thomas; Günther, Patrick; Schultze, Joachim L; Kepp, Oliver; Stoll, Gautier; Lefebvre, Céline; Mulot, Claire; Castoldi, Francesca; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Ladoire, Sylvain; Apetoh, Lionel; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Lucattelli, Monica; Delarasse, Cécile; Boige, Valérie; Ducreux, Michel; Delaloge, Suzette; Borg, Christophe; André, Fabrice; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Vitale, Ilio; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-11-20

    Antitumor immunity driven by intratumoral dendritic cells contributes to the efficacy of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in cancer. We identified a loss-of-function allele of the gene coding for formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) that was associated with poor metastasis-free and overall survival in breast and colorectal cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. The therapeutic effects of anthracyclines were abrogated in tumor-bearing Fpr1(-/-) mice due to impaired antitumor immunity. Fpr1-deficient dendritic cells failed to approach dying cancer cells and, as a result, could not elicit antitumor T cell immunity. Experiments performed in a microfluidic device confirmed that FPR1 and its ligand, annexin-1, promoted stable interactions between dying cancer cells and human or murine leukocytes. Altogether, these results highlight the importance of FPR1 in chemotherapy-induced anticancer immune responses. PMID:26516201

  13. A New Differential Diagnosis: Synthetic Cannabinoids-Associated Acute Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Gudsoorkar, Vineet S; Perez, Jose A

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are herbal blends that use plant material with varying concentrations of synthetic analogues of cannabinoids. These products are sold as incense or potpourri and are labeled "Not for human use." Even so, rates of abuse are rapidly increasing worldwide, especially in the young adult population. An extensive network of users exists, and the products can easily be ordered on the Internet under various brand names, including the most popular ones, "K2" and "Spice." Not much is known about their spectrum of toxicity and no specific antidote is available at present. Renal failure is a rare complication associated with SC abuse. We describe a case of acute kidney injury associated with use of SCs and present a review of the current literature, including the history and some key pharmacologic and epidemiologic findings related to synthetic cannabinoid compounds. PMID:26634029

  14. A New Differential Diagnosis: Synthetic Cannabinoids-Associated Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gudsoorkar, Vineet S.; Perez, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are herbal blends that use plant material with varying concentrations of synthetic analogues of cannabinoids. These products are sold as incense or potpourri and are labeled “Not for human use.” Even so, rates of abuse are rapidly increasing worldwide, especially in the young adult population. An extensive network of users exists, and the products can easily be ordered on the Internet under various brand names, including the most popular ones, “K2” and “Spice.” Not much is known about their spectrum of toxicity and no specific antidote is available at present. Renal failure is a rare complication associated with SC abuse. We describe a case of acute kidney injury associated with use of SCs and present a review of the current literature, including the history and some key pharmacologic and epidemiologic findings related to synthetic cannabinoid compounds. PMID:26634029

  15. Structural insight into equine lentivirus receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lei; Han, Xiaodong; Liu, Xinqi

    2015-05-01

    Equine lentivirus receptor 1 (ELR1) has been identified as a functional cellular receptor for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). Herein, recombinant ELR1 and EIAV surface glycoprotein gp90 were respectively expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, and purified to homogeneity by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Gel filtration chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) analyses indicated that both ELR1 and gp90 existed as individual monomers in solution and formed a complex with a stoichiometry of 1:1 when mixed. The structure of ELR1 was first determined with the molecular replacement method, which belongs to the space group P42 21 2 with one molecule in an asymmetric unit. It contains eight antiparallel β-sheets, of which four are in cysteine rich domain 1 (CRD1) and two are in CRD2 and CRD3, respectively. Alignment of ELR1 with HVEM and CD134 indicated that Tyr61, Leu70, and Gly72 in CRD1 of ELR1 are important residues for binding to gp90. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments further confirmed that Leu70 and Gly72 are the critical residues.

  16. Nicotine and cannabinoids: parallels, contrasts and interactions.

    PubMed

    Viveros, Maria-Paz; Marco, Eva M; File, Sandra E

    2006-01-01

    After a brief outline of the nicotinic and cannabinoid systems, we review the interactions between the pharmacological effects of nicotine and cannabis, two of the most widely used drugs of dependence. These drugs are increasingly taken in combination, particularly among the adolescents and young adults. The review focuses on addiction-related processes, gateway and reverse gateway theories of addiction and therapeutic implications. It then reviews studies on the important period of adolescence, an area that is in urgent need of further investigation and in which the importance of sex differences is emerging. Three other areas of research, which might be particularly relevant to the onset and/or maintenance of dependence, are then reviewed. Firstly, the effects of the two drugs on anxiety-related behaviours are discussed and then their effects on food intake and cognition, two areas in which they have contrasting effects. Certain animal studies suggest that reinforcing effects are likely to be enhanced by joint consumption of nicotine and cannabis, as also may be anxiolytic effects. If this was the case in humans, the latter might be viewed as an advantage particularly by adolescent girls, although the increased weight gain associated with cannabis would be a disadvantage. The two drugs also have opposite effects on cognition and the possibility of long-lasting cognitive impairments resulting from adolescent consumption of cannabis is of particular concern.

  17. Therapeutic Potential of Cannabinoids in Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Leweke, F Markus; Mueller, Juliane K; Lange, Bettina; Rohleder, Cathrin

    2016-04-01

    Over recent years, the interest in the endocannabinoid system (ECS) as a new target for the treatment of schizophrenia has evolved. The ECS represents one of the most relevant neurotransmitter systems in the brain and mainly fulfills a homeostatic role in terms of neurotransmission but also with respect to inflammatory processes. Two main approaches to the modulation of endocannabinoid functioning have been chosen so far. First, the selective blockade or inverse agonism of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor has been tested for the improvement of acute psychotic symptoms, as well as for the improvement of cognitive functions in schizophrenia. This was not effective in either case. Second, the modulation of endocannabinoid levels by use of the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol and selective fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors has been proposed, and the antipsychotic properties of cannabidiol are currently being investigated in humans. Unfortunately, for most of these trials that have focused on psychopathological and cognitive effects of cannabidiol, no published data are available. However, there is first evidence that cannabidiol may ameliorate psychotic symptoms with a superior side-effect profile compared with established antipsychotics. In conclusion, several clinical trials targeting the ECS in acute schizophrenia have either been completed or are underway. Although publicly available results are currently limited, preliminary data indicate that selected compounds modulating the ECS may be effective in acute schizophrenia. Nevertheless, so far, sample sizes of patients investigated are not sufficient to come to a final judgment, and no maintenance studies are available to ensure long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26852073

  18. Current Knowledge on Cannabinoids in Oral Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dayong; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is a new biological matrix for clinical and forensic drug testing, offering non-invasive and directly observable sample collection reducing adulteration potential, ease of multiple sample collections, lower biohazard risk during collection, recent exposure identification, and stronger correlation with blood than urine concentrations. Because cannabinoids are usually the most prevalent analytes in illicit drug testing, application of OF drug testing requires sufficient scientific data to support sensitive and specific OF cannabinoid detection. This review presents current knowledge on OF cannabinoids, evaluating pharmacokinetic properties, detection windows, and correlation with other biological matrices and impairment from field applications and controlled drug administration studies. In addition, on-site screening technologies, confirmatory analytical methods, drug stability, and effects of sample collection procedure, adulterants, and passive environmental exposure are reviewed. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol OF concentrations could be > 1000 μg/L shortly after smoking, whereas minor cannabinoids are detected at 10-fold and metabolites at 1000-fold lower concentrations. OF research over the past decade demonstrated that appropriate interpretation of test results requires a comprehensive understanding of distinct elimination profiles and detection windows for different cannabinoids, which are influenced by administration route, dose, and drug use history. Thus, each drug testing program should establish cutoff criteria, collection/analysis procedures, and storage conditions tailored to its purposes. Building a scientific basis for OF testing is on-going, with continuing OF cannabinoids research on passive environmental exposure, drug use history, donor physiological conditions, and oral cavity metabolism needed to better understand mechanisms of cannabinoid OF disposition and expand OF drug testing applicability. PMID:23983217

  19. Cannabinoids inhibit angiogenic capacities of endothelial cells via release of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 from lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Robert; Fischer, Sascha; Haustein, Maria; Manda, Katrin; Hinz, Burkhard

    2014-09-15

    Cannabinoids inhibit tumor neovascularization as part of their tumorregressive action. However, the underlying mechanism is still under debate. In the present study the impact of cannabinoids on potential tumor-to-endothelial cell communication conferring anti-angiogenesis was studied. Cellular behavior of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) associated with angiogenesis was evaluated by Boyden chamber, two-dimensional tube formation and fibrin bead assay, with the latter assessing three-dimensional sprout formation. Viability was quantified by the WST-1 test. Conditioned media (CM) from A549 lung cancer cells treated with cannabidiol, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, R(+)-methanandamide or the CB2 agonist JWH-133 elicited decreased migration as well as tube and sprout formation of HUVEC as compared to CM of vehicle-treated cancer cells. Inhibition of sprout formation was further confirmed for cannabinoid-treated A549 cells co-cultured with HUVEC. Using antagonists to cannabinoid-activated receptors the antimigratory action was shown to be mediated via cannabinoid receptors or transient receptor potential vanilloid 1. SiRNA approaches revealed a cannabinoid-induced expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) as well as its upstream trigger, the intercellular adhesion molecule-1, to be causally linked to the observed decrease of HUVEC migration. Comparable anti-angiogenic effects were not detected following direct exposure of HUVEC to cannabinoids, but occurred after addition of recombinant TIMP-1 to HUVEC. Finally, antimigratory effects were confirmed for CM of two other cannabinoid-treated lung cancer cell lines (H460 and H358). Collectively, our data suggest a pivotal role of the anti-angiogenic factor TIMP-1 in intercellular tumor-endothelial cell communication resulting in anti-angiogenic features of endothelial cells.

  20. The Role of Cannabinoids in Neuroanatomic Alterations in Cannabis Users.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Valentina; Solowij, Nadia; Yücel, Murat

    2016-04-01

    The past few decades have seen a marked change in the composition of commonly smoked cannabis. These changes primarily involve an increase of the psychoactive compound ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and a decrease of the potentially therapeutic compound cannabidiol (CBD). This altered composition of cannabis may be linked to persistent neuroanatomic alterations typically seen in regular cannabis users. In this review, we summarize recent findings from human structural neuroimaging investigations. We examine whether neuroanatomic alterations are 1) consistently observed in samples of regular cannabis users, particularly in cannabinoid receptor-high areas, which are vulnerable to the effects of high circulating levels of THC, and 2) associated either with greater levels of cannabis use (e.g., higher dosage, longer duration, and earlier age of onset) or with distinct cannabinoid compounds (i.e., THC and CBD). Across the 31 studies selected for inclusion in this review, neuroanatomic alterations emerged across regions that are high in cannabinoid receptors (i.e., hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, cerebellum). Greater dose and earlier age of onset were associated with these alterations. Preliminary evidence shows that THC exacerbates, whereas CBD protects from, such harmful effects. Methodologic differences in the quantification of levels of cannabis use prevent accurate assessment of cannabis exposure and direct comparison of findings across studies. Consequently, the field lacks large "consortium-style" data sets that can be used to develop reliable neurobiological models of cannabis-related harm, recovery, and protection. To move the field forward, we encourage a coordinated approach and suggest the urgent development of consensus-based guidelines to accurately and comprehensively quantify cannabis use and exposure in human studies. PMID:26858212

  1. Ligands for cannabinoid receptors, promising anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Nikan, Marjan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Manayi, Azadeh

    2016-02-01

    Cannabinoid compounds are unique to cannabis and provide some interesting biological properties. These compounds along with endocannabinoids, a group of neuromodulator compounds in the body especially in brain, express their effects by activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. There are several physiological properties attributed to the endocannabinoids including pain relief, enhancement of appetite, blood pressure lowering during shock, embryonic development, and blocking of working memory. On the other hand, activation of endocannabinoid system may be suppresses evolution and progression of several types of cancer. According to the results of recent studies, CB receptors are over-expressed in cancer cell lines and application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds reduce tumor size through decrease of cell proliferation or induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis along with desirable effect on decrease of tumor-evoked pain. Therefore, modulation of endocannabinoid system by inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme, which metabolized endocannabinoids, or application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds, may be appropriate for the treatment of several cancer subtypes. This review focuses on how cannabinoid affect different types of cancers. PMID:26764235

  2. Cannabinoids in late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aia; van der Marck, M A; van den Elsen, Gah; Olde Rikkert, Mgm

    2015-06-01

    Given the lack of effective treatments for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and the substantial burden on patients, families, health care systems, and economies, finding an effective therapy is one of the highest medical priorities. The past few years have seen a growing interest in the medicinal uses of cannabinoids, the bioactive components of the cannabis plant, including the treatment of LOAD and other physical conditions that are common in older people. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids can reduce oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the key hallmarks of LOAD. In addition, in population-based studies, cannabinoids reduced dementia-related symptoms (e.g., behavioral disturbances). The current article provides an overview of the potential of cannabinoids in the treatment of LOAD and related neuropsychiatric symptoms in older people. We also discuss the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of cannabinoid-based drugs in older people with dementia. PMID:25788394

  3. Potentiation of the antitumor activity of adriamycin against osteosarcoma by cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2

    PubMed Central

    NIU, FENG; ZHAO, SONG; XU, CHANG-YAN; SHA, HUI; BI, GUI-BIN; CHEN, LIN; YE, LONG; GONG, PING; NIE, TIAN-HONG

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumor that occurs in children and adolescents. The present study aimed to identify novel therapeutic strategies for osteosarcoma, by assessing the antitumor activity of the cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 and its combined effect with adriamycin (ADM) against the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line. To evaluate the antiproliferative action of these molecules, a Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used. The ability of cannabinoid to inhibit the migration, invasion and angiogenic activity of MG-63 cells were assessed by scratch, Transwell® chamber and angiogenesis assays, respectively, in vitro. To examine the alterations in expression of targeted genes, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used. The administration of cannabinoid combined with ADM was demonstrated to inhibit the growth of MG-63 cells, resulting in a cell viability of 32.12±3.13%, which was significantly lower (P<0.05) compared with the cell viability following treatment with cannabinoid (70.86±7.55%) and ADM (62.87±5.98%) alone. Greater antimetastasis and antiangiogenic activities were also observed following the coadministration of the two agents compared with individual treatments and controls. In addition, the expression levels of Notch-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in MG-63 cells were downregulated following the treatments with cannabinoid alone or in combination with ADM. In conclusion, the present findings demonstrated that cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 may significantly potentiate the antiproliferative, antimetastasis and antiangiogenic effects of ADM against MG-63 cells via the downregulation of Notch-1, MMP-2 and VEGF. These findings may offer a novel strategy for the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:26622862

  4. 1-Pentyl-3-Phenylacetylindoles and JWH-018 Share In Vivo Cannabinoid Profiles in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Marusich, Julie A.; Martin, Billy R.; Huffman, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Smoking of synthetic cannabinoid-enhanced “herbal incense” is an emerging substance abuse problem. The indole-derived cannabinoids identified in these products were originally developed as research tools and are structurally distinct from cannabinoids in the cannabis plant. Although abused by humans, most published research on this class of compounds has been performed in vitro. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel series of 1-pentyl-3-phenylacetylindoles in mice. Methods The potencies of these analogs to produce the cannabinoid agonist effects of antinociception, hypothermia and suppression of locomotion were evaluated in ICR mice. The major structural manipulations in the present series included the type of substituent (i.e., unsubstituted, methyl, methoxy, chloro, bromo, and fluoro) and the position of the substituent on the phenyl ring (i.e., 2-, 3- or 4-position). Results Potencies of this series of phenylacetylindoles for each cannabinoid effect were highly correlated with CB1 receptor affinities reported previously. Active compounds produced a profile of effects that resembled that exhibited by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The most critical factor affecting in vivo potency was the position of the substituent. Whereas compounds with 2- and 3-phenylacetyl substituents were efficacious with good potencies, 4-substituents resulted in compounds that had poor potency or were inactive. Conclusions These results suggest that phenylacetylindoles with good CB1 binding affinity share pharmacological properties with THC in mice; however, they also emphasize the complexity of molecular interactions of synthetic cannabinoids with CB1 receptors and suggest that scheduling efforts based solely upon structural features should proceed with caution. PMID:22127210

  5. Cannabinoids: Glutamatergic Transmission and Kynurenines.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Aguilera, Gabriela; Santamaría, Abel

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) comprises a complex of receptors, enzymes, and endogenous agonists that are widely distributed in the central nervous system of mammals and participates in a considerable number of neuromodulatory functions, including neurotransmission, immunological control, and cell signaling. In turn, the kynurenine pathway (KP) is the most relevant metabolic route for tryptophan degradation to form the metabolic precursor NAD(+). Recent studies demonstrate that the control exerted by the pharmacological manipulation of the ECS on the glutamatergic system in the brain may offer key information not only on the development of psychiatric disorders like psychosis and schizophrenia-like symptoms, but it also may constitute a solid basis for the development of therapeutic strategies to combat excitotoxic events occurring in neurological disorders like Huntington's disease (HD). Part of the evidence pointing to the last approach is based on experimental protocols demonstrating the efficacy of cannabinoids to prevent the deleterious actions of the endogenous neurotoxin and KP metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN). These findings intuitively raise the question about what is the precise role of the ECS in tryptophan metabolism through KP and vice versa. In this chapter, we will review basic concepts on the physiology of both the ECS and the KP to finally describe those recent findings combining the components of these two systems and hypothesize the future course that the research in this emerging field will take in the next years. PMID:27651254

  6. Cannabinoids: Glutamatergic Transmission and Kynurenines.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Aguilera, Gabriela; Santamaría, Abel

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) comprises a complex of receptors, enzymes, and endogenous agonists that are widely distributed in the central nervous system of mammals and participates in a considerable number of neuromodulatory functions, including neurotransmission, immunological control, and cell signaling. In turn, the kynurenine pathway (KP) is the most relevant metabolic route for tryptophan degradation to form the metabolic precursor NAD(+). Recent studies demonstrate that the control exerted by the pharmacological manipulation of the ECS on the glutamatergic system in the brain may offer key information not only on the development of psychiatric disorders like psychosis and schizophrenia-like symptoms, but it also may constitute a solid basis for the development of therapeutic strategies to combat excitotoxic events occurring in neurological disorders like Huntington's disease (HD). Part of the evidence pointing to the last approach is based on experimental protocols demonstrating the efficacy of cannabinoids to prevent the deleterious actions of the endogenous neurotoxin and KP metabolite quinolinic acid (QUIN). These findings intuitively raise the question about what is the precise role of the ECS in tryptophan metabolism through KP and vice versa. In this chapter, we will review basic concepts on the physiology of both the ECS and the KP to finally describe those recent findings combining the components of these two systems and hypothesize the future course that the research in this emerging field will take in the next years.

  7. Differential effect of cannabinoid agonists and endocannabinoids on histamine release from distinct regions of the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Cenni, Gabriele; Blandina, Patrizio; Mackie, Ken; Nosi, Daniele; Formigli, Lucia; Giannoni, Patrizia; Ballini, Chiara; Corte, Laura Della; Mannaioni, Pier Francesco; Passani, M. Beatrice

    2006-01-01

    Cannabinoids exert complex actions on neurotransmitter systems involved in cognition, locomotion, appetite, but no information was available so far on the interactions between the endocannabinoid system and histaminergic neurons that command several, similar behavioural states and memory. In this study, we investigated the effect of cannabimimetic compounds on histamine release using the microdialysis technique in the brain of freely moving rats. We found that systemic administration of the cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB1-r) agonist arachidonyl-2′chloroethylamide/N-(2chloroethyl)-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenamide (ACEA; 3 mg/kg) increased histamine release from the posterior hypothalamus, where the histaminergic tuberomamillary nuclei (TMN) are located. Local infusions of ACEA (150 nM) or R(+)-methanandamide (mAEA; 1μM), another CB1-r agonist, in the TMN augmented histamine release from the TMN, as well as from two histaminergic projection areas, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis and the dorsal striatum. When the endocannabinoid uptake inhibitor AM404 was infused into the TMN, however, increased histamine release was observed only in the TMN. The cannabinoid-induced effects on histamine release were blocked by co-administrations with the CB1-r antagonist AM251. Using double-immunofluorescence labelling and confocal laser-scanning microscopy, CB1-r immunostaining was found in the hypothalamus, but was not localized onto histaminergic cells. The modulatory effect of cannabimimetic compounds on histamine release apparently did not involve inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurotransmission, which provides the main inhibitory input to the histaminergic neurons in the hypothalamus, as local infusions of ACEA did not modify GABA release from the TMN. These profound effects of cannabinoids on histaminergic neurotransmission may partially underlie some of the behavioural changes observed following exposure to cannabinoid-based drugs. PMID:17004927

  8. Uremic Pruritus Is Not Associated with Endocannabinoid Receptor 1 Gene Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Heisig, Monika; Łaczmański, Łukasz; Reich, Adam; Lwow, Felicja

    2016-01-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP) is a frequent and bothersome symptom in hemodialysis patients. Its etiology is not fully understood and that is why there is no specific treatment. The endocannabinoid system plays a role in many pathological conditions. There is reliable evidence on the association between cannabinoid system and pruritus. In our study, we aimed to evaluate whether genetic variations in the endocannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene can affect UP. The rs12720071, rs806368, rs1049353, rs806381, rs10485170, rs6454674, and rs2023239 polymorphisms of the CNR1 gene were genotyped in 159 hemodialysis patients and 150 healthy controls using two multiplex polymerase chain reactions and the minisequencing technique. No statistically significant relationship was found in any of the evaluated genotypes between patients with and without UP, even after excluding patients with diabetes and dyslipidemia. There were no differences between patients with UP and the control group. However, in the group of all HD patients, a significantly higher incidence of GA genotype and lower incidence in GG genotype in the polymorphism rs806381s were revealed versus the control group (p = 0.04). It seems that polymorphisms of the CNR1 gene are not associated with uremic pruritus. PMID:27034934

  9. Leonurus sibiricus herb extract suppresses oxidative stress and ameliorates hypercholesterolemia in C57BL/6 mice and TNF-alpha induced expression of adhesion molecules and lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Ja; Lee, Hye-Sook; Park, Sun-Dong; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Won-Hwan

    2010-01-01

    In Leonurus sibiricus herb extract (LHE)-supplemented animals, plasma cholesterol decreased and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol increased, resulting in a lowered atherogenic index. The plasma trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, levels of hepatic thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, and protein carbonyl values decreased significantly in LHE-supplemented mice (p<0.05), whereas the hepatic antioxidant indicators were all significantly elevated (p<0.05). In human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor alpha, LHE significantly suppressed intracellular reactive oxygen species, LOX-1, and adhesion molecules. LHE supplementation may modulate the lipoprotein composition and attenuate oxidative stress by elevated antioxidant processes, thus suppressing the activation of inflammatory mediators. This is a possible mechanism of the anti-atherogenic effect.

  10. Specificity of human anti-variable heavy (VH ) chain autoantibodies and impact on the design and clinical testing of a VH domain antibody antagonist of tumour necrosis factor-α receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Cordy, J C; Morley, P J; Wright, T J; Birchler, M A; Lewis, A P; Emmins, R; Chen, Y Z; Powley, W M; Bareille, P J; Wilson, R; Tonkyn, J; Bayliffe, A I; Lazaar, A L

    2015-11-01

    During clinical trials of a tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-R1 domain antibody (dAb™) antagonist (GSK1995057), infusion reactions consistent with cytokine release were observed in healthy subjects with high levels of a novel, pre-existing human anti-VH (HAVH) autoantibody. In the presence of HAVH autoantibodies, GSK1995057 induced cytokine release in vitro due to binding of HAVH autoantibodies to a framework region of the dAb. The epitope on GSK1995057 was characterized and dAbs with reduced binding to HAVH autoantibodies were generated; pharmacological comparability was determined in human in-vitro systems and in-vivo animal experiments. A Phase I clinical trial was conducted to investigate the safety and tolerability of the modified dAb (GSK2862277). A significant reduction in HAVH binding was achieved by adding a single alanine residue at the C-terminus to create GSK2862277. Screening a pool of healthy donors demonstrated a reduced frequency of pre-existing autoantibodies from 51% to 7%; in all other respects, GSK2862277 and the parent dAb were comparable. In the Phase I trial, GSK2862277 was well tolerated by both the inhaled and intravenous routes. One subject experienced a mild infusion reaction with cytokine release following intravenous dosing. Subsequently, this subject was found to have high levels of a novel pre-existing antibody specific to the extended C-terminus of GSK2862277. Despite the reduced binding of GSK2862277 to pre-existing HAVH autoantibodies, adverse effects associated with the presence of a novel pre-existing antibody response specific to the modified dAb framework were identified and highlight the challenge of developing biological antagonists to this class of receptor.

  11. Cannabinoids and post-traumatic stress disorder: clinical and preclinical evidence for treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Mizrachi Zer-Aviv, Tomer; Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2016-10-01

    There is substantial evidence from studies in humans and animal models for a role of the endocannabinoid system in the control of emotional states. Several studies have shown an association between exposure to trauma and substance use. Specifically, it has been shown that there is increased prevalence of cannabis use in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients and vice versa. Clinical studies suggest that PTSD patients may cope with their symptoms by using cannabis. This treatment-seeking strategy may explain the high prevalence of cannabis use among individuals with PTSD. Preliminary studies in humans also suggest that treatment with cannabinoids may decrease PTSD symptoms including sleep quality, frequency of nightmares, and hyperarousal. However, there are no large-scale, randomized, controlled studies investigating this specifically. Studies in animal models have shown that cannabinoids can prevent the effects of stress on emotional function and memory processes, facilitate fear extinction, and have an anti-anxiety-like effect in a variety of tasks. Moreover, cannabinoids administered shortly after exposure to a traumatic event were found to prevent the development of PTSD-like phenotype. In this article, we review the existing literature on the use of cannabinoids for treating and preventing PTSD in humans and animal models. There is a need for large-scale clinical trials examining the potential decrease in PTSD symptomatology with the use of cannabis. In animal models, there is a need for a better understanding of the mechanism of action and efficacy of cannabis. Nevertheless, the end result of the current clinical and preclinical data is that cannabinoid agents may offer therapeutic benefits for PTSD.

  12. Cannabinoids and post-traumatic stress disorder: clinical and preclinical evidence for treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Mizrachi Zer-Aviv, Tomer; Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2016-10-01

    There is substantial evidence from studies in humans and animal models for a role of the endocannabinoid system in the control of emotional states. Several studies have shown an association between exposure to trauma and substance use. Specifically, it has been shown that there is increased prevalence of cannabis use in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients and vice versa. Clinical studies suggest that PTSD patients may cope with their symptoms by using cannabis. This treatment-seeking strategy may explain the high prevalence of cannabis use among individuals with PTSD. Preliminary studies in humans also suggest that treatment with cannabinoids may decrease PTSD symptoms including sleep quality, frequency of nightmares, and hyperarousal. However, there are no large-scale, randomized, controlled studies investigating this specifically. Studies in animal models have shown that cannabinoids can prevent the effects of stress on emotional function and memory processes, facilitate fear extinction, and have an anti-anxiety-like effect in a variety of tasks. Moreover, cannabinoids administered shortly after exposure to a traumatic event were found to prevent the development of PTSD-like phenotype. In this article, we review the existing literature on the use of cannabinoids for treating and preventing PTSD in humans and animal models. There is a need for large-scale clinical trials examining the potential decrease in PTSD symptomatology with the use of cannabis. In animal models, there is a need for a better understanding of the mechanism of action and efficacy of cannabis. Nevertheless, the end result of the current clinical and preclinical data is that cannabinoid agents may offer therapeutic benefits for PTSD. PMID:27551883

  13. Heterodimerization of human orexin receptor 1 and kappa opioid receptor promotes protein kinase A/cAMP-response element binding protein signaling via a Gαs-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Rumin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Wang, Chunmei; Cai, Xin; Liu, Haiqing; Jiang, Yunlu; Liu, Chuanxin; Bai, Bo

    2015-07-01

    Orexin and dynorphin are co-expressed in the same synaptic vesicles of hypothalamic neurons and play opposing roles in cocaine self-administration, brain stimulation reward, and impulsivity in ventral tegmental area (VTA), where dopamine neurons express both OX1R and KORs. However, detailed mechanisms of how the coreleased peptides and both receptors fine-tune their signalings and physiological/behavioral effects together remain unclear. Here we explore the possibility of heterodimerization between OX1R and KOR and reveal novel signal transduction mechanisms. First, we demonstrated co-expression of OX1R and KOR in rat hippocampal neurons by single-cell PCR. Furthermore, heterodimerization between OX1R and KOR was examined using bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BRET and FRET). Our data revealed that human OX1R and KOR heterodimerize, and this heterodimer associates with Gαs, leading to increased protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway activity, including upregulation of intracellular cAMP levels and cAMP-response element (CRE) luciferase reporter activity, resulting in increased cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. These results support the view that OX1R and KOR heterodimerization might have an anti-depressive role.

  14. Combined cannabinoid therapy via an oromucosal spray.

    PubMed

    Perez, Jordi

    2006-08-01

    Extensive basic science research has identified the potential therapeutic benefits of active compounds extracted from the Cannabis sativa L. plant (the cannabinoids). It is recognized that a significant proportion of patients suffering with the debilitating symptoms of pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis or other conditions smoke cannabis despite the legal implications and stigma associated with this controlled substance. GW Pharmaceuticals have developed Sativex (GW- 1,000-02), a combined cannabinoid medicine that delivers and maintains therapeutic levels of two principal cannabinoids, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), via an oromucosal pump spray, that aims to minimize psychotropic side effects. Sativex has proved to be well tolerated and successfully self-administered and self-titrated in both healthy volunteers and patient cohorts. Clinical assessment of this combined cannabinoid medicine has demonstrated efficacy in patients with intractable pain (chronic neuropathic pain, pain due to brachial plexus nerve injury, allodynic peripheral neuropathic pain and advanced cancer pain), rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (bladder problems, spasticity and central pain), with no significant intoxication-like symptoms, tolerance or withdrawal syndrome. PMID:16969427

  15. A survey study to characterize use of Spice products (synthetic cannabinoids)

    PubMed Central

    Vandrey, Ryan; Dunn, Kelly E.; Fry, Jeannie A.; Girling, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Synthetic cannabinoids are a rapidly emerging class of abused drugs. Synthetic cannabinoids are typically sold as “herbal blends” or “incense,” commonly referred to as Spice products. No controlled human experiments have been conducted on the effects of Spice products or the synthetic cannabinoids they often contain. Methods An internet-based survey study was conducted with adults reporting at least one lifetime use of a Spice product. Results Respondents were primarily male, Caucasian and ≥12 yrs of education. Use of other psychoactive drugs was common, though 21% identified Spice products as their preferred drug. Spice products were most frequently obtained from retail vendors and smoked, though other forms of ingestion were endorsed. Mean age of first use was 26 and mean frequency of use in the past year was 67 days (range 0–365). Primary reasons for use were curiosity, positive drug effect, relaxation, and to get high without having a positive drug test. Acute subjective effects were similar to known effects of cannabis, and a subset of users met DSM criteria for abuse and dependence on Spice products. Conclusions Participants exhibited a diverse profile of use patterns as is typical for other drugs of abuse. There was evidence that users continued to seek and use these drugs after being banned by local authorities. This study should be interpreted with caution due to methodological limitations. Controlled laboratory research is needed to further examine the behavioral pharmacology of individual synthetic cannabinoids found in Spice products. PMID:21835562

  16. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor-mediated anti-nociception in models of acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Maulik D; Sagar, Devi R; Elmes, Steven J R; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2007-08-01

    The endocannabinoid system consists of cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors, endogenous ligands and their synthesising/metabolising enzymes. Cannabinoid receptors are present at key sites involved in the relay and modulation of nociceptive information. The analgesic effects of cannabinoids have been well documented. The usefulness of nonselective cannabinoid agonists can, however, be limited by psychoactive side effects associated with activation of CB(1) receptors. Following the recent evidence for CB(2) receptors existing in the nervous system and reports of their up-regulation in chronic pain states and neurodegenerative diseases, much research is now aimed at shedding light on the role of the CB(2) receptor in human disease. Recent studies have demonstrated anti-nociceptive effects of selective CB(2) receptor agonists in animal models of pain in the absence of CNS side effects. This review focuses on the analgesic potential of CB(2) receptor agonists for inflammatory, post-operative and neuropathic pain states and discusses their possible sites and mechanisms of action.

  17. Cannabinoids for Symptom Management and Cancer Therapy: The Evidence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P

    2016-07-01

    Cannabinoids bind not only to classical receptors (CB1 and CB2) but also to certain orphan receptors (GPR55 and GPR119), ion channels (transient receptor potential vanilloid), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Cannabinoids are known to modulate a multitude of monoamine receptors. Structurally, there are 3 groups of cannabinoids. Multiple studies, most of which are of moderate to low quality, demonstrate that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and oromucosal cannabinoid combinations of THC and cannabidiol (CBD) modestly reduce cancer pain. Dronabinol and nabilone are better antiemetics for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) than certain neuroleptics, but are not better than serotonin receptor antagonists in reducing delayed emesis, and cannabinoids have largely been superseded by neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists and olanzapine; both cannabinoids have been recommended for breakthrough nausea and vomiting among other antiemetics. Dronabinol is ineffective in ameliorating cancer anorexia but does improve associated cancer-related dysgeusia. Multiple cancers express cannabinoid receptors directly related to the degree of anaplasia and grade of tumor. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that cannabinoids may have anticancer activity. Paradoxically, cannabinoid receptor antagonists also have antitumor activity. There are few randomized smoked or vaporized cannabis trials in cancer on which to judge the benefits of these forms of cannabinoids on symptoms and the clinical course of cancer. Smoked cannabis has been found to contain Aspergillosis. Immunosuppressed patients should be advised of the risks of using "medical marijuana" in this regard. PMID:27407130

  18. Nonhuman Transferrin Receptor 1 Is an Efficient Cell Entry Receptor for Ocozocoautla de Espinosa Virus

    PubMed Central

    Caì, Yíngyún; Yú, Shuĭqìng; Mazur, Steven; Dŏng, Lián; Janosko, Krisztina; Zhāng, Téngfēi; Müller, Marcel A.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Bavari, Sina; Jahrling, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Ocozocoautla de Espinosa virus (OCEV) is a novel, uncultured arenavirus. We found that the OCEV glycoprotein mediates entry into grivet and bat cells through transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) binding but that OCEV glycoprotein precursor (GPC)-pseudotyped retroviruses poorly entered 53 human cancer cell lines. Interestingly, OCEV and Tacaribe virus could use bat, but not human, TfR1. Replacing three human TfR1 amino acids with their bat ortholog counterparts transformed human TfR1 into an efficient OCEV and Tacaribe virus receptor. PMID:24109228

  19. Effects of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections.

    PubMed

    Tahamtan, Alireza; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Rygiel, Tomasz P; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Salimi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active ingredient in marijuana, and their derivatives have received remarkable attention in the last two decades because they can affect tumor growth and metastasis. There is a large body of evidence from in vivo and in vitro models showing that cannabinoids and their receptors influence the immune system, viral pathogenesis, and viral replication. The present study reviews current insights into the role of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections. The results reported here indicate that cannabinoids and their receptors have different sequels for viral infection. Although activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors in the majority of viral infections are proper targets for development of safe and effective treatments, caution is required before using pharmaceutical cannabinoids as a treatment agent for patients with viral infections.

  20. Cannabinoid-induced autophagy: Protective or death role?

    PubMed

    Costa, Lia; Amaral, Cristina; Teixeira, Natércia; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Fonseca, Bruno M

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, the "self-digestion" mechanism of the cells, is an evolutionary conserved catabolic process that targets portions of cytoplasm, damaged organelles and proteins for lysosomal degradation, which plays a crucial role in development and disease. Cannabinoids are active compounds of Cannabis sativa and the most prevalent psychoactive substance is Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabinoid compounds can be divided in three types: the plant-derived natural products (phytocannabinoids), the cannabinoids produced endogenously (endocannabinoids) and the synthesized compounds (synthetic cannabinoids). Various studies reported a cannabinoid-induced autophagy mechanism in cancer and non-cancer cells. In this review we focus on the recent advances in the cannabinoid-induced autophagy and highlight the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. PMID:26732541

  1. Stimulation of cannabinoid receptors by using Rubus coreanus extracts to control osteoporosis in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hae-Kyoung; Lee, Hye-Rim; Do, Sun Hee

    2015-06-01

    A substantial proportion of men with prostatic disease have an increased risk of bone loss. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) extracts on osteoporosis that occurs with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced prostatic hyperplasia. The rats used in this study were categorized into groups of healthy controls, rats treated with MNU, and rats treated with MNU and RCM. The rats were sacrificed after 10 weeks of RCM treatment, after which ultrasonography, serum biochemical tests, histopathological examinations, immunohistochemical analysis, and semi-quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis were performed. There were no marked differences in body weight gain and the size and weight of the prostate gland between the MNU group and the MNU and RCM group. However, treatment with RCM inhibited osteoclastic osteolysis and reduced dysplastic progress in the prostate gland, as observed by histopathological evaluation and by analyzing changes in the levels of bone regulatory factors. In addition, the group treated with MNU and RCM had higher expression levels of cannabinoid receptors-1, -2, and osteoprotegerin. These results indicate that the anti-osteoporotic effect of RCM in prostatic hyperplasia is attributable to the cannabinoid receptor-related upregulation of osteoblastogenesis and inhibition of prostatic hyperplasia. The results of the present study suggest that treatment with RCM may benefit osteoporotic patients with prostatic disease by simultaneously altering the activation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

  2. Celastrol attenuates inflammatory and neuropathic pain mediated by cannabinoid receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Longhe; Li, Yanting; Ren, Jie; Zhu, Chenggang; Fu, Jin; Lin, Donghai; Qiu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Celastrol, a major active ingredient of Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook. f. (thunder god vine), has exhibited a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammation, anti-cancer and immunosuppression. In the present study, we used animal models of inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain, generated by carrageenan injection and spared nerve injury (SNI), respectively, to evaluate the effect of celastrol and to address the mechanisms underlying pain processing. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of celastrol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of carrageenan-induced edema and allodynia. Real-time PCR analysis showed that celastrol (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced mRNA expressions of inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, in carrageenan-injected mice. In SNI mice, pain behavior studies showed that celastrol (1 mg/kg, i.p.) effectively prevented the hypersensitivity of mechanical nociceptive response on the third day post-surgery and the seventh day post-surgery. Furthermore, the anti-hyperalgesic effects of celastrol in carrageenan-injected mice and SNI mice were reversed by SR144528 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a specific cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptor antagonist, but not by SR141716 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a specific cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) receptor antagonist. Taken together, our results demonstrate the analgesia effects of celastrol through CB2 signaling and propose the potential of exploiting celastrol as a novel candidate for pain relief. PMID:25101848

  3. Involvement of central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors on antinociceptive effect of tetrahydrocannabinol in muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Bagüés, Ana; Martín, M Isabel; Sánchez-Robles, Eva M

    2014-12-15

    Cannabinoid (CB) receptors have emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for pain management in recent years and the interest in the use of cannabinoids is gradually increasing, particularly in patients where conventional treatments fail. Muscle pain is a major clinical problem and new pharmacological approaches are being studied. Recently, we have demonstrated that cannabinoid synthetic agonists are useful to reduce muscular pain in two animal models, where the local administration is effective. Now, we want to know if tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a cannabinoid natural derivative with therapeutic use in humans, is also effective in reducing acute muscle pain. The antinociceptive effect of THC by systemic (i.p.) and local (i.m.) administration was tested in two animal models of acute muscle pain, rat masseter and gastrocnemius, induced by hypertonic saline (HS) injection. The drugs used were the non-selective agonist THC and two selective cannabinoid antagonists, AM251 (CB1) and AM630 (CB2). THC, i.p. and i.m. administered, reduced the nociceptive behaviours induced by HS in both muscular pain models. The antinociceptive effect induced by the systemic administration of THC was mediated by CB1 receptors in the masseter muscle whereas in gastrocnemius both CB1 and CB2 receptors participated. When THC was administered locally, only CB2 receptors were involved in the antinociceptive effect in both muscles. This study suggests that THC could be a future pharmacological option in the treatment of muscle pain. The local administration of THC could be an interesting option to treat this type of pain avoiding the central adverse effects. PMID:25446925

  4. Cannabinoids in Disguise: Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Like Effects of Tetramethylcyclopropyl Ketone Indoles

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Marusich, Julie A.; Lefever, Timothy W.; Grabenauer, Megan; Moore, Katherine N.; Thomas, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic indole-derived cannabinoids have become commonly used recreational drugs and continue to be abused despite their adverse consequences. As compounds that were identified early in the epidemic (e.g., naphthoylindoles) have become legally banned, new compounds have appeared on the drug market. Two tetramethylcyclopropyl ketone indoles, UR-144 [(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone] and XLR-11 [(1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone], recently have been identified in confiscated products. These compounds are structurally related to a series of CB2-selective compounds explored by Abbott Labs. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which UR-144 and XLR-11 shared cannabinoid effects with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). Indices of in vitro and in vivo activity at cannabinoid receptors were assessed. Similar to other psychoactive cannabinoid agonists, XLR-11 and UR-144 showed low nanomolar (< 30) affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors, activated these receptors as full agonists, and produced dose-dependent effects that were blocked by rimonabant in mice, including antinociception, hypothermia, catalepsy and suppression of locomotor activity. The potency of both compounds was several-fold greater than Δ9-THC. XLR-11 and UR-144 also substituted for Δ9-THC in a Δ9-THC discrimination procedure in mice, effects that were attenuated by rimonabant. Analysis of urine from mice treated with the compounds revealed that both were extensively metabolized, with predominant urinary excretion as glucuronide conjugates. Together, these results demonstrate that UR-144 and XLR-11 share a pharmacological profile of in vitro and in vivo effects with Δ9-THC and other abused indole-derived cannabinoids and would be predicted to produce Δ9-THC-like subjective effects in humans. PMID:23916483

  5. Behavioral effects of cannabinoids show differential sensitivity to cannabinoid receptor blockade and tolerance development.

    PubMed

    De Vry, J; Jentzsch, K R; Kuhl, E; Eckel, G

    2004-02-01

    This study compared the potency and efficacy of the cannabinoids delta-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-THC), HU-210, WIN 55,212-2 and CP 55,940 in suppressing food-reinforced operant behavior, increasing reaction latency in a hot-plate test and inducing hypothermia, and tested whether these behavioral effects induced by CP 55,940 showed differential sensitivity to the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A, and to tolerance development. After acute i.p. administration to rats, operant behavior was more potently affected than reaction latency and body temperature, but the order of potency of the different drugs was similar across the tests: HU-210cannabinoid receptor agonist is situated at the left-hand side of the dose-spectrum, the more the effect is resistant to blockade by a cannabinoid receptor antagonist and to the development of tolerance. The possible consequence of this observation for the therapeutic use of cannabinoids is discussed.

  6. Cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor inhibition decreases vascular smooth muscle migration and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Hasko, Gyoergy; Pacher, Pal

    2008-12-26

    Vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration triggered by inflammatory stimuli and chemoattractants such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are key events in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Cannabinoids may modulate cell proliferation and migration in various cell types through cannabinoid receptors. Here we investigated the effects of CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716A), which has recently been shown to have anti-atherosclerotic effects both in mice and humans, on PDGF-induced proliferation, migration, and signal transduction of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). PDGF induced Ras and ERK 1/2 activation, while increasing proliferation and migration of HCASMCs, which were dose dependently attenuated by CB{sub 1} antagonist, rimonabant. These findings suggest that in addition to improving plasma lipid alterations and decreasing inflammatory cell migration and inflammatory response, CB{sub 1} antagonists may exert beneficial effects in atherosclerosis and restenosis by decreasing vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration.

  7. Synthetic Cannabinoid 'Bonzai' Intoxication: Six Case Series.

    PubMed

    Ergül, Dursun Fırat; Ekemen, Serdar; Yelken, Birgül Büyükkıdan

    2015-10-01

    In the language of the streets, 'bonzai', known as '1-naphthalenyl of methanol', also known as JWH-18 group, is a drug belonging to the group of synthetic cannabinoids. At the beginning of 2004, it started to be sold on the internet and it is seen that private markets. It has structurally similar chemical characteristics as delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active substance in marijuana. In 2013, in a study conducted by the European Monitoring Centre of Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA), 102 varieties of synthetic cannabinoids were identified; however, more than 200 substances have been reported since 1997. In this study, we report the difficulties in the clinical course, treatment and management of six patients that had a use history of bonzai although it was not detected in blood in a short period of time in the intensive care unit. PMID:27366526

  8. Acute Rhabdomyolysis Following Synthetic Cannabinoid Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Adedinsewo, Demilade A.; Odewole, Oluwaseun; Todd, Taylor

    2016-01-01

    Context: Novel psychoactive substances, including synthetic cannabinoids, are becoming increasingly popular, with more patients being seen in the emergency room following acute ingestion. These substances have been associated with a wide range of adverse effects. However, identification of complications, clinical toxicity, and management remain challenging. Case Report: We present the case of a young African-American male who developed severe agitation and bizarre behavior following acute K2 ingestion. Laboratory studies revealed markedly elevated serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) with normal renal function. The patient was managed with aggressive intravenous (IV) fluid hydration and treatment of underlying psychiatric illness. Conclusion: We recommend the routine evaluation of renal function and CPK levels with early initiation of IV hydration among patients who present to the emergency department following acute ingestion of synthetic cannabinoids to identify potential complications early as well as institute early supportive therapy. PMID:27500131

  9. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Paradoxical Cannabis Effect.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Rivera, Ivonne Marie; Estremera-Marcial, Rodolfo; Sierra-Mercado, Marielly; Gutiérrez-Núñez, José; Toro, Doris H

    2015-01-01

    Despite well-established antiemetic properties of marijuana, there has been increasing evidence of a paradoxical effect in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, given rise to a new and underrecognized clinical entity called the Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Reported cases in the medical literature have established a series of patients exhibiting a classical triad of symptoms: cyclic vomiting, chronic marijuana use, and compulsive bathing. We present a case of a 29-year-old man whose clinical presentation strongly correlates with cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Despite a diagnosis of exclusion, this syndrome should be considered plausible in the setting of a patient with recurrent intractable vomiting and a strong history of cannabis use as presented in this case. PMID:26266060

  10. Quantification of Cannabinoid Content in Cannabis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Zhang, F.; Jia, K.; Wen, M.; Yuan, Ch.

    2015-09-01

    Cannabis is an economically important plant that is used in many fields, in addition to being the most commonly consumed illicit drug worldwide. Monitoring the spatial distribution of cannabis cultivation and judging whether it is drug- or fiber-type cannabis is critical for governments and international communities to understand the scale of the illegal drug trade. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the cannabinoids content in cannabis could be spectrally quantified using a spectrometer and to identify the optimal wavebands for quantifying the cannabinoid content. Spectral reflectance data of dried cannabis leaf samples and the cannabis canopy were measured in the laboratory and in the field, respectively. Correlation analysis and the stepwise multivariate regression method were used to select the optimal wavebands for cannabinoid content quantification based on the laboratory-measured spectral data. The results indicated that the delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content in cannabis leaves could be quantified using laboratory-measured spectral reflectance data and that the 695 nm band is the optimal band for THC content quantification. This study provides prerequisite information for designing spectral equipment to enable immediate quantification of THC content in cannabis and to discriminate drug- from fiber-type cannabis based on THC content quantification in the field.

  11. Cannabinoid receptor type-1: breaking the dogmas

    PubMed Central

    Busquets Garcia, Arnau; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is abundantly expressed in the brain. This system regulates a plethora of physiological functions and is composed of cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and the enzymes involved in the metabolism of endocannabinoids. In this review, we highlight the new advances in cannabinoid signaling, focusing on a key component of the ECS, the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB 1). In recent years, the development of new imaging and molecular tools has demonstrated that this receptor can be distributed in many cell types (e.g., neuronal or glial cells) and intracellular compartments (e.g., mitochondria). Interestingly, cellular and molecular effects are differentially mediated by CB 1 receptors according to their specific localization (e.g., glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons). Moreover, this receptor is expressed in the periphery, where it can modulate periphery-brain connections. Finally, the better understanding of the CB 1 receptor structure led researchers to propose interesting and new allosteric modulators. Thus, the advances and the new directions of the CB 1 receptor field will provide new insights and better approaches to profit from its interesting therapeutic profile. PMID:27239293

  12. The discovery of a cannabinoid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Devane, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A tritiated form of CP-55,940, a Pfizer cannabinoid analog that is 20- to 100-fold more potent than {Delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol in various in vivo and in vitro models of cannabimimetric activity, was used as the tool with which to probe for a cannabinoid receptor in rat cortical membranes. The bound and free ligand were successfully separated using a centrifugation assay. Specific binding was saturable, rapidly attained, and completely reversible. The K{sub D}'s derived from kinetic analysis of binding agreed well with the K{sub D}'s derived from saturation and displacement analysis. The ({sup 3}H)CP-55,940 binding site exhibited high affinity with a K{sub D} of 68 pM as determined by LIGAND analysis of homologous displacement studies. The ability of other cannabinoid drugs to displace ({sup 3}H)CP-55,940 binding correlated well with the potency of these drugs in in vivo and in vitro models of cannabimimetic activity. The K{sub i} of {Delta}{sup 9}-THC was 1.6 nM. Cannabidiol and cannabigerol, which both lack psychoactivity in man, displaced specific binding by less than 50% at 1 {mu}M.

  13. [Cannabinoids in the control of pain].

    PubMed

    Shaladi, Ali Muftah; Crestani, Francesco; Tartari, Stefano; Piva, Bruno

    2008-12-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) has been used since remotes ages as a herbal remedy. Only recently the medical community highlighted the pharmacological scientific bases of its effects. The most important active principle, Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was identified in the second half of the last century, and subsequently two receptors were identified and cloned: CB1 that is primarily present in the central nervous system, and CB2 that is present on the cells of the immune system. Endogenous ligands, called endocannabinoids, were characterized. The anandamide was the first one to be discovered. The effectiveness of the cannabinoids in the treatment of nausea and vomit due to anti-neoplastic chemotherapy and in the wasting-syndrome during AIDS is recognized. Moreover, the cannabinoids are analgesic, and their activity is comparable to the weak opioids. Furthermore, parallels exist between opioid and cannabinoid receptors, and evidence is accumulating that the two systems sometimes may operate synergistically. The interest of the pharmaceutical companies led to the production of various drugs, whether synthetic or natural derived. The good ratio between the polyunsatured fatty acids omega-3 and omega-6 of the oil of Cannabis seeds led to reduction of the phlogosis and an improvement of the pain symptoms in patients with chronic musculo-skeletal inflammation. PMID:19388223

  14. Cannabidiol causes endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via CB1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher P.; Hind, William H.; Tufarelli, Cristina; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The protective effects of cannabidiol (CBD) have been widely shown in preclinical models and have translated into medicines for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. However, the direct vascular effects of CBD in humans are unknown. Methods and results Using wire myography, the vascular effects of CBD were assessed in human mesenteric arteries, and the mechanisms of action probed pharmacologically. CBD-induced intracellular signalling was characterized using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). CBD caused acute, non-recoverable vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries with an Rmax of ∼40%. This was inhibited by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists, desensitization of transient receptor potential channels using capsaicin, removal of the endothelium, and inhibition of potassium efflux. There was no role for cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptor, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)γ, the novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (CBe), or cyclooxygenase. CBD-induced vasorelaxation was blunted in males, and in patients with type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolemia. In HAECs, CBD significantly reduced phosphorylated JNK, NFκB, p70s6 K and STAT5, and significantly increased phosphorylated CREB, ERK1/2, and Akt levels. CBD also increased phosphorylated eNOS (ser1177), which was correlated with increased levels of ERK1/2 and Akt levels. CB1 receptor antagonism prevented the increase in eNOS phosphorylation. Conclusion This study shows, for the first time, that CBD causes vasorelaxation of human mesenteric arteries via activation of CB1 and TRP channels, and is endothelium- and nitric oxide-dependent. PMID:26092099

  15. Therapeutic modulation of cannabinoid lipid signaling: metabolic profiling of a novel antinociceptive cannabinoid-2 receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Wood, JodiAnne T.; Smith, Dustin M.; Janero, David R.; Zvonok, Alexander M.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2012-01-01

    Aims AM-1241, a novel, racemic cannabinoid-2 receptor (CB2) ligand, is the primary experimental agonist used to characterize the role of CB2-mediated lipid signaling in health and disease, including substance abuse disorders. In vivo pharmacological effects have been used as indirect proxies for AM-1241 biotransformation processes that could modulate activity. We report the initial pre-clinical characterization of AM-1241 biotransformation and in vivo distribution. Main methods AM-1241 metabolism was characterized in a variety of predictive in vitro systems (Caco-2 cells, mouse, rat and human microsomes) and in the mouse in vivo. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry techniques were used to quantify AM-1241 tissue distribution and metabolic conversion. Key findings AM-1241 bound extensively to plasma protein/albumin. A pharmacological AM-1241 dose (25 mg/kg, i.v.) was administered to mice for direct determination of its plasma half-life (37 min), following which AM-1241 was quantified in brain, spleen, liver, and kidney. After p.o. administration, AM-1241 was detected in plasma, spleen, and kidney; its oral bioavailability was ~21%. From Caco-2 permeability studies and microsomal-based hepatic clearance estimates, in vivo AM-1241 absorption was moderate. Hepatic microsomal metabolism of AM-1241 in vitro generated hydroxylation and demethylation metabolites. Species-dependent differences were discovered in AM-1241’s predicted hepatic clearance. Our data demonstrate that AM-1241 has the following characteristics: a) short plasma half-life; b) limited oral bioavailability; c) extensive plasma/albumin binding; d) metabolic substrate for hepatic hydroxylation and demethylation; e) moderate hepatic clearance. Significance These results should help inform the design, optimization, and pre-clinical profiling of CB2 ligands as pharmacological tools and medicines. PMID:22749867

  16. Functional role of cannabinoid receptors in urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Tyagi, Vikas; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa (maijuana), and their derivatives produce a wide spectrum of central and peripheral effects, some of which may have clinical applications. The discovery of specific cannabinoid receptors and a family of endogenous ligands of those receptors has attracted much attention to the general cannabinoid pharmacology. In recent years, studies on the functional role of cannabinoid receptors in bladder have been motivated by the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids on voiding dysfunction in multiple sclerosis patients. In this review, we shall summarize the literature on the expression of cannabinoid receptors in urinary bladder and the peripheral influence of locally and systemically administered cannabinoids in the bladder. The ongoing search for cannabinoid-based therapeutic strategies devoid of psychotropic effects can be complemented with local delivery into bladder by the intravesical route. A greater understanding of the role of the peripheral CB(1) and CB(2) receptor system in lower urinary tract is necessary to allow the development of new treatment for pelvic disorders.

  17. Cannabinoid-induced changes in respiration of brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Fišar, Zdeněk; Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana

    2014-11-18

    Cannabinoids exert various biological effects that are either receptor-mediated or independent of receptor signaling. Mitochondrial effects of cannabinoids were interpreted either as non-receptor-mediated alteration of mitochondrial membranes, or as indirect consequences of activation of plasma membrane type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1). Recently, CB1 receptors were confirmed to be localized to the membranes of neuronal mitochondria, where their activation directly regulates respiration and energy production. Here, we performed in-depth analysis of cannabinoid-induced changes of mitochondrial respiration using both an antagonist/inverse agonist of CB1 receptors, AM251 and the cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol, anandamide, and WIN 55,212-2. Relationships were determined between cannabinoid concentration and respiratory rate driven by substrates of complex I, II or IV in pig brain mitochondria. Either full or partial inhibition of respiratory rate was found for the tested drugs, with an IC50 in the micromolar range, which verified the significant role of non-receptor-mediated mechanism in inhibiting mitochondrial respiration. Effect of stepwise application of THC and AM251 evidenced protective role of AM251 and corroborated the participation of CB1 receptor activation in the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. We proposed a model, which includes both receptor- and non-receptor-mediated mechanisms of cannabinoid action on mitochondrial respiration. This model explains both the inhibitory effect of cannabinoids and the protective effect of the CB1 receptor inverse agonist.

  18. Cross-sensitization and cross-tolerance between exogenous cannabinoid antinociception and endocannabinoid-mediated stress-induced analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Suplita, Richard L.; Eisenstein, Sarah A.; Neely, Mark H.; Moise, Anna M.; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Footshock stress induces both endocannabinoid mobilization and antinociception. The present studies investigated behavioral plasticity in cannabinoid antinociceptive mechanisms following repeated activation using the tail-flick test. A secondary objective was to ascertain whether blockade of stress antinociception by the CB1 antagonist rimonabant could be attributed to changes in locomotor activity. The cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 induced hypoactivity in the open field relative to vehicle-treated controls. By contrast, rimonabant, administered at a dose that virtually eliminated endocannabinoid-mediated stress antinociception, failed to alter locomotor behavior (i.e. time resting, ambulatory counts, distance traveled) in rats subjected to the same stressor. Rats exposed acutely to footshock were hypersensitive to the antinociceptive effects of WIN55,212-2 and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). The converse was also true; acute Δ9-THC and WIN55,212-2 administration potentiated stress antinociception, suggesting a bidirectional sensitization between endocannabinoid-mediated stress antinociception and exogenous cannabinoid antinociception. Stress antinociception was also attenuated following chronic relative to acute treatment with WIN55,212-2 or Δ9-THC. Repeated exposure to footshock (3 min/day for 15 days), however, failed to attenuate antinociception induced by either footshock stress or WIN55,212-2. Our results demonstrate that endocannabinoid-mediated stress antinociception cannot be attributed to motor suppression. Our results further identify a functional plasticity of the cannabinoid system in response to repeated activation. The existence of cross-sensitization between endocannabinoid-mediated stress antinociception and exogenous cannabinoid antinociception suggests that these phenomena are mediated by a common mechanism. The observation of stress-induced hypersensitivity to effects of exogenous cannabinoids may have clinical implications for

  19. Cannabinoid-hypocretin cross-talk in the central nervous system: what we know so far

    PubMed Central

    Flores, África; Maldonado, Rafael; Berrendero, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Emerging findings suggest the existence of a cross-talk between hypocretinergic and endocannabinoid systems. Although few studies have examined this relationship, the apparent overlap observed in the neuroanatomical distribution of both systems as well as their putative functions strongly point to the existence of such cross-modulation. In agreement, biochemical and functional studies have revealed the existence of heterodimers between CB1 cannabinoid receptor and hypocretin receptor-1, which modulates the cellular localization and downstream signaling of both receptors. Moreover, the activation of hypocretin receptor-1 stimulates the synthesis of 2-arachidonoyl glycerol culminating in the retrograde inhibition of neighboring cells and suggesting that endocannabinoids could contribute to some hypocretin effects. Pharmacological data indicate that endocannabinoids and hypocretins might have common physiological functions in the regulation of appetite, reward and analgesia. In contrast, these neuromodulatory systems seem to play antagonistic roles in the regulation of sleep/wake cycle and anxiety-like responses. The present review attempts to piece together what is known about this interesting interaction and describes its potential therapeutic implications. PMID:24391536

  20. Synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis resulting in rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Argamany, Jacqueline R; Reveles, Kelly R; Duhon, Bryson

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid usage has increased in the past decade. Concurrently, emergency management of associated adverse effects due to synthetic cannabinoid usage has also risen. Reported toxicities include psychosis, seizures, cardiotoxicity, acute kidney injury, and death. While cannabis was first described as a cause of acute hyperemesis in 2004, a more recent case series also describes the association between cannabinoid hyperemesis and risk of acute renal failure. Synthetic cannabinoids have also been reported to cause acute hyperemesis and acute renal failure; however, the risk of rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure has yet to be elucidated. In this article, we report the first known case of synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis leading to rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

  1. Cannabinoids and value-based decision making: implications for neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Angela M.; Oleson, Erik B.; Diergaarde, Leontien; Cheer, Joseph F.; Pattij, Tommy

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, disturbances in cognitive function have been increasingly recognized as important symptomatic phenomena in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Value-based decision making in particular is an important executive cognitive function that is not only impaired in patients with PD, but also shares neural substrates with PD in basal ganglia structures and the dopamine system. Interestingly, the endogenous cannabinoid system modulates dopamine function and subsequently value-based decision making. This review will provide an overview of the interdisciplinary research that has influenced our understanding of value-based decision making and the role of dopamine, particularly in the context of reinforcement learning theories, as well as recent animal and human studies that demonstrate the modulatory role of activation of cannabinoid receptors by exogenous agonists or their naturally occurring ligands. The implications of this research for the symptomatology of and potential treatments for PD are also discussed. PMID:23162787

  2. Cytochrome P450-mediated oxidative metabolism of abused synthetic cannabinoids found in K2/Spice: identification of novel cannabinoid receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Chimalakonda, Krishna C; Seely, Kathryn A; Bratton, Stacie M; Brents, Lisa K; Moran, Cindy L; Endres, Gregory W; James, Laura P; Hollenberg, Paul F; Prather, Paul L; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H

    2012-11-01

    Abuse of synthetic cannabinoids (SCs), such as [1-naphthalenyl-(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl]-methanone (JWH-018) and [1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (AM2201), is increasing at an alarming rate. Although very little is known about the metabolism and toxicology of these popular designer drugs, mass spectrometric analysis of human urine specimens after JWH-018 and AM2201 exposure identified monohydroxylated and carboxylated derivatives as major metabolites. The present study extends these initial findings by testing the hypothesis that JWH-018 and its fluorinated counterpart AM2201 are subject to cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated oxidation, forming potent hydroxylated metabolites that retain significant affinity and activity at the cannabinoid 1 (CB(1)) receptor. Kinetic analysis using human liver microsomes and recombinant human protein identified CYP2C9 and CYP1A2 as major P450s involved in the oxidation of the JWH-018 and AM2201. In vitro metabolite formation mirrored human urinary metabolic profiles, and each of the primary enzymes exhibited high affinity (K(m) = 0.81-7.3 μM) and low to high reaction velocities (V(max) = 0.0053-2.7 nmol of product · min(-1) · nmol protein(-1)). The contribution of CYP2C19, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4 in the hepatic metabolic clearance of these synthetic cannabinoids was minimal (f(m) = <0.2). In vitro studies demonstrated that the primary metabolites produced in humans display high affinity and intrinsic activity at the CB(1) receptor, which was attenuated by the CB(1) receptor antagonist (6aR,10aR)-3-(1-methanesulfonylamino-4-hexyn-6-yl)-6a,7,10,10a-tetrahydro-6,6,9-trimethyl-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran (O-2050). Results from the present study provide critical, missing data related to potential toxicological properties of "K2" parent compounds and their human metabolites, including mechanism(s) of action at cannabinoid receptors.

  3. Cytochrome P450-Mediated Oxidative Metabolism of Abused Synthetic Cannabinoids Found in K2/Spice: Identification of Novel Cannabinoid Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Chimalakonda, Krishna C.; Seely, Kathryn A.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Brents, Lisa K.; Moran, Cindy L.; Endres, Gregory W.; James, Laura P.; Hollenberg, Paul F.; Prather, Paul L.; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Abuse of synthetic cannabinoids (SCs), such as [1-naphthalenyl-(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl]-methanone (JWH-018) and [1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (AM2201), is increasing at an alarming rate. Although very little is known about the metabolism and toxicology of these popular designer drugs, mass spectrometric analysis of human urine specimens after JWH-018 and AM2201 exposure identified monohydroxylated and carboxylated derivatives as major metabolites. The present study extends these initial findings by testing the hypothesis that JWH-018 and its fluorinated counterpart AM2201 are subject to cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated oxidation, forming potent hydroxylated metabolites that retain significant affinity and activity at the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor. Kinetic analysis using human liver microsomes and recombinant human protein identified CYP2C9 and CYP1A2 as major P450s involved in the oxidation of the JWH-018 and AM2201. In vitro metabolite formation mirrored human urinary metabolic profiles, and each of the primary enzymes exhibited high affinity (Km = 0.81–7.3 μM) and low to high reaction velocities (Vmax = 0.0053–2.7 nmol of product · min−1 · nmol protein−1). The contribution of CYP2C19, 2D6, 2E1, and 3A4 in the hepatic metabolic clearance of these synthetic cannabinoids was minimal (fm = <0.2). In vitro studies demonstrated that the primary metabolites produced in humans display high affinity and intrinsic activity at the CB1 receptor, which was attenuated by the CB1 receptor antagonist (6aR,10aR)-3-(1-methanesulfonylamino-4-hexyn-6-yl)-6a,7,10,10a-tetrahydro-6,6,9-trimethyl-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran (O-2050). Results from the present study provide critical, missing data related to potential toxicological properties of “K2” parent compounds and their human metabolites, including mechanism(s) of action at cannabinoid receptors. PMID:22904561

  4. Endogenous cannabinoid signaling at inhibitory interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Younts, Thomas J.; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in our understanding of how endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) signal at excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). This review discusses how eCBs regulate inhibitory interneurons, their synapses, and the networks in which they are embedded. eCB signaling plays a pivotal role in brain physiology by means of their synaptic signal transduction, spatiotemporal signaling profile, routing of information through inhibitory microcircuits, and experience-dependent plasticity. Understanding the normal processes underlying eCB signaling is beginning to shed light on how their dysregulation contributes to disease. PMID:24650503

  5. Cannabinoid-based medicines for neurological disorders--clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    Whereas the cannabis plant has a long history of medicinal use, it is only in recent years that a sufficient understanding of the pharmacology of the main plant constituents has allowed for a better understanding of the most rational therapeutic targets. The distribution of cannabinoid receptors, both within the nervous system and without, and the development of pharmacological tools to investigate their function has lead to a substantial increase in efforts to develop cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Concomitant with these efforts, the understanding of the pharmacology of plant cannabinoids at receptor and other systems distinct from the cannabinoid receptors suggests that the therapeutic applications of plant-derived cannabinoids (and presumably their synthetic derivatives also) may be diverse. This review aims to discuss the clinical evidence investigating the use of medicines derived, directly or indirectly, from plant cannabinoids with special reference to neurological disorders. Published studies suggest that the oral administration of cannabinoids may not be the preferred route of administration and that plant extracts show greater evidence of efficacy than synthetic compounds. One of these, Sativex (GW Pharmaceuticals), was approved as a prescription medicine in Canada in 2005 and is currently under regulatory review in the EU. PMID:17952657

  6. Emerging strategies for exploiting cannabinoid receptor agonists as medicines.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2009-02-01

    Medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptor are already in the clinic. These are Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) and Sativex (Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol with cannabidiol). The first two of these medicines can be prescribed to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Marinol can also be prescribed to stimulate appetite, while Sativex is prescribed for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in adults with multiple sclerosis and as an adjunctive analgesic treatment for adult patients with advanced cancer. One challenge now is to identify additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a number of potential clinical applications for such agonists are mentioned in this review. A second challenge is to develop strategies that will improve the efficacy and/or the benefit-to-risk ratio of a cannabinoid receptor agonist. This review focuses on five strategies that have the potential to meet either or both of these objectives. These are strategies that involve: (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier; (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue; (iii) targeting up-regulated cannabinoid receptors; (iv) targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors; or (v) 'multi-targeting'. Preclinical data that justify additional research directed at evaluating the clinical importance of each of these strategies are also discussed. PMID:19226257

  7. Effects of various cannabinoid ligands on choice behaviour in a rat model of gambling

    PubMed Central

    Gueye, Aliou B.; Trigo, Jose M.; Vemuri, Kiran V.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that 0.6–1% of the population in the USA and Canada fulfil the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed. (DSM-5) criteria for gambling disorders (GD). To date, there are no approved pharmacological treatments for GD. The rat gambling task (rGT) is a recently developed rodent analogue of the Iowa gambling task in which rats are trained to associate four response holes with different magnitudes and probabilities of food pellet rewards and punishing time-out periods. Similar to healthy human volunteers, most rats adopt the optimal strategies (optimal group). However, a subset of animals show preference for the disadvantageous options (suboptimal group), mimicking the choice pattern of patients with GD. Here, we explored for the first time the effects of various cannabinoid ligands (WIN 55,212-2, AM 4113, AM 630 and URB 597) on the rGT. Administration of the cannabinoid agonist CB1/CB2 WIN 55,212-2 improved choice strategy and increased choice latency in the suboptimal group, but only increased perseverative behaviour, when punished, in the optimal group. Blockade of CB1 or CB2 receptors or inhibition of fatty-acid amide hydrolase did not affect rGT performance. These results suggest that stimulation of cannabinoid receptors could affect gambling choice behaviours differentially in some subgroups of subjects. PMID:26905189

  8. Low dose oral cannabinoid therapy reduces progression of atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Sabine; Veillard, Niels R; Arnaud, Claire; Pelli, Graziano; Burger, Fabienne; Staub, Christian; Karsak, Meliha; Zimmer, Andreas; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Mach, François

    2005-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, and is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke in Western countries. Derivatives of cannabinoids such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) modulate immune functions and therefore have potential for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effects of THC in a murine model of established atherosclerosis. Oral administration of THC (1 mg kg(-1) per day) resulted in significant inhibition of disease progression. This effective dose is lower than the dose usually associated with psychotropic effects of THC. Furthermore, we detected the CB2 receptor (the main cannabinoid receptor expressed on immune cells) in both human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques. Lymphoid cells isolated from THC-treated mice showed diminished proliferation capacity and decreased interferon-gamma secretion. Macrophage chemotaxis, which is a crucial step for the development of atherosclerosis, was also inhibited in vitro by THC. All these effects were completely blocked by a specific CB2 receptor antagonist. Our data demonstrate that oral treatment with a low dose of THC inhibits atherosclerosis progression in the apolipoprotein E knockout mouse model, through pleiotropic immunomodulatory effects on lymphoid and myeloid cells. Thus, THC or cannabinoids with activity at the CB2 receptor may be valuable targets for treating atherosclerosis.

  9. Cannabinoid-related agents in the treatment of anxiety disorders: current knowledge and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tambaro, Simone; Bortolato, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Rich evidence has shown that cannabis products exert a broad gamut of effects on emotional regulation. The main psychoactive ingredient of hemp, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and its synthetic cannabinoid analogs have been reported to either attenuate or exacerbate anxiety and fear-related behaviors in humans and experimental animals. The heterogeneity of cannabis-induced psychological outcomes reflects a complex network of molecular interactions between the key neurobiological substrates of anxiety and fear and the endogenous cannabinoid system, mainly consisting of the arachidonic acid derivatives anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and two receptors, respectively termed CB1 and CB2. The high degree of interindividual variability in the responses to cannabis is contributed by a wide spectrum of factors, including genetic and environmental determinants, as well as differences in the relative concentrations of THC and other alkaloids (such as cannabidiol) within the plant itself. The present article reviews the currently available knowledge on the herbal, synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids with respect to the modulation of anxiety responses, and highlights the challenges that should be overcome to harness the therapeutic potential of some of these compounds, all the while limiting the side effects associated with cannabis consumption. PMID:22280339

  10. Prevalence of synthetic cannabinoids in U.S. athletes: initial findings.

    PubMed

    Heltsley, Rebecca; Shelby, Melinda K; Crouch, Dennis J; Black, David L; Robert, Timothy A; Marshall, Lucas; Bender, Chantel L; DePriest, Anne Z; Colello, Michael A

    2012-10-01

    A number of synthetic cannabinoids such as JWH-018 and JWH-073 have been incorporated into "spice" products. Despite having labels warning against human consumption, the products are smoked for their cannabinoid-like effects and the extent of their use by athletes has not been adequately described. Urine samples collected from 5,956 athletes were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the presence of JWH-018, JWH-073, and their metabolites. Metabolites of JWH-018 and/or JWH-073 were detected in 4.5% of the samples. Metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073, only JWH-018, and only JWH-073 were detected in 50%, 49%, and approximately 1% of positive samples, respectively. In total, JWH-018 metabolites were detected in 99% (50% + 49%) and JWH-073 metabolites were detected in approximately 50% (49% + 1%) of the positive samples. Parent JWH-018, JWH-018-2-OH-indole, and JWH-018-4-OH-indole were not detected in any of the samples. All samples in which JWH-073 metabolites were detected contained JWH-073-N-butanoic acid. Parent JWH-073 and its N-(4-OH-butyl), 4-OH-indole, 5-OH-indole, and 7-OH-indole metabolites were not detected. Given the number of synthetic cannabinoids that have been synthesized, their limited regulation, and the prevalence of JWH-018 and JWH-073 metabolites detected in the athletes, these compounds should remain a priority for anti-doping programs.

  11. Turning Over a New Leaf: Cannabinoid and Endocannabinoid Modulation of Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Guy A; Rogers, Thomas J; Lichtman, Aron H

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis is a complex substance that harbors terpenoid-like compounds referred to as phytocannabinoids. The major psychoactive phytocannabinoid found in cannabis ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces the majority of its pharmacological effects through two cannabinoid receptors, termed CB1 and CB2. The discovery of these receptors as linked functionally to distinct biological effects of THC, and the subsequent development of synthetic cannabinoids, precipitated discovery of the endogenous cannabinoid (or endocannabinoid) system. This system consists of the endogenous lipid ligands N- arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide; AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), their biosynthetic and degradative enzymes, and the CB1 and CB2 receptors that they activate. Endocannabinoids have been identified in immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, basophils, lymphocytes, and dendritic cells and are believed to be enzymatically produced and released "on demand" in a similar fashion as the eicosanoids. It is now recognized that other phytocannabinoids such as cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) can alter the functional activities of the immune system. This special edition of the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology (JNIP) presents a collection of cutting edge original research and review articles on the medical implications of phytocannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system. The goal of this special edition is to provide an unbiased assessment of the state of research related to this topic from leading researchers in the field. The potential untoward effects as well as beneficial uses of marijuana, its phytocannabinoid composition, and synthesized cannabinoid analogs are discussed. In addition, the role of the endocannabinoid system and approaches to its manipulation to treat select human disease processes are addressed.

  12. Turning Over a New Leaf: Cannabinoid and Endocannabinoid Modulation of Immune Function.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Guy A; Rogers, Thomas J; Lichtman, Aron H

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis is a complex substance that harbors terpenoid-like compounds referred to as phytocannabinoids. The major psychoactive phytocannabinoid found in cannabis ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces the majority of its pharmacological effects through two cannabinoid receptors, termed CB1 and CB2. The discovery of these receptors as linked functionally to distinct biological effects of THC, and the subsequent development of synthetic cannabinoids, precipitated discovery of the endogenous cannabinoid (or endocannabinoid) system. This system consists of the endogenous lipid ligands N- arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide; AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), their biosynthetic and degradative enzymes, and the CB1 and CB2 receptors that they activate. Endocannabinoids have been identified in immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, basophils, lymphocytes, and dendritic cells and are believed to be enzymatically produced and released "on demand" in a similar fashion as the eicosanoids. It is now recognized that other phytocannabinoids such as cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) can alter the functional activities of the immune system. This special edition of the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology (JNIP) presents a collection of cutting edge original research and review articles on the medical implications of phytocannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system. The goal of this special edition is to provide an unbiased assessment of the state of research related to this topic from leading researchers in the field. The potential untoward effects as well as beneficial uses of marijuana, its phytocannabinoid composition, and synthesized cannabinoid analogs are discussed. In addition, the role of the endocannabinoid system and approaches to its manipulation to treat select human disease processes are addressed. PMID:26054900

  13. A common molecular basis for exogenous and endogenous cannabinoid potentiation of glycine receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Wu, Xiongwu; Li, Fuying; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Lovinger, David M; Zhang, Li

    2012-04-11

    Both exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids can allosterically modulate glycine receptors (GlyRs). However, little is known about the molecular basis of cannabinoid-GlyR interactions. Here we report that sustained incubation with the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) substantially increased the amplitude of glycine-activated current in both rat cultured spinal neurons and in HEK-293 cells expressing human α1, rat α2 and α3 GlyRs. While the α1 and α3 subunits were highly sensitive to AEA-induced potentiation, the α2 subunit was relatively insensitive to AEA. Switching a serine at 296 and 307 in the TM3 (transmembrane domain 3) of the α1 and α3 subunits with an alanine (A) at the equivalent position in the α2 subunit converted the α1/α3 AEA-sensitive receptors to sensitivity resembling that of α2. The S296 residue is also critical for exogenous cannabinoid-induced potentiation of I(Gly). The magnitude of AEA potentiation decreased with removal of either the hydroxyl or oxygen groups on AEA. While desoxy-AEA was significantly less efficacious in potentiating I(Gly), desoxy-AEA inhibited potentiation produced by both Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a major psychoactive component of marijuana, and AEA. Similarly, didesoxy-THC, a modified THC with removal of both hydroxyl/oxygen groups, did not affect I(Gly) when applied alone but inhibited the potentiation of I(Gly) induced by AEA and THC. These findings suggest that exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids potentiate GlyRs via a hydrogen bonding-like interaction. Such a specific interaction likely stems from a common molecular basis involving the S296 residue in the TM3 of the α1 and α3 subunits. PMID:22496565

  14. Synthetic cannabinoids pharmacokinetics and detection methods in biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Castaneto, Marisol S; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Desrosiers, Nathalie A; Hartman, Rebecca L; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SC), originally developed as research tools, are now highly abused novel psychoactive substances. We present a comprehensive systematic review covering in vivo and in vitro animal and human pharmacokinetics and analytical methods for identifying SC and their metabolites in biological matrices. Of two main phases of SC research, the first investigated therapeutic applications, and the second abuse-related issues. Administration studies showed high lipophilicity and distribution into brain and fat tissue. Metabolite profiling studies, mostly with human liver microsomes and human hepatocytes, structurally elucidated metabolites and identified suitable SC markers. In general, SC underwent hydroxylation at various molecular sites, defluorination of fluorinated analogs and phase II metabolites were almost exclusively glucuronides. Analytical methods are critical for documenting intake, with different strategies applied to adequately address the continuous emergence of new compounds. Immunoassays have different cross-reactivities for different SC classes, but cannot keep pace with changing analyte targets. Gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry assays - first for a few, then numerous analytes - are available but constrained by reference standard availability, and must be continuously updated and revalidated. In blood and oral fluid, parent compounds are frequently present, albeit in low concentrations; for urinary detection, metabolites must be identified and interpretation is complex due to shared metabolic pathways. A new approach is non-targeted HRMS screening that is more flexible and permits retrospective data analysis. We suggest that streamlined assessment of new SC's pharmacokinetics and advanced HRMS screening provide a promising strategy to maintain relevant assays.

  15. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome with extreme hydrophilia

    PubMed Central

    Enuh, Hilary A; Chin, Julia; Nfonoyim, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Marijuana is the most widely used recreational drug in the US. Hyperemetic hydrophilic syndrome is a previously described but infrequently recognized condition of cannabinoid abuse with hyperemesis and obsessive hot showering. We present a 47-year-old male known marijuana addict with intractable abdominal pain who could not wait for physical examination, meal, or medication, because of obsessive compulsive warm baths. He had a history of epilepsy and addiction to marijuana, which he took on the day of admission. He presented to the hospital with a seizure, complicated by nausea, vomiting, and severe abdominal pain. His examination was unremarkable, except for mild epigastric tenderness. His laboratory and radiological tests were within normal limits, except for a positive urine drug screen for marijuana and opiates. He took himself immediately to the bathroom and remained under a hot shower with the exception of two 15-minute breaks for the rest of the day. He stated that it made him feel better than medication. Receiving medication and even eating was a problem because of this compulsive showering. Abstinence from marijuana during the hospital stay made the patient’s nausea and vomiting resolve significantly. Cannabinoid hyperemesis is a differential diagnosis among patients with intractable nausea, vomiting, and obsessive hot bathing. The syndrome is an unmistakable indication of marijuana addiction. A thorough history and observation is very valuable. Recognition of this entity will reduce unnecessary testing and utilization of health care resources. PMID:23983485

  16. Counteractive effects of cannabinoid and nicotine-addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Liu, Zhiqiang; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2011-03-01

    Our recent results suggest that cannabinoid exposure induces conditioned place preference (CPP) through facilitated induction of synaptic long-term depression at dopamine circuitry of the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA). Here, we show that chronic nicotine exposure also induces CPP, but facilitates the induction of synaptic long-term potentiation in the VTA. Coadministration of cannabinoid and nicotine leads to a blockade of facilitated long-term depression and long-term potentiation induction in these neurons and elimination of CPP. These findings point to counteractive effects of cannabinoid and nicotine-addictive behavior through opposite changes in synaptic plasticity of dopamine circuitry of the VTA.

  17. Case Series of Synthetic Cannabinoid Intoxication from One Toxicology Center

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Kenneth D.; Leonetti, Adam L.; Bailey, Blake C.; Surmaitis, Ryan M.; Eustice, Eric R.; Kacinko, Sherri; Wheatley, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid use has risen at alarming rates. This case series describes 11 patients exposed to the synthetic cannabinoid, MAB-CHMINACA who presented to an emergency department with life-threatening toxicity including obtundation, severe agitation, seizures and death. All patients required sedatives for agitation, nine required endotracheal intubation, three experienced seizures, and one developed hyperthermia. One developed anoxic brain injury, rhabdomyolysis and died. A significant number were pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment was aggressive sedation and respiratory support. Synthetic cannabinoids pose a major public health risk. Emergency physicians must be aware of their clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27330661

  18. The role of the hippocampus in mediating emotional responses to nicotine and cannabinoids: a possible neural substrate for functional interactions.

    PubMed

    Viveros, María-Paz; Marco, Eva-María; Llorente, Ricardo; Lamota, Laura

    2007-09-01

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in the regulation of behavioural and physiological stress-related responses. Nicotine exerts complex effects on emotional behaviour, and its withdrawal may result in depressive and anxiogenic-like symptoms. Cannabinoid receptor agonists and nicotine induce biphasic effects in diverse tests of unconditioned anxiety, alter adrenocortical activity and affect hippocampus-dependent contextual fear conditioning. Upon exposure to stressful stimuli, central endocannabinoid and cholinergic systems appear to be activated in key limbic areas such as hippocampus and amygdala, which might contribute to adaptive cognitive and emotional strategies to cope with aversive situations. Numerous studies indicate the existence of functional interactions between nicotine and cannabinoids, particularly in relation to anxiety-related processes. An overlapping distribution of CB1 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the hippocampus is observed and the endocannabinoid system exerts a modulatory role over the hippocampal cholinergic system. In this review, we point to the hippocampus as a relevant neural substrate for cannabinoid-nicotine interactions, notably as regards emotional responses. After a general description of the cannabinoid and nicotinic systems, we review their implications in unconditioned anxiety, depressive-like behaviour and fear conditioning. Then we discuss the role of both systems in modulating stress-induced changes at cellular, endocrine and behavioural levels and their possible involvement in hippocampal neurogenesis. Although we mainly focus on animal data, some relevant human studies are also discussed.

  19. Epigenetic Regulation of Immunological Alterations Following Prenatal Exposure to Marijuana Cannabinoids and its Long Term Consequences in Offspring.

    PubMed

    Zumbrun, Elizabeth E; Sido, Jessica M; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2015-06-01

    Use of marijuana during pregnancy is fairly commonplace and can be expected increase in frequency as more states legalize its recreational use. The cannabinoids present in marijuana have been shown to be immunosuppressive, yet the effect of prenatal exposure to cannabinoids on the immune system of the developing fetus, its long term consequences during adult stage of life, and transgenerational effects have not been well characterized. Confounding factors such as co-existing drug use make the impact of cannabis use on progeny inherently difficult to study in a human population. Data from various animal models suggests that in utero exposure to cannabinoids results in profound T cell dysfunction and a greatly reduced immune response to viral antigens. Furthermore, evidence from animal studies indicates that the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids can be mediated through epigenetic mechanisms such as altered microRNA, DNA methylation and histone modification profiles. Such studies support the hypothesis that that parental or prenatal exposure to cannabis can trigger epigenetic changes that could have significant immunological consequences for offspring as well as long term transgenerational effects.

  20. Epigenetic Regulation of Immunological Alterations Following Prenatal Exposure to Marijuana Cannabinoids and its Long Term Consequences in Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Zumbrun, Elizabeth E.; Sido, Jessica M.; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.

    2015-01-01

    Use of marijuana during pregnancy is fairly commonplace and can be expected increase in frequency as more states legalize its recreational use. The cannabinoids present in marijuana have been shown to be immunosuppressive, yet the effect of prenatal exposure to cannabinoids on the immune system of the developing fetus, its long term consequences during adult stage of life, and transgenerational effects have not been well characterized. Confounding factors such as coexisting drug use make the impact of cannabis use on progeny inherently difficult to study in a human population. Data from various animal models suggests that in utero exposure to cannabinoids results in profound T cell dysfunction and a greatly reduced immune response to viral antigens. Furthermore, evidence from animal studies indicates that the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids can be mediated through epigenetic mechanisms such as altered microRNA, DNA methylation and histone modification profiles. Such studies support the hypothesis that that parental or prenatal exposure to cannabis can trigger epigenetic changes that could have significant immunological consequences for offspring as well as long term transgenerational effects. PMID:25618446

  1. Cannabinoids: is there a potential treatment role in epilepsy?

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Robert E; Deshpande, Laxmikant S; DeLorenzo, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoids have been used medicinally for centuries, and in the last decade, attention has focused on their broad therapeutic potential particularly in seizure management. While some cannabinoids have demonstrated anticonvulsant activity in experimental studies, their efficacy for managing clinical seizures has not been fully established. This commentary will touch on our understanding of the brain endocannabinoid system’s regulation of synaptic transmission in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and review the findings from both experimental and clinical studies on the effectiveness of cannabinoids to suppress epileptic seizures. At present, there is preliminary evidence that non-psychoactive cannabinoids may be useful as anticonvulsants, but additional clinical trials are needed to fully evaluate the efficacy and safety of these compounds for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:26234319

  2. Cannabinoids Inhibit Insulin Receptor Signaling in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook; Doyle, Máire E.; Liu, Zhuo; Lao, Qizong; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Carlson, Olga D.; Kim, Hee Seung; Thomas, Sam; Napora, Joshua K.; Lee, Eun Kyung; Moaddel, Ruin; Wang, Yan; Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Egan, Josephine M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Optimal glucose homeostasis requires exquisitely precise adaptation of the number of insulin-secreting β-cells in the islets of Langerhans. Insulin itself positively regulates β-cell proliferation in an autocrine manner through the insulin receptor (IR) signaling pathway. It is now coming to light that cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) agonism/antagonism influences insulin action in insulin-sensitive tissues. However, the cells on which the CB1Rs are expressed and their function in islets have not been firmly established. We undertook the current study to investigate if intraislet endogenous cannabinoids (ECs) regulate β-cell proliferation and if they influence insulin action. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured EC production in isolated human and mouse islets and β-cell line in response to glucose and KCl. We evaluated human and mouse islets, several β-cell lines, and CB1R-null (CB1R−/−) mice for the presence of a fully functioning EC system. We investigated if ECs influence β-cell physiology through regulating insulin action and demonstrated the therapeutic potential of manipulation of the EC system in diabetic (db/db) mice. RESULTS ECs are generated within β-cells, which also express CB1Rs that are fully functioning when activated by ligands. Genetic and pharmacologic blockade of CB1R results in enhanced IR signaling through the insulin receptor substrate 2-AKT pathway in β-cells and leads to increased β-cell proliferation and mass. CB1R antagonism in db/db mice results in reduced blood glucose and increased β-cell proliferation and mass, coupled with enhanced IR signaling in β-cells. Furthermore, CB1R activation impedes insulin-stimulated IR autophosphorylation on β-cells in a Gαi-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS These findings provide direct evidence for a functional interaction between CB1R and IR signaling involved in the regulation of β-cell proliferation and will serve as a basis for developing new therapeutic interventions to

  3. Role of cannabinoid CB2 receptors in glucose homeostasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Bermudez-Silva, Francisco Javier; Sanchez-Vera, Irene; Suárez, Juan; Serrano, Antonia; Fuentes, Esther; Juan-Pico, Pablo; Nadal, Angel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2007-06-22

    Here we show that the activation of cannabinoid CB2 receptors improved glucose tolerance after a glucose load. Blockade of cannabinoid CB2 receptors counteracted this effect, leading to glucose intolerance. Since blockade of cannabinoid CB1 receptors mimics the actions of cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonists, we propose that the endocannabinoid system modulates glucose homeostasis through the coordinated actions of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. We also describe the presence of both cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor immunoreactivity in rat pancreatic beta- and non-beta-cells, adding the endocrine pancreas to adipose tissue and the liver as potential sites for endocannabinoid regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  4. Medical cannabis vs. synthetic cannabinoids: What does the future hold?

    PubMed

    Bolognini, D; Ross, R A

    2015-06-01

    The medical use of cannabis has an intricate therapeutic history that finds its roots in ancient China (∼2700 BC). The main psychoactive component of cannabis, Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC), was discovered in 1964. This was a significant breakthrough, as it allowed the generation of synthetic analogs of Δ(9) -THC, the discovery of cannabinoid receptors, and the generation of synthetic small molecules. Despite this, today there is still a paucity of drugs that target the cannabinoid system.

  5. Medical cannabis vs. synthetic cannabinoids: What does the future hold?

    PubMed

    Bolognini, D; Ross, R A

    2015-06-01

    The medical use of cannabis has an intricate therapeutic history that finds its roots in ancient China (∼2700 BC). The main psychoactive component of cannabis, Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC), was discovered in 1964. This was a significant breakthrough, as it allowed the generation of synthetic analogs of Δ(9) -THC, the discovery of cannabinoid receptors, and the generation of synthetic small molecules. Despite this, today there is still a paucity of drugs that target the cannabinoid system. PMID:25761845

  6. Alzheimer's disease; taking the edge off with cannabinoids?

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, V A; Gowran, A

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age-related neurodegenerative condition associated with cognitive decline. The pathological hallmarks of the disease are the deposition of β-amyloid protein and hyperphosphorylation of tau, which evoke neuronal cell death and impair inter-neuronal communication. The disease is also associated with neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. In recent years the proclivity of cannabinoids to exert a neuroprotective influence has received substantial interest as a means to mitigate the symptoms of neurodegenerative conditions. In brains obtained from Alzheimer's patients alterations in components of the cannabinoid system have been reported, suggesting that the cannabinoid system either contributes to, or is altered by, the pathophysiology of the disease. Certain cannabinoids can protect neurons from the deleterious effects of β-amyloid and are capable of reducing tau phosphorylation. The propensity of cannabinoids to reduce β-amyloid-evoked oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, whilst stimulating neurotrophin expression neurogenesis, are interesting properties that may be beneficial in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol can also inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity and limit amyloidogenesis which may improve cholinergic transmission and delay disease progression. Targeting cannabinoid receptors on microglia may reduce the neuroinflammation that is a feature of Alzheimer's disease, without causing psychoactive effects. Thus, cannabinoids offer a multi-faceted approach for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease by providing neuroprotection and reducing neuroinflammation, whilst simultaneously supporting the brain's intrinsic repair mechanisms by augmenting neurotrophin expression and enhancing neurogenesis. The evidence supporting a potential role for the cannabinoid system as a therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease will be reviewed herewith. PMID:17828287

  7. An NMDA antagonist (LY 235959) attenuates abstinence-induced withdrawal of planarians following acute exposure to a cannabinoid agonist (WIN 55212-2).

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Gomez, Teresa; Raffa, Robert B

    2007-03-01

    The mechanisms that facilitate the development and expression of cannabinoid physical dependence in humans and other mammals are poorly understood. The present experiments used a planarian model to provide evidence that pharmacological antagonism of NMDA receptors significantly attenuates the development of cannabinoid physical dependence. Abstinence-induced withdrawal from the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55212-2 (10 microM) was manifested as a significant (P<0.05) decrease in the rate of planarian spontaneous locomotor velocity (pLMV) when WIN 55212-2 (10 microM)-exposed planarians were placed into drug-free water. No change in pLMV occurred when WIN 55212-2 (10 microM)-exposed planarians were placed into water containing WIN 55212-2 (10 microM). WIN 55212-2 (10 microM)-exposed planarians placed into water containing LY 235959 (1 or 10 microM) did not display withdrawal (no significant difference, P>0.05, in pLMV). In addition, withdrawal was not observed (no significant difference, P>0.05, in pLMV) in planarians that were co-exposed to a solution containing WIN 55212-2 (10 microM) and LY 235959 (10 microM). The present results reveal that NMDA receptor activation mediates the development of cannabinoid physical dependence and the expression of cannabinoid withdrawal in planarians.

  8. A Curious Case of Inhalation Fever Caused by Synthetic Cannabinoid

    PubMed Central

    Chinnadurai, Thiru; Shrestha, Srijan; Ayinla, Raji

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 29 Final Diagnosis: Inhalation fever induced by synthetic cannabinoid Symptoms: Agitation • smoked synthetic cannabinoid Medication: Ringer’s lactate solution • Ceftriaxone • Azithromycin• Magnesium sulfate • Potassium Phosphate • Levofloxacin • Risperidone Clinical Procedure: Chest radiograph • CBC • urine toxicology Specialty: Pulmonology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: This case report describes inhalation fever as an uncommon pulmonary adverse effect of synthetic cannabinoids. Case Report: A 29-year-old man was brought in for severe agitation after smoking K2, a synthetic cannabinoid. He required multiple doses of lorazepam and haloperidol for sedation. His vital signs were notable for a mild fever and tachycardia. Otherwise, the rest of his exam was unremarkable. The laboratory test was significant for leucocytosis and diffuse reticular-nodular and interstitial infiltrates on chest radiograph. Urine drug toxicology was negative. Interestingly, his symptoms and pulmonary infiltrates on the chest radiograph resolved spontaneously after 24 hours of observation. Conclusions: This patient developed transient pulmonary infiltrates and fever following the synthetic cannabinoid inhalation, as seen in self-limiting inhalation fever. Inhalation fever as a consequence of synthetic cannabinoid has not been described previously and there is a need for further research in this field. PMID:27262587

  9. Cellular mechanisms underlying the interaction between cannabinoid and opioid system.

    PubMed

    Parolaro, D; Rubino, T; Viganò, D; Massi, P; Guidali, C; Realini, N

    2010-04-01

    Recently, the presence of functional interaction between the opioid and cannabinoid system has been shown in various pharmacological responses. Although there is an increasing interest for the feasible therapeutic application of a co-administration of cannabinoids and opioids in some disorders (i.e. to manage pain, to modulate immune system and emotions) and the combined use of the two drugs by drug abusers is becoming largely diffuse, only few papers focused on cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this interaction. This review updates the biochemical and molecular underpinnings of opioid and cannabinoid interaction, both within the central nervous system and periphery. The most convincing theory for the explanation of this reciprocal interaction involves (i) the release of opioid peptides by cannabinoids or endocannabinoids by opioids, (ii) the existence of a direct receptor-receptor interaction when the receptors are co-expressed in the same cells, and (iii) the interaction of their intracellular pathways. Finally, the cannabinoid/opioid interaction might be different in the brain rewarding networks and in those accounting for other pharmacological effects (antinociception, modulation of emotionality and cognitive behavior), as well as between the central nervous system and periphery. Further insights about the cannabinoid/opioid interaction could pave the way for new and promising therapeutic approaches.

  10. Antibacterial cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa: a structure-activity study.

    PubMed

    Appendino, Giovanni; Gibbons, Simon; Giana, Anna; Pagani, Alberto; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Stavri, Michael; Smith, Eileen; Rahman, M Mukhlesur

    2008-08-01

    Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) has long been known to contain antibacterial cannabinoids, whose potential to address antibiotic resistance has not yet been investigated. All five major cannabinoids (cannabidiol (1b), cannabichromene (2), cannabigerol (3b), Delta (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (4b), and cannabinol (5)) showed potent activity against a variety of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains of current clinical relevance. Activity was remarkably tolerant to the nature of the prenyl moiety, to its relative position compared to the n-pentyl moiety (abnormal cannabinoids), and to carboxylation of the resorcinyl moiety (pre-cannabinoids). Conversely, methylation and acetylation of the phenolic hydroxyls, esterification of the carboxylic group of pre-cannabinoids, and introduction of a second prenyl moiety were all detrimental for antibacterial activity. Taken together, these observations suggest that the prenyl moiety of cannabinoids serves mainly as a modulator of lipid affinity for the olivetol core, a per se poorly active antibacterial pharmacophore, while their high potency definitely suggests a specific, but yet elusive, mechanism of activity.

  11. The influence of cannabinoids on generic traits of neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, S G; Campbell, V A

    2014-01-01

    In an increasingly ageing population, the incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease are rising. While the aetiologies of these disorders are different, a number of common mechanisms that underlie their neurodegenerative components have been elucidated; namely neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity, mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced trophic support. Current therapies focus on treatment of the symptoms and attempt to delay the progression of these diseases but there is currently no cure. Modulation of the endogenous cannabinoid system is emerging as a potentially viable option in the treatment of neurodegeneration. Endocannabinoid signalling has been found to be altered in many neurodegenerative disorders. To this end, pharmacological manipulation of the endogenous cannabinoid system, as well as application of phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids have been investigated. Signalling from the CB1 and CB2 receptors are known to be involved in the regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis, mitochondrial function, trophic support and inflammatory status, respectively, while other receptors gated by cannabinoids such as PPARγ, are gaining interest in their anti-inflammatory properties. Through multiple lines of evidence, this evolutionarily conserved neurosignalling system has shown neuroprotective capabilities and is therefore a potential target for neurodegenerative disorders. This review details the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and highlights the beneficial effects of cannabinoid treatment. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:24172185

  12. Type-2 cannabinoid receptors in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bisogno, Tiziana; Oddi, Sergio; Piccoli, Alessandra; Fazio, Domenico; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2016-09-01

    Based on its wide expression in immune cells, type-2 cannabinoid (CB2) receptors were traditionally thought to act as "peripheral receptors" with an almost exclusively immunomodulatory function. However, their recent identification in mammalian brain areas, as well as in distinct neuronal cells, has opened the way to a re-consideration of CB2 signaling in the context of brain pathophysiology, synaptic plasticity and neuroprotection. To date, accumulated evidence from several independent preclinical studies has offered new perspectives on the possible involvement of CB2 signaling in brain and spinal cord traumatic injury, as well as in the most relevant neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea. Here, we will review available information on CB2 in these disease conditions, along with data that support also its therapeutic potential to treat them. PMID:27450295

  13. Cannabinoid Receptor–Interacting Protein 1a Modulates CB1 Receptor Signaling and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tricia H.; Blume, Lawrence C.; Straiker, Alex; Cox, Jordan O.; David, Bethany G.; McVoy, Julie R. Secor; Sayers, Katherine W.; Poklis, Justin L.; Abdullah, Rehab A.; Egertová, Michaela; Chen, Ching-Kang; Mackie, Ken; Elphick, Maurice R.; Howlett, Allyn C.

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) mediate the presynaptic effects of endocannabinoids in the central nervous system (CNS) and most behavioral effects of exogenous cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor–interacting protein 1a (CRIP1a) binds to the CB1R C-terminus and can attenuate constitutive CB1R-mediated inhibition of Ca2+ channel activity. We now demonstrate cellular colocalization of CRIP1a at neuronal elements in the CNS and show that CRIP1a inhibits both constitutive and agonist-stimulated CB1R-mediated guanine nucleotide–binding regulatory protein (G-protein) activity. Stable overexpression of CRIP1a in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells stably expressing CB1Rs (CB1-HEK), or in N18TG2 cells endogenously expressing CB1Rs, decreased CB1R-mediated G-protein activation (measured by agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPγS (guanylyl-5′-[O-thio]-triphosphate) binding) in both cell lines and attenuated inverse agonism by rimonabant in CB1-HEK cells. Conversely, small-interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of CRIP1a in N18TG2 cells enhanced CB1R-mediated G-protein activation. These effects were not attributable to differences in CB1R expression or endocannabinoid tone because CB1R levels did not differ between cell lines varying in CRIP1a expression, and endocannabinoid levels were undetectable (CB1-HEK) or unchanged (N18TG2) by CRIP1a overexpression. In CB1-HEK cells, 4-hour pretreatment with cannabinoid agonists downregulated CB1Rs and desensitized agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding. CRIP1a overexpression attenuated CB1R downregulation without altering CB1R desensitization. Finally, in cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons, CRIP1a overexpression attenuated both depolarization-induced suppression of excitation and inhibition of excitatory synaptic activity induced by exogenous application of cannabinoid but not by adenosine A1 agonists. These results confirm that CRIP1a inhibits constitutive CB1R activity and demonstrate that CRIP1a can also inhibit agonist

  14. Cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein 1a modulates CB1 receptor signaling and regulation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tricia H; Blume, Lawrence C; Straiker, Alex; Cox, Jordan O; David, Bethany G; McVoy, Julie R Secor; Sayers, Katherine W; Poklis, Justin L; Abdullah, Rehab A; Egertová, Michaela; Chen, Ching-Kang; Mackie, Ken; Elphick, Maurice R; Howlett, Allyn C; Selley, Dana E

    2015-04-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) mediate the presynaptic effects of endocannabinoids in the central nervous system (CNS) and most behavioral effects of exogenous cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein 1a (CRIP1a) binds to the CB1R C-terminus and can attenuate constitutive CB1R-mediated inhibition of Ca(2+) channel activity. We now demonstrate cellular colocalization of CRIP1a at neuronal elements in the CNS and show that CRIP1a inhibits both constitutive and agonist-stimulated CB1R-mediated guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G-protein) activity. Stable overexpression of CRIP1a in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells stably expressing CB1Rs (CB1-HEK), or in N18TG2 cells endogenously expressing CB1Rs, decreased CB1R-mediated G-protein activation (measured by agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS (guanylyl-5'-[O-thio]-triphosphate) binding) in both cell lines and attenuated inverse agonism by rimonabant in CB1-HEK cells. Conversely, small-interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CRIP1a in N18TG2 cells enhanced CB1R-mediated G-protein activation. These effects were not attributable to differences in CB1R expression or endocannabinoid tone because CB1R levels did not differ between cell lines varying in CRIP1a expression, and endocannabinoid levels were undetectable (CB1-HEK) or unchanged (N18TG2) by CRIP1a overexpression. In CB1-HEK cells, 4-hour pretreatment with cannabinoid agonists downregulated CB1Rs and desensitized agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding. CRIP1a overexpression attenuated CB1R downregulation without altering CB1R desensitization. Finally, in cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons, CRIP1a overexpression attenuated both depolarization-induced suppression of excitation and inhibition of excitatory synaptic activity induced by exogenous application of cannabinoid but not by adenosine A1 agonists. These results confirm that CRIP1a inhibits constitutive CB1R activity and demonstrate that CRIP1a can also inhibit agonist

  15. Cannabinoids increase type 1 cannabinoid receptor expression in a cell culture model of striatal neurons: implications for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Laprairie, Robert B; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2013-09-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is expressed at high levels in the striatum. Activation of CB1 increases expression of neuronal trophic factors and inhibits neurotransmitter release from GABA-ergic striatal neurons. CB1 mRNA levels can be elevated by treatment with cannabinoids in non-neuronal cells. We wanted to determine whether cannabinoid treatment could induce CB1 expression in a cell culture model of striatal neurons and, if possible, determine the molecular mechanism by which this occurred. We found that treatment of STHdh(7/7) cells with the cannabinoids ACEA, mAEA, and AEA produced a CB1receptor-dependent increase in CB1 promoter activity, mRNA, and protein expression. This response was Akt- and NF-κB-dependent. Because decreased CB1 expression is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD), we wanted to determine whether cannabinoids could increase CB1 expression in STHdh(7/111) and (111/111) cells expressing the mutant huntingtin protein. We observed that cannabinoid treatment increased CB1 mRNA levels approximately 10-fold in STHdh(7/111) and (111/111) cells, compared to vehicle treatment. Importantly, cannabinoid treatment improved ATP production, increased the expression of the trophic factor BDNF-2, and the mitochondrial regulator PGC1α, and reduced spontaneous GABA release, in HD cells. Therefore, cannabinoid-mediated increases in CB1 levels could reduce the severity of some molecular pathologies observed in HD.

  16. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors and apoptotic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB{sub 2} receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB{sub 1} receptors.

  17. Estrogenic effects of marijuana smoke condensate and cannabinoid compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Yeun; Oh, Seung Min; Chung, Kyu Hyuck . E-mail: khchung@skku.edu

    2006-08-01

    Chronic exposure to marijuana produces adverse effects on the endocrine and reproductive systems in humans; however, the experimental evidence for this presented thus far has not been without controversy. In this study, the estrogenic effect of marijuana smoke condensate (MSC) was evaluated using in vitro bioassays, viz., the cell proliferation assay, the reporter gene assay, and the ER competitive binding assay. The results of these assays were compared with those of three major cannabinoids, i.e., THC, CBD, and CBN. The estrogenic effect of MSC was further confirmed by the immature female rat uterotrophic assay. MSC stimulated the estrogenicity related to the ER-mediated pathway, while neither THC, CBD, nor CBN did. Moreover, treatment with 10 and 25 mg/kg MSC induced significant uterine response, and 10 mg/kg MSC resulted in an obvious change in the uterine epithelial cell appearance. MSC also enhanced the IGFBP-1 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. To identify the constituents of MSC responsible for its estrogenicity, the MSC fractionated samples were examined using another cell proliferation assay, and the estrogenic active fraction was analyzed using GC-MS. In the organic acid fraction that showed the strongest estrogenic activity among the seven fractions of MSC, phenols were identified. Our results suggest that marijuana abuse is considered an endocrine-disrupting factor. Furthermore, these results suggest that the phenolic compounds contained in MSC play a role in its estrogenic effect.

  18. The Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 as Mediator of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Immunosuppressive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Francesca; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Bellini, Giulia; Luongo, Livio; Conforti, Antonella; Manzo, Iolanda; Guida, Francesca; Cristino, Luigia; Imperatore, Roberta; Petrosino, Stefania; Nobili, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells are non-hematopoietic, multipotent progenitor cells producing cytokines, chemokines, and extracellular matrix proteins that support hematopoietic stem cell survival and engraftment, influence immune effector cell development, maturation, and function, and inhibit alloreactive T-cell responses. The immunosuppressive properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells have attracted much attention from immunologists, stem cell biologists and clinicians. Recently, the presence of the endocannabinoid system in hematopoietic and neural stem cells has been demonstrated. Endocannabinoids, mainly acting through the cannabinoid receptor subtype 2, are able to modulate cytokine release and to act as immunosuppressant when added to activated T lymphocytes. In the present study, we have investigated, through a multidisciplinary approach, the involvement of the endocannabinoids in migration, viability and cytokine release of human mesenchymal stromal cells. We show, for the first time, that cultures of human mesenchymal stromal cells express all of the components of the endocannabinoid system, suggesting a potential role for the cannabinoid CB2 receptor as a mediator of anti-inflammatory properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells, as well as of their survival pathways and their capability to home and migrate towards endocannabinoid sources. PMID:24312195

  19. Magnitude Of Stimulation Dictates The Cannabinoid-Mediated Differential T Cell Response To HIVgp120

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cannabinoids have immunosuppressive properties, but it is unknown whether cannabinoids further impair the immune status of immunocompromised HIV patients, as approximately 25% of HIV patients smoke marijuana for its putative therapeutic benefit. A surrogate mouse model to induce ...

  20. Cannabinoids as therapeutic agents in cancer: current status and future implications

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, Ramesh K.

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacological importance of cannabinoids has been in study for several years. Cannabinoids comprise of (a) the active compounds of the Cannabis sativa plant, (b) endogenous as well as (c) synthetic cannabinoids. Though cannabinoids are clinically used for anti-palliative effects, recent studies open a promising possibility as anti-cancer agents. They have been shown to possess anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro as well as in vivo in different cancer models. Cannabinoids regulate key cell signaling pathways that are involved in cell survival, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, etc. There is more focus on CB1 and CB2, the two cannabinoid receptors which are activated by most of the cannabinoids. In this review article, we will focus on a broad range of cannabinoids, their receptor dependent and receptor independent functional roles against various cancer types with respect to growth, metastasis, energy metabolism, immune environment, stemness and future perspectives in exploring new possible therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25115386

  1. Use of Tandem Affinity Chromatography for Purification of Cannabinoid Receptor CB2

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia C.; Yeliseev, Alexei A.

    2016-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification has been increasingly applied to isolation of recombinant proteins. It relies on two consecutive chromatographic steps that take advantage of the affinity tags placed at opposing ends of the target protein. This allows for efficient removal of contaminating proteins, including products of proteolytic degradation of the fusion that lack either N- or C-terminal tags. Here, we describe the use of two small affinity tags, a poly-histidine tag and a Strep-tag for expression and purification of the human cannabinoid receptor CB2, an integral membrane G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:24943318

  2. Cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Das, S K; Paria, B C; Chakraborty, I; Dey, S K

    1995-05-01

    Using RNA (Northern) blot hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrate that the brain-type cannabinoid receptor (CB1-R) mRNA, but not the spleen-type cannabinoid receptor (CB2-R) mRNA, is expressed in the mouse uterus and that this organ has the capacity to synthesize the putative endogenous cannabinoid ligand, anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide). The psychoactive cannabinoid component of marijuana--delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)--or anandamide, but not the inactive and nonpsychoactive cannabidiol (CBD), inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in the mouse uterus, which was prevented by pertussis toxin pretreatment. These results suggest that uterine CB1-R is coupled to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and is biologically active. Autoradiographic studies identified ligand binding sites ([3H]anandamide) in the uterine epithelium and stromal cells, suggesting that these cells are perhaps the targets for cannabinoid action. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H]WIN 55212-2, another cannabinoid receptor ligand, showed a single class of high-affinity binding sites in the endometrium with an apparent Kd of 2.4 nM and Bmax of 5.4 x 10(9) molecules per mg of protein. The gene encoding lactoferrin is an estrogen-responsive gene in the mouse uterus that was rapidly and transiently up-regulated by THC, but not by CBD, in ovariectomized mice in the absence of ovarian steroids. This effect, unlike that of 17 beta-estradiol (E2), was not influenced by a pure antiestrogen, ICI 182780, suggesting that the THC-induced uterine lactoferrin gene expression does not involve estrogen receptors. We propose that the uterus is a new target for cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling.

  3. Cannabinoid receptor activation shifts temporally engendered patterns of dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Erik B; Cachope, Roger; Fitoussi, Aurelie; Tsutsui, Kimberly; Wu, Sharon; Gallegos, Jacqueline A; Cheer, Joseph F

    2014-05-01

    The ability to discern temporally pertinent environmental events is essential for the generation of adaptive behavior in conventional tasks, and our overall survival. Cannabinoids are thought to disrupt temporally controlled behaviors by interfering with dedicated brain timing networks. Cannabinoids also increase dopamine release within the mesolimbic system, a neural pathway generally implicated in timing behavior. Timing can be assessed using fixed-interval (FI) schedules, which reinforce behavior on the basis of time. To date, it remains unknown how cannabinoids modulate dopamine release when responding under FI conditions, and for that matter, how subsecond dopamine release is related to time in these tasks. In the present study, we hypothesized that cannabinoids would accelerate timing behavior in an FI task while concurrently augmenting a temporally relevant pattern of dopamine release. To assess this possibility, we measured subsecond dopamine concentrations in the nucleus accumbens while mice responded for food under the influence of the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 in an FI task. Our data reveal that accumbal dopamine concentrations decrease proportionally to interval duration--suggesting that dopamine encodes time in FI tasks. We further demonstrate that WIN 55,212-2 dose-dependently increases dopamine release and accelerates a temporal behavioral response pattern in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner--suggesting that cannabinoid receptor activation modifies timing behavior, in part, by augmenting time-engendered patterns of dopamine release. Additional investigation uncovered a specific role for endogenous cannabinoid tone in timing behavior, as elevations in 2-arachidonoylglycerol, but not anandamide, significantly accelerated the temporal response pattern in a manner akin to WIN 55,212-2. PMID:24345819

  4. Cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed Central

    Das, S K; Paria, B C; Chakraborty, I; Dey, S K

    1995-01-01

    Using RNA (Northern) blot hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrate that the brain-type cannabinoid receptor (CB1-R) mRNA, but not the spleen-type cannabinoid receptor (CB2-R) mRNA, is expressed in the mouse uterus and that this organ has the capacity to synthesize the putative endogenous cannabinoid ligand, anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide). The psychoactive cannabinoid component of marijuana--delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)--or anandamide, but not the inactive and nonpsychoactive cannabidiol (CBD), inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in the mouse uterus, which was prevented by pertussis toxin pretreatment. These results suggest that uterine CB1-R is coupled to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and is biologically active. Autoradiographic studies identified ligand binding sites ([3H]anandamide) in the uterine epithelium and stromal cells, suggesting that these cells are perhaps the targets for cannabinoid action. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H]WIN 55212-2, another cannabinoid receptor ligand, showed a single class of high-affinity binding sites in the endometrium with an apparent Kd of 2.4 nM and Bmax of 5.4 x 10(9) molecules per mg of protein. The gene encoding lactoferrin is an estrogen-responsive gene in the mouse uterus that was rapidly and transiently up-regulated by THC, but not by CBD, in ovariectomized mice in the absence of ovarian steroids. This effect, unlike that of 17 beta-estradiol (E2), was not influenced by a pure antiestrogen, ICI 182780, suggesting that the THC-induced uterine lactoferrin gene expression does not involve estrogen receptors. We propose that the uterus is a new target for cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7753807

  5. Spice drugs are more than harmless herbal blends: a review of the pharmacology and toxicology of synthetic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Seely, Kathryn A; Lapoint, Jeff; Moran, Jeffery H; Fattore, Liana

    2012-12-01

    "K2" and "Spice" drugs (collectively hereafter referred to as Spice) represent a relatively new class of designer drugs that have recently emerged as popular alternatives to marijuana, otherwise characterized as "legal highs". These drugs are readily available on the Internet and sold in many head shops and convenience stores under the disguise of innocuous products like herbal blends, incense, or air fresheners. Although package labels indicate "not for human consumption", the number of intoxicated people presenting to emergency departments is dramatically increasing. The lack of validated and standardized human testing procedures and an endless supply of potential drugs of abuse are primary reasons why researchers find it difficult to fully characterize clinical consequences associated with Spice. While the exact chemical composition and toxicology of Spice remains to be determined, there is mounting evidence identifying several synthetic cannabinoids as causative agents responsible for psychoactive and adverse physical effects. This review provides updates of the legal status of common synthetic cannabinoids detected in Spice and analytical procedures used to test Spice products and human specimens collected under a variety of clinical circumstances. The pharmacological and toxicological consequences of synthetic cannabinoid abuse are also reviewed to provide a future perspective on potential short- and long-term implications.

  6. Spice drugs are more than harmless herbal blends: a review of the pharmacology and toxicology of synthetic cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Seely, Kathryn A.; Lapoint, Jeff; Moran, Jeffery H.; Fattore, Liana

    2014-01-01

    “K2” and “Spice” drugs (collectively hereafter referred to as Spice) represent a relatively new class of designer drugs that have recently emerged as popular alternatives to marijuana, otherwise characterized as “legal highs”. These drugs are readily available on the Internet and sold in many head shops and convenience stores under the disguise of innocuous products like herbal blends, incense, or air fresheners. Although package labels indicate “not for human consumption”, the number of intoxicated people presenting to emergency departments is dramatically increasing. The lack of validated and standardized human testing procedures and an endless supply of potential drugs of abuse are primary reasons why researchers find it difficult to fully characterize clinical consequences associated with Spice. While the exact chemical composition and toxicology of Spice remains to be determined, there is mounting evidence identifying several synthetic cannabinoids as causative agents responsible for psychoactive and adverse physical effects. This review provides updates of the legal status of common synthetic cannabinoids detected in Spice and analytical procedures used to test Spice products and human specimens collected under a variety of clinical circumstances. The pharmacological and toxicological consequences of synthetic cannabinoid abuse are also reviewed to provide a future perspective on potential short- and long-term implications. PMID:22561602

  7. Epileptiform activity in the CA1 region of the hippocampus becomes refractory to attenuation by cannabinoids in part because of endogenous γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Messer, Ricka D; Levine, Eric S

    2012-07-01

    The anticonvulsant properties of marijuana have been known for centuries. The recently characterized endogenous cannabinoid system thus represents a promising target for novel anticonvulsant agents; however, administration of exogenous cannabinoids has shown mixed results in both human epilepsy and animal models. The ability of cannabinoids to attenuate release of both excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters may explain the variable effects of cannabinoids in different models of epilepsy, but this has not been well explored. Using acute mouse brain slices, we monitored field potentials in the CA1 region of the hippocampus to characterize systematically the effects of the cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN) on evoked basal and epileptiform activity. WIN, acting presynaptically, significantly reduced the amplitude and slope of basal field excitatory postsynaptic potentials as well as stimulus-evoked epileptiform responses induced by omission of magnesium from the extracellular solution. In contrast, the combination of omission of magnesium plus elevation of potassium induced an epileptiform response that was refractory to attenuation by WIN. The effect of WIN in this model was partially restored by blocking γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B) ), but not GABA(A) , receptors. Subtle differences in models of epileptiform activity can profoundly alter the efficacy of cannabinoids. Endogenous GABA(B) receptor activation played a role in the decreased cannabinoid sensitivity observed for epileptiform activity induced by omission of magnesium plus elevation of potassium. These results suggest that interplay between presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors with overlapping downstream targets may underlie the variable efficacy of cannabinoids in different models of epilepsy.

  8. Cannabinoid receptor signaling induces proliferation but not neurogenesis in the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hutch, Chelsea R; Hegg, Colleen C

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium actively generates neurons through adulthood, and this neurogenesis is tightly regulated by multiple factors that are not fully defined. Here, we examined the role of cannabinoids in the regulation of neurogenesis in the mouse olfactory epithelium. In vivo proliferation and cell lineage studies were performed in mice (C57BL/6 and cannabinoid type 1 and 2 receptor deficient strains) treated with cannabinoids directly (WIN 55,212-2 or 2-arachidonylglycerol ether) or indirectly via inhibition of cannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes. Cannabinoids increased proliferation in neonatal and adult mice, and had no effect on proliferation in cannabinoid type 1 and 2 receptor deficient adult mice. Pretreatment with the cannabinoid type1 receptor antagonist AM251 decreased cannabinoid-induced proliferation in adult mice. Despite a cannabinoid-induced increase in proliferation, there was no change in newly generated neurons or non-neuronal cells 16 d post-treatment. However, cannabinoid administration increased apoptotic cell death at 72 hours post-treatment and by 16 d the level of apoptosis dropped to control levels. Thus, cannabinoids induce proliferation, but do not induce neurogenesis nor non-neuronal cell generation. Cannabinoid receptor signaling may regulate the balance of progenitor cell survival and proliferation in adult mouse olfactory epithelium. PMID:27606334

  9. The therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Benzi; Triolo, Piera; Jones, Wallace; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    There is growing interest in the therapeutic potential of marijuana (cannabis) and cannabinoid-based chemicals within the medical community and, particularly, for neurological conditions. This interest is driven both by changes in the legal status of cannabis in many areas and increasing research into the roles of endocannabinoids within the central nervous system and their potential as symptomatic and/or neuroprotective therapies. We review basic science as well as preclinical and clinical studies on the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids specifically as it relates to movement disorders. The pharmacology of cannabis is complex, with over 60 neuroactive chemicals identified to date. The endocannabinoid system modulates neurotransmission involved in motor function, particularly within the basal ganglia. Preclinical research in animal models of several movement disorders have shown variable evidence for symptomatic benefits, but more consistently suggest potential neuroprotective effects in several animal models of Parkinson's (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). Clinical observations and clinical trials of cannabinoid-based therapies suggests a possible benefit of cannabinoids for tics and probably no benefit for tremor in multiple sclerosis or dyskinesias or motor symptoms in PD. Data are insufficient to draw conclusions regarding HD, dystonia, or ataxia and nonexistent for myoclonus or RLS. Despite the widespread publicity about the medical benefits of cannabinoids, further preclinical and clinical research is needed to better characterize the pharmacological, physiological, and therapeutic effects of this class of drugs in movement disorders. PMID:25649017

  10. The Therapeutic Potential of Cannabinoids for Movement Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, Benzi; Triolo, Piera; Jones, Wallace; Jankovic, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the therapeutic potential of marijuana (cannabis) and cannabinoid-based chemicals within the medical community and particularly for neurologic conditions. This interest is driven both by changes in the legal status of cannabis in many areas and increasing research into the roles of endocannabinoids within the central nervous system and their potential as symptomatic and/or neuroprotective therapies. We review basic science, preclinical and clinical studies on the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids specifically as it relates to movement disorders. Results The pharmacology of cannabis is complex with over 60 neuroactive chemicals identified to date. The endocannabinoid system modulates neurotransmission involved in motor function, particularly within the basal ganglia. Preclinical research in animal models of several movement disorders have shown variable evidence for symptomatic benefits but more consistently suggest potential neuroprotective effects in several animal models of Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD). Clinical observations and clinical trials of cannabinoid-based therapies suggests a possible benefit of cannabinoids for tics and probably no benefit for tremor in multiple sclerosis or dyskinesias or motor symptoms in PD. Data are insufficient to draw conclusions regarding HD, dystonia or ataxia and nonexistent for myoclonus or restless legs syndrome. Conclusions Despite the widespread publicity about the medical benefits of cannabinoids, further preclinical and clinical research is needed to better characterize the pharmacological, physiological and therapeutic effects of this class of drugs in movement disorders. PMID:25649017

  11. Peripherally Restricted Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Pain.

    PubMed

    Romero-Sandoval, E Alfonso; Asbill, Scott; Paige, Candler A; Byrd-Glover, Kiara

    2015-10-01

    The use of cannabinoids for the treatment of chronic diseases has increased in the United States, with 23 states having legalized the use of marijuana. Although currently available cannabinoid compounds have shown effectiveness in relieving symptoms associated with numerous diseases, the use of cannabis or cannabinoids is still controversial mostly due to their psychotropic effects (e.g., euphoria, laughter) or central nervous system (CNS)-related undesired effects (e.g., tolerance, dependence). A potential strategy to use cannabinoids for medical conditions without inducing psychotropic or CNS-related undesired effects is to avoid their actions in the CNS. This approach could be beneficial for conditions with prominent peripheral pathophysiologic mechanisms (e.g., painful diabetic neuropathy, chemotherapy-induced neuropathy). In this article, we discuss the scientific evidence to target the peripheral cannabinoid system as an alternative to cannabis use for medical purposes, and we review the available literature to determine the pros and cons of potential strategies that can be used to this end.

  12. Pro-drugs for indirect cannabinoids as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John

    2008-10-01

    Medicinal cannabis, cannabis extracts, and other cannabinoids are currently in use or under clinical trial investigation for the control of nausea, emesis and wasting in patients undergoing chemotherapy, the control of neuropathic pain and arthritic pain, and the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. The further development of medicinal cannabinoids has been challenged with problems. These include the psychoactivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists and the lack of availability of highly selective cannabinoid receptor full agonists (for the CB1 or CB2 receptor), as well as problems of pharmacokinetics. Global activation of cannabinoid receptors is usually undesirable, and so enhancement of local endocannabinoid receptor activity with indirect cannabimimetics is an attractive strategy for therapeutic modulation of the endocannabinoid system. However, existing drugs of this type tend to be metabolized by the same enzymes as their target endocannabinoids and are not yet available in a form that is clinically useful. A potential solution to these problems may now have been suggested by the discovery that paracetamol (acetaminophen) exerts its analgesic (and probably anti-pyretic) effects by its degradation into an anandamide (an endocannabinoid) reuptake inhibitor (AM404) within the body, thus classifying it as pro-drug for an indirect cannabimimetic. Given the proven efficacy and safety of paracetamol, the challenge now is to develop related drugs, or entirely different substrates, into pro-drug indirect cannabimimetics with a similar safety profile to paracetamol but at high effective dose titrations.

  13. Pro-drugs for indirect cannabinoids as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John

    2008-10-01

    Medicinal cannabis, cannabis extracts, and other cannabinoids are currently in use or under clinical trial investigation for the control of nausea, emesis and wasting in patients undergoing chemotherapy, the control of neuropathic pain and arthritic pain, and the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. The further development of medicinal cannabinoids has been challenged with problems. These include the psychoactivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists and the lack of availability of highly selective cannabinoid receptor full agonists (for the CB1 or CB2 receptor), as well as problems of pharmacokinetics. Global activation of cannabinoid receptors is usually undesirable, and so enhancement of local endocannabinoid receptor activity with indirect cannabimimetics is an attractive strategy for therapeutic modulation of the endocannabinoid system. However, existing drugs of this type tend to be metabolized by the same enzymes as their target endocannabinoids and are not yet available in a form that is clinically useful. A potential solution to these problems may now have been suggested by the discovery that paracetamol (acetaminophen) exerts its analgesic (and probably anti-pyretic) effects by its degradation into an anandamide (an endocannabinoid) reuptake inhibitor (AM404) within the body, thus classifying it as pro-drug for an indirect cannabimimetic. Given the proven efficacy and safety of paracetamol, the challenge now is to develop related drugs, or entirely different substrates, into pro-drug indirect cannabimimetics with a similar safety profile to paracetamol but at high effective dose titrations. PMID:18855592

  14. WIN 55,212-2, Agonist of Cannabinoid Receptors, Prevents Amyloid β1-42 Effects on Astrocytes in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aldasoro, Martin; Iradi, Antonio; Obrador, Elena; Mauricio, Maria D.; Vila, Jose Mª; Marchio, Patricia; Valles, Soraya L.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer´s disease (AD), a neurodegenerative illness involving synaptic dysfunction with extracellular accumulation of Aβ1-42 toxic peptide, glial activation, inflammatory response and oxidative stress, can lead to neuronal death. Endogenous cannabinoid system is implicated in physiological and physiopathological events in central nervous system (CNS), and changes in this system are related to many human diseases, including AD. However, studies on the effects of cannabinoids on astrocytes functions are scarce. In primary cultured astrocytes we studied cellular viability using MTT assay. Inflammatory and oxidative stress mediators were determined by ELISA and Western-blot techniques both in the presence and absence of Aβ1-42 peptide. Effects of WIN 55,212-2 (a synthetic cannabinoid) on cell viability, inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress were also determined. Aβ1-42 diminished astrocytes viability, increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels and p-65, COX-2 and iNOS protein expression while decreased PPAR-γ and antioxidant enzyme Cu/Zn SOD. WIN 55,212-2 pretreatment prevents all effects elicited by Aβ1-42. Furthermore, cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 also increased cell viability and PPAR-γ expression in control astrocytes. In conclusion cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 increases cell viability and anti-inflammatory response in cultured astrocytes. Moreover, WIN 55,212-2 increases expression of anti-oxidant Cu/Zn SOD and is able to prevent inflammation induced by Aβ1-42 in cultured astrocytes. Further studies would be needed to assess the possible beneficial effects of cannabinoids in Alzheimer's disease patients. PMID:25874692

  15. Cannabinoids, eating behaviour, and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y; Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of cannabis by western societies, its psychotropic effects overshadowed its medical benefits. However, investigation into the molecular action of the main constituents of cannabis has led to the discovery of an intercellular signalling system, called the endocannabinoid system (ECS). The ECS comprises a set of molecular components, including enzymes, signalling lipids and G-protein coupled receptors, which has an outstanding role in modulating eating behaviour and energy homeostasis. Interestingly, evidence has shown that the ECS is present at the central and peripheral nervous system, modulating the function of the hypothalamus, the brain reward system and the brainstem, and coordinating the crosstalk between these brain structures and peripheral organs. Indeed, the ECS is present and functional in metabolically relevant peripheral tissues, directly modulating their physiology. In the context of a global obesity pandemic, these discoveries are highly suggestive in order to design novel pharmaceutical tools to fight obesity and related morbidities. In fact, a cannabinoid-based first generation of drugs was developed and marketed. Their failure, due to central side-effects, is leading to a second generation of these drugs unable to cross the blood-brain barrier, as well as other ECS-focused strategies that are still in the pipeline. In the next few years we will hopefully know whether such an important player in energy homeostasis can be successfully targeted without significantly affecting other vital processes related to mood and sense of well-being.

  16. Using cannabinoids in pain and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Peat, Sue

    2010-10-01

    Interest in the use of cannabinoids in a clinical setting is gradually increasing, particularly in patients where more conventional treatments have failed. They have been reported as offering perceived benefits in a wide range of conditions, but the major interest at present is centred on their place in pain management and in the palliation of symptoms secondary to terminal cancer and neurological disease. The potential benefits include symptomatic relief for patients suffering from intractable neuropathic pain, anorexia, anxiety and muscle spasm. There is clear consensus that cannibinoids should not be used as a first-line monotherapy, but should be considered as valuable adjuvants to more commonly indicated therapeutic options in the management of palliative care patients. Scientific evidence documenting the benefits of the canibinoids nabilone and sativex is accumulating, but needs to be evaluated carefully in the light of the paucity of available data. Both drugs are usually used under the guidance of specialist units. Nabilone and Sativex are now controlled drugs, and are frequently used outside of their licensed indication (control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting) and hence particular care needs to be taken in evaluating the rational for their use. Sativex has been recently licenced for use in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:20972379

  17. Cellular and intracellular mechanisms involved in the cognitive impairment of cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Puighermanal, Emma; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Exogenous cannabinoids, such as delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), as well as the modulation of endogenous cannabinoids, affect cognitive function through the activation of cannabinoid receptors. Indeed, these compounds modulate a number of signalling pathways critically implicated in the deleterious effect of cannabinoids on learning and memory. Thus, the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and extracellular signal-regulated kinases, together with their consequent regulation of cellular processes such as protein translation, play a critical role in the amnesic-like effects of cannabinoids. In this study, we summarize the cellular and molecular mechanisms reported in the modulation of cognitive function by the endocannabinoid system. PMID:23108544

  18. GPR55 and the vascular receptors for cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Hiley, C R; Kaup, S S

    2007-11-01

    CB1 and CB2 receptors mediate most responses to cannabinoids but not some of the cardiovascular actions of endocannabinoids such as anandamide and virodhamine, or those of some synthetic agents, like abnormal cannabidiol (abn-cbd). These agents induce vasorelaxation which is antagonised by rimonabant but only at high concentrations relative to those required to block CB1 receptors. Vasorelaxation to anandamide is sensitive to Pertussis toxin (though that to abn-cbd is not), and so is thought to be mediated by a G protein-coupled receptor through Gi/o. An orphan receptor, GPR55, apparently a cannabinoid receptor, is activated by abn-cbd, but is not the receptor mediating vasorelaxation to this agent, as the response persists in vessels from GPR55 knockout mice. However, the activity of anandamide in GPR55 knockout mice is not yet reported and so the role of GPR55 as a cannabinoid receptor mediating vascular responses has yet to be finalised.

  19. [Possibilities of applying cannabinoids' in the treatment of glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Nadolska, Krystyna; Goś, Roman

    2008-01-01

    Over a period of several decades numerous scientific research has proven that, regardless of the route of administration, cannabinoids are able to decrease intraocular pressure. What is more, these compounds are characterized by neuroprotection and vasodilatation properties, that additionally substantiate it's therapeutic utility in conservative treatment of glaucoma. So far, it has not been described in details what mechanism is used to lower the intraocular pressure by cannabinoids. Nevertheless, the presence of endocannabinoid receptors in structures of the eye responsible for formation and outflow of aqueous humor is an explanation for effectiveness of these compounds, when administered in topical form. These days, with the aid of modern pharmacological technology are available significantly bigger possibilities of improving bioavailability of cannabinoids administered to the eye than in the past, as well as limitation of it's undesired side effects.

  20. Symptomatic treatment of multiple sclerosis using cannabinoids: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F

    2007-09-01

    Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of clinical trials investigating the potential efficacy of medicinal cannabinoids for the symptomatic treatment of chronic pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS). A number of different cannabinoids have been used, including: delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) itself; the synthetic delta9-THC, dronabinol; a 1:1 ratio of delta9-THC:cannabidiol (Sativex); and the synthetic delta9-THC metabolites CT-3 and nabilone. Other Cannabis extracts have also been tested. While 2-3 years ago there was little consensus in the literature, now the majority of studies are beginning to suggest that cannabinoids are useful in the treatment of MS in at least a subset of individuals. Their adverse side-effect profile has generally been mild compared with other drugs used for pain and spasticity; nonetheless, there is still concern about potential long-term side effects, particularly psychiatric side effects and effects on fetal development. PMID:17868014

  1. Hijacking of Basic Research: The Case of Synthetic Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Marusich, Julie A.; Huffman, John W.; Balster, Robert L.; Thomas, Brian F.

    2012-01-01

    Gathering and communicating knowledge are important aspects of the scientific endeavor. Yet presentation of data in public forums such as scientific meetings and publications makes it available not only to scientists, but also to others who may have different ideas about how to use research findings. A recent example of this type of hijacking is the introduction of synthetic cannabinoids that are sprayed on herbal products and subsequently smoked for their marijuana-like intoxicating properties. Originally developed for the legitimate research purpose of furthering understanding of the cannabinoid system, these synthetic cannabinoids are being abused worldwide, creating issues for regulatory and law enforcement agencies that are struggling to keep up with the growing number of compounds of various structural motifs. Basic and clinical scientists need to provide advice now to facilitate decision-making about the health threats posed by this emerging problem. PMID:23397508

  2. Cannabinoids reverse the effects of early stress on neurocognitive performance in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Alteba, Shirley; Korem, Nachshon; Akirav, Irit

    2016-07-01

    Early life stress (ES) significantly increases predisposition to psychopathologies. Cannabinoids may cause cognitive deficits and exacerbate the effects of ES. Nevertheless, the endocannabinoid system has been suggested as a therapeutic target for the treatment of stress- and anxiety-related disorders. Here we examined whether cannabinoids administered during "late adolescence" (extensive cannabis use in humans at the ages 18-25) could reverse the long-term adverse effects of ES on neurocognitive function in adulthood. Male and female rats were exposed to ES during post-natal days (P) 7-14, injected with the cannabinoid CB1/2 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 1.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for 2 wk during late adolescence (P45-60) and tested in adulthood (P90) for working memory, anxiety, and alterations in CB1 receptors (CB1r), and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the stress circuit [hippocampus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and basolateral amygdala (BLA)]. ES males and females exhibited impaired performance in short-term memory in adulthood in the spatial location and social recognition tasks; males were also impaired in the novel object recognition task. WIN administered during late adolescence prevented these stress-induced impairments and reduced anxiety levels. WIN normalized the ES-induced up-regulation in PFC-GRs and CA1-CB1r in females. In males, WIN normalized the ES-induced up-regulation in PFC-GR and down-regulation in BLA-CB1r. There is a crucial role of the endocannabinoid system in the effects of early life stress on behavior at adulthood. Differences in recognition memory and in the expression of GRs and CB1r in the fear circuit suggest sex differences in the mechanism underlying coping with stress. PMID:27317195

  3. Microglial CB2 cannabinoid receptors are neuroprotective in Huntington's disease excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Palazuelos, Javier; Aguado, Tania; Pazos, M Ruth; Julien, Boris; Carrasco, Carolina; Resel, Eva; Sagredo, Onintza; Benito, Cristina; Romero, Julián; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Guzmán, Manuel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael

    2009-11-01

    Cannabinoid-derived drugs are promising agents for the development of novel neuroprotective strategies. Activation of neuronal CB(1) cannabinoid receptors attenuates excitotoxic glutamatergic neurotransmission, triggers prosurvival signalling pathways and palliates motor symptoms in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. However, in Huntington's disease there is a very early downregulation of CB(1) receptors in striatal neurons that, together with the undesirable psychoactive effects triggered by CB(1) receptor activation, foster the search for alternative pharmacological treatments. Here, we show that CB(2) cannabinoid receptor expression increases in striatal microglia of Huntington's disease transgenic mouse models and patients. Genetic ablation of CB(2) receptors in R6/2 mice, that express human mutant huntingtin exon 1, enhanced microglial activation, aggravated disease symptomatology and reduced mice lifespan. Likewise, induction of striatal excitotoxicity in CB(2) receptor-deficient mice by quinolinic acid administration exacerbated brain oedema, microglial activation, proinflammatory-mediator state and medium-sized spiny neuron degeneration. Moreover, administration of CB(2) receptor-selective agonists to wild-type mice subjected to excitotoxicity reduced neuroinflammation, brain oedema, striatal neuronal loss and motor symptoms. Studies on ganciclovir-induced depletion of astroglial proliferation in transgenic mice expressing thymidine kinase under the control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter excluded the participation of proliferating astroglia in CB(2) receptor-mediated actions. These findings support a pivotal role for CB(2) receptors in attenuating microglial activation and preventing neurodegeneration that may pave the way to new therapeutic strategies for neuroprotection in Huntington's disease as well as in other neurodegenerative disorders with a significant excitotoxic component.

  4. Prospects for cannabinoid therapies in basal ganglia disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Moreno-Martet, Miguel; Rodríguez-Cueto, Carmen; Palomo-Garo, Cristina; Gómez-Cañas, María; Valdeolivas, Sara; Guaza, Carmen; Romero, Julián; Guzmán, Manuel; Mechoulam, Raphael; Ramos, José A

    2011-01-01

    Cannabinoids are promising medicines to slow down disease progression in neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), two of the most important disorders affecting the basal ganglia. Two pharmacological profiles have been proposed for cannabinoids being effective in these disorders. On the one hand, cannabinoids like Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol or cannabidiol protect nigral or striatal neurons in experimental models of both disorders, in which oxidative injury is a prominent cytotoxic mechanism. This effect could be exerted, at least in part, through mechanisms independent of CB1 and CB2 receptors and involving the control of endogenous antioxidant defences. On the other hand, the activation of CB2 receptors leads to a slower progression of neurodegeneration in both disorders. This effect would be exerted by limiting the toxicity of microglial cells for neurons and, in particular, by reducing the generation of proinflammatory factors. It is important to mention that CB2 receptors have been identified in the healthy brain, mainly in glial elements and, to a lesser extent, in certain subpopulations of neurons, and that they are dramatically up-regulated in response to damaging stimuli, which supports the idea that the cannabinoid system behaves as an endogenous neuroprotective system. This CB2 receptor up-regulation has been found in many neurodegenerative disorders including HD and PD, which supports the beneficial effects found for CB2 receptor agonists in both disorders. In conclusion, the evidence reported so far supports that those cannabinoids having antioxidant properties and/or capability to activate CB2 receptors may represent promising therapeutic agents in HD and PD, thus deserving a prompt clinical evaluation. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7 PMID:21545415

  5. Beyond THC: The New Generation of Cannabinoid Designer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fattore, Liana; Fratta, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids are functionally similar to delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive principle of cannabis, and bind to the same cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral organs. From 2008, synthetic cannabinoids were detected in herbal smoking mixtures sold on websites and in “head shops” under the brand name of Spice Gold, Yucatan Fire, Aroma, and others. Although these products (also known as “Spice drugs” or “legal highs”) do not contain tobacco or cannabis, when smoked they produce effects similar to THC. Intoxication, withdrawal, psychosis, and death have been recently reported after consumption, posing difficult social, political, and health challenges. More than 140 different Spice products have been identified to date. The ability to induce strong cannabis-like psychoactive effects, along with the fact that they are readily available on the Internet, still legal in many countries, marketed as natural safe substances, and undetectable by conventional drug screening tests, has rendered these drugs very popular and particularly appealing to young and drug-naïve individuals seeking new experiences. An escalating number of compounds with cannabinoid receptor activity are currently being found as ingredients of Spice, of which almost nothing is known in terms of pharmacology, toxicology, and safety. Since legislation started to control the synthetic cannabinoids identified in these herbal mixtures, many new analogs have appeared on the market. New cannabimimetic compounds are likely to be synthesized in the near future to replace banned synthetic cannabinoids, leading to a “dog chasing its tail” situation. Spice smokers are exposed to drugs that are extremely variable in composition and potency, and are at risk of serious, if not lethal, outcomes. Social and health professionals should maintain a high degree of alertness for Spice use and its possible psychiatric effects in vulnerable people. PMID:22007163

  6. Cannabinoid modulation of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection and transformation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Wang, Jian Feng; Kunos, George; Groopman, Jerome E

    2007-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; also named human herpesvirus 8) is necessary but not sufficient for the development of Kaposi's sarcoma. A variety of factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma in addition to KSHV. Marijuana is a widely used recreational agent, and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the major active component of marijuana, is prescribed for medicinal use. To evaluate how cannabinoids may affect the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, we studied primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) exposed to KSHV. There was an increased efficiency of KSHV infection in the presence of low doses of Delta(9)-THC. We also found that Delta(9)-THC increased the viral load in KSHV-infected HMVEC through activation of the KSHV lytic switch gene, the open reading frame 50. Furthermore, we observed that Delta(9)-THC stimulated expression of the KSHV-encoded viral G protein-coupled receptor and Kaposi's sarcoma cell proliferation. Our results indicate that Delta(9)-THC can enhance KSHV infection and replication and foster KSHV-mediated endothelial transformation. Thus, use of cannabinoids may place individuals at greater risk for the development and progression of Kaposi's sarcoma. PMID:17671191

  7. Review of detection frequency and type of synthetic cannabinoids in herbal compounds analyzed by Istanbul Narcotic Department of the Council of Forensic Medicine, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gurdal, Fatma; Asirdizer, Mahmut; Aker, Rezzan Gulhan; Korkut, Senol; Gocer, Yasemin; Kucukibrahimoglu, E Esra; Ince, C Haluk

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, synthetic cannabinoids have been frequently observed in seized materials all over the world. This new generation of designer drugs, mixed with herbal substances, is also known as "Herbal Highs" or "Legal Highs". There are many articles about the history, type and pharmaco-chemical properties of synthetic cannabinoids in the literature; however the number of articles about the frequency of their detection is limited. In this study, we evaluated the type and detection frequency of synthetic cannabinoids in Istanbul and its surrounding area. The reports of the Council of Forensic Medicine-Istanbul Narcotic Department were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of synthetic cannabinoids in herbal compounds sent by the judicial authorities between August 01, 2010 and March 31, 2012. Among 1200 herbal compounds, 1179 of them (98.3%) contained synthetic cannabinoids. Twenty-one samples (1.7%) had other psychoactive substances. The analysis of 1179 samples showed that JWH-018 was present in 1172 (99.4%) of the samples. JWH-081 was found in 777 samples (65.9%) together with JWH-018. Samples had different package names. "Bonzai Aromatic Potpourri" (n = 755; 64.0%) and "Bonzai Plant Growth Regulator" (n = 316; 26.8%) were the most common product names amongst the herbal products in this study. It is clear from the present study and previous studies that brand name of synthetic cannabinoids that dominate the market exhibit regional differences as to the type and detection frequency of synthetic cannabinoids and the content of herbal highs packages. The number and diversity of synthetic cannabinoid compounds have increased dramatically in the drug market in recent years. New, different, potent derivatives appear on the market almost every day and this presents important problems that need to be solved by scientists and judicial authorities working to prevent their harm. These problems include the limited knowledge about their frequency, the lack of

  8. Rapid Lymphatic Dissemination of Encapsulated Group A Streptococci via Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Receptor-1 Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lynskey, Nicola N; Banerji, Suneale; Johnson, Louise A; Holder, Kayla A; Reglinski, Mark; Wing, Peter A C; Rigby, David; Jackson, David G; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-09-01

    The host lymphatic network represents an important conduit for pathogen dissemination. Indeed, the lethal human pathogen group A streptococcus has a predilection to induce pathology in the lymphatic system and draining lymph nodes, however the underlying basis and subsequent consequences for disease outcome are currently unknown. Here we report that the hyaluronan capsule of group A streptococci is a crucial virulence determinant for lymphatic tropism in vivo, and further, we identify the lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1 as the critical host receptor for capsular hyaluronan in the lymphatic system. Interference with this interaction in vivo impeded bacterial dissemination to local draining lymph nodes and, in the case of a hyper-encapsulated M18 strain, redirected streptococcal entry into the blood circulation, suggesting a pivotal role in the manifestation of streptococcal infections. Our results reveal a novel function for bacterial capsular polysaccharide in directing lymphatic tropism, with potential implications for disease pathology.

  9. Rapid Lymphatic Dissemination of Encapsulated Group A Streptococci via Lymphatic Vessel Endothelial Receptor-1 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Louise A.; Holder, Kayla A.; Reglinski, Mark; Wing, Peter A. C.; Rigby, David; Jackson, David G.; Sriskandan, Shiranee

    2015-01-01

    The host lymphatic network represents an important conduit for pathogen dissemination. Indeed, the lethal human pathogen group A streptococcus has a predilection to induce pathology in the lymphatic system and draining lymph nodes, however the underlying basis and subsequent consequences for disease outcome are currently unknown. Here we report that the hyaluronan capsule of group A streptococci is a crucial virulence determinant for lymphatic tropism in vivo, and further, we identify the lymphatic vessel endothelial receptor-1 as the critical host receptor for capsular hyaluronan in the lymphatic system. Interference with this interaction in vivo impeded bacterial dissemination to local draining lymph nodes and, in the case of a hyper-encapsulated M18 strain, redirected streptococcal entry into the blood circulation, suggesting a pivotal role in the manifestation of streptococcal infections. Our results reveal a novel function for bacterial capsular polysaccharide in directing lymphatic tropism, with potential implications for disease pathology. PMID:26352587

  10. Cannabinoids and Reproduction: A Lasting and Intriguing History

    PubMed Central

    Cacciola, Giovanna; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Ciaramella, Vincenza; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo; Meccariello, Rosaria; Cobellis, Gilda

    2010-01-01

    Starting from an historical overview of lasting Cannabis use over the centuries, we will focus on a description of the cannabinergic system, with a comprehensive analysis of chemical and pharmacological properties of endogenous and synthetic cannabimimetic analogues. The metabolic pathways and the signal transduction mechanisms, activated by cannabinoid receptors stimulation, will also be discussed. In particular, we will point out the action of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids on the different neuronal networks involved in reproductive axis, and locally, on male and female reproductive tracts, by emphasizing the pivotal role played by this system in the control of fertility.

  11. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors and apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB1 receptor, but not by the CB2 receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain.

  12. Altered pupillary light reflex in PACAP receptor 1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Engelund, Anna; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Harrison, Adrian; Luuk, Hendrik; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-05-01

    The pupillary light reflex (PLR) is regulated by the classical photoreceptors, rods and cones, and by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin. IpRGCs receive input from rods and cones and project to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN), which is the primary visual center involved in PLR. Mice lacking either the classical photoreceptors or melanopsin exhibit some changes in PLR, whereas the reflex is completely lost in mice deficient of all three photoreceptors. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is co-stored with melanopsin in ipRGCs and mediates light signaling to the brain via the specific PACAP receptor 1 (PAC1R). Here, we examined the occurrence of PACAP and PAC1R in the mouse OPN, and studied if lack of PAC1R affected the PLR. PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibers were shown in the mouse OPN, and by in situ hybridization histochemistry, we demonstrated the presence of PAC1R mRNA. Mice lacking PAC1R exhibited a significantly attenuated PLR compared to wild type mice upon light stimulation, and the difference became more pronounced as light intensity was increased. Our findings accord well with observations of the PLR in the melanopsin-deficient mouse. We conclude that PACAP/PAC1R signaling is involved in the sustained phase of the PLR at high irradiances.

  13. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  14. Simultaneous Analysis of Cannabinoid and Synthetic Cannabinoids in Dietary Supplements Using UPLC with UV and UPLC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Heo, Seok; Yoo, Geum Joo; Choi, Ji Yeon; Park, Hyoung Joon; Do, Jung-Ah; Cho, Sooyeul; Baek, Sun Young; Park, Sung-Kwan

    2016-06-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to develop and validate a method based on UPLC with UV and UPLC-MS-MS for the simultaneous analysis of different cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids in food as well as in herbal and dietary supplements. The limits of detection and quantitation of the method ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 and 0.3 to 0.9 μg/mL by UPLC with UV, respectively. The coefficient of determination was >0.999; the intra- and interday precision of the method were 0.1-3.7 and 0.9-4.1%, respectively. The intra- and interday accuracy were 94.8-103.1 and 98.3-100.9%, respectively. The mean recoveries of nine cannabinoids obtained from tablet samples ranged from 81.1 to 105.4%. The mean extraction recoveries of nine target cannabinoids obtained from various types of samples (tablets, capsules, powders, liquids, cookies and candies) ranged from 82.26 to 112.40%. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the stability of the prepared sample solutions was <1.80%. Identification and quantification of the nine cannabinoids were accomplished by ion spray UPLC-MS-MS using multiple reaction monitoring. The UPLC-MS-MS method was validated for linearity (R(2) > 0.99); the precision was 0.1-4.0% (intraday) and 0.1-2.8% (interday), and the accuracy was 98.0-103.5% (intraday) and 97.1-103.2% (interday). The mean extraction recoveries of six types of samples were 82.2-114.5% and the RSD of stability was <6.54%, complying with the established international guidelines. The results indicated that the method can be used for rapid and accurate screening of cannabinoids present in food.

  15. Simultaneous Analysis of Cannabinoid and Synthetic Cannabinoids in Dietary Supplements Using UPLC with UV and UPLC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Heo, Seok; Yoo, Geum Joo; Choi, Ji Yeon; Park, Hyoung Joon; Do, Jung-Ah; Cho, Sooyeul; Baek, Sun Young; Park, Sung-Kwan

    2016-06-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to develop and validate a method based on UPLC with UV and UPLC-MS-MS for the simultaneous analysis of different cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids in food as well as in herbal and dietary supplements. The limits of detection and quantitation of the method ranged from 0.1 to 0.3 and 0.3 to 0.9 μg/mL by UPLC with UV, respectively. The coefficient of determination was >0.999; the intra- and interday precision of the method were 0.1-3.7 and 0.9-4.1%, respectively. The intra- and interday accuracy were 94.8-103.1 and 98.3-100.9%, respectively. The mean recoveries of nine cannabinoids obtained from tablet samples ranged from 81.1 to 105.4%. The mean extraction recoveries of nine target cannabinoids obtained from various types of samples (tablets, capsules, powders, liquids, cookies and candies) ranged from 82.26 to 112.40%. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of the stability of the prepared sample solutions was <1.80%. Identification and quantification of the nine cannabinoids were accomplished by ion spray UPLC-MS-MS using multiple reaction monitoring. The UPLC-MS-MS method was validated for linearity (R(2) > 0.99); the precision was 0.1-4.0% (intraday) and 0.1-2.8% (interday), and the accuracy was 98.0-103.5% (intraday) and 97.1-103.2% (interday). The mean extraction recoveries of six types of samples were 82.2-114.5% and the RSD of stability was <6.54%, complying with the established international guidelines. The results indicated that the method can be used for rapid and accurate screening of cannabinoids present in food. PMID:27185817

  16. MAM-2201, a synthetic cannabinoid drug of abuse, suppresses the synaptic input to cerebellar Purkinje cells via activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Irie, Tomohiko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Usami, Makoto; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Goda, Yukihiro; Sekino, Yuko

    2015-08-01

    Herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids-initially sold as legal alternatives to marijuana-have become major drugs of abuse. Among the synthetic cannabinoids, [1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](4-methyl-1-naphthalenyl)-methanone (MAM-2201) has been recently detected in herbal products and has psychoactive and intoxicating effects in humans, suggesting that MAM-2201 alters brain function. Nevertheless, the pharmacological actions of MAM-2201 on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and neuronal functions have not been elucidated. We found that MAM-2201 acted as an agonist of human CB1Rs expressed in AtT-20 cells. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings made from Purkinje cells (PCs) in slice preparations of the mouse cerebellum, we also found that MAM-2201 inhibited glutamate release at parallel fiber-PC synapses via activation of presynaptic CB1Rs. MAM-2201 inhibited neurotransmitter release with an inhibitory concentration 50% of 0.36 μM. MAM-2201 caused greater inhibition of neurotransmitter release than Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol within the range of 0.1-30 μM and JWH-018, one of the most popular and potent synthetic cannabinoids detected in the herbal products, within the range of 0.03-3 μM. MAM-2201 caused a concentration-dependent suppression of GABA release onto PCs. Furthermore, MAM-2201 induced suppression of glutamate release at climbing fiber-PC synapses, leading to reduced dendritic Ca(2+) transients in PCs. These results suggest that MAM-2201 is likely to suppress neurotransmitter release at CB1R-expressing synapses in humans. The reduction of neurotransmitter release from CB1R-containing synapses could contribute to some of the symptoms of synthetic cannabinoid intoxication including impairments in cerebellum-dependent motor coordination and motor learning. PMID:25747605

  17. MAM-2201, a synthetic cannabinoid drug of abuse, suppresses the synaptic input to cerebellar Purkinje cells via activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Irie, Tomohiko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Usami, Makoto; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Goda, Yukihiro; Sekino, Yuko

    2015-08-01

    Herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids-initially sold as legal alternatives to marijuana-have become major drugs of abuse. Among the synthetic cannabinoids, [1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl](4-methyl-1-naphthalenyl)-methanone (MAM-2201) has been recently detected in herbal products and has psychoactive and intoxicating effects in humans, suggesting that MAM-2201 alters brain function. Nevertheless, the pharmacological actions of MAM-2201 on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and neuronal functions have not been elucidated. We found that MAM-2201 acted as an agonist of human CB1Rs expressed in AtT-20 cells. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings made from Purkinje cells (PCs) in slice preparations of the mouse cerebellum, we also found that MAM-2201 inhibited glutamate release at parallel fiber-PC synapses via activation of presynaptic CB1Rs. MAM-2201 inhibited neurotransmitter release with an inhibitory concentration 50% of 0.36 μM. MAM-2201 caused greater inhibition of neurotransmitter release than Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol within the range of 0.1-30 μM and JWH-018, one of the most popular and potent synthetic cannabinoids detected in the herbal products, within the range of 0.03-3 μM. MAM-2201 caused a concentration-dependent suppression of GABA release onto PCs. Furthermore, MAM-2201 induced suppression of glutamate release at climbing fiber-PC synapses, leading to reduced dendritic Ca(2+) transients in PCs. These results suggest that MAM-2201 is likely to suppress neurotransmitter release at CB1R-expressing synapses in humans. The reduction of neurotransmitter release from CB1R-containing synapses could contribute to some of the symptoms of synthetic cannabinoid intoxication including impairments in cerebellum-dependent motor coordination and motor learning.

  18. The Neuroprotective Effect of Lithium in cannabinoid Dependence is Mediated through Modulation of Cyclic AMP, ERK1/2 and GSK-3β Phosphorylation in Cerebellar Granular Neurons of Rat.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Ejtemaei-Mehr, Shahram; Razmi, Ali; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Lithium (Li), a glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor, has used to attenuate the cannabinoid-induced dependence/withdrawal signs, but molecular mechanisms related to this are unclear. Recent studies indicate the involvement of upstream extracellular signal kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and downstream GSK-3β pathways in the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence. This is mediated through cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) enriched in cerebellar granular neurons (CGNs). Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of modulatory/neuroprotective effects of Li on a cannabinoid agonist (WIN 55,212-2 (WIN))-induced dependence, through quantitative analysis of some involved proteins such as ERK1/2, GSK-3β and related signaling pathways including their phosphorylated forms; and cAMP level as the other molecular mechanisms leading to dependence, in CGNs model. The CGNs were prepared from 7-day-old Wistar rat pup in a 12-well plate, pretreated with Li (1mM) and an ERK1/2 inhibitor SL327 (SL, 10 µM). The WIN (1 µM) was added 30 minutes prior to treatment and AM251 (AM, 1 µM), as a cannabinoid antagonist was co-treated with WIN. The cAMP level, as an indicator of cannabinoid-induced dependence, was measured by ELISA following forskolin (FSK) stimulation. Western blot analyses determined the phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2), GSK-3β (p-GSK-3β) as well as their total expressions in various treatment times and doses in CGNs. WIN alone could down regulate the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade compared to AM treatment. However, P-GSK-3β was up-regulated with Li and WIN or with SL and Li pretreatment to AM-induced cellular response, which was the highest 60 minutes after CGNs exposure. Results further suggested the potential role of Li pretreatment to diminish the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence/neuronal injury through possible mechanisms of modulating the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade independent of p-GSK-3β signaling pathway in-vitro.

  19. The Neuroprotective Effect of Lithium in cannabinoid Dependence is Mediated through Modulation of Cyclic AMP, ERK1/2 and GSK-3β Phosphorylation in Cerebellar Granular Neurons of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Ejtemaei-Mehr, Shahram; Razmi, Ali; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Lithium (Li), a glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor, has used to attenuate the cannabinoid-induced dependence/withdrawal signs, but molecular mechanisms related to this are unclear. Recent studies indicate the involvement of upstream extracellular signal kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and downstream GSK-3β pathways in the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence. This is mediated through cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) enriched in cerebellar granular neurons (CGNs). Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of modulatory/neuroprotective effects of Li on a cannabinoid agonist (WIN 55,212-2 (WIN))-induced dependence, through quantitative analysis of some involved proteins such as ERK1/2, GSK-3β and related signaling pathways including their phosphorylated forms; and cAMP level as the other molecular mechanisms leading to dependence, in CGNs model. The CGNs were prepared from 7-day-old Wistar rat pup in a 12-well plate, pretreated with Li (1mM) and an ERK1/2 inhibitor SL327 (SL, 10 µM). The WIN (1 µM) was added 30 minutes prior to treatment and AM251 (AM, 1 µM), as a cannabinoid antagonist was co-treated with WIN. The cAMP level, as an indicator of cannabinoid-induced dependence, was measured by ELISA following forskolin (FSK) stimulation. Western blot analyses determined the phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2), GSK-3β (p-GSK-3β) as well as their total expressions in various treatment times and doses in CGNs. WIN alone could down regulate the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade compared to AM treatment. However, P-GSK-3β was up-regulated with Li and WIN or with SL and Li pretreatment to AM-induced cellular response, which was the highest 60 minutes after CGNs exposure. Results further suggested the potential role of Li pretreatment to diminish the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence/neuronal injury through possible mechanisms of modulating the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade independent of p-GSK-3β signaling pathway in-vitro. PMID:26664379

  20. Synthetic Cannabinoids-Further Evidence Supporting the Relationship Between Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Liana

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of synthetic mind-altering compounds, also known as "new psychoactive substances," is increasing globally at an alarming rate. Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are among the most commonly used new psychoactive substances. They are usually purchased as marijuana-like drugs, marketed as herbal blends and perceived as risk-free by inexperienced users. Yet, contrary to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, SCs may lead to severe health consequences, including anxiety, tachycardia, hallucinations, violent behavior, and psychosis. This review focuses on the latest (2010-2015) evidence of psychotic symptoms induced by ingestion of products containing SCs. Reports suggesting that SCs may either exacerbate previously stable psychotic symptoms (in vulnerable individuals) or trigger new-onset psychosis (in individuals with no previous history of psychosis) are reviewed. Pharmacology and toxicology of these compounds are discussed, with particular reference to their psychoactive effects. PMID:26970364

  1. Differential Effects of the Cannabinoid Agonist WIN55,212-2 on Delay and Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Central cannabinoid-1 receptors (CB1R) play a role in the acquisition of delay eyeblink conditioning but not trace eyeblink conditioning in humans and animals. However, it is not clear why trace conditioning is immune to the effects of cannabinoid receptor compounds. The current study examined the effects of variants of delay and trace conditioning procedures to elucidate the factors that determine the effects of CB1R agonists on eyeblink conditioning. In Experiment 1 rats were administered the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 during delay, long delay, or trace conditioning. Rats were impaired during delay and long delay but not trace conditioning; the impairment was greater for long delay than delay conditioning. Trace conditioning was further examined in Experiment 2 by manipulating the trace interval and keeping constant the conditioned stimulus (CS) duration. It was found that when the trace interval was 300 ms or less WIN55,212-2 administration impaired the rate of learning. Experiment 3 tested whether the trace interval duration or the relative durations of the CS and trace interval were critical parameters influencing the effects of WIN55,212-2 on eyeblink conditioning. Rats were not impaired with a 100 ms CS, 200 ms trace paradigm but were impaired with a 1000 ms CS, 500 ms trace paradigm, indicating that the duration of the trace interval does not matter but the proportion of the interstimulus interval occupied by the CS relative to the trace period is critical. Taken together the results indicate that cannabinoid agonists affect cerebellar learning the CS is longer than the trace interval. PMID:24128358

  2. Sex-Specific Alterations in Hippocampal Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Expression Following Adolescent Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Treatment in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Lindsay; Harte-Hargrove, Lauren; Izenwasser, Sari; Frank, Ashley; Wade, Dean; Dow-Edwards, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana use by adolescents has been on the rise since the early 1990’s. With recent legalization and decriminalization acts passed, cannabinoid exposure in adolescents will undoubtedly increase. Human studies are limited in their ability to examine underlying changes in brain biochemistry making rodent models valuable. Studies in adult and adolescent animals show region and sex specific downregulation of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor following chronic cannabinoid treatment. However, although sex-dependent changes in behavior have been observed during the drug abstinence period following adolescent cannabinoid exposure, little is known about CB1 receptor expression during this critical time. In order to characterize CB1 receptor expression following chronic adolescent Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure, we used [3H]CP55,940 binding to assess CB1 receptor expression in the dentate gyrus and areas CA1, CA2, and CA3 of the hippocampus in both male and female adolescent rats at both 24 hours and 2 weeks post chronic THC treatment. Consistent with other reported findings, we found downregulation of the CB1 receptor in the hippocampal formation at 24 hours post treatment. While this downregulation persisted in both sexes following two weeks of abstinence in the CA2 region, in females, this downregulation also persisted in areas CA1 and CA3. Expression in the dentate gyrus returned to the normal range by two weeks. These data suggest that selective regions of the hippocampus show persistent reductions in CB1 receptor expression and that these reductions are more widespread in female compared to male adolescents. PMID:26118897

  3. Synthetic cannabinoids 2015: An update for pediatricians in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Daniel; Gralnik, Leonard M

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids are a group of substances in the world of designer drugs that have become increasingly popular over the past few years. Synthetic cannabinoids are a chemically diverse group of compounds functionally similar to THC. Since first appearing on the world market a few years ago these compounds have evolved rapidly. Newer more potent analogues have been developed. Identifying youth who abuse these substances can be difficult. Newer forms of consumption have also evolved. These products are now manufactured in products that look like natural cannabis resin and in liquid cartridges used in electronic cigarettes. Synthetic cannabinoids appear to be associated with potentially dangerous health effects that are more severe than that of marijuana. Some synthetic cannabinoid compounds have been associated with serious physical consequences, such as, seizures, myocardial infarction and renal damage. In addition, psychoactive effects, such as aggression, confusion, anxiety and psychosis have also been reported. The diagnosis remains primarily clinical with toxicological confirmation difficult due to manufacturers constantly developing new analogues to avoid detection. Pediatricians are urged to familiarize themselves with these drugs and the typical presentations of patients who use them. PMID:26862498

  4. Clinical Use of Cannabinoids for Symptom Control in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Notcutt, William G

    2015-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system was discovered in 1988 but has received little attention for its potential therapeutic possibilities. That has started to change, and since 2000, a significant number of clinical trials of cannabinoids, principally for the control of spasticity in multiple sclerosis, have been undertaken. These studies have been difficult because of the nature of the disease and have involved patients for whom other therapies have failed or proved inadequate. This paper outlines the background to the use of cannabinoids available and discusses the principles of practice associated with their safe use. The focus has been on nabiximols, being the most studied and the only cannabinoid that has been both adequately researched for use in multiple sclerosis and granted a license by the regulators. However, what has emerged is that the effect for many patients can be much wider than just control of spasticity. Within and outside of neurology there seems to be an expanding range of possibilities for the therapeutic use of cannabinoids.

  5. Effects of opioids, cannabinoids, and vanilloids on body temperature.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Benamar, Khalid

    2011-06-01

    Cannabinoid and opioid drugs produce marked changes in body temperature. Recent findings have extended our knowledge about the thermoregulatory effects of cannabinoids and opioids, particularly as related to delta opioid receptors, endogenous systems, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Although delta opioid receptors were originally thought to play only a minor role in thermoregulation compared to mu and kappa opioid receptors, their activation has been shown to produce hypothermia in multiple species. Endogenous opioids and cannabinoids also regulate body temperature. Mu and kappa opioid receptors are thought to be in tonic balance, with mu and kappa receptor activation producing hyperthermia and hypothermia, respectively. A particularly intense research focus is TRP channels, where TRPV1 channel activation produces hypothermia whereas TRPA1 and TRPM8 channel activation causes hyperthermia. The marked hyperthermia produced by TRPV1 channel antagonists suggests these warm channels tonically control body temperature. A better understanding of the roles of cannabinoid, opioid, and TRP systems in thermoregulation may have broad clinical implications and provide insights into interactions among neurotransmitter systems involved in thermoregulation.

  6. Synthetic cannabinoids 2015: An update for pediatricians in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Daniel; Gralnik, Leonard M

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids are a group of substances in the world of designer drugs that have become increasingly popular over the past few years. Synthetic cannabinoids are a chemically diverse group of compounds functionally similar to THC. Since first appearing on the world market a few years ago these compounds have evolved rapidly. Newer more potent analogues have been developed. Identifying youth who abuse these substances can be difficult. Newer forms of consumption have also evolved. These products are now manufactured in products that look like natural cannabis resin and in liquid cartridges used in electronic cigarettes. Synthetic cannabinoids appear to be associated with potentially dangerous health effects that are more severe than that of marijuana. Some synthetic cannabinoid compounds have been associated with serious physical consequences, such as, seizures, myocardial infarction and renal damage. In addition, psychoactive effects, such as aggression, confusion, anxiety and psychosis have also been reported. The diagnosis remains primarily clinical with toxicological confirmation difficult due to manufacturers constantly developing new analogues to avoid detection. Pediatricians are urged to familiarize themselves with these drugs and the typical presentations of patients who use them. PMID:26862498

  7. Synthetic cannabinoids 2015: An update for pediatricians in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Daniel; Gralnik, Leonard M

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids are a group of substances in the world of designer drugs that have become increasingly popular over the past few years. Synthetic cannabinoids are a chemically diverse group of compounds functionally similar to THC. Since first appearing on the world market a few years ago these compounds have evolved rapidly. Newer more potent analogues have been developed. Identifying youth who abuse these substances can be difficult. Newer forms of consumption have also evolved. These products are now manufactured in products that look like natural cannabis resin and in liquid cartridges used in electronic cigarettes. Synthetic cannabinoids appear to be associated with potentially dangerous health effects that are more severe than that of marijuana. Some synthetic cannabinoid compounds have been associated with serious physical consequences, such as, seizures, myocardial infarction and renal damage. In addition, psychoactive effects, such as aggression, confusion, anxiety and psychosis have also been reported. The diagnosis remains primarily clinical with toxicological confirmation difficult due to manufacturers constantly developing new analogues to avoid detection. Pediatricians are urged to familiarize themselves with these drugs and the typical presentations of patients who use them.

  8. Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain.

    PubMed

    Russo, Ethan B

    2008-02-01

    This article reviews recent research on cannabinoid analgesia via the endocannabinoid system and non-receptor mechanisms, as well as randomized clinical trials employing cannabinoids in pain treatment. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, Marinol((R))) and nabilone (Cesamet((R))) are currently approved in the United States and other countries, but not for pain indications. Other synthetic cannabinoids, such as ajulemic acid, are in development. Crude herbal cannabis remains illegal in most jurisdictions but is also under investigation. Sativex((R)), a cannabis derived oromucosal spray containing equal proportions of THC (partial CB(1) receptor agonist ) and cannabidiol (CBD, a non-euphoriant, anti-inflammatory analgesic with CB(1) receptor antagonist and endocannabinoid modulating effects) was approved in Canada in 2005 for treatment of central neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis, and in 2007 for intractable cancer pain. Numerous randomized clinical trials have demonstrated safety and efficacy for Sativex in central and peripheral neuropathic pain, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer pain. An Investigational New Drug application to conduct advanced clinical trials for cancer pain was approved by the US FDA in January 2006. Cannabinoid analgesics have generally been well tolerated in clinical trials with acceptable adverse event profiles. Their adjunctive addition to the pharmacological armamentarium for treatment of pain shows great promise. PMID:18728714

  9. The role of cannabinoids and leptin in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Agar, E

    2015-12-01

    Cannabinoids exert a neuroprotective influence on some neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists or compounds can provide symptom relief or control the progression of neurological diseases. However, the molecular mechanism and the effectiveness of these agents in controlling the progression of most of these diseases remain unclear. Cannabinoids may exert effects via a number of mechanisms and interactions with neurotransmitters, neurotropic factors and neuropeptides. Leptin is a peptide hormone involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance via its actions on specific hypothalamic nuclei. Leptin receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain, especially in the hippocampus, basal ganglia, cortex and cerebellum. Leptin has also shown neuroprotective properties in a number of neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Therefore, cannabinoid and leptin hold therapeutic potential for neurological diseases. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects on these agents may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:25880465

  10. Chronic Cannabinoid Administration in Vivo Compromises Extinction of Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Mao, Sheng-Chun; Chen, Po-See; Gean, Po-Wu

    2008-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are critically involved in the extinction of fear memory. Here we examined the effects of repeated cannabinoid administration on the extinction of fear memory in rats and on inhibitory synaptic transmission in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) slices. Rats were treated with the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN 10 mg/kg, i.p.)…

  11. The role of cannabinoids and leptin in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Agar, E

    2015-12-01

    Cannabinoids exert a neuroprotective influence on some neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists or compounds can provide symptom relief or control the progression of neurological diseases. However, the molecular mechanism and the effectiveness of these agents in controlling the progression of most of these diseases remain unclear. Cannabinoids may exert effects via a number of mechanisms and interactions with neurotransmitters, neurotropic factors and neuropeptides. Leptin is a peptide hormone involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance via its actions on specific hypothalamic nuclei. Leptin receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain, especially in the hippocampus, basal ganglia, cortex and cerebellum. Leptin has also shown neuroprotective properties in a number of neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Therefore, cannabinoid and leptin hold therapeutic potential for neurological diseases. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects on these agents may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  12. Cannabinoids, Neurogenesis and Antidepressant Drugs: Is there a Link?

    PubMed Central

    Fogaça, Manoela Viar; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira; Campos, Alline Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Similar to clinically used antidepressants, cannabinoids can also regulate anxiety and depressive symptoms. Although the mechanisms of these effects are not completely understood, recent evidence suggests that changes in endocannabinoid system could be involved in some actions of antidepressants. Chronic antidepressant treatment modifies the expression of CB1 receptors and endocannabinoid (EC) content in brain regions related to mood and anxiety control. Moreover, both antidepressant and cannabinoids activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase(PI3-K)/Akt or PKB signaling, intracellular pathways that regulate cell proliferation and neural cell survival. Facilitation of hippocampal neurogenesis is proposed as a common effect of chronic antidepressant treatment. Genetic or pharmacological manipulations of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) or enzymes responsible for endocannabinoid-metabolism have also been shown to control proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampus. In the present paper we reviewed the studies that have investigated the potential contribution of cannabinoids and neurogenesisto antidepressant effects. Considering the widespread brain distribution of the EC system, a better understanding of this possible interaction could contribute to the development of therapeutic alternatives to mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:24179463

  13. Blockade of cannabinoid 1 receptor improves GLP-1R mediated insulin secretion in mice.

    PubMed

    González-Mariscal, Isabel; Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Kim, Wook; Rouse, Michael; Egan, Josephine M

    2016-03-01

    The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1) is an important regulator of energy metabolism. Reports of in vivo and in vitro studies give conflicting results regarding its role in insulin secretion, possibly due to circulatory factors, such as incretins. We hypothesized that this receptor may be a regulator of the entero-insular axis. We found that despite lower food consumption and lower body weight postprandial GLP-1 plasma concentrations were increased in CB1(-/-) mice compared to CB1(+/+) mice administered a standard diet or high fat/sugar diet. Upon exogenous GLP-1 treatment, CB1(-/-) mice had increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In mouse insulinoma cells, cannabinoids reduced GLP-1R-mediated intracellular cAMP accumulation and subsequent insulin secretion. Importantly, such effects were also evident in human islets, and were prevented by pharmacologic blockade of CB1. Collectively, these findings suggest a novel mechanism in which endocannabinoids are negative modulators of incretin-mediated insulin secretion. PMID:26724516

  14. A cannabinoid analogue of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol disrupts neural development in chick.

    PubMed

    Psychoyos, Delphine; Hungund, Basalingappa; Cooper, Thomas; Finnell, Richard H

    2008-10-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly abused illicit drug by pregnant women. Its major psychoactive constituent, Delta(9)-THC (Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol), crosses the placenta and accumulates in the foetus, potentially harming its development. In humans, marijuana use in early pregnancy is associated with miscarriage, a fetal alcohol-like syndrome, as well as learning disabilities, memory impairment, and ADHD in the offspring. Classical studies in the 1970 s have reached disparate conclusions as to the teratogenic effects of cannabinoids in animal models. Further, there is very little known about the immediate effects of Delta(9)-THC on early embryogenesis. We have used the chick embryo as a model in order to characterize the effects of a water-soluble Delta(9)-THC analogue, O-2545, on early development. Embryos were exposed to the drug (0.035 to 0.35 mg/ml) at gastrulation and assessed for morphological defects at stages equivalent to 9-14 somites. We report that O-2545 impairs the formation of brain, heart, somite, and spinal cord primordia. Shorter incubation times following exposure to the drug show that O-2545 interferes with the initial steps of head process and neural plate formation. Our results indicate that the administration of the cannabinoid O-2545 during early embryogenesis results in embryotoxic effects and serves to illuminate the risks of marijuana exposure during the second week of pregnancy, a time point at which most women are unaware of their pregnancies. PMID:19040278

  15. A cannabinoid analogue of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol disrupts neural development in chick.

    PubMed

    Psychoyos, Delphine; Hungund, Basalingappa; Cooper, Thomas; Finnell, Richard H

    2008-10-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly abused illicit drug by pregnant women. Its major psychoactive constituent, Delta(9)-THC (Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol), crosses the placenta and accumulates in the foetus, potentially harming its development. In humans, marijuana use in early pregnancy is associated with miscarriage, a fetal alcohol-like syndrome, as well as learning disabilities, memory impairment, and ADHD in the offspring. Classical studies in the 1970 s have reached disparate conclusions as to the teratogenic effects of cannabinoids in animal models. Further, there is very little known about the immediate effects of Delta(9)-THC on early embryogenesis. We have used the chick embryo as a model in order to characterize the effects of a water-soluble Delta(9)-THC analogue, O-2545, on early development. Embryos were exposed to the drug (0.035 to 0.35 mg/ml) at gastrulation and assessed for morphological defects at stages equivalent to 9-14 somites. We report that O-2545 impairs the formation of brain, heart, somite, and spinal cord primordia. Shorter incubation times following exposure to the drug show that O-2545 interferes with the initial steps of head process and neural plate formation. Our results indicate that the administration of the cannabinoid O-2545 during early embryogenesis results in embryotoxic effects and serves to illuminate the risks of marijuana exposure during the second week of pregnancy, a time point at which most women are unaware of their pregnancies.

  16. Preparation of stable isotope-labeled peripheral cannabinoid receptor CB2 by bacterial fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Christian; Ho, Jenny T.C.; Kimura, Tomohiro; Hess, Sonja; Gawrisch, Klaus; Yeliseev, Alexei

    2010-01-01

    We developed a bacterial fermentation protocol for production of a stable isotope-labeled cannabinoid receptor CB2 for subsequent structural studies of this protein by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The human peripheral cannabinoid receptor was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion with maltose binding protein and two affinity tags. The fermentation was performed in defined media comprised of mineral salts, glucose and 15N2-L-tryptophan to afford incorporation of the labeled amino acid into the protein. Medium, growth and expression conditions were optimized so that the fermentation process produced about 2 mg of purified, labeled CB2 per liter of culture medium. By performing a mass spectroscopic characterization of the purified CB2, we determined that one of the two 15N atoms in tryptophan was incorporated into the recombinant protein. NMR analysis of 15N chemical shifts strongly suggests that the 15N atoms are located in Trp-indole rings. Importantly, analysis of the peptides derived from the CNBr cleavage of the purified protein confirmed a minimum of 95% incorporation of the labeled tryptophan into the CB2 sequence. The labeled CB2, purified and reconstituted into liposomes at a protein-to-lipid molar ratio of 1:500, was functional as confirmed by activation of cognate G proteins in an in vitro coupled assay. To our knowledge, this is the first reported production of a biologically active, stable isotope-labeled G protein-coupled receptor by bacterial fermentation. PMID:20044006

  17. Corneal avascularity is due to soluble VEGF receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Ambati, Balamurali K; Nozaki, Miho; Singh, Nirbhai; Takeda, Atsunobu; Jani, Pooja D; Suthar, Tushar; Albuquerque, Romulo J C; Richter, Elizabeth; Sakurai, Eiji; Newcomb, Michael T; Kleinman, Mark E; Caldwell, Ruth B; Lin, Qing; Ogura, Yuichiro; Orecchia, Angela; Samuelson, Don A; Agnew, Dalen W; St Leger, Judy; Green, W Richard; Mahasreshti, Parameshwar J; Curiel, David T; Kwan, Donna; Marsh, Helene; Ikeda, Sakae; Leiper, Lucy J; Collinson, J Martin; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Khurana, Tejvir S; Shibuya, Masabumi; Baldwin, Megan E; Ferrara, Napoleone; Gerber, Hans-Peter; De Falco, Sandro; Witta, Jassir; Baffi, Judit Z; Raisler, Brian J; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2006-10-26

    Corneal avascularity-the absence of blood vessels in the cornea-is required for optical clarity and optimal vision, and has led to the cornea being widely used for validating pro- and anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategies for many disorders. But the molecular underpinnings of the avascular phenotype have until now remained obscure and are all the more remarkable given the presence in the cornea of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, a potent stimulator of angiogenesis, and the proximity of the cornea to vascularized tissues. Here we show that the cornea expresses soluble VEGF receptor-1 (sVEGFR-1; also known as sflt-1) and that suppression of this endogenous VEGF-A trap by neutralizing antibodies, RNA interference or Cre-lox-mediated gene disruption abolishes corneal avascularity in mice. The spontaneously vascularized corneas of corn1 and Pax6+/- mice and Pax6+/- patients with aniridia are deficient in sflt-1, and recombinant sflt-1 administration restores corneal avascularity in corn1 and Pax6+/- mice. Manatees, the only known creatures uniformly to have vascularized corneas, do not express sflt-1, whereas the avascular corneas of dugongs, also members of the order Sirenia, elephants, the closest extant terrestrial phylogenetic relatives of manatees, and other marine mammals (dolphins and whales) contain sflt-1, indicating that it has a crucial, evolutionarily conserved role. The recognition that sflt-1 is essential for preserving the avascular ambit of the cornea can rationally guide its use as a platform for angiogenic modulators, supports its use in treating neovascular diseases, and might provide insight into the immunological privilege of the cornea.

  18. Ligand-induced down-regulation of the cannabinoid 1 receptor is mediated by the G-protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein GASP1.

    PubMed

    Martini, Lene; Waldhoer, Maria; Pusch, Margareta; Kharazia, Viktor; Fong, Jamie; Lee, Josephine H; Freissmuth, Clarissa; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2007-03-01

    The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) is one of the most abundant seven transmembrane (7TM) spanning/G-protein-coupled receptors in the central nervous system and plays an important role in pain transmission, feeding, and the rewarding effects of cannabis. Tolerance to cannabinoids has been widely observed after long-term use, with concomitant receptor desensitization and/or down-regulation depending on the brain region studied. Several CB1R agonists promote receptor internalization after activation, but the postendocytic sorting of the receptor has not been studied in detail. Utilizing human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells stably expressing the CB1R and primary cultured neurons expressing endogenous CB1R, we show that treatment with cannabinoid agonists results in CB1R degradation after endocytosis and that the G-protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein GASP1 plays a major role in the postendocytic sorting process. Thus, these results may identify a molecular mechanism underlying tolerance and receptor down-regulation after long-term use of cannabinoids.

  19. Cannabinoids in the treatment of pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F

    2002-06-01

    There is a large amount of evidence to support the view that the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), and cannabinoids in general, can reduce muscle spasticity and pain under some circumstances. Cannabinoid (CB1) receptors in the CNS appear to mediate both of these effects and endogenous cannabinoids may fulfil these functions to some extent under normal circumstances. However, in the context of multiple sclerosis (MS), it is still questionable whether cannabinoids are superior to existing, conventional medicationsfor the treatment of spasticity and pain. In the case of spasticity, there are too few controlled clinical trials to draw any reliable conclusion at this stage. In the case of pain, most of the available trials suggest that cannabinoids are not superior to existing treatments; however, few trials have examined chronic pain syndromes that are relevant to MS. Whether or not cannabinoids do have therapeutic potential in the treatment of MS, a further issue will be whether synthetic cannabinoids should be used in preference to cannabis itself. Smoking cannabis is associated with significant risks of lung cancer and other respiratory dysfunction. Furthermore, delta9-THC, as a broad-spectrum cannabinoid receptor agonist, will activate both CB1 and CB2 receptors. Synthetic cannabinoids, which target specific cannabinoid receptor subtypes in specific parts of the CNS, are likely to be of more therapeutic use than delta9-THC itself. If rapid absorption is necessary, such synthetic drugs could be delivered via aerosol formulations.

  20. Characterization of the intrinsic activity for a novel class of cannabinoid receptor ligands: Indole quinuclidine analogs.

    PubMed

    Franks, Lirit N; Ford, Benjamin M; Madadi, Nikhil R; Penthala, Narsimha R; Crooks, Peter A; Prather, Paul L

    2014-08-15

    Our laboratory recently reported that a group of novel indole quinuclidine analogs bind with nanomolar affinity to cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. This study characterized the intrinsic activity of these compounds by determining whether they exhibit agonist, antagonist, or inverse agonist activity at cannabinoid type-1 and/or type-2 receptors. Cannabinoid receptors activate Gi/Go-proteins that then proceed to inhibit activity of the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase. Therefore, intrinsic activity was quantified by measuring the ability of compounds to modulate levels of intracellular cAMP in intact cells. Concerning cannabinoid type-1 receptors endogenously expressed in Neuro2A cells, a single analog exhibited agonist activity, while eight acted as neutral antagonists and two possessed inverse agonist activity. For cannabinoid type-2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells, all but two analogs acted as agonists; these two exceptions exhibited inverse agonist activity. Confirming specificity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors, modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by all proposed agonists and inverse agonists was blocked by co-incubation with the neutral cannabinoid type-1 antagonist O-2050. All proposed cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonists attenuated adenylyl cyclase modulation by cannabinoid agonist CP-55,940. Specificity at cannabinoid type-2 receptors was confirmed by failure of all compounds to modulate adenylyl cyclase activity in CHO cells devoid of cannabinoid type-2 receptors. Further characterization of select analogs demonstrated concentration-dependent modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity with potencies similar to their respective affinities for cannabinoid receptors. Therefore, indole quinuclidines are a novel structural class of compounds exhibiting high affinity and a range of intrinsic activity at cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors.

  1. Characterization of the intrinsic activity for a novel class of cannabinoid receptor ligands: Indole Quinuclidine analogues

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Lirit N.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Madadi, Nikhil R.; Penthala, Narsimha R.; Crooks, Peter A.; Prather, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Our laboratory recently reported that a group of novel indole quinuclidine analogues bind with nanomolar affinity to cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. This study characterized the intrinsic activity of these compounds by determining whether they exhibit agonist, antagonist, or inverse agonist activity at cannabinoid type-1 and/or type-2 receptors. Cannabinoid receptors activate Gi/Go-proteins that then proceed to inhibit activity of the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase. Therefore, intrinsic activity was quantified by measuring the ability of compounds to modulate levels of intracellular cAMP in intact cells. Concerning cannabinoid type-1 receptors endogenously expressed in Neuro2A cells, a single analogue exhibited agonist activity, while eight acted as neutral antagonists and two possessed inverse agonist activity. For cannabinoid type-2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells, all but two analogues acted as agonists; these two exceptions exhibited inverse agonist activity. Confirming specificity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors, modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by all proposed agonists and inverse agonists was blocked by co-incubation with the neutral cannabinoid type-1 antagonist O-2050. All proposed cannabinoid type-1 receptor antagonists attenuated adenylyl cyclase modulation by cannabinoid agonist CP-55,940. Specificity at cannabinoid type-2 receptors was confirmed by failure of all compounds to modulate adenylyl cyclase activity in CHO cells devoid of cannabinoid type-2 receptors. Further characterization of select analogues demonstrated concentration-dependent modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity with potencies similar to their respective affinities for cannabinoid receptors. Therefore, indole quinuclidines are a novel structural class of compounds exhibiting high affinity and a range of intrinsic activity at cannabinoid type-1 and type-2 receptors. PMID:24858620

  2. Incretin-like effects of small molecule trace amine-associated receptor 1 agonists

    PubMed Central

    Raab, Susanne; Wang, Haiyan; Uhles, Sabine; Cole, Nadine; Alvarez-Sanchez, Ruben; Künnecke, Basil; Ullmer, Christoph; Matile, Hugues; Bedoucha, Marc; Norcross, Roger D.; Ottaway-Parker, Nickki; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Conde Knape, Karin; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Hoener, Marius C.; Sewing, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes and obesity are emerging pandemics in the 21st century creating worldwide urgency for the development of novel and safe therapies. We investigated trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) as a novel target contributing to the control of glucose homeostasis and body weight. Methods We investigated the peripheral human tissue distribution of TAAR1 by immunohistochemistry and tested the effect of a small molecule TAAR1 agonist on insulin secretion in vitro using INS1E cells and human islets and on glucose tolerance in C57Bl6, and db/db mice. Body weight effects were investigated in obese DIO mice. Results TAAR1 activation by a selective small molecule agonist increased glucose-dependent insulin secretion in INS1E cells and human islets and elevated plasma PYY and GLP-1 levels in mice. In diabetic db/db mice, the TAAR1 agonist normalized glucose excursion during an oral glucose tolerance test. Sub-chronic treatment of diet-induced obese (DIO) mice with the TAAR1 agonist resulted in reduced food intake and body weight. Furthermore insulin sensitivity was improved and plasma triglyceride levels and liver triglyceride content were lower than in controls. Conclusions We have identified TAAR1 as a novel integrator of metabolic control, which acts on gastrointestinal and pancreatic islet hormone secretion. Thus TAAR1 qualifies as a novel and promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:26844206

  3. Transferrin receptor 1 is a cellular receptor for New World haemorrhagic fever arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Abraham, Jonathan; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Kuhn, Jens H; Nguyen, Dan; Li, Wenhui; Nagel, Jane; Schmidt, Paul J; Nunberg, Jack H; Andrews, Nancy C; Farzan, Michael; Choe, Hyeryun

    2007-03-01

    At least five arenaviruses cause viral haemorrhagic fevers in humans. Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus, uses the cellular receptor alpha-dystroglycan to infect cells. Machupo, Guanarito, Junin and Sabia viruses are New World haemorrhagic fever viruses that do not use alpha-dystroglycan. Here we show a specific, high-affinity association between transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and the entry glycoprotein (GP) of Machupo virus. Expression of human TfR1, but not human transferrin receptor 2, in hamster cell lines markedly enhanced the infection of viruses pseudotyped with the GP of Machupo, Guanarito and Junin viruses, but not with those of Lassa or lymphocytic choriomeningitis viruses. An anti-TfR1 antibody efficiently inhibited the replication of Machupo, Guanarito, Junin and Sabia viruses, but not that of Lassa virus. Iron depletion of culture medium enhanced, and iron supplementation decreased, the efficiency of infection by Junin and Machupo but not Lassa pseudoviruses. These data indicate that TfR1 is a cellular receptor for New World haemorrhagic fever arenaviruses.

  4. Lasting impacts of prenatal cannabis exposure and the role of endogenous cannabinoids in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Jew, Christopher P; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2011-07-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit substance among pregnant women. Human epidemiological and animal studies have found that prenatal cannabis exposure influences brain development and can have long-lasting impacts on cognitive functions. Exploration of the therapeutic potential of cannabis-based medicines and synthetic cannabinoid compounds has given us much insight into the physiological roles of endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids) and their receptors. In this article, we examine human longitudinal cohort studies that document the long-term influence of prenatal exposure to cannabis, followed by an overview of the molecular composition of the endocannabinoid system and the temporal and spatial changes in their expression during brain development. How endocannabinoid signaling modulates fundamental developmental processes such as cell proliferation, neurogenesis, migration and axonal pathfinding are also summarized.

  5. JWH018, a common constituent of ‘Spice’ herbal blends, is a potent and efficacious cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Brady K; Huffman, John; Straiker, Alex; Mackie, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: ‘Spice’ is an herbal blend primarily marketed in Europe as a mild hallucinogen with prominent cannabis-like effects and as a legal alternative to cannabis. However, a recent report identified a number of synthetic additives in samples of ‘Spice’. One of these, the indole derivative JWH018, is a ligand for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) cannabinoid receptor and inhibits cAMP production in CB1 receptor-expressing CHO cells. Other effects of JWH018 on CB1 receptor-mediated signalling are not known, particularly in neurons. Here we have evaluated the signalling pathways activated by JWH018 at CB1 receptors. Experimental approach: We investigated the effects of JWH018 on neurotransmission in cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons. We further analysed its activation of ERK1/2 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and internalization of CB1 receptors in HEK293 cells stably expressing this receptor. Key results: In cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons, JWH018 potently inhibited excitatory postsynaptic currents (IC50= 14.9 nM) in a concentration- and CB1 receptor-dependent manner. Furthermore, it increased ERK1/2 MAPK phosphorylation (EC50= 4.4 nM). We also found that JWH018 potently induced rapid and robust CB1 receptor internalization (EC50= 2.8 nM; t1/2= 17.3 min). Conclusions and implications: JWH018, a prominent component of several herbal preparations marketed for their psychoactivity, is a potent and effective CB1 receptor agonist that activates multiple CB1 receptor signalling pathways. Thus, it is likely that the subjective effects of ‘Spice’ are due to activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors by JWH018, added to this herbal preparation. PMID:20100276

  6. The Structure-Function Relationships of Classical Cannabinoids: CB1/CB2 Modulation.

    PubMed

    Bow, Eric W; Rimoldi, John M

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoids are members of a deceptively simple class of terpenophenolic secondary metabolites isolated from Cannabis sativa highlighted by (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), eliciting distinct pharmacological effects mediated largely by cannabinoid receptor (CB1 or CB2) signaling. Since the initial discovery of THC and related cannabinoids, synthetic and semisynthetic classical cannabinoid analogs have been evaluated to help define receptor binding modes and structure-CB1/CB2 functional activity relationships. This perspective will examine the classical cannabinoids, with particular emphasis on the structure-activity relationship of five regions: C3 side chain, phenolic hydroxyl, aromatic A-ring, pyran B-ring, and cyclohexenyl C-ring. Cumulative structure-activity relationship studies to date have helped define the critical structural elements required for potency and selectivity toward CB1 and CB2 and, more importantly, ushered the discovery and development of contemporary nonclassical cannabinoid modulators with enhanced physicochemical and pharmacological profiles. PMID:27398024

  7. Cannabinoid Ligands and Alcohol Addiction: A Promising Therapeutic Tool or a Humbug?

    PubMed

    Kleczkowska, Patrycja; Smaga, Irena; Filip, Małgorzata; Bujalska-Zadrozny, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The vast therapeutic potential of cannabinoids of both synthetic and plant-derived origins currently makes these compounds the focus of a growing interest. Although cannabinoids are still illicit drugs, their possible clinical usefulness, including treatment of acute or neuropathic pain, have been suggested by several studies. In addition, some observations indicate that cannabinoid receptor antagonists may be useful for the treatment of alcohol dependence and addiction, which is a major health concern worldwide. While the synergism between alcohol and cannabinoid agonists (in various forms) creates undesirable side effects when the two are consumed together, the administration of CB1 antagonists leads to a significant reduction in alcohol consumption. Furthermore, cannabinoid antagonists also mitigate alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Herein, we present an overview of studies focusing on the effects of cannabinoid ligands (agonists and antagonists) during acute or chronic consumption of ethanol.

  8. Use of cannabinoid receptor agonists in cancer therapy as palliative and curative agents.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, Simona; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Grimaldi, Claudia; Santoro, Antonietta; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2009-02-01

    Cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa) and their derivatives have received renewed interest in recent years due to their diverse pharmacological activities. In particular, cannabinoids offer potential applications as anti-tumour drugs, based on the ability of some members of this class of compounds to limit cell proliferation and to induce tumour-selective cell death. Although synthetic cannabinoids may have pro-tumour effects in vivo due to their immunosuppressive properties, predominantly inhibitory effects on tumour growth and migration, angiogenesis, metastasis, and also inflammation have been described. Emerging evidence suggests that agonists of cannabinoid receptors expressed by tumour cells may offer a novel strategy to treat cancer. In this chapter we review the more recent results generating interest in the field of cannabinoids and cancer, and provide novel suggestions for the development, exploration and use of cannabinoid agonists for cancer therapy, not only as palliative but also as curative drugs.

  9. The Structure–Function Relationships of Classical Cannabinoids: CB1/CB2 Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bow, Eric W.; Rimoldi, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoids are members of a deceptively simple class of terpenophenolic secondary metabolites isolated from Cannabis sativa highlighted by (−)-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), eliciting distinct pharmacological effects mediated largely by cannabinoid receptor (CB1 or CB2) signaling. Since the initial discovery of THC and related cannabinoids, synthetic and semisynthetic classical cannabinoid analogs have been evaluated to help define receptor binding modes and structure–CB1/CB2 functional activity relationships. This perspective will examine the classical cannabinoids, with particular emphasis on the structure–activity relationship of five regions: C3 side chain, phenolic hydroxyl, aromatic A-ring, pyran B-ring, and cyclohexenyl C-ring. Cumulative structure–activity relationship studies to date have helped define the critical structural elements required for potency and selectivity toward CB1 and CB2 and, more importantly, ushered the discovery and development of contemporary nonclassical cannabinoid modulators with enhanced physicochemical and pharmacological profiles. PMID:27398024

  10. Cannabinoid receptors in developing rats: detection of mRNA and receptor binding.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C R; Martin, B R; Compton, D R; Abood, M E

    1994-08-01

    Despite a large body of research directed at assessing the effects of perinatal cannabinoid exposure, little is known about the development of the cannabinoid receptor. Recent advances, including the cloning of the cannabinoid receptor, have afforded us the opportunity to plot the postnatal ontogeny of the cannabinoid receptor and its mRNA in whole brain using the methods of receptor binding and RNA blot hybridization, respectively. Our results indicate that cannabinoid receptor mRNA is present at adult levels as early as postnatal day 3. The Bmax, on the other hand, increases almost fifty percent with increasing postnatal age, while the affinity does not change. The Hill coefficients for all ages studied were approximately 1. These findings suggest the possibility of a developmental progression for cannabinoid receptor development with receptor mRNA appearing first, followed by a period of rapid proliferation of the receptors themselves. PMID:7988356

  11. Effects of Pubertal Cannabinoid Administration on Attentional Set-Shifting and Dopaminergic Hyper-Responsivity in a Developmental Disruption Model of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Francisco S.; Grace, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adolescent exposure to cannabinoids in vulnerable individuals is proposed to be a risk factor for psychiatric conditions later in life, particularly schizophrenia. Evidence from studies in animals has indicated that a combination of repeated pubertal cannabinoid administration with either neonatal prefrontocortical lesion, isolation rearing, or chronic NMDA receptor antagonism administration induces enhanced schizophrenia-like behavioral disruptions. The effects of adolescent exposure to CB1 receptor agonists, however, have not been tested in a developmental disruption model of schizophrenia. Methods: This was tested in the methylazoxymethanol (MAM) model, in which repeated treatment with the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN; 1.2mg/kg) was extended over 25 days throughout puberty (postnatal days 40–65) in control and MAM rats. The rats received 20 injections, which were delivered irregularly to mimic the human condition. Adult rats were tested for attentional set-shifting task and locomotor response to amphetamine, which was compared with in vivo recording from ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. Results: MAM-treated rats showed impairment in the attentional set-shifting task, augmented locomotor response to amphetamine administration, and an increased number of spontaneously active DA neurons in the VTA. Interestingly, pubertal WIN treatment in normal animals induced similar changes at adulthood as those observed in MAM-treated rats, supporting the notion that adolescence exposure to cannabinoids may represent a risk factor for developing schizophrenia-like signs at adulthood. However, contrary to expectations, pubertal WIN administration did not exacerbate the behavioral and electrophysiological changes in MAM-treated rats beyond that observed in WIN-treated saline rats (Sal). Indeed, WIN treatment actually attenuated the locomotor response to amphetamine in MAM rats without impacting DA neuron activity states

  12. [Synthetic cannabinoids--the new "legal high" drugs].

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, Ronny; Arieli, Mickey; Marom, Eli

    2011-12-01

    Recently, a new Law, named the "derivative law" (first addition, schedule drug change--2010), was accepted in the Israeli parliament. It will mean that dangerous substances that are closely related structurally to a drug that is listed in the dangerous drugs ordinance will automatically enter the dangerous drugs ordinance. The dangerous drugs that were sold in kiosks were related to 4 major groups: Amphetamines, methamphetamines, cathinone and methcathinone. Over 90% of the substances known as "legal highs" or "hagigat" belong to these groups. Before the law was accepted, merchandisers and clandestine Laboratories took advantage of a state in which every small molecular change in a controlled substance of amphetamines, methamphetamines, cathinone and methcathinone required a long legal process in order to include the new substance in the controlled substance law. During this process, we believe that public health was endangered. The chemists and merchandisers found a new solution to "legally" bypass the "derivative law", by marketing a new group of substances named "synthetic cannabinoids". The synthetic cannabinoids do not resemble the chemical structure of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC] which appears in marijuana or hashish, but affects the body in the same manner and according to the literature, are five times more potent. The synthetic cannabinoids are sold in Israel under different nicknames such as: "Mabsuton", "Mr. Nice Guy", "Spice", "Sabbaba" and "Lemon Grass". The substance can be used in different ways such as smoking, inhaling or swallowing. The use of synthetic cannabinoids causes side effects that include: euphoria, dizziness, headache, thirst, paranoia, insomnia, fatigue and disturbed vision. Cases of hospital admission in Israel due to the use of these substances have been reported. The symptoms included psychiatric disturbances. In an urgent meeting of the multi-ministry committee on psychotropic substances held in December 2010 in the Israel Anti

  13. Protease Activated Receptor-1 Deficiency Diminishes Bleomycin-Induced Skin Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duitman, JanWillem; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta R; Shi, Kun; de Boer, Onno J; Borensztajn, Keren S; Florquin, Sandrine; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Spek, C Arnold

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) plays an important role in the development of fibrosis, including lung fibrosis. However, whether PAR-1 also plays a role in the development of skin fibrosis remains elusive. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PAR-1 in the development of skin fibrosis. To explore possible mechanisms by which PAR-1 could play a role, human dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes were stimulated with specific PAR-1 agonists or antagonists. To investigate the role of PAR-1 in skin fibrosis, we subjected wild-type and PAR-1-deficient mice to a model of bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis. PAR-1 activation leads to increased proliferation and extra cellular matrix (ECM) production, but not migration of human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) in vitro. Moreover, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β production was increased in keratinocytes upon PAR-1 activation, but not in HDF. The loss of PAR-1 in vivo significantly attenuated bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis. The bleomycin-induced increase in dermal thickness and ECM production was reduced significantly in PAR-1-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, TGF-β expression and the number of proliferating fibroblasts were reduced in PAR-1-deficient mice although the difference did not reach statistical significance. This study demonstrates that PAR-1 contributes to the development of skin fibrosis and we suggest that PAR-1 potentiates the fibrotic response mainly by inducing fibroblast proliferation and ECM production. PMID:24842054

  14. Oxytocin receptor and vasopressin receptor 1a genes are respectively associated with emotional and cognitive empathy.

    PubMed

    Uzefovsky, F; Shalev, I; Israel, S; Edelman, S; Raz, Y; Mankuta, D; Knafo-Noam, A; Ebstein, R P

    2015-01-01

    Empathy is the ability to recognize and share in the emotions of others. It can be considered a multifaceted concept with cognitive and emotional aspects. Little is known regarding the underlying neurochemistry of empathy and in the current study we used a neurogenetic approach to explore possible brain neurotransmitter pathways contributing to cognitive and emotional empathy. Both the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) and the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) genes contribute to social cognition in both animals and humans and hence are prominent candidates for contributing to empathy. The following research examined the associations between polymorphisms in these two genes and individual differences in emotional and cognitive empathy in a sample of 367 young adults. Intriguingly, we found that emotional empathy was associated solely with OXTR, whereas cognitive empathy was associated solely with AVPR1a. Moreover, no interaction was observed between the two genes and measures of empathy. The current findings contribute to our understanding of the distinct neurogenetic pathways involved in cognitive and emotional empathy and underscore the pervasive role of both oxytocin and vasopressin in modulating human emotions.

  15. Malaria inhibits surface expression of complement receptor-1 in monocyte/macrophages causing decreased immunecomplex internalization

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Arias, Cristina; Lopez, Jean Pierre; Hernandez-Perez, Jean Nikolae; Bautista-Ojeda, Maria Dolores; Branch, OraLee; Rodriguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) expressed on the surface of phagocytic cells binds complement-bound IC playing an important role in the clearance of circulating immunecomplexes (IC). This receptor is critical to prevent accumulation of IC, which can contribute to inflammatory pathology. Accumulation of circulating IC is frequently observed during malaria, although the factors contributing to this accumulation are not clearly understood. We have observed that the surface expression of CR1 on monocyte/macrophages and B cells is strongly reduced in mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model. Monocyte/macrophages from these infected mice present a specific inhibition of complement-mediated internalization of IC caused by the decreased CR1 expression. Accordingly, mice show accumulation of circulating IC and deposition of IC in the kidneys that inversely correlates with the decrease in CR1 surface expression. Our results indicate that malaria induces a significant decrease on surface CR1 expression in the monocyte/macrophage population that results in deficient internalization of IC by monocyte/macrophages. To determine whether this phenomenon is found in human malaria patients, we have analyzed 92 patients infected with either P. falciparum (22) or P. vivax (70), the most prevalent human malaria parasites. The levels of surface CR1 on peripheral monocyte/macrophages and B cells of these patients show a significant decrease compared to uninfected control individuals in the same area. We propose that this decrease in CR1 plays an essential role in impaired IC clearance during malaria. PMID:23440418

  16. Cannabinoid-Induced Changes in the Activity of Electron Transport Chain Complexes of Brain Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the activity of individual mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II/III, IV) and citrate synthase induced by pharmacologically different cannabinoids. In vitro effects of selected cannabinoids on mitochondrial enzymes were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Both cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, anandamide, and R-(+)-WIN55,212-2, and antagonist/inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptors, AM251, and cannabidiol were examined in pig brain mitochondria. Different effects of these cannabinoids on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase were found. Citrate synthase activity was decreased only by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and AM251. Significant increase in the complex I activity was induced by anandamide. At micromolar concentration, all the tested cannabinoids inhibited the activity of electron transport chain complexes II/III and IV. Stimulatory effect of anandamide on activity of complex I may participate on distinct physiological effects of endocannabinoids compared to phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids. Common inhibitory effect of cannabinoids on activity of complex II/III and IV confirmed a non-receptor-mediated mechanism of cannabinoid action on individual components of system of oxidative phosphorylation.

  17. Synthetic Cannabinoid Induced acute Tubulointerstitial Nephritis and Uveitis Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Vedat; Kockar, Alev; Ecder, Tevfik

    2016-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial Nephritis with Uveitis (TINU) syndrome is a rarely seen syndrome. The interstitial nephritis may be with the concurrent uveitis and can also develop before or after uveitis. The syndrome can resolve after elimination of the culprit destructive factors, such as drugs, toxins and immune reaction. Synthetic cannabinoids have emerged as drugs of abuse with increasing popularity among young adults. Recent literature has documented reports of acute kidney injury in association with the use of synthetic cannabinoids; however, there is no report of TINU syndrome development secondary to using of synthetic cannabinoids. Herein, we report a 42-year-old male with TINU syndrome associated with smoking synthetic cannabinoid. PMID:27437289

  18. Analysis of Parent Synthetic Cannabinoids in Blood and Urinary Metabolites by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Jessica L; Holler, Justin M; Chmiel, Jeffrey D; Vorce, Shawn P; Magluilo, Joseph; Levine, Barry; Ramos, Gerardo; Bosy, Thomas Z

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids emerged on the designer drug market in recent years due to their ability to produce cannabis-like effects without the risk of detection by traditional drug testing techniques such as immunoassay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As government agencies work to schedule existing synthetic cannabinoids, new, unregulated and structurally diverse compounds continue to be developed and sold. Synthetic cannabinoids undergo extensive metabolic conversion. Consequently, both blood and urine specimens may play an important role in the forensic analysis of synthetic cannabinoids. It has been observed that structurally similar synthetic cannabinoids follow common metabolic pathways, which often produce metabolites with similar metabolic transformations. Presented are two validated quantitative methods for extracting and identifying 15 parent synthetic cannabinoids in blood, 17 synthetic cannabinoid metabolites in urine and the qualitative identification of 2 additional parent compounds. The linear range for most synthetic cannabinoid compounds monitored was 0.1-10 ng/mL with the limit of detection between 0.01 and 0.5 ng/mL. Selectivity, specificity, accuracy, precision, recovery and matrix effect were also examined and determined to be acceptable for each compound. The validated methods were used to analyze a compilation of synthetic cannabinoid investigative cases where both blood and urine specimens were submitted. The study suggests a strong correlation between the metabolites detected in urine and the parent compounds found in blood. PMID:26792810

  19. The potential for clinical use of cannabinoids in treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Durst, Ronen; Lotan, Chaim

    2011-02-01

    Cannabinoids, the constituents of the marijuana plant and their analogs, have not only neurobehavioral but also cardiovascular effects. Great advances in the last couple of decades have led to better understanding of the physiological effects of the cannabinoids and of their role in various cardiovascular pathologies. The potential therapeutic use of cannabinoids in various cardiac diseases, such as ischemic injury, heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias, has been studied in animal models. The purpose of this article is to review the physiological cardiovascular properties of cannabinoids and to summarize the knowledge related to their potential therapeutic use. PMID:20946323

  20. Synthetic Cannabinoid Induced acute Tubulointerstitial Nephritis and Uveitis Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Sinangil, Ayse; Celik, Vedat; Kockar, Alev; Ecder, Tevfik

    2016-05-01

    Tubulointerstitial Nephritis with Uveitis (TINU) syndrome is a rarely seen syndrome. The interstitial nephritis may be with the concurrent uveitis and can also develop before or after uveitis. The syndrome can resolve after elimination of the culprit destructive factors, such as drugs, toxins and immune reaction. Synthetic cannabinoids have emerged as drugs of abuse with increasing popularity among young adults. Recent literature has documented reports of acute kidney injury in association with the use of synthetic cannabinoids; however, there is no report of TINU syndrome development secondary to using of synthetic cannabinoids. Herein, we report a 42-year-old male with TINU syndrome associated with smoking synthetic cannabinoid. PMID:27437289

  1. The Role of Cannabinoids in Modulating Emotional and Non-Emotional Memory Processes in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Akirav, Irit

    2011-01-01

    Cannabinoid agonists generally have a disruptive effect on memory, learning, and operant behavior that is considered to be hippocampus-dependent. Nevertheless, under certain conditions, cannabinoid receptor activation may facilitate neuronal learning processes. For example, CB1 receptors are essential for the extinction of conditioned fear associations, indicating an important role for this receptor in neuronal emotional learning and memory. This review examines the diverse effects of cannabinoids on hippocampal memory and plasticity. It shows how the effects of cannabinoid receptor activation may vary depending on the route of administration, the nature of the task (aversive or not), and whether it involves emotional memory formation (e.g., conditioned fear and extinction learning) or non-emotional memory formation (e.g., spatial learning). It also examines the memory stage under investigation (acquisition, consolidation, retrieval, extinction), and the brain areas involved. Differences between the effects of exogenous and endogenous agonists are also discussed. The apparently biphasic effects of cannabinoids on anxiety is noted as this implies that the effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on hippocampal learning and memory may be attributable to a general modulation of anxiety or stress levels and not to memory per se. The review concludes that cannabinoids have diverse effects on hippocampal memory and plasticity that cannot be categorized simply into an impairing or an enhancing effect. A better understanding of the involvement of cannabinoids in memory processes will help determine whether the benefits of the clinical use of cannabinoids outweigh the risks of possible memory impairments. PMID:21734875

  2. 3′-Functionalized Adamantyl Cannabinoid Receptor Probes

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Go; Tius, Marcus A.; Zhou, Han; Nikas, Spyros P.; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Mallipeddi, Srikrishnan; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    The aliphatic side chain plays a pivotal role in determining the cannabinergic potency of tricyclic classical cannabinoids, and we have previously shown that this chain could be substituted successfully by adamantyl or other polycyclic groups. In an effort to explore the pharmacophoric features of these conformationally fixed groups, we have synthesized a series of analogues in which the C3 position is substituted directly with an adamantyl group bearing functionality at one of the tertiary carbon atoms. These substituents included the electrophilic isothiocyanate and photoactivatable azido groups, both of which are capable of covalent attachment with the target protein. Our results show that substitution at the 3′-adamantyl position can lead to ligands with improved affinities and CB1/CB2 selectivities. Our work has also led to the development of two successful covalent probes with high affinities for both cannabinoid receptors, namely, the electrophilic isothiocyanate AM994 and the photoactivatable aliphatic azido AM993 analogues. PMID:25760146

  3. Sexually Dimorphic Effects of Cannabinoid Compounds on Emotion and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of sex differences in the response to cannabinoid compounds focusing mainly on behaviors belonging to the cognitive and emotional sphere. Sexual dimorphism exists in the different components of the endocannabinoid system. Males seem to have higher CB1 receptor binding sites than females, but females seem to possess more efficient CB1 receptors. Differences between sexes have been also observed in the metabolic processing of THC, the main psychoactive ingredient of marijuana. The consistent dimorphism in the endocannabinoid system and THC metabolism may justify at least in part the different sensitivity observed between male and female animals in different behavioral paradigms concerning emotion and cognition after treatment with cannabinoid compounds. On the basis of these observations, we would like to emphasize the need of including females in basic research and to analyze results for sex differences in epidemiological studies. PMID:21991251

  4. The Wide and Unpredictable Scope of Synthetic Cannabinoids Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Blaak, Christa; Tam, Eric; Rajayer, Salil; Morante, Joaquin; Yeh, Angela; Butala, Ashvin

    2015-01-01

    Drug use and abuse continue to be a large public health concern worldwide. Over the past decade, novel or atypical drugs have emerged and become increasingly popular. In the recent past, compounds similar to tetrahydrocannabinoid (THC), the active ingredient of marijuana, have been synthetically produced and offered commercially as legal substances. Since the initial communications of their abuse in 2008, few case reports have been published illustrating the misuse of these substances with signs and symptoms of intoxication. Even though synthetic cannabinoids have been restricted, they are still readily available across USA and their use has been dramatically increasing, with a concomitant increment in reports to poison control centers and emergency department (ED) visits. We describe a case of acute hypoxemic/hypercapnic respiratory failure as a consequence of acute congestive heart failure (CHF) developed from myocardial stunning resulting from a non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) following the consumption of synthetic cannabinoids. PMID:26788376

  5. Synthetic Cannabinoid ‘Bonzai’ Intoxication: Six Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ergül, Dursun Fırat; Ekemen, Serdar; Yelken, Birgül Büyükkıdan

    2015-01-01

    In the language of the streets, ‘bonzai’, known as ‘1-naphthalenyl of methanol’, also known as JWH-18 group, is a drug belonging to the group of synthetic cannabinoids. At the beginning of 2004, it started to be sold on the internet and it is seen that private markets. It has structurally similar chemical characteristics as delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active substance in marijuana. In 2013, in a study conducted by the European Monitoring Centre of Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA), 102 varieties of synthetic cannabinoids were identified; however, more than 200 substances have been reported since 1997. In this study, we report the difficulties in the clinical course, treatment and management of six patients that had a use history of bonzai although it was not detected in blood in a short period of time in the intensive care unit. PMID:27366526

  6. Endogenous and Synthetic Cannabinoids as Therapeutics in Retinal Disease.

    PubMed

    Kokona, Despina; Georgiou, Panagiota-Christina; Kounenidakis, Mihalis; Kiagiadaki, Foteini; Thermos, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    The functional significance of cannabinoids in ocular physiology and disease has been reported some decades ago. In the early 1970s, subjects who smoked Cannabis sativa developed lower intraocular pressure (IOP). This led to the isolation of phytocannabinoids from this plant and the study of their therapeutic effects in glaucoma. The main treatment of this disease to date involves the administration of drugs mediating either the decrease of aqueous humour synthesis or the increase of its outflow and thus reduces IOP. However, the reduction of IOP is not sufficient to prevent visual field loss. Retinal diseases, such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, have been defined as neurodegenerative diseases and characterized by ischemia-induced excitotoxicity and loss of retinal neurons. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies must be applied in order to target retinal cell death, reduction of visual acuity, and blindness. The aim of the present review is to address the neuroprotective and therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in retinal disease. PMID:26881135

  7. The Wide and Unpredictable Scope of Synthetic Cannabinoids Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Jose; Blaak, Christa; Tam, Eric; Rajayer, Salil; Morante, Joaquin; Yeh, Angela; Butala, Ashvin

    2015-01-01

    Drug use and abuse continue to be a large public health concern worldwide. Over the past decade, novel or atypical drugs have emerged and become increasingly popular. In the recent past, compounds similar to tetrahydrocannabinoid (THC), the active ingredient of marijuana, have been synthetically produced and offered commercially as legal substances. Since the initial communications of their abuse in 2008, few case reports have been published illustrating the misuse of these substances with signs and symptoms of intoxication. Even though synthetic cannabinoids have been restricted, they are still readily available across USA and their use has been dramatically increasing, with a concomitant increment in reports to poison control centers and emergency department (ED) visits. We describe a case of acute hypoxemic/hypercapnic respiratory failure as a consequence of acute congestive heart failure (CHF) developed from myocardial stunning resulting from a non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) following the consumption of synthetic cannabinoids. PMID:26788376

  8. Bioactive prenylogous cannabinoid from fiber hemp (Cannabis sativa).

    PubMed

    Pollastro, Federica; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Allarà, Marco; Muñoz, Eduardo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Appendino, Giovani

    2011-09-23

    The waxy fraction from the variety Carma of fiber hemp (Cannabis sativa) afforded the unusual cannabinoid 4, identified as the farnesyl prenylogue of cannabigerol (CBG, 1) on the basis of its spectroscopic properties. A comparative study of the profile of 4 and 1 toward metabotropic (CB1, CB2) and ionotropic (TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPM8, TRPA1) targets of phytocannabinoids showed that prenylogation increased potency toward CB2 by ca. 5-fold, with no substantial difference toward the other end-points, except for a decreased affinity for TRPM8. The isolation of 4 suggests that C. sativa could contain yet-to-be-discovered prenylogous versions of medicinally relevant cannabinoids, for which their biological profiles could offer interesting opportunities for biomedical exploitation.

  9. Synthetic cannabinoid and cathinone use among US soldiers.

    PubMed

    Berry-Cabán, Cristóbal S; Kleinschmidt, Paul E; Rao, Dinesh S; Jenkins, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    New hallucinogenic drugs of abuse, known generically as "spice" and "bath salts," have become readily available in the United States. Spice is one of many names that refers to a variety of synthetic cannabinoids that act on the body in a way similar to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). A large and complex variety of synthetic cannabinoids, most often cannabicyclohexanol, JWH-018, JWH-073, or HU-210, are used in an attempt to avoid the laws that make cannabis illegal, making synthetic cannabis a designer drug. Bath salts, on the other hand, is one of many names for a group of cathinone-containing hallucinogens that produces sympathomimetic effects in its users. Both have become popular among those seeking chemical euphorias with decreased chance of detection. Consequently, both have become a problem for maintaining mentally fit Soldiers, unit readiness, and morale in the US armed forces.

  10. Acute Intoxication Caused by a Synthetic Cannabinoid in Two Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Travis S.; Burroughs, Zachary; Thompson, A. Jill; Tecklenburg, Frederick W.

    2012-01-01

    Illicit drug use continues to be a common problem among pediatric patients. Daily marijuana use among high school seniors is currently at a 30-year high. Marijuana use in adults has rarely been associated with cardiovascular adverse effects, including hypertension, tachycardia, arrhythmia, and myocardial infarction. Recently, abuse of synthetic cannabinoids, such as the incense “K2” or “Spice,” has been increasingly reported in the lay press and medical literature. Overdose and chronic use of these substances may cause adverse effects including altered mental status, tachycardia, and loss of consciousness. Overdoses in adult patients have been described; however, limited reports in the pediatric population have been documented. A recent case series describes myocardial infarctions in pediatric patients, associated with synthetic cannabinoid use. In this report, we describe two adolescent patients admitted after they inhaled “K2,” resulting in loss of consciousness, tachycardia, and diffuse pain. PMID:23118671

  11. Cannabinoids As Potential Treatment for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting.

    PubMed

    Rock, Erin M; Parker, Linda A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advent of classic anti-emetics, chemotherapy-induced nausea is still problematic, with vomiting being somewhat better managed in the clinic. If post-treatment nausea and vomiting are not properly controlled, anticipatory nausea-a conditioned response to the contextual cues associated with illness-inducing chemotherapy-can develop. Once it develops, anticipatory nausea is refractive to current anti-emetics, highlighting the need for alternative treatment options. One of the first documented medicinal uses of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) was for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), and recent evidence is accumulating to suggest a role for the endocannabinoid system in modulating CINV. Here, we review studies assessing the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids and manipulations of the endocannabinoid system in human patients and pre-clinical animal models of nausea and vomiting. PMID:27507945

  12. Estrogens and Spermiogenesis: New Insights from Type 1 Cannabinoid Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cacciola, Giovanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo; Cobellis, Gilda

    2013-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex mechanism which allows the production of male gametes; it consists of mitotic, meiotic, and differentiation phases. Spermiogenesis is the terminal differentiation process during which haploid round spermatids undergo several biochemical and morphological changes, including extensive remodelling of chromatin and nuclear shape. Spermiogenesis is under control of endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors, like gonadotropins and testosterone. More recently, emerging pieces of evidence are suggesting that, among these factors, estrogens may have a role. To date, this is a matter of debate and concern because of the agonistic and antagonistic estrogenic effects that environmental chemicals may have on animal and human with damaging outcome on fertility. In this review, we summarize data which fuel this debate, with a particular attention to our recent results, obtained using type 1 cannabinoid receptor knockout male mice as animal model. PMID:24324492

  13. Cannabinoids As Potential Treatment for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Erin M.; Parker, Linda A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advent of classic anti-emetics, chemotherapy-induced nausea is still problematic, with vomiting being somewhat better managed in the clinic. If post-treatment nausea and vomiting are not properly controlled, anticipatory nausea—a conditioned response to the contextual cues associated with illness-inducing chemotherapy—can develop. Once it develops, anticipatory nausea is refractive to current anti-emetics, highlighting the need for alternative treatment options. One of the first documented medicinal uses of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) was for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), and recent evidence is accumulating to suggest a role for the endocannabinoid system in modulating CINV. Here, we review studies assessing the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids and manipulations of the endocannabinoid system in human patients and pre-clinical animal models of nausea and vomiting. PMID:27507945

  14. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome: a guide for the practising clinician.

    PubMed

    Bajgoric, Sanjin; Samra, Kiran; Chandrapalan, Subashini; Gautam, Nishant

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the world. The medicinal value of cannabis as an antiemetic is well known by the medical fraternity. A less well-recognised entity is the potential for certain chronic users to develop hyperemesis. We describe the case of a young man who presented to us with features of cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. We review the current literature on this condition, its pathogenesis and management. PMID:26698198

  15. Cannabinoid-Induced Chemotaxis in Bovine Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murataeva, Natalia; Li, Shimin; Oehler, Olivia; Miller, Sally; Dhopeshwarkar, Amey; Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Bonanno, Joseph A.; Bradshaw, Heather; Mackie, Ken; McHugh, Douglas; Straiker, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors are found in abundance in the vertebrate eye, with most tissue types expressing this receptor. However, the function of CB1 receptors in corneal epithelial cells (CECs) is poorly understood. Interestingly, the corneas of CB1 knockout mice heal more slowly after injury via a mechanism proposed to involve protein kinase B (Akt) activation, chemokinesis, and cell proliferation. The current study examined the role of cannabinoids in CEC migration in greater detail. Methods. We determined the role of CB1 receptors in corneal healing. We examined the consequences of their activation on migration and proliferation in bovine CECs (bCECs). We additionally examined the mRNA profile of cannabinoid-related genes and CB1 protein expression as well as CB1 signaling in bovine CECs. Results. We now report that activation of CB1 with physiologically relevant concentrations of the synthetic agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN) induces bCEC migration via chemotaxis, an effect fully blocked by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716. The endogenous agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) also enhances migration. Separately, mRNA for most cannabinoid-related proteins are present in bovine corneal epithelium and cultured bCECs. Notably absent are CB2 receptors and the 2-AG synthesizing enzyme diglycerol lipase-α (DAGLα). The signaling profile of CB1 activation is complex, with inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Lastly, CB1 activation does not induce bCEC proliferation, but may instead antagonize EGF-induced proliferation. Conclusions. In summary, we find that CB1-based signaling machinery is present in bovine cornea and that activation of this system induces chemotaxis. PMID:26024113

  16. The endogenous cannabinoid system protects against colonic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Federico; Marsicano, Giovanni; Hermann, Heike; Cannich, Astrid; Monory, Krisztina; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Sibaev, Andrei; Storr, Martin; Lutz, Beat

    2004-01-01

    Excessive inflammatory responses can emerge as a potential danger for organisms’ health. Physiological balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory processes constitutes an important feature of responses against harmful events. Here, we show that cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1) mediate intrinsic protective signals that counteract proinflammatory responses. Both intrarectal infusion of 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) and oral administration of dextrane sulfate sodium induced stronger inflammation in CB1-deficient mice (CB1–/–) than in wild-type littermates (CB1+/+). Treatment of wild-type mice with the specific CB1 antagonist N-(piperidino-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A) mimicked the phenotype of CB1–/– mice, showing an acute requirement of CB1 receptors for protection from inflammation. Consistently, treatment with the cannabinoid receptor agonist R(-)-7-hydroxy-Δ6-tetra-hydrocannabinol-dimethylheptyl (HU210) or genetic ablation of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) resulted in protection against DNBS-induced colitis. Electrophysiological recordings from circular smooth muscle cells, performed 8 hours after DNBS treatment, revealed spontaneous oscillatory action potentials in CB1–/– but not in CB1+/+ colons, indicating an early CB1-mediated control of inflammation-induced irritation of smooth muscle cells. DNBS treatment increased the percentage of myenteric neurons expressing CB1 receptors, suggesting an enhancement of cannabinoid signaling during colitis. Our results indicate that the endogenous cannabinoid system represents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of intestinal disease conditions characterized by excessive inflammatory responses. PMID:15085199

  17. Juvenile cannabinoid treatment induces frontostriatal gliogenesis in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Bortolato, Marco; Bini, Valentina; Frau, Roberto; Devoto, Paola; Pardu, Alessandra; Fan, Yijun; Solbrig, Marylou V

    2014-06-01

    Cannabis abuse in adolescence is associated with a broad array of phenotypical consequences, including a higher risk for schizophrenia and other mental disturbances related to dopamine (DA) imbalances. The great variability of these sequelae likely depends on the key influence of diverse genetic vulnerability factors. Inbred rodent strains afford a highly informative tool to study the contribution of genetic determinants to the long-term effects of juvenile cannabinoid exposure. In this study, we analyzed the phenotypical impact of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN; 2mg/kg/day from postnatal day 35-48) in adolescent Lewis rats, an inbred strain exhibiting resistance to psychotomimetic effects of environmental manipulations. At the end of this treatment, WIN-injected animals displayed increased survival of new cells (mainly oligodendroglia precursors) in the striatum and prefrontal cortex (PFC), two key terminal fields of DAergic pathways. To test whether these changes may be associated with enduring behavioral alterations, we examined the consequences of adolescent WIN treatment in adulthood (postnatal days 60-70), with respect to DA levels and metabolism as well as multiple behavioral paradigms. Rats injected with WIN exhibited increased turnover, but not levels, of striatal DA. In addition, cannabinoid-treated animals displayed increases in acoustic startle latency and novel-object exploration; however, WIN treatment failed to induce overt deficits of sensorimotor gating and social interaction. These results indicate that, in Lewis rats, juvenile cannabinoid exposure leads to alterations in frontostriatal gliogenesis, as well as select behavioral alterations time-locked to high DAergic metabolism, but not overt schizophrenia-related deficits.

  18. Effects of synthetic cannabinoids on electroencephalogram power spectra in rats.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Matsumoto, Naomi; Huang, Zhi-Li; Goda, Yukihiro; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2012-02-10

    Several synthetic cannabinoids have recently been distributed as psychoactive adulterants in many herbal products on the illegal drug market around the world. However, there is little information on pharmacology and toxicology of such compounds. Although Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), a psychoactive cannabinoid of marijuana, was reported to affect electroencephalograms (EEG) of rats, the effects of synthetic cannabinoids are unknown. We examined the pharmacological activities of three synthetic cannabinoids; cannabicyclohexanol (CCH), CP-47,497 and JWH-018; by analyzing EEG power spectra and locomotor activity after intraperitoneal administration to rats and compared them with those of Δ(9)-THC. The three compounds significantly increased the EEG power in the frequency range of 5.0-6.0 Hz for the first 3h, while Δ(9)-THC decreased the power spectra in the wide range of 7.0-20.0 Hz during the first hour. These results indicate that the effect of the three compounds on EEG is different from that of Δ(9)-THC. Additionally, CCH, CP-47,497 and JWH-018 significantly decreased the locomotor activity for 11.5h, 11h and 4.5h, respectively, after administration which was longer than that of Δ(9)-THC (3.5h). Furthermore, all three compounds significantly reduced the total amounts of locomotor activity during a 3-h, 6-h and 12-h period after injection, whereas no statistical difference was observed for the Δ(9)-THC injection. Among the three compounds, CCH and CP-47,497 exerted a longer duration of the change in the EEG power spectra and suppression of the locomotor activity than JWH-018.

  19. Synthetic Cannabinoids: Pharmacology, Behavioral Effects, and Abuse Potential

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Sherrica; Fantegrossi, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis has been used throughout the world for centuries. The psychoactive effects of cannabis are largely attributable to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the prototypical cannabinoid that occurs naturally in the plant. More recently, chemically- and pharmacologically-distinct synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) have emerged as drugs of abuse. As compared to Δ9-THC, the distinct structures of these compounds allow them to avoid legal restrictions (at least initially) and detection in standard drug screens. This has contributed to the popularity of SCBs among drug users who seek to avoid positive drug screens. Importantly, the distinct structures of the SCBs also typically result in increased affinity for and efficacy at cannabinoid CB1 receptors, which are thought to be responsible for the psychoactive effects of Δ9-THC and its analogues. Accordingly, it seems likely that these more powerful cannabimimetic effects could result in increased adverse reactions and toxicities not elicited by Δ9-THC in cannabis. Animal models useful for the study of emerging SCBs include the cannabinoid tetrad, drug discrimination, and assays of tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal. However, these in vivo procedures have not been particularly informative with regards to drug efficacy, where the majority of SCB effects are comparable to those of Δ9-THC. In contrast, essentially all in vitro measures of drug efficacy confirm Δ9-THC as a relatively weak CB1 partial agonist, while the majority of the SCBs detected in commercial preparations are full agonists at the CB1 receptor. As use of these emerging SCBs continues to rise, there is an urgent need to better understand the pharmacology and toxicology of these novel compounds. PMID:26413452

  20. Neurotoxicity of Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-081 and JWH-210.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hye Jin; Seong, Yeon-Hee; Song, Min-Ji; Jeong, Ho-Sang; Shin, Jisoon; Yun, Jaesuk; Han, Kyoungmoon; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kang, Hoil; Kim, Hyoung Soo

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-250 in 'herbal incense' also called 'spice' were first introduced in many countries. Numerous synthetic cannabinoids with similar chemical structures emerged simultaneously and suddenly. Currently there are not sufficient data on their adverse effects including neurotoxicity. There are only anecdotal reports that suggest their toxicity. In the present study, we evaluated the neurotoxicity of two synthetic cannabinoids (JWH-081 and JWH-210) through observation of various behavioral changes and analysis of histopathological changes using experimental mice with various doses (0.1, 1, 5 mg/kg). In functional observation battery (FOB) test, animals treated with 5 mg/kg of JWH-081 or JWH-210 showed traction and tremor. Their locomotor activities and rotarod retention time were significantly (p<0.05) decreased. However, no significant change was observed in learning or memory function. In histopathological analysis, neural cells of the animals treated with the high dose (5 mg/kg) of JWH-081 or JWH-210 showed distorted nuclei and nucleus membranes in the core shell of nucleus accumbens, suggesting neurotoxicity. Our results suggest that JWH-081 and JWH-210 may be neurotoxic substances through changing neuronal cell damages, especially in the core shell part of nucleus accumbens. To confirm our findings, further studies are needed in the future. PMID:26535086

  1. [Potential applications of marijuana and cannabinoids in medicine].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Pypno, Damian; Cabała, Krzysztof; Bugaj, Bartosz; Waracki, Mateusz

    2014-10-01

    Cannabinoids, psychoactive substances present in cannabis, have been known to mankind for hundreds of years. Apart from 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) substances found in the cannabis herb with the highest toxicological value are cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN). The discovery of CB1 and CB2 receptors, located in various tissues (ranging from the brain to peripheral tissues), has defined the potential objective of these new chemical substances' effects. Many studies on the application of cannabinoids in the treatment of various diseases such as diabetes, neoplasms, inflammatory diseases, neurological conditions, pain and vomitting were conducted. Drugs containing e.g. THC appear on the pharmaceutical market. Substances affecting cannabinoid receptors may show beneficial effects, but they may also cause the risk of side effects related mainly to the inhibition of central nervous system. The purpose of this dissertation is the analysis, whether the substances responsible for the effects of marijuana, can find application in medicine. Original articles and reviews were used to summarize the results of studies connected to the topic.

  2. [Potential applications of marijuana and cannabinoids in medicine].

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Pypno, Damian; Cabała, Krzysztof; Bugaj, Bartosz; Waracki, Mateusz

    2014-10-01

    Cannabinoids, psychoactive substances present in cannabis, have been known to mankind for hundreds of years. Apart from 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) substances found in the cannabis herb with the highest toxicological value are cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN). The discovery of CB1 and CB2 receptors, located in various tissues (ranging from the brain to peripheral tissues), has defined the potential objective of these new chemical substances' effects. Many studies on the application of cannabinoids in the treatment of various diseases such as diabetes, neoplasms, inflammatory diseases, neurological conditions, pain and vomitting were conducted. Drugs containing e.g. THC appear on the pharmaceutical market. Substances affecting cannabinoid receptors may show beneficial effects, but they may also cause the risk of side effects related mainly to the inhibition of central nervous system. The purpose of this dissertation is the analysis, whether the substances responsible for the effects of marijuana, can find application in medicine. Original articles and reviews were used to summarize the results of studies connected to the topic. PMID:25518584

  3. Why do cannabinoid receptors have more than one endogenous ligand?

    PubMed Central

    Di Marzo, Vincenzo; De Petrocellis, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system was revealed following the understanding of the mechanism of action of marijuana's major psychotropic principle, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and includes two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors), their endogenous ligands (the endocannabinoids, the best studied of which are anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)), and the proteins that regulate the levels and activity of these receptors and ligands. However, other minor lipid metabolites different from, but chemically similar to, anandamide and 2-AG have also been suggested to act as endocannabinoids. Thus, unlike most other GPCRs, cannabinoid receptors appear to have more than one endogenous agonist, and it has been often wondered what could be the physiological meaning of this peculiarity. In 1999, it was proposed that anandamide might also activate other targets, and in particular the transient receptor potential of vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels. Over the last decade, this interaction has been shown to occur both in peripheral tissues and brain, during both physiological and pathological conditions. TRPV1 channels can be activated also by another less abundant endocannabinoid, N-arachidonoyldopamine, but not by 2-AG, and have been proposed by some authors to act as ionotropic endocannabinoid receptors. This article will discuss the latest discoveries on this subject, and discuss, among others, how anandamide and 2-AG differential actions at TRPV1 and cannabinoid receptors contribute to making this signalling system a versatile tool available to organisms to fine-tune homeostasis. PMID:23108541

  4. Quantitative urine confirmatory testing for synthetic cannabinoids in randomly collected urine specimens

    PubMed Central

    Castaneto, Marisol S.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Gandhi, Adarsh; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Klette, Kevin L.; Martin, Thomas M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid intake is an ongoing health issue worldwide, with new compounds continually emerging, making drug testing complex. Parent synthetic cannabinoids are rarely detected in urine, the most common matrix employed in workplace drug testing. Optimal identification of synthetic cannabinoid markers in authentic urine specimens and correlation of metabolite concentrations and toxicities would improve synthetic cannabinoid result interpretation. We screened 20,017 randomly collected US military urine specimens between July 2011 and June 2012 with a synthetic cannabinoid immunoassay yielding 1,432 presumptive positive specimens. We analyzed all presumptive positive and 1,069 negative specimens with our qualitative synthetic cannabinoid LC-MS/MS method, which confirmed 290 positive specimens. All 290 positive and 487 randomly-selected negative specimens were quantified with the most comprehensive urine quantitative LC-MS/MS method published to date. 290 specimens confirmed positive for 22 metabolites from 11 parent synthetic cannabinoids. The five most predominant metabolites were JWH-018 pentanoic acid (93%), JWH-018 N-hydroxypentyl (84%), AM2201 N-hydroxypentyl (69%), JWH-073 butanoic acid (69%), and JWH-122 N-hydroxypentyl (45%) with 11.1 (0.1–2434), 5.1 (0.1–1239), 2.0 (0.1–321), 1.1 (0.1–48.6), and 1.1 (0.1–250) μg/L median (range) concentrations, respectively. Alkyl hydroxy and carboxy metabolites provided suitable biomarkers for 11 parent synthetic cannabinoids; although, hydroxyindoles also were observed. This is by far the largest data set of synthetic cannabinoid metabolites urine concentrations from randomly collected workplace drug testing specimens rather than acute intoxications or driving under the influence of drugs. These data improve the interpretation of synthetic cannabinoid urine test results and suggest suitable urine markers of synthetic cannabinoid intake. PMID:25231213

  5. Quantitative urine confirmatory testing for synthetic cannabinoids in randomly collected urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Castaneto, Marisol S; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Gandhi, Adarsh; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Klette, Kevin L; Martin, Thomas M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid intake is an ongoing health issue worldwide, with new compounds continually emerging, making drug testing complex. Parent synthetic cannabinoids are rarely detected in urine, the most common matrix employed in workplace drug testing. Optimal identification of synthetic cannabinoid markers in authentic urine specimens and correlation of metabolite concentrations and toxicities would improve synthetic cannabinoid result interpretation. We screened 20 017 randomly collected US military urine specimens between July 2011 and June 2012 with a synthetic cannabinoid immunoassay yielding 1432 presumptive positive specimens. We analyzed all presumptive positive and 1069 negative specimens with our qualitative synthetic cannabinoid liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method, which confirmed 290 positive specimens. All 290 positive and 487 randomly selected negative specimens were quantified with the most comprehensive urine quantitative LC-MS/MS method published to date; 290 specimens confirmed positive for 22 metabolites from 11 parent synthetic cannabinoids. The five most predominant metabolites were JWH-018 pentanoic acid (93%), JWH-N-hydroxypentyl (84%), AM2201 N-hydroxypentyl (69%), JWH-073 butanoic acid (69%), and JWH-122 N-hydroxypentyl (45%) with 11.1 (0.1-2,434), 5.1 (0.1-1,239), 2.0 (0.1-321), 1.1 (0.1-48.6), and 1.1 (0.1-250) µg/L median (range) concentrations, respectively. Alkyl hydroxy and carboxy metabolites provided suitable biomarkers for 11 parent synthetic cannabinoids; although hydroxyindoles were also observed. This is by far the largest data set of synthetic cannabinoid metabolites urine concentrations from randomly collected workplace drug testing specimens rather than acute intoxications or driving under the influence of drugs. These data improve the interpretation of synthetic cannabinoid urine test results and suggest suitable urine markers of synthetic cannabinoid intake.

  6. Rheumatologists lack confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoids pertaining to the management of rheumatic complaints

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arthritis pain is reported as one of the most common reasons for persons using medical herbal cannabis in North America. “Severe arthritis” is the condition justifying legal use of cannabis in over half of all authorizations in Canada, where cannabis remains a controlled substance. As champions for the care of persons with arthritis, rheumatologists must be knowledgeable of treatment modalities both traditional and non-traditional, used by their patients. As study of cannabinoid molecules in medicine is recent, we have examined the confidence in the knowledge of cannabinoids expressed by Canadian rheumatologists. Methods The confidence of rheumatologists in their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules and mechanisms relevant to rheumatology, and their ability to advise patients about cannabinoid treatments was recorded by an online questionnaire circulated via email to the entire Canadian Rheumatology Association membership. Results Over three quarters of the 128 respondents lacked confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules. While 45% of respondents believed there was no current role for cannabinoids in rheumatology patient care, only 25% supported any use of herbal cannabis. With 70% never having previously prescribed or recommended any cannabinoid treatment, uncertainty regarding good prescribing practices was prevalent. Concerns about risks of cannabis use were in line with the current literature. Conclusions Rheumatologists lacked confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules in general and in their competence to prescribe any cannabinoid for rheumatic complaints. In line with this uncertainty, there is reticence to prescribe cannabinoid preparations for rheumatology patients. Guidance is required to inform rheumatologists on the evidence regarding cannabinoids. PMID:25080153

  7. Monitoring urinary excretion of cannabinoids by fluorescence-polarization immunoassay: a cannabinoid-to-creatinine ratio study.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Albert D; Worth, David

    2002-12-01

    Drug testing in substance abuse treatment programs is focused on urine analysis of parent drugs and major metabolites. Huestis reported that serial monitoring of the major urinary cannabinoid metabolite (delta9-THC-COOH)-to-creatinine ratios in paired urine specimens (collected at least 24 hours apart) could differentiate new marijuana or hashish use from residual cannabinoid metabolite excretion in urine after previous drug use. Subjects with a history of chronic marijuana use were screened for cannabinoids in urine over several months by an enzyme immunoassay (EMIT) with a cut-off value of 50 ng/mL. Presumptive positive specimens were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for delta9-THC-COOH with a cut-off value of 15 ng/mL. The objective of this study was to determine whether a semiquantitative cannabinoids immunoassay (corrected for creatinine concentration) could differentiate new marijuana use from residual cannabinoid excretion in chronic users of marijuana or hashish compared with GC-MS. The criterion for new marijuana use was a cannabinoid-to-creatinine ratio > or =0.5 (dividing the immunoassay quantitative result to creatinine ratio of specimen 2 by the specimen 1 ratio, specimen 3 by the specimen 2 ratio, etc.). Urine specimens were analyzed by fluorescence-polarization immunoassay (FPIA) on an Abbott TDxFLx analyzer after analysis by GC-MS. In 90 urine specimens (group A) with delta9-THC-COOH values determined by GC-MS, the mean delta9-THC-COOH concentration was 44.4 ng/mL (range, 16-100), and the mean FPIA total cannabinoids value was 91.7 ng/mL (range, 21-204 ng/mL) with a correlation coefficient of 0.993 (group A). In 111 specimens (group B), the mean delta9-THC-COOH concentration was 361 ng/mL (range, 101-960 ng/mL). The mean FPIA value was 657 ng/mL (range, 211-1,270 ng/mL), and the correlation coefficient of the B series was 0.975. Percent cross-reactivity for delta9-THC-COOH standards prepared in drug-free urine by FPIA was 82

  8. The discoidin domain receptor 1 gene has a functional A2RE sequence.

    PubMed

    Roig, Barbara; Moyano, Sílvia; Martorell, Lourdes; Costas, Javier; Vilella, Elisabet

    2012-02-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is expressed in myelin oligodendrocytes and co-localizes with myelin basic protein (MBP). Alternative splicing of DDR1 generates five isoforms designated DDR1a-e. The MBP mRNA contains an hnRNP A2 response element (A2RE) sequence that is recognized by heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2/B1, which is responsible for transport of the MBP mRNA to oligodendrocyte processes. We hypothesized that DDR1 could have a functional A2RE sequence. By in silico analysis, we identified an A2RE-like sequence in the human DDR1 mRNA. We observed nuclear and dendrite cytoplasmic immunofluorescence, indicating that DDR1 and hnRNP A2/B1 co-localize in human oligodendrocytes and in differentiated HOG16 cells. The A2RE-like sequence of DDR1 contains the single nucleotide polymorphism rs2267641, and we found that in the human brain, the minor allele is associated with lower and higher levels DDR1b and DDR1c mRNA expression, respectively. Moreover, a positive correlation between DDR1c and the myelin genes myelin-associated glycoprotein and oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 was found. Differentiated HOG16 cells transfected with an hnRNP A2/B1 siRNA simultaneously show a decrease and an increase in the DDR1c and DDR1b mRNA expression levels, respectively, which was accompanied by a decrease in DDR1 protein levels at the cytoplasmic edges. These results suggest that the DDR1 A2RE sequence is functionally involved in the hnRNP A2/B1-mediated splicing and transport of the DDR1c mRNA.

  9. Pravastatin and C reactive protein modulate protease- activated receptor-1 expression in vitro blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Chu, L-X; Zhou, S-X; Yang, F; Qin, Y-Q; Liang, Z-S; Mo, C-G; Wang, X-D; Xie, J; He, L-P

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) plays an important role in mediating activation of human platelets by thrombin. However, mechanism of statin in ADP-induced platelet PAR-1 expression is also unknown. Aggregometry, flow cytometry, immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine role of pravastatin participating in ADP-induced platelet activation and PAR-1 expression. ADP stimulation significantly increased PAR-1 expression on platelets. PAR-1 antagonist SCH-79797 inhibited platelet aggregation as well as decreased platelet P-selectin expression induced by ADP. CRP inhibited PAR-1 expression induced by ADP in a concentration-dependent manner. Pravastatin treatment reduced PAR-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination treatment of CRP and Pravastatin significantly reduced platelet PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. By western-blot analysis, pravastatin treatment did not influence total PAR-1 after ADP treatment. CRP decreased platelet total PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. Pravastatin and CRP reduced TXB2 formation by ADP significantly. CRP decreased thrombin fragment F1+2 level with ADP treatment. Pravastatin, in contrast, did not influence F1+2 level. Upon treatment with Pravastatin reduced platelet LOX-1 expression induced by ADP. In conclusion, PAR-1 served as a critical mechan