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Sample records for human cannabinoid receptor-1

  1. Failure to extinguish fear and genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Klumpers, F; Oosting, R S; Evers, D J J; Leon Kenemans, J; Baas, J M P

    2012-09-25

    Failure to extinguish fear can lead to persevering anxiety and has been postulated as an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of human anxiety disorders. In animals, it is well documented that the endogenous cannabinoid system has a pivotal role in the successful extinction of fear, most importantly through the cannabinoid receptor 1. However, no human studies have reported a translation of this preclinical evidence yet. Healthy medication-free human subjects (N=150) underwent a fear conditioning and extinction procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex was measured to assess fear-conditioned responding, and subjective fear ratings were collected. Participants were genotyped for two polymorphisms located within the promoter region (rs2180619) and the coding region (rs1049353) of cannabinoid receptor 1. As predicted from the preclinical literature, acquisition and expression of conditioned fear did not differ between genotypes. Crucially, whereas both homozygote (G/G, N=23) and heterozygote (A/G, N=68) G-allele carriers of rs2180619 displayed robust extinction of fear, extinction of fear-potentiated startle was absent in A/A homozygotes (N=51). Additionally, this resistance to extinguish fear left A/A carriers of rs2180619 with significantly higher levels of fear-potentiated startle at the end of the extinction training. No effects of rs1049353 genotype were observed regarding fear acquisition and extinction. These results suggest for the first time involvement of the human endocannabinoid system in fear extinction. Implications are that genetic variability in this system may underlie individual differences in anxiety, rendering cannabinoid receptor 1 a potential target for novel pharmacological treatments of anxiety disorders.

  2. Genetic variability in the human cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG theta power in humans.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Kenemans, J L; Böcker, K B E; Baas, J M P

    2014-11-01

    It has long been postulated that exogenous cannabinoids have a profound effect on human cognitive functioning. These cannabinoid effects are thought to depend, at least in parts, on alterations of phase-locking of local field potential neuronal firing. The latter can be measured as activity in the theta frequency band (4-7Hz) by electroencephalogram. Theta oscillations are supposed to serve as a mechanism in neural representations of behaviorally relevant information. However, it remains unknown whether variability in endogenous cannabinoid activity is involved in theta rhythms and therefore, may serve as an individual differences index of human cognitive functioning. To clarify this issue, we recorded resting state EEG activity in 164 healthy human subjects and extracted EEG power across frequency bands (δ, θ, α, and β). To assess variability in the endocannabinoid system, two genetic polymorphisms (rs1049353, rs2180619) within the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) were determined in all participants. As expected, we observed significant effects of rs1049353 on EEG power in the theta band at frontal, central and parietal electrode regions. Crucially, these effects were specific for the theta band, with no effects on activity in the other frequency bands. Rs2180619 showed no significant associations with theta power after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, we provide novel evidence in humans showing that genetic variability in the cannabinoid receptor 1 is associated with resting state EEG power in the theta frequency band. This extends prior findings of exogenous cannabinoid effects on theta power to the endogenous cannabinoid system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of cannabinoid receptor 1 in human adipose tissue for lipolysis regulation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sidibeh, Cherno O; Pereira, Maria J; Lau Börjesson, Joey; Kamble, Prasad G; Skrtic, Stanko; Katsogiannos, Petros; Sundbom, Magnus; Svensson, Maria K; Eriksson, Jan W

    2017-03-01

    We recently showed that the peripheral cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CNR1) gene is upregulated by the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. CNR1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system and has been a drug target for the treatment of obesity. Here we explore the role of peripheral CNR1 in states of insulin resistance in human adipose tissue. Subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained from well-controlled type 2 diabetes subjects and controls. Subcutaneous adipose tissue gene expression levels of CNR1 and endocannabinoid synthesizing and degrading enzymes were assessed. Furthermore, paired human subcutaneous adipose tissue and omental adipose tissue from non-diabetic volunteers undergoing kidney donation or bariatric surgery, was incubated with or without dexamethasone. Subcutaneous adipose tissue obtained from volunteers through needle biopsy was incubated with or without dexamethasone and in the presence or absence of the CNR1-specific antagonist AM281. CNR1 gene and protein expression, lipolysis and glucose uptake were evaluated. Subcutaneous adipose tissue CNR1 gene expression levels were 2-fold elevated in type 2 diabetes subjects compared with control subjects. Additionally, gene expression levels of CNR1 and endocannabinoid-regulating enzymes from both groups correlated with markers of insulin resistance. Dexamethasone increased CNR1 expression dose-dependently in subcutaneous adipose tissue and omental adipose tissue by up to 25-fold. Dexamethasone pre-treatment of subcutaneous adipose tissue increased lipolysis rate and reduced glucose uptake. Co-incubation with the CNR1 antagonist AM281 prevented the stimulatory effect on lipolysis, but had no effect on glucose uptake. CNR1 is upregulated in states of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Furthermore, CNR1 is involved in glucocorticoid-regulated lipolysis. Peripheral CNR1 could be an interesting drug target in type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia.

  4. Cannabinoid receptor 1 ligands revisited: Pharmacological assessment in the ACTOne system.

    PubMed

    Presley, Chaela S; Abidi, Ammaar H; Moore, Bob M

    2016-04-01

    In vitro cannabinoid pharmacology has evolved over time from simple receptor binding to include [(35)S]GTPγ, β-arrestin, and cAMP assays. Each assay has benefits and drawbacks; however, no single functional system has been used for high-throughput evaluation of compounds from binding to pharmacological functionality and antagonist assessment in a well-characterized human cell line. In this study, we evaluated and validated one system-ACTOne human embryonic kidney cells transfected with a cyclic nucleotide gated channel and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1)-and compared human CB1 affinity, functional, and antagonistic effects on cAMP with previously published results. The study was conducted on a diverse group of CB1 ligands, including endocannabinoids and related compounds, 2-AG, AEA, MAEA, and ACEA, the phytocannabinoid Δ(9) THC, and synthetic cannabinoids CP 55,940, WIN 55,212-2, SR 141716A, CP 945,598, and WIN 55,212-3. Our results were compared with literature values where human CB1 was used for affinity determination and cAMP was used as a functional readout. Here we report the first detailed evaluation of the ACTOne assay for the pharmacological evaluation of CB1 ligands. The results from the study reveal some interesting deviations from previously reported functional activities of the aforementioned ligands.

  5. Modulation of Pilocarpine-Induced Seizures by Cannabinoid Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kow, Rebecca L.; Jiang, Kelly; Naydenov, Alipi V.; Le, Joshua H.; Stella, Nephi; Nathanson, Neil M.

    2014-01-01

    Administration of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine is commonly used to induce seizures in rodents for the study of epilepsy. Activation of muscarinic receptors has been previously shown to increase the production of endocannabinoids in the brain. Endocannabinoids act at the cannabinoid CB1 receptors to reduce neurotransmitter release and the severity of seizures in several models of epilepsy. In this study, we determined the effect of CB1 receptor activity on the induction in mice of seizures by pilocarpine. We found that decreased activation of the CB1 receptor, either through genetic deletion of the receptor or treatment with a CB1 antagonist, increased pilocarpine seizure severity without modifying seizure-induced cell proliferation and cell death. These results indicate that endocannabinoids act at the CB1 receptor to modulate the severity of pilocarpine-induced seizures. Administration of a CB1 agonist produced characteristic CB1-dependent behavioral responses, but did not affect pilocarpine seizure severity. A possible explanation for the lack of effect of CB1 agonist administration on pilocarpine seizures, despite the effects of CB1 antagonist administration and CB1 gene deletion, is that muscarinic receptor-stimulated endocannabinoid production is acting maximally at CB1 receptors to modulate sensitivity to pilocarpine seizures. PMID:24752144

  6. Evidence for association between polymorphisms in the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CNR1) gene and cannabis dependence

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Arpana; Wetherill, Leah; Dick, Danielle M.; Xuei, Xiaoling; Hinrichs, Anthony; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Nurnberger, John I.; Schuckit, Marc; Bierut, Laura J.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    Genomic studies of cannabis use disorders have been limited. The cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) on chromosome 6q14–15 is an excellent candidate gene for cannabis dependence due to the important role of the G-protein coupled receptor encoded by this gene in the rewarding effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Previous studies have found equivocal evidence for an association between SNPs in CNR1 and a general vulnerability to substance use disorders. We investigate the association between 9 SNPs spanning CNR1 and cannabis dependence in 1,923 individuals. Two SNPs that were previously associated with cannabis dependence in other studies were also significant with this phenotype in our analyses [rs806368 (p = 0.05) and rs806380 (p = 0.009)]. Haplotype analyses revealed the association to be largely driven by the SNP rs806380. These results suggest a role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 gene in cannabis dependence. PMID:19016476

  7. Synthetic cannabinoids: In silico prediction of the cannabinoid receptor 1 affinity by a quantitative structure-activity relationship model.

    PubMed

    Paulke, Alexander; Proschak, Ewgenij; Sommer, Kai; Achenbach, Janosch; Wunder, Cora; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-03-14

    The number of new synthetic psychoactive compounds increase steadily. Among the group of these psychoactive compounds, the synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) are most popular and serve as a substitute of herbal cannabis. More than 600 of these substances already exist. For some SCBs the in vitro cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) affinity is known, but for the majority it is unknown. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was developed, which allows the determination of the SCBs affinity to CB1 (expressed as binding constant (Ki)) without reference substances. The chemically advance template search descriptor was used for vector representation of the compound structures. The similarity between two molecules was calculated using the Feature-Pair Distribution Similarity. The Ki values were calculated using the Inverse Distance Weighting method. The prediction model was validated using a cross validation procedure. The predicted Ki values of some new SCBs were in a range between 20 (considerably higher affinity to CB1 than THC) to 468 (considerably lower affinity to CB1 than THC). The present QSAR model can serve as a simple, fast and cheap tool to get a first hint of the biological activity of new synthetic cannabinoids or of other new psychoactive compounds.

  8. A novel control of human keratin expression: cannabinoid receptor 1-mediated signaling down-regulates the expression of keratins K6 and K16 in human keratinocytes in vitro and in situ

    PubMed Central

    Zákány, Nóra; Tóth, Balázs I.; Bíró, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors (CB) are expressed throughout human skin epithelium. CB1 activation inhibits human hair growth and decreases proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. Since psoriasis is a chronic hyperproliferative, inflammatory skin disease, it is conceivable that the therapeutic modulation of CB signaling, which can inhibit both proliferation and inflammation, could win a place in future psoriasis management. Given that psoriasis is characterized by up-regulation of keratins K6 and K16, we have investigated whether CB1 stimulation modulates their expression in human epidermis. Treatment of organ-cultured human skin with the CB1-specific agonist, arachidonoyl-chloro-ethanolamide (ACEA), decreased K6 and K16 staining intensity in situ. At the gene and protein levels, ACEA also decreased K6 expression of cultured HaCaT keratinocytes, which show some similarities to psoriatic keratinocytes. These effects were partly antagonized by the CB1-specific antagonist, AM251. While CB1-mediated signaling also significantly inhibited human epidermal keratinocyte proliferation in situ, as shown by K6/Ki-67-double immunofluorescence, the inhibitory effect of ACEA on K6 expression in situ was independent of its anti-proliferative effect. Given recent appreciation of the role of K6 as a functionally important protein that regulates epithelial wound healing in mice, it is conceivable that the novel CB1-mediated regulation of keratin 6/16 revealed here also is relevant to wound healing. Taken together, our results suggest that cannabinoids and their receptors constitute a novel, clinically relevant control element of human K6 and K16 expression. PMID:23638377

  9. Functional Genetic Variation of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Cannabis Use Interact on Prefrontal Connectivity and Related Working Memory Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Colizzi, Marco; Fazio, Leonardo; Ferranti, Laura; Porcelli, Annamaria; Masellis, Rita; Marvulli, Daniela; Bonvino, Aurora; Ursini, Gianluca; Blasi, Giuseppe; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid signaling is involved in different brain functions and it is mediated by the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1), which is encoded by the CNR1 gene. Previous evidence suggests an association between cognition and cannabis use. The logical interaction between genetically determined cannabinoid signaling and cannabis use has not been determined. Therefore, we investigated whether CNR1 variation predicts CNR1 prefrontal mRNA expression in postmortem prefrontal human tissue. Then, we studied whether functional variation in CNR1 and cannabis exposure interact in modulating prefrontal function and related behavior during working memory processing. Thus, 208 healthy subjects (113 males) were genotyped for the relevant functional SNP and were evaluated for cannabis use by the Cannabis Experience Questionnaire. All individuals performed the 2-back working memory task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. CNR1 rs1406977 was associated with prefrontal mRNA and individuals carrying a G allele had reduced CNR1 prefrontal mRNA levels compared with AA subjects. Moreover, functional connectivity MRI demonstrated that G carriers who were also cannabis users had greater functional connectivity in the left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and reduced working memory behavioral accuracy during the 2-back task compared with the other groups. Overall, our results indicate that the deleterious effects of cannabis use are more evident on a specific genetic background related to its receptor expression. PMID:25139064

  10. Hydrophobic Residues in Helix 8 of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Are Critical for Structural and Functional Properties†

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kwang H.; Nishiyama, Akiko; Mierke, Dale F.; Kendall, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the heptahelical transmembrane domain shared by all G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), many class A GPCRs adopt a helical domain, termed helix 8, in the membrane-proximal region of the C terminus. We investigated the role of residues in the hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces of amphiphilic helix 8 of human cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). To differentiate between a role for specific residues and global features, we made two key mutants: one involving replacement of the highly hydrophobic groups, Leu404, Phe408, and Phe412, all with alanine and the second involving substitution of the basic residues, Lys402, Arg405, and Arg409, all with the neutral glutamine. The former showed a very low Bmax based on binding isotherms, a minimal Emax based on GTPγS binding analysis, and defective localization relative to the wild-type CB1 receptor as revealed by confocal microscopy. However, the latter mutant and the wild-type receptors were indistinguishable. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of purified peptides with corresponding sequences indicated that the highly hydrophobic residues are critical for maintaining a strong helical structure in detergent, whereas the positively charged residues are not. Further investigation of mutant receptors revealed that CB1 localization requires a threshold level of hydrophobicity but not specific amino acids. Moreover, mutant receptors carrying two- to six-residue insertions amino-terminal to helix 8 revealed a graded decrease in Bmax values. Our results identify the key helix 8 components (including hydrophobicity of specific residues, structure, and location relative to TM7) determinant for receptor localization leading to robust ligand binding and G protein activation. PMID:20025243

  11. Binding between a Distal C-Terminus Fragment of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Arrestin-2

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shubhadra; Bakshi, Kunal; Mercier, Richard W.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Pavlopoulos, Spiro

    2011-01-01

    Internalization of G-protein coupled receptors is mediated by phosphorylation of the C-terminus, followed by binding with the cytosolic protein arrestin. To explore structural factors that may play a role in internalization of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), we utilize a phosphorylated peptide derived from the distal C-terminus of CB1 (CB15P454-473). Complexes formed between the peptide and human arrestin-2 (wt-arr21-418) were compared to those formed with a truncated arrestin-2 mutant (tr-arr21-382) using isothermal titration calorimetry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The penta-phosphopeptide CB15P454-473 adopts a helix-loop conformation, whether binding to full-length arrestin-2 or its truncated mutant. This structure is similar to that of a hepta-phosphopeptide, mimicking the distal segment of the rhodopsin C-tail (Rh7P330-348), binding to visual arrestin, suggesting that this adopted structure bears functional significance. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments show that the CB15P454-473 peptide binds to tr-arr21-382 with higher affinity than to the full-length wt-arr21-418. As the observed structure of the bound peptides is similar in either case, we attribute the increased affinity to a more exposed binding site on the N-domain of the truncated arrestin construct. The transferred nOe data from the bound phosphopeptides are used to predict a model describing the interaction with arrestin, using the data driven HADDOCK docking program. The truncation of arrestin-2 provides scope for positively charged residues in the polar core of the protein to interact with phosphates present in the loop of the CB15P454-473 peptide. PMID:21306178

  12. Mutation of putative GRK phosphorylation sites in the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) confers resistance to cannabinoid tolerance and hypersensitivity to cannabinoids in mice.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Daniel J; Davis, Brian J; Kearn, Chris S; Marcus, David; Cook, Alex J; Wager-Miller, Jim; Straiker, Alex; Myoga, Michael H; Karduck, Jeffrey; Leishman, Emma; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Czyzyk, Traci A; Bradshaw, Heather B; Selley, Dana E; Mackie, Ken

    2014-04-09

    For many G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R), desensitization has been proposed as a principal mechanism driving initial tolerance to agonists. GPCR desensitization typically requires phosphorylation by a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) and interaction of the phosphorylated receptor with an arrestin. In simple model systems, CB1R is desensitized by GRK phosphorylation at two serine residues (S426 and S430). However, the role of these serine residues in tolerance and dependence for cannabinoids in vivo was unclear. Therefore, we generated mice where S426 and S430 were mutated to nonphosphorylatable alanines (S426A/S430A). S426A/S430A mutant mice were more sensitive to acutely administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), have delayed tolerance to Δ(9)-THC, and showed increased dependence for Δ(9)-THC. S426A/S430A mutants also showed increased responses to elevated levels of endogenous cannabinoids. CB1R desensitization in the periaqueductal gray and spinal cord following 7 d of treatment with Δ(9)-THC was absent in S426A/S430A mutants. Δ(9)-THC-induced downregulation of CB1R in the spinal cord was also absent in S426A/S430A mutants. Cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons from S426A/S430A mice showed enhanced endocannabinoid-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of excitation (DSE) and reduced agonist-mediated desensitization of DSE. These results indicate that S426 and S430 play major roles in the acute response to, tolerance to, and dependence on cannabinoids. Additionally, S426A/S430A mice are a novel model for studying pathophysiological processes thought to involve excessive endocannabinoid signaling such as drug addiction and metabolic disease. These mice also validate the approach of mutating GRK phosphorylation sites involved in desensitization as a general means to confer exaggerated signaling to GPCRs in vivo.

  13. The hypocretin/orexin receptor-1 as a novel target to modulate cannabinoid reward.

    PubMed

    Flores, África; Maldonado, Rafael; Berrendero, Fernando

    2014-03-15

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the world. Although there is a high prevalence of users who seek treatment for cannabis dependence, no accepted pharmacologic treatment is available to facilitate and maintain abstinence. The hypocretin/orexin system plays a critical role in drug addiction, but the potential participation of this system in the addictive properties of cannabinoids is unknown. We investigated the effects of hypocretins in the intravenous self-administration of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 using hypocretin receptor-1 (Hcrtr-1) and hypocretin receptor-2 antagonists and Hcrtr-1 knockout mice. Additional groups of mice were trained to obtain water to rule out operant responding impairments. Activation of hypocretin neurons was analyzed by using double-label immunofluorescence of FosB/ΔFosB with hypocretin-1. Microdialysis studies were performed to evaluate dopamine extracellular levels in the nucleus accumbens after acute Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol administration. Systemic administration of the Hcrtr-1 antagonist SB334867 reduced intravenous self-administration of WIN55,212-2, as well as the maximum effort to obtain a WIN55,212-2 infusion, as revealed under a progressive ratio schedule. This role of Hcrtr-1 in the reinforcing and motivational properties of WIN55,212-2 was confirmed in Hcrtr-1 knockout mice. Contingent, but not noncontingent, WIN55,212-2 self-administration increased the percentage of hypocretin cells expressing FosB/ΔFosB in the lateral hypothalamus. The enhancement in dopamine extracellular levels in the nucleus accumbens induced by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol was blocked in mice lacking the Hcrtr-1. These findings demonstrate that Hcrtr-1 modulates the reinforcing properties of cannabinoids, which could have a clear therapeutic interest. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene variant moderates neural index of cognitive disruption during nicotine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Evans, D E; Sutton, S K; Jentink, K G; Lin, H-Y; Park, J Y; Drobes, D J

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine withdrawal-related disruption of cognitive control may contribute to the reinforcement of tobacco use. Identification of gene variants that predict this withdrawal phenotype may lead to tailored pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation. Variation on the cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) has been related to nicotine dependence, and CNR1 antagonists may increase attention and memory functioning. We targeted CNR1 variants as moderators of a validated neural marker of nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption. CNR1 polymorphisms comprising the 'TAG' haplotype (rs806379, rs1535255 and rs2023239) were tested independently, as no participants in this sample possessed this haplotype. Nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption was indexed as increased resting electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha-1 power density across 17 electrodes. Seventy-three Caucasian Non-Hispanic smokers (≥15 cigarettes per day) visited the laboratory on two occasions following overnight smoking/nicotine deprivation. Either two nicotine or two placebo cigarettes were smoked prior to collecting EEG data at each session. Analyses showed that rs806379 moderated the effects of nicotine deprivation increasing slow wave EEG (P = 0.004). Smokers homozygous for the major allele exhibited greater nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption. The current findings suggest potential efficacy of cannabinoid receptor antagonism as a pharmacotherapy approach for smoking cessation among individuals who exhibit greater nicotine withdrawal-related cognitive disruption. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  15. Brain structural and clinical changes after first episode psychosis: Focus on cannabinoid receptor 1 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pinilla, Paula; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Ortiz-García de la Foz, Víctor; Guest, Paul C; Ayesa-Arriola, Rosa; Córdova-Palomera, Aldo; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto

    2015-08-30

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene polymorphisms have been associated with central and peripheral effects of cannabis and schizophrenia pathophysiology. Here, we have tested whether three CNR1 variants (rs1049353, rs1535255 and rs2023239) are associated with changes in brain volumes, body mass index (BMI) or psychopathological scores in a 3-year longitudinal study of 65 first-episode psychosis patients. The rs1049353 at-risk allele was significantly associated with a greater reduction of caudate volume, and the rs2023239 T/C polymorphism showed a significant decrease in thalamic volume after the 3-year period. For those who were not cannabis users, the rs1535255 and rs2023239 polymorphisms had effects in lateral ventricle (LV), and LV and white matter, respectively. The rs2023239 variant also was associated with significant improvements in positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. There was no significant effect of any of the variants on changes in BMI over the 3-year study. Finally, an interaction between all three polymorphisms was found involving evolution of positive symptoms. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid pathway is associated with schizophrenia evolution over time. However, further studies using larger cohorts are needed to confirm these results. If confirmed, the present findings could lead in subsequent investigations for identification of novel drug targets for improved treatment of patients suffering from schizophrenia.

  16. Cannabinoid receptor 1 binding activity and quantitative analysis of Cannabis sativa L. smoke and vapor.

    PubMed

    Fischedick, Justin; Van Der Kooy, Frank; Verpoorte, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Cannabis sativa L. (cannabis) extracts, vapor produced by the Volcano vaporizer and smoke made from burning cannabis joints were analyzed by GC-flame ionization detecter (FID), GC-MS and HPLC. Three different medicinal cannabis varieties were investigated Bedrocan, Bedrobinol and Bediol. Cannabinoids plus other components such as terpenoids and pyrolytic by-products were identified and quantified in all samples. Cannabis vapor and smoke was tested for cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) binding activity and compared to pure Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC). The top five major compounds in Bedrocan extracts were Delta(9)-THC, cannabigerol (CBG), terpinolene, myrcene, and cis-ocimene in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBG, cannabichromene (CBC), and camphene in Bediol cannabidiol (CBD), Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBC, and CBG. The major components in Bedrocan vapor (>1.0 mg/g) were Delta(9)-THC, terpinolene, myrcene, CBG, cis-ocimene and CBD in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, myrcene and CBD in Bediol CBD, Delta(9)-THC, myrcene, CBC and terpinolene. The major components in Bedrocan smoke (>1.0 mg/g) were Delta(9)-THC, cannabinol (CBN), terpinolene, CBG, myrcene and cis-ocimene in Bedrobinol Delta(9)-THC, CBN and myrcene in Bediol CBD, Delta(9)-THC, CBN, myrcene, CBC and terpinolene. There was no statistically significant difference between CB1 binding of pure Delta(9)-THC compared to cannabis smoke and vapor at an equivalent concentration of Delta(9)-THC.

  17. Cannabinoids modulate Olig2 and polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule expression in the subventricular zone of post-natal rats through cannabinoid receptor 1 and cannabinoid receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Arévalo-Martín, Angel; García-Ovejero, Daniel; Rubio-Araiz, Ana; Gómez, Oscar; Molina-Holgado, Francisco; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo

    2007-09-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is a source of post-natal glial precursors that can migrate to the overlying white matter, where they may differentiate into oligodendrocytes. We showed that, in the post-natal SVZ ependymocytes, radial glia and astrocyte-like cells express cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), whereas cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) is found in cells expressing the polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule. To study CB1 and CB2 function, post-natal rats were exposed to selective CB1 or CB2 agonists (arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide and JWH-056, respectively) for 15 days. Accordingly, we found that CB1 activation increases the number of Olig2-positive cells in the dorsolateral SVZ, whereas CB2 activation increases polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule expression in this region. As intense myelination occurs during the first weeks of post-natal development, we examined how modulating these factors affected the expression of myelin basic protein. Pharmacological administration of agonists and antagonists of CB1 and CB2 showed that the activation of both receptors is needed to augment the expression of myelin basic protein in the subcortical white matter.

  18. Colocalization of cannabinoid receptor 1 with somatostatin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in rat brain hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shenglong; Kumar, Ujendra

    2015-10-05

    Somatostatin (SST), a growth hormone inhibitory peptide, is expressed in different parts of the brain and functions as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. In the central nervous system (CNS), SST inhibits Ca(2+) influx and regulates neuronal excitability in the hippocampus, the brain region which plays a major role in seizure, as well as cognitive and memory function. Much like SST, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 receptor) is also widely distributed in the CNS, associated with memory function ad exerts inhibitory effects on seizure. It is unknown whether overlapping functional activities of SST and CB1 receptor are also associated with coexpression in the hippocampus. In the present study, we determined the colocalization between SST and CB1 receptor in adult rat brain hippocampus. In the CNS, the majority of SST positive interneurons coexpress neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Accordingly, colocalization studies were also performed to determine whether nNOS positive neurons display comparable colocalization with CB1 receptor. The findings suggested that SST and nNOS are expressed in most interneurons whereas CB1 receptor is present in both interneurons and projection neurons in hippocampal regions. The distinct neuronal populations either expressing CB1 receptor, SST and nNOS alone or colocalization were observed in a region specific manner. Taken together, the observations described here anticipate the possibility of crosstalk between somatostatin subtypes and CB1 receptor in regulation of physiological activities in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Protection from Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis by Peripheral Targeting of Cannabinoid Receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Bronova, Irina; Smith, Brett; Aydogan, Bulent; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Vemuri, Kiran; Erdelyi, Katalin; Makriyannis, Alex; Pacher, Pal; Berdyshev, Evgeny V

    2015-10-01

    Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIF) is a severe complication of thoracic radiotherapy that limits its dose, intensity, and duration. The contribution of the endocannabinoid signaling system in pulmonary fibrogenesis is not known. Using a well-established mouse model of RIF, we assessed the involvement of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) in the onset and progression of pulmonary fibrosis. Female C57BL/6 mice and CB1 knockout mice generated on C57BL/6 background received 20 Gy (2 Gy/min) single-dose thoracic irradiation that resulted in pulmonary fibrosis and animal death within 15 to 18 weeks. Some C57BL/6 animals received the CB1 peripherally restricted antagonist AM6545 at 1 mg/kg intraperitoneally three times per week. Animal survival and parameters of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis were evaluated. Thoracic irradiation (20 Gy) was associated with marked pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice and high mortality within 15 to 18 weeks after exposure. Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of CB1 receptors with a peripheral CB1 antagonist AM6545 markedly attenuated or delayed the lung inflammation and fibrosis and increased animal survival. Our results show that CB1 signaling plays a key pathological role in the development of radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis, and peripherally restricted CB1 antagonists may represent a novel therapeutic approach against this devastating complication of radiotherapy/irradiation.

  20. Immunohistochemical distribution of the cannabinoid receptor 1 and fatty acid amide hydrolase in the dog claustrum.

    PubMed

    Pirone, Andrea; Cantile, Carlo; Miragliotta, Vincenzo; Lenzi, Carla; Giannessi, Elisabetta; Cozzi, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) are part of the endocannabinoid system (ECB) which exerts a neuromodulatory activity on different brain functions and plays a key role in neurogenesis. Although many studies have reported FAAH and CB1R expression in the brain of different animal species, to the best of our knowledge they have never been described in the canine claustrum. Claustrum samples, obtained from necropsy of four neurologically normal dogs, were formalin fixed for paraffin embedding. Sections were either stained for morpho-histological analysis or immunostained for CB1R and FAAH. Analysis of adjacent sections incubated with the two antisera showed a complementary labeling pattern in the claustrum, with CB1R antibody staining fibers while anti-FAAH antibody stained cell bodies and the proximal portion of dendrites; this particular anatomical relationship suggests a retrograde endocannabinoid action via CB1R. CB1R and FAAH complementary immunostaining and their cellular localization reported here provide the first anatomical evidence for existence of the ECB in the dog claustrum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Expression and Functional Relevance of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Benz, Alexander H.; Renné, Christoph; Maronde, Erik; Koch, Marco; Grabiec, Urszula; Kallendrusch, Sonja; Rengstl, Benjamin; Newrzela, Sebastian; Hartmann, Sylvia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2013-01-01

    Background Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is expressed in certain types of malignancies. An analysis of CB1 expression and function in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), one of the most frequent lymphomas, was not performed to date. Design and Methods We examined the distribution of CB1 protein in primary cases of HL. Using lymphoma derived cell lines, the role of CB1 signaling on cell survival was investigated. Results A predominant expression of CB1 was found in Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells in a vast majority of classical HL cases. The HL cell lines L428, L540 and KM-H2 showed strong CB1-abundance and displayed a dose-dependent decline of viability under CB1 inhibition with AM251. Further, application of AM251 led to decrease of constitutively active NFκB/p65, a crucial survival factor of HRS-cells, and was followed by elevation of apoptotic markers in HL cells. Conclusions The present study identifies CB1 as a feature of HL, which might serve as a potential selective target in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:24349109

  2. Human Laboratory Studies on Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Mohamed; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Ranganathan, Mohini

    2016-04-01

    Some of the most compelling evidence supporting an association between cannabinoid agonists and psychosis comes from controlled laboratory studies in humans. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover laboratory studies demonstrate that cannabinoid agonists, including phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids, produce a wide range of positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms and psychophysiologic deficits in healthy human subjects that resemble the phenomenology of schizophrenia. These effects are time locked to drug administration, are dose related, and are transient and rarely necessitate intervention. The magnitude of effects is similar to the effects of ketamine but qualitatively distinct from other psychotomimetic drugs, including ketamine, amphetamine, and salvinorin A. Cannabinoid agonists have also been shown to transiently exacerbate symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia in laboratory studies. Patients with schizophrenia are more vulnerable than healthy control subjects to the acute behavioral and cognitive effects of cannabinoid agonists and experience transient exacerbation of symptoms despite treatment with antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, laboratory studies have failed to demonstrate any "beneficial" effects of cannabinoid agonists in individuals with schizophrenia-challenging the cannabis self-medication hypothesis. Emerging evidence suggests that polymorphisms of several genes related to dopamine metabolism (e.g., COMT, DAT1, and AKT1) may moderate the effects of cannabinoid agonists in laboratory studies. Cannabinoid agonists induce dopamine release, although the magnitude of release does not appear to be commensurate to the magnitude and spectrum of their acute psychotomimetic effects. Interactions between the endocannabinoid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and glutamate systems and their individual and interactive effects on neural oscillations provide a plausible mechanism underlying the psychotomimetic effects of

  3. Cannabinoid receptor 1 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma initiation and progression through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Schuebel, Kornel; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cinar, Resat; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Xiong, Keming; Mackie, Ken; Lizak, Martin; Yuan, Qiaoping; Goldman, David; Kunos, George

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has high mortality and no adequate treatment. Endocannabinoids interact with hepatic cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) to promote hepatocyte proliferation in liver regeneration by inducing cell cycle proteins involved in mitotic progression, including Forkhead Box M1. Because this protein is highly expressed in HCC and contributes to its genesis and progression, we analyzed the involvement of the endocannabinoid/CB1R system in murine and human HCC. Postnatal diethylnitrosamine treatment induced HCC within 8 months in wild-type mice but fewer and smaller tumors in CB1R(-/-) mice or in wild-type mice treated with the peripheral CB1R antagonist JD5037, as monitored in vivo by serial magnetic resonance imaging. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed CB1R-dependent, tumor-induced up-regulation of the hepatic expression of CB1R, its endogenous ligand anandamide, and a number of tumor-promoting genes, including the GRB2 interactome as well as Forkhead Box M1 and its downstream target, the tryptophan-catalyzing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. Increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity and consequent induction of immunosuppressive T-regulatory cells in tumor tissue promote immune tolerance. The endocannabinoid/CB1R system is up-regulated in chemically induced HCC, resulting in the induction of various tumor-promoting genes, including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase; and attenuation of these changes by blockade or genetic ablation of CB1R suppresses the growth of HCC and highlights the therapeutic potential of peripheral CB1R blockade. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. This article has been contributed to by U.S. Government employees, and their work is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  4. Chronic Constriction Injury Reduces Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Activity in the Rostral Anterior Cingulate Cortex of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoot, Michelle R.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.; Poklis, Justin L.; Abdullah, Rehab A.; Scoggins, Krista L.; Selley, Dana E.; Dewey, William L.

    2013-01-01

    The present studies examined the effect of chronic neuropathic pain on cannabinoid receptor density and receptor-mediated G-protein activity within supraspinal brain areas involved in pain processing and modulation in mice. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) produced a significant decrease in WIN 55, 212-2 -stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in membranes prepared from the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) of CCI mice when compared to sham operated controls. Saturation binding with [3H]SR 141716A in membranes of the rACC showed no significant differences in binding between CCI and sham mice. Analysis of levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) or 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the rACC following CCI showed no significant differences between CCI and sham mice. These data suggest that CCI produced desensitization of the cannabinoid 1 receptor in the rACC in the absence of an overall decrease in cannabinoid 1 receptor density or change in levels of AEA or 2-AG. These data are the first to show alterations in cannabinoid receptor function in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex in response to a model of neuropathic pain. PMID:20380816

  5. Genetic variations in the human cannabinoid receptor gene are associated with happiness.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  6. Genetic Variations in the Human Cannabinoid Receptor Gene Are Associated with Happiness

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  7. Selective Cannabinoid Receptor-1 Agonists Regulate Mast Cell Activation in an Oxazolone-Induced Atopic Dermatitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Gaewon; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Park, Bu Man; Lee, Sin Hee; Kim, Hyun Jong; Hong, Seung-Phil; Kim, Beomjoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Many inflammatory mediators, including various cytokines (e.g. interleukins and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]), inflammatory proteases, and histamine are released following mast cell activation. However, the endogenous modulators for mast cell activation and the underlying mechanism have yet to be elucidated. Endogenous cannabinoids such as palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide or AEA), were found in peripheral tissues and have been proposed to possess autacoid activity, implying that cannabinoids may downregulate mast cell activation and local inflammation. Objective In order to investigate the effect of cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1R) agonists on mast cell activation, AEA-derived compounds were newly synthesized and evaluated for their effect on mast cell activation. Methods The effects of selected compounds on FcεRI-induced histamine and β-hexosaminidase release were evaluated in a rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3). To further investigate the inhibitory effects of CB1R agonist in vivo, an oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis mouse model was exploited. Results We found that CB1R inhibited the release of inflammatory mediators without causing cytotoxicity in RBL-2H3 cells and that CB1R agonists markedly and dose-dependently suppressed mast cell proliferation indicating that CB1R plays an important role in modulating antigen-dependent immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated mast cell activation. We also found that topical application of CB1R agonists suppressed the recruitment of mast cells into the skin and reduced the level of blood histamine. Conclusion Our results indicate that CB1R agonists down-regulate mast cell activation and may be used for relieving inflammatory symptoms mediated by mast cell activation, such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and contact dermatitis. PMID:26848215

  8. The cannabinoid receptor 1 associates with NMDA receptors to produce glutamatergic hypofunction: implications in psychosis and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar; Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Garzón, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is widespread throughout the central nervous system and its type 1 receptor (CB1) plays a crucial role in preventing the neurotoxicity caused by activation of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Indeed, it is the activity of NMDARs themselves that provides the demands on the endogenous cannabinoids in order to control their calcium currents. Therefore, a physiological role of this system is to maintain NMDAR activity within safe limits, thereby protecting neural cells from excitotoxicity. Thus, cannabinoids may be able to control NMDAR overactivation-related neural dysfunctions; however, the major obstacles to the therapeutic utilization of these compounds are their psychotropic effects and negative influence on cognitive performance. Studies in humans have indicated that abuse of smoked cannabis can promote psychosis and even circumstantially precipitate symptoms of schizophrenia, although the latter appears to require a prior vulnerability in the individual. It is possible that cannabinoids provoke psychosis/schizophrenia reflecting a mechanism common to neuroprotection: the reduction of NMDAR activity. Cannabinoids are proposed to produce such effect by reducing the pre-synaptic release of glutamate or interfering with post-synaptic NMDAR-regulated signaling pathways. The efficacy of such control requires the endocannabinoid system to apply its negative influence in a manner that is proportional to the strength of NMDAR signaling. Thus, cannabinoids acting at the wrong time or exerting an inappropriate influence on their receptors may cause NMDAR hypofunction. The purpose of the present review is to draw the attention of the reader to the newly described functional and physical CB1–NMDAR association, which may elucidate the scenario required for the rapid and efficacious control of NMDAR activity. Whether alterations in these mechanisms may increase NMDAR hypofunction leading to vulnerability to schizophrenia will be

  9. A pivotal role for enhanced brainstem Orexin receptor 1 signaling in the central cannabinoid receptor 1-mediated pressor response in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A.

    2015-01-01

    Orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) signaling is implicated in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) modulation of feeding. Further, our studies established the dependence of the central CB1R-mediated pressor response on neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in the RVLM. We tested the novel hypothesis that brainstem orexin-A/OX1R signaling plays a pivotal role in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response. Our multiple labeling immunofluorescence findings revealed co-localization of CB1R, OX1R and the peptide orexin-A within the C1 area of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Activation of central CB1R following intracisternal (i.c.) WIN55,212-2 (15 µg/rat) in conscious rats caused significant increases in BP and orexin-A level in RVLM neuronal tissue. Additional studies established a causal role for orexin-A in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response because (i) selective blockade of central CB1R (AM251, 30 µg/rat; i.c.) abrogated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM orexin-A level, (ii) the selective OX1R antagonist SB-408124 (10 nmol/rat; i.c.) attenuated orexin-A (3 nmol/rat; i.c.) or WIN55,212-2 (15 µg/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response while selective CB1R blockade (AM251) had no effect on orexin-A (3 nmol/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response, (iii) direct CB1R activation in the RVLM (WIN55,212-2; 0.1 µg/rat) increased RVLM orexin-A and BP. Finally, SB-408124 attenuated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM nNOS and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and BP. Our findings suggest that orexin-A/OX1R dependent activation of the RVLM nNOS/ERK1/2 cascade is essential neurochemical mechanism for the central CB1R–mediated pressor response in conscious rats. PMID:26096126

  10. A pivotal role for enhanced brainstem Orexin receptor 1 signaling in the central cannabinoid receptor 1-mediated pressor response in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2015-10-05

    Orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) signaling is implicated in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) modulation of feeding. Further, our studies established the dependence of the central CB1R-mediated pressor response on neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in the RVLM. Here, we tested the novel hypothesis that brainstem orexin-A/OX1R signaling plays a pivotal role in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response. Our multiple labeling immunofluorescence findings revealed co-localization of CB1R, OX1R and the peptide orexin-A within the C1 area of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Activation of central CB1R following intracisternal (i.c.) WIN55,212-2 (15μg/rat) in conscious rats caused significant increases in BP and orexin-A level in RVLM neuronal tissue. Additional studies established a causal role for orexin-A in the central CB1R-mediated pressor response because (i) selective blockade of central CB1R (AM251, 30μg/rat; i.c.) abrogated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM orexin-A level, (ii) the selective OX1R antagonist SB-408124 (10nmol/rat; i.c.) attenuated orexin-A (3nmol/rat; i.c.) or WIN55,212-2 (15μg/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response while selective CB1R blockade (AM251) had no effect on orexin-A (3nmol/rat; i.c.)-evoked pressor response, (iii) direct CB1R activation in the RVLM (WIN55,212-2; 0.1μg/rat) increased RVLM orexin-A and BP. Finally, SB-408124 attenuated WIN55,212-2-evoked increases in RVLM nNOS and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and BP. Our findings suggest that orexin-A/OX1R dependent activation of the RVLM nNOS/ERK1/2 cascade is essential neurochemical mechanism for the central CB1R-mediated pressor response in conscious rats.

  11. The endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyldopamine (NADA) exerts neuroprotective effects after excitotoxic neuronal damage via cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)).

    PubMed

    Grabiec, Urszula; Koch, Marco; Kallendrusch, Sonja; Kraft, Robert; Hill, Kerstin; Merkwitz, Claudia; Ghadban, Chalid; Lutz, Beat; Straiker, Alex; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2012-03-01

    Endocannabinoids exert numerous effects in the CNS under physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyldopamine (NADA) may protect neurons in excitotoxically lesioned organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC). OHSC were excitotoxically lesioned by application of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 50 μM) for 4 h and subsequently treated with different NADA concentrations (0.1 pM-50 μM) alone or in combination with cannabinoid receptor antagonists. NADA protected dentate gyrus granule cells and caused a slight reduction in the number of microglial cells. The number of degenerated neurons significantly decreased between 100 pM and 10 μM NADA (p < 0.05). To identify the responsive receptor type of NADA mediated neuroprotection, we applied the cannabinoid (CB) receptor 1 (CB(1)) inverse agonist/antagonist AM251, CB(2) inverse agonist/antagonist AM630, abnormal-cannabidiol (abn-CBD)-sensitive receptor antagonist O-1918, transient receptor potential channel V1 (TRPV1) antagonist 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin and A1 (TRPA1) antagonist HC-030031. Neuroprotective properties of low (1 nM) but not high (10 μM) NADA concentrations were solely blocked by AM251 and were absent in CB(1)(-/-) mice. AM630, O-1918, 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin and HC-030031 showed no effects at all NADA concentrations applied. Our findings demonstrate that NADA protects dentate gyrus granule cells by acting via CB(1). NADA reduced the number of microglial cells at distinct concentrations. TRPV1 and TRPA1 were not involved in NADA mediated neuroprotection. Thus, our data implicate that NADA mediated activation of neuronal CB(1) may serve as a novel pharmacological target to mitigate symptoms of neuronal damage.

  12. Marijuana withdrawal and craving: influence of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) genes.

    PubMed

    Haughey, Heather M; Marshall, Erin; Schacht, Joseph P; Louis, Ashleigh; Hutchison, Kent E

    2008-10-01

    To examine whether withdrawal after abstinence and cue-elicited craving were associated with polymorphisms within two genes involved in regulating the endocannabinoid system, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CNR1 (rs2023239) and FAAH (rs324420) genes, associated previously with substance abuse and functional changes in cannabinoid regulation, were examined in a sample of daily marijuana smokers. Participants were 105 students at the University of Colorado, Boulder between the ages of 18 and 25 years who reported smoking marijuana daily. Participants were assessed once at baseline and again after 5 days of abstinence, during which they were exposed to a cue-elicited craving paradigm. Outcome measures were withdrawal and craving collected using self-reported questionnaires. In addition, urine samples were collected at baseline and on day 5 for the purposes of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) metabolite analysis. Between the two sessions, THC-COOH metabolite levels decreased significantly, while measures of withdrawal and craving increased significantly. The CNR1 SNP displayed a significant abstinence x genotype interaction on withdrawal, as well as a main effect on overall levels of craving, while the FAAH SNP displayed a significant abstinence x genotype interaction on craving. These genetic findings may have both etiological and treatment implications. However, longitudinal studies will be needed to clarify whether these genetic variations influence the trajectory of marijuana use/dependence. The identification of underlying genetic differences in phenotypes such as craving and withdrawal may aid genetically targeted approaches to the treatment of cannabis dependence.

  13. Marijuana withdrawal and craving: influence of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) genes

    PubMed Central

    Haughey, Heather M.; Marshall, Erin; Schacht, Joseph P.; Louis, Ashleigh; Hutchison, Kent E.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To examine whether withdrawal after abstinence and cue-elicited craving were associated with polymorphisms within two genes involved in regulating the endocannabinoid system, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CNR1 (rs2023239) and FAAH (rs324420) genes, associated previously with substance abuse and functional changes in cannabinoid regulation, were examined in a sample of daily marijuana smokers. Participants Participants were 105 students at the University of Colorado, Boulder between the ages of 18 and 25 years who reported smoking marijuana daily. Measurements Participants were assessed once at baseline and again after 5 days of abstinence, during which they were exposed to a cue-elicited craving paradigm. Outcome measures were withdrawal and craving collected using self-reported questionnaires. In addition, urine samples were collected at baseline and on day 5 for the purposes of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC–COOH) metabolite analysis. Findings Between the two sessions, THC–COOH metabolite levels decreased significantly, while measures of withdrawal and craving increased significantly. The CNR1 SNP displayed a significant abstinence × genotype interaction on withdrawal, as well as a main effect on overall levels of craving, while the FAAH SNP displayed a significant abstinence × genotype interaction on craving. Conclusions These genetic findings may have both etiological and treatment implications. However, longitudinal studies will be needed to clarify whether these genetic variations influence the trajectory of marijuana use/dependence. The identification of underlying genetic differences in phenotypes such as craving and withdrawal may aid genetically targeted approaches to the treatment of cannabis dependence. PMID:18705688

  14. Expression of Cannabinoid Receptors in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage: Implications for Future Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Sara L.; Wilkinson, Jeremy Mark; Crawford, Aileen; Bunning, Rowena A.D.; Le Maitre, Christine L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Cannabinoids have shown to reduce joint damage in animal models of arthritis and reduce matrix metalloproteinase expression in primary human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The actions of cannabinoids are mediated by a number of receptors, including cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2), G-protein-coupled receptors 55 and 18 (GPR55 and GPR18), transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha and gamma (PPARα and PPARγ). However, to date very few studies have investigated the expression and localization of these receptors in human chondrocytes, and expression during degeneration, and thus their potential in clinical applications is unknown. Methods: Human articular cartilage from patients with symptomatic OA was graded histologically and the expression and localization of cannabinoid receptors within OA cartilage and underlying bone were determined immunohistochemically. Expression levels across regions of cartilage and changes with degeneration were investigated. Results: Expression of all the cannabinoid receptors investigated was observed with no change with grade of degeneration seen in the expression of CB1, CB2, GPR55, PPARα, and PPARγ. Conversely, the number of chondrocytes within the deep zone of cartilage displaying immunopositivity for GPR18 and TRPV1 was significantly decreased in degenerate cartilage. Receptor expression was higher in chondrocytes than in osteocytes in the underlying bone. Conclusions: Chondrocytes from OA joints were shown to express a wide range of cannabinoid receptors even in degenerate tissues, demonstrating that these cells could respond to cannabinoids. Cannabinoids designed to bind to receptors inhibiting the catabolic and pain pathways within the arthritic joint, while avoiding psychoactive effects, could provide potential arthritis therapies. PMID:28861474

  15. Sex-dependence of anxiety-like behavior in cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Mallory E.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological data suggest women are at increased risk for developing anxiety and depression, although the mechanisms for this sex/gender difference remain incompletely understood. Pre-clinical studies have begun to investigate sex-dependent emotional learning and behavior in rodents, particularly as it relates to psychopathology; however, information about how gonadal hormones interact with the central nervous system is limited. We observe greater anxiety-like behavior in male mice with global knockout of the cannabinoid 1 receptor (Cnr1) compared to male, wild-type controls as measured by percent open arm entries on an elevated plus maze test. A similar increase in anxiety-like behavior, however, is not observed when comparing female Cnr1 knockouts to female wild-type subjects. Although, ovariectomy in female mice did not reverse this effect, both male and female adult mice with normative development were sensitive to Cnr1 antagonist-mediated increases in anxiety-like behavior. Together, these data support an interaction between sex, potentially mediated by gonadal hormones, and the endocannabinoid system at an early stage of development that is critical for establishing adult anxiety-like behavior. PMID:26684509

  16. Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1.

    PubMed

    Hua, Tian; Vemuri, Kiran; Pu, Mengchen; Qu, Lu; Han, Gye Won; Wu, Yiran; Zhao, Suwen; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Shanshan; Korde, Anisha; Laprairie, Robert B; Stahl, Edward L; Ho, Jo-Hao; Zvonok, Nikolai; Zhou, Han; Kufareva, Irina; Wu, Beili; Zhao, Qiang; Hanson, Michael A; Bohn, Laura M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Stevens, Raymond C; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2016-10-20

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive chemical from Cannabis sativa with a wide range of therapeutic applications and a long history of recreational use. CB1 is activated by endocannabinoids and is a promising therapeutic target for pain management, inflammation, obesity, and substance abuse disorders. Here, we present the 2.8 Å crystal structure of human CB1 in complex with AM6538, a stabilizing antagonist, synthesized and characterized for this structural study. The structure of the CB1-AM6538 complex reveals key features of the receptor and critical interactions for antagonist binding. In combination with functional studies and molecular modeling, the structure provides insight into the binding mode of naturally occurring CB1 ligands, such as THC, and synthetic cannabinoids. This enhances our understanding of the molecular basis for the physiological functions of CB1 and provides new opportunities for the design of next-generation CB1-targeting pharmaceuticals.

  17. Human studies of cannabinoids and medicinal cannabis.

    PubMed

    Robson, P

    2005-01-01

    Cannabis has been known as a medicine for several thousand years across many cultures. It reached a position of prominence within Western medicine in the nineteenth century but became mired in disrepute and legal controls early in the twentieth century. Despite unremitting world-wide suppression, recreational cannabis exploded into popular culture in the 1960s and has remained easily obtainable on the black market in most countries ever since. This ready availability has allowed many thousands of patients to rediscover the apparent power of the drug to alleviate symptoms of some of the most cruel and refractory diseases known to humankind. Pioneering clinical research in the last quarter of the twentieth century has given some support to these anecdotal reports, but the methodological challenges to human research involving a pariah drug are formidable. Studies have tended to be small, imperfectly controlled, and have often incorporated unsatisfactory synthetic cannabinoid analogues or smoked herbal material of uncertain composition and irregular bioavailability. As a result, the scientific evaluation of medicinal cannabis in humans is still in its infancy. New possibilities in human research have been opened up by the discovery of the endocannabinoid system, a rapidly expanding knowledge of cannabinoid pharmacology, and a more sympathetic political environment in several countries. More and more scientists and clinicians are becoming interested in exploring the potential of cannabis-based medicines. Future targets will extend beyond symptom relief into disease modification, and already cannabinoids seem to offer particular promise in the treatment of certain inflammatory and neurodegenerative conditions. This chapter will begin with an outline of the development and current status of legal controls pertaining to cannabis, following which the existing human research will be reviewed. Some key safety issues will then be considered, and the chapter will conclude with

  18. Cannabinoid receptor 1 gene polymorphisms and nonalcoholic Fatty liver disease in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and in healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Kuliczkowska Plaksej, Justyna; Laczmanski, Lukasz; Milewicz, Andrzej; Lenarcik-Kabza, A; Trzmiel-Bira, Anna; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Lwow, Felicja; Hirnle, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    Context. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is frequently associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The endocannabinoid system may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Polymorphism of the cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) may be responsible for individual susceptibility to obesity and related conditions. Objective. To determine the role of genetic variants of CNR1 in the etiopathology of NAFLD in women with PCOS. Design and Setting. Our department (a tertiary referral center) conducted a cross-sectional, case-controlled study. Subjects. 173 women with PCOS (aged 20-35) and 125 healthy, age- and weight-matched controls were studied. Methods. Hepatic steatosis was assessed by ultrasound evaluation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of CNR1 (rs806368, rs12720071, rs1049353, rs806381, rs10485170, rs6454674) were genotyped. Results. Frequency of the G allele of rs806381 (P < 0.025) and the GG genotype of rs10485170 (P < 0.03) was significantly higher in women with PCOS and NAFLD than in PCOS women without NAFLD. Frequency of the TT genotype of rs6454674 was higher in PCOS women with NAFLD (not significantly, P = 0.059). In multivariate stepwise regression, allele G of rs806381 was associated with PCOS + NAFLD phenotype. Conclusion. Our preliminary results suggest the potential role of CNR1 polymorphisms in the etiology of NAFLD, especially in PCOS women.

  19. Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Gene Polymorphisms and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and in Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Kuliczkowska Plaksej, Justyna; Milewicz, Andrzej; Lenarcik-Kabza, A.; Trzmiel-Bira, Anna; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula; Hirnle, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    Context. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is frequently associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The endocannabinoid system may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Polymorphism of the cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) may be responsible for individual susceptibility to obesity and related conditions. Objective. To determine the role of genetic variants of CNR1 in the etiopathology of NAFLD in women with PCOS. Design and Setting. Our department (a tertiary referral center) conducted a cross-sectional, case-controlled study. Subjects. 173 women with PCOS (aged 20–35) and 125 healthy, age- and weight-matched controls were studied. Methods. Hepatic steatosis was assessed by ultrasound evaluation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of CNR1 (rs806368, rs12720071, rs1049353, rs806381, rs10485170, rs6454674) were genotyped. Results. Frequency of the G allele of rs806381 (P < 0.025) and the GG genotype of rs10485170 (P < 0.03) was significantly higher in women with PCOS and NAFLD than in PCOS women without NAFLD. Frequency of the TT genotype of rs6454674 was higher in PCOS women with NAFLD (not significantly, P = 0.059). In multivariate stepwise regression, allele G of rs806381 was associated with PCOS + NAFLD phenotype. Conclusion. Our preliminary results suggest the potential role of CNR1 polymorphisms in the etiology of NAFLD, especially in PCOS women. PMID:25136364

  20. Cannabinoid receptor 1 in the vagus nerve is dispensable for body weight homeostasis but required for normal gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Claudia R; Donato, Jose; Rossi, Jari; Scott, Michael; Economides, Kyriakos; Gautron, Lauren; Pierpont, Stephanie; Elias, Carol F; Elmquist, Joel K

    2012-07-25

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)R) is required for body weight homeostasis and normal gastrointestinal motility. However, the specific cell types expressing CB(1)R that regulate these physiological functions are unknown. CB(1)R is widely expressed, including in neurons of the parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system. The vagus nerve has been implicated in the regulation of several aspects of metabolism and energy balance (e.g., food intake and glucose balance), and gastrointestinal functions including motility. To directly test the relevance of CB(1)R in neurons of the vagus nerve on metabolic homeostasis and gastrointestinal motility, we generated and characterized mice lacking CB(1)R in afferent and efferent branches of the vagus nerve (Cnr1(flox/flox); Phox2b-Cre mice). On a chow or on a high-fat diet, Cnr1(flox/flox); Phox2b-Cre mice have similar body weight, food intake, energy expenditure, and glycemia compared with Cnr1(flox/flox) control mice. Also, fasting-induced hyperphagia and after acute or chronic pharmacological treatment with SR141716 [N-piperidino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-3-pyrazole carboxamide] (CB(1)R inverse agonist) paradigms, mutants display normal body weight and food intake. Interestingly, Cnr1(flox/flox); Phox2b-Cre mice have increased gastrointestinal motility compared with controls. These results unveil CB(1)R in the vagus nerve as a key component underlying normal gastrointestinal motility.

  1. Cannabinoid receptor 1 contributes to sprouted innervation in endometrial ectopic growth through mitogen-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongxiu; Liang, Xizi; Wang, Juan; Zhao, Qianqian; Yang, Mei; Rong, Weifang; Zhang, Guohua

    2017-05-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates neurite outgrowth and neurogenesis during development of the central nervous system. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is expressed in neurons, including the somata and fibers, that innervate the endometrial ectopic cyst in rats. Here, we investigated the contribution of CB1R and its downstream signaling to the innervation of endometrial ectopic growth. We found that intrathecal injection of a CB1R agonist enhanced both the density of protein gene product (PGP) 9.5-immunoreactive sprouted nerve fibers and the protein level of PGP 9.5 of the ectopic cyst, and the CB1R antagonist induced opposite effects. The CB1R agonist increased the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (pJNK), but not pp38, in dorsal root ganglion (DRG), whereas the CB1R antagonist only decreased the expression of pERK. In cultured DRG neurons, CB1R agonists dose-dependently increased neurite elongation. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) and JNK inhibitors, but not the p38 inhibitor, attenuated CB1R agonist-induced neurite elongation. The inhibitions of CB1R and its downstream ERK and JNK signaling pathways may alleviate the sprouted innervation that has been involved in ENDO-associated pain. This finding may provide a new therapeutic target for patients with endometriosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of cannabinoid receptor 2 and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 functional responses using a cell impedance-based technology.

    PubMed

    Scandroglio, Paola; Brusa, Rossella; Lozza, Gianluca; Mancini, Isabella; Petrò, Roberta; Reggiani, Angelo; Beltramo, Massimiliano

    2010-12-01

    Recently, new technologies based on biosensors and called label free have been developed. These technologies eliminate the need for using markers and dyes. The authors applied one of these technologies, based on measurement of cell impedance variation, to study the pharmacological profiles of ligands for the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), a Gi-coupled receptor, and for the metabopotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1), a Gq-coupled receptor. Reference agonists and antagonists/inverse agonists for the 2 receptors were applied to recombinant cell lines and impedance monitored over time. Agonists (JWH133 and CP55940 for CB2; quisqualate, glutamate, 1S-3R-ACPD, and S-3,5-DHPG for mGluR1) triggered a variation of impedance consistent in both potency and efficacy with data obtained using classical assays measuring cAMP or Ca(2+) levels. This effect was not present in the parental nontransfected cell line, confirming specific receptor-mediated response. Application of antagonists (AM630 for CB2; YM298198, SCH1014222, J&J16259685, and CPCCOEt for mGluR1) reduced agonist-induced impedance changes. The only exception was the mGluR1 antagonist BAY367620 that, while active in the Ca(2+) assay, was inactive in the impedance assay. Overall, these results confirm the possibility of using cell impedance-based technology to study the pharmacological profile of ligands acting at G-protein-coupled receptors coupled to different downstream signaling pathways.

  3. Evaluation of Phytocannabinoids from High Potency Cannabis sativa using In Vitro Bioassays to Determine Structure-Activity Relationships for Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Cannabinoid Receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Husni, Afeef S; McCurdy, Christopher R; Radwan, Mohamed M; Ahmed, Safwat A; Slade, Desmond; Ross, Samir A; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Cutler, Stephen J

    2014-09-01

    Cannabis has been around for thousands of years and has been used recreationally, medicinally, and for fiber. Over 500 compounds have been isolated from Cannabis sativa with approximately 105 being cannabinoids. Of those 105 compounds, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol has been determined as the primary constituent, which is also responsible for the psychoactivity associated with Cannabis. Cannabinoid receptors belong to the large superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. Targeting the cannabinoid receptors has the potential to treat a variety of conditions such as pain, neurodegeneration, appetite, immune function, anxiety, cancer, and others. Developing in vitro bioassays to determine binding and functional activity of compounds has the ability to lead researchers to develop a safe and effective drug that may target the cannabinoid receptors. Using radioligand binding and functional bioassays, a structure-activity relationship for major and minor cannabinoids was developed.

  4. Impaired Ethanol-Induced Sensitization and Decreased Cannabinoid Receptor-1 in a Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Matchynski-Franks, Jessica J.; Susick, Laura L.; Schneider, Brandy L.; Perrine, Shane A.; Conti, Alana C.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Impaired striatal neuroplasticity may underlie increased alcoholism documented in those with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) is sensitive to the effects of ethanol (EtOH) and traumatic stress, and is a critical regulator of striatal plasticity. To investigate CB1 involvement in the PTSD-alcohol interaction, this study measured the effects of traumatic stress using a model of PTSD, mouse single-prolonged stress (mSPS), on EtOH-induced locomotor sensitization and striatal CB1 levels. Methods Mice were exposed to mSPS, which includes: 2-h restraint, 10-min group forced swim, 15-min exposure to rat bedding odor, and diethyl ether exposure until unconsciousness or control conditions. Seven days following mSPS exposure, the locomotor sensitizing effects of EtOH were assessed. CB1, post-synaptic density-95 (PSD95), and dopamine-2 receptor (D2) protein levels were then quantified in the dorsal striatum using standard immunoblotting techniques. Results Mice exposed to mSPS-EtOH demonstrated impaired EtOH-induced locomotor sensitization compared to Control-EtOH mice, which was accompanied by reduced striatal CB1 levels. EtOH increased striatal PSD95 in control and mSPS-exposed mice. Additionally, mSPS-Saline exposure increased striatal PSD95 and decreased D2 protein expression, with mSPS-EtOH exposure alleviating these changes. Conclusions These data indicate that the mSPS model of PTSD blunts the behavioral sensitizing effects of EtOH, a response that suggests impaired striatal neuroplasticity. Additionally, this study demonstrates that mice exposed to mSPS and repeated EtOH exposure decreases CB1 in the striatum, providing a mechanism of interest for understanding the effects of EtOH following severe, multimodal stress exposure. PMID:27186643

  5. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/-) mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity. Whether this phenotype of CB1-/- mice is related to altered fat metabolism in adipose tissue is unknown. Methods We evaluated adipose tissue differentiation/proliferation markers and quantified lipogenic and lipolytic activities in fat tissues of CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice fed a high-fat (HF) or a high-fat/fish oil (HF/FO) diet as compared to animals receiving a low-fat chow diet. Comparison between HF diet and HF/FO diet allowed to investigate the influence of dietary fat quality on adipose tissue biology in relation to CB1 functioning. Results The adiposity-resistant phenotype of the CB1-/- mice was characterized by reduced fat mass and adipocyte size in HF and HF/FO-fed CB1-/- mice in parallel to a significant increase in energy expenditure as compared to CB1+/+ mice. The expression levels of adipocyte differentiation and proliferation markers were however maintained in these animals. Consistent with unaltered lipogenic gene expression, the fatty acid synthesis rates in adipose tissues from CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice were unchanged. Whole-body and adipose-specific lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities were also not altered in CB1-/- mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that protection against diet-induced adiposity in CB1-deficient mice is not related to changes in adipocyte function per se, but rather results from increased energy dissipation by oxidative and non-oxidative pathways. PMID:22201701

  6. Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Gene Polymorphisms and Marijuana Misuse Interactions On White Matter and Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Beng-Choon; Wassink, Thomas H.; Ziebell, Steven; Andreasen, Nancy C.

    2011-01-01

    Marijuana exposure during the critical period of adolescent brain maturation may disrupt neuro-modulatory influences of endocannabinoids and increase schizophrenia susceptibility. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1/CNR1) is the principal brain receptor mediating marijuana effects. No study to-date has systematically investigated the impact of CNR1 on quantitative phenotypic features in schizophrenia and inter-relationships with marijuana misuse. We genotyped 235 schizophrenia patients using 12 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) that account for most of CB1 coding region genetic variability. Patients underwent a high-resolution anatomic brain magnetic resonance scan and cognitive assessment. Almost a quarter of the sample met DSM marijuana abuse (14%) or dependence (8%) criteria. Effects of CNR1 tSNPs and marijuana abuse/dependence on brain volumes and neurocognition were assessed using ANCOVA, including co-morbid alcohol/non-marijuana illicit drug misuse as covariates. Significant main effects of CNR1 tSNPs (rs7766029, rs12720071, and rs9450898) were found in white matter (WM) volumes. Patients with marijuana abuse/dependence had smaller fronto-temporal WM volumes than patients without heavy marijuana use. More interestingly, there were significant rs12720071 genotype-by-marijuana use interaction effects on WM volumes and neurocognitive impairment; suggestive of gene-environment interactions for conferring phenotypic abnormalities in schizophrenia. In this comprehensive evaluation of genetic variants distributed across the CB1 locus, CNR1 genetic polymorphisms were associated with WM brain volume variation among schizophrenia patients. Our findings suggest that heavy cannabis use in the context of specific CNR1 genotypes may contribute to greater WM volume deficits and cognitive impairment, which could in turn increase schizophrenia risk. PMID:21420833

  7. Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Promotes Hepatocellular Carcinoma Initiation and Progression via Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Schuebel, Kornel; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Cinar, Resat; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Xiong, Keming; Mackie, Ken; Lizak, Martin; Yuan, Qiaoping; Goldman, David; Kunos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has high mortality and no adequate treatment. Endocannabinoids interact with hepatic CB1 receptors (CB1R) to promote hepatocyte proliferation in liver regeneration via inducing cell-cycle proteins involved in mitotic progression, including Forkhead Box M1 (FOXM1). Because FOXM1 is highly expressed in HCC and contributes to its genesis and progression, we analyzed the involvement of the endocannabinoid/CB1R system in murine and human HCC. Postnatal diethylnitrosamine (DEN) treatment induced HCC within 8 months in wild-type mice, but fewer and smaller tumors in CB1R−/− mice or in wild-type mice treated with the peripheral CB1R antagonist JD5037, as monitored in vivo by serial magnetic resonance imaging. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed CB1R-dependent, tumor-induced upregulation of the hepatic expression of CB1R, its endogenous ligand anandamide, and a number of tumor promoting genes, including the GRB2 interactome as well as FOXM1 and its downstream target the tryptophan-catalyzing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO2). Increased IDO2 activity and consequent induction of immunosuppressive Treg cells in tumor tissue promote immune tolerance. Conclusion The endocannabinoid/CB1R system is upregulated in chemically induced HCC resulting in the induction of various tumor promoting genes, including IDO2, and attenuation of these changes by blockade or genetic ablation of CB1R suppresses the growth of HCC and highlights the therapeutic potential of peripheral CB1R blockade. PMID:25580584

  8. Dual Role of the Second Extracellular Loop of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1: Ligand Binding and Receptor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Kwang H.; Bertalovitz, Alexander C.; Mierke, Dale F.

    2009-01-01

    The seven transmembrane α-helices of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the hallmark of this superfamily. Intrahelical interactions are critical to receptor assembly and, for the GPCR subclass that binds small molecules, ligand binding. Most research has focused on identifying the ligand binding pocket within the helical bundle, whereas the role of the extracellular loops remains undefined. Molecular modeling of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) extracellular loop 2 (EC2), however, suggests that EC2 is poised for key interactions. To test this possibility, we employed alanine scanning mutagenesis of CB1 EC2 and identified two distinct regions critical for ligand binding, G protein coupling activity, and receptor trafficking. Receptors with mutations in the N terminus of EC2 (W255A, N256A) were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and did not bind the agonist (1R,3R,4R)-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-phenyl]-4-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexan-1-ol (CP55940) or the inverse agonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide(SR141716A). In contrast, the C terminus of EC2 differentiates agonist and inverse agonist; the P269A, H270A, and I271A receptors exhibited diminished binding for several agonists but bound inverse agonists SR141716A, N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251), and 4-[6-methoxy-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)benzofuran-3-carbonyl]benzonitrile (LY320135) with wild-type receptor affinity. The F268A receptor involving substitution in the Cys-X-X-X-Ar motif, displayed both impaired localization and ligand binding. Other amino acid substitutions at position 268 revealed that highly hydrophobic residues are required to accomplish both functions. It is noteworthy that a F268W receptor was trafficked to the cell surface yet displayed differential binding preference for inverse agonists comparable with the P269A, H270A, and I271A receptors. The findings

  9. Enkephalin levels and the number of neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons in the hippocampus are decreased in female cannabinoid-receptor 1 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sophie A; Kempen, Tracey A Van; Pickel, Virginia M; Milner, Teresa A

    2016-05-04

    Drug addiction requires learning and memory processes that are facilitated by activation of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) and opioid receptors in the hippocampus. This involves activity-dependent synaptic plasticity that is partially regulated by endogenous opioid (enkephalin and dynorphin) and non-opioid peptides, specifically cholecystokinin, parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y, the neuropeptides present in inhibitory interneurons that co-express CB1 or selective opioid receptors. We tested the hypothesis that CB1 receptor expression is a determinant of the availability of one or more of these peptide modulators in the hippocampus. This was achieved by quantitatively analyzing the immunoperoxidase labeling for each of these neuropeptide in the dorsal hippocampus of female wild-type (CB1+/+) and cannabinoid receptor 1 knockout (CB1-/-) C57/BL6 mice. The levels of Leu(5)-enkephalin-immunoreactivity were significantly reduced in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and in stratum lucidum of CA3 in CB1-/- mice. Moreover, the numbers of neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive interneurons in the dentate hilus were significantly lower in the CB1-/- compared to wild-type mice. However, CB1+/+ and CB1-/- mice did not significantly differ in expression levels of either dynorphin or cholecystokinin, and showed no differences in numbers of parvalbumin-containing interneurons. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid and opioid systems have a nuanced, regulatory relationship that could affect the balance of excitation and inhibition in the hippocampus and thus processes such as learning that rely on this balance.

  10. Effect of the cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist rimonabant on inflammation in mice with diet-induced obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We studied whether cannabinoid receptor (CB1) blockade with rimonabant has an anti-inflammatory effect in obese mice, and whether this effect depends on weight loss and/or diet consumption. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice were treated orally with rimonabant (HFD-R) or vehicle (HFD-V) for 4 we...

  11. Vascular targets for cannabinoids: animal and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2014-01-01

    Application of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids to perfused vascular beds or individual isolated arteries results in changes in vascular resistance. In most cases, the result is vasorelaxation, although vasoconstrictor responses are also observed. Cannabinoids also modulate the actions of vasoactive compounds including acetylcholine, methoxamine, angiotensin II and U46619 (thromboxane mimetic). Numerous mechanisms of action have been proposed including receptor activation, potassium channel activation, calcium channel inhibition and the production of vasoactive mediators such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, prostanoids, NO, endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor and hydrogen peroxide. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence for the range of receptors now known to be activated by cannabinoids. Direct activation by cannabinoids of CB1, CBe, TRPV1 (and potentially other TRP channels) and PPARs in the vasculature has been observed. A potential role for CB2, GPR55 and 5-HT1A has also been identified in some studies. Indirectly, activation of prostanoid receptors (TP, IP, EP1 and EP4) and the CGRP receptor is involved in the vascular responses to cannabinoids. The majority of this evidence has been obtained through animal research, but recent work has confirmed some of these targets in human arteries. Vascular responses to cannabinoids are enhanced in hypertension and cirrhosis, but are reduced in obesity and diabetes, both due to changes in the target sites of action. Much further work is required to establish the extent of vascular actions of cannabinoids and the application of this research in physiological and pathophysiological situations. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:24329566

  12. Increased Expression of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in Achilles Tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Björklund, Emmelie; Forsgren, Sture; Alfredson, Håkan; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in the control of pain. However, little is known as to the integrity of the cannabinoid system in human pain syndromes. Here we investigate the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in human Achilles tendons from healthy volunteers and from patients with Achilles tendinosis. Methodology Cannabinoid CB1 receptor immunoreactivity (CB1IR) was evaluated in formalin-fixed biopsies from individuals suffering from painful Achilles tendinosis in comparison with healthy human Achilles tendons. Principal Findings CB1IR was seen as a granular pattern in the tenocytes. CB1IR was also observed in the blood vessel wall and in the perineurium of the nerve. Quantification of the immunoreactivity in tenocytes showed an increase of CB1 receptor expression in tendinosis tissue compared to control tissue. Conclusion Expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 is increased in human Achilles tendinosis suggesting that the cannabinoid system may be dysregulated in this disorder. PMID:21931835

  13. Effects of gonadal hormones on the peripheral cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) system under a myositis condition in rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Katelyn Y; Zhang, Youping; Ro, Jin Y

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we assessed the effects of peripherally administered cannabinoids in an orofacial myositis model, and the role of sex hormones in cannabinoid receptor (CBR) expression in trigeminal ganglia (TG). Peripherally administered arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA), a specific CB1R agonist, significantly attenuated complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in the masseter muscle in male rats. The ACPA effect was blocked by a local administration of AM251, a specific CB1R antagonist, but not by AM630, a specific CB2R antagonist. In female rats, a 30-fold higher dose of ACPA was required to produce a moderate reduction in mechanical hypersensitivity. CFA injected in masseter muscle significantly upregulated CB1R mRNA expression in TG in male, but not in female, rats. There was a close correlation between the CB1R mRNA levels in TG and the antihyperalgesic effect of ACPA. Interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, which are elevated in the muscle tissue following CFA treatment, induced a significant upregulation of CB1R mRNA expression in TG from male rats. The upregulation of CB1R was prevented in TG cultures from orchidectomized male rats, which was restored by the application of testosterone. The cytokines did not alter the CB1R mRNA level in TG from intact as well as ovariectomized female rats. Neither estradiol supplement nor estrogen receptor blockade had any effects on CB1R expression. These data indicate that testosterone, but not estradiol, is required for the regulation of CB1Rs in TG under inflammatory conditions, which provide explanations for the sex differences in the antihyperalgesic effects of peripherally administered cannabinoids. Copyright © 2012 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 and glutamate signaling in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Jin; Shin, Seung-Shick; Lee, Hwa Jin; Marín, Yarí E; Wall, Brian A; Goydos, James S; Chen, Suzie

    2007-03-01

    Recently, several laboratories have started to investigate the involvement of glutamate signaling in cancer. In previous studies, we reported on a transgenic mouse model that develops melanoma spontaneously. Subsequent studies in these mice identified that the aberrant expression of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1) in melanocytes played a critical role in the onset of melanoma. Confirmation of the etiologic role of GRM1 in melanoma development was shown in a second transgenic line with GRM1 expression under the regulation of a melanocyte-specific dopachrome tautomerase promoter. Ectopic expression of GRM1 was also detected in a subset of human melanoma cell lines and biopsies, suggesting that aberrant expression of GRM1 in melanocytes may contribute to the development of human melanoma. GRM1, a seven-transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptor, is normally expressed and functional in neuronal cells, and its ligand, glutamate, is the major excitatory neurotransmitter. Human melanoma cells are shown here to release elevated levels of glutamate, implying a possible autocrine loop. Treatment of GRM1-expressing human melanoma cells with a GRM1 antagonist (LY367385 or BAY36-7620) or a glutamate release inhibitor (riluzole) leads to a suppression of cell proliferation as well as a decrease in levels of extracellular glutamate. Treatment of human melanoma cell xenografts with riluzole for 18 days via p.o. gavage or i.v. injection leads to inhibition of tumor growth by 50% in comparison with controls. These data suggest the importance of glutamate signaling in human melanoma and imply that the suppression of glutamate signaling may be a new target for melanoma therapy.

  15. Mice Expressing a "Hyper-Sensitive" Form of the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1) Are Neither Obese Nor Diabetic

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Mary-Jeanette; Amin, Randa; Henderson-Redmond, Angela N.; Mackie, Ken; Czyzyk, Traci A.; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence implicate the endocannabinoid signaling system in the modulation of metabolic disease. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of CB1 in rodents leads to reduced body weight, resistance to diet-induced obesity, decreased intake of highly palatable food, and increased energy expenditure. Cannabinoid agonists stimulate feeding in rodents and increased levels of endocannabinoids can disrupt lipid metabolism. Therefore, the hypothesis that sustained endocannabinoid signaling can lead to obesity and diabetes was examined in this study using S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing a desensitization-resistant CB1 receptor. These mice display exaggerated and prolonged responses to acute administration of phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids, and endocannabinoids. As a consequence these mice represent a novel model for determining the effect of enhanced endocannabinoid signaling on metabolic disease. S426A/S430A mutants consumed equivalent amounts of both high fat (45%) and low fat (10%) chow control diet compared to wild-type littermate controls. S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice fed either high or low fat control diet displayed similar fasting blood glucose levels and normal glucose clearance following a 2 g/kg glucose challenge. Furthermore, S426A/S430A mutants and wild-type mice consumed similar amounts of chow following an overnight fast. While both THC and JZL195 significantly increased food intake two hours after injection, this increase was similar between the S426A/S430A mutant and wildtype control mice Our results indicate that S426A/S430A mutant mice expressing the desensitization-resistant form of CB1 do not exhibit differences in body weight, food intake, glucose homeostasis, or re-feeding following a fast. PMID:27501235

  16. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Melck, Dominique; Palmisano, Antonella; Bisogno, Tiziana; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of “central” CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 μM and 83–92% maximal inhibition at 5–10 μM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 μM anandamide. The anti-proliferative effect of anandamide was not due to toxicity or to apoptosis of cells but was accompanied by a reduction of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. A stable analogue of anandamide (R)-methanandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 also inhibited EFM-19 cell proliferation, whereas arachidonic acid was much less effective. These cannabimimetic substances displaced the binding of the selective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP 55,940 to EFM-19 membranes with an order of potency identical to that observed for the inhibition of EFM-19 cell proliferation. Moreover, anandamide cytostatic effect was inhibited by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Cell proliferation was arrested by a prolactin mAb and enhanced by exogenous human prolactin, whose mitogenic action was reverted by very low (0.1–0.5 μM) doses of anandamide. Anandamide suppressed the levels of the long form of the prolactin receptor in both EFM-19 and MCF-7 cells, as well as a typical prolactin-induced response, i.e., the expression of the breast cancer cell susceptibility gene brca1. These data suggest that anandamide blocks human breast cancer cell proliferation through CB1-like receptor-mediated inhibition of endogenous prolactin action at the level of prolactin receptor. PMID:9653194

  17. Mechanical and material properties of cortical and trabecular bone from cannabinoid receptor-1-null (Cnr1(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Aysha B; Goodyear, Simon R; Ross, Ruth A; Aspden, Richard M

    2016-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system is known for its regulatory effects on bone metabolism through the cannabinoid receptors, Cnr1 and Cnr2. In this study we analysed the mechanical and material properties of long bones from Cnr1(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6 background. Tibiae and femora from 5- and 12-week-old mice were subjected to three-point bending to measure bending stiffness and yield strength. Elastic modulus, density and mineral content were measured in the diaphysis. Second moment of area (MOA2), inner and outer perimeters of the cortical shaft and trabecular fractional bone volume (BV/TV) were measured using micro-CT. In Cnr1(-/-) males and females at both ages the bending stiffness was reduced due to a smaller MOA2. Bone from Cnr1(-/-) females had a greater modulus than wild-type controls, although no differences were observed in males. BV/TV of 12-week-old Cnr1(-/-) females was greater than controls, although no difference was seen at 5-weeks. On the contrary, Cnr1(-/-) males had the same BV/TV as controls at 12-weeks while they had significantly lower values at 5-weeks. This study shows that deleting Cnr1 decreases the amount of cortical bone in both males and females at 12-weeks, but increases the amount of trabecular bone only in females. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fasting Induces CART Down-Regulation in the Zebrafish Nervous System in a Cannabinoid Receptor 1-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Nishio, Shin-Ichi; Gibert, Yann; Berekelya, Liubov; Bernard, Laure; Brunet, Frédéric; Guillot, Etienne; Le Bail, Jean-Christophe; Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Galzin, Anne Marie; Triqueneaux, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Central and peripheral mechanisms modulate food intake and energy balance in mammals and the precise role of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) in these processes is still being explored. Using the zebrafish, Danio rerio, we show that rimonabant, a CB1-specific antagonist with an EC50 of 5.15 × 10−8 m, decreases embryonic yolk sac reserve use. We reveal a developmental overlap between CART genes and CB1 expression in the hypothalamus and medulla oblongata, two brain structures that play crucial roles in appetite regulation in mammals. We show that morpholino knockdown of CB1 or fasting decreases cocaine- and amphetamine-related transcript (CART)-3 expression. Strikingly, this down-regulation occurs only in regions coexpressing CB1 and CART3, reinforcing the link between CB1, CART, and appetite regulation. We show that rimonabant treatment impairs the fasting-induced down-regulation of CART expression in specific brain regions, whereas vehicle alone-treated embryos do not display this rescue of CART expression. Our data reveal that CB1 lies upstream of CART and signals the appetite through the down-regulation of CART expression. Thus, our results establish the zebrafish as a promising system to study appetite regulation. PMID:22700585

  19. Electroacupuncture Inhibition of Hyperalgesia in Rats with Adjuvant Arthritis: Involvement of Cannabinoid Receptor 1 and Dopamine Receptor Subtypes in Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yin; Yang, Yang; Xu, Ming-Shu; Zhao, Ying-Qian; Ge, Lin-Bao; Zhang, Bi-Meng

    2013-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been regarded as an alternative treatment for inflammatory pain for several decades. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the antinociceptive effect of EA have not been thoroughly clarified. Previous studies have shown that cannabinoid CB1 receptors are related to pain relief. Accumulating evidence has shown that the CB1 and dopamine systems sometimes interact and may operate synergistically in rat striatum. To our knowledge, dopamine D1/D2 receptors are involved in EA analgesia. In this study, we found that repeated EA at Zusanli (ST36) and Kunlun (BL60) acupoints resulted in marked improvements in thermal hyperalgesia. Both western blot assays and FQ-PCR analysis results showed that the levels of CB1 expression in the repeated-EA group were much higher than those in any other group (P = 0.001). The CB1-selective antagonist AM251 inhibited the effects of repeated EA by attenuating the increases in CB1 expression. The two kinds of dopamine receptors imparted different actions on the EA-induced CB1 upregulation in AA rat model. These results suggested that the strong activation of the CB1 receptor after repeated EA resulted in the concomitant phenomenon of the upregulation of D1 and D2 levels of gene expression. PMID:23762129

  20. Fasting induces CART down-regulation in the zebrafish nervous system in a cannabinoid receptor 1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Shin-Ichi; Gibert, Yann; Berekelya, Liubov; Bernard, Laure; Brunet, Frédéric; Guillot, Etienne; Le Bail, Jean-Christophe; Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Galzin, Anne Marie; Triqueneaux, Gerard; Laudet, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    Central and peripheral mechanisms modulate food intake and energy balance in mammals and the precise role of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) in these processes is still being explored. Using the zebrafish, Danio rerio, we show that rimonabant, a CB1-specific antagonist with an EC(50) of 5.15 × 10(-8) m, decreases embryonic yolk sac reserve use. We reveal a developmental overlap between CART genes and CB1 expression in the hypothalamus and medulla oblongata, two brain structures that play crucial roles in appetite regulation in mammals. We show that morpholino knockdown of CB1 or fasting decreases cocaine- and amphetamine-related transcript (CART)-3 expression. Strikingly, this down-regulation occurs only in regions coexpressing CB1 and CART3, reinforcing the link between CB1, CART, and appetite regulation. We show that rimonabant treatment impairs the fasting-induced down-regulation of CART expression in specific brain regions, whereas vehicle alone-treated embryos do not display this rescue of CART expression. Our data reveal that CB1 lies upstream of CART and signals the appetite through the down-regulation of CART expression. Thus, our results establish the zebrafish as a promising system to study appetite regulation.

  1. C-terminal truncated cannabinoid receptor 1 coexpressed with G protein trimer in Sf9 cells exists in a precoupled state and shows constitutive activity.

    PubMed

    Chillakuri, Chandramouli Reddy; Reinhart, Christoph; Michel, Hartmut

    2007-12-01

    We have investigated the existence of a precoupled form of the distal C-terminal truncated cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1-417) and heterotrimeric G proteins in a heterologous insect cell expression system. CB1-417 showed higher production levels than the full-length receptor. The production levels obtained in our expression system were double the values reported in the literature. We also observed that at least the distal C-terminus of the receptor was not involved in receptor dimerization, as was predicted in the literature. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we found that CB1-417 and Galpha(i1)beta(1)gamma(2) proteins were colocalized in the cells. GTPgammaS binding assays with the Sf9 cell membranes containing CB1-417 and the G protein trimer showed that the receptor could constitutively activate the Galpha(i1) protein in the absence of agonists. A CB1-specific antagonist (SR 141716A) inhibited this constitutive activity of the truncated receptor. We found that the CB1-417/Galpha(i1)beta(1)gamma(2) complex could be solubilized from Sf9 cell membranes and coimmunoprecipitated. In this study, we have proven that the receptor and G proteins can be coexpressed in higher yields using Sf9 cells, and that the protein complex is stable in detergent solution. Thus, our system can be used to produce sufficient quantities of the protein complex to start structural studies.

  2. Overexpression of cannabinoid receptor 1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is correlated with metastasis to lymph nodes and distant organs, and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hijiya, Naoki; Shibata, Tomotaka; Daa, Tsutomu; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Uchida, Tomohisa; Matsuura, Keiko; Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Nakada, Chisato; Iha, Hidekatsu; Inomata, Masafumi; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2017-02-01

    In patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the status of metastasis to lymph nodes is strongly associated with prognosis. Consequently, development of a biomarker to detect the presence of metastasis would be clinically valuable. In this study, we found that overexpression of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) was applicable as a marker for prediction of metastasis in ESCC. CB1R overexpression was detected immunohistochemically in 54 of 88 cases (61.4%). The intensity of CB1R expression was uniform in both intraepithelial and invasive regions in each case, and was significantly correlated with the status of metastasis to lymph nodes (P = 0.046) and distant organs (P = 0.047). Furthermore, multivariate analysis revealed that CB1R overexpression was independently associated with poor prognosis (P = 0.019). Biological analysis of CB1R overexpression using ESCC cell lines revealed that CB1R activation appeared to promote cell proliferation and invasion. On the basis of these findings, we propose that evaluation of CB1R expression status in biopsy specimens of ESCC using immunohistochemistry might be clinically useful for prediction of metastasis to lymph nodes and distant organs. © 2016 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Expression of human peripheral cannabinoid receptor for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Wong, Karen K.; Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Human peripheral-type cannabinoid receptor (CB2) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion with the maltose-binding protein, thioredoxin, and a deca-histidine tag. Functional activity and structural integrity of the receptor in bacterial protoplast membranes was confirmed by extensive binding studies with a variety of natural and synthetic cannabinoid ligands. E. coli membranes expressing CB2 also activated cognate G-proteins in an in vitro coupled assay. Detergent-solubilized receptor was purified to 80%–90% homogeneity by affinity chromatography followed by ion-exchange chromatography. By high-resolution NMR on the receptor in DPC micelles, it was determined that purified CB2 forms 1:1 complexes with the ligands CP-55,940 and anandamide. The receptor was successfully reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine bilayers and the membranes were deposited into a porous substrate as tubular lipid bilayers for structural studies by NMR and scattering techniques. PMID:16195551

  4. Exogenous delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol influences circulating endogenous cannabinoids in humans.

    PubMed

    Walter, Carmen; Ferreirós, Nerea; Bishay, Philipp; Geisslinger, Gerd; Tegeder, Irmgard; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-10-01

    Delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) competes with the endogenous cannabinoids arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) at cannabinoid receptors. This may cause adaptive changes in the endocannabinoid signaling cascade with possible consequences for the biological functions of the endocannabinoid system. We show that administration of a single oral dose of 20 mg THC to 30 healthy volunteers resulted in higher circulating concentrations of anandamide, 2-AG, palmitoyl ethanolamide, and oleoylethanolamide at 2 and 3 hours after administration as compared with placebo. At 2 hours after THC administration, changes in oleoylethanolamide plasma concentrations from baseline were linearly related to the THC plasma concentrations. In rats, treatment with the CB₁/CB₂ agonist WIN 55,212 also increased plasma endocannabinoid concentrations. However, this was associated with a decrease of ethanolamide endocannabinoids in specific brain regions including spinal cord, cortex, and hypothalamus; whereas 2-arachidonoyl glycerol increased in the cortex. Thus, administration of THC to human volunteers influenced the concentrations of circulating endocannabinoids, which was mimicked by WIN-55,212 in rats, suggesting that exogenous cannabinoids may lead to changes in the endocannabinoid system that can be detected in plasma.

  5. Cannabinoid receptor 1 but not 2 mediates macrophage phagocytosis by G(α)i/o /RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mai, Ping; Tian, Lei; Yang, Le; Wang, Lin; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2015-07-01

    Phagocytosis is critical to macrophages linking innate and adaptive immune reaction. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) mediate immune modulation. However, the role of cannabinoid receptors in macrophage phagocytosis is undefined. In this study, we found that two murine macrophage lines (J774A.1 and RAW264.7) and peripheral blood macrophages all expressed CB1 and CB2 by immunofluorescence-staining, real time RT-PCR and Western blot. Macrophage phagocytic activity was determined by quantifying fluorescent intensity of the engulfed BioParticles or fluorescence-activated cell sorting. mAEA (CB1 agonist) enhanced phagocytosis of macrophages, but JWH133 (CB2 agonist) had no influence. Pharmacological or genetic ablation of CB1 inhibited mAEA-enhanced phagocytosis, while CB2 had no such effects. Meanwhile, activation of CB1 increased GTP-bounding active form of small GTPase RhoA, but not Rac1 or Cdc42. AM281 (CB1 antagonist) and pertussis toxin (PTX, G((α)i/o) protein inhibitor) decreased GTP-bound RhoA protein level with mAEA. In addition, PTX, C3 Transferase (RhoA inhibitor) or Y27632 (Rho-associated kinase ROCK inhibitor) attenuated CB1-mediated phagocytosis. These results confirm that activation of CB1 regulates macrophage phagocytosis through G((α)i/o)/RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. Moreover, activation of CB1 induced significant up-regulation of CB1 expression by real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, but not CB2. It indicated the existence of a positive feedback between CB1 activation and CB1 expression. The up-regulation of CB1 was RhoA-independent but it may contribute to maintaining high phagocytic activity of macrophages for a longer time. In conclusion, CB1 mediates macrophage phagocytosis by G((α)i/o)/RhoA/ROCK signal axis. These data further underline the role of CB1 in macrophage phagocytic process.

  6. Allele-specific differences in activity of a novel cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) gene intronic enhancer in hypothalamus, dorsal root ganglia, and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Gemma; Davidson, Scott; Shanley, Lynne; Hing, Ben; Lear, Marissa; McGuffin, Peter; Ross, Ruth; MacKenzie, Alasdair

    2012-04-13

    Polymorphisms within intron 2 of the CNR1 gene, which encodes cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)), have been associated with addiction, obesity, and brain volume deficits. We used comparative genomics to identify a polymorphic (rs9444584-C/T) sequence (ECR1) in intron 2 of the CNR1 gene that had been conserved for 310 million years. The C-allele of ECR1 (ECR1(C)) acted as an enhancer in hypothalamic and dorsal root ganglia cells and responded to MAPK activation through the MEKK pathway but not in hippocampal cells. However, ECR1(T) was significantly more active in hypothalamic and dorsal root ganglia cells but, significantly, and in contrast to ECR1(C), was highly active in hippocampal cells where it also responded strongly to activation of MAPK. Intriguingly, rs9444584 is in strong linkage disequilibrium with two other SNPs (rs9450898 (r(2) = 0.841) and rs2023239 (r(2) = 0.920)) that have been associated with addiction, obesity (rs2023239), and reduced fronto-temporal white matter volumes in schizophrenia patients as a result of cannabis misuse (rs9450898). Considering their high linkage disequilibrium and the increased response of ECR1(T) to MAPK signaling when compared with ECR1(C), it is possible that the functional effects of the different alleles of rs9444584 may play a role in the conditions associated with rs9450898 and rs2023239. Further analysis of the different alleles of ECR1 may lead to a greater understanding of the role of CNR1 gene misregulation in these conditions as well as chronic inflammatory pain.

  7. Spontaneous involution of pediatric low-grade gliomas: high expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1) at the time of diagnosis may indicate involvement of the endocannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Sredni, Simone Treiger; Huang, Chiang-Ching; Suzuki, Mario; Pundy, Tatiana; Chou, Pauline; Tomita, Tadanori

    2016-11-01

    Pediatric low-grade gliomas (P-LGG) consist of a mixed group of brain tumors that correspond to the majority of CNS tumors in children. Notably, they may exhibit spontaneous involution after subtotal surgical removal (STR). In this study, we investigated molecular indicators of spontaneous involution in P-LGG. We performed an integrated molecular analysis including high throughput gene expression (GE), microRNA (miRNA) expression data of primary, untreated tumors from patients with P-LGG who underwent STR at our institution, with at least 10 years follow-up. We identified a set of protein-coding genes and miRNAs significantly differentially expressed in P-LGG that presented spontaneous involution (involution-I) or without progression (stable-S) after STR alone. The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1 or CB1) gene (FC = 2.374; p value = 0.007) was at the top of the list and predicted to be regulated by hsa-miR-29b-3p (FC = -2.353, p value = 0.0001). CNR1 also showed a trend to be higher expressed in S/I by immunohistochemistry. The P-LGG, which remained stable or that presented spontaneous involution after STR, showed significantly higher CNR1 expression at the time of diagnosis. We hypothesize that high expression levels of CNR1 provide tumor susceptibility to the antitumor effects of circulating endocannabinoids like anandamide, resulting in tumor involution. This corroborates with reports suggesting that CNR1 agonists and activators of the endocannabinoid system may represent therapeutic opportunities for children with LGG. We also suggest that CNR1 may be a prognostic marker for P-LGG. This is the first time spontaneous involution of P-LGG has been suggested to be induced by endocannabinoids.

  8. Functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Gao, B; Mirshahi, F; Sanyal, A J; Khanolkar, A D; Makriyannis, A; Kunos, G

    2000-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor mRNA was detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in endothelial cells from human aorta and hepatic artery and in the ECV304 cell line derived from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. CB1 receptor-binding sites were detected by the high-affinity antagonist radioligand [(125)I]AM-251. In ECV304 cells, both the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU-210 and the endogenous ligand anandamide induce activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and the effect of HU-210 was completely blocked, whereas the effect of anandamide was partially inhibited by SR141716A, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Transfection of ECV304 cells with CB1 receptor antisense, but not sense, oligonucleotides caused the same pattern of inhibition as SR141716A. This provides more definitive evidence for the involvement of CB1 receptors in MAP kinase activation and suggests that anandamide may also activate MAP kinase via an additional, CB1 receptor-independent, SR141716A-resistant mechanism. The MAP kinase activation by anandamide in ECV304 cells requires genistein-sensitive tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C (PKC), and anandamide also activates p38 kinase and c-Jun kinase. These findings indicate that CB1 receptors located in human vascular endothelium are functionally coupled to the MAP kinase cascade. Activation of protein kinase cascades by anandamide may be involved in the modulation of endothelial cell growth and proliferation. PMID:10698714

  9. Cannabinoid facilitation of fear extinction memory recall in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Sripada, Chandra S.; Abelson, James L.; Liberzon, Israel; Milad, Mohammed R.; Phan, K. Luan

    2012-01-01

    A first-line approach to treat anxiety disorders is exposure-based therapy, which relies on extinction processes such as repeatedly exposing the patient to stimuli (conditioned stimuli; CS) associated with the traumatic, fear-related memory. However, a significant number of patients fail to maintain their gains, partly attributed to the fact that this inhibitory learning and its maintenance is temporary and conditioned fear responses can return. Animal studies have shown that activation of the cannabinoid system during extinction learning enhances fear extinction and its retention. Specifically, CB1 receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC), can facilitate extinction recall by preventing recovery of extinguished fear in rats. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in humans. We conducted a study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design, coupling a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and simultaneous skin conductance response (SCR) recording with an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) or placebo (PBO) 2 hours prior to extinction learning in 29 healthy adult volunteers (THC = 14; PBO = 15) and tested extinction retention 24 hours after extinction learning. Compared to subjects that received PBO, subjects that received THC showed low SCR to a previously extinguished CS when extinction memory recall was tested 24 hours after extinction learning, suggesting that THC prevented the recovery of fear. These results provide the first evidence that pharmacological enhancement of extinction learning is feasible in humans using cannabinoid system modulators, which may thus warrant further development and clinical testing. PMID:22796109

  10. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  11. Enhancement of Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla Neuronal Nitric-Oxide Synthase–Nitric-Oxide Signaling Mediates the Central Cannabinoid Receptor 1-Evoked Pressor Response in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Badr Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Our recent studies implicated brainstem GABAergic signaling in the central cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R)-mediated pressor response in conscious rats. Given the well established link between neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling and GABAergic transmission in brainstem cardiovascular regulating areas, we elucidated the role of nNOS-generated NO in the central CB1R-elicited pressor response. Compared with vehicle, intracisternal (i.c.) microinjection of the CB1R agonist (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3[(4-morpholinyl)methyl]pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-(1-naphthalenyl) methanone mesylate (WIN55212-2) (15 μg/rat) significantly enhanced nNOS phosphorylation as well as the total nitrate and nitrite content in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) at 5, 10, and 30 min, which paralleled the elicited pressor response. These findings were corroborated by: 1) the parallel dose-related increases in blood pressure and RVLM-NO levels, measured in real time by in vivo electrochemistry, elicited by intra-RVLM WIN55212-2 (100, 200, or 300 pmol /80 nl; n = 5) in conscious rats; and 2) the significantly higher phosphorylated nNOS (p-nNOS) levels in the WIN55212-2-injected RVLM compared with the contralateral RVLM. Subsequent neurochemical studies showed that WIN55212-2 (15 μg/rat i.c.) significantly increased the number and percentage of neurons immunostained for nNOS (nitroxidergic neurons) and c-Fos (marker of neuronal activity) within the RVLM. The increases in blood pressure and the neurochemical responses elicited by intracisternal WIN55212-2 were attenuated by prior central CB1R blockade by N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251; 30 μg/rat i.c.) or selective nNOS inhibition by Nω-propyl-L-arginine (1 μg/rat i.c.). These findings implicate RVLM p-nNOS/NO signaling as a molecular mechanism in the central CB1R-evoked pressor effect in conscious rats. PMID:22366659

  12. Cannabinoids inhibit cellular respiration of human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Donna A; Al-Hammadi, Suleiman; Balhaj, Ghazala; Brown, Oliver M; Penefsky, Harvey S; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2010-01-01

    The primary cannabinoids, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC) and Delta(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(8)-THC) are known to disturb the mitochondrial function and possess antitumor activities. These observations prompted us to investigate their effects on the mitochondrial O(2) consumption in human oral cancer cells (Tu183). This epithelial cell line overexpresses bcl-2 and is highly resistant to anticancer drugs. A phosphorescence analyzer that measures the time-dependence of O(2) concentration in cellular or mitochondrial suspensions was used for this purpose. A rapid decline in the rate of respiration was observed when Delta(9)-THC or Delta(8)-THC was added to the cells. The inhibition was concentration-dependent, and Delta(9)-THC was the more potent of the two compounds. Anandamide (an endocannabinoid) was ineffective; suggesting the effects of Delta(9)-THC and Delta(8)-THC were not mediated by the cannabinoidreceptors. Inhibition of O(2) consumption by cyanide confirmed the oxidations occurred in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Delta(9)-THC inhibited the respiration of isolated mitochondria from beef heart. These results show the cannabinoids are potent inhibitors of Tu183 cellular respiration and are toxic to this highly malignant tumor.

  13. Stoichiometries of Transferrin Receptors 1 and 2 in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Chloupková, Maja; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in either the hereditary hemochromatosis protein, HFE, or transferrin receptor 2, TfR2, result in a similarly severe form of the most common type of iron overload disease called hereditary hemochromatosis. Models of the interactions between HFE, TfR1, and TfR2 imply that these proteins are present in different molar concentrations in the liver, where they control expression of the iron regulatory hormone, hepcidin, in response to body iron loading. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo levels of mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR and concentrations of these proteins by quantitative immunoblotting in human liver tissues. The level of TfR2 mRNA was 21- and 63- fold higher than that of TfR1 and HFE, respectively. Molar concentration of TfR2 protein was the highest and determined to be 1.95 nmoles/g protein in whole cell lysates and 10.89 nmoles/g protein in microsomal membranes. Molar concentration of TfR1 protein was 4.5- and 6.1-fold lower than that of TfR2 in whole cell lysates and membranes, respectively. The level of HFE protein was below 0.53 nmoles/g of total protein. HFE is thus present in substoichiometric concentrations with respect to both TfR1 and TfR2 in human liver tissue. This finding supports a model, in which availability of HFE is limiting for formation of complexes with TfR1 or TfR2. PMID:19819738

  14. Cannabinoid facilitation of fear extinction memory recall in humans.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Sripada, Chandra S; Abelson, James L; Liberzon, Israel; Milad, Mohammed R; Phan, K Luan

    2013-01-01

    A first-line approach to treat anxiety disorders is exposure-based therapy, which relies on extinction processes such as repeatedly exposing the patient to stimuli (conditioned stimuli; CS) associated with the traumatic, fear-related memory. However, a significant number of patients fail to maintain their gains, partly attributed to the fact that this inhibitory learning and its maintenance is temporary and conditioned fear responses can return. Animal studies have shown that activation of the cannabinoid system during extinction learning enhances fear extinction and its retention. Specifically, CB1 receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC), can facilitate extinction recall by preventing recovery of extinguished fear in rats. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in humans. We conducted a study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design, coupling a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and simultaneous skin conductance response (SCR) recording with an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) or placebo (PBO) 2 h prior to extinction learning in 29 healthy adult volunteers (THC = 14; PBO = 15) and tested extinction retention 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects that received PBO, subjects that received THC showed low SCR to a previously extinguished CS when extinction memory recall was tested 24 h after extinction learning, suggesting that THC prevented the recovery of fear. These results provide the first evidence that pharmacological enhancement of extinction learning is feasible in humans using cannabinoid system modulators, which may thus warrant further development and clinical testing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'.

  15. High-resolution crystal structure of the human CB1 cannabinoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhenhua; Yin, Jie; Chapman, Karen; Grzemska, Magdalena; Clark, Lindsay; Wang, Junmei; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    The human cannabinoid G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) CB1 and CB2 mediate the functional responses to the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG), as well as the widely consumed plant (phyto)cannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)1. The cannabinoid receptors have been the targets of intensive drug discovery efforts due to the therapeutic potential of modulators for controlling pain2, epilepsy3, obesity4, and other maladies. While much progress has recently been made in understanding the biophysical properties of GPCRs, investigations of the molecular mechanisms of the cannabinoids and their receptors have lacked high-resolution structural data. We used GPCR engineering and lipidic cubic phase (LCP) crystallization to determine the structure of the human CB1 receptor bound to the inhibitor taranabant at 2.6 Å resolution. CB1's extracellular surface, including the highly conserved membrane-proximal amino-terminal (N-terminal) region, is distinct from other lipid-activated GPCRs and forms a critical part of the ligand binding pocket. Docking studies further demonstrate how this same pocket may accommodate the cannabinoid agonist THC. Our CB1 structure provides an atomic framework for studying cannabinoid receptor function, and will aid the design and optimization of cannabinoid system modulators for therapeutic ends. PMID:27851727

  16. Effects of coadministration of low dose cannabinoid type 2 receptor agonist and morphine on vanilloid receptor 1 expression in a rat model of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyue; Chi, Meng; Zou, Huichao; Tian, Songyu; Zhang, Zhaodi; Wang, Guonian

    2017-09-13

    Morphine is widely used as an analgesic to treat moderate to severe pain, but chronic morphine use is associated with development of tolerance and dependence, which limits its analgesic efficacy. Our previous research has showed that nonanalgetic dose of a cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor agonist reduced morphine tolerance in cancer pain. A previous study showed the colocalization of CB2 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in human and rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. Whether coadministration of a CB2 receptor agonist and morphine could reduce TRPV1 expression in morphine‑induced antinociception and tolerance in cancer pain is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of coadministration of a CB2 receptor agonist AM1241 and morphine on TRPV1 expression and tolerance in cancer pain. Coadministration of AM1241 and morphine for 8 days significantly reduced morphine tolerance, as assessed by measuring paw withdrawal latency to a radiant heat stimulation, in Walker 256 tumor‑bearing rats. Repeated morphine treatment for a period of 8 days induced upregulation of the TRPV1 protein expression levels in the DRG in the tumor‑bearing rats, although no change in mRNA expression. Pretreatment with AM1241 reduced this morphine‑induced upregulation of TRPV1 and the effect was reversed by the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Our findings suggest that coadministration of a CB2 receptor agonist AM1241 and morphine reduced morphine tolerance possibly through regulation of TRPV1 protein expression in the DRG in cancer pain.

  17. Self-Administration of Cannabinoids by Experimental Animals and Human Marijuana Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Justinova, Zuzana; Goldberg, Steven R.; Heishman, Stephen J.; Tanda, Gianluigi

    2009-01-01

    Drug self-administration behavior has been one of the most direct and productive approaches for studying the reinforcing effects of psychoactive drugs, which are critical in determining their abuse potential. Cannabinoids, which are usually abused by humans in the form of marijuana, have become the most frequently abused illicit class of drugs in the United States. The early elucidation of the structure and stereochemistry of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in 1964, which is now recognized as the principal psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, activated cannabinoid research worldwide. This review examines advances in research on cannabinoid self-administration behavior by humans and laboratory animals. There have been numerous laboratory demonstrations of the reinforcing effects of cannabinoids in human subjects, but reliable self-administration of cannabinoids by laboratory animals has only recently been demonstrated. It has now been shown that strong and persistent self-administration behavior can be maintained in experimentally and drug-naïve squirrel monkeys by doses of THC comparable to those in marijuana smoke inhaled by humans. Furthermore, reinforcing effects of some synthetic CB1 cannabinoid agonists have been recently reported using intravenous and intracerebroventricular self-administration procedures in rats and mice. These findings support previous conclusions that THC has a pronounced abuse liability comparable to other drugs of abuse under certain experimental conditions. Self-administration of THC by squirrel monkeys provides the most reliable animal model for human marijuana abuse available to date. This animal model now makes it possible to study the relative abuse liability of other natural and synthetic cannabinoids and to preclinically assess new therapeutic strategies for the treatment or prevention of marijuana abuse in humans. PMID:15932767

  18. Functional assessment of neuronal cannabinoid receptors in the muscular layers of human ileum and colon.

    PubMed

    Manara, L; Croci, T; Guagnini, F; Rinaldi-Carmona, M; Maffrand, J P; Le Fur, G; Mukenge, S; Ferla, G

    2002-04-01

    The notion that specific receptors account for the ability of natural and synthetic cannabinoids to alter physiological functions, prompted this study aimed at assessing their functional presence in the human gut. The effects have been studied of cannabinoids and selective antagonists of their receptors on chemically or electrically evoked contractions in preparations of human intestinal smooth muscle in vitro. Atropine prevented the contractions of longitudinal and circular muscle strips of ileum and colon induced by carbachol or electrical field stimulation; tetrodotoxin abolished only the latter which suggests they do involve activation of cholinergic neurons. The synthetic cannabinoid (+)WIN 55,212-2 had no effect on carbachol contractions, but in a concentration-dependent fashion prevented those elicited by electrical field stimulation - which were insensitive to the putative endogenous cannabinoid anandamide - more potently in longitudinal than in circular strips. The selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716, which had no effect in the absence of (+)WIN 55,212-2, competitively antagonised its inhibition of electrical field stimulation contractions, unlike the selective CB2 antagonist SR144528. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors are functionally present in the human ileum and colon; their pharmacological activation apparently results in inhibition of excitatory cholinergic pathways subserving smooth muscle contraction.

  19. Ontogenetic development of cannabinoid receptor expression and signal transduction functionality in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Mato, Susana; Del Olmo, Elena; Pazos, Angel

    2003-05-01

    Previous evidence suggests that the endogenous cannabinoid system emerges relatively early during brain development in the rat. However, the pre- and postnatal pattern of appearance of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in humans has not been analysed in detail. Furthermore, there is a complete lack of information about the functional ability of these proteins to activate signal transduction mechanisms during human development. In the present study we have explored CB1 receptor expression throughout the different areas of the developing human brain by [3H]CP55 940 autoradiography. We have also assessed CB1 functional coupling to G proteins during brain development by agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS autoradiography in the same cases. Our results indicate a significant density of cannabinoid receptors at 19 weeks' gestation in the same areas that contain these receptors in the adult human brain. Autoradiographic levels of CB1 receptors in these structures seem to increase progressively from early prenatal stages to adulthood. Interestingly, high densities of cannabinoid receptors have also been detected during prenatal development in fibre-enriched areas that are practically devoid of them in the adult brain. In parallel with these data, we have found that brain cannabinoid receptors are functionally coupled to signal transduction mechanisms from early prenatal stages. This early pattern of expression of functionally active cannabinoid receptors, along with the transient and atypical localization of these proteins in white matter areas during the prenatal stages, suggest an specific role of the endocannabinoid system in the events related to human neural development.

  20. Structure-Activity Relationship Study of Indole-2-carboxamides Identifies a Potent Allosteric Modulator for the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1)

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Mariam M.; Ali, Hamed I.; Ahn, Kwang H.; Damaraju, Aparna; Samala, Sushma; Pulipati, Venkata K.; Kolluru, Srikanth; Kendall, Debra A.; Lu, Dai

    2013-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor is involved in complex physiological functions. The discovery of CB1 allosteric modulators generates new opportunities for drug discovery targeting the pharmacologically important CB1 receptor. 5-chloro-3-ethyl-N-(4-(piperidin-1-yl)phenethyl)-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (ORG27569; 1) represents a new class of indole-2-carboxamides that exhibit allostery of CB1. To better understand the SAR, a group of indole-2-carboxamide analogs were synthesized and assessed for allostery of the CB1 receptor. We found that within the structure of indole-2-carboxamides, the presence of the indole ring is preferred for maintaining the modulator's high binding affinity for the allosteric site, but not for generating allostery on the orthosteric site. However, the C3 substituents of the indole-2-carboxamides significantly impact the allostery of the ligand. A robust CB1 allosteric modulator 5-chloro-N-(4-(dimethylamino)phenethyl)-3-pentyl-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (11j) was identified. It showed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KB) of 167.3 nM with a markedly high binding cooperativity factor (α=16.55) and potent antagonism of agonist-induced GTPγS binding. PMID:24053617

  1. Cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist treatment induces glucagon release and shows an additive therapeutic effect with GLP-1 agonist in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kartikkumar Navinchandra; Joharapurkar, Amit Arvind; Patel, Vishal; Kshirsagar, Samadhan Govind; Bahekar, Rajesh; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Jain, Mukul R

    2014-12-01

    Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists reduce body weight and improve insulin sensitivity. Preclinical data indicates that an acute dose of CB1 antagonist rimonabant causes an increase in blood glucose. A stable analog of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), exendin-4 improves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreas, and reduces appetite through activation of GLP-1 receptors in the central nervous system and liver. We hypothesized that the insulin secretagogue effect of GLP-1 agonist exendin-4 may synergize with the insulin-sensitizing action of rimonabant. Intraperitoneal as well as intracerebroventricular administration of rimonabant increased serum glucose upon glucose challenge in overnight fasted, diet-induced obese C57 mice, with concomitant rise in serum glucagon levels. Exendin-4 reversed the acute hyperglycemia induced by rimonabant. The combination of exendin-4 and rimonabant showed an additive effect in the food intake, and sustained body weight reduction upon repeated dosing. The acute efficacy of both the compounds was additive for inducing nausea-like symptoms in conditioned aversion test in mice, whereas exendin-4 treatment antagonized the effect of rimonabant on forced swim test upon chronic dosing. Thus, the addition of exendin-4 to rimonabant produces greater reduction in food intake owing to increased aversion, but reduces the other central nervous system side effects of rimonabant. The hyperglucagonemia induced by rimonabant is partially responsible for enhancing the antiobesity effect of exendin-4.

  2. The cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) and multiple sclerosis: an association study in two case-control groups from Spain.

    PubMed

    Ramil, E; Sánchez, A J; González-Pérez, P; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, A; Gómez-Lozano, N; Ortiz, P; Arroyo, R; De las Heras, V; Vilches, C; García-Merino, A

    2010-02-01

    Different studies point to the implication of the endocannabinoid system in multiple sclerosis (MS) and animal models of MS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a possible association of MS with polymorphic markers at the CNR1 gene, encoding the cannabinoid 1 (CB(1)) receptor. We have performed a genetic analysis of an AAT repeat microsatellite localized in the downstream region of the CNR1 gene, in two case-control groups of MS patients and healthy controls (HC) from Spain (Madrid and Bilbao). MS patients with primary progressive MS (PPMS) had more commonly long ((AAT) > or = (13)) alleles and genotypes with a significant difference for genotype 7/8 in Madrid (p = 0.043) and in the sum of both groups (p = 0.016); short alleles were less frequently found in PPMS with a significant difference for allele 5 in the analysis of both groups together (p = 0.039). In patients with relapsing MS, no consistent differences in allele and genotype distribution were found. Disease severity and progression was unrelated to AAT repeat variations. In conclusion, long (AAT) > or = (13) CNR1 genotypes could behave as risk factors for PPMS.

  3. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans.

    PubMed

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K Luan

    2014-09-01

    Pre-extinction administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely occurs via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders.

  4. Interleukin-2 suppression by 2-arachidonyl glycerol is mediated through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma independently of cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Cheryl E; Snider, Natasha T; Thompson, Jerry T; Vanden Heuvel, John P; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2006-07-01

    2-Arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) is an endogenous arachidonic acid derivative that binds cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 and is hence termed an endocannabinoid. 2-AG also modulates a variety of immunological responses, including expression of the autocrine/paracrine T cell growth factor interleukin (IL)-2. The objective of the present studies was to determine the mechanism responsible for IL-2 suppression by 2-AG. Because of the labile properties of 2-AG, 2-AG ether, a nonhydrolyzable analog of 2-AG, was also used. Both 2-AG and 2-AG ether suppressed IL-2 expression independently of CB1 and CB2, as demonstrated in leukocytes derived from CB1/CB2-null mice. Moreover, we demonstrated that both 2-AG and 2-AG ether treatment activated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), as evidenced by forced differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells into adipocytes, induction of aP2 mRNA levels, and activation of a PPARgamma-specific luciferase reporter in transiently transfected 3T3-L1 cells. Consequently, the putative role of PPARgamma in IL-2 suppression by 2-AG and 2-AG ether was examined in Jurkat T cells. Concordant with PPARgamma involvement, the PPARgamma-specific antagonist 2-chloro-5-nitro-N-(4-pyridyl)-benzamide (T0070907) blocked 2-AG- and 2-AG ether-mediated IL-2 suppression. Likewise, 2-AG suppressed the transcriptional activity of two transcription factors crucial for IL-2 expression, nuclear factor of activated T cells and nuclear factor kappaB, in the absence but not in the presence of T0070907. 2-AG treatment also induced PPARgamma binding to a PPAR response element in activated Jurkat T cells. Together, the aforementioned studies identify PPARgamma as a novel intracellular target of 2-AG, which mediates the suppression of IL-2 by 2-AG in a manner that is independent of CB1 and/or CB2.

  5. Honokiol suppresses formyl peptide-induced human neutrophil activation by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Yu, Huang-Ping; Syu, Yu-Ting; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Shih-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Tung; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2017-07-27

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) mediates bacterial and mitochondrial N-formyl peptides-induced neutrophil activation. Therefore, FPR1 is an important therapeutic target for drugs to treat septic or sterile inflammatory diseases. Honokiol, a major bioactive compound of Magnoliaceae plants, possesses several anti-inflammatory activities. Here, we show that honokiol exhibits an inhibitory effect on FPR1 binding in human neutrophils. Honokiol inhibited superoxide anion generation, reactive oxygen species formation, and elastase release in bacterial or mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (FPR1 agonists)-activated human neutrophils. Adhesion of FPR1-induced human neutrophils to cerebral endothelial cells was also reduced by honokiol. The receptor-binding results revealed that honokiol repressed FPR1-specific ligand N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein binding to FPR1 in human neutrophils, neutrophil-like THP-1 cells, and hFPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. However, honokiol did not inhibit FPR2-specific ligand binding to FPR2 in human neutrophils. Furthermore, honokiol inhibited FPR1 agonist-induced calcium mobilization as well as phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, and JNK in human neutrophils. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that honokiol may have therapeutic potential for treating FPR1-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  6. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  7. Cannabinoids inhibit cholinergic contraction in human airways through prejunctional CB1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Grassin-Delyle, S; Naline, E; Buenestado, A; Faisy, C; Alvarez, J-C; Salvator, H; Abrial, C; Advenier, C; Zemoura, L; Devillier, P

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Marijuana smoking is widespread in many countries, and the use of smoked synthetic cannabinoids is increasing. Smoking a marijuana joint leads to bronchodilation in both healthy subjects and asthmatics. The effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and synthetic cannabinoids on human bronchus reactivity have not previously been investigated. Here, we sought to assess the effects of natural and synthetic cannabinoids on cholinergic bronchial contraction. Experimental Approach Human bronchi isolated from 88 patients were suspended in an organ bath and contracted by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the presence of the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the endogenous 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the synthetic dual CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940, the synthetic, CB2-receptor-selective agonist JWH-133 or the selective GPR55 agonist O-1602. The receptors involved in the response were characterized by using selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists (SR141716 and SR144528 respectively). Key Results Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940 induced concentration-dependent inhibition of cholinergic contractions, with maximum inhibitions of 39, 76 and 77% respectively. JWH-133 only had an effect at high concentrations. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol and O-1602 were devoid of any effect. Only CB1 receptors were involved in the response because the effects of cannabinoids were antagonized by SR141716, but not by SR144528. The cannabinoids did not alter basal tone or contractions induced by exogenous Ach. Conclusions and Implications Activation of prejunctional CB1 receptors mediates the inhibition of EFS-evoked cholinergic contraction in human bronchus. This mechanism may explain the acute bronchodilation produced by marijuana smoking. PMID:24467410

  8. Cannabinoids inhibit cholinergic contraction in human airways through prejunctional CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Grassin-Delyle, S; Naline, E; Buenestado, A; Faisy, C; Alvarez, J-C; Salvator, H; Abrial, C; Advenier, C; Zemoura, L; Devillier, P

    2014-06-01

    Marijuana smoking is widespread in many countries, and the use of smoked synthetic cannabinoids is increasing. Smoking a marijuana joint leads to bronchodilation in both healthy subjects and asthmatics. The effects of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol and synthetic cannabinoids on human bronchus reactivity have not previously been investigated. Here, we sought to assess the effects of natural and synthetic cannabinoids on cholinergic bronchial contraction. Human bronchi isolated from 88 patients were suspended in an organ bath and contracted by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the presence of the phytocannabinoid Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol, the endogenous 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the synthetic dual CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940, the synthetic, CB2 -receptor-selective agonist JWH-133 or the selective GPR55 agonist O-1602. The receptors involved in the response were characterized by using selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists (SR141716 and SR144528 respectively). Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol, WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940 induced concentration-dependent inhibition of cholinergic contractions, with maximum inhibitions of 39, 76 and 77% respectively. JWH-133 only had an effect at high concentrations. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol and O-1602 were devoid of any effect. Only CB1 receptors were involved in the response because the effects of cannabinoids were antagonized by SR141716, but not by SR144528. The cannabinoids did not alter basal tone or contractions induced by exogenous Ach. Activation of prejunctional CB1 receptors mediates the inhibition of EFS-evoked cholinergic contraction in human bronchus. This mechanism may explain the acute bronchodilation produced by marijuana smoking. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Antagonism of Human Formyl Peptide Receptor 1 with Natural Compounds and their Synthetic Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) regulates a wide variety of neutrophil functional responses and plays an important role in inflammation and the pathogenesis of various diseases. To date, a variety of natural and synthetic molecules have been identified as FPR1 ligands. Here, we review current knowledge on natural products and natural product-inspired small-molecules reported to antagonize and/or inhibit the FPR1-mediated responses. Based on this literature, additional screening of selected commercially available natural compounds for their ability to inhibit fMLF-induced Ca2+ mobilization in human neutrophils and FPR1 transfected HL-60 cells, and pharmacophore modeling, natural products with potential as FPR1 antagonists are considered and discussed in this review. The identification and characterization of natural products that antagonize FPR1 activity may have potential for the development of novel therapeutics to limit or alter the outcome of inflammatory processes. PMID:26382576

  10. Antagonism of human formyl peptide receptor 1 with natural compounds and their synthetic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Quinn, Mark T

    2016-08-01

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) regulates a wide variety of neutrophil functional responses and plays an important role in inflammation and the pathogenesis of various diseases. To date, a variety of natural and synthetic molecules have been identified as FPR1 ligands. Here, we review current knowledge on natural products and natural product-inspired small molecules reported to antagonize and/or inhibit the FPR1-mediated responses. Based on this literature, additional screening of selected commercially available natural compounds for their ability to inhibit fMLF-induced Ca(2+) mobilization in human neutrophils and FPR1 transfected HL-60 cells, and pharmacophore modeling, natural products with potential as FPR1 antagonists are considered and discussed in this review. The identification and characterization of natural products that antagonize FPR1 activity may have potential for the development of novel therapeutics to limit or alter the outcome of inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Human maternal behaviour is associated with arginine vasopressin receptor 1A gene.

    PubMed

    Avinun, Reut; Ebstein, Richard P; Knafo, Ariel

    2012-10-23

    Parenting is one of the main influences on children's early development, and yet its underlying genetic mechanisms have only recently begun to be explored, with many studies neglecting to control for possible child effects. This study focuses on maternal behaviour and on an allele at the RS3 promoter region of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A) gene, previously associated with autism and with higher amygdala activation in a face-matching task. Mothers were observed during a free-play session with each of their 3.5-year-old twins. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that mothers who are carriers of the AVPR1A RS3 allele tend to show less structuring and support throughout the interaction independent of the child's sex and RS3 genotype. This finding advances our understanding of the genetic influences on human maternal behaviour.

  12. Alcohol and Cannabinoids Differentially Affect HIV Infection and Function of Human Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells (MDDC).

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Marisela; Figueroa, Gloria; Yndart, Adriana; Casteleiro, Gianna; Muñoz, Karla; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata; Nair, Madhavan P

    2015-01-01

    During human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, alcohol has been known to induce inflammation while cannabinoids have been shown to have an anti-inflammatory role. For instance cannabinoids have been shown to reduce susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and attenuate HIV replication in macrophages. Recently, we demonstrated that alcohol induces cannabinoid receptors and regulates cytokine production by monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). However, the ability of alcohol and cannabinoids to alter MDDC function during HIV infection has not been clearly elucidated yet. In order to study the potential impact of alcohol and cannabinoids on differentiated MDDC infected with HIV, monocytes were cultured for 7 days with GM-CSF and IL-4, differentiated MDDC were infected with HIV-1Ba-L and treated with EtOH (0.1 and 0.2%), THC (5 and 10 μM), or JWH-015 (5 and 10 μM) for 4-7 days. HIV infection of MDDC was confirmed by p24 and Long Terminal Repeats (LTR) estimation. MDDC endocytosis assay and cytokine array profiles were measured to investigate the effects of HIV and substances of abuse on MDDC function. Our results show the HIV + EtOH treated MDDC had the highest levels of p24 production and expression when compared with the HIV positive controls and the cannabinoid treated cells. Although both cannabinoids, THC and JWH-015 had lower levels of p24 production and expression, the HIV + JWH-015 treated MDDC had the lowest levels of p24 when compared to the HIV + THC treated cells. In addition, MDDC endocytic function and cytokine production were also differentially altered after alcohol and cannabinoid treatments. Our results show a differential effect of alcohol and cannabinoids, which may provide insights into the divergent inflammatory role of alcohol and cannabinoids to modulate MDDC function in the context of HIV infection.

  13. Co-expression of the human cannabinoid receptor coding region splice variants (hCB₁) affects the function of hCB₁ receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Bagher, Amina M; Laprairie, Robert B; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2013-12-05

    The human type 1 cannabinoid (hCB1) receptor is expressed at high levels in the central nervous system. mRNA variants of the coding region of this receptor, human cannabinoid hCB1a and hCB1b receptors, have been identified, their biological function remains unclear. The present study demonstrated that the three human cannabinoid hCB1 coding region variants are expressed in the human and monkey (Macaca fascicularis) brain. Western blot analyses of homogenates from different regions of the monkey brain demonstrated that proteins with the expected molecular weights of the cannabinoid CB1, CB1a and CB1b receptors were co-expressed throughout the brain. Given the co-localization of these receptors, we hypothesized that physical interactions between the three splice variants may affect cannabinoid pharmacology. The human cannabinoid hCB1, hCB1a, and hCB1b receptors formed homodimers and heterodimers, as determined by BRET in transiently transfected HEK 293A cells. We found that the co-expression of the human cannabinoid hCB1 and each of the splice variants increased cell surface expression of the human cannabinoid hCB1 receptor and increased Gi/o-dependent ERK phosphorylation in response to cannabinoid agonists. Therefore, the human cannabinoid hCB1 coding region splice variants play an important physiological role in the activity of the endocannabinoid system.

  14. Discoidin domain receptor 1: isoform expression and potential functions in cirrhotic human liver.

    PubMed

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A; Wang, Xin M; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2011-03-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell-collagen interactions in chronic liver injury.

  15. The effects of cannabinoids on serum cortisol and prolactin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Braley, Gabriel; Pittman, Brian; Cooper, Thomas; Perry, Edward; Krystal, John; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2010-01-01

    Background Cannabis is one of the most widely used illicit substances, and there is growing interest in the therapeutic applications of cannabinoids. While known to modulate neuroendocrine function, the precise acute and chronic dose-related effects of cannabinoids in humans are not well-known. Furthermore, the existing literature on the neuroendocrine effects of cannabinoids is limited by small sample sizes (n=6–22), heterogeneous samples with regard to cannabis exposure (lumping users and nonusers), lack of controlling for chronic cannabis exposure, differing methodologies, and limited dose–response data. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC) was hypothesized to produce dose-related increases in plasma cortisol levels and decreases in plasma prolactin levels. Furthermore, relative to controls, frequent users of cannabis were hypothesized to show altered baseline levels of these hormones and blunted Δ-9-THC-induced changes of these hormones. Materials and methods Pooled data from a series of laboratory studies with multiple doses of intravenous Δ-9-THC in healthy control subjects (n=36) and frequent users of cannabis (n=40) was examined to characterize the acute, chronic, and acute on chronic effects of cannabinoids on plasma cortisol and prolactin levels. Hormone levels were measured before (baseline) and 70 min after administration of each dose of Δ-9-THC. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models with +70 min hormonal levels as the dependant variable and baseline hormonal level as the covariate. Results At socially relevant doses, Δ-9-THC raised plasma cortisol levels in a dose-dependent manner but frequent users showed blunted increases relative to healthy controls. Frequent users also had lower baseline plasma prolactin levels relative to healthy controls. Conclusions These group differences may be related to the development of tolerance to the neuroendocrine effects of cannabinoids. Alternatively, these results may reflect inherent differences

  16. Human and Host Species Transferrin Receptor 1 Use by North American Arenaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Min; Fofana, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT At least five New World (NW) arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fevers in South America. These pathogenic clade B viruses, as well as nonpathogenic arenaviruses of the same clade, use transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) of their host species to enter cells. Pathogenic viruses are distinguished from closely related nonpathogenic ones by their additional ability to utilize human TfR1 (hTfR1). Here, we investigate the receptor usage of North American arenaviruses, whose entry proteins share greatest similarity with those of the clade B viruses. We show that all six North American arenaviruses investigated utilize host species TfR1 orthologs and present evidence consistent with arenavirus-mediated selection pressure on the TfR1 of the North American arenavirus host species. Notably, one of these viruses, AV96010151, closely related to the prototype Whitewater Arroyo virus (WWAV), entered cells using hTfR1, consistent with a role for a WWAV-like virus in three fatal human infections whose causative agent has not been identified. In addition, modest changes were sufficient to convert hTfR1 into a functional receptor for most of these viruses, suggesting that a minor alteration in virus entry protein may allow these viruses to use hTfR1. Our data establish TfR1 as a cellular receptor for North American arenaviruses, highlight an “arms race” between these viruses and their host species, support the association of North American arenavirus with fatal human infections, and suggest that these viruses have a higher potential to emerge and cause human diseases than has previously been appreciated. IMPORTANCE hTfR1 use is a key determinant for a NW arenavirus to cause hemorrhagic fevers in humans. All known pathogenic NW arenaviruses are transmitted in South America by their host rodents. North American arenaviruses are generally considered nonpathogenic, but some of these viruses have been tentatively implicated in human fatalities. We show that these North American

  17. Cannabinoid receptor-independent cytotoxic effects of cannabinoids in human colorectal carcinoma cells: synergism with 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Sofia B; Lindgren, Theres; Jonsson, Maria; Jacobsson, Stig O P

    2009-03-01

    Cannabinoids (CBs) have been found to exert antiproliferative effects upon a variety of cancer cells, including colorectal carcinoma cells. However, little is known about the signalling mechanisms behind the antitumoural effect in these cells, whether the effects are shared by endogenous lipids related to endocannabinoids, or whether such effects are synergistic with treatment paradigms currently used in the clinic. The aim of this preclinical study was to investigate the effect of synthetic and endogenous CBs and their related fatty acids on the viability of human colorectal carcinoma Caco-2 cells, and to determine whether CB effects are synergistic with those seen with the pyrimidine antagonist 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The synthetic CB HU 210, the endogenous CB anandamide, the endogenous structural analogue of anandamide, N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly), as well as the related polyunsaturated fatty acids arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid showed antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects in the Caco-2 cells, as measured by using [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation assay, the CyQUANT proliferation assay and calcein-AM fluorescence. HU 210 was the most potent compound examined, followed by anandamide, whereas NAGly showed equal potency and efficacy as the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, HU 210 and 5-FU produced synergistic effects in the Caco-2 cells, but not in the human colorectal carcinoma cell lines HCT116 or HT29. The compounds examined produced cytotoxic, rather than antiproliferative effects, by a mechanism not involving CB receptors, since the CB receptor antagonists AM251 and AM630 did not attenuate the effects, nor did pertussis toxin. However, alpha-tocopherol and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME attenuated the CB toxicity, suggesting involvement of oxidative stress. It is concluded that the CB system may provide new targets for the development of drugs to treat colorectal cancer.

  18. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R.; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K. Luan

    2013-01-01

    Pre-extinction administration of ∆9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely involves via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 hours after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders. PMID:24055595

  19. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K; Franks, Lirit N; Moran, Jeffery H; Prather, Paul L

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB2Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB2Rs (hCB2Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB2Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB2Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB2Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB2R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB2Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB2Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB1 and CB2Rs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A. R.; Harkness, John H.; Neve, Kim A.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K.; Eshleman, Amy J.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30–40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  1. Binding and uptake of H-ferritin are mediated by human transferrin receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Fang, Celia J; Ryan, James C; Niemi, Eréne C; Lebrón, José A; Björkman, Pamela J; Arase, Hisashi; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V; Nakamura, Mary C; Seaman, William E

    2010-02-23

    Ferritin is a spherical molecule composed of 24 subunits of two types, ferritin H chain (FHC) and ferritin L chain (FLC). Ferritin stores iron within cells, but it also circulates and binds specifically and saturably to a variety of cell types. For most cell types, this binding can be mediated by ferritin composed only of FHC (HFt) but not by ferritin composed only of FLC (LFt), indicating that binding of ferritin to cells is mediated by FHC but not FLC. By using expression cloning, we identified human transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1) as an important receptor for HFt with little or no binding to LFt. In vitro, HFt can be precipitated by soluble TfR1, showing that this interaction is not dependent on other proteins. Binding of HFt to TfR1 is partially inhibited by diferric transferrin, but it is hindered little, if at all, by HFE. After binding of HFt to TfR1 on the cell surface, HFt enters both endosomes and lysosomes. TfR1 accounts for most, if not all, of the binding of HFt to mitogen-activated T and B cells, circulating reticulocytes, and all cell lines that we have studied. The demonstration that TfR1 can bind HFt as well as Tf raises the possibility that this dual receptor function may coordinate the processing and use of iron by these iron-binding molecules.

  2. Binding and uptake of H-ferritin are mediated by human transferrin receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Fang, Celia J.; Ryan, James C.; Niemi, Eréne C.; Lebrón, José A.; Björkman, Pamela J.; Arase, Hisashi; Torti, Frank M.; Torti, Suzy V.; Nakamura, Mary C.; Seaman, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Ferritin is a spherical molecule composed of 24 subunits of two types, ferritin H chain (FHC) and ferritin L chain (FLC). Ferritin stores iron within cells, but it also circulates and binds specifically and saturably to a variety of cell types. For most cell types, this binding can be mediated by ferritin composed only of FHC (HFt) but not by ferritin composed only of FLC (LFt), indicating that binding of ferritin to cells is mediated by FHC but not FLC. By using expression cloning, we identified human transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1) as an important receptor for HFt with little or no binding to LFt. In vitro, HFt can be precipitated by soluble TfR1, showing that this interaction is not dependent on other proteins. Binding of HFt to TfR1 is partially inhibited by diferric transferrin, but it is hindered little, if at all, by HFE. After binding of HFt to TfR1 on the cell surface, HFt enters both endosomes and lysosomes. TfR1 accounts for most, if not all, of the binding of HFt to mitogen-activated T and B cells, circulating reticulocytes, and all cell lines that we have studied. The demonstration that TfR1 can bind HFt as well as Tf raises the possibility that this dual receptor function may coordinate the processing and use of iron by these iron-binding molecules. PMID:20133674

  3. Regulation of protease-activated receptor-1 expression in human buccal fibroblasts stimulated with arecoline.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Hung; Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Huang, Fu-Mei; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the major thrombin receptor protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in normal human buccal mucosa and oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) specimens and further explore the potential mechanisms that may lead to induce PAR-1 expression. Thirty OSF and 10 normal buccal mucosa specimens were examined by immunohistochemistry. Buccal mucosal fibroblasts (BMFs) were challenged with arecoline by using Western blot analysis. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), LY294002, herbimycin A, NS-398, and PD98059 were added to find the possible regulatory mechanisms. PAR-1 expression was significantly higher in OSF specimens (p < .05). Arecoline was found to elevate PAR-1 expression in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner (p < .05). The addition of NAC, LY294002, herbimycin A, NS398, and PD98059 markedly inhibited the arecoline-induced PAR-1 expression (p < .05). PAR-1 expression is significantly upregulated in areca quid chewing-associated OSF. Arecoline-induced PAR-1 expression was downregulated by NAC, LY294002, herbimycin A, NS398, and PD98059. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Clinical significance of leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 expression in human cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xueshan; Miao, Fang; Cao, Yanning; Xue, Jiangnan; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Xiaoshu

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is broadly expressed on the majority of immune cells; however, the biological role of LAIR in solid tumors has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, using immunohistochemical staining analysis, the expression of LAIR-1 in human cervical cancer (HCC) and nontumor-adjacent tissue specimens was determined, and the results indicated that the expression of LAIR-1 in HCC tissue was higher compared with that in noncancerous tissue. The χ2 test was used to analyze the correlation between the expression of LAIR-1 in tumor tissues with clinicopathological parameters. The results showed that the expression of LAIR-1 in the cancer cell nucleus was significantly associated with tumor size, pathological differentiation, T classification and clinical stage. In addition, the expression in the cytoplasm was evidently associated with the number of positive lymph nodes. The HCC cell line, ME-180, which does not express LAIR-1, was stably transfected using LAIR-1 cDNA. Cell Counting Kit-8 and an annexin V assay showed that the overexpression of LAIR-1 in ME-180 cells suppressed the proliferation and anti-apoptosis capacity of the cells. These findings demonstrated that LAIR-1 is markedly overexpressed in HCC tissue, and that its expression status is associated with tumor progression. LAIR-1 may be a biomarker and target in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with HCC. PMID:28105100

  5. Recombinant human erythropoietin modulates erythrocyte complement receptor 1 functional activity in patients with lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Kiss, E; Kávai, M; Csipõ, I; Szegedi, G

    1998-06-01

    Deposition of immune complexes (IC) is an important step in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. Impairment of IC-clearance contributes to the accumulation of IC. It may be partly attributed to decreased complement containing immune complex (ICC) binding by erythrocytic complement receptor 1 (ECR1). Stimulating erythropoiesis with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) may enhance the IC-clearance as increasing ECR1 expression and/or functional activity. Ten anemic patients with lupus nephritis were treated with 50 IU rHuEPO (Eprex) per kg body weight three times a week during a five week period. ICC-binding capacity of ECR1 was determined with 125I-labelled, C3ib containing BSA-anti-BSA complexes. In addition to effective correction of anemia, indicated by increased red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration and reticulocyte ratio, rHuEPO significantly improved decreased ECR1 functional (ICC-binding) activity in patients with lupus nephritis. This improvement correlated with the increase in reticulocyte ratio. Although patients were kept on their previous therapy during Eprex administration, their clinical condition also improved. That was shown by a decrease in Westergreen ratio, serum creatinine concentration and anti-dsDNA level and also by an increase in creatinine clearance. Results suggest a beneficial immune modulatory effect of rHuEPO in lupus nephritis.

  6. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  7. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  8. Endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand induces the migration of human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Seishi; Muramatsu, Mayumi; Gokoh, Maiko; Oka, Saori; Waku, Keizo; Sugiura, Takayuki

    2005-02-01

    2-Arachidonoylglycerol is an endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). Evidence is gradually accumulating which shows that 2-arachidonoylglycerol plays important physiological roles in several mammalian tissues and cells, yet the details remain ambiguous. In this study, we first examined the effects of 2-arachidonoylglycerol on the motility of human natural killer cells. We found that 2-arachidonoylglycerol induces the migration of KHYG-1 cells (a natural killer leukemia cell line) and human peripheral blood natural killer cells. The migration of natural killer cells induced by 2-arachidonoylglycerol was abolished by treating the cells with SR144528, a CB2 receptor antagonist, suggesting that the CB2 receptor is involved in the 2-arachidonoylglycerol-induced migration. In contrast to 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand, did not induce the migration. Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, a major psychoactive constituent of marijuana, also failed to induce the migration; instead, the addition of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol together with 2-arachidonoylglycerol abolished the migration induced by 2-arachidonoylglycerol. It is conceivable that the endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptor, that is, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, affects natural killer cell functions such as migration, thereby contributing to the host-defense mechanism against infectious viruses and tumor cells.

  9. Antagonism of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) by chromones and related isoflavones.

    PubMed

    Schepetkin, Igor A; Kirpotina, Liliya N; Khlebnikov, Andrei I; Cheng, Ni; Ye, Richard D; Quinn, Mark T

    2014-12-15

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on a variety of cell types. Because FPRs play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions implicated in disease pathogenesis, FPR antagonists may represent novel therapeutics for modulating innate immunity. Previously, 4H-chromones were reported to be potent and competitive FPR1 antagonists. In the present studies, 96 additional chromone analogs, including related synthetic and natural isoflavones were evaluated for FPR1 antagonist activity. We identified a number of novel competitive FPR1 antagonists that inhibited fMLF-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in FPR1-HL60 cells and effectively competed with WKYMVm-FITC for binding to FPR1 in FPR1-HL60 and FPR1-RBL cells. Compound 10 (6-hexyl-2-methyl-3-(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromen-7-yl acetate) was found to be the most potent FPR1-specific antagonist, with binding affinity Ki∼100 nM. These chromones inhibited Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis in human neutrophils with nanomolar-micromolar IC50 values. In addition, the most potent novel FPR1 antagonists inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) in FPR1-RBL cells. These antagonists were specific for FPR1 and did not inhibit WKYMVM/WKYMVm-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in FPR2-HL60 cells, FPR3-HL60 cells, RBL cells transfected with murine Fpr1, or interleukin 8-induced Ca2+ flux in human neutrophils and RBL cells transfected with CXC chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1). Moreover, pharmacophore modeling showed that the active chromones had a significantly higher degree of similarity with the pharmacophore template as compared to inactive analogs. Thus, the chromone/isoflavone scaffold represents a relevant backbone for development of novel FPR1 antagonists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Antagonism of Human Formyl Peptide Receptor 1 (FPR1) by Chromones and Related Isoflavones

    PubMed Central

    Schepetkin, Igor A.; Kirpotina, Liliya N.; Khlebnikov, Andrei I.; Cheng, Ni; Ye, Richard D.; Quinn, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on a variety of cell types. Because FPRs play an important role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions implicated in disease pathogenesis, FPR antagonists may represent novel therapeutics for modulating innate immunity. Previously, 4H-chromones were reported to be potent and competitive FPR1 antagonists. In the present studies, 96 additional chromone analogs, including related synthetic and natural isoflavones were evaluated for FPR1 antagonist activity. We identified a number of novel competitive FPR1 antagonists that inhibited fMLF-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in FPR1-HL60 cells and effectively competed with WKYMVm-FITC for binding to FPR1 in FPR1-HL60 and FPR1-RBL cells. Compound 10 (6-hexyl-2-methyl-3-(1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-4-oxo-4H-chromen-7-yl acetate) was found to be the most potent FPR1-specific antagonist, with binding affinity Ki~100 nM. These chromones inhibited Ca2+ flux and chemotaxis in human neutrophils with nanomolar-micromolar IC50 values. In addition, the most potent novel FPR1 antagonists inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) in FPR1-RBL cells. These antagonists were specific for FPR1 and did not inhibit WKYMVM/WKYMVm-induced intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in FPR2-HL60 cells, FPR3-HL60 cells, RBL cells transfected with murine Fpr1, or interleukin 8-induced Ca2+ flux in human neutrophils and RBL cells transfected with CXC chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1). Moreover, pharmacophore modeling showed that the active chromones had a significantly higher degree of similarity with the pharmacophore template as compared to inactive analogs. Thus, the chromone/isoflavone scaffold represents a relevant backbone for development of novel FPR1 antagonists. PMID:25450672

  11. Antitumor activity of plant cannabinoids with emphasis on the effect of cannabidiol on human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ligresti, Alessia; Moriello, Aniello Schiano; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Matias, Isabel; Pisanti, Simona; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Laezza, Chiara; Portella, Giuseppe; Bifulco, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2006-09-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exhibits antitumor effects on various cancer cell types, but its use in chemotherapy is limited by its psychotropic activity. We investigated the antitumor activities of other plant cannabinoids, i.e., cannabidiol, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, cannabidiol acid and THC acid, and assessed whether there is any advantage in using Cannabis extracts (enriched in either cannabidiol or THC) over pure cannabinoids. Results obtained in a panel of tumor cell lines clearly indicate that, of the five natural compounds tested, cannabidiol is the most potent inhibitor of cancer cell growth (IC(50) between 6.0 and 10.6 microM), with significantly lower potency in noncancer cells. The cannabidiol-rich extract was equipotent to cannabidiol, whereas cannabigerol and cannabichromene followed in the rank of potency. Both cannabidiol and the cannabidiol-rich extract inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors obtained by s.c. injection into athymic mice of human MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma or rat v-K-ras-transformed thyroid epithelial cells and reduced lung metastases deriving from intrapaw injection of MDA-MB-231 cells. Judging from several experiments on its possible cellular and molecular mechanisms of action, we propose that cannabidiol lacks a unique mode of action in the cell lines investigated. At least for MDA-MB-231 cells, however, our experiments indicate that cannabidiol effect is due to its capability of inducing apoptosis via: direct or indirect activation of cannabinoid CB(2) and vanilloid transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 receptors and cannabinoid/vanilloid receptor-independent elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species. Our data support the further testing of cannabidiol and cannabidiol-rich extracts for the potential treatment of cancer.

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) expression in human corneal fibroblast decreased with age

    PubMed Central

    Berthaut, Alexandre; Mirshahi, Pezhman; Benabbou, Nadia; Azzazene, Dalel; Bordu, Camille; Therwath, Amu; Legeais, Jean-marc

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Mechanisms by which fibroblast networks between stromal lamellae are laid in the corneal stroma are far from clear. We have investigated the role of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs) by in vitro studies in the human corneal network formation obtained from donors whose ages ranged from 19 to 89 years. Methods Corneal fibroblasts were prepared from cornea donations. The functional properties of these cells to form networks were analyzed using a semi solid matrix (substratum) of Matrigel™. The presence of VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) and the functionality in these fibroblasts were investigated using immunofluorescence, molecular analysis (gene microarray, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction [RT–PCR] and VEGFR siRNA transfections), and cell culture. Results Corneal fibroblasts from 61 donors were classified into two groups according to whether they formed (82%) a reticulum on Matrigel™ or not (18%). By RT–PCR and immunofluorescence analysis, we showed that corneal fibroblasts expressed VEGFR-1 (mRNA and protein). Further, cell culture analysis revealed that only the network (reticulum) forming corneal fibroblast expressed VEGFR-1 in contrast to non network-forming fibroblasts. Use of inhibitors such as VEGFR-1 siRNA transfection or neutralizing antibody (Avastin™) indicated that VEGFR-1 was essential to the formation of the corneal network in vitro. Conclusions The cell reticulum formation seemed to be directly related to the expression of VEGFR-1 in the corneal fibroblast, and this expression decreased with age. The decrease in VEGFR-1 expression is probably related to the diminution of autocrine functions, which may alter the overall tissular homeostasis. This may culminate in the gradual development of poor vision, which is observed in certain pathologies and in aging individuals. PMID:19816604

  13. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-12-04

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1(HIGH) cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1(HIGH) cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions.

  14. CB1 cannabinoid receptor enrichment in the ependymal region of the adult human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Torija, Beatriz; Arevalo-Martin, Angel; Ferrer, Isidro; Molina-Holgado, Eduardo; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are involved in the regulation of neural stem cell biology and their receptors are expressed in the neurogenic niches of adult rodents. In the spinal cord of rats and mice, neural stem cells can be found in the ependymal region, surrounding the central canal, but there is evidence that this region is largely different in adult humans: lacks a patent canal and presents perivascular pseudorosettes, typically found in low grade ependymomas. Using Laser Capture Microdissection, Taqman gene expression assays and immunohistochemistry, we have studied the expression of endocannabinoid system components (receptors and enzymes) at the human spinal cord ependymal region. We observe that ependymal region is enriched in CB1 cannabinoid receptor, due to high CB1 expression in GFAP+ astrocytic domains. However, in human spinal cord levels that retain central canal patency we found ependymal cells with high CB1 expression, equivalent to the CB1HIGH cell subpopulation described in rodents. Our results support the existence of ependymal CB1HIGH cells across species, and may encourage further studies on this subpopulation, although only in cases when central canal is patent. In the adult human ependyma, which usually shows central canal absence, CB1 may play a different role by modulating astrocyte functions. PMID:26634814

  15. The Effect of Chronic Cannabinoids on Broadband EEG Neural Oscillations in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Skosnik, Patrick D; D'Souza, Deepak C; Steinmetz, Adam B; Edwards, Chad R; Vollmer, Jennifer M; Hetrick, William P; O'Donnell, Brian F

    2012-01-01

    Animal and cellular work has shown that central cannabinoid-1 receptors modulate neural oscillations in the gamma range (40 Hz), which may be important for normal perceptual and cognitive processes. In order to assess the effect of cannabinoids on broadband-frequency neural oscillations in humans, the current study examined the effect of chronic cannabis use on auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) utilizing electroencephalography (EEG). Passive ASSRs were assessed using varying rates of binaural stimulation (auditory click-trains; 10–50 Hz in increments of 5 Hz; 80 dB SPL) in carefully screened cannabis users and controls. Chronic cannabis users (n=22; 12 h abstinence before study; positive 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol urine levels) and cannabis naïve controls (n=24) were evaluated. Time X frequency analyses on EEG data were performed using Fourier-based mean trial power (MTP) and phase-locking (inter-trial coherence; ITC). Transient ERPs to stimulus onset (auditory N100 components) were also evaluated. As predicted, a decrease in spectral power (MTP) at 40 Hz was observed in the cannabis group (p<0.018). No effects on phase-locking (ITC) or the N100 were observed. Further, within the cannabis group, lower 40 Hz power correlated with an earlier age of onset of cannabis use (p<0.04). These data suggest that chronic exposure to exogenous cannabinoids can alter the ability to generate neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma range. This is consistent with preclinical animal and cellular data, which may have implications for understanding the short- and long-term psychopharmacological effects of cannabis. PMID:22713908

  16. Spicing thing up: Synthetic cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. Objectives The availability, acute subjective effects—including self-reports posted on Erowid—laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Results Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike THC, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid-receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. Conclusions There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug-detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available. PMID:23836028

  17. Astrocytic expression of cannabinoid type 1 receptor in rat and human sclerotic hippocampi

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xian-Dong; Wei, Dong; Li, Juan; Kang, Jun-Jun; Wu, Chen; Ma, Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhu, Ge-Min; Ou-Yang, Tang-Peng; Liu, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), which is traditionally located on axon terminals, plays an important role in the pathology of epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases by modulating synaptic transmission. Using the pilocarpine model of chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures, which mimics the main features of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS) in humans, we examined the expression of CB1R in hippocampal astrocytes of epileptic rats. Furthermore, we also examined the expression of astrocytic CB1R in the resected hippocampi from patients with medically refractory mesial TLE. Using immunofluorescent double labeling, we found increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in hippocampi of epileptic rats, whereas expression of astrocytic CB1R was not detectable in hippocampi of saline treated animals. Furthermore, CB1R was also found in some astrocytes in sclerotic hippocampi in a subset of patients with intractable mesial TLE. Detection with immune electron microscopy showed that the expression of CB1R was increased in astrocytes of epileptic rats and modest levels of CB1R were also found on the astrocytic membrane of sclerotic hippocampi. These results suggest that increased expression of astrocytic CB1R in sclerotic hippocampi might be involved in the cellular basis of the effects of cannabinoids on epilepsy. PMID:25031702

  18. Human Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Ligand-Interaction Motif: Transmembrane Helix 2 Cysteine, C2.59(89), as Determinant of Classical Cannabinoid Agonist Activity and Binding Pose.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Peng, Yan; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Fan, Pusheng; Janero, David R; Thakur, Ganesh A; Mercier, Richard W; Sun, Xin; Ma, Xiaoyu; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2017-03-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R)-dependent signaling is implicated in neuronal physiology and immune surveillance by brain microglia. Selective CB2R agonists hold therapeutic promise for inflammatory and other neurological disorders. Information on human CB2R (hCB2R) ligand-binding and functional domains is needed to inform the rational design and optimization of candidate druglike hCB2R agonists. Prior demonstration that hCB2R transmembrane helix 2 (TMH2) cysteine C2.59(89) reacts with small-molecule methanethiosulfonates showed that this cysteine residue is accessible to sulfhydryl derivatization reagents. We now report the design and application of two novel, pharmacologically active, high-affinity molecular probes, AM4073 and AM4099, as chemical reporters to interrogate directly the interaction of classical cannabinoid agonists with hCB2R cysteine residues. AM4073 has one electrophilic isothiocyanate (NCS) functionality at the C9 position of its cyclohexenyl C-ring, whereas AM4099 has NCS groups at that position and at the terminus of its aromatic A-ring C3 side chain. Pretreatment of wild-type hCB2R with either probe reduced subsequent [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by ∼60%. Conservative serine substitution of any hCB2R TMH cysteine residue except C2.59(89) did not affect the reduction of [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by either probe, suggesting that AM4073 and AM4099 interact irreversibly with this TMH2 cysteine. In contrast, AM841, an exceptionally potent hCB2R megagonist and direct AM4073/4099 congener bearing a single electrophilic NCS group at the terminus of its C3 side chain, had been demonstrated to bind covalently to TMH6 cysteine C6.47(257) and not C2.59(89). Molecular modeling indicates that the AM4073-hCB2R* interaction at C2.59(89) orients this classical cannabinoid away from TMH6 and toward the TMH2-TMH3 interface in the receptor's hydrophobic binding pocket, whereas the AM841-hCB2R* interaction at C6.47(257) favors agonist orientation toward

  19. Simultaneous Quantification of Free and Glucuronidated Cannabinoids in Human Urine by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cannabis is the most commonly abused drug of abuse and is commonly quantified during urine drug testing. We conducted a controlled drug administration studies investigating efficacy of urinary cannabinoid glucuronide metabolites for documenting recency of cannabis intake and for determining stability of urinary cannabinoids. Methods A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated quantifying Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), cannabidiol, cannabinol, THC-glucuronide and THCCOOH-glucuronide in 0.5 ml human urine via supported-liquid extraction. Chromatography was performed on an Ultra Biphenyl column with a gradient of 10 mmol/l ammonium acetate, pH 6.15 and 15% methanol in acetonitrile at 0. 4ml/min. Analytes were monitored by positive and negative mode electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. Results Linear ranges were 0.5–50 ng/ml for THC-glucuronide, 1–100 ng/ml for THCCOOH, 11-OH-THC and cannabidiol, 2–100 ng/ml for THC and cannabinol, and 5–500 ng/ml for THCCOOH-glucuronide (R2>0.99). Mean extraction efficiencies were 34–73% with analytical recovery (bias) 80.5–118.0% and total imprecision 3.0–10.2% coefficient of variation. Conclusion This method simultaneously quantifies urinary cannabinoids and phase II glucuronide metabolites, and enables evaluation of urinary cannabinoid glucuronides for documenting recency of cannabis intake and cannabinoid stability. The assay is applicable for routine urine cannabinoid testing. PMID:22771478

  20. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol attenuates allogeneic host-versus-graft response and delays skin graft rejection through activation of cannabinoid receptor 1 and induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sido, Jessica M.; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2015-01-01

    Immune cells have been shown to express cannabinoid receptors and to produce endogenous ligands. Moreover, activation of cannabinoid receptors on immune cells has been shown to trigger potent immunosuppression. Despite such studies, the role of cannabinoids in transplantation, specifically to prevent allograft rejection, has not, to our knowledge, been investigated previously. In the current study, we tested the effect of THC on the suppression of HvGD as well as rejection of skin allografts. To this end, we studied HvGD by injecting H-2k splenocytes into H-2b mice and analyzing the immune response in the draining ingLNs. THC treatment significantly reduced T cell proliferation and activation in draining LNs of the recipient mice and decreased early stage rejection-indicator cytokines, including IL-2 and IFN-γ. THC treatment also increased the allogeneic skin graft survival. THC treatment in HvGD mice led to induction of MDSCs. Using MDSC depletion studies as well as adoptive transfer experiments, we found that THC-induced MDSCs were necessary for attenuation of HvGD. Additionally, using pharmacological inhibitors of CB1 and CB2 receptors and CB1 and CB2 knockout mice, we found that THC was working preferentially through CB1. Together, our research shows, for the first time to our knowledge, that targeting cannabinoid receptors may provide a novel treatment modality to attenuate HvGD and prevent allograft rejection. PMID:26034207

  1. Δ⁹-Tetrahydrocannabinol attenuates allogeneic host-versus-graft response and delays skin graft rejection through activation of cannabinoid receptor 1 and induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Sido, Jessica M; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2015-09-01

    Immune cells have been shown to express cannabinoid receptors and to produce endogenous ligands. Moreover, activation of cannabinoid receptors on immune cells has been shown to trigger potent immunosuppression. Despite such studies, the role of cannabinoids in transplantation, specifically to prevent allograft rejection, has not, to our knowledge, been investigated previously. In the current study, we tested the effect of THC on the suppression of HvGD as well as rejection of skin allografts. To this end, we studied HvGD by injecting H-2(k) splenocytes into H-2(b) mice and analyzing the immune response in the draining ingLNs. THC treatment significantly reduced T cell proliferation and activation in draining LNs of the recipient mice and decreased early stage rejection-indicator cytokines, including IL-2 and IFN-γ. THC treatment also increased the allogeneic skin graft survival. THC treatment in HvGD mice led to induction of MDSCs. Using MDSC depletion studies as well as adoptive transfer experiments, we found that THC-induced MDSCs were necessary for attenuation of HvGD. Additionally, using pharmacological inhibitors of CB1 and CB2 receptors and CB1 and CB2 knockout mice, we found that THC was working preferentially through CB1. Together, our research shows, for the first time to our knowledge, that targeting cannabinoid receptors may provide a novel treatment modality to attenuate HvGD and prevent allograft rejection.

  2. Human fear acquisition deficits in relation to genetic variants of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 and the serotonin transporter.

    PubMed

    Heitland, Ivo; Groenink, Lucianne; Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y; Oosting, Ronald S; Baas, Johanna M P

    2013-01-01

    The ability to identify predictors of aversive events allows organisms to appropriately respond to these events, and failure to acquire these fear contingencies can lead to maladaptive contextual anxiety. Recently, preclinical studies demonstrated that the corticotropin-releasing factor and serotonin systems are interactively involved in adaptive fear acquisition. Here, 150 healthy medication-free human subjects completed a cue and context fear conditioning procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex (FPS) was measured to assess both uninstructed fear acquisition and instructed fear expression. All participants were genotyped for polymorphisms located within regulatory regions of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1 - rs878886) and the serotonin transporter (5HTTLPR). These polymorphisms have previously been linked to panic disorder and anxious symptomology and personality, respectively. G-allele carriers of CRHR1 (rs878886) showed no acquisition of fear conditioned responses (FPS) to the threat cue in the uninstructed phase, whereas fear acquisition was present in C/C homozygotes. Moreover, carrying the risk alleles of both rs878886 (G-allele) and 5HTTLPR (short allele) was associated with increased FPS to the threat context during this phase. After explicit instructions regarding the threat contingency were given, the cue FPS and context FPS normalized in all genotype groups. The present results indicate that genetic variability in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1, especially in interaction with the 5HTTLPR, is involved in the acquisition of fear in humans. This translates prior animal findings to the human realm.

  3. Functional effects of cannabinoids during dopaminergic specification of human neural precursors derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Stanslowsky, Nancy; Jahn, Kirsten; Venneri, Anna; Naujock, Maximilian; Haase, Alexandra; Martin, Ulrich; Frieling, Helge; Wegner, Florian

    2016-03-30

    Among adolescents cannabis is one of the most widely used illicit drugs. In adolescence brain development continues, characterized by neuronal maturation and synaptic plasticity. The endocannabinoid system plays an important role during brain development by modulating neuronal function and neurogenesis. Changes in endocannabinoid signaling by Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of cannabis, might therefore lead to neurobiological changes influencing brain function and behavior. We investigated the functional maturation and dopaminergic specification of human cord blood-derived induced pluripotent stem cell (hCBiPSC)-derived small molecule neural precursor cells (smNPCs) after cultivation with the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and the exogenous THC, both potent agonists at the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1 R). Higher dosages of 10-μM AEA or THC significantly decreased functionality of neurons, indicated by reduced ion currents and synaptic activity. A lower concentration of 1-μM THC had no marked effect on neuronal and dopaminergic maturation, while 1-μM AEA significantly enhanced the frequency of synaptic activity. As there were no significant effects on DNA methylation in promotor regions of genes important for neuronal function, these cannabinoid actions seem to be mediated by another than this epigenetic mechanism. Our data suggest that there are concentration-dependent actions of cannabinoids on neuronal function in vitro indicating neurotoxic, dysfunctional effects of 10-μM AEA and THC during human neurogenesis.

  4. Reduced bioenergetics and toll-like receptor 1 function in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in aging.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; Guo, Xiuyang; Wang, Xiaomei; Yuan, Xiaoling; Chen, Shu; Malawista, Stephen E; Bockenstedt, Linda K; Allore, Heather G; Montgomery, Ruth R

    2014-02-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive decline in immune function (immunosenescence) resulting in an increased susceptibility to viral and bacterial infections. Here we show reduced expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and an underlying age-dependent deficiency in PMN bioenergetics. In older (>65 years) adults, stimulation through TLR1 led to lower activation of integrins (CD11b and CD18), lower production of the chemokine IL-8, and lower levels of the phosphorylated signaling intermediate p38 MAP kinase than in PMN from younger donors (21-30 years). In addition, loss of CD62L, a marker of PMN activation, was reduced in PMN of older adults stimulated through multiple pathways. Rescue of PMN from apoptosis by stimulation with TLR1 was reduced in PMN from older adults. In seeking an explanation for effects of aging across multiple pathways, we examined PMN energy utilization and found that glucose uptake after stimulation through TLR1 was dramatically lower in PMN of older adults. Our results demonstrate a reduction in TLR1 expression and TLR1-mediated responses in PMN with aging, and reduced efficiency of bioenergetics in PMN. These changes likely contribute to reduced PMN efficiency in aging through multiple aspects of PMN function and suggest potential therapeutic opportunities.

  5. Agonist-dependent cannabinoid receptor signalling in human trabecular meshwork cells

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, B T; Hudson, B; Yegorova, S; Jollimore, C A B; Kelly, M E M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Trabecular meshwork (TM) is an ocular tissue involved in the regulation of aqueous humour outflow and intraocular pressure (IOP). CB1 receptors (CB1) are present in TM and cannabinoid administration decreases IOP. CB1 signalling was investigated in a cell line derived from human TM (hTM). Experimental approach: CB1 signalling was investigated using ratiometric Ca2+ imaging, western blotting and infrared In-Cell Western analysis. Key results: WIN55212-2, a synthetic aminoalkylindole cannabinoid receptor agonist (10–100 μM) increased intracellular Ca2+ in hTM cells. WIN55,212-2-mediated Ca2+ increases were blocked by AM251, a CB1 antagonist, but were unaffected by the CB2 antagonist, AM630. The WIN55,212-2-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i was pertussis toxin (PTX)-insensitive, therefore, independent of Gi/o coupling, but was attenuated by a dominant negative Gαq/11 subunit, implicating a Gq/11 signalling pathway. The increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent upon PLC activation and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores. A PTX-sensitive increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation was also observed in response to WIN55,212-2, indicative of a Gi/o signalling pathway. CB1-Gq/11 coupling to activate PLC-dependent increases in Ca2+ appeared to be specific to WIN55,212-2 and were not observed with other CB1 agonists, including CP55,940 and methanandamide. CP55940 produced PTX-sensitive increases in [Ca2+]i at concentrations ≥15 μM, and PTX-sensitive increases in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Conclusions and implications: This study demonstrates that endogenous CB1 couples to both Gq/11 and Gi/o in hTM cells in an agonist-dependent manner. Cannabinoid activation of multiple CB1 signalling pathways in TM tissue could lead to differential changes in aqueous humour outflow and IOP. PMID:17922024

  6. Folding and conformational studies on SCR1-3 domains of human complement receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Clark, N S; Dodd, I; Mossakowska, D E; Smith, R A; Gore, M G

    1996-10-01

    Short consensus repeats SCR3 and SCR1-3 are soluble recombinant proteins, consisting of the third and first three N-terminal domains of complement receptor 1, respectively, which retain some anti-complement activity. The conformational stabilities and folding/unfolding of SCR3 and SCR1-3 have been studied using circular dichroism and equilibrium and pre-equilibrium fluorescence spectroscopy. Denaturation by guanidinium hydrochloride (GdnHCl) is rapid and completely reversible. Reduction of disulphide bridges in the folded proteins by beta-mercaptoethanol leads to an increase in fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence intensity of the folded proteins is approximately 7.5% of that of the respective unfolded proteins. The data can be approximated to a two-state transition between native and denatured forms of the proteins. SCR3 has a conformational stability in water of 12-13 kJ/mol whereas that of SCR1-3 is 19.5-19.9 kJ/mol depending upon the technique utilized. The heat capacity change associated with the unfolding of SCR1-3 was obtained by a series of GdnHCl unfolding experiments over a range of temperatures and was found to be 6.6 kJ/K.mol or 33.8 J/K.mol(residue). The refolding process of SCR3 was found to be simple, described by a single exponential equation, whereas that of SCR1-3 was found to be complex and could be fitted to a double exponential equation indicating the presence of folding intermediates.

  7. Identification of New Synthetic Cannabinoid ADB-CHMINACA (MAB-CHMINACA) Metabolites in Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Jeremy; Diao, Xingxing; Sempio, Cristina; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2017-03-01

    ADB-CHMINACA (MAB-CHMINACA) is a new synthetic cannabinoid with high potency and many reported adverse events and fatalities. The drug is currently scheduled in several countries in Europe and the USA. Analytical methods need to be developed to confirm ADB-CHMINACA intake for clinical and forensic programs. For many synthetic cannabinoids, parent compound is not detectable in biological samples after intake, making the detection of metabolites the only way to prove consumption. Therefore, detection of ADB-CHMINACA metabolites in biological specimens is critical. Since there are currently no published data on ADB-CHMINACA metabolism, we aimed to identify its major metabolites. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes were incubated with 10 μmol/L ADB-CHMINACA for 3 h. Incubations were analyzed with liquid chromatography on a biphenyl column, high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (orbitrap), and metabolite identification software. A reference standard of six commercially available potential metabolites was simultaneously analyzed under the same conditions to allow correct assignment of isomers. We detected ten major metabolites. Biotransformations mainly occurred at the cyclohexylmethyl tail of the compound, as also observed with structural analogs' metabolism. Minor reactions also occurred at the tert-butyl chain. Only two analytical standards of potential metabolites matched an actual metabolite detected in hepatocyte incubations. We recommend A9 (ADB-CHMINACA hydroxycyclohexylmethyl), A4 (ADB-CHMINACA 4″-hydroxycyclohexyl), and A6 (ADB-CHMINACA hydroxycyclohexylmethyl) as metabolite targets to document ADB-CHMINACA intake in clinical and forensic cases. Additionally, these results will guide analytical standard manufacturers to better provide suitable references for further studies on ADB-CHMINACA metabolism.

  8. Screening for the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and its major metabolites in human doping controls.

    PubMed

    Möller, Ines; Wintermeyer, Annette; Bender, Katja; Jübner, Martin; Thomas, Andreas; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2011-09-01

    Referred to as 'spice', several new drugs, advertised as herbal blends, have appeared on the market in the last few years, in which the synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and a C(8) homologue of CP 47,497 were identified as major active ingredients. Due to their reported cannabis-like effects, many European countries have banned these substances. The World Anti-Doping Agency has also explicitly prohibited synthetic cannabinoids in elite sport in-competition. Since urine specimens have been the preferred doping control samples, the elucidation of the metabolic pathways of these substances is of particular importance to implement them in sports drug testing programmes. In a recent report, an in vitro phase-I metabolism study of JWH-018 was presented yielding mainly hydroxylated and N-dealkylated metabolites. Due to these findings, a urine sample of a healthy man declaring to have smoked a 'spice' product was screened for potential phase-I and -II metabolites by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry in the present report. The majority of the phase-I metabolites observed in earlier in vitro studies of JWH-018 were detected in this urine specimen and furthermore most of their respective monoglucuronides. As no intact JWH-018 was detectable, the monohydroxylated metabolite being the most abundant one was chosen as a target analyte for sports drug testing purposes; a detection method was subsequently developed and validated in accordance to conventional screening protocols based on enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The method was applied to approximately 7500 urine doping control samples yielding two JWH-018 findings and demonstrated its capability for a sensitive and selective identification of JWH-018 and its metabolites in human urine. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Pharmacological differences between the human and rat vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1)

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Peter; McLatchie, Linda M; Chambers, Anne; Phillips, Elsa; Clarke, Melanie; Savidge, Jonathan; Toms, Christy; Peacock, Marcus; Shah, Kirti; Winter, Janet; Weerasakera, Natasha; Webb, Mike; Rang, Humphrey P; Bevan, Stuart; James, Iain F

    2001-01-01

    Vanilloid receptors (VR1) were cloned from human and rat dorsal root ganglion libraries and expressed in Xenopus oocytes or Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Both rat and human VR1 formed ligand gated channels that were activated by capsaicin with similar EC50 values. Capsaicin had a lower potency on both channels, when measured electrophysiologically in oocytes compared to CHO cells (oocytes: rat=1.90±0.20 μM; human=1.90±0.30 μM: CHO cells: rat=0.20±0.06 μM; human=0.19±0.08 μM). In CHO cell lines co-expressing either rat or human VR1 and the calcium sensitive, luminescent protein, aequorin, the EC50 values for capsaicin-induced responses were similar in both cell lines (rat=0.35±0.06 μM, human=0.53±0.03 μM). The threshold for activation by acidic solutions was lower for human VR1 channels than that for rat VR1 (EC50 pH 5.49±0.04 and pH 5.78±0.09, respectively). The threshold for heat activation was identical (42°C) for rat and human VR1. PPAHV was an agonist at rat VR1 (EC50 between 3 and 10 μM) but was virtually inactive at the human VR1 (EC50>10 μM). Capsazepine and ruthenium red were both more potent at blocking the capsaicin response of human VR1 than rat VR1. Capsazepine blocked the human but not the rat VR1 response to low pH. Capsazepine was also more effective at inhibiting the noxious heat response of human than of rat VR1. PMID:11226139

  10. Tumor-promoting effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Sara; Fogli, Stefano; Polini, Beatrice; Montagnani, Valentina; Podestà, Adriano; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Romanini, Antonella; Stecca, Barbara; Nieri, Paola

    2017-04-01

    The role of endocannabinoid system in melanoma development and progression is actually not fully understood. This study was aimed at clarifying whether cannabinoid-type 1 (CB1) receptor may function as tumor-promoting or -suppressing signal in human cutaneous melanoma. CB1 receptor expression was measured in human melanoma cell lines by real-time PCR. A genetic deletion of CB1 receptors in selected melanoma cells was carried out by using three different short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). Performance of target gene silencing was verified by real-time PCR and Western blot. The effects of CB1 receptor silencing on cell growth, clonogenicity, migration capability, cell cycle progression, and activation of mitogenic signals was tested. Lentiviral shRNAs vectors targeting different regions of the human CB1 gene led to a significant reduction in CB1 receptor mRNA and a near complete loss of CB1 receptor protein, compared to control vector (LV-c). The number of viable cells, the colony-forming ability and cell migration were significantly reduced in cells transduced with CB1 lentiviral shRNAs compared to LV-c. Cell cycle analyses showed arrest at G1/S phase. p-Akt and p-ERK expression were decreased in transduced versus control cells. Findings of this study suggest that CB1 receptor might function as tumor-promoting signal in human cutaneous melanoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Gemcitabine/cannabinoid combination triggers autophagy in pancreatic cancer cells through a ROS-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Donadelli, M; Dando, I; Zaniboni, T; Costanzo, C; Dalla Pozza, E; Scupoli, M T; Scarpa, A; Zappavigna, S; Marra, M; Abbruzzese, A; Bifulco, M; Caraglia, M; Palmieri, M

    2011-01-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM, 2′,2′-difluorodeoxycytidine) is currently used in advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with a response rate of < 20%. The purpose of our work was to improve GEM activity by addition of cannabinoids. Here, we show that GEM induces both cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB2) receptors by an NF-κB-dependent mechanism and that its association with cannabinoids synergistically inhibits pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell growth and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by single treatments. The antiproliferative synergism is prevented by the radical scavenger N-acetyl--cysteine and by the specific NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7085, demonstrating that the induction of ROS by GEM/cannabinoids and of NF-κB by GEM is required for this effect. In addition, we report that neither apoptotic nor cytostatic mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic cell growth inhibition, which is strictly associated with the enhancement of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Noteworthy, the antiproliferative synergism is stronger in GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with GEM-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines. The combined treatment strongly inhibits growth of human pancreatic tumor cells xenografted in nude mice without apparent toxic effects. These findings support a key role of the ROS-dependent activation of an autophagic program in the synergistic growth inhibition induced by GEM/cannabinoid combination in human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:21525939

  12. Human Fear Acquisition Deficits in Relation to Genetic Variants of the Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor 1 and the Serotonin Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Heitland, Ivo; Groenink, Lucianne; Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y.; Oosting, Ronald S.; Baas, Johanna M. P.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to identify predictors of aversive events allows organisms to appropriately respond to these events, and failure to acquire these fear contingencies can lead to maladaptive contextual anxiety. Recently, preclinical studies demonstrated that the corticotropin-releasing factor and serotonin systems are interactively involved in adaptive fear acquisition. Here, 150 healthy medication-free human subjects completed a cue and context fear conditioning procedure in a virtual reality environment. Fear potentiation of the eyeblink startle reflex (FPS) was measured to assess both uninstructed fear acquisition and instructed fear expression. All participants were genotyped for polymorphisms located within regulatory regions of the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1 - rs878886) and the serotonin transporter (5HTTLPR). These polymorphisms have previously been linked to panic disorder and anxious symptomology and personality, respectively. G-allele carriers of CRHR1 (rs878886) showed no acquisition of fear conditioned responses (FPS) to the threat cue in the uninstructed phase, whereas fear acquisition was present in C/C homozygotes. Moreover, carrying the risk alleles of both rs878886 (G-allele) and 5HTTLPR (short allele) was associated with increased FPS to the threat context during this phase. After explicit instructions regarding the threat contingency were given, the cue FPS and context FPS normalized in all genotype groups. The present results indicate that genetic variability in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1, especially in interaction with the 5HTTLPR, is involved in the acquisition of fear in humans. This translates prior animal findings to the human realm. PMID:23717480

  13. Generation and characterization of small single domain antibodies inhibiting human tumor necrosis factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Steeland, Sophie; Puimège, Leen; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Haustraete, Jurgen; Devoogdt, Nick; Hulpiau, Paco; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Laukens, Debby; Meuleman, Philip; De Vos, Martine; Libert, Claude

    2015-02-13

    The cytokine TNF is a well known drug target for several inflammatory diseases such as Crohn disease. Despite the great success of TNF blockers, therapy could be improved because of high costs and side effects. Selective inhibition of TNF receptor (TNFR) 1 signaling holds the potential to greatly reduce the pro-inflammatory activity of TNF, thereby preserving the advantageous immunomodulatory signals mediated by TNFR2. We generated a selective human TNFR1 inhibitor based on Nanobody (Nb) technology. Two anti-human TNFR1 Nbs were linked with an anti-albumin Nb to generate Nb Alb-70-96 named "TNF Receptor-One Silencer" (TROS). TROS selectively binds and inhibits TNF/TNFR1 and lymphotoxin-α/TNFR1 signaling with good affinity and IC50 values, both of which are in the nanomolar range. Surface plasmon resonance analysis reveals that TROS competes with TNF for binding to human TNFR1. In HEK293T cells, TROS strongly reduces TNF-induced gene expression, like IL8 and TNF, in a dose-dependent manner; and in ex vivo cultured colon biopsies of CD patients, TROS inhibits inflammation. Finally, in liver chimeric humanized mice, TROS antagonizes inflammation in a model of acute TNF-induced liver inflammation, reflected in reduced human IL8 expression in liver and reduced IL6 levels in serum. These results demonstrate the considerable potential of TROS and justify the evaluation of TROS in relevant disease animal models of both acute and chronic inflammation and eventually in patients.

  14. Cannabinoids inhibit human keratinocyte proliferation through a non-CB1/CB2 mechanism and have a potential therapeutic value in the treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Jonathan D; Williamson, Elizabeth M

    2007-02-01

    Cannabinoids from cannabis (Cannabis sativa) are anti-inflammatory and have inhibitory effects on the proliferation of a number of tumorigenic cell lines, some of which are mediated via cannabinoid receptors. Cannabinoid (CB) receptors are present in human skin and anandamide, an endogenous CB receptor ligand, inhibits epidermal keratinocyte differentiation. Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease also characterised in part by epidermal keratinocyte hyper-proliferation. We investigated the plant cannabinoids Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabinol and cannabigerol for their ability to inhibit the proliferation of a hyper-proliferating human keratinocyte cell line and for any involvement of cannabinoid receptors. A keratinocyte proliferation assay was used to assess the effect of treatment with cannabinoids. Cell integrity and metabolic competence confirmed using lactate-dehydrogenase and adenosine tri-phosphate assays. To determine the involvement of the receptors, specific agonist and antagonist were used in conjunction with some phytocannabinoids. Western blot and RT-PCR analysis confirmed presence of CB1 and CB2 receptors. The cannabinoids tested all inhibited keratinocyte proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. The selective CB2 receptor agonists JWH015 and BML190 elicited only partial inhibition, the non-selective CB agonist HU210 produced a concentration-dependent response, the activity of theses agonists were not blocked by either CB1/CB2 antagonists. The results indicate that while CB receptors may have a circumstantial role in keratinocyte proliferation, they do not contribute significantly to this process. Our results show that cannabinoids inhibit keratinocyte proliferation, and therefore support a potential role for cannabinoids in the treatment of psoriasis.

  15. Cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors and tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    One hypothesis suggests that tinnitus is a form of sensory epilepsy, arising partly from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory regions of the brain such as the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus. Although there is currently no effective drug treatment for tinnitus, anti-epileptic drugs are used in some cases as a potential treatment option. There is increasing evidence to suggest that cannabinoid drugs, i.e. cannabinoid receptor agonists, can also have anti-epileptic effects, at least in some cases and in some parts of the brain. It has been reported that cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and that they are involved in the regulation of plasticity. This review explores the question of whether cannabinoid receptor agonists are likely to be pro- or anti-epileptic in the cochlear nucleus and therefore whether cannabinoids and Cannabis itself are likely to make tinnitus better or worse.

  16. The effects of leptin in combination with a cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist, AM 251, or cannabidiol on food intake and body weight in rats fed a high-fat or a free-choice high sugar diet.

    PubMed

    Wierucka-Rybak, M; Wolak, M; Bojanowska, E

    2014-08-01

    High intake of fats and sugars has prompted a rapid growth in the number of obese individuals worldwide. To further investigate whether simultaneous pharmacological intervention in the leptin and cannabinoid system might change food and water intake, preferences for palatable foods, and body weight, we have examined the effects of concomitant intraperitoneal administration of leptin and AM 251, a cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonist, or cannabidiol (CBD), a plant cannabinoid, in rats maintained on either a high-fat (HF) diet (45% energy from fat) or free-choice (FC) diet consisting of high-sucrose and normal rat chow (83% and 61% energy from carbohydrates, respectively). Leptin at a dose of 100 μg/kg injected individually for 3 subsequent days to rats fed a HF diet reduced significantly the daily caloric intake and inhibited body weight gain. The hormone had no significant effects, however, on either caloric intake, body weight or food preferences in rats fed an FC diet. Co-injection of leptin and 1 mg/kg AM 251 resulted in a further significant decrease in HF diet intake and a profound reduction in body weight gain both in HF diet- and FC diet-fed rats. This drug combination, however, had no effect on the consumption of high-sucrose chow. In contrast, 3mg/kg of CBD co-injected with leptin did not modify leptin effects on food intake in rats maintained on an FC or HF diet. None of the drug combinations affected water consumption. It is concluded that the concomitant treatment with leptin and AM 251 attenuated markedly body weight gain in rats maintained on high-calorie diets rich in fat and carbohydrates but did not affect preferences for sweet food.

  17. Dynamic of expression and localization of cannabinoid-degrading enzymes FAAH and MGLL in relation to CB1 during meiotic maturation of human oocytes.

    PubMed

    Agirregoitia, Ekaitz; Totorikaguena, Lide; Expósito, Antonia; Mendoza, Rosario; Matorras, Roberto; Agirregoitia, Naiara

    2016-08-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid system has been characterized in some female reproductive organs but little is known about the expression and localization pattern of cannabinoid-degrading enzymes in relation to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in human oocytes. In this study, we focus on the investigation of the presence and differential distribution of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) in relation to CB1 during the maturation of human oocytes. We used a total of 290 human oocytes not suitable for in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI): germinal-vesicle (GV) and metaphase-I (MI) stages and metaphase-II (MII) oocytes that had not developed into an embryo after ICSI. Cannabinoid-degrading enzymes and the cannabinoid CB1 receptor were present in human oocytes. Specifically, FAAH was detected in the periphery of the oocyte from the GV to MI stage and co-localized with CB1. Later, by the MII stage, FAAH was spread within the oocyte, whereas MGLL immunostaining was homogeneous across the oocyte at all stages of maturation and only overlapped with CB1 at the GV stage. This coordinated redistribution of cannabinoid system proteins suggests a role for this system in the maturation of the female gamete.

  18. Metabolism of MK-0524, a prostaglandin D2 receptor 1 antagonist, in microsomes and hepatocytes from preclinical species and humans.

    PubMed

    Dean, Brian J; Chang, Steve; Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria; Xia, Yuan-Qing; Braun, Matt; Soli, Eric; Zhao, Yuming; Franklin, Ronald B; Karanam, Bindhu

    2007-02-01

    (3R)-4-(4-Chlorobenzyl)-7-fluoro-5-(methylsulfonyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocyclopenta[b]indol-3-yl acetic acid (MK-0524) is a potent orally active human prostaglandin D(2) receptor 1 antagonist that is currently under development for the prevention of niacin-induced flushing. The major in vitro and in vivo metabolite of MK-0524 is the acyl glucuronic acid conjugate of the parent compound, M2. To compare metabolism of MK-0524 across preclinical species and humans, studies were undertaken to determine the in vitro kinetic parameters (K(m) and V(max)) for the glucuronidation of MK-0524 in Sprague-Dawley rat, beagle dog, cynomolgus monkey, and human liver microsomes, human intestinal microsomes, and in recombinant human UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGT). A comparison of K(m) values indicated that UGT1A9 has the potential to catalyze the glucuronidation of MK-0524 in the liver, whereas UGT1A3 and UGT2B7 have the potential to catalyze the glucuronidation in the intestine. MK-0524 also was subject to phase I oxidative metabolism; however, the rate was significantly lower than that of glucuronidation. The rate of phase I metabolism was ranked as follows: rat approximately monkey > human intestine > dog > human liver with qualitatively similar metabolite profiles across species. In all the cases, the major metabolites were the monohydroxylated epimers (M1 and M4) and the keto-metabolite, M3. Use of inhibitory monoclonal antibodies and recombinant human cytochromes P450 suggested that CYP3A4 was the major isozyme involved in the oxidative metabolism of MK-0524, with a minor contribution from CYP2C9. The major metabolite in hepatocyte preparations was the acyl glucuronide, M2, with minor amounts of M1, M3, M4, and their corresponding glucuronides. Overall, the in vivo metabolism of MK-0524 is expected to proceed via glucuronidation, with minor contributions from oxidative pathways.

  19. Differential expression of intracellular and extracellular CB(2) cannabinoid receptor protein by human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Julie T; Harui, Airi; Kiertscher, Sylvia M; Roth, Jeffrey D; Roth, Michael D

    2013-03-01

    mRNA encoding for the CB(2) cannabinoid receptor is expressed by many subsets of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), but little is known about the resulting protein expression and function. Employing clones from the A549 and 293T cell lines that were constructed to express both full-length human CB(2) and GFP, we developed a flow cytometry assay for characterizing CB(2) protein expression. A monoclonal antibody directed against human CB(2) selectively stained the surface of transduced but not parental cell lines. When cells were fixed and permeabilized, imaging flow cytometry identified large stores of intracellular protein. Total cellular staining for CB(2) corresponded closely with the level of GFP expression. When exposed to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, CB(2)-expressing cells internalized cell surface CB(2) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Applying these approaches to human PBL, CB(2) protein was identified on the surface of human B cells but not on T cells or monocytes. In contrast, when PBL were fixed and permeabilized, intracellular CB(2) expression was readily detected in all three subsets by both conventional and imaging flow cytometry. Similar to the protein expression pattern observed in fixed and permeabilized PBL, purified B cells, T cells, and monocytes expressed relatively equal levels of CB(2) mRNA by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our findings confirm that human PBL express CB(2) protein but that its distribution is predominantly intracellular with only B cells expressing CB(2) protein at the extracellular membrane. The differential role of intracellular and extracellular CB(2) receptors in mediating ligand signaling and immune function remains to be determined.

  20. In vitro and in vivo human metabolism of a new synthetic cannabinoid NM-2201 (CBL-2201).

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Carlier, Jeremy; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Kronstrand, Robert; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2017-01-01

    In 2014, NM-2201 (CBL-2201), a novel synthetic cannabinoid (SC), was detected by Russian and United States laboratories. It was already added to the scheduled drugs list in Japan, Sweden and Germany. Unfortunately, no human metabolism data are currently available, making it challenging to confirm its intake because all previous investigated SCs were extensively metabolized. The present study aims to recommend appropriate marker metabolites by investigating NM-2201 metabolism in human hepatocytes and confirm the results in authentic human urine specimens. For the metabolic stability assay, 1 μM NM-2201 was incubated in human liver microsomes (HLMs) for up to 1 h; for metabolite profiling, 10 μM of NM-2201 was incubated in human hepatocytes for 3 h. Two authentic urine specimens from NM-2201 positive cases were analyzed after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. Metabolite identification in hepatocyte samples and urine specimens was achieved with high-resolution mass spectrometry via information-dependent acquisition. NM-2201 was quickly metabolized in HLMs with an 8.0 min half-life. In human hepatocyte incubation samples, a total of thirteen NM-2201 metabolites were identified, generated mainly from ester hydrolysis and further hydroxylation, oxidative defluorination and subsequent glucuronidation. M13 (5-fluoro PB-22 3-carboxyindole) was the major metabolite. In the urine specimens, the parent drug NM-2201 was not detected; M13 was the predominant metabolite after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. Therefore, based on our study, we recommend the M13 as a suitable urinary marker metabolite for confirming NM-2201 and/or 5F-PB-22 intake.

  1. Regulation of adiponectin receptor 1 in human hepatocytes by agonists of nuclear receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeier, Markus; Weigert, Johanna; Schaeffler, Andreas; Weiss, Thomas; Kirchner, Stefan; Laberer, Sabine; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Buechler, Christa . E-mail: christa.buechler@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2005-09-02

    The adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 have been identified to mediate the insulin-sensitizing effects of adiponectin. Although AdipoR2 was suggested to be the main receptor for this adipokine in hepatocytes, AdipoR1 protein is highly abundant in primary human hepatocytes and hepatocytic cell lines. Nuclear receptors are main regulators of lipid metabolism and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} and {gamma}, retinoid X receptor (RXR), and liver X receptor (LXR) by specific ligands may influence AdipoR1 abundance. AdipoR1 protein is neither altered by RXR or LXR agonists nor by pioglitazone. In contrast, fenofibric acid reduces AdipoR1 whereas hepatotoxic troglitazone upregulates AdipoR1 protein in HepG2 cells. Taken together this work shows for the first time that AdipoR1 protein is expressed in human hepatocytes but that it is not a direct target gene of nuclear receptors. Elevated AdipoR1 induced by hepatotoxic troglitazone may indicate a role of this receptor in adiponectin-mediated beneficial effects in liver damage.

  2. Exposure to anthrax toxin alters human leucocyte expression of anthrax toxin receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Ingram, R J; Harris, A; Ascough, S; Metan, G; Doganay, M; Ballie, L; Williamson, E D; Dyson, H; Robinson, J H; Sriskandan, S; Altmann, D M

    2013-07-01

    Anthrax is a toxin-mediated disease, the lethal effects of which are initiated by the binding of protective antigen (PA) with one of three reported cell surface toxin receptors (ANTXR). Receptor binding has been shown to influence host susceptibility to the toxins. Despite this crucial role for ANTXR in the outcome of disease, and the reported immunomodulatory consequence of the anthrax toxins during infection, little is known about ANTXR expression on human leucocytes. We characterized the expression levels of ANTXR1 (TEM8) on human leucocytes using flow cytometry. In order to assess the effect of prior toxin exposure on ANTXR1 expression levels, leucocytes from individuals with no known exposure, those exposed to toxin through vaccination and convalescent individuals were analysed. Donors could be defined as either 'low' or 'high' expressers based on the percentage of ANTXR1-positive monocytes detected. Previous exposure to toxins appears to modulate ANTXR1 expression, exposure through active infection being associated with lower receptor expression. A significant correlation between low receptor expression and high anthrax toxin-specific interferon (IFN)-γ responses was observed in previously infected individuals. We propose that there is an attenuation of ANTXR1 expression post-infection which may be a protective mechanism that has evolved to prevent reinfection.

  3. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 effectively inhibits angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang; Shi, Minglei; Xi, Yongyi; Gao, Lihua; Zhang, Guanyi; Shao, Yong; Chen, Huipeng; Hu, Xianwen

    2015-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in both physiological and pathological angiogenesis. VEGF receptor‑1 (VEGFR‑1) acts as a decoy VEGF receptor that enables the regulation of VEGF on the vascular endothelium. In the present study, the recombinant human VEGFR1D1‑3/Fc (rhVEGFR‑1), which contains key domains for VEGF binding, was cloned and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The rhVEGFR‑1 protein was purified using protein‑A affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of rhVEGFR‑1 was found to be ~162 and 81 kD in non‑reducing and reducing SDS‑PAGE, respectively. The majority of the final protein products were in the dimeric conformation. Western blot analysis revealed that rhVEGFR‑1 was only capable of binding to the full glycan form of rhVEGF‑165 and rhVEGF‑121. The dissociation constant for the binding of rhVEGFR‑1 to VEGF‑165, detected using Biacore, was 285 pM. In addition, rhVEGFR‑1 inhibited the proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In vivo experiments also demonstrated that rhVEGFR‑1 inhibited chicken chorioallantoic membrane neovascularization and angiogenesis in nude mice. In conclusion, an anti‑angiogenic recombinant soluble VEGFR was expressed (up to 5 mg/l) in CHO cells and was shown to be capable of inhibiting neovascularization in vivo and in vitro.

  4. Sulfonylurea Receptor 1 in Humans with Post-Traumatic Brain Contusions

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Valverde, Tamara; Vidal-Jorge, Marian; Martínez-Saez, Elena; Castro, Lidia; Arikan, Fuat; Cordero, Esteban; Rădoi, Andreea; Poca, Maria-Antonia; Simard, J. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Post-traumatic brain contusions (PTBCs) are traditionally considered primary injuries and can increase in size, generate perilesional edema, cause mass effect, induce neurological deterioration, and cause death. Most patients experience a progressive increase in pericontusional edema, and nearly half, an increase in the hemorrhagic component itself. The underlying molecular pathophysiology of contusion-induced brain edema and hemorrhagic progression remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate sulfonylurea 1/transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (SUR1-TRPM4) ion channel SUR1 expression in various cell types (neurons, astrocytes, endothelial cells, microglia, macrophages, and neutrophils) of human brain contusions and whether SUR1 up-regulation was related to time postinjury. Double immunolabeling of SUR1 and cell-type– specific proteins was performed in 26 specimens from traumatic brain injury patients whose lesions were surgically evacuated. Three samples from limited brain resections performed for accessing extra-axial skull-base tumors or intraventricular lesions were controls. We found SUR1 was significantly overexpresed in all cell types and was especially prominent in neurons and endothelial cells (ECs). The temporal pattern depended on cell type: 1) In neurons, SUR1 increased within 48 h of injury and stabilized thereafter; 2) in ECs, there was no trend; 3) in glial cells and microglia/macrophages, a moderate increase was observed over time; and 4) in neutrophils, it decreased with time. Our results suggest that up-regulation of SUR1 in humans point to this channel as one of the important molecular players in the pathophysiology of PTBCs. Our findings reveal opportunities to act therapeutically on the mechanisms of growth of traumatic contusions and therefore reduce the number of patients with neurological deterioration and poor neurological outcomes. PMID:26398596

  5. Analysis of human cultured myotubes responses mediated by ryanodine receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Mukaida, K; Migita, T; Hamada, H; Kawamoto, M; Yuge, O

    2011-03-01

    Malignant hyperthermia is a life-threatening condition caused by autosomal dominant mutations in the ryanodine receptor type 1 gene. Identifying patients predisposed to malignant hyperthermia is done through the Ca-induced Ca release test in Japan. We examined the intracellular calcium concentration in human cultured muscle cells and compared the sensitivity of myotubes to ryanodine receptor type 1 activators based on the Ca-induced Ca release rate. We assessed the utility of this method as an identifying test for predisposition to malignant hyperthermia. Muscle specimens were obtained from 34 individuals undergoing the Ca-induced Ca release test. We cultured myotubes from residual material and monitored changes in intracellular calcium concentration after exposure to the ryanodine receptor type 1 activators caffeine, halothane and 4-chloro-m-cresol by measuring fura-2 fluorescence. We determined the half maximal effective concentrations (EC50) for the test compounds in each myotube and calculated cut-off points using receiver operating characteristic curves. Seventeen patients each were classified into the accelerated and non-accelerated groups based on their Ca-induced Ca release rate. The EC50 values for caffeine, halothane and 4-chloro-m-cresol of the accelerated group were significant lower than those of the non-accelerated group (P < 0.001, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). The calculated cut-off points of EC50 values for caffeine, halothane and 4-CmC were 3.62 mM, 2.28 mM and 197 microM, respectively. An increased sensitivity to ryanodine receptor type 1 activators was seen in myotubes in the accelerated group. This functional test on human cultured myotubes indicates that the alteration of their intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis may identify the predisposition to malignant hyperthermia.

  6. Metabolite profiling of RCS-4, a novel synthetic cannabinoid designer drug, using human hepatocyte metabolism and TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Adarsh S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2009, scheduling legislation of synthetic cannabinoids prompted new compound emergence to circumvent legal restrictions. 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-indol-3-yl)methanone (RCS-4) is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist sold in herbal smoking blends. Absence of parent synthetic cannabinoids in urine suggests the importance of metabolite identification for detecting RCS-4 consumption in clinical and forensic investigations. Materials & methods & Results With 1 h human hepatocyte incubation and TOF high-resolution MS, we identified 18 RCS-4 metabolites, many not yet reported. Most metabolites were hydroxylated with or without demethylation, carboxylation and dealkylation followed by glucuronidation. One additional sulfated metabolite was also observed. O-demethylation was the most common biotransformation and generated the major metabolite. Conclusion For the first time, we present a metabolic scheme of RCS-4 obtained from human hepatocytes, including Phase I and II metabolites. Metabolite structural information and associated high-resolution mass spectra can be employed for developing clinical and forensic laboratory RCS-4 urine screening methods. PMID:25046048

  7. Expression of protease-activated receptor 1 and 2 and anti-tubulogenic activity of protease-activated receptor 1 in human endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Tiago M; Vara, Dina S; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Pula, Giordano

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are obtained from the culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (hPBMNC) fractions and are characterised by high proliferative and pro-vasculogenic potential, which makes them of great interest for cell therapy. Here, we describe the detection of protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and 2 amongst the surface proteins expressed in ECFCs. Both receptors are functionally coupled to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, which become activated and phosphorylated in response to selective PAR1- or PAR2-activating peptides. Specific stimulation of PAR1, but not PAR2, significantly inhibits capillary-like tube formation by ECFCs in vitro, suggesting that tubulogenesis is negatively regulated by proteases able to stimulate PAR1 (e.g. thrombin). The activation of ERKs is not involved in the regulation of tubulogenesis in vitro, as suggested by use of the MEK inhibitor PD98059 and by the fact that PAR2 stimulation activates ERKs without affecting capillary tube formation. Both qPCR and immunoblotting showed a significant downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor 2 (VEGFR2) in response to PAR1 stimulation. Moreover, the addition of VEGF (50-100 ng/ml) but not basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) (25-100 ng/ml) rescued tube formation by ECFCs treated with PAR1-activating peptide. Therefore, we propose that reduction of VEGF responsiveness resulting from down-regulation of VEGFR2 is underlying the anti-tubulogenic effect of PAR1 activation. Although the role of PAR2 remains elusive, this study sheds new light on the regulation of the vasculogenic activity of ECFCs and suggests a potential link between adult vasculogenesis and the coagulation cascade.

  8. R(+)-methanandamide induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human neuroglioma cells via a non-cannabinoid receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ramer, R; Brune, K; Pahl, A; Hinz, B

    2001-09-07

    Cannabinoids affect prostaglandin (PG) formation in the central nervous system through as yet unidentified mechanisms. Using H4 human neuroglioma cells, the present study investigates the effect of R(+)-methanandamide (metabolically stable analogue of the endocannabinoid anandamide) on the expression of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme. Incubation of cells with R(+)-methanandamide was accompanied by concentration-dependent increases in COX-2 mRNA, COX-2 protein, and COX-2-dependent PGE(2) synthesis. Moreover, treatment of cells with R(+)-methanandamide in the presence of interleukin-1beta led to an overadditive induction of COX-2 expression. The stimulatory effect of R(+)-methanandamide on COX-2 expression was mimicked by the structurally unrelated cannabinoid Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol. Stimulation of both COX-2 mRNA expression and subsequent PGE(2) synthesis by R(+)-methanandamide was not affected by the selective CB(1) receptor antagonist AM-251 or the G(i/o) protein inactivator pertussis toxin. Enhancement of COX-2 expression by R(+)-methanandamide was paralleled by time-dependent phosphorylations of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and p42/44 MAPK. Consistent with the activation of both kinases, R(+)-methanandamide-induced COX-2 mRNA expression and PGE(2) formation were abrogated in the presence of specific inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580) and p42/44 MAPK activation (PD98059). Together, our results demonstrate that R(+)-methanandamide induces COX-2 expression in human neuroglioma cells via a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism involving activation of the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, induction of COX-2 expression may represent a novel mechanism by which cannabinoids mediate PG-dependent effects within the central nervous system.

  9. The Neurotensin Receptor-1 Pathway Contributes to Human Ductal Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Dupouy, Sandra; Viardot-Foucault, Véronique; Alifano, Marco; Souazé, Frédérique; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; Chaouat, Marc; Lavaur, Anne; Hugol, Danielle; Gespach, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background The neurotensin (NTS) and its specific high affinity G protein coupled receptor, the NT1 receptor (NTSR1), are considered to be a good candidate for one of the factors implicated in neoplastic progression. In breast cancer cells, functionally expressed NT1 receptor coordinates a series of transforming functions including cellular migration and invasion. Methods and Results we investigated the expression of NTS and NTSR1 in normal human breast tissue and in invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDCs) by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. NTS is expressed and up-regulated by estrogen in normal epithelial breast cells. NTS is also found expressed in the ductal and invasive components of IDCs. The high expression of NTSR1 is associated with the SBR grade, the size of the tumor, and the number of metastatic lymph nodes. Furthermore, the NTSR1 high expression is an independent factor of prognosis associated with the death of patients. Conclusion these data support the activation of neurotensinergic deleterious pathways in breast cancer progression. PMID:19156213

  10. Suppression of human monocyte interleukin-1beta production by ajulemic acid, a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid.

    PubMed

    Zurier, Robert B; Rossetti, Ronald G; Burstein, Sumner H; Bidinger, Bonnie

    2003-02-15

    Oral administration of ajulemic acid (AjA), a cannabinoid acid devoid of psychoactivity, reduces joint tissue damage in rats with adjuvant arthritis. Because interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) are central to the progression of inflammation and joint tissue injury in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, we investigated human monocyte IL-1beta and TNFalpha responses after the addition of AjA to cells in vitro. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid monocytes (PBM and SFM) were isolated from healthy subjects and patients with inflammatory arthritis, respectively, treated with AjA (0-30 microM) in vitro, and then stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Cells were harvested for mRNA, and supernatants were collected for cytokine assay. Addition of AjA to PBM and SFM in vitro reduced both steady-state levels of IL-1beta mRNA and secretion of IL-1beta in a concentration-dependent manner. Suppression was maximal (50.4%) at 10 microM AjA (P<0.05 vs untreated controls, N=7). AjA did not influence TNFalpha gene expression in or secretion from PBM. Reduction of IL-1beta by AjA may help explain the therapeutic effects of AjA in the animal model of arthritis. Development of nonpsychoactive therapeutically useful synthetic analogs of Cannabis constituents, such as AjA, may help resolve the ongoing debate about the use of marijuana as medicine.

  11. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 is an enhancer of tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    González-Chavarría, Iván; Cerro, Rita P; Parra, Natalie P; Sandoval, Felipe A; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Omazábal, Valeska A; Lamperti, Liliana I; Jiménez, Silvana P; Fernandez, Edelmira A; Gutiérrez, Nicolas A; Rodriguez, Federico S; Onate, Sergio A; Sánchez, Oliberto; Vera, Juan C; Toledo, Jorge R

    2014-01-01

    Altered expression and function of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) has been associated with several diseases such as endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and obesity. In these pathologies, oxLDL/LOX-1 activates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, cell motility and angiogenesis. Recent studies have indicated that olr1 mRNA is over-expressed in stage III and IV of human prostatic adenocarcinomas. However, the function of LOX-1 in prostate cancer angiogenesis remains to be determined. Our aim was to analyze the contribution of oxLDL and LOX-1 to tumor angiogenesis using C4-2 prostate cancer cells. We analyzed the expression of pro-angiogenic molecules and angiogenesis on prostate cancer tumor xenografts, using prostate cancer cell models with overexpression or knockdown of LOX-1 receptor. Our results demonstrate that the activation of LOX-1 using oxLDL increases cell proliferation, and the expression of the pro-angiogenic molecules VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Noticeably, these effects were prevented in the C4-2 prostate cancer model when LOX-1 expression was knocked down. The angiogenic effect of LOX-1 activated with oxLDL was further demonstrated using the aortic ring assay and the xenograft model of tumor growth on chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. Consequently, we propose that LOX-1 activation by oxLDL is an important event that enhances tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells.

  12. Lectin-Like Oxidized LDL Receptor-1 Is an Enhancer of Tumor Angiogenesis in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Chavarría, Iván; Cerro, Rita P.; Parra, Natalie P.; Sandoval, Felipe A.; Zuñiga, Felipe A.; Omazábal, Valeska A.; Lamperti, Liliana I.; Jiménez, Silvana P.; Fernandez, Edelmira A.; Gutiérrez, Nicolas A.; Rodriguez, Federico S.; Onate, Sergio A.; Sánchez, Oliberto; Vera, Juan C.; Toledo, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Altered expression and function of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) has been associated with several diseases such as endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and obesity. In these pathologies, oxLDL/LOX-1 activates signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, cell motility and angiogenesis. Recent studies have indicated that olr1 mRNA is over-expressed in stage III and IV of human prostatic adenocarcinomas. However, the function of LOX-1 in prostate cancer angiogenesis remains to be determined. Our aim was to analyze the contribution of oxLDL and LOX-1 to tumor angiogenesis using C4-2 prostate cancer cells. We analyzed the expression of pro-angiogenic molecules and angiogenesis on prostate cancer tumor xenografts, using prostate cancer cell models with overexpression or knockdown of LOX-1 receptor. Our results demonstrate that the activation of LOX-1 using oxLDL increases cell proliferation, and the expression of the pro-angiogenic molecules VEGF, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Noticeably, these effects were prevented in the C4-2 prostate cancer model when LOX-1 expression was knocked down. The angiogenic effect of LOX-1 activated with oxLDL was further demonstrated using the aortic ring assay and the xenograft model of tumor growth on chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. Consequently, we propose that LOX-1 activation by oxLDL is an important event that enhances tumor angiogenesis in human prostate cancer cells. PMID:25170920

  13. Chemokine-like receptor 1 expression and chemerin-directed chemotaxis distinguish plasmacytoid from myeloid dendritic cells in human blood.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Brian A; Silverio, Amanda M; Butcher, Eugene C

    2005-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are versatile cells of the immune response, secreting type I IFNs and differentiating into potent immunogenic or tolerogenic APCs. pDCs can express adhesion and chemokine receptors for lymphoid tissues, but are also recruited by unknown mechanisms during tissue inflammation. We use a novel mAb specific for serpentine chemokine-like receptor 1 (CMKLR1) to evaluate its expression by circulating leukocytes in humans. We show that CMKLR1 is expressed by circulating pDCs in human blood, whereas myeloid DCs (mDCs) as well as lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils are negative. We identify a major serum agonist activity for CMKLR1 as chemerin, a proteolytically activated attractant and the sole known ligand for CMKLR1, and we show that chemerin is activated during blood coagulation and attracts pDC but not mDC in ex vivo chemotaxis assays. We conclude that CMKLR1 expression and chemerin-mediated chemotaxis distinguish circulating pDCs from mDCs, providing a potential mechanism for their differential contribution to or regulation of immune responses at sites of bleeding or inflammatory protease activity.

  14. In vitro and in vivo human metabolism of the synthetic cannabinoid AB-CHMINACA.

    PubMed

    Erratico, Claudio; Negreira, Noelia; Norouzizadeh, Helia; Covaci, Adrian; Neels, Hugo; Maudens, Kristof; van Nuijs, Alexander L N

    2015-10-01

    N-[(1S)-1-(aminocarbonyl)-2-methylpropyl]-1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (AB-CHMINACA) is a recently introduced synthetic cannabinoid. At present, no information is available about in vitro or in vivo human metabolism of AB-CHMINACA. Therefore, biomonitoring studies to screen AB-CHMINACA consumption lack any information about the potential biomarkers (e.g. metabolites) to target. To bridge this gap, we investigated the in vitro metabolism of AB-CHMINACA using human liver microsomes (HLMs). Formation of AB-CHMINACA metabolites was monitored using liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Twenty-six metabolites of AB-CHMINACA were detected including seven mono-hydroxylated and six di-hydroxylated metabolites and a metabolite resulting from N-dealkylation of AB-CHMINACA, all produced by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Two carboxylated metabolites, likely produced by amidase enzymes, and five glucuronidated metabolites were also formed. Five mono-hydroxylated and one carboxylated metabolite were likely the major metabolites detected. The involvement of individual CYPs in the formation of AB-CHMINACA metabolites was tested using a panel of seven human recombinant CYPs (rCYPs). All the hydroxylated AB-CHMINACA metabolites produced by HLMs were also produced by the rCYPs tested, among which rCYP3A4 was the most active enzyme. Most of the in vitro metabolites of AB-CHMINACA were also present in urine obtained from an AB-CHMINACA user, therefore showing the reliability of the results obtained using the in vitro metabolism experiments conducted to predict AB-CHMINACA in vivo metabolism. The AB-CHMINACA metabolites to target in biomonitoring studies using urine samples are now reliably identified and can be used for routine analysis.

  15. Characterization of human hepatic and extrahepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes involved in the metabolism of classic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Anna; Lichti, Cheryl F; Prather, Paul L; Zielinska, Agnieszka K; Bratton, Stacie M; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Finel, Moshe; Miller, Grover P; Radomińska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H

    2009-07-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is subject to cytochrome P450 oxidation and subsequent UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-dependent glucuronidation. Many studies have shown that CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are the primary enzymes responsible for these cytochrome P450-dependent oxidations, but little work has been done to characterize phase II metabolic pathways. In this study, we test the hypothesis that there are specific human UGTs responsible for classic cannabinoid metabolism. The activities of 12 human recombinant UGTs toward classic cannabinoids [cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), (-)-Delta(8)-THC, (-)-Delta(9)-THC, (+/-)-11-hydroxy-Delta(9)-THC (THC-OH), and (-)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-THC (THC-COOH)] were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and labeling assays. Despite activity by UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, and 2B7 toward CBN, CBD, THC-OH, and THC-COOH, only selected UGTs demonstrate sufficient activity for further characterization of steady-state kinetics. CBN was the most recognized substrate as evidenced by activities from hepatic UGT1A9 and extrahepatic UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10. These results may reflect the introduction of an aromatic ring to Delta(9)-THC, leading to favorable pi stacking with phenylalanines in the UGT active site. Likewise, oxidation of Delta(9)-THC to THC-OH results in UGT1A9 and UGT1A10 activity toward the cannabinoid. Further oxidation to THC-COOH surprisingly leads to a loss in metabolism by UGT1A9 and UGT1A10, while creating a substrate recognized by UGT1A1 and UGT1A3. The resulting glucuronide of THC-COOH is the main metabolite found in urine, and thus these hepatic enzymes play a critical role in the metabolic clearance of cannabinoids. Taken together, glucuronidation of cannabinoids depends on upstream processing including enzymes such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4.

  16. Characterization of Human Hepatic and Extrahepatic UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzymes Involved in the Metabolism of Classic Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Anna; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Prather, Paul L.; Zielinska, Agnieszka K.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Finel, Moshe; Miller, Grover P.; Radomińska-Pandya, Anna; Moran, Jeffery H.

    2009-01-01

    Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, is subject to cytochrome P450 oxidation and subsequent UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-dependent glucuronidation. Many studies have shown that CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 are the primary enzymes responsible for these cytochrome P450-dependent oxidations, but little work has been done to characterize phase II metabolic pathways. In this study, we test the hypothesis that there are specific human UGTs responsible for classic cannabinoid metabolism. The activities of 12 human recombinant UGTs toward classic cannabinoids [cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), (–)-Δ8-THC, (–)-Δ9-THC, (±)-11-hydroxy-Δ9-THC (THC-OH), and (–)-11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-THC (THC-COOH)] were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and labeling assays. Despite activity by UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A8, 1A9, 1A10, and 2B7 toward CBN, CBD, THC-OH, and THC-COOH, only selected UGTs demonstrate sufficient activity for further characterization of steady-state kinetics. CBN was the most recognized substrate as evidenced by activities from hepatic UGT1A9 and extrahepatic UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10. These results may reflect the introduction of an aromatic ring to Δ9-THC, leading to favorable π stacking with phenylalanines in the UGT active site. Likewise, oxidation of Δ9-THC to THC-OH results in UGT1A9 and UGT1A10 activity toward the cannabinoid. Further oxidation to THC-COOH surprisingly leads to a loss in metabolism by UGT1A9 and UGT1A10, while creating a substrate recognized by UGT1A1 and UGT1A3. The resulting glucuronide of THC-COOH is the main metabolite found in urine, and thus these hepatic enzymes play a critical role in the metabolic clearance of cannabinoids. Taken together, glucuronidation of cannabinoids depends on upstream processing including enzymes such as CYP2C9 and CYP3A4. PMID:19339377

  17. Enrichment of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 (LYVE1)-positive macrophages around blood vessels in the normal human sclera.

    PubMed

    Schlereth, Simona L; Neuser, Barbara; Caramoy, Albert; Grajewski, Rafael S; Koch, Konrad R; Schrödl, Falk; Cursiefen, Claus; Heindl, Ludwig M

    2014-02-10

    To investigate whether the normal adult human sclera contains lymphatic vessels and to study their relation to immune cells and blood vessel anatomy. Scleral tissue probes from 35 adult human donor bulbi were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy for blood vessels (CD31+), lymphatic vessels (lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 [LYVE1]+, podoplanin+), and macrophages (CD68+) at 12 locations (anterior, equatorial, and posterior at 3, 6, 9, and 12 o'clock positions of the eye) in all three scleral layers (episclera, stroma, and lamina fusca). Approval for scientific examination was obtained. CD31+ blood vessels were detectable in the human sclera, where the percentage area covered by CD31+ blood vessels was highest in the anterior episclera, followed by equatorial and posterior episclera, and was lowest in the scleral stroma (regardless of location). LYVE1+ podoplanin+ lymphatic vessels were not detectable in any location investigated, although there was a high number of LYVE1+ CD68+ macrophages. These macrophages were concentrated around blood vessels. In contrast, in the episclera, the number of detected LYVE1+ CD68+ macrophages was comparable in all locations; within the stroma, their number increased toward the posterior part of the eye. The adult sclera contains blood vessels but lacks, as revealed by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, true lymphatic vessels. LYVE1+ CD68+ macrophages are located adjacent to the longitudinal axis of blood vessels. The function of these cells needs further investigation, but could be a next step toward a better understanding of pathological disorders such as inflammation, tumor, trauma, or glaucoma.

  18. Reevaluation of Fatty Acid Receptor 1 as a Drug Target for the Stimulation of Insulin Secretion in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Robert; Kaiser, Gabriele; Gerst, Felicia; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E.; Grundmann, Manuel; Machicao, Fausto; Peter, Andreas; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Ullrich, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The role of free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1/GPR40) in glucose homeostasis is still incompletely understood. Small receptor agonists stimulating insulin secretion are undergoing investigation for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, genome-wide association studies did not discover diabetes risk variants in FFAR1. We reevaluated the role of FFAR1 in insulin secretion using a specific agonist, FFAR1-knockout mice and human islets. Nondiabetic individuals were metabolically phenotyped and genotyped. In vitro experiments indicated that palmitate and a specific FFAR1 agonist, TUG-469, stimulate glucose-induced insulin secretion through FFAR1. The proapoptotic effect of chronic exposure of β-cells to palmitate was independent of FFAR1. TUG-469 was protective, whereas inhibition of FFAR1 promoted apoptosis. In accordance with the proapoptotic effect of palmitate, in vivo cross-sectional observations demonstrated a negative association between fasting free fatty acids (NEFAs) and insulin secretion. Because NEFAs stimulate secretion through FFAR1, we examined the interaction of genetic variation in FFAR1 with NEFA and insulin secretion. The inverse association of NEFA and secretion was modulated by rs1573611 and became steeper for carriers of the minor allele. In conclusion, FFAR1 agonists support β-cell function, but variation in FFAR1 influences NEFA effects on insulin secretion and therefore could affect therapeutic efficacy of FFAR1 agonists. PMID:23378609

  19. Cannabidiol inhibits human glioma cell migration through a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vaccani, Angelo; Massi, Paola; Colombo, Arianna; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of cannabidiol (CBD) to impair the migration of tumor cells stimulated by conditioned medium. CBD caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the migration of U87 glioma cells, quantified in a Boyden chamber. Since these cells express both cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the membrane, we also evaluated their engagement in the antimigratory effect of CBD. The inhibition of cell was not antagonized either by the selective cannabinoid receptor antagonists SR141716 (CB1) and SR144528 (CB2) or by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, indicating no involvement of classical cannabinoid receptors and/or receptors coupled to Gi/o proteins. These results reinforce the evidence of antitumoral properties of CBD, demonstrating its ability to limit tumor invasion, although the mechanism of its pharmacological effects remains to be clarified. PMID:15700028

  20. The Synthetic Cannabinoids Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Karila, Laurent; Benyamina, Amine; Blecha, Lisa; Cottencin, Olivier; Billieux, Joël

    2016-01-01

    « Spice » is generally used to describe the diverse types of herbal blends that encompass synthetic cannabinoids on the market. The emergence of smokable herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids, which mimic the effects of cannabis, appears to become increasingly popular, in the new psychoactive substances landscape. In 2014, the existence of 134 different types of synthetic cannabinoids were reported by the European Union Early Warning System. These drugs are mainly sold online as an alternative to controlled and regulated psychoactive substances. They appear to have a life cycle of about 1-2 years before being replaced by a next wave of products. Legislation controlling these designer drugs has been introduced in many countries with the objective to limit the spread of existing drugs and control potential new analogs. The majority of the synthetic cannabinoids are full agonists at the CB1 receptor and do not contain tobacco or cannabis. They are becoming increasingly popular in adolescents, students and clubbers as an abused substance. Relatively high incidence of adverse effects associated with synthetic cannabinoids use has been documented in the literature. Numerous fatalities linked with their use and abuse have been reported. In this paper, we will review the available data regarding the use and effects of synthetic cannabinoids in humans in order to highlight their impact on public health. To reach this objective, a literature search was performed on two representative databases (Pubmed, Google Scholar), the Erowid Center website (a US non-profit educational organization that provides information about psychoactive plants and chemicals), and various governmental websites. The terms used for the database search were: "synthetic cannabinoids", "spice", "new psychoactive substances", and/or "substance use disorder", and/or "adverse effects", and/or "fatalities". The search was limited to years 2005 to 2016 due to emerging scientific literature at

  1. Cannabinoids: Friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Le Foll, B; Tyndale, R F

    2015-06-01

    This issue of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics focuses on cannabinoids. Our understanding of these interesting endogenous and synthetic compounds, and their role in the cannabinoid system, has evolved dramatically, in part because of the acquisition of new research tools. Cannabis has been used for centuries by humans for recreational and medicinal purposes, however, there is substantial evidence that cannabis use can expose people to varying complications (e.g., risk of addiction, cognitive impairment), thus, it is important to determine the benefit/risk of cannabis with precision and to implement policy measures based on evidence to maximize the benefits and minimize the harm. Novel cannabinoid drugs are emerging for medicinal use (e.g., dronabinol, nabiximols) and as illicit drugs (e.g., Spice, K2) perpetuating the perception that cannabinoid drugs can be a friend or foe. This special issue will cover these various aspects of cannabinoid pharmacology and therapeutics ranging from basic chemistry, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical trial results, to policy and education efforts in this area.

  2. Simultaneous determination of five naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites and their deposition in human and rat hair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Park, Yuran; Park, Meejung; Kim, Eunmi; Yang, Wonkyung; Baeck, Seungkyung; Lee, Sooyeun; Han, Sangbeom

    2015-01-01

    The continuing appearance of new synthetic cannabinoids has been a major issue in the field of forensic and clinical toxicology. In response to that, analytical methods for synthetic cannabinoids have been increasingly established in a variety of biological matrices. Since most of synthetic cannabinoids with structure similarity share some enzymatic metabolites, making the interpretation of analytical results and the discovery of the parent drug actually ingested very complicated, the investigation on metabolites of the first generation of synthetic cannabinoids with their relatively short side chains in chemical structure could be more important. Therefore, in the present study, we developed the analytical method for AM-2201, JWH-122 and MAM-2201 with JWH-018 as a precursor and their monohydroxylated metabolites in hair matrix. Also, using a rat model, AM-2201 and its monohydroxylated metabolites were identified and then the ratios of metabolite-to-parent drug were estimated to be used as criteria on external contamination. All analytes were extracted with methanol from washed and cut hair samples and the extracts were injected into LC-MS/MS with electrospray ion source in the positive ionization mode. Matrix effect and recovery were evaluated in hair matrices and no significant variations were observed. The validation results for precision and accuracy were satisfactory in both human and rat hair. The LOD and LOQ were 0.5 pg/10mg and 1.0 pg/10mg in human hair and 0.5 pg/20mg and 1.0 pg/20mg in pigmented and non-pigmented rat hair, respectively. Additionally, as a result of the animal study, there were not significant differences in the effect of pigmentation on the distribution of AM-2201 and its monohydroxylated metabolites in hair. Wide variations were observed for the concentrations of the naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites in authentic hair samples from nine cases; those were 0.4-59.2 pg/mg for JWH-018, 0.1-0.8 pg/mg for JWH-073, 1

  3. Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli are protected from leukocyte phagocytosis by binding to erythrocyte complement receptor 1 in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Brekke, Ole-Lars; Hellerud, Bernt Christian; Christiansen, Dorte; Fure, Hilde; Castellheim, Albert; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Pharo, Anne; Lindstad, Julie Katrine; Bergseth, Grethe; Leslie, Graham; Lambris, John D.; Brandtzaeg, Petter; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2011-01-01

    The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant were incubated with whole blood using lepirudin as anticoagulant which has no adverse effects on complement. Bacteria free in plasma, bound to erythrocytes or phagocytized by granulocytes and monocytes were quantified using flow cytometry. The effects of the C3 inhibitor compstatin, a C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRa) and a complement receptor 1 (CR1)-blocking antibody (3D9) were examined. Most bacteria (80%) immediately bound to erythrocytes. The binding gradually declined over time, with a parallel increase in phagocytosis. Complement inhibition with compstatin reduced erythrocyte binding and bacterial C3 opsonization. In contrast, the C5aRa efficiently reduced phagocytosis, but did not affect the binding of bacteria to erythrocytes. The anti-CR1 blocking mAb dose-dependently reduced bacterial binding to erythrocytes to nil, with subsequent increased phagocytosis and oxidative burst. LPS had no effect on these processes since similar results were obtained using an LPS-deficient N. meningitidis mutant. In vivo experiments in a pig model of sepsis showed limited binding of bacteria to erythrocytes, consistent with the facts that erythrocyte CR1 receptors are absent in non-primates and that the bacteria were mainly found in the lungs. In conclusion, complement-dependent binding of Gram-negative bacteria to erythrocyte CR1 decreases phagocytosis and oxidative burst by leukocytes in human whole blood. PMID:21839519

  4. Binding of Hepatitis A Virus to its Cellular Receptor 1 Inhibits T-Regulatory Cell Functions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Manangeeswaran, Mohanraj; Jacques, Jérôme; Tami, Cecilia; Konduru, Krishnamurthy; Amharref, Nadia; Perrella, Oreste; Casasnovas, Jose M.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Perrella, Alessandro; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims CD4+ T regulatory (Treg) cells suppress immune responses and control self-tolerance and immunity to pathogens, cancer, and alloantigens. Most pathogens activate Treg cells to minimize immune-mediated tissue damage and prevent clearance, which promotes chronic infections. However, hepatitis A virus (HAV) temporarily inhibits Treg-cell functions. We investigated whether the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), a T-cell co-stimulatory molecule, inhibits the function of Treg cells to control HAV infection. Methods We studied the effects of HAV interaction with HAVCR1 on human T cells using binding, signal transduction, apoptosis, activation, suppression, cytokine production, and confocal microscopy analyses. Cytokines were analyzed in sera from 14 patients with HAV infection using bead arrays. Results Human Treg cells constitutively express HAVCR1. Binding of HAV to HAVCR1 blocked phosphorylation of Akt, prevented activation of the T-cell receptor, and inhibited function of Treg cells. At the peak viremia, patients with acute HAV infection had no Treg-cell suppression function, produced low levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF–β), which limited leukocyte recruitment and survival, and high levels of interleukin-22, which prevented liver damage. Conclusions Interaction between HAV and its receptor HAVCR1 inhibits Treg cell function, resulting in an immune imbalance that allows viral expansion with limited hepatocellular damage during early stages of infection—a characteristic of HAV pathogenesis. The mechanism by which HAV is cleared in the absence of Treg-cell function could be used as a model to develop anti-cancer therapies, modulate autoimmune and allergic responses, and prevent transplant rejection. PMID:22430395

  5. Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli are protected from leukocyte phagocytosis by binding to erythrocyte complement receptor 1 in human blood.

    PubMed

    Brekke, Ole-Lars; Hellerud, Bernt Christian; Christiansen, Dorte; Fure, Hilde; Castellheim, Albert; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Pharo, Anne; Lindstad, Julie Katrine; Bergseth, Grethe; Leslie, Graham; Lambris, John D; Brandtzaeg, Petter; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2011-09-01

    The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 N. meningitidis and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant were incubated with whole blood using lepirudin as anticoagulant which has no adverse effects on complement. Bacteria free in plasma, bound to erythrocytes or phagocytized by granulocytes and monocytes were quantified using flow cytometry. The effects of the C3 inhibitor compstatin, a C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRa) and a complement receptor 1 (CR1)-blocking antibody (3D9) were examined. Most bacteria (80%) immediately bound to erythrocytes. The binding gradually declined over time, with a parallel increase in phagocytosis. Complement inhibition with compstatin reduced erythrocyte binding and bacterial C3 opsonization. In contrast, the C5aRa efficiently reduced phagocytosis, but did not affect the binding of bacteria to erythrocytes. The anti-CR1 blocking mAb dose-dependently reduced bacterial binding to erythrocytes to nil, with subsequent increased phagocytosis and oxidative burst. LPS had no effect on these processes since similar results were obtained using an LPS-deficient N. meningitidis mutant. In vivo experiments in a pig model of sepsis showed limited binding of bacteria to erythrocytes, consistent with the facts that erythrocyte CR1 receptors are absent in non-primates and that the bacteria were mainly found in the lungs. In conclusion, complement-dependent binding of Gram-negative bacteria to erythrocyte CR1 decreases phagocytosis and oxidative burst by leukocytes in human whole blood.

  6. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor 1 suppresses nicotinic acid-induced vasodilation in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kang; Wu, Tsuei-Ju; Wu, Kenneth K; Sturino, Claudio; Metters, Kathleen; Gottesdiener, Keith; Wright, Samuel D; Wang, Zhaoyin; O'Neill, Gary; Lai, Eseng; Waters, M Gerard

    2006-04-25

    Nicotinic acid (NA) is commonly used to treat dyslipidemia, but it elicits an adverse effect, termed flushing, which consists of cutaneous vasodilation with associated discomfort. An animal model of NA-induced flushing has been established in mice. As in humans, NA stimulated vasodilation in a dose-dependent manner, was associated with an increase of the vasodilatory prostaglandin (PG) D2 in plasma and could be blocked by pretreatment with aspirin. Two PGD2 receptors have been identified: PGD2 receptor 1 (DP1, also called DP) and PGD2 receptor 2 (DP2, sometimes termed CRTH2). DP2 does not mediate NA-induced vasodilation; the DP2-specific agonist DK-PGD2 (13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGD2) did not induce cutaneous vasodilation, and DP2-/- mice had a normal vasodilatory response to NA. By contrast, BW245C, a DP1-selective agonist, induced vasodilation in mice, and MK-0524, a DP1-selective antagonist, blocked both PGD2- and NA-induced vasodilation. NA-induced vasodilation was also studied in DP1+/+, DP1+/-, and DP1-/- mice; although NA-induced vasodilation depended almost completely on DP1 in female mice, it depended only partially on DP1 in male mice. The residual NA-induced vasodilation in male DP-/- mice was aspirin-sensitive. Thus, in the mouse, DP1 appears to be an important component involved in NA-induced vasodilation, but other cyclooxygenase-dependent mechanisms also may be involved. A clinical study in healthy men and women demonstrated that treatment with MK-0524 reduced the symptoms of flushing and the increase in skin perfusion after the administration of NA. These studies suggest that DP1 receptor antagonism may be an effective means to suppress NA-induced flushing in humans.

  7. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor 1 suppresses nicotinic acid-induced vasodilation in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kang; Wu, Tsuei-Ju; Wu, Kenneth K.; Sturino, Claudio; Metters, Kathleen; Gottesdiener, Keith; Wright, Samuel D.; Wang, Zhaoyin; O’Neill, Gary; Lai, Eseng; Waters, M. Gerard

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA) is commonly used to treat dyslipidemia, but it elicits an adverse effect, termed flushing, which consists of cutaneous vasodilation with associated discomfort. An animal model of NA-induced flushing has been established in mice. As in humans, NA stimulated vasodilation in a dose-dependent manner, was associated with an increase of the vasodilatory prostaglandin (PG) D2 in plasma and could be blocked by pretreatment with aspirin. Two PGD2 receptors have been identified: PGD2 receptor 1 (DP1, also called DP) and PGD2 receptor 2 (DP2, sometimes termed CRTH2). DP2 does not mediate NA-induced vasodilation; the DP2-specific agonist DK-PGD2 (13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGD2) did not induce cutaneous vasodilation, and DP2−/− mice had a normal vasodilatory response to NA. By contrast, BW245C, a DP1-selective agonist, induced vasodilation in mice, and MK-0524, a DP1-selective antagonist, blocked both PGD2- and NA-induced vasodilation. NA-induced vasodilation was also studied in DP1+/+, DP1+/−, and DP1−/− mice; although NA-induced vasodilation depended almost completely on DP1 in female mice, it depended only partially on DP1 in male mice. The residual NA-induced vasodilation in male DP−/− mice was aspirin-sensitive. Thus, in the mouse, DP1 appears to be an important component involved in NA-induced vasodilation, but other cyclooxygenase-dependent mechanisms also may be involved. A clinical study in healthy men and women demonstrated that treatment with MK-0524 reduced the symptoms of flushing and the increase in skin perfusion after the administration of NA. These studies suggest that DP1 receptor antagonism may be an effective means to suppress NA-induced flushing in humans. PMID:16617107

  8. Methamphetamine induces trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) expression in human T lymphocytes: role in immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Uma; Cenna, Jonathan M; Haldar, Bijayesh; Fernandes, Nicole C; Razmpour, Roshanak; Fan, Shongshan; Ramirez, Servio H; Potula, Raghava

    2016-01-01

    The novel transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor, trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), represents a potential, direct target for drugs of abuse and monoaminergic compounds, including amphetamines. For the first time, our studies have illustrated that there is an induction of TAAR1 mRNA expression in resting T lymphocytes in response to methamphetamine. Methamphetamine treatment for 6 h significantly increased TAAR1 mRNA expression (P < 0.001) and protein expression (P < 0.01) at 24 h. With the use of TAAR1 gene silencing, we demonstrate that methamphetamine-induced cAMP, a classic response to methamphetamine stimulation, is regulated via TAAR1. We also show by TAAR1 knockdown that the down-regulation of IL-2 in T cells by methamphetamine, which we reported earlier, is indeed regulated by TAAR1. Our results also show the presence of TAAR1 in human lymph nodes from HIV-1-infected patients, with or without a history of methamphetamine abuse. TAAR1 expression on lymphocytes was largely in the paracortical lymphoid area of the lymph nodes with enhanced expression in lymph nodes of HIV-1-infected methamphetamine abusers rather than infected-only subjects. In vitro analysis of HIV-1 infection of human PBMCs revealed increased TAAR1 expression in the presence of methamphetamine. In summary, the ability of methamphetamine to activate trace TAAR1 in vitro and to regulate important T cell functions, such as cAMP activation and IL-2 production; the expression of TAAR1 in T lymphocytes in peripheral lymphoid organs, such as lymph nodes; and our in vitro HIV-1 infection model in PBMCs suggests that TAAR1 may play an important role in methamphetamine -mediated immune-modulatory responses. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  9. Pitfall in cannabinoid analysis--detection of a previously unrecognized interfering compound in human serum.

    PubMed

    Toennes, Stefan W; Hanisch, Stephanie; Pogoda, Werner; Wunder, Cora; Paulke, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In clinical and forensic toxicology, high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is increasingly used since it allows the development of sensitive and fast drug analysis procedures. During development of a LC-MS/MS method for determination of the psychoactive cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and of its two metabolites 11-hydroxy-THC (THCOH) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in serum, a previously unrecognized interfering compound was detected. Extending the fast gradient elution program by an isocratic phase leads to sufficient separation of the interfering compound, initially co-eluting with THCCOOH and exhibiting the same fragments. For characterization, product ion scans and precursor ion scans were performed. Samples from cannabis users were analyzed to estimate the abundance of the interfering compound. The mass spectrometric experiments showed that the interfering compound exhibited the same molecular mass as THCCOOH and a similar fragmentation pattern except for relative fragment intensities. This compound was exclusively detectable in authentic samples. Concentrations were in the range of 4.5 to 51 % (median 14.6 %, n = 73) of those of THCCOOH. After further optimization of the gradient, the method was sufficiently selective and sensitive and validation parameters were within acceptance limits. A new compound related to cannabis use was detected in human serum, and data suggest an isomeric structure to THCCOOH. Considering the rather high amounts observed, it was surprising that this compound had not been detected previously. Further studies on its structure and origin are necessary.

  10. Endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptor genetics.

    PubMed

    Onaivi, Emmanuel S; Leonard, Claire M; Ishiguro, Hiroki; Zhang, Ping Wu; Lin, Zhicheng; Akinshola, Babatunde E; Uhl, George R

    2002-04-01

    This review presents the remarkable advances that have been achieved in marijuana (cannabinoid) research, with the discovery of specific receptors and the existence of naturally occurring cannabis-like substances in the human body and brain. The last decade has seen more rapid progress in marijuana research than any time in the thousands of years that marijuana has been used by humans, particularly in cannabinoid genomics. The cDNA and genomic sequences encoding G protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors (Cnrs) from several species have now been cloned. Endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), synthetic and hydrolyzing enzymes and transporters that define neurochemically-specific cannabinoid brain pathways have been identified. Endocannabinoid lipid signaling molecules alter activity at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and possibly at anandamide-gated ion channels, such as vanilloid receptors. Availability of increasingly-specific CB1 and CB2 Cnr antagonists and of CB1 and CB2 Cnr knockout mice have increased our understanding of these cannabinoid systems and provides tantalizing evidence for even more G protein-coupled Cnrs. Initial studies of the Cnr gene structure, regulation and polymorphisms whet our appetite for more information about these interesting genes, their variants and roles in vulnerabilities to addictions and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Behavioral studies of cannabinoids document the complex interactions between rewarding and aversive effects of these drugs. Pursuing cannabinoid-related molecular, pharmacological and behavioral leads will add greatly to our understanding of endogenous brain neuromodulator systems, abused substances and potential therapeutics. This review of CB1 and CB2 Cnr genes in human and animal brain and their neurobiological effects provide a basis for many of these studies. Therefore, understanding the physiological cannabinoid control system in the human body and brain will contribute to elucidating this natural

  11. Structural Insights into the Activation of Human Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1 by Small-Molecule Agonists.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Myhr, Courtney; Huang, Zaohua; Xiao, Jingbo; Barnaeva, Elena; Ho, Brian A; Agoulnik, Irina U; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan J; Southall, Noel; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2016-03-29

    The GPCR relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) mediates the action of relaxin peptide hormone, including its tissue remodeling and antifibrotic effects. The peptide has a short half-life in plasma, limiting its therapeutic utility. However, small-molecule agonists of human RXFP1 can overcome this limitation and may provide a useful therapeutic approach, especially for chronic diseases such as heart failure and fibrosis. The first small-molecule agonists of RXFP1 were recently identified from a high-throughput screening, using a homogeneous cell-based cAMP assay. Optimization of the hit compounds resulted in a series of highly potent and RXFP1 selective agonists with low cytotoxicity, and excellent in vitro ADME and pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we undertook extensive site-directed mutagenesis studies in combination with computational modeling analysis to probe the molecular basis of the small-molecule binding to RXFP1. The results showed that the agonists bind to an allosteric site of RXFP1 in a manner that closely interacts with the seventh transmembrane domain (TM7) and the third extracellular loop (ECL3). Several residues were determined to play an important role in the agonist binding and receptor activation, including a hydrophobic region at TM7 consisting of W664, F668, and L670. The G659/T660 motif within ECL3 is crucial to the observed species selectivity of the agonists for RXFP1. The receptor binding and activation effects by the small molecule ML290 were compared with the cognate ligand, relaxin, providing valuable insights on the structural basis and molecular mechanism of receptor activation and selectivity for RXFP1.

  12. Metabolism of RCS-8, a synthetic cannabinoid with cyclohexyl structure, in human hepatocytes by high-resolution MS

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Zhu, Mingshe; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-01-01

    Background Since 2008, synthetic cannabinoids are major new designer drugs of abuse. They are extensively metabolized and excreted in urine, but limited human metabolism data are available. As there are no reports on the metabolism of RCS-8, a scheduled phenylacetylindole synthetic cannabinoid with an N-cyclohexylethyl moiety, we investigated metabolism of this new designer drug by human hepatocytes and high resolution MS. Methods After human hepatocyte incubation with RCS-8, samples were analyzed on a TripleTOF 5600+ mass spectrometer with time-of-flight survey scan and information-dependent acquisition triggered product ion scans. Data mining of the accurate mass full scan and product ion spectra employed different data processing algorithms. Results and Conclusion More than 20 RCS-8 metabolites were identified, products of oxidation, demethylation, and glucuronidation. Major metabolites and targets for analytical methods were hydroxyphenyl RCS - 8 glucuronide, a variety of hydroxycyclohexyl-hydroxyphenyl RCS-8 glucuronides, hydroxyphenyl RCS-8, as well as the demethyl-hydroxycyclohexyl RCS-8 glucuronide. PMID:24946920

  13. The inhibitory effects of cannabinoids, the active constituents of Cannabis sativa L. on human and rabbit platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Formukong, E A; Evans, A T; Evans, F J

    1989-10-01

    Olivetol, cannabigerol (CBG), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN) and tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 1-THC) were assessed for their ability to inhibit agonist-induced platelet aggregation and [14C]5-HT release. With the exception of olivetol, (40% maximal effectiveness), none of the compounds inhibited tetradecanoylphorbolacetate (TPA)-induced aggregation of human or rabbit platelets. All of these cannabinoids partially inhibited primary aggregation and totally inhibited secondary aggregation of human platelets when adrenaline was used as the agonist. Inhibition was dose-dependent over the range 10(-3)-10(-5) M. Both rabbit and human platelet aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the order of potency was CBG greater than CBD greater than olivetol greater than THC greater than CBN, the IC50 of CBG being 2.7 x 10(-4) M. PAF-induced aggregation of rabbit platelets was also inhibited by these compounds in a dose-dependent manner over the concentration range 10(-3) to 10(-4) M, however [14C]5-HT release was only partially prevented by the cannabinoids in a manner which did not correlate with inhibition of aggregation.

  14. Cannabinoids inhibit peptidoglycan-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB and cell growth in U87MG human malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Echigo, Ryosuke; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Yachie, Akihiro; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is the key transcription factor involved in the inflammatory responses, and its activation aggravates tumors. Peptidoglycan (PGN), a main cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria, stimulates Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) and activates a number of inflammatory pathways, including NF-κB. Cannabinoids have been reported to exert anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects. The mechanisms underlying these actions, however, are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cannabinoids can suppress the PGN-induced activation of NF-κB and cell growth via cannabinoid receptors in U87MG human malignant glioma cells. PGN treatment induced the phosphorylation of NF-κB and cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. The main endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, prevented the PGN-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB, which was reversed by the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, AM281. The synthetic cannabinoid, WIN55,212-2, abolished the PGN-activated cell growth, and this effect was reversed by AM281. The preferential expression of CB1 rather than CB2 receptors in these cells was confirmed by reverse transcription-mediated polymerase chain reaction experiments and the observation that the WIN55,212-2-induced morphological changes were completely reversed by AM281 but not by the CB2 antagonist, AM630. Our finding that cannabinoids suppress the NF-κB inflammatory pathway and cell growth via CB1 receptors in glioma cells provides evidence for the therapeutic potential of targeting cannabinoid receptors for the treatment of inflammation-dependent tumor progression.

  15. The synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212 induced-apoptosis in cytotrophoblasts cells by a mechanism dependent on CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Almada, Marta; Costa, Lia; Fonseca, Bruno Miguel; Amaral, Cristina; Teixeira, Natércia; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina

    2017-06-15

    The endocannabinoid system has evolved as a key regulator in several pathological and physiological processes, including placentation, decidualization and implantation. In addition, it is known that Cannabis and cannabinoids negatively affect female reproduction. Although, the biological action of synthetic cannabinoids, such as WIN-55,212, in human fertility and pregnancy outcome remain to be unveiled. A tight balance between proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of trophoblast cells is required for placental development and pregnancy outcome. Therefore, in this work, the effects of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212 in placental cytotrophoblast cells were explored. For that, it was used a human choriocarcinoma cell line, BeWo cells, and primary cultures of human cytotrophoblasts isolated from term placentas. Results demonstrate that this synthetic cannabinoid induces cell cycle arrest. We also observed that cell viability loss was associated with a disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspases -9 and -3/-7 independently of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production or recruitment of the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker CHOP. Moreover, these effects were prevented by pre-incubation with a selective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CBR1) antagonist (AM281). Thus, our results provide strong evidences of the apoptotic process induced by WIN-55,212 through the activation of the CBR1, which may reveal the impact of cannabinoids consumption during placental development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits interleukin-1β induced matrix metalloproteinase and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase expression in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Dunn, S L; Wilkinson, J M; Crawford, A; Le Maitre, C L; Bunning, R A D

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is involved in the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) leading to cartilage degradation. Cannabinoids are anti-inflammatory and reduce joint damage in animal models of arthritis. This study aimed to determine a mechanism whereby the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) may inhibit cartilage degradation. Effects of WIN-55 were studied on IL-1β stimulated production of MMP-3 and -13 and their inhibitors TIMP-1 and -2 in human chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were obtained from articular cartilage of patients undergoing total knee replacement. Chondrocytes were grown in monolayer and 3D alginate bead cultures. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to determine the gene expression of MMP-3, -13, TIMP-1 and -2 and Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) to measure the amount of MMP-3 and MMP-13 protein released into media. Immunocytochemistry was used to investigate the expression of cannabinoid receptors in chondrocyte cultures. Treatment with WIN-55 alone or in combination with IL-1β, decreased or abolished MMP-3, -13, TIMP-1 and -2 gene expression in human chondrocyte monolayer and alginate bead cultures in both a concentration and time dependent manner. WIN-55 treatment alone, and in combination with IL-1β, reduced MMP-3 and -13 protein production by chondrocytes cultured in alginate beads. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated the expression of cannabinoid receptors in chondrocyte cultures. Cannabinoid WIN-55 can reduce both basal and IL-1β stimulated gene and protein expression of MMP-3 and -13. However WIN-55 also decreased basal levels of TIMP-1 and -2 mRNA. These actions of WIN-55 suggest a mechanism by which cannabinoids may act to prevent cartilage breakdown in arthritis. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    PubMed

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-01-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects.

  18. Human Hepatocyte Metabolism of Novel Synthetic Cannabinoids MN-18 and Its 5-Fluoro Analog 5F-MN-18.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Carlier, Jeremy; Zhu, Mingshe; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2017-08-18

    In 2014, 2 novel synthetic cannabinoids, MN-18 and its 5-fluoro analog, 5F-MN-18, were first identified in an ongoing survey of novel psychoactive substances in Japan. In vitro pharmacological assays revealed that MN-18 and 5F-MN-18 displayed high binding affinities to human CB1 and CB2 receptors, with Ki being 1.65-3.86 nmol/L. MN-18 and 5F-MN-18 were scheduled in Japan and some other countries in 2014. Despite increasing prevalence, no human metabolism data are currently available, making it challenging for forensic laboratories to confirm intake of MN-18 or 5F-MN-18. We incubated 10 μ mol/L of MN-18 and 5F-MN-18 in human hepatocytes for 3 h and analyzed the samples on a TripleTOF 5600(+) high-resolution mass spectrometer to identify appropriate marker metabolites. Data were acquired via full scan and information-dependent acquisition-triggered product ion scans with mass defect filter. In total, 13 MN-18 metabolites were detected, with the top 3 abundant metabolites being 1-pentyl-1H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid, pentyl-carbonylated MN-18, and naphthalene-hydroxylated MN-18. For 5F-MN-18, 20 metabolites were observed, with the top 3 abundant metabolites being 5`-OH-MN-18, MN-18 pentanoic acid, and 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid. We have characterized MN-18 and 5F-MN-18 metabolism with human hepatocytes and high-resolution mass spectrometry, and we recommend characteristic major metabolites for clinical and forensic laboratories to identify MN-18 and 5F-MN-18 intake and link observed adverse events to these novel synthetic cannabinoids. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  19. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes by inhibiting expression of syndecan-1

    PubMed Central

    KONG, YING; WANG, WANCHUN; ZHANG, CHANGJIE; WU, YI; LIU, YANG; ZHOU, XIAORONG

    2016-01-01

    A central feature of osteoarthritis (OA) is the loss of articular cartilage, which is primarily attributed to cartilage breakdown. A group of metalloproteinases termed the A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family are reported to be important in cartilage breakdown. Recent studies have suggested that ADAMTS-4 is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of OA and that syndecan-1 is closely associated with activation of ADAMTS-4 in human chondrocytes. Accumulating evidence also suggests that cannabinoids have chondroprotective effects. The current study explored the effects of synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) on the expression of syndecan-1 and ADAMTS-4, as well as ADAMTS-4 activity, in unstimulated and interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Primary human OA articular chondrocytes were treated with WIN-55 in the presence or absence of IL-1β and cannabinoid receptor antagonists. The results of the present study demonstrated that WIN-55 inhibited ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated primary human OA articular chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) were constitutively expressed in human OA articular chondrocytes. Furthermore, selective CB2 antagonist, JTE907, but not selective CB1 antagonist, MJ15, abolished the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on ADAMTS-4 activity. WIN55 inhibited the expression of syndecan-1 but not ADAMTS-4, and overexpression of syndecan-1 reversed the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on the ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated human OA articular chondrocytes. Despite having no significant effect on syndecan-1 gene promoter activity, WIN-55 markedly decreased the stability of syndecan-1 mRNA via CB2. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first in vitro evidence supporting that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55 inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1

  20. The Endocannabinoid/Endovanilloid N-Arachidonoyl Dopamine (NADA) and Synthetic Cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 Abate the Inflammatory Activation of Human Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Khakpour, Samira; Tran, Alphonso; Sheehan, Kayla; Schumacher, Mark; Xu, Fengyun; Hellman, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Although cannabinoids, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, have been studied extensively for their psychoactive effects, it has become apparent that certain cannabinoids possess immunomodulatory activity. Endothelial cells (ECs) are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of organ injury in acute inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, because they express cytokines and chemokines, which facilitate the trafficking of leukocytes to organs, and they modulate vascular barrier function. In this study, we find that primary human ECs from multiple organs express the cannabinoid receptors CB1R, GPR18, and GPR55, as well as the ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1. In contrast to leukocytes, CB2R is only minimally expressed in some EC populations. Furthermore, we show that ECs express all of the known endocannabinoid (eCB) metabolic enzymes. Examining a panel of cannabinoids, we demonstrate that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 and the eCB N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA), but neither anandamide nor 2-arachidonoylglycerol, reduce EC inflammatory responses induced by bacterial lipopeptide, LPS, and TNFα. We find that endothelial CB1R/CB2R are necessary for the effects of NADA, but not those of WIN55,212-2. Furthermore, transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1 appears to counter the anti-inflammatory properties of WIN55,212-2 and NADA, but conversely, in the absence of these cannabinoids, its inhibition exacerbates the inflammatory response in ECs activated with LPS. These data indicate that the eCB system can modulate inflammatory activation of the endothelium and may have important implications for a variety of acute inflammatory disorders that are characterized by EC activation. PMID:24644287

  1. The endocannabinoid/endovanilloid N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) and synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 abate the inflammatory activation of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Khakpour, Samira; Tran, Alphonso; Sheehan, Kayla; Schumacher, Mark; Xu, Fengyun; Hellman, Judith

    2014-05-09

    Although cannabinoids, such as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, have been studied extensively for their psychoactive effects, it has become apparent that certain cannabinoids possess immunomodulatory activity. Endothelial cells (ECs) are centrally involved in the pathogenesis of organ injury in acute inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, because they express cytokines and chemokines, which facilitate the trafficking of leukocytes to organs, and they modulate vascular barrier function. In this study, we find that primary human ECs from multiple organs express the cannabinoid receptors CB1R, GPR18, and GPR55, as well as the ion channel transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1. In contrast to leukocytes, CB2R is only minimally expressed in some EC populations. Furthermore, we show that ECs express all of the known endocannabinoid (eCB) metabolic enzymes. Examining a panel of cannabinoids, we demonstrate that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 and the eCB N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA), but neither anandamide nor 2-arachidonoylglycerol, reduce EC inflammatory responses induced by bacterial lipopeptide, LPS, and TNFα. We find that endothelial CB1R/CB2R are necessary for the effects of NADA, but not those of WIN55,212-2. Furthermore, transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid type 1 appears to counter the anti-inflammatory properties of WIN55,212-2 and NADA, but conversely, in the absence of these cannabinoids, its inhibition exacerbates the inflammatory response in ECs activated with LPS. These data indicate that the eCB system can modulate inflammatory activation of the endothelium and may have important implications for a variety of acute inflammatory disorders that are characterized by EC activation.

  2. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A.; Wang, Xin M.; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Gorrell, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell–collagen interactions in chronic liver injury. PMID:21356365

  3. Detection and quantification of new designer drugs in human blood: Part 1 - Synthetic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Julia; McLaren, Jenna M; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Beyer, Jochen

    2012-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids sprayed on herbal mixtures have been abused as a new designer drug all over the world since 2004. In 2008, the first compounds, CP 47,497 and JWH-018, were identified as active ingredients in these mixtures. Most of the compounds have been synthesized for research purposes and are potent CB1 and/or CB2 receptor agonists. To investigate the presence of synthetic cannabinoids in blood samples, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method was developed using only 100 µL of blood. After the addition of 0.2 mL of trizma buffer, the blood was extracted using liquid-liquid extraction with 1 mL of 1-chlorobutane containing 10% of isopropanol for 5 min on a shaker at 1,500 rpm. After centrifugation at 12,000 rpm for 1 min, the separated solvent layer was transferred to an autosampler vial and evaporated to dryness under N₂. The residue was reconstituted in methanol and injected into a Shimadzu 8030 LC-MS-MS system to separate and detect 25 synthetic cannabinoids. The method has been validated according to international guidelines and was found to be selective for all tested compounds. Calibration was satisfactory from 0.5-100 ng/mL, and from 5.0-500 ng/mL. for HU-210, CP 47,497 and the CP 47,497 C-8 homolog, respectively. The extraction efficiencies ranged from 30-101% and the matrix effects from 67-112%. Accuracy data were within the acceptance interval of ±15% (±20% at the lower limit of quantification) of the nominal values for all drugs.

  4. Cannabinoids in postmortem toxicology.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Nikolas P; Ingle, Eric A

    2011-09-01

    Cannabinoids are often excluded from postmortem toxicology screens due to their ubiquitous nature, interpretative difficulties and unanswered questions regarding their postmortem redistribution. In this study, we review 30 postmortem cases where a drug screen gave a positive cannabinoids result and a confirmation identified Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC), and/or 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in peripheral (BL-P) or cardiac/central blood (BL-C) and/or urine (UR). Had cannabinoids not been included in these toxicologic evaluations, incomplete or erroneous inferences would have been drawn in a substantial number of cases regarding cause/manner of death. THC was detected in 28 BL-C and in all 30 BL-P. THC and THC-COOH were confirmed present in 2 and 23 UR, respectively. 11-OH-THC was detected in 4 BL-C, 6 BL-P, and 0 UR. The mean THC concentrations in BL-C and BL-P were 8.0 and 15.8 ng/mL, respectively. The mean THC-COOH concentrations in BL-C and BL-P were 55.2 and 60.6 ng/mL, respectively. The mean 11-OH-THC concentrations in BL-C and BL-P were 17.0 and 12.5 ng/mL, respectively. Postmortem interval (PMI) for each case was determined and evaluated in relation to BL-C/BL-P concentration ratios with THC-COOH exhibiting a possible trend. This study is the first of its kind and demonstrates the usefulness of cannabinoid analyses as part of death investigations. Furthermore, it provides distribution data that will improve the ability of toxicologists and pathologists to evaluate cannabinoid concentrations in human postmortem specimens.

  5. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. )

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  6. Expression and characterization of human CB1 cannabinoid receptor in methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kang; Zhang, Rundong; Feng, Wenke; Cai, Jian; Pierce, William; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2005-03-01

    For the purpose of purification and structural characterization, the CB1 cannabinoid receptors are expressed in methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The expression plasmid was constructed in which the CB1 gene is under the control of the highly inducible promoter of P. pastoris alcohol oxidase I gene. To facilitate easy detection and purification, a FLAG tag was introduced at the N-terminal, a c-myc epitope and a hexahistidine tag were introduced at the C-terminal of the CB1. In membrane preparations of CB1 gene transformed yeast cells, Western blot analysis detected the expression of CB1 proteins. Radioligand binding assays demonstrated that the tagged CB1 receptors expressed in P. pastoris have a pharmacological profile similar to that of the untagged CB1 receptors expressed in mammalian systems. Furthermore, the tagged CB1 receptors were purified by anti-FLAG M2 affinity chromatography and the identity of the purified CB1 receptor proteins was confirmed by Western blot analysis. MALDI/TOF mass spectrometry analysis of the peptides extracted from tryptic digestions of purified CB1 preparations detected 17 peptide fragments derived from the CB1, thus further confirming the identity of the purified receptor. In conclusion, these data demonstrated for the first time that epitope tagged, functional CB1 cannabinoid receptors can be expressed in P. pastoris for purification and mass spectrometry characterization.

  7. Cannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    PERTWEE, R

    2001-01-01

    The enteric nervous system of several species, including the mouse, rat, guinea pig and humans, contains cannabinoid CB1 receptors that depress gastrointestinal motility, mainly by inhibiting ongoing contractile transmitter release. Signs of this depressant effect are, in the whole organism, delayed gastric emptying and inhibition of the transit of non-absorbable markers through the small intestine and, in isolated strips of ileal tissue, inhibition of evoked acetylcholine release, peristalsis, and cholinergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) contractions of longitudinal or circular smooth muscle. These are contractions evoked electrically or by agents that are thought to stimulate contractile transmitter release either in tissue taken from morphine pretreated animals (naloxone) or in unpretreated tissue (γ-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine). The inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastric emptying and intestinal transit are mediated to some extent by CB1 receptors in the brain as well as by enteric CB1 receptors. Gastric acid secretion is also inhibited in response to CB1 receptor activation, although the detailed underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Cannabinoid receptor agonists delay gastric emptying in humans as well as in rodents and probably also inhibit human gastric acid secretion. Cannabinoid pretreatment induces tolerance to the inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastrointestinal motility. Findings that the CB1 selective antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A produces in vivo and in vitro signs of increased motility of rodent small intestine probably reflect the presence in the enteric nervous system of a population of CB1 receptors that are precoupled to their effector mechanisms. SR141716A has been reported not to behave in this manner in the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparation (MPLM) of human ileum unless this has first been rendered cannabinoid tolerant. Nor has it been

  8. Phase I metabolism of the highly potent synthetic cannabinoid MDMB-CHMICA and detection in human urine samples.

    PubMed

    Franz, Florian; Angerer, Verena; Moosmann, Bjoern; Auwärter, Volker

    2017-05-01

    Among the recently emerged synthetic cannabinoids, MDMB-CHMICA (methyl N-{[1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]carbonyl}-3-methylvalinate) shows an extraordinarily high prevalence in intoxication cases, necessitating analytical methods capable of detecting drug uptake. In this study, the in vivo phase I metabolism of MDMB-CHMICA was investigated using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-Q ToF-MS) techniques. The main metabolites are formed by hydrolysis of the methyl ester and oxidation of the cyclohexyl methyl side chain. One monohydroxylated metabolite, the ester hydrolysis product and two further hydroxylated metabolites of the ester hydrolysis product are suggested as suitable targets for a selective and sensitive detection in urine. All detected in vivo metabolites could be verified in vitro using a human liver microsome assay. Two of the postulated main metabolites were successfully included in a comprehensive LC-ESI-MS/MS screening method for synthetic cannabinoid metabolites. The screening of 5717 authentic urine samples resulted in 818 cases of confirmed MDMB-CHMICA consumption (14%). Since the most common route of administration is smoking, smoke condensates were analyzed to identify relevant thermal degradation products. Pyrolytic cleavage of the methyl ester and amide bond led to degradation products which were also formed metabolically. This is particularly important in hair analysis, where detection of metabolites is commonly considered a proof of consumption. In addition, intrinsic activity of MDMB-CHMICA at the CB1 receptor was determined applying a cAMP accumulation assay and showed that the compound is a potent full agonist. Based on the collected data, an enhanced interpretation of analytical findings in urine and hair is facilitated. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John

  9. A synthetic peptide derived from A1 module in CRD4 of human TNF receptor-1 inhibits binding and proinflammatory effect of human TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yingnan; Wang, Zhaohe; Bu, Xianzhang; Tang, Shu; Mei, Zhengrong; Liu, Peiqing

    2009-06-01

    Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine, which has been shown to be a causative factor in rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and septic shock. Proinflammatory effect of TNF-alpha is activated mainly through human TNF receptor-1 (TNF-R1). However, the role of the fourth cystein-rich domain (CRD4) of TNF-R1 extracellular portion in the interaction of TNF-alpha with TNF-R1 is still unclear. In the present study, binding activity of TNF-alpha to TNF-R1 and protein levels of IkappaB-alpha and nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) p65 subunit in HeLa cells were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western-blot analysis. Pep 3 (LRENECVS) which was derived from the hydrophilic region of A1 module in CRD4 remarkably inhibited the binding of TNF-alpha to TNF-R1, and also reversed TNF-alpha-induced degradation of IkappaB-alpha and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB p65 subunit in HeLa cells. Our results confirmed that the hydrophilic region of A1 module in CRD4 participated in the interaction of TNF-alpha with TNF-R1, and demonstrated the potential of small-molecule TNF-alpha extracellular inhibitors targeting at A1 module in CRD4 of TNF-R1 in suppressing proinflammatory effect of TNF-alpha.

  10. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jäntti, Maria H.; Mandrika, Ilona; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  11. Upregulation of the expression of inflammatory and angiogenic markers in human adipocytes by a synthetic cannabinoid, JTE-907.

    PubMed

    González-Muniesa, P; Bing, C; Trayhurn, P

    2010-09-01

    Inflammation in adipose tissue is a characteristic of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. It is suggested that the endocannabinoid system is involved in the regulation of inflammatory and angiogenic processes within the tissue. Human subcutaneous preadipocytes (Zen Bio) were used as the source of human preadipocytes or adipocytes. Gene expression was examined by RT-PCR and real-time PCR. The secretion of inflammation-related proteins was determined by an ELISA array. In experiments on adipocytes treated at day 14 post-differentiation, JTE-907, a synthetic cannabinoid, upregulated the expression of key inflammatory markers - IL-6, MCP-1 and IL-1 beta - and angiogenic factors - VEGF and ANGPTL4 - at 10 microM after 20 h of treatment, having also increased the expression of TRPV1 at 10 microM. JTE-907 showed no effect after 4 h. The ELISA array showed a 2.6-fold increase in IL-6 protein release. The effect of JTE-907 was inhibited by AM251 (CB1 antagonist), and partially by arachidonyl serotonin (TRPV1 and FAAH antagonist). The CB2 antagonist, AM630, partially upregulated the effect of JTE-907. Preadipocytes fed 14 days after 100% confluence exhibited downregulation of CB1, MCP-1, and IL-1 beta, 20 h after having been exposed to JTE-907. CB1 and TRPV1 receptors participate in the regulation of several inflammatory and angiogenic factors in human adipocytes, indicating their potential value as targets for the treatment of disorders related to obesity.

  12. Losartan attenuates human monocyte-derived dendritic cell immune maturation via downregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong; Lu, Hao; Liu, Hongying; Yao, Kang; Sun, Aijun; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2012-08-01

    The angiotensin II receptor-1 blockers have generally been shown to have antiatherogenic effects, and dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient antigen presenting cells that play an active role in the development of atherosclerosis through inflammatory-immune responses. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the antiatherogenic effect of losartan, the first angiotensin II receptor-1 blockers, might partly be mediated by attenuating DCs maturation. In this study, we showed that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and angiotensin II (Ang II) could induce the maturation of human monocyte-derived DCs, stimulate CD83, HLA-DR expressions and IL-12, interferon-gamma secretions and increase the capacity of DCs to stimulate T-cell proliferation, which were suppressed by losartan. OxLDL could promote the autocrine secretion of Ang II by DCs and upregulate the expressions of 3 scavenger receptors SR-A, CD36, and LOX-1. Losartan reduced oxLDL-induced LOX-1 expression but not SR-A and CD36 expressions. Ang II could only upregulate the LOX-1 expression, which was reduced by losartan. OxLDL- and Ang II-induced upregulation of CD83 and secretion of IL-12 were all attenuated by LOX-1 neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, losartan could attenuate the oxLDL- and Ang II-induced immune maturation of human monocyte-derived DCs partly through downregulation of the LOX-1 expression.

  13. New ursane triterpenoids from Ficus pandurata and their binding affinity for human cannabinoid and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Amgad I M; Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A; Ahmed, Hany E A; Ahmad, Amany S; Ramadan, Mahmoud A; El-Baky, Atef E Abd; Yamada, Koji; Ross, Samir A

    2016-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Ficus pandurata Hance (Moraceae) fruits has led to the isolation of two new triterpenoids, ficupanduratin A [1β-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (11) and ficupanduratin B [21α-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (17), along with 20 known compounds: α-amyrin acetate (1), α-amyrin (2), 3β-acetoxy-20-taraxasten-22-one (3), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (4), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-12-ursene (5), 11-oxo-α-amyrin acetate (6), 11-oxo-β-amyrin acetate (7), palmitic acid (8), stigmast-4,22-diene-3,6-dione (9), stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione (10), stigmasterol (12), β-sitosterol (13), stigmast-22-ene-3,6-dione (14), stigmastane-3,6-dione (15), 3β,21β-dihydroxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (16), 3β-hydroxy-11α-methoxyurs-12-ene (18), 6-hydroxystigmast-4,22-diene-3-one (19), 6-hydroxystigmast-4-ene-3-one (20), 11α,21α-dihydroxy-3β-acetoxy-urs-12-ene (21), and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22). Compound 21 is reported for the first time from a natural source. The structures of the 20 compounds were elucidated on the basis of IR, 1D ((1)H and (13)C), 2D ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY) NMR and MS spectroscopic data, in addition to comparison with literature data. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-leishmanial, and cytotoxic activities. In addition, their radioligand displacement affinity on opioid and cannabinoid receptors was assessed. Compounds 4, 11, and 15 exhibited good affinity towards the CB2 receptor, with displacement values of 69.7, 62.5 and 86.5 %, respectively. Furthermore, the binding mode of the active compounds in the active site of the CB2 cannabinoid receptors was investigated through molecular modelling.

  14. Modulation of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Signaling by Medicinal Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Utomo, Wesley K.; de Vries, Marjan; Braat, Henri; Bruno, Marco J.; Parikh, Kaushal; Comalada, Mònica; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van Goor, Harry; Fuhler, Gwenny M.

    2017-01-01

    Medical marijuana is increasingly prescribed as an analgesic for a growing number of indications, amongst which terminal cancer and multiple sclerosis. However, the mechanistic aspects and properties of cannabis remain remarkably poorly characterized. In this study we aimed to investigate the immune-cell modulatory properties of medical cannabis. Healthy volunteers were asked to ingest medical cannabis, and kinome profiling was used to generate comprehensive descriptions of the cannabis challenge on inflammatory signal transduction in the peripheral blood of these volunteers. Results were related to both short term and long term effects in patients experimentally treated with a medical marijuana preparation for suffering from abdominal pain as a result of chronic pancreatitis or other causes. The results reveal an immunosuppressive effect of cannabinoid preparations via deactivation of signaling through the pro-inflammatory p38 MAP kinase and mTOR pathways and a concomitant deactivation of the pro-mitogenic ERK pathway. However, long term cannabis exposure in two patients resulted in reversal of this effect. While these data provide a powerful mechanistic rationale for the clinical use of medical marijuana in inflammatory and oncological disease, caution may be advised with sustained use of such preparations. PMID:28174520

  15. Acute and Chronic Effects of Cannabinoids on Human Cognition-A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Broyd, Samantha J; van Hell, Hendrika H; Beale, Camilla; Yücel, Murat; Solowij, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    Cannabis use has been associated with impaired cognition during acute intoxication as well as in the unintoxicated state in long-term users. However, the evidence has been mixed and contested, and no systematic reviews of the literature on neuropsychological task-based measures of cognition have been conducted in an attempt to synthesize the findings. We systematically review the empirical research published in the past decade (from January 2004 to February 2015) on acute and chronic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids and on persistence or recovery after abstinence. We summarize the findings into the major categories of the cognitive domains investigated, considering sample characteristics and associations with various cannabis use parameters. Verbal learning and memory and attention are most consistently impaired by acute and chronic exposure to cannabis. Psychomotor function is most affected during acute intoxication, with some evidence for persistence in chronic users and after cessation of use. Impaired verbal memory, attention, and some executive functions may persist after prolonged abstinence, but persistence or recovery across all cognitive domains remains underresearched. Associations between poorer performance and a range of cannabis use parameters, including a younger age of onset, are frequently reported. Little further evidence has emerged for the development of tolerance to the acutely impairing effects of cannabis. Evidence for potential protection from harmful effects by cannabidiol continues to increase but is not definitive. In light of increasing trends toward legalization of cannabis, the knowledge gained from this body of research needs to be incorporated into strategies to minimize harm.

  16. Cyclic analogs of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alphaMSH) with high agonist potency and selectivity at human melanocortin receptor 1b.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Maria A; MacNeil, Tanya; Tang, Rui; Fong, Tung M; Cabello, M Angeles; Maroto, Marta; Teran, Ana

    2008-06-01

    Alpha-melanotropin (alphaMSH), Ac-Ser1-Tyr2-Ser3-Met4-Glu5-His6-Phe7-Arg8-Trp9-Gly10-Lys11-Pro12-Val13-NH2,(1) has been long recognized as an important physiological regulator of skin and hair pigmentation in mammals. Binding of this peptide to the melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) leads to activation of tyrosinase, the key enzyme of the melanin biosynthesis pathway. In this study, interactions of the human MC1bR (an isoform of the receptor 1a) with the synthetic cyclic analogs of alphaMSH were studied. These ligands were analogs of MTII, Ac-Nle4-cyclo-(Asp5-His6-D-Phe7-Arg8-Trp9-Lys10)-NH2, a potent pan-agonist at the human melanocortin receptors (hMC1,3-5R). In the structure of MTII, the His6-D-Phe7-Arg8-Trp9 segment has been recognized as "essential" for molecular recognition at the human melanocortin receptors (hMC1,3-5R). Herein, the role of the Trp9 in the ligand interactions with the hMC1b,3-5R has been reevaluated. Analogs with various amino acids in place of Trp9 were synthesized and tested in vitro in receptor affinity binding and cAMP functional assays at human melanocortin receptors 1b, 3, 4 and 5 (hMC1b,3-5R). Several of the new peptides were high potency agonists (partial) at hMC1bR (EC50 from 0.5 to 20 nM) and largely inactive at hMC3-5R. The bulky aromatic side chain in position 9, such as that in Trp, was found not to be essential to agonism (partial) of the studied peptides at hMC1bR.

  17. Cannabinoids in Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Strouse, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many patients with chronic medical illnesses use cannabinoids. There are two FDA-approved cannabinoid products, whereas medical marijuana purchased at legal dispensaries is not FDA regulated and may contain uncertain concentrations of various compounds. Cannabinoids have shown efficacy in treating chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting, poor appetite in advanced HIV, some pain states, and multiple sclerosis-associated spasticity. Recreational cannabinoid use has many known potential serious harms. Physicians should be knowledgeable about cannabinoids and should inquire with their patients about cannabinoid use. Practical suggestions for clinical approaches are included. PMID:28861478

  18. In Vitro and In Vivo Human Metabolism of Synthetic Cannabinoids FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Kronstrand, Robert; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    In 2014, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22, two novel synthetic cannabinoids, were detected in herbal blends in Japan, Russia, and Germany and were quickly added to their scheduled drugs list. Unfortunately, no human metabolism data are currently available, making it challenging to confirm their intake. The present study aims to identify appropriate analytical markers by investigating FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 metabolism in human hepatocytes and confirm the results in authentic urine specimens. For metabolic stability, 1 μM FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 was incubated with human liver microsomes for up to 1 h; for metabolite profiling, 10 μM was incubated with human hepatocytes for 3 h. Two authentic urine specimens from FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 positive cases were analyzed after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. Metabolite identification in hepatocyte samples and urine specimens was accomplished by high-resolution mass spectrometry using information-dependent acquisition. Both FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 were rapidly metabolized in HLM with half-lives of 12.4 and 11.5 min, respectively. In human hepatocyte samples, we identified seven metabolites for both compounds, generated by ester hydrolysis and further hydroxylation and/or glucuronidation. After ester hydrolysis, FDU-PB-22 and FUB-PB-22 yielded the same metabolite M7, fluorobenzylindole-3-carboxylic acid (FBI-COOH). M7 and M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) were the major metabolites. In authentic urine specimens after β-glucuronidase hydrolysis, M6 and M7 also were the predominant metabolites. Based on our study, we recommend M6 (hydroxylated FBI-COOH) and M7 (FBI-COOH) as suitable urinary markers for documenting FDU-PB-22 and/or FUB-PB-22 intake.

  19. Endo-cannabinoids system and the toxicity of cannabinoids with a biotechnological approach.

    PubMed

    Niaz, Kamal; Khan, Fazlullah; Maqbool, Faheem; Momtaz, Saeideh; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Nobakht-Haghighi, Navid; Rahimifard, Mahban; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Cannabinoids have shown diverse and critical effects on the body systems, which alter the physiological functions. Synthetic cannabinoids are comparatively innovative misuse drugs with respect to their nature of synthesis. Synthetic cannabinoids therapy in healthy, chain smokers, and alcoholic individuals cause damage to the immune and nervous system, eventually leading to intoxication throughout the body. Relevant studies were retrieved using major electronic databases such as PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, Scopus, and Google Scholar. The extensive use of Cannabis Sativa L. (C. Sativa) and its derivatives/analogues such as the nonpsychoactive dimethyl heptyl homolog (CBG-DMH), and tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) amongst juveniles and adults have been enhanced in recent years. Cannabinoids play a crucial role in the induction of respiratory, reproductive, immune and carcinogenic effects; however, potential data about mutagenic and developmental effects are still insufficient. The possible toxicity associated with the prolong use of cannabinoids acts as a tumor promoter in animal models and humans. Particular synthetic cannabinoids and analogues have low affinity for CB1 or CB2 receptors, while some synthetic members like Δ9-THC have high affinity towards these receptors. Cannabinoids and their derivatives have a direct or indirect association with acute and long-term toxicity. To reduce/attenuate cannabinoids toxicity, pharmaceutical biotechnology and cloning methods have opened a new window to develop cannabinoids encoding the gene tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase. Plant revolution and regeneration hindered genetic engineering in C. Sativa. The genetic culture suspension of C. Sativa can be transmuted by the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to overcome its toxicity. The main aim of the present review was to collect evidence of the endo-cannabinoid system (ECS), cannabinoids toxicity, and the potential biotechnological approach of cannabinoids synthesis.

  20. Endo-cannabinoids system and the toxicity of cannabinoids with a biotechnological approach

    PubMed Central

    Niaz, Kamal; Khan, Fazlullah; Maqbool, Faheem; Momtaz, Saeideh; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Nobakht-Haghighi, Navid; Rahimifard, Mahban; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Cannabinoids have shown diverse and critical effects on the body systems, which alter the physiological functions. Synthetic cannabinoids are comparatively innovative misuse drugs with respect to their nature of synthesis. Synthetic cannabinoids therapy in healthy, chain smokers, and alcoholic individuals cause damage to the immune and nervous system, eventually leading to intoxication throughout the body. Relevant studies were retrieved using major electronic databases such as PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, Scopus, and Google Scholar. The extensive use of Cannabis Sativa L. (C. Sativa) and its derivatives/analogues such as the nonpsychoactive dimethyl heptyl homolog (CBG-DMH), and tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) amongst juveniles and adults have been enhanced in recent years. Cannabinoids play a crucial role in the induction of respiratory, reproductive, immune and carcinogenic effects; however, potential data about mutagenic and developmental effects are still insufficient. The possible toxicity associated with the prolong use of cannabinoids acts as a tumor promoter in animal models and humans. Particular synthetic cannabinoids and analogues have low affinity for CB1 or CB2 receptors, while some synthetic members like Δ9-THC have high affinity towards these receptors. Cannabinoids and their derivatives have a direct or indirect association with acute and long-term toxicity. To reduce/attenuate cannabinoids toxicity, pharmaceutical biotechnology and cloning methods have opened a new window to develop cannabinoids encoding the gene tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase. Plant revolution and regeneration hindered genetic engineering in C. Sativa. The genetic culture suspension of C. Sativa can be transmuted by the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to overcome its toxicity. The main aim of the present review was to collect evidence of the endo-cannabinoid system (ECS), cannabinoids toxicity, and the potential biotechnological approach of cannabinoids synthesis. PMID

  1. The effects of synthetic cannabinoid UR-144 on the human body-A review of 39 cases.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Piotr; Gieroń, Joanna; Gil, Dominika; Lechowicz, Wojciech; Skulska, Agnieszka; Tokarczyk, Bogdan

    2017-03-07

    UR-144 [(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone] is a synthetic cannabinoid, which has been detected in many 'legal highs', seized from the global drug market since the beginning of 2012. It has gained popularity as a 'legal' alternative to classic cannabis in countries where it was not controlled. Despite the widespread distribution of this substance, the data on its effects on the human body are scarce. Therefore, this paper describes the results of analysis and observed effects in 39 cases in which UR-144 was determined in blood. Symptoms were noted from the blood sampling forms filled out by the representative doctor. The determined concentrations of UR-144 were in the range of trace amounts (LOD-0.15ng/mL; LOQ-0.5ng/mL) up to 17ng/mL. The most common observed effects included slurred speech, dilated pupils, sluggish and abnormal pupillary reaction, cheerful behaviour, poor coordination, and staggering. Less frequently observed were: verbosity, narrow pupils, loss of consciousness, pale or reddened facial skin, blackout, euphoria, agitation, hallucinations, hindered communication, shaking hands, seizures, convulsions, somnolence, delayed movements, redness of the conjunctiva, and tachycardia. The discussed cases show the effects observed after UR-144 use. This study can assist in the recognition of possible effects caused by this substance.

  2. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation by the Cannabinoid Receptor (CB1) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) Induces Differential Responses in Corneal Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation by the cannabinoid receptor (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) induces...Available online 7 July 2010 Keywords: cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR...release of endogenous metabolites that are cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ( TRPV1 ) agonists. We determined

  3. Cannabis and Cannabinoids (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... District of Columbia have enacted laws to legalize medical marijuana (see Question 1 ). In the United States, Cannabis ... District of Columbia have enacted laws to legalize medical marijuana. (See Question 4 ). What are cannabinoids? Cannabinoids are ...

  4. Differential expression of protease-activated receptors-1 and -2 in stromal fibroblasts of normal, benign, and malignant human tissues.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, M R; Derian, C K; Santulli, R J; Andrade-Gordon, P

    2001-06-01

    The serine proteases thrombin and trypsin are among many factors that malignant cells secrete into the extracellular space to mediate metastatic processes such as cellular invasion, extracellular matrix degradation, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. The degree of protease secretion from malignant cells has been correlated to their metastatic potential. Protease activated receptors (PAR)-1 and -2, which are activated by thrombin and trypsin respectively, have not been extensively characterized in human tumors in situ. We investigated the presence of PAR-1 and PAR-2 in human normal, benign and malignant tissues using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our results demonstrate PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression in the tumor cells, mast cells, macrophages, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells of the metastatic tumor microenvironment. Most notably, an up-regulation of PAR-1 and PAR-2 observed in proliferating, smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive stromal fibroblasts surrounding the carcinoma cells was not observed in normal or benign conditions. Furthermore, in vitro studies using proliferating, SMA-positive, human dermal fibroblasts, and scrape-wounded human dermal fibroblasts demonstrated the presence of PAR-1 and PAR-2 not detected in quiescent, SMA-negative cultures. PAR-1 and PAR-2 in the cells forming the tumor microenvironment suggest that these receptors mediate the signaling of secreted thrombin and trypsin in the processes of cellular metastasis.

  5. An Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization MS/MS Assay Using Online Extraction for the Analysis of 11 Cannabinoids and Metabolites in Human Plasma and Urine.

    PubMed

    Klawitter, Jelena; Sempio, Cristina; Mörlein, Sophie; De Bloois, Erik; Klepacki, Jacek; Henthorn, Thomas; Leehey, Maureen A; Hoffenberg, Edward J; Knupp, Kelly; Wang, George S; Hopfer, Christian; Kinney, Greg; Bowler, Russell; Foreman, Nicholas; Galinkin, Jeffrey; Christians, Uwe; Klawitter, Jost

    2017-10-01

    Although, especially in the United States, there has been a recent surge of legalized cannabis for either recreational or medicinal purposes, surprisingly little is known about clinical dose-response relationships, pharmacodynamic and toxicodynamic effects of cannabinoids such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Even less is known about other active cannabinoids. To address this knowledge gap, an online extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites including THC, 11-hydroxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid, 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid glucuronide (THC-C-gluc), cannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabigerol, cannabidivarin, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV-COOH) was developed and validated in human urine and plasma. In contrast to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, electrospray ionization was associated with extensive ion suppression in plasma and urine samples. Thus, the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization assay was validated showing a lower limit of quantification ranging from 0.39 to 3.91 ng/mL depending on study compound and matrix. The upper limit of quantification was 400 ng/mL except for THC-C-gluc with an upper limit of quantification of 2000 ng/mL. The linearity was r > 0.99 for all analyzed calibration curves. Acceptance criteria for intrabatch and interbatch accuracy (85%-115%) and imprecision (<15%) were met for all compounds. In plasma, the only exceptions were THCV (75.3%-121.2% interbatch accuracy) and cannabidivarin (interbatch imprecision, 15.7%-17.2%). In urine, THCV did not meet predefined acceptance criteria for intrabatch accuracy. This assay allows for monitoring not only THC and its major metabolites but also major cannabinoids that are of interest for marijuana research and clinical practice.

  6. Architecture of cannabinoid signaling in mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Arnold, Andy; Hutchens, Jacqueline M.; Radicke, Josh; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Wager-Miller, Jim; Mackie, Ken; Straiker, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors and their ligands constitute an endogenous signaling system that is found throughout the body, including the eye. This system can be activated by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, a major drug of abuse. Cannabinoids offer considerable therapeutic potential in modulating ocular immune and inflammatory responses and in regulating intraocular pressure. The location of cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB1) in the retina is known, but recently a constellation of proteins has been identified that produce and break down endocannabinoids (eCBs) and modulate CB1 function. Localization of these proteins is critical to defining specific cannabinoid signaling circuitry in the retina. Here we show the localization of diacylglycerol lipase α and β (DGLα/β), implicated in the production of the eCB 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG); monoacylglycerol lipase (MGL) and α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6), both implicated in the breakdown of 2-AG; cannabinoid receptor interacting protein 1a (CRIP1a), a protein that may modulate CB1 function; Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase (NAAA) which have been shown to break down the eCB anandamide and related acyl amides. In our most prominent finding, DGLα is present in post-synaptic Type 1 OFF cone bipolar cells juxtaposed to CB1-containing cone photoreceptor terminals. Interestingly, CRIP1a is reliably presynaptic to DGLα, consistent with a possible role in cannabinoid signaling, NAAA is restricted to retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), while DGLβ is limited to retinal blood vessels. These results taken together with previous anatomic and functional studies define specific cannabinoid circuitry likely to modulate eCB signaling at the first synapse of the retina as well as in the inner plexiform layer (IPL). PMID:20653038

  7. Bioactive secondary metabolites of a marine Bacillus sp. inhibit superoxide generation and elastase release in human neutrophils by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Wen-Yi; Kuo, Jimmy; Huang, Yin-Ting; Chung, Pei-Jen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-06-03

    It is well known that overwhelming neutrophil activation is closely related to acute and chronic inflammatory injuries. Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) plays an important role in activation of neutrophils and may represent a potent therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that IA-LBI07-1 (IA), an extract of bioactive secondary metabolites from a marine Bacillus sp., has anti-inflammatory effects in human neutrophils. IA significantly inhibited superoxide generation and elastase release in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-activated neutrophils, but failed to suppress the cell responses activated by non-FPR1 agonists. IA did not alter superoxide production and elastase activity in cell-free systems. IA also attenuated the downstream signaling from FPR1, such as the Ca2+, MAP kinases and AKT pathways. In addition, IA inhibited the binding of N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein, a fluorescent analogue of FMLP, to FPR1 in human neutrophils and FPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. Taken together, these results show that the anti-inflammatory effects of IA in human neutrophils are through the inhibition of FPR1. Also, our data suggest that IA may have therapeutic potential to decrease tissue damage induced by human neutrophils.

  8. Mouse mammary tumor virus uses mouse but not human transferrin receptor 1 to reach a low pH compartment and infect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Enxiu; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Ying Qihua; Davey, Robert A.; Ross, Susan R.

    2008-11-25

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a pH-dependent virus that uses mouse transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) for entry into cells. Previous studies demonstrated that MMTV could induce pH 5-dependent fusion-from-with of mouse cells. Here we show that the MMTV envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion requires both the entry receptor and low pH (pH 5). Although expression of the MMTV envelope and TfR1 was sufficient to mediate low pH-dependent syncytia formation, virus infection required trafficking to a low pH compartment; infection was independent of cathepsin-mediated proteolysis. Human TfR1 did not support virus infection, although envelope-mediated syncytia formation occurred with human cells after pH 5 treatment and this fusion depended on TfR1 expression. However, although the MMTV envelope bound human TfR1, virus was only internalized and trafficked to a low pH compartment in cells expressing mouse TfR1. Thus, while human TfR1 supported cell-cell fusion, because it was not internalized when bound to MMTV, it did not function as an entry receptor. Our data suggest that MMTV uses TfR1 for all steps of entry: cell attachment, induction of the conformational changes in Env required for membrane fusion and internalization to an appropriate acidic compartment.

  9. H-Ferritin Is Preferentially Incorporated by Human Erythroid Cells through Transferrin Receptor 1 in a Threshold-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Soichiro; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Mizumoto, Chisaki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein composed of different ratios of 24 light (L) and heavy (H) subunits. The serum level of ferritin is a clinical marker of the body’s iron level. Transferrin receptor (TFR)1 is the receptor not only for transferrin but also for H-ferritin, but how it binds two different ligands and the blood cell types that preferentially incorporate H-ferritin remain unknown. To address these questions, we investigated hematopoietic cell-specific ferritin uptake by flow cytometry. Alexa Fluor 488-labeled H-ferritin was preferentially incorporated by erythroid cells among various hematopoietic cell lines examined, and was almost exclusively incorporated by bone marrow erythroblasts among human primary hematopoietic cells of various lineages. H-ferritin uptake by erythroid cells was strongly inhibited by unlabeled H-ferritin but was only partially inhibited by a large excess of holo-transferrin. On the other hand, internalization of labeled holo-transferrin by these cells was not inhibited by H-ferritin. Chinese hamster ovary cells lacking functional endogenous TFR1 but expressing human TFR1 with a mutated RGD sequence, which is required for transferrin binding, efficiently incorporated H-ferritin, indicating that TFR1 has distinct binding sites for H-ferritin and holo-transferrin. H-ferritin uptake by these cells required a threshold level of cell surface TFR1 expression, whereas there was no threshold for holo-transferrin uptake. The requirement for a threshold level of TFR1 expression can explain why among primary human hematopoietic cells, only erythroblasts efficiently take up H-ferritin. PMID:26441243

  10. Focus on cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Le Boisselier, R; Alexandre, J; Lelong-Boulouard, V; Debruyne, D

    2017-02-01

    The recent emergence of a multitude of synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) has generated a wealth of new information, suggesting the usefulness of state-of-the-art on lato sensu cannabinoids. By modulating a plurality of neurotransmission pathways, the endocannabinoid system is involved in many physiological processes that are increasingly explored. SCs desired and adverse effects are considered to be more intense than those observed with cannabis smoking, which is partly explained by the full agonist activity and higher affinity for cannabinoid receptors. Neurological and cardiovascular side effects observed after cannabinoid poisoning generally respond to conventional supportive care, but severe outcomes may occur in a minority of cases, mainly observed with SCs. The likelihood of severe abuse and addiction produced by SCs are of concern for the scientific community also interested in the potential therapeutic value of cannabinoids. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  11. Analogs of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone with high agonist potency and selectivity at human melanocortin receptor 1b: the role of Trp(9) in molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Maria A; Macneil, Tanya; Tang, Rui; Fong, Tung M; Angeles Cabello, M; Maroto, Marta; Teran, Ana

    2008-05-01

    alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone (alphaMSH), Ac-Ser(1)-Tyr(2)-Ser(3)-Met(4)-Glu(5)-His(6)-Phe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Gly(10)-Lys(11)-Pro(12)-Val(13)-NH(2), is an endogenous agonist for the melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R), the receptor found in the skin, several types of immune cells, and other peripheral sites. Three-dimensional models of complexes of this receptor with alphaMSH and its synthetic analog NDP-alphaMSH, Ac-Ser(1)-Tyr(2)-Ser(3)-Nle(4)-Glu(5)-His(6)-D-Phe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Gly(10)-Lys(11)-Pro(12)-Val(13)-NH(2), have been previously proposed. In those models, the 6-9 segment of the ligand was considered essential for the ligand-receptor interactions. In this study, we probed the role of Trp(9) of NDP-alphaMSH in interactions with hMC1bR. Analogs of NDP-alphaMSH with various amino acids in place of Trp(9) were synthesized and tested in vitro in receptor affinity binding and cAMP functional assays at human melanocortin receptors 1b, 3, 4, and 5 (hMC1b,3-5R). Several new compounds displayed high agonist potency at hMC1bR (EC(50) = 0.5-5 nM) and receptor subtype selectivity greater than 2000-fold versus hMC3-5R. The Trp(9) residue of NDP-alphaMSH was determined to be not essential for molecular recognition at hMC1bR.

  12. Differential recruitment of co-regulatory proteins to the human estrogen receptor 1 in response to xenoestrogens☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The diverse biological effects of xenoestrogens may be explained by their ability to differentially recruit co-regulatory proteins to the estrogen receptor (ER). We employed high-throughput receptor affinity binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment screening assays based on fluorescence polarization and time resolved florescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), respectively, to assess xenoestrogen-specific binding and co-regulatory protein recruitment to the ER. Then we used a functional proteomic assay based on co-immunoprecipitation of ER-bound proteins to isolate and identify intact co-regulatory proteins recruited to a ligand-activated ER. Through these approaches, we revealed differential binding affinity of bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein (GEN) to the human ERα (ESR1) and ligand-dependent recruitment of SRC-1 and SRC-3 peptides. Recruitment profiles were variable for each ligand and in some cases were distinct compared to 17β-estradiol (E2). For example, E2 and GEN recruited both SRC-1 and -3 peptides whereas BPA recruited only SRC-1 peptides. Results of the functional proteomic assay showed differential recruitment between ligands where E2 recruited the greatest number of proteins followed by BPA then GEN. A number of proteins share previously identified relationships with ESR1 as determined by STRING analysis. Although there was limited overlap in proteins identified between treatments, all ligands recruited proteins involved in cell growth as determined by subnetwork enrichment analysis (p < 0.05). A comparative, in silico analysis revealed that fewer interactions exist between zebrafish (Danio rerio) esr1 and zebrafish orthologs of proteins identified in our functional proteomic analysis. Taken together these results identify recruitment of known and previously unknown co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 and highlight new methods to assay recruitment of low abundant and intact, endogenous co-regulatory proteins to ESR1 or other nuclear receptors, in

  13. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs. PMID:25484051

  14. Affinity maturation of a novel antagonistic human monoclonal antibody with a long VH CDR3 targeting the Class A GPCR formyl-peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Huntington, Catherine; Hammersley, Jayne; Marwood, Rose; Hakulinen, Jonna K; Ek, Margareta; Sjögren, Tove; Rider, David; Privezentzev, Cyril; Seaman, Jonathan C; Cariuk, Peter; Knights, Vikki; Young, Joyce; Wilkinson, Trevor; Sleeman, Matthew; Finch, Donna K; Lowe, David C; Vaughan, Tristan J

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are desirable for intervention in a wide range of disease processes. The discovery of such antibodies is challenging due to a lack of stability of many GPCRs as purified proteins. We describe here the generation of Fpro0165, a human anti-formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antibody generated by variable domain engineering of an antibody derived by immunization of transgenic mice expressing human variable region genes. Antibody isolation and subsequent engineering of affinity, potency and species cross-reactivity using phage display were achieved using FPR1 expressed on HEK cells for immunization and selection, along with calcium release cellular assays for antibody screening. Fpro0165 shows full neutralization of formyl peptide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils. A crystal structure of the Fpro0165 Fab shows a long, protruding VH CDR3 of 24 amino acids and in silico docking with a homology model of FPR1 suggests that this long VH CDR3 is critical to the predicted binding mode of the antibody. Antibody mutation studies identify the apex of the long VH CDR3 as key to mediating the species cross-reactivity profile of the antibody. This study illustrates an approach for antibody discovery and affinity engineering to typically intractable membrane proteins such as GPCRs.

  15. Neurotensin-induced Proinflammatory Signaling in Human Colonocytes Is Regulated by β-Arrestins and Endothelin-converting Enzyme-1-dependent Endocytosis and Resensitization of Neurotensin Receptor 1*

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ivy Ka Man; Murphy, Jane E.; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2012-01-01

    The neuropeptide/hormone neurotensin (NT) mediates intestinal inflammation and cell proliferation by binding of its high affinity receptor, neurotensin receptor-1 (NTR1). NT stimulates IL-8 expression in NCM460 human colonic epithelial cells by both MAP kinase- and NF-κB-dependent pathways. Although the mechanism of NTR1 endocytosis has been studied, the relationship between NTR1 intracellular trafficking and inflammatory signaling remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we show that in NCM460 cells exposed to NT, β-arrestin-1 (βARR1), and β-arrestin-2 (βARR2) translocate to early endosomes together with NTR1. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) degrades NT in acidic conditions, and its activity is crucial for NTR1 recycling. Pretreatment of NCM460 cells with the ECE-1 inhibitor SM19712 or gene silencing of βARR1 or βARR2 inhibits NT-stimulated ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation, NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation and phosphorylation, and IL-8 secretion. Furthermore, NT-induced cell proliferation, but not IL-8 transcription, is attenuated by the JNK inhibitor, JNK(AII). Thus, NTR1 internalization and recycling in human colonic epithelial cells involves βARRs and ECE-1, respectively. Our results also indicate that βARRs and ECE-1-dependent recycling regulate MAP kinase and NF-κB signaling as well as cell proliferation in human colonocytes in response to NT. PMID:22416137

  16. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 (IRF6) and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1) Contribute to Human Tooth Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Modesto, Adriana; Meira, Raquel; Barbosa, Anna Renata Schneider; Lidral, Andrew C.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-01

    Phenotypic characteristics expressed in syndromes give clues to the factors involved in the cause of isolated forms of the same defects. We investigated two genes responsible for craniofacial syndromes, FGFR1 and IRF6, in a collection of families with isolated tooth agenesis. Cheek swab samples were obtained for DNA analysis from 116 case/parent trios. Probands had at least one developmentally missing tooth, excluding third molars. In addition, we studied 89 cases and 50 controls from Ohio to replicate any positive findings. Genotyping was performed by kinetic polymerase chain-reaction or TaqMan assays. Linkage disequilibrium analysis and transmission distortion of the marker alleles were performed. The same variants in the IRF6 gene that are associated with isolated orofacial clefts are also associated with human tooth agenesis (rs861019, P = 0.058; rs17015215—V274I, P = 0.0006; rs7802, P = 0.004). Mutations in IRF6 cause Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndromes. The craniofacial phenotypic characteristics of these syndromes include oral clefts and preferential tooth agenesis of incisors and premolars, besides pits on the lower lips. Also it appears that preferential premolar agenesis is associated with FGFR1 (P = 0.014) and IRF6 (P = 0.002) markers. There were statistically significant data suggesting that IRF6 interacts not only with MSX1 (P = 0.001), but also with TGFA (P = 0.03). PMID:17318851

  17. Formylated MHC Class Ib Binding Peptides Activate Both Human and Mouse Neutrophils Primarily through Formyl Peptide Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Winther, Malene; Holdfeldt, André; Gabl, Michael; Wang, Ji Ming; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Two different immune recognition systems have evolved in parallel to recognize peptides starting with an N-formylated methionine, and recognition similarities/differences between these two systems have been investigated. A number of peptides earlier characterized in relation to the H2-M3 complex that presents N-formylated peptides to cytotoxic T cells, have been characterized in relation to the formyl peptide receptors expressed by phagocytic neutrophils in both men (FPRs) and mice (Fprs). FPR1/Fpr1 was identified as the preferred receptor for all fMet-containing peptides examined, but there was no direct correlation between H2-M3 binding and the neutrophil activation potencies. Similarly, there was no direct correlation between the activities induced by the different peptides in human and mouse neutrophils, respectively. The formyl group was important in both H2-M3 binding and FPR activation, but FPR2 was the preferred receptor for the non-formylated peptide. The structural requirements differed between the H2-M3 and FPR/Fpr recognition systems and these data suggest that the two recognition systems have different evolutionary traits.

  18. Formylated MHC Class Ib Binding Peptides Activate Both Human and Mouse Neutrophils Primarily through Formyl Peptide Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Malene; Holdfeldt, André; Gabl, Michael; Wang, Ji Ming; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Two different immune recognition systems have evolved in parallel to recognize peptides starting with an N-formylated methionine, and recognition similarities/differences between these two systems have been investigated. A number of peptides earlier characterized in relation to the H2-M3 complex that presents N-formylated peptides to cytotoxic T cells, have been characterized in relation to the formyl peptide receptors expressed by phagocytic neutrophils in both men (FPRs) and mice (Fprs). FPR1/Fpr1 was identified as the preferred receptor for all fMet-containing peptides examined, but there was no direct correlation between H2-M3 binding and the neutrophil activation potencies. Similarly, there was no direct correlation between the activities induced by the different peptides in human and mouse neutrophils, respectively. The formyl group was important in both H2-M3 binding and FPR activation, but FPR2 was the preferred receptor for the non-formylated peptide. The structural requirements differed between the H2-M3 and FPR/Fpr recognition systems and these data suggest that the two recognition systems have different evolutionary traits. PMID:27907124

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) modulates free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1) dependent insulin secretion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Robert; Hieronimus, Anja; Lamprinou, Apostolia; Heni, Martin; Hatziagelaki, Erifili; Ullrich, Susanne; Stefan, Norbert; Staiger, Harald; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation in FFAR1 modulates insulin secretion dependent on non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations. We previously demonstrated lower insulin secretion in minor allele carriers of PPARG Pro12Ala in high-NEFA environment, but the mode of action could not been revealed. We tested if this effect is mediated by FFAR1 in humans. Subjects with increased risk of diabetes who underwent oral glucose tolerance tests were genotyped for 7 tagging SNPs in FFAR1 and PPARG Pro12Ala. The FFAR1 SNPs rs12462800 and rs10422744 demonstrated interactions with PPARG on insulin secretion. FFAR1 rs12462800 (p = 0.0006) and rs10422744 (p = 0.001) were associated with reduced insulin secretion in participants concomitantly carrying the PPARG minor allele and having high fasting FFA. These results suggest that the minor allele of the PPARG SNP exposes its carriers to modulatory effects of FFAR1 on insulin secretion. This subphenotype may define altered responsiveness to FFAR1-agonists, and should be investigated in further studies. PMID:25161890

  20. Cannabis and cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nocerino, E; Amato, M; Izzo, A A

    2000-08-01

    Cannabis and cannabinoids exert many of their biological functions through receptor-mediated mechanisms. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified, namely CB(1) and CB(2), both coupled to a G protein. CB(1) receptors have been detected in the central nervous system (where they are responsible for the characteristic effects of Cannabis, including catalepsy, depression of motor activity, analgesia and feelings of relaxation and well being) and in peripheral neurons (where their activation produces a suppression in neurotransmitter release in the heart, bladder, intestine and vas deferens). Cannabinoid CB(2) receptors have only been detected outside the central nervous system, mostly in cells of the immune system, presumably mediating cannabinoid-induced immunosuppression and antinflammatory effects. With the discovery of cannabinoid receptors for exogenous cannabinoids, also endogenous cannabinoids (anandamide, 2-arachidonylglycerol) have been described.

  1. Identification of C-terminal Phosphorylation Sites of N-Formyl Peptide Receptor-1 (FPR1) in Human Blood Neutrophils*

    PubMed Central

    Maaty, Walid S.; Lord, Connie I.; Gripentrog, Jeannie M.; Riesselman, Marcia; Keren-Aviram, Gal; Liu, Ting; Dratz, Edward A.; Bothner, Brian; Jesaitis, Algirdas J.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation, activation, and control of neutrophils at inflammation sites is partly driven by N-formyl peptide chemoattractant receptors (FPRs). Occupancy of these G-protein-coupled receptors by formyl peptides has been shown to induce regulatory phosphorylation of cytoplasmic serine/threonine amino acid residues in heterologously expressed recombinant receptors, but the biochemistry of these modifications in primary human neutrophils remains relatively unstudied. FPR1 and FPR2 were partially immunopurified using antibodies that recognize both receptors (NFPRa) or unphosphorylated FPR1 (NFPRb) in dodecylmaltoside extracts of unstimulated and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF) + cytochalasin B-stimulated neutrophils or their membrane fractions. After deglycosylation and separation by SDS-PAGE, excised Coomassie Blue-staining bands (∼34,000 Mr) were tryptically digested, and FPR1, phospho-FPR1, and FPR2 content was confirmed by peptide mass spectrometry. C-terminal FPR1 peptides (Leu312–Arg322 and Arg323–Lys350) and extracellular FPR1 peptide (Ile191–Arg201) as well as three similarly placed FPR2 peptides were identified in unstimulated and fMLF + cytochalasin B-stimulated samples. LC/MS/MS identified seven isoforms of Ala323–Lys350 only in the fMLF + cytochalasin B-stimulated sample. These were individually phosphorylated at Thr325, Ser328, Thr329, Thr331, Ser332, Thr334, and Thr339. No phospho-FPR2 peptides were detected. Cytochalasin B treatment of neutrophils decreased the sensitivity of fMLF-dependent NFPRb recognition 2-fold, from EC50 = 33 ± 8 to 74 ± 21 nm. Our results suggest that 1) partial immunopurification, deglycosylation, and SDS-PAGE separation of FPRs is sufficient to identify C-terminal FPR1 Ser/Thr phosphorylations by LC/MS/MS; 2) kinases/phosphatases activated in fMLF/cytochalasin B-stimulated neutrophils produce multiple C-terminal tail FPR1 Ser/Thr phosphorylations but have little effect on corresponding FPR2 sites; and 3) the extent of

  2. Identification of C-terminal phosphorylation sites of N-formyl peptide receptor-1 (FPR1) in human blood neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Maaty, Walid S; Lord, Connie I; Gripentrog, Jeannie M; Riesselman, Marcia; Keren-Aviram, Gal; Liu, Ting; Dratz, Edward A; Bothner, Brian; Jesaitis, Algirdas J

    2013-09-20

    Accumulation, activation, and control of neutrophils at inflammation sites is partly driven by N-formyl peptide chemoattractant receptors (FPRs). Occupancy of these G-protein-coupled receptors by formyl peptides has been shown to induce regulatory phosphorylation of cytoplasmic serine/threonine amino acid residues in heterologously expressed recombinant receptors, but the biochemistry of these modifications in primary human neutrophils remains relatively unstudied. FPR1 and FPR2 were partially immunopurified using antibodies that recognize both receptors (NFPRa) or unphosphorylated FPR1 (NFPRb) in dodecylmaltoside extracts of unstimulated and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF) + cytochalasin B-stimulated neutrophils or their membrane fractions. After deglycosylation and separation by SDS-PAGE, excised Coomassie Blue-staining bands (∼34,000 Mr) were tryptically digested, and FPR1, phospho-FPR1, and FPR2 content was confirmed by peptide mass spectrometry. C-terminal FPR1 peptides (Leu(312)-Arg(322) and Arg(323)-Lys(350)) and extracellular FPR1 peptide (Ile(191)-Arg(201)) as well as three similarly placed FPR2 peptides were identified in unstimulated and fMLF + cytochalasin B-stimulated samples. LC/MS/MS identified seven isoforms of Ala(323)-Lys(350) only in the fMLF + cytochalasin B-stimulated sample. These were individually phosphorylated at Thr(325), Ser(328), Thr(329), Thr(331), Ser(332), Thr(334), and Thr(339). No phospho-FPR2 peptides were detected. Cytochalasin B treatment of neutrophils decreased the sensitivity of fMLF-dependent NFPRb recognition 2-fold, from EC50 = 33 ± 8 to 74 ± 21 nM. Our results suggest that 1) partial immunopurification, deglycosylation, and SDS-PAGE separation of FPRs is sufficient to identify C-terminal FPR1 Ser/Thr phosphorylations by LC/MS/MS; 2) kinases/phosphatases activated in fMLF/cytochalasin B-stimulated neutrophils produce multiple C-terminal tail FPR1 Ser/Thr phosphorylations but have little effect on corresponding FPR2 sites

  3. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid-based drugs.

    PubMed

    Klein, Thomas W; Newton, Catherine A

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoid-based drugs modeled on cannabinoids originally isolated from marijuana are now known to significantly impact the functioning of the endocannabinoid system of mammals. This system operates not only in the brain but also in organs and tissues in the periphery including the immune system. Natural and synthetic cannabinoids are tricyclic terpenes, whereas the endogenous physiological ligands are eicosanoids. Several receptors for these compounds have been extensively described, CB1 and CB2, and are G protein-coupled receptors; however, cannabinoid-based drugs are also demonstrated to function independently of these receptors. Cannabinoids regulate many physiological functions and their impact on immunity is generally antiinflammatory as powerful modulators of the cytokine cascade. This anti-inflammatory potency has led to the testing of these drugs in chronic inflammatory laboratory paradigms and even in some human diseases. Psychoactive and nonpsychoactive cannabinoid-based drugs such as Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, HU-211, and ajulemic acid have been tested and found moderately effective in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, arthritis, and neuropathic pain. Furthermore, although clinical trials are not yet reported, preclinical data with cannabinoid-based drugs suggest efficacy in other inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis.

  4. An analgesia circuit activated by cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Meng, I D; Manning, B H; Martin, W J; Fields, H L

    1998-09-24

    Although many anecdotal reports indicate that marijuana and its active constituent, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), may reduce pain sensation, studies of humans have produced inconsistent results. In animal studies, the apparent pain-suppressing effects of delta-9-THC and other cannabinoid drugs are confounded by motor deficits. Here we show that a brainstem circuit that contributes to the pain-suppressing effects of morphine is also required for the analgesic effects of cannabinoids. Inactivation of the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) prevents the analgesia but not the motor deficits produced by systemically administered cannabinoids. Furthermore, cannabinoids produce analgesia by modulating RVM neuronal activity in a manner similar to, but pharmacologically dissociable from, that of morphine. We also show that endogenous cannabinoids tonically regulate pain thresholds in part through the modulation of RVM neuronal activity. These results show that analgesia produced by cannabinoids and opioids involves similar brainstem circuitry and that cannabinoids are indeed centrally acting analgesics with a new mechanism of action.

  5. Propofol inhibits superoxide production, elastase release, and chemotaxis in formyl peptide-activated human neutrophils by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Chung, Pei-Jen; Ho, Chiu-Ming; Kuo, Chan-Yen; Hung, Min-Fa; Huang, Yin-Ting; Chang, Wen-Yi; Chang, Ya-Wen; Chan, Kwok-Hon; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-06-15

    Neutrophils play a critical role in acute and chronic inflammatory processes, including myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, sepsis, and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Binding of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) by N-formyl peptides can activate neutrophils and may represent a new therapeutic target in either sterile or septic inflammation. Propofol, a widely used i.v. anesthetic, has been shown to modulate immunoinflammatory responses. However, the mechanism of propofol remains to be established. In this study, we showed that propofol significantly reduced superoxide generation, elastase release, and chemotaxis in human neutrophils activated by fMLF. Propofol did not alter superoxide generation or elastase release in a cell-free system. Neither inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid receptors nor an inhibitor of protein kinase A reversed the inhibitory effects of propofol. In addition, propofol showed less inhibitory effects in non-FPR1-induced cell responses. The signaling pathways downstream from FPR1, involving calcium, AKT, and ERK1/2, were also competitively inhibited by propofol. These results show that propofol selectively and competitively inhibits the FPR1-induced human neutrophil activation. Consistent with the hypothesis, propofol inhibited the binding of N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein, a fluorescent analog of fMLF, to FPR1 in human neutrophils, differentiated THP-1 cells, and FPR1-transfected human embryonic kidney-293 cells. To our knowledge, our results identify, for the first time, a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of propofol by competitively blocking FPR1 in human neutrophils. Considering the importance of N-formyl peptides in inflammatory processes, our data indicate that propofol may have therapeutic potential to attenuate neutrophil-mediated inflammatory diseases by blocking FPR1.

  6. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia. PMID:26539529

  7. The effect of soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) and human thyroid antibodies on the course of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis in rats.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, R A; McIntosh, R S; Morgan, B P; Levin, J L; Weetman, A P

    1996-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), induced by immunisation of rats with thyroid extract and complete Freund's adjuvant, has been used as a model to study the effects of complement inhibition mediated by soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) administration during the initial phase of the disease. There was no effect of sCR1 on the severity of thyroiditis at day 28 after immunisation or on the levels of thyroid antibodies, whether sCR1 was given during the first or second week after immunisation. Human IgG containing high levels of thyroid peroxidase antibodies given to rats at the time of immunisation caused significant worsening of thyroiditis severity (P < 0.01 compared to animals receiving normal IgG) but sCR1 again had no effect in this variant of the EAT model. The results indicate that complement does not play a major role in the initial phase of tissue injury in EAT and complement inhibition does not impair the generation of an autoimmune response against the thyroid, although it remains possible that complement activation is important during the chronic phase of disease maintenance in human autoimmune thyroid disease.

  8. Pharmacology of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2004-01-01

    Dronabinol (Delta 9-tetrahydocannabinol, THC), the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the use of cannabis, is an agonist to both the CB1 and the CB2 subtype of cannabinoid receptors. It is available on prescription in several countries. The non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), some analogues of natural cannabinoids and their metabolites, antagonists at the cannabinoid receptors and modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system and many peripheral tissues including spleen, leukocytes; reproductive, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts; endocrine glands, arteries and heart. Five endogenous cannabinoids have been detected so far, of whom anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol are best characterized. There is evidence that besides the two cannabinoid receptor subtypes cloned so far additional cannabinoid receptor subtypes and vanilloid receptors are involved in the complex physiological functions of the cannabinoid system that include motor coordination, memory procession, control of appetite, pain modulation and neuroprotection. Strategies to modulate their activity include inhibition of re-uptake into cells and inhibition of their degradation to increase concentration and duration of action. Properties of cannabinoids that might be of therapeutic use include analgesia, muscle relaxation, immunosuppression, anti-inflammation, anti-allergic effects, sedation, improvement of mood, stimulation of appetite, anti-emesis, lowering of intraocular pressure, bronchodilation, neuroprotection and antineoplastic effects.

  9. Synthetic cannabinoids and potential reproductive consequences.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofei; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2014-02-27

    Increases in emergency room visits due to abuse of designer drugs, popularly known by the street names "K2" and "Spice," are a cause for social, judicial, and clinical concerns. The psychoactive components in these herbal drugs mainly consist of different synthetic cannabinoids, and users of these street drugs are primarily within the age group of 12 to 20years old. The abusive use of synthetic cannabinoids results in anxiety, nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, elevated blood pressure, tremors, seizures, hallucinations, and paranoid behavior, but the effects of maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids during pregnancy are ambiguous due to limited studies in humans and a relative short history of the drugs. In this review, we discuss the known and potential adverse effects of synthetic cannabinoids on human pregnancy using knowledge gathered from studies in mice and limited studies in humans. In mice, multiple sites and stages of pregnancy are potential targets of synthetic cannabinoids, including preimplantation embryo development, oviductal embryo transport, implantation, placentation, and parturition. It is anticipated that maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids would result in severely compromised female fertility and pregnancy outcome.

  10. Synthetic cannabinoids and potential reproductive consequences

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofei; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2013-01-01

    Increases in emergency room visits due to abuse of designer drugs, popularly known by the street names “K2” and “Spice,” are a cause for social, judicial, and clinical concerns. The psychoactive components in these herbal drugs mainly consist of different synthetic cannabinoids, and users of these street drugs are primarily within the age group of 12 to 20 years old. The abusive use of synthetic cannabinoids results in anxiety, nausea, vomiting, tachycardia, elevated blood pressure, tremors, seizures, hallucinations, and paranoid behavior, but the effects of maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids during pregnancy are ambiguous due to limited studies in humans and a relative short history of the drugs. In this review, we discuss the known and potential adverse effects of synthetic cannabinoids on human pregnancy using knowledge gathered from studies in mice and limited studies in humans. In mice, multiple sites and stages of pregnancy are potential targets of synthetic cannabinoids, including preimplantation embryo development, oviductal embryo transport, implantation, placentation, and parturition. It is anticipated that maternal use of synthetic cannabinoids would result in severely compromised female fertility and pregnancy outcome. PMID:23827241

  11. Human fear acquisition deficits in relation to genetic variants of the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 and the serotonin transporter--revisited.

    PubMed

    Heitland, I; Groenink, L; van Gool, J M; Domschke, K; Reif, A; Baas, J M P

    2016-02-01

    We recently showed that a genetic polymorphism (rs878886) in the human corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) is associated with reduced fear-conditioned responses to a threat cue. This is a potentially important finding considering that the failure to acquire fear contingencies can leave an individual in a maladaptive state of more generalized anxiety. Consistent with that idea, the CRHR1-dependent fear acquisition deficit translated into heightened contextual anxiety when taking genetic variability within the serotonin transporter long polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) into account. To replicate our previous findings, we conducted a replication study in 224 healthy medication-free human subjects using the exact same cue and context virtual reality fear-conditioning procedure as in study by Heitland et al. (2013). In the replication study, consistent with the original findings, CRHR1 rs878886 G-allele carriers showed reduced acquisition of cue-specific fear-conditioned responses compared with C/C homozygotes. Also, in this larger sample the cue acquisition deficit of G-allele carriers translated into heightened contextual anxiety, even independent of 5-HTT gene variation. In contrast to our earlier findings, there was an additional interaction effect of CRHR1 rs878886 and the triallelic 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 variant on cued fear acquisition. In summary, this study replicated the initially reported association of the CRHR1 rs878886 G-allele with cued fear acquisition deficits, albeit with a different pattern of results regarding the interaction with 5-HTT variation. This further supports the notion that the human corticotropin-releasing hormone plays a role in the acquisition of fears. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  12. [Drug discrimination properties and cytotoxicity of the cannabinoid receptor ligands].

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2012-06-01

    The worldwide distribution of smokable herbal mixtures called "Spice" that contain synthetic cannabinoids with a pharmacological activity similar to delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) has been reported. The synthetic cannabinoids induce behavior and have biochemical properties similar to naturally occurring cannabinoids such as delta 9-THC. In drug discrimination procedures, animal behavior is differentially reinforced depending on the presence or absence of specific drug stimuli. This review seeks to establish an animal model to serve as a discriminative stimulus of the synthetic cannabinoids, to determine whether this discriminative stimulus is identical to that of delta 9-THC. Much data have been obtained in drug discrimination experiments with various synthetic cannabinoids. In the discriminative study, synthetic cannabinoids such as CP-55,940 and WIN-55,212-2 were substituted for delta 9-THC in rats trained to discriminate delta 9-THC from the vehicle. These discriminative effects of synthetic cannabinoids were antagonized by CB1 antagonist SR-141,716A. The discriminative effects of synthetic cannabinoids may overlap with the delta 9-THC cue mediated by CB1 receptors. In in vitro study using NG 108-15 cell lines, synthetic cannabinoids have produced strong cytotoxicities that were suppressed by pretreatment with the CB1 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, pretreatment with caspase inhibitors suppressed these synthetic-cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicities in NG 108-15 cells. These findings indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards NG 108-15 cells is mediated by the CB1 receptors and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the cytotoxicities induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, synthetic cannabinoid abuse could be a health hazard for humans.

  13. A novel gene silencer, pyrrole-imidazole polyamide targeting human lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 gene improves endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Takahiro; Fukuda, Noboru; Tsunemi, Akiko; Yao, En-Hui; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Tahira, Kazunobu; Matsumoto, Taro; Matsumoto, Koichi; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Sawamura, Tatsuya

    2009-03-01

    Pyrrole-imidazole polyamide can be combined in antiparallel side-by-side dimeric complexes along the minor groove of DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamides are effective inhibitors of transcription factors as well as viral repressors and transactivators. Recently, lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) was reported to be a major factor contributing to the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis. In this study, we designed a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide specific for the LOX-1 gene and evaluated its effect on LOX-1 gene transcription. A pyrrole-imidazole polyamide was designed to target the AP-1 binding site of the LOX-1 gene and synthesized by solid phase methods. This pyrrole-imidazole polyamide significantly inhibited LOX-1 promoter activity in HEK293 cells, determined by the luciferase assay. LOX-1 mRNA expression was also inhibited by the pyrrole-imidazole polyamide at a concentration of 10-9 mol/l in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), determined by the real-time PCR method. HUVEC were treated by pyrrole-imidazole polyamide targeting the LOX-1 gene, and apoptosis was assessed using Hoechst stain, terminal deoxy nucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP end labeling method, and dye-uptake bioassay. Treatment of HUVEC for 72 h with LOX-1 targeted pyrrole-imidazole polyamide decreased apoptosis induced by angiotensin II and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) loading in all assays. This novel therapeutic agent, pyrrole-imidazole polyamide, could specifically inhibit LOX-1 gene expression by reducing the promoter activity of the gene. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamide seems to be a powerful promising new agent that can be used to explore therapies based on inhibition of transcription. Molecular recognition of DNA by small molecules could provide insight into the development of new human medicines.

  14. Human cannabinoid 1 GPCR C-terminal domain interacts with bilayer phospholipids to modulate the structure of its membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Tiburu, Elvis K; Tyukhtenko, Sergiy; Zhou, Han; Janero, David R; Struppe, Jochem; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2011-03-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play critical physiological and therapeutic roles. The human cannabinoid 1 GPCR (hCB1) is a prime pharmacotherapeutic target for addiction and cardiometabolic disease. Our prior biophysical studies on the structural biology of a synthetic peptide representing the functionally significant hCB1 transmembrane helix 7 (TMH7) and its cytoplasmic extension, helix 8 (H8), [hCB1(TMH7/H8)] demonstrated that the helices are oriented virtually perpendicular to each other in membrane-mimetic environments. We identified several hCB1(TMH7/H8) structure-function determinants, including multiple electrostatic amino-acid interactions and a proline kink involving the highly conserved NPXXY motif. In phospholipid bicelles, TMH7 structure, orientation, and topology relative to H8 are dynamically modulated by the surrounding membrane phospholipid bilayer. These data provide a contextual basis for the present solid-state NMR study to investigate whether intermolecular interactions between hCB1(TMH7/H8) and its phospholipid environment may affect membrane-bilayer structure. For this purpose, we measured (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear dipolar couplings for the choline, glycerol, and acyl-chain regions of dimyristoylphosphocholine in a magnetically aligned hCB1(TMH7/H8) bicelle sample. The results identify discrete regional interactions between hCB1(TMH7/H8) and membrane lipid molecules that increase phospholipid motion and decrease phospholipid order, indicating that the peptide's partial traversal of the bilayer alters membrane structure. These data offer new insight into hCB1(TMH7/H8) properties and support the concept that the membrane bilayer itself may serve as a mechanochemical mediator of hCB1/GPCR signal transduction. Since interaction with its membrane environment has been implicated in hCB1 function and its modulation by small-molecule therapeutics, our work should help inform hCB1 pharmacology and the design of hCB1-targeted drugs.

  15. Impact of Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Endocannabinoids in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Caroline; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laviolette, Michel; Flamand, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Since the identification of cannabinoid receptors in the 1990s, a research field has been dedicated to exploring the role of the cannabinoid system in immunity and the inflammatory response in human tissues and animal models. Although the cannabinoid system is present and crucial in many human tissues, studying the impact of cannabinoids on the lungs is particularly relevant because of their contact with exogenous cannabinoids in the context of marijuana consumption. In the past two decades, the scientific community has gathered a large body of evidence supporting that the activation of the cannabinoid system alleviates pain and reduces inflammation. In the context of lung inflammation, exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids have shown therapeutic potential because of their inhibitory effects on immune cell recruitment and functions. On the other hand, cannabinoids were shown to be deleterious to lung function and to impact respiratory pathogen clearance. In this review, we present the existing data on the regulation of lung immunity and inflammation by phytocannabinoids, synthetic cannabinoids and endocannabinoids. PMID:27695418

  16. Dendritic Cell Regulation by Cannabinoid-Based Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Mattias; Chen, Puran; Hammarfjord, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the cannabinoid system was discovered. Studies in experimental models and in humans have produced promising results using cannabinoid-based drugs for the treatment of obesity and cancer, as well as neuroinflammatory and chronic inflammatory diseases. Moreover, as we discuss here, additional studies also indicates that these drugs have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties including modulation of immune cell function. Thus, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies against inflammatory disorders. At least two types of cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid 1 and cannabinoid 2 receptors are expressed on immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC). Dendritic cells are recognized for their critical role in initiating and maintaining immune responses. Therefore, DC are potential targets for cannabinoid-mediated modulation. Here, we review the effects of cannabinoids on DC and provide some perspective concerning the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for the treatment of human diseases involving aberrant inflammatory processes. PMID:27713374

  17. Cannabinoids Activate Monoaminergic Signaling to Modulate Key C. elegans Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Mitchell D; Law, Wen Jing; Clark, Tobias; Bamber, Bruce A; Komuniecki, Richard

    2017-03-15

    Cannabis sativa, or marijuana, a popular recreational drug, alters sensory perception and exerts a range of potential medicinal benefits. The present study demonstrates that the endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA) activate a canonical cannabinoid receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans and also modulate monoaminergic signaling at multiple levels. 2-AG or AEA inhibit nociception and feeding through a pathway requiring the cannabinoid-like receptor NPR-19. 2-AG or AEA activate NPR-19 directly and cannabinoid-dependent inhibition can be rescued in npr-19-null animals by the expression of a human cannabinoid receptor, CB1, highlighting the orthology of the receptors. Cannabinoids also modulate nociception and locomotion through an NPR-19-independent pathway requiring an α2A-adrenergic-like octopamine (OA) receptor, OCTR-1, and a 5-HT1A-like serotonin (5-HT) receptor, SER-4, that involves a complex interaction among cannabinoid, octopaminergic, and serotonergic signaling. 2-AG activates OCTR-1 directly. In contrast, 2-AG does not activate SER-4 directly, but appears to enhance SER-4-dependent serotonergic signaling by increasing endogenous 5-HT. This study defines a conserved cannabinoid signaling system in C. elegans, demonstrates the cannabinoid-dependent activation of monoaminergic signaling, and highlights the advantages of studying cannabinoid signaling in a genetically tractable whole-animal model.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTCannabis sativa, or marijuana, causes euphoria and exerts a wide range of medicinal benefits. For years, cannabinoids have been studied at the cellular level using tissue explants with conflicting results. To better understand cannabinoid signaling, we have used the Caenorhabditis elegans model to examine the effects of cannabinoids on behavior. The present study demonstrates that mammalian cannabinoid receptor ligands activate a conserved cannabinoid signaling system in C. elegans and also

  18. V101L of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) increases receptor affinity and augments the antagonism mediated by cyclosporins

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Caihong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jia; Feng, Yang; Wang, Haonan; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Yani; Ye, Richard D.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation plays a major role in drug response variability. CsA (cyclosporin A), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, is a specific antagonist for FPR1 (formyl peptide receptor 1), which is an important G-protein-coupled chemoattractant receptor in the innate immune system. In order to study the variable responses of cyclosporins to different FPR1 mutants, we investigated the distribution of human FPR1 haplotypes among 209 healthy Han Chinese subjects. The haplotype pattern in Han Chinese were characterized on the basis of five SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including rs5030878 (p.T11I), rs2070745 (p.V101L), rs5030880 (p.R190W), rs1042229 (p.N192K) and rs867228 (p.A346E). Receptor binding affinity of cyclosporins to FPR1 haplotypes was assessed using N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys–FITC in CHO-Gα16 cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding the top 12 FPR1 haplotypes in the Han Chinese. Variants of FPR1 carrying a single amino acid substitution of leucine for valine at position 101 (p.Leu101) displayed significantly higher pKi values for CsA and CsH (cyclosporin H), indicative of an improved receptor affinity. The polymorphism of FPR1 p.Leu101 also enhanced the inhibitory effects of cyclosporins on fMLF (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine)-induced activities, including calcium mobilization, cell chemotaxis and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation. These results point to a possible complication for clinical use of CsA in patients carrying the p.Leu101 allele of FPR1. PMID:23373827

  19. V101L of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) increases receptor affinity and augments the antagonism mediated by cyclosporins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Caihong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jia; Feng, Yang; Wang, Haonan; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Yani; Ye, Richard D; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-04-15

    Genetic variation plays a major role in drug response variability. CsA (cyclosporin A), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, is a specific antagonist for FPR1 (formyl peptide receptor 1), which is an important G-protein-coupled chemoattractant receptor in the innate immune system. In order to study the variable responses of cyclosporins to different FPR1 mutants, we investigated the distribution of human FPR1 haplotypes among 209 healthy Han Chinese subjects. The haplotype pattern in Han Chinese were characterized on the basis of five SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including rs5030878 (p.T11I), rs2070745 (p.V101L), rs5030880 (p.R190W), rs1042229 (p.N192K) and rs867228 (p.A346E). Receptor binding affinity of cyclosporins to FPR1 haplotypes was assessed using N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-FITC in CHO-G(α16) cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding the top 12 FPR1 haplotypes in the Han Chinese. Variants of FPR1 carrying a single amino acid substitution of leucine for valine at position 101 (p.Leu(101)) displayed significantly higher pK(i) values for CsA and CsH (cyclosporin H), indicative of an improved receptor affinity. The polymorphism of FPR1 p.Leu(101) also enhanced the inhibitory effects of cyclosporins on fMLF (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine)-induced activities, including calcium mobilization, cell chemotaxis and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation. These results point to a possible complication for clinical use of CsA in patients carrying the p.Leu(101) allele of FPR1.

  20. Cannabinoids: mechanisms and therapeutic applications in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Drysdale, Alison J; Platt, Bettina

    2003-12-01

    Cannabinoids comprise three classes of compounds, the active components of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), as well as endogenous and synthetic derivatives. To date, two distinct cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) have been discovered, but evidence for further receptor types has been brought forward. The potential use of cannabinoids for medicinal purposes has long been known, but the mechanisms of action of both exogenously applied and endogenous cannabinoids are only partly established. For nervous system disorders, cannabinoids may be useful by modulating neurotransmission and calcium homeostasis as well as by anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant actions. Some cannabinoids can also trigger cell death, which may be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of malignant tumours. A number of both in vitro and in vivo models have provided promising but diverse evidence for cannabinoid protection in glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, hypoxia and glucose deprivation, brain trauma, epilepsy and MS. Subsequent to many preclinical investigations, clinical trials are now underway in a variety of the above applications. Overall, the understanding of the therapeutic relevance of cannabinoids will rely on further investigations into the neuroprotective and neurotoxic potency of cannabinoids in animal models and humans, as much as on a further advancement of our general understanding of the endocannabinoid system and the development of specific compounds devoid of unwanted psychoactive side effects.

  1. Pharmacological characterization of emerging synthetic cannabinoids in HEK293T cells and hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Costain, Willard J; Tauskela, Joseph S; Rasquinha, Ingrid; Comas, Tanya; Hewitt, Melissa; Marleau, Vincent; Soo, Evelyn C

    2016-09-05

    There has been a worldwide proliferation of synthetic cannabinoids that have become marketed as legal alternatives to cannabis (marijuana). Unfortunately, there is a dearth of information about the pharmacological effects of many of these emerging synthetic cannabinoids (ESCs), which presents a challenge for regulatory authorities that need to take such scientific evidence into consideration in order to regulate ECSs as controlled substances. We aimed to characterize the pharmacological properties of ten ESCs using two cell based assays that enabled the determination of potency and efficacy relative to a panel of well-characterized cannabinoids. Agonist-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels was monitored in live HEK293T cells transfected with human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene (CNR1) and pGloSensor-22F. Pharmacological analysis of this data indicated that all of the ESCs tested were full agonists, with the following rank order of potency: Win 55212-2≈5F-PB-22≈AB-PINACA≈EAM-2201≈MAM-2201>JWH-250≈ PB-22>AKB48 N-(5FP)>AKB-48≈STS-135>XLR-11. Assessment of agonist-stimulated depression of Ca(2+) transients was also used to confirm the efficacy of five ESCs (XLR-11, JWH-250, AB-PINACA, 5F-PB-22, and MAM-2201) in cultured primary hippocampal neurons. This work aims to help inform decisions made by regulatory agencies concerned with the profusion of these poorly characterized recreational drugs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry for Characterizing the Metabolism of Synthetic Cannabinoid THJ-018 and Its 5-Fluoro Analog THJ-2201 after Incubation in Human Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing prevalence of novel psychoactive substances, no human metabolism data are currently available, complicating laboratory documentation of intake in urine samples and assessment of the drugs' pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and toxicological properties. In 2014, THJ-018 and THJ-2201, synthetic cannabinoid indazole analogs of JWH-018 and AM-2201, were identified, with the National Forensic Laboratory Information System containing 220 THJ-2201 reports. Because of numerous adverse events, the Drug Enforcement Administration listed THJ-2201 as Schedule I in January 2015. We used high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) (TripleTOF 5600(+)) to identify optimal metabolite markers after incubating 10 μmol/L THJ-018 and THJ-2201 in human hepatocytes for 3 h. Data were acquired via full scan and information-dependent acquisition triggered product ion scans with mass defect filter. In silico metabolite predictions were performed with MetaSite and compared with metabolites identified in human hepatocytes. Thirteen THJ-018 metabolites were detected, with the major metabolic pathways being hydroxylation on the N-pentyl chain and further oxidation or glucuronidation. For THJ-2201, 27 metabolites were observed, predominantly oxidative defluorination plus subsequent carboxylation or glucuronidation, and glucuronidation of hydroxylated metabolites. Dihydrodiol formation on the naphthalene moiety was observed for both compounds. MetaSite prediction matched well with THJ-018 hepatocyte metabolites but underestimated THJ-2201 oxidative defluorination. With HR-MS for data acquisition and processing, we characterized THJ-018 and THJ-2201 metabolism in human hepatocytes and suggest appropriate markers for laboratories to identify THJ-018 and THJ-2201 intake and link observed adverse events to these new synthetic cannabinoids. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  3. The anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 monoclonal antibody D16F7 inhibits invasiveness of human glioblastoma and glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Maria Grazia; Tentori, Lucio; Ruffini, Federica; Ceci, Claudia; Lisi, Lucia; Bonanno, Elena; Scimeca, Manuel; Eskilsson, Eskil; Daubon, Thomas; Miletic, Hrvoje; Ricci Vitiani, Lucia; Pallini, Roberto; Navarra, Pierluigi; Bjerkvig, Rolf; D'Atri, Stefania; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Graziani, Grazia

    2017-08-10

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly migratory, invasive, and angiogenic brain tumor. Like vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), placental growth factor (PlGF) promotes GBM angiogenesis. VEGF-A is a ligand for both VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) and VEGFR-2, while PlGF interacts exclusively with VEGFR-1. We recently generated the novel anti-VEGFR-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) D16F7 that diminishes VEGFR-1 homodimerization/activation without affecting VEGF-A and PlGF binding. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of VEGFR-1 in human GBM tissue samples (n = 42) by immunohistochemistry, in cell lines (n = 6) and GBM stem cells (GSCs) (n = 18) by qRT-PCR and/or western blot analysis. In VEGFR-1 positive GBM or GSCs we also analyzed the ability of D16F7 to inhibit GBM invasiveness in response to VEGF-A and PlGF. Most of GBM specimens stained positively for VEGFR-1 and all but one GBM cell lines expressed VEGFR-1. On the other hand, in GSCs the expression of the receptor was heterogeneous. D16F7 reduced migration and invasion of VEGFR-1 positive GBM cell lines and patient-derived GSCs in response to VEGF-A and PlGF. Interestingly, this effect was also observed in VEGFR-1 positive GSCs transfected to over-express wild-type EGFR (EGFRwt(+)) or mutant EGFR (ligand binding domain-deficient EGFRvIII(+)). Furthermore, D16F7 suppressed intracellular signal transduction in VEGFR-1 over-expressing GBM cells by reducing receptor auto-phosphorylation at tyrosine 1213 and downstream Erk1/2 activation induced by receptor ligands. The results from this study suggest that VEGFR-1 is a relevant target for GBM therapy and that D16F7-derived humanized mAbs warrant further investigation.

  4. 76 FR 71351 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Cannabinoid(s) and Cannabidiol(s) Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... practice the invention embodied in U.S. Patent 6,630,507, entitled ``Cannabinoids as antioxidants and... ``Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants'' to KannaLife Sciences Inc., which has offices in New York... antioxidants and neuroprotectants for use and delivery in humans, for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy...

  5. Modulation of breast cancer cell viability by a cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist, JWH-015, is calcium dependent

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Katherine E; Lozano-Ondoua, Alysia N; Umaretiya, Puja J; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M; Chandramouli, Anupama; Moy, Jamie K; Kwass, William K; Mantyh, Patrick W; Nelson, Mark A; Vanderah, Todd W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cannabinoid compounds, both nonspecific as well as agonists selective for either cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) or cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), have been shown to modulate the tumor microenvironment by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells in several model systems. The mechanism of this modulation remains only partially delineated, and activity induced via the CB1 and CB2 receptors may be distinct despite significant sequence homology and structural similarity of ligands. Methods The CB2-selective agonist JWH-015 was used to investigate mechanisms downstream of CB2 activation in mouse and human breast cancer cell lines in vitro and in a murine mammary tumor model. Results JWH-015 treatment significantly reduced primary tumor burden and metastasis of luciferase-tagged murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 cells in immunocompetent mice in vivo. Furthermore, JWH-015 reduced the viability of murine 4T1 and human MCF7 mammary carcinoma cells in vitro by inducing apoptosis. JWH-015-mediated reduction of breast cancer cell viability was not dependent on Gαi signaling in vitro or modified by classical pharmacological blockade of CB1, GPR55, TRPV1, or TRPA1 receptors. JWH-015 effects were calcium dependent and induced changes in MAPK/ERK signaling. Conclusion The results of this work characterize the actions of a CB2-selective agonist on breast cancer cells in a syngeneic murine model representing how a clinical presentation of cancer progression and metastasis may be significantly modulated by a G-protein-coupled receptor. PMID:27186076

  6. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Jonathan A.; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2013-01-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation. PMID:22150623

  7. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galli, Jonathan A; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K

    2011-12-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation.

  8. Cannabinoid-induced apoptosis in immune cells as a pathway to immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Chauhan, Ashok; Singh, Ugra; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash

    2010-08-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds present in Cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.). They mediate their physiological and behavioral effects by activating specific cannabinoid receptors. With the recent discovery of the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) and the endocannabinoid system, research in this field has expanded exponentially. Cannabinoids have been shown to act as potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agents and have been shown to mediate beneficial effects in a wide range of immune-mediated diseases such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes, septic shock, rheumatoid arthritis, and allergic asthma. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is mainly expressed on the cells of the central nervous system as well as in the periphery. In contrast, cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) is predominantly expressed on immune cells. The precise mechanisms through which cannabinoids mediate immunosuppression is only now beginning to be understood and can be broadly categorized into four pathways: apoptosis, inhibition of proliferation, suppression of cytokine and chemokine production and induction of T regulatory cells (T regs). Studies from our laboratory have focused on mechanisms of apoptosis induction by natural and synthetic cannabinoids through activation of CB2 receptors. In this review, we will focus on apoptotic mechanisms of immunosuppression mediated by cannabinoids on different immune cell populations and discuss how activation of CB2 provides a novel therapeutic modality against inflammatory and autoimmune diseases as well as malignancies of the immune system, without exerting the untoward psychotropic effects.

  9. Distinguishing Intake of New Synthetic Cannabinoids ADB-PINACA and 5F-ADB-PINACA with Human Hepatocyte Metabolites and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Jeremy; Diao, Xingxing; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2017-05-01

    ADB-PINACA and its 5-fluoropentyl analog 5F-ADB-PINACA are among the most potent synthetic cannabinoids tested to date, with several severe intoxication cases. ADB-PINACA and 5F-ADB-PINACA have a different legal status, depending on the country. Synthetic cannabinoid metabolites predominate in urine, making detection of specific metabolites the most reliable way for proving intake in clinical and forensic specimens. However, there are currently no data on ADB-PINACA and 5F-PINACA metabolism. The substitution of a single fluorine atom distinguishes the 2 molecules, which may share common major metabolites. For some legal applications, distinguishing between ADB-PINACA and 5F-PINACA intake is critical. For this reason, we determined the human metabolic fate of the 2 analogs. ADB-PINACA and 5F-PINACA were incubated for 3 h with pooled cryopreserved human hepatocytes, followed by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry analysis. Data were processed with Compound Discoverer. We identified 19 and 12 major ADB-PINACA and 5F-ADB-PINACA metabolites, respectively. Major metabolic reactions included pentyl hydroxylation, hydroxylation followed by oxidation (ketone formation), and glucuronidation of ADB-PINACA, and oxidative defluorination followed by carboxylation of 5F-ADB-PINACA. We recommend ADB-PINACA ketopentyl and hydroxypentyl, and ADB-PINACA 5-hydroxypentyl and pentanoic acid, as optimal markers for ADB-PINACA and 5F-ADB-PINACA intake, respectively. Since the 2 compounds present positional isomers as the primary metabolites, monitoring unique product ions and optimized chromatographic conditions are required for a clear distinction between ADB-PINACA and 5F-ADB-PINACA intake. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  10. Impact of a synthetic cannabinoid (CP-47,497-C8) on protein expression in human cells: evidence for induction of inflammation and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bileck, Andrea; Ferk, Franziska; Al-Serori, Halh; Koller, Verena J; Muqaku, Besnik; Haslberger, Alexander; Auwärter, Volker; Gerner, Christopher; Knasmüller, Siegfried

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are marketed worldwide as legal surrogates for marihuana. In order to predict potential health effects in consumers and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action, we investigated the impact of a representative of the cyclohexylphenols, CP47,497-C8, which binds to both cannabinoid receptors, on protein expression patterns, genomic stability and on induction of inflammatory cytokines in human lymphocytes. After treatment of the cells with the drug, we found pronounced up-regulation of a variety of enzymes in nuclear extracts which are involved in lipid metabolism and inflammatory signaling; some of the identified proteins are also involved in the endogenous synthesis of endocannabinoids. The assumption that the drug causes inflammation is further supported by results obtained in additional experiments with cytosols of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes which showed that the SC induces pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL12p40 and IL-6) as well as TNF-α. Furthermore, the proteome analyses revealed that the drug causes down-regulation of proteins which are involved in DNA repair. This observation provides an explanation for the formation of comets which was seen in single-cell gel electrophoresis assays and for the induction of micronuclei (which reflect structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations) by the drug. These effects were seen in experiments with human lymphocytes which were conducted under identical conditions as the proteome analysis. Taken together, the present findings indicate that the drug (and possibly other structurally related SCs) may cause DNA damage and inflammation in directly exposed cells of consumers.

  11. Severe toxicity following synthetic cannabinoid ingestion.

    PubMed

    Lapoint, J; James, L P; Moran, C L; Nelson, L S; Hoffman, R S; Moran, J H

    2011-10-01

    To report a case of seizures and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) following confirmed synthetic cannabinoid ingestion. Despite widespread use of legal synthetic cannabinoids, reports of serious toxicity following confirmed use of synthetic cannabinoids are rare. We report severe toxicity including seizures following intentional ingestion of the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and detail confirmation by laboratory analysis. A healthy 48 year old man had a generalized seizure within thirty minutes of ingesting an ethanol mixture containing a white powder he purchased from the Internet in an attempt to get high. Seizures recurred and abated with lorazepam. Initial vital signs were: pulse, 106/min; BP, 140/88 mmHg; respirations, 22/min; temperature, 37.7 °C. A noncontrast computed tomography of the brain and EEG were negative, and serum chemistry values were normal. The blood ethanol concentration was 3.8 mg/dL and the CPK 2,649 U/L. Urine drug screening by EMIT was negative for common drugs of abuse, including tetrahydrocannabinol. On hospital day 1, he developed medically refractory SVT. The patient had no further complications and was discharged in his normal state of health 10 days after admission. The original powder was confirmed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to be JWH-018, and a primary JWH-018 metabolite was detected in the patient's urine (200 nM) using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Synthetic cannabinoids are legal in many parts of the world and easily obtained over the Internet. Data on human toxicity are limited and real-time confirmatory testing is unavailable to clinicians. The potential for toxicity exists for users mistakenly associating the dose and side effect profiles of synthetic cannabinoids to those of marijuana. Ingestion of JWH-018 can produce seizures and tachyarrhythmias. Clinicians, lawmakers, and the general public need to be aware of the potential for toxicity associated with synthetic cannabinoid use.

  12. The dietary polyphenols trans-resveratrol and curcumin selectively bind human CB1 cannabinoid receptors with nanomolar affinities and function as antagonists/inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Seely, Kathryn A; Levi, Mark S; Prather, Paul L

    2009-07-01

    The dietary polyphenols trans-resveratrol [5-[(1E)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethenyl]-1,3-benzenediol; found in red wine] and curcumin [1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione] (found in curry powders) exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects via poorly defined mechanisms. It is interesting that cannabinoids, derived from the marijuana plant (Cannabis sativa), produce similar protective effects via CB1 and CB2 receptors. We examined whether trans-resveratrol, curcumin, and ASC-J9 [1,7-bis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-hydroxy-1E,4E,6E-heptatriene-3-one] (a curcumin analog) act as ligands at cannabinoid receptors. All three bind to human (h) CB1 and mouse CB1 receptors with nanomolar affinities, displaying only micromolar affinities for hCB2 receptors. Characteristic of inverse agonists, the polyphenols inhibit basal G-protein activity in membranes prepared from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-hCB1 cells or mouse brain that is reversed by a neutral CB1 antagonist. Furthermore, they competitively antagonize G-protein activation produced by a CB1 agonist. In intact CHO-hCB1 cells, the polyphenols act as neutral antagonists, producing no effect when tested alone, whereas competitively antagonizing CB1 agonist mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. Confirming their neutral antagonist profile in cells, the polyphenols similarly attenuate stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity produced by a CB1 inverse agonist. In mice, the polyphenols dose-dependently reverse acute hypothermia produced by a CB1 agonist. Upon repeated administration, the polyphenols also reduce body weight in mice similar to that produced by a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist. Finally, trans-resveratrol and curcumin share common structural motifs with other known cannabinoid receptor ligands. Collectively, we suggest that trans-resveratrol and curcumin act as antagonists/inverse agonists at CB1 receptors at dietary relevant concentrations. Therefore, these polyphenols and their

  13. Cellular approaches to the interaction between cannabinoid receptor ligands and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Oz, Murat; Al Kury, Lina; Keun-Hang, Susan Yang; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Galadari, Sehamuddin

    2014-05-15

    Cannabinoids are among the earliest known drugs to humanity. Cannabis plant contains various phytochemicals that bind to cannabinoid receptors. In addition, synthetic and endogenously produced cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) constitute other classes of cannabinoid receptor ligands. Although many pharmacological effects of these cannabinoids are mediated by the activation of cannabinoid receptors, recent studies indicate that cannabinoids also modulate the functions of various integral membrane proteins including ion channels, receptors, neurotransmitter transporters, and enzymes by mechanism(s) not involving the activation of known cannabinoid receptors. Currently, the mechanisms of these effects were not fully understood. However, it is likely that direct actions of cannabinoids are closely linked to their lipophilic structures. This report will focus on the actions of cannabinoids on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and will examine the results of recent studies in this field. In addition some mechanistic approaches will be provided. The results discussed in this review indicate that, besides cannabinoid receptors, further molecular targets for cannabinoids exist and that these targets may represent important novel sites to alter neuronal excitability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Strokes are possible complications of cannabinoids use.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Jouanjus, Emilie

    2017-02-23

    cannabinoids, the low frequency of neurovascular complications after their use may be due to a genetic predisposition to their neurovascular toxicity in some individuals. Further studies should focus on this point. More importantly however, this low frequency may be underestimated because the drug consumption may not be systematically researched, neither by questioning nor by laboratory screening. Besides this vascular role of cannabinoids in the occurrence of stroke, a cellular effect of cannabis on brain mitochondria was recently suggested in an experimental study. One of the mechanisms involved in young cannabis users with stroke may be the generation of reactive oxygen species leading to an oxidative stress, which is a known mechanism in stroke in humans. It is useful to inform the young population about the real potential risk of using cannabinoids. We suggest to systematically ask all young adults with stroke about their drug consumption including cannabinoids, to screen urine for cannabis or to include a specific diagnostic test to detect synthetic cannabinoids, and to obtain non-invasive intracranial arterial investigations (i.e. CT-angiography or cerebral MRA) in order to search for cerebral vasoconstriction. However, several questions remained unresolved and further research is still needed to assess the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in young cannabinoids users with stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Cannabinoids and Epilepsy".

  15. Anticancer mechanisms of cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Velasco, G.; Sánchez, C.; Guzmán, M.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the well-known palliative effects of cannabinoids on some cancer-associated symptoms, a large body of evidence shows that these molecules can decrease tumour growth in animal models of cancer. They do so by modulating key cell signalling pathways involved in the control of cancer cell proliferation and survival. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit angiogenesis and decrease metastasis in various tumour types in laboratory animals. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of cannabinoids as antitumour agents, focusing on recent discoveries about their molecular mechanisms of action, including resistance mechanisms and opportunities for their use in combination therapy. Those observations have already contributed to the foundation for the development of the first clinical studies that will analyze the safety and potential clinical benefit of cannabinoids as anticancer agents. PMID:27022311

  16. Cannabinoids and haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzeska, Agnieszka; Grędziński, Tomasz; Kisiel, Wioleta; Chabielska, Ewa

    2016-07-07

    Elements of the endocannabinoid system (cannabinoid receptors CB1, CB2, CBPT and CBED, endocannabinoids, enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of endocannabinoids) are located on the structures involved in the process of hemostasis. An increasing level of endocannabinoids was also observed in some pathological conditions, which may occur in disorders of hemostasis. At the same time, disconcertingly, there is an increased number of reports about incidents of cardiovascular events in smokers of marijuana. Experimental and clinical studies demonstrated multidirectional, often contradictory, effects of cannabinoids on hemostasis, including effects of the compounds on platelets, vascular endothelium, fibrinolysis and plasma coagulation systems. The mechanisms of action of cannabinoids on homeostasis depend on the cannabinoid receptors CB1, CB2, CBPT and CBED, receptors of other systems stimulated by endocannabinoids, as well as metabolites of endocannabinoids and nitrogen oxide. The range of biological functions of endo- and plant cannabinoids, expanded to include the process of hemostasis, may constitute a condition for their recognition as a new factor responsible for thromboembolism in smokers of marijuana, in pathological disorders with increased levels of endocannabinoids and in individuals with polymorphisms of FAAH C385A and A385A. On the other hand, there are compelling reasons for anti‑hemostatic action of cannabinoids.

  17. Cannabinoids, inflammation, and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zurier, Robert B; Burstein, Sumner H

    2016-11-01

    Cannabinoids apparently act on inflammation through mechanisms different from those of agents such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). As a class, the cannabinoids are generally free from the adverse effects associated with NSAIDs. Their clinical development thus provides a new approach to treatment of diseases characterized by acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis. A concise survey of the anti-inflammatory actions of the phytocannabinoids Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol, cannabichromene, and cannabinol is presented. Mention is also made of the noncannabinoid plant components and pyrolysis products, followed by a discussion of 3 synthetic preparations-Cesamet (nabilone; Meda Pharmaceuticals, Somerset, NJ, USA), Marinol (dronabinol; THC; AbbVie, Inc., North Chicago, IL, USA), and Sativex (Cannabis extract; GW Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge United Kingdom)-that have anti-inflammatory effects. A fourth synthetic cannabinoid, ajulemic acid (AJA; CT-3; Resunab; Corbus Pharmaceuticals, Norwood, MA, USA), is discussed in greater detail because it represents the most recent advance in this area and is currently undergoing 3 phase 2 clinical trials by Corbus Pharmaceuticals. The endogenous cannabinoids, including the closely related lipoamino acids, are then discussed. The review concludes with a presentation of a possible mechanism for the anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic actions of these substances. Thus, several cannabinoids may be considered candidates for development as anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic agents. Of special interest is their possible use for treatment of chronic inflammation, a major unmet medical need.-Zurier, R. B., Burstein, S. H. Cannabinoids, inflammation, and fibrosis. © FASEB.

  18. Cardiovascular Pharmacology of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Pacher, P.; Bátkai, S.; Kunos, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids and their synthetic and endogenous analogs affect a broad range of physiological functions, including cardiovascular variables, the most important component of their effect being profound hypotension. The mechanisms of the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids in vivo are complex and may involve modulation of autonomic outflow in both the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as direct effects on the myocardium and vasculature. Although several lines of evidence indicate that the cardiovascular depressive effects of cannabinoids are mediated by peripherally localized CB1 receptors, recent studies provide strong support for the existence of as-yet-undefined endothelial and cardiac receptor(s) that mediate certain endocannabinoid-induced cardiovascular effects. The endogenous cannabinoid system has been recently implicated in the mechanism of hypotension associated with hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and cardiogenic shock, and advanced liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, cannabinoids have been considered as novel antihypertensive agents. A protective role of endocannabinoids in myocardial ischemia has also been documented. In this chapter, we summarize current information on the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids and highlight the importance of these effects in a variety of pathophysiological conditions. PMID:16596789

  19. A cannabinoid link between mitochondria and memory.

    PubMed

    Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne; Desprez, Tifany; Serrat, Román; Bellocchio, Luigi; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Pagano Zottola, Antonio Christian; Delamarre, Anna; Cannich, Astrid; Vincent, Peggy; Varilh, Marjorie; Robin, Laurie M; Terral, Geoffrey; García-Fernández, M Dolores; Colavita, Michelangelo; Mazier, Wilfrid; Drago, Filippo; Puente, Nagore; Reguero, Leire; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Dupuy, Jean-William; Cota, Daniela; Lopez-Rodriguez, Maria-Luz; Barreda-Gómez, Gabriel; Massa, Federico; Grandes, Pedro; Bénard, Giovanni; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-11-24

    Cellular activity in the brain depends on the high energetic support provided by mitochondria, the cell organelles which use energy sources to generate ATP. Acute cannabinoid intoxication induces amnesia in humans and animals, and the activation of type-1 cannabinoid receptors present at brain mitochondria membranes (mtCB1) can directly alter mitochondrial energetic activity. Although the pathological impact of chronic mitochondrial dysfunctions in the brain is well established, the involvement of acute modulation of mitochondrial activity in high brain functions, including learning and memory, is unknown. Here, we show that acute cannabinoid-induced memory impairment in mice requires activation of hippocampal mtCB1 receptors. Genetic exclusion of CB1 receptors from hippocampal mitochondria prevents cannabinoid-induced reduction of mitochondrial mobility, synaptic transmission and memory formation. mtCB1 receptors signal through intra-mitochondrial Gαi protein activation and consequent inhibition of soluble-adenylyl cyclase (sAC). The resulting inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of specific subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport system eventually leads to decreased cellular respiration. Hippocampal inhibition of sAC activity or manipulation of intra-mitochondrial PKA signalling or phosphorylation of the Complex I subunit NDUFS2 inhibit bioenergetic and amnesic effects of cannabinoids. Thus, the G protein-coupled mtCB1 receptors regulate memory processes via modulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. By directly linking mitochondrial activity to memory formation, these data reveal that bioenergetic processes are primary acute regulators of cognitive functions.

  20. Determination of cannabinoids in hemp nut products in Taiwan by HPLC-MS/MS coupled with chemometric analysis: quality evaluation and a pilot human study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Tung, Chun-Wei; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Wu, Yu-Tse; Hsu, Mei-Chich

    2016-09-02

    Hemp nuts are mature cannabis seeds obtained after shelling and that are commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating functional constipation. In this work, we screened hemp nut products, classified them, and verified the legality of consuming them. A total of 18 products were purchased from Taiwan, China, and Canada. Validated high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry methods were developed for analyzing the cannabinoid (i.e., Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabinol) content of the products and the concentration of urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC. Chemometric techniques, namely hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA), were applied for rapidly classifying 11 concentrated powder products in Taiwan. A pilot human study comprising single and multiple administrations of a product with 1.5 µg/g of THC was conducted to examine the urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC concentration. Through optimization of 3(2) full factorial design, using 60% isopropanol as the extraction solvent exhibited the highest yield of cannabinoids and was applied as the optimal condition in further analysis. The results of HCA and PCA on quality evaluation were in good agreement; however, the tested products possessed distinct CBD-to-THC ratios which ranged widely from 0.1:1 to 46.8:1. Particularly, the products with CBD-to-THC ratios higher than 1:1 were the majority in Taiwan. Our data suggested that all the tested hemp nut products met the Taiwan restriction criterion of 10 µg/g of THC. We propose a usual consumption amount of hemp nut products in Taiwan would unlikely to violate the cut-off point of 15 ng/mL of urinary 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. First Metabolic Profile of XLR-11, a Novel Synthetic Cannabinoid, Obtained by Using Human Hepatocytes and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Pang, Shaokun; Zhu, Mingshe; Gandhi, Adarsh S.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Liu, Hua-fen; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Since the mid-2000s synthetic cannabinoids have been abused as recreational drugs, prompting scheduling of these substances in many countries. To circumvent legislation, manufacturers constantly market new compounds; [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (XLR-11), the fluorinated UR-144 analog, is one of the most recent and widely abused drugs, and its use is now linked with acute kidney injury. Our goal was to investigate XLR-11 metabolism for identification of major urinary targets in analytical methods and to clarify the origin of metabolites when one or more parent synthetic cannabinoids can be the source. METHODS We incubated 10 μmol/L XLR-11 with pooled human hepatocytes and sampled after 1 and 3 h. Samples were analyzed by high-resolution mass spectrometry with a TOF scan followed by information-dependent acquisition triggered product ion scans with dynamic background subtraction and mass defect filters. Scans were thoroughly data mined with different data processing algorithms (Metabolite Pilot 1.5). RESULTS XLR-11 underwent phase I and II metabolism, producing more than 25 metabolites resulting from hydroxylation, carboxylation, hemiketal and hemiacetal formation, internal dehydration, and further glucuronidation of some oxidative metabolites. No sulfate or glutathione conjugation was observed. XLR-11 also was defluorinated, forming UR-144 metabolites. On the basis of mass spectrometry peak areas, we determined that the major metabolites were 2′-carboxy-XLR-11, UR-144 pentanoic acid, 5-hydroxy-UR-144, hydroxy-XLR-11 glucuronides, and 2′-carboxy-UR-144 pentanoic acid. Minor metabolites were combinations of the biotransformations mentioned above, often glucuronidated. CONCLUSIONS These are the first data defining major urinary targets of XLR-11 metabolism that could document XLR-11 intake in forensic and clinical investigations. PMID:24014837

  2. Evaluation of the analgesic efficacy and psychoactive effects of AZD1940, a novel peripherally acting cannabinoid agonist, in human capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, Jarkko; Annas, Peter; Huizar, Karin; Clarke, Cyril; Zettergren, Annika; Karlsten, Rolf; Segerdahl, Märta

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of AZD1940, a novel peripherally acting cannabinoid CB(1) /CB(2) receptor agonist, on capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia, as well as on biomarkers of cannabinoid central nervous system (CNS) effects. The present study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-sequence, two-period, cross-over study in 44 male healthy volunteers aged 20-45 years. The effects of two single oral doses of AZD1940 (400 and 800 μg) were compared with placebo. Pain intensity after intradermal capsaicin injections in the forearm was assessed on a continuous visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-100 mm). Primary and secondary hyperalgesia induced by application of capsaicin cream on the calf were assessed by measuring heat pain thresholds and the area of mechanical allodynia, respectively. The CNS effects were assessed at baseline and up to 24 h after dosing using a visual analogue mood scales (VAMS) for feeling 'stimulated', 'high', 'anxious', 'sedated' or 'down'. AZD1940 did not significantly attenuate ongoing pain or primary or secondary hyperalgesia compared with placebo. Mild CNS effects for AZD1940were observed on the VAMS for 'high' and 'sedated'. Dose-dependent mild-to-moderate CNS-related and gastrointestinal adverse events were reported following treatment with AZD1940. No evidence of analgesic efficacy was found for a peripherally acting CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist in the human capsaicin pain model. The emergence of mild dose-dependent CNS effects suggests that the dose range predicted from preclinical data had been attained.

  3. Cannabinoids and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Katchan, Valeria; David, Paula; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-06-01

    Cannabinoids have shown to have a variety effects on body systems. Through CB1 and CB2 receptors, amongst other, they exert an effect by modulating neurotransmitter and cytokine release. Current research in the role of cannabinoids in the immune system shows that they possess immunosuppressive properties. They can inhibit proliferation of leucocytes, induce apoptosis of T cells and macrophages and reduce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In mice models, they are effective in reducing inflammation in arthritis, multiple sclerosis, have a positive effect on neuropathic pain and in type 1 diabetes mellitus. They are effective as treatment for fibromyalgia and have shown to have anti-fibrotic effect in scleroderma. Studies in human models are scarce and not conclusive and more research is required in this field. Cannabinoids can be therefore promising immunosuppressive and anti-fibrotic agents in the therapy of autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The effects of cannabinoids on the brain.

    PubMed

    Ameri, A

    1999-07-01

    Cannabinoids have a long history of consumption for recreational and medical reasons. The primary active constituent of the hemp plant Cannabis sativa is delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC). In humans, psychoactive cannabinoids produce euphoria, enhancement of sensory perception, tachycardia, antinociception, difficulties in concentration and impairment of memory. The cognitive deficiencies seem to persist after withdrawal. The toxicity of marijuana has been underestimated for a long time, since recent findings revealed delta9-THC-induced cell death with shrinkage of neurons and DNA fragmentation in the hippocampus. The acute effects of cannabinoids as well as the development of tolerance are mediated by G protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors. The CB1 receptor and its splice variant CB1A, are found predominantly in the brain with highest densities in the hippocampus, cerebellum and striatum. The CB2 receptor is found predominantly in the spleen and in haemopoietic cells and has only 44% overall nucleotide sequence identity with the CB1 receptor. The existence of this receptor provided the molecular basis for the immunosuppressive actions of marijuana. The CB1 receptor mediates inhibition of adenylate cyclase, inhibition of N- and P/Q-type calcium channels, stimulation of potassium channels, and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. The CB2 receptor mediates inhibition of adenylate cyclase and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. The discovery of endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligands, anandamide (N-arachidonylethanolamine) and 2-arachidonylglycerol made the notion of a central cannabinoid neuromodulatory system plausible. Anandamide is released from neurons upon depolarization through a mechanism that requires calcium-dependent cleavage from a phospholipid precursor in neuronal membranes. The release of anandamide is followed by rapid uptake into the plasma and hydrolysis by fatty-acid amidohydrolase. The psychoactive cannabinoids

  5. Expression of the Endocannabinoid Receptors in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; Caro, R. De; Stecco, C.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1) and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2) in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies) and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:27349320

  6. Irciniastatin A induces potent and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and thereby promotes ectodomain shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in human lung carcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Quach, Hue Tu; Hirano, Seiya; Fukuhara, Sayuri; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Kanoh, Naoki; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Usui, Takeo; Kataoka, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Irciniastatin A is a pederin-type marine product that potently inhibits translation. We have recently shown that irciniastatin A induces ectodomain shedding of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 with slower kinetics than other translation inhibitors. In human lung carcinoma A549 cells, irciniastatin A induced a marked and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and induced little activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Moreover, the TNF receptor 1 shedding induced by irciniastatin A was blocked by the MAP kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor U0126, but not by the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB203580 or the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Thus unlike other translation inhibitors that trigger ribotoxic stress response, our results show that irciniastatin A is a unique translation inhibitor that induces a potent and sustained activation of the ERK pathway, and thereby promotes the ectodomain shedding of TNF receptor 1 in A549 cells.

  7. Cannabinoid acids analysis.

    PubMed

    Lercker, G; Bocci, F; Frega, N; Bortolomeazzi, R

    1992-03-01

    The cannabinoid pattern of vegetable preparations from Cannabis sativa (hashish, marijuana) allows to recognize the phenotype of the plants, to be used as drug or for fiber. Cannabinoid determination by analytical point of view has represented some problems caused by the complex composition of the hexane extract. Capillary gas chromatography of the hexane extracts of vegetable samples, shows the presence of rather polar constituents that eluted, with noticeable interactions, only on polar phase. The compounds can be methylated by diazomethane and silanized (TMS) by silylating reagents. The methyl and methyl-TMS derivatives are analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The identification of the compounds shows their nature of cannabinoid acids, which the main by quantitative point of view results the cannabidiolic acid (CBDA). It is known that the cannabinoid acids are thermally unstable and are transformed in the corresponding cannabinoids by decarboxilation. This is of interest in forensic analysis with the aim to establish the total amount of THC in the Cannabis preparations, as the active component.

  8. Cannabinoids and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fabrício A; Wotjak, Carsten T

    2010-01-01

    The term cannabinoids encompasses compounds produced by the plant Cannabis sativa, such as delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and synthetic counterparts. Their actions occur mainly through activation of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors. Arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) serve as major endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids) of CB1 receptors. Hence, the cannabinoid receptors, the endocannabinoids, and their metabolizing enzymes comprise the endocannabinoid system. Cannabinoids induce diverse responses on anxiety- and fear-related behaviors. Generally, low doses tend to induce anxiolytic-like effects, whereas high doses often cause the opposite. Inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation seems to circumvent these biphasic effects by enhancing CB1 receptor signaling in a temporarily and spatially restricted manner, thus reducing anxiety-like behaviors. Pharmacological blockade or genetic deletion of CB1 receptors, in turn, primarily exerts anxiogenic-like effects and impairments in extinction of aversive memories. Interestingly, pharmacological blockade of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) channel, which can be activated by anandamide as well, has diametrically opposite consequences. This book chapter summarizes and conceptualizes our current knowledge about the role of (endo)cannabinoids in fear and anxiety and outlines implications for an exploitation of the endocannabinoid system as a target for new anxiolytic drugs.

  9. Qualitative Confirmation of 9 Synthetic Cannabinoids and 20 Metabolites in Human Urine Using LC–MS/MS and Library Search

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Hua-fen; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Synthetic cannabinoids are an emerging illicit drug class. The variety of available substances is large and ever-changing, making it difficult for laboratories to remain current. We present a qualitative LC–MS/MS method identifying urinary metabolites of JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-200, JWH-210, JWH-250, RCS-4, and AM2201 and the parent compounds JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-210, JWH-250, RCS-4, AM2201, and MAM2201. Methods After enzymatic hydrolysis, urinary proteins were precipitated with acetonitrile. Chromatography utilized a 10 min gradient on a Kinetex XB-C18 column with 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile. Scheduled multiple reaction monitoring “survey scans” were followed by information-dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion scan experiments on an ABSciex 5500 QTRAP mass spectrometer. Analytes were identified by software-assisted library searching against reference spectra. Results The method was fully validated, including proof of selectivity (no exogenous or endogenous interferences were observed), assessment of matrix effects (95–122%) and recovery (53–95%), determination of limits of detection (0.5–10 ng/mL), carry-over studies (thresholds between 100 and 1000 ng/mL), and determination of autosampler stability (samples were stable for at least 3 days). Hydrolysis efficiency was thoroughly investigated for a wide range of glucuronides and for the reference standard, JWH-018 5-hydroxypentyl glucuronide PMID:23458260

  10. Qualitative confirmation of 9 synthetic cannabinoids and 20 metabolites in human urine using LC-MS/MS and library search.

    PubMed

    Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Chen, Xiaohong; Liu, Hua-fen; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-04-02

    Synthetic cannabinoids are an emerging illicit drug class. The variety of available substances is large and ever-changing, making it difficult for laboratories to remain current. We present a qualitative LC-MS/MS method identifying urinary metabolites of JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-200, JWH-210, JWH-250, RCS-4, and AM2201 and the parent compounds JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-210, JWH-250, RCS-4, AM2201, and MAM2201. After enzymatic hydrolysis, urinary proteins were precipitated with acetonitrile. Chromatography utilized a 10 min gradient on a Kinetex XB-C18 column with 0.1% formic acid in water and acetonitrile. Scheduled multiple reaction monitoring "survey scans" were followed by information-dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion scan experiments on an ABSciex 5500 QTRAP mass spectrometer. Analytes were identified by software-assisted library searching against reference spectra. The method was fully validated, including proof of selectivity (no exogenous or endogenous interferences were observed), assessment of matrix effects (95-122%) and recovery (53-95%), determination of limits of detection (0.5-10 ng/mL), carry-over studies (thresholds between 100 and 1000 ng/mL), and determination of autosampler stability (samples were stable for at least 3 days). Hydrolysis efficiency was thoroughly investigated for a wide range of glucuronides and for the reference standard, JWH-018 5-hydroxypentyl glucuronide.

  11. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 regulates STAT3 activity and its expression dictates the responsiveness to SR141716 treatment in human glioma patients' cells.

    PubMed

    Ciaglia, Elena; Torelli, Giovanni; Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; D'Alessandro, Alba; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Fiore, Donatella; Pagano Zottola, Antonio Christian; Proto, Maria Chiara; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2015-06-20

    Herein we show that a majority of human brain tumor samples and cell lines over-expressed cannabinoid receptor CB1 as compared to normal human astrocytes (NHA), while uniformly expressed low levels of CB2. This finding prompted us to investigate the therapeutic exploitation of CB1 inactivation by SR141716 treatment, with regard to its direct and indirect cell-mediated effects against gliomas. Functional studies, using U251MG glioma cells and primary tumor cell lines derived from glioma patients expressing different levels of CB1, highlighted SR141716 efficacy in inducing apoptosis via G1 phase stasis and block of TGF-β1 secretion through a mechanism that involves STAT3 inhibition. According to the multivariate role of STAT3 in the immune escape too, interestingly SR141716 lead also to the functional and selective expression of MICA/B on the surface of responsive malignant glioma cells, but not on NHA. This makes SR141716 treated-glioma cells potent targets for allogeneic NK cell-mediated recognition through a NKG2D restricted mechanism, thus priming them for NK cell antitumor reactivity. These results indicate that CB1 and STAT3 participate in a new oncogenic network in the complex biology of glioma and their expression levels in patients dictate the efficacy of the CB1 antagonist SR141716 in multimodal glioma destruction.

  12. Molecular imaging of human tumor cells that naturally overexpress type 2 cannabinoid receptors using a quinolone-based near-infrared fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Shao, Pin; Zhang, Shaojuan; Ling, Xiaoxi; Bai, Mingfeng

    2014-07-01

    Cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2R) hold promise as therapeutic targets for treating diverse diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders, addiction, and immune disorders. However, the fundamental role of CBR in the regulation of diseases remains unclear, largely due to a lack of reliable imaging tools for the receptors. The goal of this study was to develop a CBR-targeted molecular imaging probe and evaluate the specificity of the probe using human tumor cells that naturally overexpress CBR. To synthesize the CBR-targeted probe (NIR760-Q), a conjugable CBR ligand based on the quinolone structure was first prepared, followed by bioconjugation with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, NIR760. In vitro fluorescence imaging and competitive binding studies showed higher uptake of NIR760-Q than free NIR760 dye in Jurkat human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In addition, the high uptake of NIR760-Q was significantly inhibited by the blocking agent, 4-quinolone-3-carboxamide, indicating specific binding of NIR760-Q to the target receptors. These results indicate that the NIR760-Q has potential in diagnostic imaging of CBR positive cancers and elucidating the role of CBR in the regulation of disease progression.

  13. Molecular imaging of human tumor cells that naturally overexpress type 2 cannabinoid receptors using a quinolone-based near-infrared fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Shao, Pin; Zhang, Shaojuan; Ling, Xiaoxi; Bai, Mingfeng

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2R) hold promise as therapeutic targets for treating diverse diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders, addiction, and immune disorders. However, the fundamental role of CB2R in the regulation of diseases remains unclear, largely due to a lack of reliable imaging tools for the receptors. The goal of this study was to develop a CB2R-targeted molecular imaging probe and evaluate the specificity of the probe using human tumor cells that naturally overexpress CB2R. To synthesize the CB2R-targeted probe (NIR760-Q), a conjugable CB2R ligand based on the quinolone structure was first prepared, followed by bioconjugation with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, NIR760. In vitro fluorescence imaging and competitive binding studies showed higher uptake of NIR760-Q than free NIR760 dye in Jurkat human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In addition, the high uptake of NIR760-Q was significantly inhibited by the blocking agent, 4-quinolone-3-carboxamide, indicating specific binding of NIR760-Q to the target receptors. These results indicate that the NIR760-Q has potential in diagnostic imaging of CB2R positive cancers and elucidating the role of CB2R in the regulation of disease progression.

  14. Cannabinoids and Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Evan C; Tsien, Richard W; Whalley, Benjamin J; Devinsky, Orrin

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has been used for centuries to treat seizures. Recent anecdotal reports, accumulating animal model data, and mechanistic insights have raised interest in cannabis-based antiepileptic therapies. In this study, we review current understanding of the endocannabinoid system, characterize the pro- and anticonvulsive effects of cannabinoids [e.g., Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol (CBD)], and highlight scientific evidence from pre-clinical and clinical trials of cannabinoids in epilepsy. These studies suggest that CBD avoids the psychoactive effects of the endocannabinoid system to provide a well-tolerated, promising therapeutic for the treatment of seizures, while whole-plant cannabis can both contribute to and reduce seizures. Finally, we discuss results from a new multicenter, open-label study using CBD in a population with treatment-resistant epilepsy. In all, we seek to evaluate our current understanding of cannabinoids in epilepsy and guide future basic science and clinical studies.

  15. Synthetic cannabinoids revealing adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Avi; Benninger, Felix; Djaldetti, Ruth

    2016-02-01

    We report a 41-year-old man who presented with a first generalized tonic-clonic seizure after recent consumption of a synthetic cannabinoid. MRI showed extensive bilateral, mainly frontal, white matter lesions. Blood analysis for very long chain fatty acids was compatible with adrenoleukodystrophy, and a missense mutation in the ABCD1 gene confirmed the diagnosis. We hypothesize that cannabinoid use might have contributed to metabolic decompensation with subacute worsening of the underlying condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The inverse agonist effect of rimonabant on G protein activation is not mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor: evidence from postmortem human brain.

    PubMed

    Erdozain, A M; Diez-Alarcia, R; Meana, J J; Callado, L F

    2012-01-15

    Rimonabant (SR141716) was the first potent and selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist synthesized. Several data support that rimonabant behaves as an inverse agonist. Moreover, there is evidence suggesting that this inverse agonism may be CB1 receptor-independent. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the effect of rimonabant over G protein activation in postmortem human brain is CB1 dependent or independent. [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays and antibody-capture [(35)S]GTPγS scintillation proximity assays (SPA) were performed in human and mice brain. [(3)H]SR141716 binding characteristics were also studied. Rimonabant concentration-dependently decreased basal [(35)S]GTPγS binding to human cortical membranes. This effect did not change in the presence of either the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2, the CB1 receptor neutral antagonist O-2050, or the CB1 allosteric modulator Org 27569. [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays performed in CB1 knockout mice brains revealed that rimonabant inhibited the [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the same manner as it did in wild-type mice. The SPA combined with the use of specific antibody-capture of G(α) specific subunits showed that rimonabant produces its inverse agonist effect through G(i3), G(o) and G(z) subtypes. This effect was not inhibited by the CB1 receptor antagonist O-2050. Finally, [(3)H]SR141716 binding assays in human cortical membranes demonstrated that rimonabant recognizes an additional binding site other than the CB1 receptor orthosteric binding site recognized by O-2050. This study provides new data demonstrating that at least the inverse agonist effect observed with >1μM concentrations of rimonabant in [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays is not mediated by the CB1 receptor in human brain.

  17. Overactive cannabinoid 1 receptor in podocytes drives type 2 diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jourdan, Tony; Szanda, Gergő; Rosenberg, Avi Z; Tam, Joseph; Earley, Brian James; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Cinar, Resat; Liu, Ziyi; Liu, Jie; Ju, Cynthia; Pacher, Pál; Kunos, George

    2014-12-16

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of end-stage kidney disease, and overactivity of the endocannabinoid/cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) system contributes to diabetes and its complications. Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats develop type 2 diabetic nephropathy with albuminuria, reduced glomerular filtration, activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), oxidative/nitrative stress, podocyte loss, and increased CB1R expression in glomeruli. Peripheral CB1R blockade initiated in the prediabetic stage prevented these changes or reversed them when animals with fully developed diabetic nephropathy were treated. Treatment of diabetic ZDF rats with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor-1 (Agtr1) antagonist, attenuated the development of nephropathy and down-regulated renal cortical CB1R expression, without affecting the marked hyperglycemia. In cultured human podocytes, CB1R and desmin gene expression were increased and podocin and nephrin content were decreased by either the CB1R agonist arachydonoyl-2'-chloroethylamide, angiotensin II, or high glucose, and the effects of all three were antagonized by CB1R blockade or siRNA-mediated knockdown of CNR1 (the cannabinoid type 1 receptor gene). We conclude that increased CB1R signaling in podocytes contributes to the development of diabetic nephropathy and represents a common pathway through which both hyperglycemia and increased RAS activity exert their deleterious effects, highlighting the therapeutic potential of peripheral CB1R blockade.

  18. Identification of cannabinoid type 1 receptor in dog hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Mercati, Francesca; Dall'Aglio, Cecilia; Pascucci, Luisa; Boiti, Cristiano; Ceccarelli, Piero

    2012-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there is an increasing interest in the study of the endo-cannabinoid system and the possible use of the cannabinoids for the treatment of several diseases. Cannabinoid receptors (CB) are widely distributed in human and laboratory animal tissues, justifying the involvement of the endo-cannabinoid system in a great number of metabolic ways. Since there are no data regarding cannabinoid receptors in hair follicles of domestic animals, we investigated the presence and localization of CB1 receptor in dog hair follicles. By using a goat anti-CB1 polyclonal antibody, we observed CB1 receptor in the proximal part of both primary and secondary hair follicles. Staining was localized in the inner root sheath cells. We suppose that the endo-cannabinoid system is involved in the molecular mechanisms regulating hair follicle activity in dog. The identification of CB1 receptor at the level of the inner root sheath may help in the understanding of hair follicle biology and the possibility that cannabinoid molecules could be considered as suitable therapeutic tools in dog.

  19. Strategies to distinguish new synthetic cannabinoid FUBIMINA (BIM-2201) intake from its isomer THJ-2201: metabolism of FUBIMINA in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Diao, Xingxing; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Huestis, Marilyn A

    Since 2013, a new drugs-of-abuse trend attempts to bypass drug legislation by marketing isomers of scheduled synthetic cannabinoids (SCs), e.g., FUBIMINA (BIM-2201) and THJ-2201. It is much more challenging to confirm a specific isomer's intake and distinguish it from its structural analog because the isomers and their major metabolites usually have identical molecular weights and display the same product ions. Here, we investigated isomers FUBIMINA and THJ-2201 and propose strategies to distinguish their consumption. THJ-2201 was scheduled in the US, Japan, and Europe; however, FUBIMINA is easily available on the Internet. We previously investigated THJ-2201 metabolism in human hepatocytes, but human FUBIMINA metabolism is unknown. We aim to characterize FUBIMINA metabolism in human hepatocytes, recommend optimal metabolites to confirm its consumption, and propose strategies to distinguish between intakes of FUBIMINA and THJ-2201. FUBIMINA (10 μM) was incubated in human hepatocytes for 3 h, and metabolites were characterized with high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). We identified 35 metabolites generated by oxidative defluorination, further carboxylation, hydroxylation, dihydrodiol formation, glucuronidation, and their combinations. We recommend 5'-OH-BIM-018 (M34), BIM-018 pentanoic acid (M33), and BIM-018 pentanoic acid dihydrodiol (M7) as FUBIMINA specific metabolites. THJ-2201 produced specific metabolite markers 5'-OH-THJ-018 (F26), THJ-018 pentanoic acid (F25), and hydroxylated THJ-2201 (F13). Optimized chromatographic conditions to achieve different retention times and careful selection of specific product ion spectra enabled differentiation of isomeric metabolites, in this case FUBIMINA from THJ-2201. Our HR-MS approach should be applicable for differentiating future isomeric SCs, which is especially important when different isomers have different legal status.

  20. Variation in the human lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1) gene is associated with plasma soluble LOX-1 levels.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, Tina E; Kume, Noriaki; Mitsuoka, Hirokazu; Brown, Michael D; Phares, Dana A; Ferrell, Robert E; Kita, Toru; Hagberg, James M

    2008-09-01

    The lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1) expressed on vascular cells plays a major role in atherogenesis by internalizing and degrading oxidized low-density lipoprotein. LOX-1 can be cleaved from the cell surface and released as soluble LOX-1 (sLOX-1), and elevated sLOX-1 levels may be indicative of atherosclerotic plaque instability. We examined associations between the LOX-1 gene 3'UTR-C/T and G501C polymorphisms and plasma sLOX-1 levels in 97 healthy older men and women. The frequencies for the 3'UTR-T and 501C alleles were 46 and 10%, respectively. Plasma sLOX-1 levels were significantly higher in the 3'UTR CC genotype group compared with both the CT (P=0.02) and TT genotype groups (P=0.002). Plasma sLOX-1 levels were also significantly higher in the 501GC genotype group compared with the GG genotype group (P=0.004). In univariate analyses, sLOX-1 levels were significantly associated with both the 3'UTR-C/T and G501C polymorphisms. These associations remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, race and body mass index. In conclusion, variation in the LOX-1 gene is associated with plasma sLOX-1 levels in older men and women.

  1. C1q-Mediated Repression of Human Monocytes Is Regulated by Leukocyte-Associated Ig-Like Receptor 1 (LAIR-1)

    PubMed Central

    Son, Myoungsun; Diamond, Betty

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by abnormal function of both the innate and the adaptive immune system, leading to a loss of tolerance to self-antigens. Monocytes are a key component of the innate immune system and are efficient producers of multiple cytokines. In SLE, inappropriate activation of monocytes is thought to contribute to the loss of self-tolerance. In this study, we demonstrate that type 1 interferon (IFN) production by CpG-challenged monocytes can be suppressed by C1q through activating leukocyte-associated Ig-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1), which contains immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs). The phosphorylation of LAIR-1 and the interaction of LAIR-1 with SH2 domain–containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) were enhanced after LAIR-1 engagement by C1q. Moreover, engagement of LAIR-1 by C1q inhibited nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 and IRF5 in CpG-stimulated monocytes. These data suggest a model in which LAIR-1 engagement by C1q helps maintain monocyte tolerance, specifically with respect to Toll-like receptor-9–mediated monocyte activation. PMID:25247291

  2. Identification of small molecule agonists of human relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) by utilizing a homogenous cell-based cAMP assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Catherine Z.; Southall, Noel; Xiao, Jingbo; Marugan, Juan J.; Ferrer, Marc; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E.; Feng, Shu; Agoulnik, Irina U.

    2016-01-01

    The relaxin hormone is involved in a variety of biological functions including female reproduction and parturition, regulation of cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, and hepatic functions. It regulates extracellular matrix remodeling, cell invasiveness, proliferation, differentiation, and overall tissue homeostasis. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) RXFP1, relaxin family receptor 1, is a cognate relaxin receptor that mainly signals through cyclic AMP second messenger. While agonists of the receptor could have a wide range of pharmacological utility, up to date, there are no reported small molecule agonists for relaxin receptors. Here, we report the development of quantitative high-throughput platform for RXFP1 agonist screen based on homogenous cell-based HTRF cAMP assay technology. Two small molecules of similar structure were independently identified from a screen of more than 365,677 compounds. Neither compound showed activity in a counter screen with HEK293T cells transfected with an unrelated GPCR vasopressin 1b receptor. These small molecule agonists also demonstrated selectivity against the RXFP2 receptor, providing a basis for future medicinal chemistry optimization of selective relaxin receptor agonists. PMID:23212924

  3. Imaging the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in humans with [11C]OMAR: assessment of kinetic analysis methods, test-retest reproducibility, and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Normandin, Marc D; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Mason, N Scott; Lin, Shu-Fei; Ropchan, Jim; Labaree, David; Henry, Shannan; Williams, Wendol A; Carson, Richard E; Neumeister, Alexander; Huang, Yiyun

    2015-08-01

    The Radiotracer [(11)C]OMAR was developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1R). The objectives of the present study were to evaluate kinetic analysis methods, determine test-retest reliability, and assess gender differences in receptor availability. Dynamic PET data were acquired in 10 human subjects, and analyzed with one-tissue (1T) and two-tissue (2T) compartment models and by the Logan and multilinear analysis (MA1) methods to estimate regional volume of distribution (VT). The 2T model inclusive of a vascular component (2TV) and MA1 were the preferred techniques. Test-retest reliability of VT was good (mean absolute deviation ~9%; intraclass correlation coefficient ~0.7). Tracer parent fraction in plasma was lower in women (P<0.0001). Cerebral uptake normalized by body weight and injected dose was higher in men by 17% (P<0.0001), but VT was significantly greater in women by 23% (P<0.0001). These findings show that [(11)C]OMAR binding can be reliably quantified by the 2T model or MA1 method and demonstrate the utility of this tracer for in vivo imaging of CB1R. In addition, results from the present study indicate that gender difference in receptor binding should be taken into consideration when [(11)C]OMAR is used to quantify CB1R availability in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Simultaneous quantification of major cannabinoids and metabolites in human urine and plasma by HPLC-MS/MS and enzyme-alkaline hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; Zarandona, Iratxe; Ortiz, Laura; Navarro, Patricia; Etxebarria, Nestor; Usobiaga, Aresatz

    2017-04-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous quantification of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its two metabolites 11-hydroxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), and four additional cannabinoids (cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), and cannabinol (CBN)) in 1 mL of human urine and plasma was developed and validated. The hydrolysis process was studied to ensure complete hydrolysis of glucuronide conjugates and the extraction of a total amount of analytes. Initially, urine and plasma blank samples were spiked with THC-COOH-glucuronide and THC-glucuronide, and four different pretreatment methods were compared: hydrolysis-free method, enzymatic hydrolysis with Escherichia Coli β-glucuronidase, alkaline hydrolysis with 10 M NaOH, and enzyme-alkaline tandem hydrolysis. The last approach assured the maximum efficiencies (close to 100%) for both urine and plasma matrices. Regarding the figures of merit, the limits of detection were below 1 ng/mL for all analytes, the accuracy ranged from 84% to 115%, and both within-day and between-day precision were lower than 12%. Finally, the method was successfully applied to real urine and plasma samples from cannabis users. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Allyn C

    2002-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptors were named because they have affinity for the agonist delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), a ligand found in organic extracts from Cannabis sativa. The two types of cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. are G protein coupled receptors that are coupled through the Gi/o family of proteins to signal transduction mechanisms that include inhibition of adenylyl cyclase, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase, regulation of calcium and potassium channels (CB1 only), and other signal transduction pathways. A class of the eicosanoid ligands are relevant to lipid-mediated cellular signaling because they serve as endogenous agonists for cannabinoid receptors, and are thus referred to as endocannabinoids. Those compounds identified to date include the eicosanoids arachidonoylethanolamide (anandamide), 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 2-arachidonylglyceryl ether (noladin ether). Several excellent reviews on endocannabinoids and their synthesis, metabolism and function have appeared in recent years. This paper will describe the biological activities, pharmacology, and signal transduction mechanisms for the cannabinoid receptors, with particular emphasis on the responses to the eicosanoid ligands.

  6. Cannabinoid Receptors Are Overexpressed in CLL but of Limited Potential for Therapeutic Exploitation

    PubMed Central

    Le, Trang; Gruber, Michaela; Pausz, Clemens; Staber, Philipp; Jäger, Ulrich; Vanura, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CNR1&2) are overexpressed in a variety of malignant diseases and cannabinoids can have noteworthy impact on tumor cell viability and tumor growth. Patients diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) present with very heterogeneous disease characteristics translating into highly differential risk properties. To meet the urgent need for refinement in risk stratification at diagnosis and the search for novel therapies we studied CNR expression and response to cannabinoid treatment in CLL. Expression levels of CNR1&2 were determined in 107 CLL patients by real-time PCR and analyzed with regard to prognostic markers and survival. Cell viability of primary CLL cells was determined in suspension and co-culture after incubation in increasing cannabinoid concentrations under normal and reduced serum conditions and in combination with fludarabine. Impact of cannabinoids on migration of CLL cells towards CXCL12 was determined in transwell plates. We found CNR1&2 to be overexpressed in CLL compared to healthy B-cells. Discriminating between high and low expressing subgroups, only high CNR1 expression was associated with two established high risk markers and conferred significantly shorter overall and treatment free survival. Viability of CLL primary cells was reduced in a dose dependent fashion upon incubation with cannabinoids, however, healthy cells were similarly affected. Under serum reduced conditions, no significant differences were observed within suspension and co-culture, respectively, however, the feeder layer contributed significantly to the survival of CLL cells compared to suspension culture conditions. No significant differences were observed when treating CLL cells with cannabinoids in combination with fludarabine. Interestingly, biologic activity of cannabinoids was independent of both CNR1&2 expression. Finally, we did not observe an inhibition of CXCL12-induced migration by cannabinoids. In contrast to other tumor

  7. Cannabinoids and atherosclerotic coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Singla, Sandeep; Sachdeva, Rajesh; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2012-06-01

    Marijuana is the most abused recreational drug in the United States. Cannabinoids, the active ingredients of marijuana, affect multiple organ systems in the human body. The pharmacologic effects of marijuana, based on stimulation of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, which are widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, have been well described. Activation of these receptors modulates the function of various cellular elements of the vessel wall, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Clinically, there are reports linking marijuana smoking to the precipitation of angina and acute coronary syndromes. Recently, large published clinical trials with CB1 antagonist rimonabant did not show any significant benefit of this agent in preventing progression of atherosclerosis. In light of these findings and emerging data on multiple pathways linking cannabinoids to atherosclerosis, we discuss the literature on the role of cannabinoids in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We also propose a marijuana paradox, which implies that inhalation of marijuana may be linked to precipitation of acute coronary syndromes, but modulation of the endocannabinoid system by a noninhalation route may have a salutary effect on the development of atherosclerosis. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Surinabant, a selective cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonist, inhibits Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced central nervous system and heart rate effects in humans.

    PubMed

    Klumpers, Linda E; Roy, Christine; Ferron, Geraldine; Turpault, Sandrine; Poitiers, Franck; Pinquier, Jean-Louis; van Hasselt, Johan G C; Zuurman, Lineke; Erwich, Frank A S; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2013-07-01

    Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 ) antagonists have been developed for the treatment of obesity and associated risk factors. Surinabant is a high affinity CB1 antagonist in vitro. The aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of inhibition by surinabant of CNS effects and heart rate induced by Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, four period six sequence crossover study. Thirty healthy young male occasional cannabis users (<1 per week) were included. A single oral dose of surinabant (5, 20 or 60 mg) or placebo was administered followed 1.5 h later by four intrapulmonary THC doses (2, 4, 6 and 6 mg) or vehicle, administered at 1 h intervals. The wash-out period was 14-21 days. Subjective and objective pharmacodynamic (PD) measurements were performed. A population PK-PD model for THC and surinabant quantified PK and PD effects. Surinabant 20 and 60 mg inhibited all THC-induced PD effects in a similar range for both doses with inhibition ratios ranging from 68.3% (95% CI = 32.5, 104.2; heart rate) to 91.1% (95% CI = 30.3, 151.8; body sway). IC50 ranged from 22.0 ng ml(-1) [relative standard error (RSE) = 45.2%; body sway] to 58.8 ng ml(-1) (RSE = 44.2%; internal perception). Surinabant 5 mg demonstrated no significant effects. The dose-related inhibition by surinabant, without any effect of its own, suggests that this compound behaves as a CB1 receptor antagonist in humans at these concentrations. A single surinabant dose between 5 to 20 mg and above was able to antagonize THC-induced effects in humans. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Surinabant, a selective cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonist, inhibits Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced central nervous system and heart rate effects in humans

    PubMed Central

    Klumpers, Linda E; Roy, Christine; Ferron, Geraldine; Turpault, Sandrine; Poitiers, Franck; Pinquier, Jean-Louis; van Hasselt, Johan G C; Zuurman, Lineke; Erwich, Frank A S; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2013-01-01

    Aim Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists have been developed for the treatment of obesity and associated risk factors. Surinabant is a high affinity CB1 antagonist in vitro. The aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of inhibition by surinabant of CNS effects and heart rate induced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in humans. Methods This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, four period six sequence crossover study. Thirty healthy young male occasional cannabis users (<1 per week) were included. A single oral dose of surinabant (5, 20 or 60 mg) or placebo was administered followed 1.5 h later by four intrapulmonary THC doses (2, 4, 6 and 6 mg) or vehicle, administered at 1 h intervals. The wash-out period was 14–21 days. Subjective and objective pharmacodynamic (PD) measurements were performed. A population PK–PD model for THC and surinabant quantified PK and PD effects. Results Surinabant 20 and 60 mg inhibited all THC-induced PD effects in a similar range for both doses with inhibition ratios ranging from 68.3% (95% CI = 32.5, 104.2; heart rate) to 91.1% (95% CI = 30.3, 151.8; body sway). IC50 ranged from 22.0 ng ml−1 [relative standard error (RSE) = 45.2%; body sway] to 58.8 ng ml−1 (RSE = 44.2%; internal perception). Surinabant 5 mg demonstrated no significant effects. Conclusions The dose-related inhibition by surinabant, without any effect of its own, suggests that this compound behaves as a CB1 receptor antagonist in humans at these concentrations. A single surinabant dose between 5 to 20 mg and above was able to antagonize THC-induced effects in humans. PMID:23278647

  10. The protective role of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER-1) on methotrexate-induced nephrotoxicity in human renal epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Akif Hakan; Bozkus, Fulsen; Uremis, Nuray; Uremis, Muhammed Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    Nephrotoxicity is an important problem during methotrexate (MTX) treatment, which has been widely used for the treatment of several cancer types. Females are less susceptible to kidney diseases; however, the reason for this condition has not to be fully clarified. But sex hormones such as estrogen may have a protective effect on the kidney. We aimed to evaluate the possible protective role of estrogen on the MTX-induced renal epithelial cell death. Primary renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC) were incubated with MTX (1, 10 and 100 μM), either alone or in combination with the 17β-estradiol, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) agonist G-1, estrogen receptor alpha agonist propyl pyrazole triol (PPT), estrogen receptor beta agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN). Cell viability was determined by MTT assays. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined in RPTEC. Approximately half of the cell death was observed with 10 μM MTX incubation for 48 h. The cell death was prevented by co-incubating with17β-estradiol, PPT and G-1. MTX was significantly induced IL-1β and IL-6.17β-estradiol, PPT and G-1 significantly decreased effects of MTX. SOD activity was significantly decreased treatment with MTX compared to control group. SOD activity was increased with co-incubation with 17β-estradioland G-1 compared to treatment with MTX. MDA levels significantly increased in treatment with MTX compared with the control group. Increased MDA levels by MTX-induced was decreased significantly by the treatment with 17β-estradiol and G-1. These data indicate that especially 17β-estradiol and G-1 may be useful in preventing undesirable effects of MTX in renal failure.

  11. Oxaza adamantyl cannabinoids. A new class of cannabinoid receptor probes.

    PubMed

    Le Goanvic, David; Tius, Marcus A

    2006-09-29

    The preparation of C3 oxaza adamantyl cannabinoids has been described starting from phloroglucinol. Straightforward manipulations of the aromatic ring lead to a bromononaflate that is a benzyne precursor and that serves as a common intermediate for the synthesis of diverse C3-substituted tricyclic cannabinoids. Generation of the benzyne in the presence of an oxaza adamantyl amide anion results in efficient and regiospecific addition to C3 of the aromatic ring. This represents an attractive strategy for the synthesis of classical tricyclic cannabinoids that bear a modified aromatic appendage. The oxaza adamantyl cannabinoids that have been prepared represent a new class of ligands for the CB1 and CB2 receptors.

  12. Detection of the recently emerged synthetic cannabinoid 5 F-MDMB-PICA in 'legal high' products and human urine samples.

    PubMed

    Mogler, Lukas; Franz, Florian; Rentsch, Daniel; Angerer, Verena; Weinfurtner, Georg; Longworth, Mitchell; Banister, Samuel D; Kassiou, Michael; Moosmann, Bjoern; Auwärter, Volker

    2017-03-31

    Indole or indazole based synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) bearing substituents derived from valine or tert-leucine are frequently abused new psychoactive substances (NPS). The emergence of 5 F-MDMB-PICA (methyl N-{[1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]carbonyl}-3-methylvalinate) on the German drug market is a further example of a substance synthesized in the context of scientific research being misused by clandestine laboratories by adding it to 'legal high' products. In this work we present the detection of 5 F-MDMB-PICA in several 'legal high' products by GC-MS analysis. To detect characteristic metabolites suitable for a proof of 5 F-MDMB-PICA consumption by urine analysis, pooled human liver microsome (pHLM) assays were performed and evaluated using LC-MS/MS and LC-QToF-MS techniques to generate reference spectra of the in vitro phase I metabolites. The in vivo phase I metabolism was investigated by the analysis of more than 20 authentic human urine specimens and compared to the data received from the pHLM assay. Biotransformation of the 5-fluoropentyl side chain and hydrolysis of the terminal methyl ester bond are main phase I biotransformation steps. Two of the identified main metabolites formed by methyl ester hydrolysis or mono-hydroxylation at the indole ring system were evaluated as suitable urinary biomarkers and discussed regarding the interpretation of analytical findings. Exemplary analysis of one urine sample for 5 F-MDMB-PICA phase II metabolites showed that two of the main phase I metabolites are subject to extensive glucuronidation prior to renal excretion. Therefore, conjugate cleavage is reasonable for enhancing sensitivity. Commercially available immunochemical pre-tests for urine proved to be unsuitable for the detection of 5 F-MDMB-PICA consumption.

  13. The Role of Water in Activation Mechanism of Human N-Formyl Peptide Receptor 1 (FPR1) Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shuguang; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Trzaskowski, Bartosz; Latek, Dorota; Debinski, Aleksander; Pulawski, Wojciech; Wu, Rongliang; Gerke, Volker; Filipek, Slawomir

    2012-01-01

    The Formyl Peptide Receptor 1 (FPR1) is an important chemotaxis receptor involved in various aspects of host defense and inflammatory processes. We constructed a model of FPR1 using as a novel template the chemokine receptor CXCR4 from the same branch of the phylogenetic tree of G-protein-coupled receptors. The previously employed template of rhodopsin contained a bulge at the extracellular part of TM2 which directly influenced binding of ligands. We also conducted molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of FPR1 in the apo form as well as in a form complexed with the agonist fMLF and the antagonist tBocMLF in the model membrane. During all MD simulation of the fMLF-FPR1 complex a water molecule transiently bridged the hydrogen bond between W2546.48 and N1083.35 in the middle of the receptor. We also observed a change in the cytoplasmic part of FPR1 of a rotamer of the Y3017.53 residue (tyrosine rotamer switch). This effect facilitated movement of more water molecules toward the receptor center. Such rotamer of Y3017.53 was not observed in any crystal structures of GPCRs which can suggest that this state is temporarily formed to pass the water molecules during the activation process. The presence of a distance between agonist and residues R2015.38 and R2055.42 on helix TM5 may suggest that the activation of FPR1 is similar to the activation of β-adrenergic receptors since their agonists are separated from serine residues on helix TM5. The removal of water molecules bridging these interactions in FPR1 can result in shrinking of the binding site during activation similarly to the shrinking observed in β-ARs. The number of GPCR crystal structures with agonists is still scarce so the designing of new ligands with agonistic properties is hampered, therefore homology modeling and docking can provide suitable models. Additionally, the MD simulations can be beneficial to outline the mechanisms of receptor activation and the agonist/antagonist sensing. PMID:23189124

  14. Interleukin 1 Receptor 1 and Interleukin 1β Regulate Megakaryocyte Maturation, Platelet Activation, and Transcript Profile During Inflammation in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Lea M.; Lin, Elaine; Mick, Eric; Koupenova, Milka; Weinberg, Ellen O.; Kramer, Carolyn D.; Genco, Caroline A.; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Larson, Martin G.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Freedman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Interleukin 1 Receptor 1 (IL1R1) and its ligand, IL1β, are upregulated in cardiovascular disease, obesity, and infection. Previously, we reported a higher level of IL1R1 transcripts in platelets from obese individuals of the Framingham Heart Study (FHS), but its functional effect in platelets has never been described. Additionally, IL1β levels are increased in atherosclerotic plaques and in bacterial infections. The aim of this work is to determine whether IL1β, through IL1R1, can activate platelets and megakaryocytes to promote atherothrombosis. Approach and Results We found that IL1β-related genes from platelets, as measured in 1819 FHS participants, were associated with increased body mass index, and a direct relationship was shown in wild-type mice fed a high-fat diet. Mechanistically, IL1β activated nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in megakaryocytes. IL1β, through IL1R1, increased ploidy of megakaryocytes to 64+ N by 2-fold over control. IL1β increased agonist-induced platelet aggregation by 1.2-fold with thrombin and 4.2-fold with collagen. IL1β increased adhesion to both collagen and fibrinogen, and heterotypic aggregation by 1.9-fold over resting. High fat diet-enhanced platelet adhesion was absent in IL1R1−/− mice. Wild-type mice infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis had circulating heterotypic aggregates (1.5-fold more than control at 24 hours and 6.2-fold more at 6 weeks) that were absent in infected IL1R1−/− and IL1β−/− mice. Conclusions In summary, IL1R1- and IL1β-related transcripts are elevated in the setting of obesity. IL1R1/IL1β augment both megakaryocyte and platelet functions, thereby promoting a prothrombotic environment during infection and obesity; potentially contributing to the development of atherothrombotic disease. PMID:24458711

  15. Cannabinoids in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Williamson, E M; Evans, F J

    2000-12-01

    Cannabis has a potential for clinical use often obscured by unreliable and purely anecdotal reports. The most important natural cannabinoid is the psychoactive tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC); others include cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG). Not all the observed effects can be ascribed to THC, and the other constituents may also modulate its action; for example CBD reduces anxiety induced by THC. A standardised extract of the herb may be therefore be more beneficial in practice and clinical trial protocols have been drawn up to assess this. The mechanism of action is still not fully understood, although cannabinoid receptors have been cloned and natural ligands identified. Cannabis is frequently used by patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) for muscle spasm and pain, and in an experimental model of MS low doses of cannabinoids alleviated tremor. Most of the controlled studies have been carried out with THC rather than cannabis herb and so do not mimic the usual clincal situation. Small clinical studies have confirmed the usefulness of THC as an analgesic; CBD and CBG also have analgesic and antiinflammatory effects, indicating that there is scope for developing drugs which do not have the psychoactive properties of THC. Patients taking the synthetic derivative nabilone for neurogenic pain actually preferred cannabis herb and reported that it relieved not only pain but the associated depression and anxiety. Cannabinoids are effective in chemotherapy-induced emesis and nabilone has been licensed for this use for several years. Currently, the synthetic cannabinoid HU211 is undergoing trials as a protective agent after brain trauma. Anecdotal reports of cannabis use include case studies in migraine and Tourette's syndrome, and as a treatment for asthma and glaucoma. Apart from the smoking aspect, the safety profile of cannabis is fairly good. However, adverse reactions include panic or anxiety attacks, which are worse in the elderly and in women, and less

  16. Behavioral effects of cannabinoid agents in animals.

    PubMed

    Chaperon, F; Thiébot, M H

    1999-01-01

    induce biphasic effects, for example, hyperactivity at low doses and severe motor deficits at larger doses. Intriguingly, although cannabis is widely used as recreational drug in humans, only a few studies revealed an appetitive potential of cannabimimetics in animals, and evidence for aversive effects of delta9-THC, WIN 55,212-2, and CP 55,940 is more readily obtained in a variety of tests. The selective blockade of CB1 receptors by SR 141716 impaired the perception of the appetitive value of positive reinforcers (food, cocaine, morphine) and reduced the motivation for sucrose, beer and alcohol consumption, indicating that positive incentive and/or motivational processes could be under a permissive control of CB1-related mechanisms. There is little evidence that cannabinoid systems are activated under basal conditions. However, by using SR 141716 as a tool, a tonic involvement of a CB1-mediated cannabinoid link has been demonstrated, notably in animals suffering from chronic pain, faced with anxiogenic stimuli or highly motivational reinforcers. Some effects of SR 141716 also suggest that CB1-related mechanisms exert a tonic control on cognitive processes. Extensive basic research is still needed to elucidate the roles of cannabinoid systems, both in the brain and at the periphery, in normal physiology and in diseases. Additional compounds, such as selective CB1 receptor agonists, ligands that do not cross the blood brain barrier, drugs interfering with synthesis, degradation or uptake of endogenous ligand(s) of CB receptors, are especially needed to understand when and how cannabinoid systems are activated. In turn, new therapeutic strategies would likely to emerge.

  17. Capillary electrochromatography of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Lurie, I S; Meyers, R P; Conver, T S

    1998-08-01

    The applicability of capillary electrochromatography (CEC) with photodiode array UV detection for the analysis of cannabinoids is presented. Baseline separation of seven cannabinoids (cannabigerol, cannabidiol, cannabinol, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabichromene, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid) is obtained using a 3-micron CEC Hypersil C18 capillary with an acetonitrile/phosphate (pH 2.57) mobile phase. The effects of acetonitrile concentration, buffer concentration, voltage, temperature, stationary phase, and column length on the separation of the cannabinoids were investigated. Good short- and long-term precision in retention times are observed, with significant improvement obtained using relative retention times with cannabinol as reference compound. Although short- and long-term peak area precisions are poor, satisfactory reproducibility is obtained using relative peak areas with cannabinol as reference compound. The applicability of the CEC methodology to drug seizures was demonstrated on marijuana and hashish. Using a high-sensitivity UV flow cell with an extended path length of 1.2 mm, concentration sensitivities approaching HPLC were obtained.

  18. Effects of the cannabinoid antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant) and d-amphetamine on palatable food and food pellet intake in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Foltin, Richard W.; Haney, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist would selectively decrease consumption of highly palatable food in non-human primates. The CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant; 0.12 - 1.0 mg/kg, i.m.) and the stimulant anorectic drug d-amphetamine (0.12 - 1.0 mg/kg, i.m.) were administered to non-food deprived baboons for the purpose of measuring the effect of each drug on consumption of the normal diet, and a large single meal of a high-carbohydrate candy. Four male and four female baboons had access to food 24 hr each day, but they had to complete a two phase operant procedure in order to eat. Responding on one lever during a 30-min appetitive phase was required before animals could start a consumption phase, where responding on another lever led to food delivery, i.e., a meal. Three days a week baboons received a jelly sugar-coated candy (Skittles®) during the first meal and then pellets were available in subsequent meals. All baboons ate as many individual candies in one meal as they did pellets throughout the entire day. Acute d-amphetamine and, to a lesser extent, SR141716 decreased both candy intake in a single meal and pellet intake in a single meal and over 24 hr. d-Amphetamine, but not SR141716 increased latency to the candy meal and the first pellet meal indicating that the two drugs differentially altered feeding topography. Although males ate more food pellets than females, few other sex differences were observed. Thus, although effective in decreasing food intake, there was no evidence of a specific effect of CB1 receptor antagonism on consumption of a large meal or a palatable food. PMID:17445873

  19. Effects of the cannabinoid antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant) and d-amphetamine on palatable food and food pellet intake in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Foltin, Richard W; Haney, Margaret

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist would selectively decrease consumption of highly palatable food in non-human primates. The CB(1) receptor antagonist SR141716 (rimonabant; 0.12-1.0 mg/kg, i.m.) and the stimulant anorectic drug d-amphetamine (0.12-1.0 mg/kg, i.m.) were administered to non-food deprived baboons for the purpose of measuring the effect of each drug on consumption of the normal diet, and a large single meal of a high-carbohydrate candy. Four male and four female baboons had access to food 24 h each day, but they had to complete a two phase operant procedure in order to eat. Responding on one lever during a 30-min appetitive phase was required before animals could start a consumption phase, where responding on another lever led to food delivery, i.e., a meal. Three days a week baboons received a jelly sugar-coated candy (Skittles) during the first meal and then pellets were available in subsequent meals. All baboons ate as many individual candies in one meal as they did pellets throughout the entire day. Acute d-amphetamine and, to a lesser extent, SR141716 decreased both candy intake in a single meal and pellet intake in a single meal and over 24 h. d-Amphetamine, but not SR141716, increased latency to the candy meal and the first pellet meal indicating that the two drugs differentially altered feeding topography. Although males ate more food pellets than females, few other sex differences were observed. Thus, although effective in decreasing food intake, there was no evidence of a specific effect of CB(1) receptor antagonism on consumption of a large meal or a palatable food.

  20. Rapid and sensitive screening and confirmation of thirty-four aminocarbonyl/carboxamide (NACA) and arylindole synthetic cannabinoid drugs in human whole blood.

    PubMed

    Tynon, Marykathryn; Homan, Joseph; Kacinko, Sherri; Ervin, Annette; McMullin, Matthew; Logan, Barry K

    2017-06-01

    We describe the development and validation of a method for the screening and confirmation of a range of chemically diverse synthetic cannabinoid drugs in human whole blood. The method targets the better known arylindole compounds as well as the emerging aminocarbonyl/ carboxamide (NACA) compounds. The approach consists of two separate extraction procedures designed to optimize recovery of each of these two classes, followed by analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The most significant novel compounds added were AB-FUBINACA, ADBICA, 5 F-ADBICA, ADB-PINACA, ADB-FUBINACA, ADB-FUBINACA, 5 F-ADB-PINACA, 5 F-ADB-PINACA, AB-PINACA, AB-CHMINACA, and ADB-CHMINACA. A third procedure is described for the quantitative confirmation of those compounds for which deuterated internal standards permitted quantitative analysis, including JWH-018, JWH-122, JWH-081, JWH-210, AM-2201, XLR-11, and UR-144. The methods were successfully validated according to Scientific Working Group in Forensic Toxicology (SWGTOX) protocol for 34 compounds in common use in the United States in the period of 2014 and 2015, although other substances, unknown at the time may have been introduced to the market over the same time period. The method was determined to be free from carry-over between samples, and no interference was found from other common therapeutic abused or novel psychoactive drugs. The methods were applied to the analysis of 1142 blood samples from forensic investigations, including post-mortem examinations and driving impairment cases. The drugs most frequently detected were AB-CHMINACA (18.6%), ADB-CHMINACA (15%), XLR-11 (5.5%), AB-FUBINACA (4.5%), AB-PINACA (3.9%), and ADB-FUBINACA (2.3%). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. In vitro inhibition of protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4 demonstrates that these receptors are not involved in an Acanthamoeba castellanii keratitis isolate-mediated disruption of the human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Naeem, Komal; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis is a rare but serious human disease leading almost always to death. The pathophysiology of amoebic encephalitis is better understood, while events leading to the constitution of brain infection are largely unknown. Traversal of the blood-brain barrier is a key step in amoebae invasion of the central nervous system and facilitated by amoebic extracellular proteases. By using specific inhibitors of protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4, here we studied the role of these host receptors in Acanthamoeba castellanii-mediated damage to human brain microvasculature endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. The primary HBMEC were incubated with A. castellanii-conditioned medium in the presence or absence of FR-171113 (selective inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1), FSLLRY-NH2 (inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 2), and tcY-NH2 (inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 4). The HBMEC monolayer disruptions were assessed by microscopy using Eosin staining, while host cell cytotoxicity was determined by measuring the release of cytoplasmic lactate dehydrogenase. Zymographic assays were performed to determine the effects of inhibitors of protease-activated receptors on the extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. A. castellanii-conditioned medium produced severe HBMEC monolayer disruptions within 60 min. The selective inhibitors of protease-activated receptors tested did not affect HBMEC monolayer disruptions. On the contrary, pre-treatment of A. castellanii-conditioned medium with phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a serine protease inhibitor, or heating for 10 min at 95°C abolished HBMEC monolayer disruptions. Additionally, inhibitors of protease-activated receptors tested, failed to block A. castellanii-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity and did not affect extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. Protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4 do not appear to play a role in A. castellanii

  2. Thermolytic Degradation of Synthetic Cannabinoids: Chemical Exposures and Pharmacological Consequences.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian F; Lefever, Timothy W; Cortes, Ricardo A; Grabenauer, Megan; Kovach, Alexander L; Cox, Anderson O; Patel, Purvi R; Pollard, Gerald T; Marusich, Julie A; Kevin, Richard C; Gamage, Thomas F; Wiley, Jenny L

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids are manufactured clandestinely with little quality control and are distributed as herbal "spice" for smoking or as bulk compound for mixing with a solvent and inhalation via electronic vaporizers. Intoxication with synthetic cannabinoids has been associated with seizure, excited delirium, coma, kidney damage, and other disorders. The chemical alterations produced by heating these structurally novel compounds for consumption are largely unknown. Here, we show that heating synthetic cannabinoids containing tetramethylcyclopropyl-ring substituents produced thermal degradants with pharmacological activity that varied considerably from their parent compounds. Moreover, these degradants were formed under conditions simulating smoking. Some products of combustion retained high affinity at the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors, were more efficacious than (-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexanol (CP55,940) in stimulating CB1 receptor-mediated guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) binding, and were potent in producing Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-like effects in laboratory animals, whereas other compounds had low affinity and efficacy and were devoid of cannabimimetic activity. Degradants that retained affinity and efficacy also substituted in drug discrimination tests for the prototypical synthetic cannabinoid 1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole (JWH-018), and are likely to produce psychotropic effects in humans. Hence, it is important to take into consideration the actual chemical exposures that occur during use of synthetic cannabinoid formulations to better comprehend the relationships between dose and effect.

  3. Toxicokinetics of new psychoactive substances: plasma protein binding, metabolic stability, and human phase I metabolism of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 studied using in vitro tools and LC-HR-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Mardal, Marie; Gracia-Lor, Emma; Leibnitz, Svenja; Castiglioni, Sara; Meyer, Markus R

    2016-10-01

    The new psychoactive substance WIN 55,212-2 ((R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo-[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-napthalenylmethanone) is a potent synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist. The metabolism of WIN 55,212-2 in man has never been reported. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the human in vitro metabolites of WIN 55,212-2 using pooled human liver microsomes and liquid chromatography-high resolution-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-HR-MS/MS) to provide targets for toxicological, doping, and environmental screening procedures. Moreover, a metabolic stability study in pooled human liver microsomes (pHLM) was carried out. In total, 19 metabolites were identified and the following partly overlapping metabolic steps were deduced: degradation of the morpholine ring via hydroxylation, N- and O-dealkylation, and oxidative deamination, hydroxylations on either the naphthalene or morpholine ring or the alkyl spacer with subsequent oxidation, epoxide formation with subsequent hydrolysis, or combinations. In conclusion, WIN 55,212-2 was extensively metabolized in human liver microsomes incubations and the calculated hepatic clearance was comparably high, indicating a fast and nearly complete metabolism in vivo. This is in line with previous findings on other synthetic cannabinoids. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Effects of cannabinoids and cannabinoid-enriched Cannabis extracts on TRP channels and endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Ligresti, Alessia; Moriello, Aniello Schiano; Allarà, Marco; Bisogno, Tiziana; Petrosino, Stefania; Stott, Colin G; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) interact with transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and enzymes of the endocannabinoid system. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of 11 pure cannabinoids and botanical extracts [botanical drug substance (BDS)] from Cannabis varieties selected to contain a more abundant cannabinoid, on TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPM8, TRPA1, human recombinant diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGLα), rat brain fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), COS cell monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), human recombinant N-acylethanolamine acid amide hydrolase (NAAA) and anandamide cellular uptake (ACU) by RBL-2H3 cells, were studied using fluorescence-based calcium assays in transfected cells and radiolabelled substrate-based enzymatic assays. Cannabinol (CBN), cannabichromene (CBC), the acids (CBDA, CBGA, THCA) and propyl homologues (CBDV, CBGV, THCV) of CBD, cannabigerol (CBG) and THC, and tetrahydrocannabivarin acid (THCVA) were also tested. KEY RESULTS CBD, CBG, CBGV and THCV stimulated and desensitized human TRPV1. CBC, CBD and CBN were potent rat TRPA1 agonists and desensitizers, but THCV-BDS was the most potent compound at this target. CBG-BDS and THCV-BDS were the most potent rat TRPM8 antagonists. All non-acid cannabinoids, except CBC and CBN, potently activated and desensitized rat TRPV2. CBDV and all the acids inhibited DAGLα. Some BDS, but not the pure compounds, inhibited MAGL. CBD was the only compound to inhibit FAAH, whereas the BDS of CBC > CBG > CBGV inhibited NAAA. CBC = CBG > CBD inhibited ACU, as did the BDS of THCVA, CBGV, CBDA and THCA, but the latter extracts were more potent inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results are relevant to the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects of cannabinoids and Cannabis extracts. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011

  5. Cannabinoid WIN55, 212-2 induces cell cycle arrest and inhibits the proliferation and migration of human BEL7402 hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dacai; Wang, Jianglin; Zhou, Zhenkang; He, Zhiwei; Zhao, Qing

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide; however, only limited therapeutic treatments are currently available. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of cannabinoids as novel therapeutic targets in HCC. In addition, the mechanism underlying the effects of a synthetic cannabinoid, WIN55, 212‑2, on the BEL7402 HCC cell line was investigated. The results demonstrated that WIN55, 212‑2 induced cell cycle arrest of the BEL7402 cells at the G0/G1 phase via cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2)‑mediated downregulation of phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2, upregulation of p27, and downregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin‑dependent kinase 4. Furthermore, inhibition of CB2 with the CB2 antagonist AM630 abrogated WIN55, 212‑2‑induced cell cycle arrest. Inhibition of ERK1/2 also resulted in cell cycle dysregulation and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, which subsequently resulted in cell growth inhibition. In addition, the present study detected a significant reduction in matrix metalloproteinase‑9, retinoblastoma protein and E2F1 expression, and migration inhibition by WIN treatment. These results suggested that cannabinoid receptor agonists, including WIN, may be considered as novel therapeutics for the treatment of HCC.

  6. Tyramine and β-phenylethylamine, from fermented food products, as agonists for the human trace amine-associated receptor 1 (hTAAR1) in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hiroto; Takebe, Youhei; Murakami, Yuka; Takahama, Yusei; Morimura, Shigeru

    2017-05-01

    The aromatic amines tyramine and β-phenylethylamine are abundant in fermented foods. Recently, a family of human trace amine-associated receptors (hTAARs) was discovered that responds to these compounds. This study examined the expression of hTAAR genes in five human organs. Among them, the stomach expressed hTAAR1 and hTAAR9. Interestingly, more hTAAR1 was expressed in the pylorus than in the other stomach regions. The CRE-SEAP reporter assay revealed that only hTAAR1 functioned as a Gs-coupled receptor in response to tyramine and β-phenylethylamine stimulation. The β-phenylethylamine-mediated hTAAR1 activity could be potentiated using 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. These data suggest that tyramine and β-phenylethylamine in fermented foods act at hTAAR1 as agonists in the pylorus of stomach.

  7. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 regulates STAT3 activity and its expression dictates the responsiveness to SR141716 treatment in human glioma patients' cells

    PubMed Central

    Ciaglia, Elena; Torelli, Giovanni; Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; D'Alessandro, Alba; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Fiore, Donatella; Zottola, Antonio Christian Pagano; Proto, Maria Chiara; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Herein we show that a majority of human brain tumor samples and cell lines over-expressed cannabinoid receptor CB1 as compared to normal human astrocytes (NHA), while uniformly expressed low levels of CB2. This finding prompted us to investigate the therapeutic exploitation of CB1 inactivation by SR141716 treatment, with regard to its direct and indirect cell-mediated effects against gliomas. Functional studies, using U251MG glioma cells and primary tumor cell lines derived from glioma patients expressing different levels of CB1, highlighted SR141716 efficacy in inducing apoptosis via G1 phase stasis and block of TGF-β1 secretion through a mechanism that involves STAT3 inhibition. According to the multivariate role of STAT3 in the immune escape too, interestingly SR141716 lead also to the functional and selective expression of MICA/B on the surface of responsive malignant glioma cells, but not on NHA. This makes SR141716 treated-glioma cells potent targets for allogeneic NK cell-mediated recognition through a NKG2D restricted mechanism, thus priming them for NK cell antitumor reactivity. These results indicate that CB1 and STAT3 participate in a new oncogenic network in the complex biology of glioma and their expression levels in patients dictate the efficacy of the CB1 antagonist SR141716 in multimodal glioma destruction. SIGNIFICANCE CB1 is implicated in the regulation of cellular processes linked to survival, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in several physio-pathological conditions. We shed light on previously unrecognized molecular mechanism of CB1-mediated modulation of human glioma progression and provide the first and original demonstration of CB1-STAT3 axis as a new target and predictor biomarkers of the benefit from specific therapies. Indeed CB1 antagonism capable of tumoral cell division' control while making the glioma immunovisible and engaging the immune system to fight it may represent a hopeful alternative to other established

  8. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum, plasma... cannabinoid use or abuse and in monitoring levels of cannabinoids during clinical investigational use. (b...

  9. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum, plasma... cannabinoid use or abuse and in monitoring levels of cannabinoids during clinical investigational use. (b...

  10. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum, plasma... cannabinoid use or abuse and in monitoring levels of cannabinoids during clinical investigational use. (b...

  11. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum, plasma... cannabinoid use or abuse and in monitoring levels of cannabinoids during clinical investigational use. (b...

  12. 21 CFR 862.3870 - Cannabinoid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... measure any of the cannabinoids, hallucinogenic compounds endogenous to marihuana, in serum, plasma... cannabinoid use or abuse and in monitoring levels of cannabinoids during clinical investigational use. (b...

  13. Methods of the pharmacological imaging of the cannabinoid system (PhICS) study: towards understanding the role of the brain endocannabinoid system in human cognition.

    PubMed

    van Hell, Hendrika H; Bossong, Matthijs G; Jager, Gerry; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2011-03-01

    Various lines of (pre)clinical research indicate that cannabinoid agents carry the potential for therapeutic application to reduce symptoms in several psychiatric disorders. However, direct testing of the involvement of cannabinoid brain systems in psychiatric syndromes is essential for further development. In the Pharmacological Imaging of the Cannabinoid System (PhICS) study, the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in cognitive brain function is assessed by comparing acute effects of the cannabinoid agonist Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on brain function between healthy controls and groups of psychiatric patients showing cognitive dysfunction. This article describes the objectives and methods of the PhICS study and presents preliminary results of the administration procedure on subjective and neurophysiological parameters. Core elements in the methodology of PhICS are the administration method (THC is administered by inhalation using a vaporizing device) and a comprehensive use of pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) combining several types of MRI scans including functional MRI (fMRI), Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) to measure brain perfusion, and resting-state fMRI. Additional methods like neuropsychological testing further specify the exact role of the endocannabinoid system in regulating cognition. Preliminary results presented in this paper indicate robust behavioral and subjective effects of THC. In addition, fMRI paradigms demonstrate activation of expected networks of brain regions in the cognitive domains of interest. The presented administration and assessment protocol provides a basis for further research on the involvement of the endocannabionoid systems in behavior and in psychopathology, which in turn may lead to development of therapeutic opportunities of cannabinoid ligands. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 contributes to resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor drugs in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Rosa, Roberta; Damiano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Gennaro; Gelardi, Teresa; Garofalo, Sonia; Tarallo, Valeria; De Falco, Sandro; Melisi, Davide; Benelli, Roberto; Albini, Adriana; Ryan, Anderson; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2008-08-15

    The resistance to selective EGFR inhibitors involves the activation of alternative signaling pathways, and Akt activation and VEGF induction have been described in EGFR inhibitor-resistant tumors. Combined inhibition of EGFR and other signaling proteins has become a successful therapeutic approach, stimulating the search for further determinants of resistance as basis for novel therapeutic strategies. We established human cancer cell lines with various degrees of EGFR expression and sensitivity to EGFR inhibitors and analyzed signal transducers under the control of EGFR-dependent and EGFR-independent pathways. Multitargeted inhibitor vandetanib (ZD6474) inhibited the growth and the phosphorylation of Akt and its effector p70S6 kinase in both wild-type and EGFR inhibitor-resistant human colon, prostate, and breast cancer cells. We found that the resistant cell lines exhibit, as common feature, VEGFR-1/Flt-1 overexpression, increased secretion of VEGF and placental growth factor, and augmented migration capabilities and that vandetanib is able to antagonize them. Accordingly, a new kinase assay revealed that in addition to VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2, RET, and EGFR, vandetanib efficiently inhibits also VEGFR-1. The contribution of VEGFR-1 to the resistant phenotype was further supported by the demonstration that VEGFR-1 silencing in resistant cells restored sensitivity to anti-EGFR drugs and impaired migration capabilities, whereas exogenous VEGFR-1 overexpression in wild-type cells conferred resistance to these agents. This study shows that VEGFR-1 contributes to anti-EGFR drug resistance in different human cancer cells. Moreover, vandetanib inhibits VEGFR-1 activation, cell proliferation, and migration, suggesting its potential utility in patients resistant to EGFR inhibitors.

  15. Expression and activity of Toll-like receptors 1-9 in the human term placenta and changes associated with labor at term.

    PubMed

    Patni, Shalini; Wynen, Louise P; Seager, Anna L; Morgan, Gareth; White, John O; Thornton, Catherine A

    2009-02-01

    Inflammatory processes are involved in the initiation and maintenance of labor, suggesting that Toll-like receptor (TLR) activity within gestation-associated tissues, such as the placenta, might contribute to the process of parturition. Expression of transcripts for TLR1-TLR10 was examined in term (>37 wk of gestation) human placentas collected in the absence of labor (elective caesarean sections; ECS; n = 11) and after the completion of labor (normal vaginal delivery; NVD; n = 12). Placental explants were cultured in the presence of agonists for TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR5, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9, and cytokine production after 24 h was examined. All placentas expressed transcripts for TLR1-TLR10. Reactivity to all agonists except CpG oligonucleotides was observed, indicating that, other than TLR9, all of the receptors studied yielded functional responses. Placental explants prepared from NVD placentas (n = 17) produced significantly more TNFA in response to lipopolysaccharide (TLR4 agonist) and resiquimod (TLR7/8 agonist) than explants from ECS placentas (n = 17). In contrast, gene expression analysis revealed that only transcripts for TLR2 and TLR5 were significantly elevated in association with labor. The human term placenta expresses a variety of functional TLRs, indicating that this family of receptors has an important role in parturition via as yet undetermined cell types and signaling pathways.

  16. Biophysical Studies of the Induced Dimerization of Human VEGF Receptor 1 Binding Domain by Divalent Metals Competing with VEGF-A

    PubMed Central

    Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Broussy, Sylvain; Coric, Pascale; Seijo, Bili; Lascombe, Marie-Bernard; Gautier, Benoit; Liu, Wang-Quing; Huguenot, Florent; Inguimbert, Nicolas; Bouaziz, Serge; Vidal, Michel; Broutin, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is tightly regulated through the binding of vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) to their receptors (VEGFRs). In this context, we showed that human VEGFR1 domain 2 crystallizes in the presence of Zn2+, Co2+ or Cu2+ as a dimer that forms via metal-ion interactions and interlocked hydrophobic surfaces. SAXS, NMR and size exclusion chromatography analyses confirm the formation of this dimer in solution in the presence of Co2+, Cd2+ or Cu2+. Since the metal-induced dimerization masks the VEGFs binding surface, we investigated the ability of metal ions to displace the VEGF-A binding to hVEGFR1: using a competition assay, we evidenced that the metals displaced the VEGF-A binding to hVEGFR1 extracellular domain binding at micromolar level. PMID:27942001

  17. Positive and Negative Cross-Talk between Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1, Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4, and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Human Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Mandi M; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E

    2016-10-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator that mediates cellular effects via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a peptide that acts via a receptor tyrosine kinase. LPA and EGF both induce proliferation of prostate cancer cells and can transactivate each other's receptors. The LPA receptor LPA1 is particularly important for LPA response in human prostate cancer cells. Previous work in our laboratory has demonstrated that free fatty acid 4 (FFA4), a GPCR activated by ω-3 fatty acids, inhibits responses to both LPA and EGF in these cells. One potential mechanism for the inhibition involves negative interactions between FFA4 and LPA1, thereby suppressing responses to EGF that require LPA1 In the current study, we examined the role of LPA1 in mediating EGF and FFA4 agonist responses in two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU145 and PC-3. The results show that an LPA1-selective antagonist inhibits proliferation and migration to both LPA and EGF. Knockdown of LPA1 expression, using silencing RNA, blocks responses to LPA and significantly inhibits responses to EGF. The partial response to EGF that is observed after LPA1 knockdown is not inhibited by FFA4 agonists. Finally, the role of arrestin-3, a GPCR-binding protein that mediates many actions of activated GPCRs, was tested. Knockdown of arrestin-3 completely inhibits responses to both LPA and EGF in prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these results suggest that LPA1 plays a critical role in EGF responses and that FFA4 agonists inhibit proliferation by suppressing positive cross-talk between LPA1 and the EGF receptor. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. 3,5-Di-t-butyl catechol is a potent human ryanodine receptor 1 activator, not suitable for the diagnosis of malignant hyperthermia susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Lacava, Caterina; Michalek-Sauberer, Andrea; Kraft, Birgit; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Sipos, Elisabeth; Höller, Carmen; Kress, Hans Georg; Fusi, Fabio; Weigl, Lukas G

    2012-07-01

    3,5-Di-t-butyl catechol (DTCAT) releases Ca(2+) from rat skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles. Hence, it is a candidate for use as a substitute for halothane or caffeine in the in vitro contracture test for the diagnosis of susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH). To characterize the effect of DTCAT at cell level, Ca(2+) release experiments were performed on cultured, human skeletal muscle myotubes using the fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator fura2-AM. DTCAT was also assayed in the in vitro contracture test on human skeletal muscle bundles obtained from individuals diagnosed susceptible (MHS), normal (MHN) or equivocal for halothane (MHEH) and compared to the standard test substances caffeine and halothane. DTCAT increased, in a concentration-dependent manner and with a higher efficacy as compared to caffeine, the free, intracellular Ca(2+) levels of cultured MHN and MHS skeletal muscle myotubes. This effect was similar in both types of myotubes and involved the release of Ca(2+) from SR stores as well as Ca(2+)-influx from the extracellular space. Inhibition of ryanodine receptors either with ryanodine or with ruthenium red markedly reduced DTCAT-induced increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration while abolishing that induced by caffeine. In MHN skeletal muscle bundles, DTCAT induced contractures with an EC(50) value of 160 ± 91 μM. However, the sensitivity of MHS or MHEH muscles to DTCAT was similar to that of MHN muscles. In conclusion, DTCAT is not suitable for the diagnosis of MH susceptibility due to its failure to discriminate between MHN and MHS muscles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptor 1 (PAC1) in the human infant brain and changes in the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Waters, K A; Machaalani, R

    2017-07-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its complementary receptor, PAC1, are crucial in central respiratory control. PACAP Knockout (KO) mice exhibit a SIDS-like phenotype, with an inability to overcome noxious insults, compression of baseline ventilation, and death in the early post-neonatal period. PAC1 KO demonstrate similar attributes to PACAP-null mice, but with the addition of increased pulmonary artery pressure, consequently leading to heart failure and death. This study establishes a detailed interpretation of the neuroanatomical distribution and localization of both PACAP and PAC1 in the human infant brainstem and hippocampus, to determine whether any changes in expression are evident in infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and any relationships to risk factors of SIDS including smoke exposure and sleep related parameters. Immunohistochemistry for PACAP and PAC1 was performed on formalin fixed and paraffin embedded human infant brain tissue of SIDS (n=32) and non-SIDS (n=12). The highest expression of PACAP was found in the hypoglossal (XII) of the brainstem medulla and lowest expression in the subiculum of the hippocampus. Highest expression of PAC1 was also found in XII of the medulla and lowest in the midbrain dorsal raphe (MBDR) and inferior colliculus. SIDS compared to non-SIDS had higher PACAP in the MBDR (p<0.05) and lower PAC1 in the medulla arcuate nucleus (p<0.001). Correlations were found between PACAP and PAC1 with the risk factors of smoke exposure, bed sharing, upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) and seasonal temperatures. The findings of this study show for the first time that some abnormalities of the PACAP system are evident in the SIDS brain and could contribute to the mechanisms of infants succumbing to SIDS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sustained Brown Fat Stimulation and Insulin Sensitization by a Humanized Bispecific Antibody Agonist for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1/βKlotho Complex.

    PubMed

    Kolumam, Ganesh; Chen, Mark Z; Tong, Raymond; Zavala-Solorio, Jose; Kates, Lance; van Bruggen, Nicholas; Ross, Jed; Wyatt, Shelby K; Gandham, Vineela D; Carano, Richard A D; Dunshee, Diana Ronai; Wu, Ai-Luen; Haley, Benjamin; Anderson, Keith; Warming, Søren; Rairdan, Xin Y; Lewin-Koh, Nicholas; Zhang, Yingnan; Gutierrez, Johnny; Baruch, Amos; Gelzleichter, Thomas R; Stevens, Dale; Rajan, Sharmila; Bainbridge, Travis W; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Meng, Y Gloria; Ziai, James; Soriano, Robert H; Brauer, Matthew J; Chen, Yongmei; Stawicki, Scott; Kim, Hok Seon; Comps-Agrar, Laëtitia; Luis, Elizabeth; Spiess, Christoph; Wu, Yan; Ernst, James A; McGuinness, Owen P; Peterson, Andrew S; Sonoda, Junichiro

    2015-07-01

    Dissipating excess calories as heat through therapeutic stimulation of brown adipose tissues (BAT) has been proposed as a potential treatment for obesity-linked disorders. Here, we describe the generation of a humanized effector-less bispecific antibody that activates fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) 1/βKlotho complex, a common receptor for FGF21 and FGF19. Using this molecule, we show that antibody-mediated activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex in mice induces sustained energy expenditure in BAT, browning of white adipose tissue, weight loss, and improvements in obesity-associated metabolic derangements including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hepatosteatosis. In mice and cynomolgus monkeys, FGFR1/βKlotho activation increased serum high-molecular-weight adiponectin, which appears to contribute over time by enhancing the amplitude of the metabolic benefits. At the same time, insulin sensitization by FGFR1/βKlotho activation occurs even before the onset of weight loss in a manner that is independent of adiponectin. Together, selective activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex with a long acting therapeutic antibody represents an attractive approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and other obesity-linked disorders through enhanced energy expenditure, insulin sensitization and induction of high-molecular-weight adiponectin.

  1. Cannabis, cannabinoids and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Park, Boram; McPartland, John M; Glass, Michelle

    2004-02-01

    In most countries Cannabis is the most widely used illegal drug. Its use during pregnancy in developed nations is estimated to be approximately 10%. Recent evidence suggests that the endogenous cannabinoid system, now consisting of two receptors and multiple endocannabinoid ligands, may also play an important role in the maintenance and regulation of early pregnancy and fertility. The purpose of this review is therefore twofold, to examine the impact that cannabis use may have on fertility and reproduction, and to review the potential role of the endocannabinoid system in hormonal regulation, embryo implantation and maintenance of pregnancy.

  2. Soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 and IL-6 plasma levels in humans subjected to the sleep deprivation model of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, W. T.; Reuben, J. M.; Mullington, J. M.; Price, N. J.; Lee, B. N.; Smith, E. O.; Szuba, M. P.; Van Dongen, H. P.; Dinges, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent to which sleep loss may predispose astronauts to a state of altered immunity during extended space travel prompts evaluation with ground-based models. OBJECTIVE: We sought to measure plasma levels of selected cytokines and their receptors, including the putative sleep-regulation proteins soluble TNF-alpha receptor (sTNF-alpha R) I and IL-6, in human subjects undergoing 2 types of sleep deprivation during environmental confinement with performance demands. METHODS: Healthy adult men (n = 42) were randomized to schedules that varied in severity of sleep loss: 4 days (88 hours) of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) involving two 2-hour naps per day or 4 days of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Plasma samples were obtained every 6 hours across 5 days and analyzed by using enzyme-linked immunoassays for sTNF-alpha RI, sTNF-alpha RII, IL-6, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-10, and TNF-alpha. RESULTS: Interactions between the effects of time and sleep deprivation level were detected for sTNF-alpha RI and IL-6 but not for sTNF-alpha RII, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-10, and TNF-alpha. Relative to the PSD condition, subjects in the TSD condition had elevated plasma levels of sTNF-alpha RI on day 2 (P =.04), day 3 (P =.01), and across days 2 to 4 of sleep loss (P =.01) and elevated levels of IL-6 on day 4 (P =.04). CONCLUSIONS: Total sleep loss produced significant increases in plasma levels of sTNF-alpha RI and IL-6, messengers that connect the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. These changes appeared to reflect elevations of the homeostatic drive for sleep because they occurred in TSD but not PSD, suggesting that naps may serve as the basis for a countermeasures approach to prolonged spaceflight.

  3. Soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 and IL-6 plasma levels in humans subjected to the sleep deprivation model of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, W. T.; Reuben, J. M.; Mullington, J. M.; Price, N. J.; Lee, B. N.; Smith, E. O.; Szuba, M. P.; Van Dongen, H. P.; Dinges, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent to which sleep loss may predispose astronauts to a state of altered immunity during extended space travel prompts evaluation with ground-based models. OBJECTIVE: We sought to measure plasma levels of selected cytokines and their receptors, including the putative sleep-regulation proteins soluble TNF-alpha receptor (sTNF-alpha R) I and IL-6, in human subjects undergoing 2 types of sleep deprivation during environmental confinement with performance demands. METHODS: Healthy adult men (n = 42) were randomized to schedules that varied in severity of sleep loss: 4 days (88 hours) of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) involving two 2-hour naps per day or 4 days of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Plasma samples were obtained every 6 hours across 5 days and analyzed by using enzyme-linked immunoassays for sTNF-alpha RI, sTNF-alpha RII, IL-6, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-10, and TNF-alpha. RESULTS: Interactions between the effects of time and sleep deprivation level were detected for sTNF-alpha RI and IL-6 but not for sTNF-alpha RII, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-10, and TNF-alpha. Relative to the PSD condition, subjects in the TSD condition had elevated plasma levels of sTNF-alpha RI on day 2 (P =.04), day 3 (P =.01), and across days 2 to 4 of sleep loss (P =.01) and elevated levels of IL-6 on day 4 (P =.04). CONCLUSIONS: Total sleep loss produced significant increases in plasma levels of sTNF-alpha RI and IL-6, messengers that connect the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems. These changes appeared to reflect elevations of the homeostatic drive for sleep because they occurred in TSD but not PSD, suggesting that naps may serve as the basis for a countermeasures approach to prolonged spaceflight.

  4. Riluzole enhances ionizing radiation-induced cytotoxicity in human melanoma cells that ectopically express metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Khan, Atif J; Wall, Brian; Ahlawat, Stuti; Green, Camille; Schiff, Devora; Mehnert, Janice M; Goydos, James S; Chen, Suzie; Haffty, Bruce G

    2011-04-01

    Brain metastases are a common preterminal event in patients with metastatic melanoma and require radiation therapy. Our group has previously shown that human GRM1 (hGRM1) expressing melanoma cells release excess extracellular glutamate and are growth inhibited by riluzole, an inhibitor of glutamate release. Riluzole-treated cells accumulate in G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle at 24 hours, and then undergo apoptotic cell death. We evaluated whether riluzole enhanced radiosensitivity in melanoma cells. Clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate clonogenic survival after treatment in hGRM1 expressing and nonexpressing melanoma cells. Western immunoblots were performed to confirm apoptotic cell death. A xenograft mouse model was used to validate the in vitro experiments. Tumors harvested from the xenografts were fixed and stained for apoptosis and DNA damage markers. In the hGRM1-positive cell lines C8161 and UACC903, riluzole enhanced the lethal effects of ionizing radiation; no difference was seen in the hGRM1-negative UACC930 cell line. C8161 cells treated with riluzole plus irradiation also showed the highest levels of the cleaved forms of PARP and caspase-3; excised C8161 xenografts showed the greatest number of apoptotic cells by immunohistochemistry (P < 0.001). On cell cycle analysis, a sequence-dependent enrichment in the G(2)/M phase was shown with the combination of riluzole and irradiation. Xenografts treated with riluzole and weekly radiation fractions showed significant growth inhibition and revealed markedly increased DNA damage. We have shown, in vitro and in vivo, that the combination of riluzole and ionizing radiation leads to greater cytotoxicity. These results have clinical implications for patients with brain metastases receiving whole brain radiation therapy.

  5. ‘Riluzole Enhances Ionizing Radiation-induced Cytotoxicity in Human Melanoma Cells that Ectopically Express Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1 In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Atif J; Wall, Brian; Ahlawat, Stuti; Green, Camille; Schiff, Devora; Mehnert, Janice M; Goydos, James S; Chen, Suzie; Haffty, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Brain metastases are a common pre-terminal event in patients with metastatic melanoma and require radiation therapy. Our group has previously demonstrated that human GRM1 (hGRM1) expressing melanoma cells release excess extracellular glutamate and are growth inhibited by riluzole, an inhibitor of glutamate release. Riluzole treated cells accumulate in G2/M phase of the cell cycle at 24 hours, and then undergo apoptotic cell death. We evaluated whether riluzole enhanced radiosensitivity in melanoma cells. Experimental Design Clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate clonogenic survival after treatment in hGRM1 expressing and non-expressing melanoma cells. Western immunoblots were performed to confirm apoptotic cell death. A xenograft mouse model was used to validate the in vitro experiments. Tumors harvested from the xenografts were fixed and stained for apoptosis and DNA damage markers. Results In the hGRM1-positive cell lines C8161 and UACC903, riluzole enhanced the lethal effects of ionizing radiation; no difference was seen in the hGRM1-negative UACC930 cell line. C8161 cells treated with riluzole plus irradiation also showed the highest levels of the cleaved forms of PARP and caspase-3; excised C8161 xenografts demonstrated the greatest number of apoptotic cells by immunohistochemistry (p<0.001). On cell cycle analysis, a sequence-dependent enrichment in the G2/M phase was demonstrated with the combination of riluzole and irradiation. Xenografts treated with riluzole and weekly radiation fractions demonstrated significant growth inhibition and revealed markedly increased DNA damage. Conclusions We have demonstrated, in vitro and in vivo, that the combination of riluzole and ionizing radiation leads to greater cytotoxicity. These results have clinical implications for patients with brain metastases receiving whole brain radiation therapy. PMID:21325066

  6. Peptide length and folding state govern the capacity of staphylococcal β-type phenol-soluble modulins to activate human formyl-peptide receptors 1 or 2.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Dorothee; Rautenberg, Maren; Linke, Dirk; Peschel, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Most staphylococci produce short α-type PSMs and about twice as long β-type PSMs that are potent leukocyte attractants and toxins. PSMs are usually secreted with the N-terminal formyl group but are only weak agonists for the leukocyte FPR1. Instead, the FPR1-related FPR2 senses PSMs efficiently and is crucial for leukocyte recruitment in infection. Which structural features distinguish FPR1 from FPR2 ligands has remained elusive. To analyze which peptide properties may govern the capacities of β-type PSMs to activate FPRs, full-length and truncated variants of such peptides from Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus lugdunensis were synthesized. FPR2 activation was observed even for short N- or C-terminal β-type PSM variants once they were longer than 18 aa, and this activity increased with length. In contrast, the shortest tested peptides were potent FPR1 agonists, and this property declined with increasing peptide length. Whereas full-length β-type PSMs formed α-helices and exhibited no FPR1-specific activity, the truncated peptides had less-stable secondary structures, were weak agonists for FPR1, and required N-terminal formyl-methionine residues to be FPR2 agonists. Together, these data suggest that FPR1 and FPR2 have opposed ligand preferences. Short, flexible PSM structures may favor FPR1 but not FPR2 activation, whereas longer peptides with α-helical, amphipathic properties are strong FPR2 but only weak FPR1 agonists. These findings should help to unravel the ligand specificities of 2 critical human PRRs, and they may be important for new, anti-infective and anti-inflammatory strategies.

  7. Synthetic Cannabinoids: Epidemiology, Pharmacodynamics, and Clinical Implications*

    PubMed Central

    Castaneto, Marisol S.; Gorelick, David A.; Desrosiers, Nathalie A.; Hartman, Rebecca L.; Pirard, Sandrine; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthetic cannabinoids (SC) are a heterogeneous group of compounds developed to probe the endogenous cannabinoid system or as potential therapeutics. Clandestine laboratories subsequently utilized published data to develop SC variations marketed as abuseable “designer drugs.” In the early 2000’s, SC became popular as “legal highs” under brand names such as “Spice” and “K2,” in part due to their ability to escape detection by standard cannabinoid screening tests. The majority of SC detected in herbal products have greater binding affinity to the cannabinoid CB1 receptor than does Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive compound in the cannabis plant, and greater affinity at the CB1 than the CB2 receptor. In-vitro and animal in-vivo studies show SC pharmacological effects 2-100 times more potent than THC, including analgesic, anti-seizure, weight-loss, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer growth effects. SC produce physiological and psychoactive effects similar to THC, but with greater intensity, resulting in medical and psychiatric emergencies. Human adverse effects include nausea and vomiting, shortness of breath or depressed breathing, hypertension, tachycardia, chest pain, muscle twitches, acute renal failure, anxiety, agitation, psychosis, suicidal ideation, and cognitive impairment. Long-term or residual effects are unknown. Due to these public health consequences, many SC are classified as controlled substances. However, frequent structural modification by clandestine laboratories results in a stream of novel SC that may not be legally controlled or detectable by routine laboratory tests. Methods We present here a comprehensive review, based on a systematic electronic literature search, of SC epidemiology and pharmacology and their clinical implications. PMID:25220897

  8. Cannabinoids as pharmacotherapies for neuropathic pain: from the bench to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2009-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus, multiple sclerosis, and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) agonists, CB(2) selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e., inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Delta(9)-THC analogs (e.g., Marinol, Cesamet) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Delta(9)-THC and cannabidiol (e.g., Sativex, Cannador) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e., rating scales) and objective (i.e., stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research.

  9. Expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 in distinct neuronal subpopulations in the adult mouse forebrain.

    PubMed

    Marsicano, G; Lutz, B

    1999-12-01

    Cannabinoids can modulate motor behaviour, learning and memory, cognition and pain perception. These effects correlate with the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and with the presence of endogenous cannabinoids in the brain. In trying to obtain further insights into the mechanisms underlying the modulatory effects of cannabinoids, CB1-positive neurons were determined in the murine forebrain at a single cell resolution. We performed a double in situ hybridization study to detect mRNA of CB1 in combination with mRNA of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65k, neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK), parvalbumin, calretinin and calbindin D28k, respectively. Our results revealed that CB1-expressing cells can be divided into distinct neuronal subpopulations. There is a clear distinction between neurons containing CB1 mRNA either at high levels or low levels. The majority of high CB1-expressing cells are GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) neurons belonging mainly to the cholecystokinin-positive and parvalbumin-negative type of interneurons (basket cells) and, to a lower extent, to the calbindin D28k-positive mid-proximal dendritic inhibitory interneurons. Only a fraction of low CB1-expressing cells is GABAergic. In the hippocampus, amygdala and entorhinal cortex area, CB1 mRNA is present at low but significant levels in many non-GABAergic cells that can be considered as projecting principal neurons. Thus, a complex mechanism appears to underlie the modulatory effects of cannabinoids. They might act on principal glutamatergic circuits as well as modulate local GABAergic inhibitory circuits. CB1 is very highly coexpressed with CCK. It is known that cannabinoids and CCK often have opposite effects on behaviour and physiology. Therefore, we suggest that a putative cross-talk between cannabinoids and CCK might exist and will be relevant to better understanding of physiology and pharmacology of the cannabinoid system.

  10. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of use of the synthetic cannabinoid agonists UR-144 and XLR-11 in human urine.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Amanda L A; Ofsa, Bill; Keil, Alyssa Marie; Simon, John R; McMullin, Matthew; Logan, Barry K

    2014-09-01

    Ongoing changes in the synthetic cannabinoid drug market create the need for relevant targeted immunoassays for rapid screening of biological samples. We describe the validation and performance characteristics of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay designed to detect use of one of the most prevalent synthetic cannabinoids in urine, UR-144, by targeting its pentanoic acid metabolite. Fluorinated UR-144 (XLR-11) has been demonstrated to metabolize to this common product. The assay has significant cross-reactivity with UR-144-5-OH, UR-144-4-OH and XLR-11-4-OH metabolites, but <10% cross-reactivity with the parent compounds, and no measurable cross-reactivity with other synthetic cannabinoids and their metabolites at concentrations of <1,000 ng/mL. The assay's cutoff is 5 ng/mL relative to the pentanoic acid metabolite of UR-144, which is used as the calibrator. The method was validated with 90 positive and negative control urine samples for UR-144, XLR-11 and its metabolites tested versus liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were determined to be 100% for the assay at the specified cutoff. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A novel synthetic analogue of ω-3 17,18-epoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid activates TNF receptor-1/ASK1/JNK signaling to promote apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dyari, Herryawan Ryadi Eziwar; Rawling, Tristan; Chen, Yongjuan; Sudarmana, William; Bourget, Kirsi; Dwyer, Julie M; Allison, Sarah E; Murray, Michael

    2017-08-10

    A saturated analog of the cytochrome P450-mediated ω-3-17,18-epoxide of ω-3-eicosapentaenoic acid (C20E) activated apoptosis in human triple-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. This study evaluated the apoptotic mechanism of C20E. Increased cytosolic cytochrome c expression and altered expression of pro- and antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 proteins indicated activation of the mitochondrial pathway. Caspase-3 activation by C20E was prevented by pharmacological inhibition and silencing of the JNK and p38 MAP kinases (MAPK), upstream MAPK kinases MKK4 and MKK7, and the upstream MAPK kinase kinase apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). Silencing of the death receptor TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1), but not Fas, DR4, or DR5, and the adapters TRADD and TNF receptor-associated factor 2, but not Fas-associated death domain, prevented C20E-mediated apoptosis. B-cell lymphoma-2 homology 3-interacting domain death agonist (Bid) cleavage by JNK/p38 MAPK linked the extrinsic and mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis. In further studies, an antibody against the extracellular domain of TNFR1 prevented apoptosis by TNF-α but not C20E. These findings suggest that C20E acts intracellularly at TNFR1 to activate ASK1-MKK4/7-JNK/p38 MAPK signaling and to promote Bid-dependent mitochondrial disruption and apoptosis. In in vivo studies, tumors isolated from C20E-treated nu/nu mice carrying MDA-MB-231 xenografts showed increased TUNEL staining and decreased Ki67 staining, reflecting increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation, respectively. ω-3-Epoxy fatty acids like C20E could be incorporated into treatments for triple-negative breast cancers.-Dyari, H. R. E., Rawling, T., Chen, Y., Sudarmana, W., Bourget, K., Dwyer, J. M., Allison, S. E., Murray, M. A novel synthetic analogue of ω-3 17,18-epoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid activates TNF receptor-1/ASK1/JNK signaling to promote apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. © FASEB.

  12. Cannabinoids receptor type 2, CB2, expression correlates with human colon cancer progression and predicts patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Esther; Gómez, Irene; Martín, Paloma; Sánchez, Antonio; Román, Laura; Tejerina, Eva; Bonilla, Félix; Merino, Antonio García; de Herreros, Antonio García; Provencio, Mariano; García, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is altered in different tumor types, including colon cancer. However, little is known about the role of the ECS in tumor progression. Here we report the correlation between CB2 expression and pathological data in a series of 175 colorectal cancer patients, as well as the response of the HT29 colon cancer-derived cell line upon CB2 activation. CB2 mRNA was detected in 28.6% of samples tested. It was more frequent in N+ patients and predicts disease free survival and overall survival in colon cancer. In positive samples, CB2 was expressed with great intensity in tumor epithelial cells and correlated with tumor growth. Treatment of HT29 with CB2 agonist revealed membrane loss of E-cadherin and SNAIL1 overexpression. A direct correlation between CB2 and SNAIL1 expression was also found in human tumors. CB2 receptor expression is a poor prognostic marker for colon cancer and the activation of this receptor, with non-apoptotic doses of agonists, could be collaborating with disease progression. These results raise the question whether the activation of CB2 should be considered as anti-tumoral therapy. PMID:25859556

  13. Cannabinoids receptor type 2, CB2, expression correlates with human colon cancer progression and predicts patient survival.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Esther; Gómez, Irene; Martín, Paloma; Sánchez, Antonio; Román, Laura; Tejerina, Eva; Bonilla, Félix; Merino, Antonio García; de Herreros, Antonio García; Provencio, Mariano; García, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is altered in different tumor types, including colon cancer. However, little is known about the role of the ECS in tumor progression. Here we report the correlation between CB 2 expression and pathological data in a series of 175 colorectal cancer patients, as well as the response of the HT29 colon cancer-derived cell line upon CB 2 activation. CB 2 mRNA was detected in 28.6% of samples tested. It was more frequent in N+ patients and predicts disease free survival and overall survival in colon cancer. In positive samples, CB 2 was expressed with great intensity in tumor epithelial cells and correlated with tumor growth. Treatment of HT29 with CB 2 agonist revealed membrane loss of E-cadherin and SNAIL1 overexpression. A direct correlation between CB 2 and SNAIL1 expression was also found in human tumors. CB 2 receptor expression is a poor prognostic marker for colon cancer and the activation of this receptor, with non-apoptotic doses of agonists, could be collaborating with disease progression. These results raise the question whether the activation of CB 2 should be considered as anti-tumoral therapy.

  14. A PET study comparing receptor occupancy by five selective cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonists in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Hjorth, Stephan; Karlsson, Cecilia; Jucaite, Aurelija; Varnäs, Katarina; Hamrén, Ulrika Wählby; Johnström, Peter; Gulyás, Balázs; Donohue, Sean R; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars

    2015-01-01

    There is a medical need for safe and efficacious anti-obesity drugs with acceptable side effect profiles. To mitigate the challenge posed by translating target interaction across species and balancing beneficial vs. adverse effects, a positron emission tomography (PET) approach could help guide clinical dose optimization. Thus, as part of a compound differentiation effort, three novel selective CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonists, developed by AstraZeneca (AZ) for the treatment of obesity, were compared with two clinically tested reference compounds, rimonabant and taranabant, with regard to receptor occupancy relative to dose and exposure. A total of 42 PET measurements were performed in 6 non-human primates using the novel CB1R antagonist radioligand [11C]SD5024. The AZ CB1R antagonists bound in a saturable manner to brain CB1R with in vivo affinities similar to that of rimonabant and taranabant, compounds with proven weight loss efficacy in clinical trials. Interestingly, it was found that exposures corresponding to those needed for optimal clinical efficacy of rimonabant and taranabant resulted in a CB1R occupancy typically around ~20–30%, thus much lower than what would be expected for classical G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists in other therapeutic contexts. These findings are also discussed in relation to emerging literature on the potential usefulness of ‘neutral’ vs. ‘classical’ CB1R (inverse agonist) antagonists. The study additionally highlighted the usefulness of the radioligand [11C]SD5024 as a specific tracer for CB1R in the primate brain, though an arterial input function would ideally be required in future studies to further assure accurate quantitative analysis of specific binding. PMID:25791528

  15. Quantitation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in healthy human brain using positron emission tomography and an inverse agonist radioligand

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Garth E.; Liow, Jeih-San; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Hirvonen, Jussi; Farris, Amanda G.; Lerner, Alicja; Tauscher, Johannes T.; Schaus, John M.; Phebus, Lee; Felder, Christian C.; Morse, Cheryl L.; Hong, Jinsoo S.; Pike, Victor W.; Halldin, Christer; Innis, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    [11C]MePPEP is a high affinity, CB1 receptor-selective, inverse agonist that has been studied in rodents and monkeys. We examined the ability of [11C]MePPEP to quantify CB1 receptors in human brain as distribution volume calculated with the “gold standard” method of compartmental modeling and compared results with the simple measure of brain uptake. A total of 17 healthy subjects participated in 26 positron emission tomography (PET) scans, with 8 having two PET scans to assess retest variability. After injection of [11C]MePPEP, brain uptake of radioactivity was high (e.g., 3.6 SUV in putamen region at ~60 minutes) and washed out very slowly. A two-tissue compartment model yielded values of distribution volume (which is proportional to receptor density) that were both well identified (SE 5%) and stable between 60 and 210 minutes. The simple measure of brain uptake (average concentration of radioactivity between 40 and 80 minutes) had good retest variability (~8%) and moderate intersubject variability (16%, coefficient of variation). In contrast, distribution volume had two-fold greater retest variability (~15%) and, thus, less precision. In addition, distribution volume had three-fold greater intersubject variability (~52%). The decreased precision of distribution volume compared to brain uptake was likely due to the slow washout of radioactivity from brain and to noise in measurements of the low concentrations of [11C]MePPEP in plasma. These results suggest that brain uptake can be used for within subject studies (e.g., to measure receptor occupancy by medications) but that distribution volume remains the gold standard for accurate measurements between groups. PMID:19573609

  16. Simultaneous quantification of eleven cannabinoids and metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using WAX-S tips

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Maria; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Sempio, Cristina; Barnes, Allan; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive cannabinoids urine quantification method may improve clinical and forensic results interpretation and is necessary to support our clinical research. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry quantification method for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCAA), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THCV (THCVCOOH), THC-glucuronide (THC-gluc) and THCCOOH-gluc (THCCOOH-gluc) in urine was developed and validated according to the Scientific Working Group on Toxicology guidelines. Sample preparation consisted of disposable pipette extraction (WAX-S) of 200μL urine. Separation was achieved on a Kinetex C18 column using gradient elution with flow rate 0.5 mL/min, mobile phase A (10 mM ammonium acetate in water) and mobile phase B (15% methanol in acetonitrile). Total run time was 14 min. Analytes were monitored in both positive and negative ionization modes by scheduled multiple reaction monitoring. Linear ranges were 0.5–100 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH, 0.5–50 μg/L for 11-OH-THC, CBD, CBN, THCAA and THC-gluc, 1–100 μg/L for CBG, THCV and THCVCOOH and 5–500 μg/L for THCCOOH-gluc (R2>0.99). Analytical biases were 88.3–113.7%, imprecisions 3.3–14.3%, extraction efficiencies 42.4–81.5% and matrix effect −10 to 32.5%. We developed and validated a comprehensive, simple and rapid LC-MS/MS cannabinoid urine method for quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites. This method is being used in a controlled cannabis administration study, investigating urine cannabinoid markers documenting recent cannabis use, chronic frequent smoking or route of drug administration and potentially improving urine cannabinoid result interpretation. PMID:27422645

  17. Simultaneous quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using WAX-S tips.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Maria; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Sempio, Cristina; Barnes, Allan J; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive cannabinoid urine quantification method may improve clinical and forensic result interpretation and is necessary to support our clinical research. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry quantification method for ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCAA), cannabinol (CBN), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabigerol (CBG), ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THCV (THCVCOOH), THC-glucuronide (THC-gluc), and THCCOOH-glucuronide (THCCOOH-gluc) in urine was developed and validated according to the Scientific Working Group on Toxicology guidelines. Sample preparation consisted of disposable pipette extraction (WAX-S) of 200 μL urine. Separation was achieved on a Kinetex C18 column using gradient elution with flow rate 0.5 mL/min, mobile phase A (10 mM ammonium acetate in water), and mobile phase B (15 % methanol in acetonitrile). Total run time was 14 min. Analytes were monitored in both positive and negative ionization modes by scheduled multiple reaction monitoring. Linear ranges were 0.5-100 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH; 0.5-50 μg/L for 11-OH-THC, CBD, CBN, THCAA, and THC-gluc; 1-100 μg/L for CBG, THCV, and THCVCOOH; and 5-500 μg/L for THCCOOH-gluc (R (2) > 0.99). Analytical biases were 88.3-113.7 %, imprecisions 3.3-14.3 %, extraction efficiencies 42.4-81.5 %, and matrix effect -10 to 32.5 %. We developed and validated a comprehensive, simple, and rapid LC-MS/MS cannabinoid urine method for quantification of 11 cannabinoids and metabolites. This method is being used in a controlled cannabis administration study, investigating urine cannabinoid markers documenting recent cannabis use, chronic frequent smoking, or route of drug administration and potentially improving urine cannabinoid result interpretation.

  18. Changes in the cannabinoid (CB1) receptor expression level and G-protein activation in kainic acid induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Bojnik, Engin; Turunç, Ezgi; Armağan, Güliz; Kanıt, Lütfiye; Benyhe, Sándor; Yalçın, Ayfer; Borsodi, Anna

    2012-03-01

    It has been known for centuries that exogenous cannabinoids, such as tetrahydrocannabinol have anticonvulsant activity. Recent studies have advanced our understanding of the endogenous cannabinoid system and renewed the interest in cannabinoids as a potential treatment for epilepsy. The endogenous cannabinoid system is rapidly activated after seizure activity but still little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of the cannabinoid system in epilepsy. In this study epileptiform activity was induced by kainic acid (KA) and effects of the CB1 receptor agonists N-(2-Chloroethyl)-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenamide (ACEA) on G-protein signaling using the agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay were evaluated. Control and KA treated rat hippocampus and cortex membranes were used. Our results showed that the ACEA displayed a high potency and efficacy in stimulating the G-proteins and when compared to the control animals, significant enhancements were observed in tissues from the KA treated animals. Potency and efficacy values were in particular increased in the hippocampus tissues. Furthermore, gene expression levels of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptor and cannabinoid receptor interacting protein 1 (CRIP1) were measured by RT-PCR, where both CB1 and CRIP1 expressions were found to be elevated in the KA treated animals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Cannabinoid system and feeding regulation].

    PubMed

    Arias Horcajadas, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the cannabinoid system is a crucial mechanism in the regulation of feeding and metabolism. It is against this background that a cannabinoid antagonist, rimonabant, is about to come onto the market for the treatment of obesity. Moreover, in addition to weight-loss effect, this drug has a beneficial effect on the so-called metabolic syndrome, with changes in the lipid and glucidic metabolism not observed for other anti-obesity drugs currently available. We present a review of current knowledge in this field and data from our own studies: genetic studies of this system in eating disorders and in obesity and studies of localization of cannabinoid receptors at sites related to feeding. These studies support a state of cannabinoid hyperactivity in obesity; furthermore, such hyperactivity can constitute a prognostic factor.

  20. A runner’s high depends on cannabinoid receptors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Johannes; Steinle, Jörg; Bindila, Laura; Auer, Matthias K.; Kirchherr, Hartmut; Lutz, Beat; Gass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is rewarding, and long-distance runners have described a runner’s high as a sudden pleasant feeling of euphoria, anxiolysis, sedation, and analgesia. A popular belief has been that endogenous endorphins mediate these beneficial effects. However, running exercise increases blood levels of both β-endorphin (an opioid) and anandamide (an endocannabinoid). Using a combination of pharmacologic, molecular genetic, and behavioral studies in mice, we demonstrate that cannabinoid receptors mediate acute anxiolysis and analgesia after running. We show that anxiolysis depends on intact cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptors on forebrain GABAergic neurons and pain reduction on activation of peripheral CB1 and CB2 receptors. We thus demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system is crucial for two main aspects of a runner's high. Sedation, in contrast, was not influenced by cannabinoid or opioid receptor blockage, and euphoria cannot be studied in mouse models. PMID:26438875

  1. Cannabinoid Receptors in Regulating the GI Tract: Experimental Evidence and Therapeutic Relevance.

    PubMed

    Taschler, Ulrike; Hasenoehrl, Carina; Storr, Martin; Schicho, Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors are fundamentally involved in all aspects of intestinal physiology, such as motility, secretion, and epithelial barrier function. They are part of a broader entity, the so-called endocannabinoid system which also includes their endocannabinoid ligands and the ligands' synthesizing/degrading enzymes. The system has a strong impact on the pathophysiology of the gastrointestinal tract and is believed to maintain homeostasis in the gut by controlling hypercontractility and by promoting regeneration after injury. For instance, genetic knockout of cannabinoid receptor 1 leads to inflammation and cancer of the intestines. Derivatives of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, such as nabilone and dronabinol, activate cannabinoid receptors and have been introduced into the clinic to treat chemotherapy-induced emesis and loss of appetite; however, they may cause many psychotropic side effects. New drugs that interfere with endocannabinoid degradation to raise endocannabinoid levels circumvent this obstacle and could be used in the future to treat emesis, intestinal inflammation, and functional disorders associated with visceral hyperalgesia.

  2. Weeding out bad waves: towards selective cannabinoid circuit control in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Soltesz, Ivan; Alger, Bradley E; Kano, Masanobu; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lovinger, David M; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Endocannabinoids are lipid-derived messengers, and both their synthesis and breakdown are under tight spatiotemporal regulation. As retrograde signalling molecules, endocannabinoids are synthesized postsynaptically but activate presynaptic cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptors to inhibit neurotransmitter release. In turn, CB1-expressing inhibitory and excitatory synapses act as strategically placed control points for activity-dependent regulation of dynamically changing normal and pathological oscillatory network activity. Here, we highlight emerging principles of cannabinoid circuit control and plasticity, and discuss their relevance for epilepsy and related comorbidities. New insights into cannabinoid signalling may facilitate the translation of the recent interest in cannabis-related substances as antiseizure medications to evidence-based treatment strategies.

  3. Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Cerebral Metabolism: Potential Applications in Stroke and Disorders of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Julius Gene S; Schmidt, Elena B

    2015-09-01

    No compound has generated more attention in both the scientific and recently in the political arena as much as cannabinoids. These diverse groups of compounds referred collectively as cannabinoids have both been vilified due to its dramatic and potentially harmful psychotropic effects and glorified due to its equally dramatic and potential application in a number of acute and chronic neurological conditions. Previously illegal to possess, cannabis, the plant where natural form of cannabinoids are derived, is now accepted in a growing number of states for medicinal purpose, and some even for recreational use, increasing opportunities for more scientific experimentation. The purpose of this review is to summarize the growing body of literature on cannabinoids and to present an overview of our current state of knowledge of the human endocannabinoid system in the hope of defining the future of cannabinoids and its potential applications in disorders of the central nervous system, focusing on stroke.

  4. Effects of cannabinoids and cannabinoid-enriched Cannabis extracts on TRP channels and endocannabinoid metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Ligresti, Alessia; Moriello, Aniello Schiano; Allarà, Marco; Bisogno, Tiziana; Petrosino, Stefania; Stott, Colin G; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2011-08-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) interact with transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and enzymes of the endocannabinoid system. The effects of 11 pure cannabinoids and botanical extracts [botanical drug substance (BDS)] from Cannabis varieties selected to contain a more abundant cannabinoid, on TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPM8, TRPA1, human recombinant diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGLα), rat brain fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), COS cell monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), human recombinant N-acylethanolamine acid amide hydrolase (NAAA) and anandamide cellular uptake (ACU) by RBL-2H3 cells, were studied using fluorescence-based calcium assays in transfected cells and radiolabelled substrate-based enzymatic assays. Cannabinol (CBN), cannabichromene (CBC), the acids (CBDA, CBGA, THCA) and propyl homologues (CBDV, CBGV, THCV) of CBD, cannabigerol (CBG) and THC, and tetrahydrocannabivarin acid (THCVA) were also tested. CBD, CBG, CBGV and THCV stimulated and desensitized human TRPV1. CBC, CBD and CBN were potent rat TRPA1 agonists and desensitizers, but THCV-BDS was the most potent compound at this target. CBG-BDS and THCV-BDS were the most potent rat TRPM8 antagonists. All non-acid cannabinoids, except CBC and CBN, potently activated and desensitized rat TRPV2. CBDV and all the acids inhibited DAGLα. Some BDS, but not the pure compounds, inhibited MAGL. CBD was the only compound to inhibit FAAH, whereas the BDS of CBC > CBG > CBGV inhibited NAAA. CBC = CBG > CBD inhibited ACU, as did the BDS of THCVA, CBGV, CBDA and THCA, but the latter extracts were more potent inhibitors. These results are relevant to the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects of cannabinoids and Cannabis extracts. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. Cannabinoid signaling system

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, María; Hernández, Mariluz

    2008-01-01

    The cannabinoid signaling system is located during brain development in a position concordant with playing a modulatory function in the regulation of neuronal and glial cell proliferation and migration, survival of neural progenitors, axonal elongation and synaptogenesis and differentiation of oligodendrocytes and formation of myelin. This assumption is based on the fact that CB1 receptors and their ligands emerge early in brain development and are transiently expressed in certain brain regions that play key roles in these processes. We have recently proposed that this modulatory action might be exerted through regulating L1 and other cell adhesion molecules, that are also key elements for those processes. The present commentary will address these two questions trying to summarize all the available evidence and to suggest the future directions for research. PMID:19262157

  6. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  7. Behavioural and neuroendocrine effects of cannabinoids in critical developmental periods.

    PubMed

    Viveros, M P; Llorente, R; Moreno, E; Marco, E M

    2005-09-01

    The present article focuses on psychoneuroendocrine effects of cannabinoids in developing animals, with special emphasis on the perinatal, periweanling and periadolescent periods. We describe and discuss published data dealing with acute and long-term effects of exposure to cannabinoid agonists in such critical periods. Human studies have demonstrated that the consumption of marijuana by women during pregnancy affects the neurobehavioural development of their children. Investigations using animal models provide useful information for a better understanding of the long-lasting deleterious consequences of cannabis exposure during pregnancy and lactation. The increasing use of cannabis among adolescents and its associated public health problems have led to a parallel increase in basic research on appropriate animal models. Chronic administration of cannabinoid agonists during the periadolescent period causes persistent behavioural alterations in adult animals. Some of these alterations may be related to a possible increased risk of psychosis and other neuropsychiatric disorders in early onset cannabis users.

  8. Pharmacological characterization of the cannabinoid CB₁ receptor PET ligand ortholog, [³H]MePPEP.

    PubMed

    Suter, Todd M; Chesterfield, Amy K; Bao, Chun; Schaus, John M; Krushinski, Joseph H; Statnick, Michael A; Felder, Christian C

    2010-12-15

    MePPEP ((3R,5R)-5-(3-methoxy-phenyl)-3-((R)-1-phenyl-ethylamino)-1-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-pyrrolidin-2-one) is an inverse agonist shown to be an effective PET ligand for labeling cannabinoid CB₁ receptors in vivo. [¹¹C]MePPEP and structurally related analogs have been reported to specifically and reversibly label cannabinoid CB₁ receptors in rat and non-human primate brains, and [¹¹C]MePPEP has been used in human subjects as a PET tracer. We have generated [³H]MePPEP, an ortholog of [¹¹C]MePPEP, to characterize the molecular pharmacology of the cannabinoid CB₁ receptor across preclinical and clinical species. [³H]MePPEP demonstrates saturable, reversible, and single-site high affinity binding to cannabinoid CB₁ receptors. In cerebellar membranes purified from brains of rat, non-human primate and human, and cells ectopically expressing recombinant human cannabinoid CB₁ receptor, [³H]MePPEP binds cannabinoid CB₁ receptors with similar affinity with K(d) values of 0.09 nM, 0.19 nM, 0.14 nM and 0.16 nM, respectively. Both agonist and antagonist cannabinoid ligands compete [³H]MePPEP with predicted rank order potency. No specific binding is present in autoradiographic sections from cannabinoid CB₁ receptor knockout mouse brains, demonstrating that [³H]MePPEP selectively binds cannabinoid CB₁ receptors in native mouse tissue. Furthermore, [³H]MePPEP binding to anatomical sites in mouse and rat brain is comparable to the anatomical profiles of [¹¹C]MePPEP in non-human primate and human brain in vivo, as well as the binding profiles of other previously described cannabinoid CB₁ receptor agonist and antagonist radioligands. Therefore, [³H]MePPEP is a promising tool for translation of preclinical cannabinoid CB₁ receptor pharmacology to clinical PET ligand and cannabinoid CB₁ receptor inverse agonist therapeutic development.

  9. Immunolocalization of cannabinoid receptor type 1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, and transient receptor potential vanilloid channels in pterygium.

    PubMed

    Assimakopoulou, Martha; Pagoulatos, Dionysios; Nterma, Pinelopi; Pharmakakis, Nikolaos

    2017-10-01

    Cannabinoids, as multi‑target mediators, activate cannabinoid receptors and transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels. There is evidence to support a functional interaction of cannabinoid receptors and TRPV channels when they are coexpressed. Human conjunctiva demonstrates widespread cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1), CB2 and TRPV channel localization. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression profile for cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) and TRPV channels in pterygium, an ocular surface lesion originating from the conjunctiva. Semi‑serial paraffin‑embedded sections from primary and recurrent pterygium samples were immunohistochemically examined with the use of specific antibodies. All of the epithelial layers in 94, 78, 96, 73 and 80% of pterygia cases, exhibited CB1, CB2, TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPV3 cytoplasmic immunoreactivity, respectively. The epithelium of all pterygia cases (100%) showed strong, mainly nuclear, TRPV4 immunolocalization. In the pterygium stroma, scattered cells demonstrated intense CB2 immunoreactivity, whereas vascular endothelial cells were immunopositive for the cannabinoid receptors and all TRPV channels. Quantitative analyses of the immunohistochemical findings in epithelial cells demonstrated a significantly higher expression level in conjunctiva compared with primary pterygia (P=0.04) for CB1, but not for CB2 (P>0.05). Additionally, CB1 and CB2 were significantly highly expressed in primary pterygia (P=0.01), compared with recurrent pterygia. Furthermore, CB1 expression levels were significantly correlated with CB2 expression levels in primary pterygia (P=0.005), but not in recurrent pterygia (P>0.05). No significant difference was detected for all TRPV channel expression levels between pterygium (primary or recurrent) and conjunctival tissues (P>0.05). A significant correlation between the TRPV1 and TRPV3 expression levels (P<0.001) was detected independently of pterygium recurrence. Finally, TRPV

  10. Plant cannabinoids: a neglected pharmacological treasure trove.

    PubMed

    Mechoulam, Raphael

    2005-12-01

    Most of the cannabinoids in Cannabis sativa L. have not been fully evaluated for their pharmacological activity. A publication in this issue presents evidence that a plant cannabinoid, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin is a potent antagonist of anandamide, a major endogenous cannabinoid. It seems possible that many of the non-psychoactive constituents of this plant will be of biological interest.

  11. Cannabinoids for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gloss, David; Vickrey, Barbara

    2014-03-05

    Marijuana appears to have anti-epileptic effects in animals. It is not currently known if it is effective in patients with epilepsy. Some states in the United States of America have explicitly approved its use for epilepsy. To assess the efficacy and safety of cannabinoids when used as monotherapy or add-on treatment for people with epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (9 September 2013), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 8), MEDLINE (Ovid) (9 September 2013), ISI Web of Knowledge (9 September 2013), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (9 September 2013), and ClinicalTrials.gov (9 September 2013). In addition, we included studies we personally knew about that were not found by the searches, as well as searched the references in the identified studies. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) whether blinded or not. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted the data. The primary outcome investigated was seizure freedom at one year or more, or three times the longest interseizure interval. Secondary outcomes included responder rate at six months or more, objective quality of life data, and adverse events. We found four randomized trial reports that included a total of 48 patients, each of which used cannabidiol as the treatment agent. One report was an abstract and another was a letter to the editor. Anti-epileptic drugs were continued in all studies. Details of randomisation were not included in any study report. There was no investigation of whether the control and treatment participant groups were the same or different. All the reports were low quality.The four reports only answered the secondary outcome about adverse effects. None of the patients in the treatment groups suffered adverse effects. No reliable conclusions can be drawn at present regarding the efficacy of cannabinoids as a treatment for epilepsy. The dose of 200 to 300 mg daily of cannabidiol was

  12. SNAP23-Dependent Surface Translocation of Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) Receptor 1 Is Essential for NOX2-Mediated Exocytotic Degranulation in Human Mast Cells Induced by Trichomonas vaginalis-Secreted LTB4.

    PubMed

    Min, Arim; Lee, Young Ah; Kim, Kyeong Ah; El-Benna, Jamel; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2017-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted parasite that causes vaginitis in women and itself secretes lipid mediator leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Mast cells are important effector cells of tissue inflammation during infection with parasites. Membrane-bridging SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) complexes are critical for fusion during exocytosis. Although T. vaginalis-derived secretory products (TvSP) have been shown to induce exocytosis in mast cells, information regarding the signaling mechanisms between mast cell activation and TvSP is limited. In this study, we found that SNAP23-dependent surface trafficking of LTB4 receptor 1 (BLT1) is required for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2)-mediated exocytotic degranulation of mast cells induced by TvSP. First, stimulation with TvSP induced exocytotic degranulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in HMC-1 cells. Next, TvSP-induced ROS generation and exocytosis were strongly inhibited by transfection of BLT1 small interfering RNA (siRNA). TvSP induced trafficking of BLT1 from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. We also found that knockdown of SNAP23 abrogated TvSP-induced ROS generation, exocytosis, and surface trafficking of BLT1 in HMC-1 cells. By coimmunoprecipitation, there was a physical interaction between BLT1 and SNAP23 in TvSP-stimulated HMC-1 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that SNAP23-dependent surface trafficking of BLT1 is essential for exocytosis in human mast cells induced by T. vaginalis-secreted LTB4 Our data collectively demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism for SNAP23-dependent mast cell activation of T. vaginalis-secreted LTB4 involving surface trafficking of BLT1. These results can help to explain how the cross talk mechanism between parasite and host can govern deliberately tissue inflammatory responses.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor stimulates matrix metalloproteinase 9 secretion from cultured human chorionic trophoblast cells through TNF receptor 1 signaling to IKBKB-NFKB and MAPK1/3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Li, Han; Bocking, Alan D; Challis, John R G

    2010-09-01

    The identification of proinflammatory signal transduction pathways may suggest new therapeutic targets. In this study, we examine which signaling pathways are involved in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) secretion in human chorionic trophoblast (CT) cells. Purified CT cells were cultured in the presence of antibodies or chemical inhibitors that specifically block/inhibit distinct TNF receptors and kinase pathways. TNF-induced proMMP9 production, as measured by zymography, was significantly blocked/inhibited by TNF receptor 1 (TNFRSF1A) antibody, NFKB activation inhibitor (NFKBAI), and MAPK1/3 (ERK) inhibitor (U0126) (P < 0.01), but not by TNF receptor 2 (TNFRSF1B) antibody, MAPK14 (p38 MAPK) inhibitor (SB203580), and MAPK8/9/10 (JNK) inhibitor (SP600125). By Western blot analysis, we found that TNF rapidly and significantly increased phosphorylation of IKBKB, MAPK1/3, and MAPK8/9/10 and that the phosphorylation of these kinases by TNF was reduced significantly by TNFRSF1A neutralizing antibody, but not by TNFRSF1B neutralizing antibody. Moreover, we found that TNF increased TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 1 and decreased TRAF2 protein expression through TNFRSF1A, but not TNFRSF1B. The CT cells that had increased TRAF1 and decreased TRAF2 after an initial TNF treatment demonstrated a dramatic deficiency in phosphorylation of the above protein kinases following a secondary TNF treatment. Localization of RELA subunit by immunocytochemistry was shifted to the nuclei after TNF treatment compared to cytosol in untreated controls. We also found cross-talk between the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway and ERK pathway. In summary, we have demonstrated that TNF stimulates proMMP9 production in CT cells through TNFRSF1A-TRAFs-IKBKB-NFKB and ERK signaling pathways, but not through TNFRSF1B and JNK/p38-AP-1 pathways.

  14. The Analgesic Potential of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Elikottil, Jaseena; Gupta, Pankaj; Gupta, Kalpna

    2013-01-01

    Historically and anecdotally cannabinoids have been used as analgesic agents. In recent years, there has been an escalating interest in developing cannabis-derived medications to treat severe pain. This review provides an overview of the history of cannabis use in medicine, cannabinoid signaling pathways, and current data from preclinical as well as clinical studies on using cannabinoids as potential analgesic agents. Clinical and experimental studies show that cannabis-derived compounds act as anti-emetic, appetite modulating and analgesic agents. However, the efficacy of individual products is variable and dependent upon the route of administration. Since opioids are the only therapy for severe pain, analgesic ability of cannabinoids may provide a much-needed alternative to opioids. Moreover, cannabinoids act synergistically with opioids and act as opioid sparing agents, allowing lower doses and fewer side effects from chronic opioid therapy. Thus, rational use of cannabis based medications deserves serious consideration to alleviate the suffering of patients due to severe pain. PMID:20073408

  15. Cannabinoids in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Natalya M; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds. In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable--instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and--in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity--just to monitor these side effects carefully.

  16. Cannabinoids in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Natalya M.; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Despite the mild addiction to cannabis and the possible enhancement of addiction to other substances of abuse, when combined with cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases, such as anorexia, emesis, pain, inflammation, multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease), epilepsy, glaucoma, osteoporosis, schizophrenia, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and metabolic syndrome-related disorders, to name just a few, are being treated or have the potential to be treated by cannabinoid agonists/antagonists/cannabinoid-related compounds. In view of the very low toxicity and the generally benign side effects of this group of compounds, neglecting or denying their clinical potential is unacceptable - instead, we need to work on the development of more selective cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists and related compounds, as well as on novel drugs of this family with better selectivity, distribution patterns, and pharmacokinetics, and - in cases where it is impossible to separate the desired clinical action and the psychoactivity - just to monitor these side effects carefully. PMID:18286801

  17. Cannabinoids: occurrence and medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Appendino, G; Chianese, G; Taglialatela-Scafati, O

    2011-01-01

    With an inventory of several hundreds secondary metabolites identified, Cannabis sativa L. (hemp) is one of the phytochemically best characterized plant species. The biomedical relevance of hemp undoubtedly underlies the wealth of data on its constituents and their biological activities, and cannabinoids, a class of unique meroterpenoids derived from the alkylation of an olivetollike alkyl resorcinol with a monoterpene unit, are the most typical constituents of Cannabis. In addition to the well-known psychotropic properties of Δ(9)-THC, cannabinoids have been reported to show potential in various fields of medicine, with the capacity to address unmet needs like the relief of chemotherapy-derived nausea and anorexia, and symptomatic mitigation of multiple sclerosis. Many of the potential therapeutic uses of cannabinoids are related to the interaction with (at least) two cannabinoid G-protein coupled receptors (CB1 and CB2). However, a number of activities, like the antibacterial or the antitumor properties are non totally dependent or fully independent from the interaction with these proteins. These pharmacological activities are particularly interesting since, in principle, they could be easily dissociated by the unwanted psychotropic effects. This review aims at giving readers a survey of the more recent advances in both phytochemistry of C. sativa, the medicinal chemistry of cannabinoids, and their distribution in plants, highlighting the impact that research in these hot fields could have for modern medicinal chemistry and pharmacology.

  18. [Influence of anandamide, the endogenous agonist of cannabinoid receptors on the circulatory system].

    PubMed

    Kwolek, Grzegorz; Zakrzeska, Agnieszka; Kozłowska, Hanna; Malinowska, Barbara

    2005-05-19

    Cannabinoids, the active ingredients of Cannabis sativa, have been used by humans as hallucinogens and therapeutic agents for thousands of years. These agents are now known to act through the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. The recent discovery of endogenous cannabinoids and the fact that they are involved in the pathology of hypotension associated with hemorrhage, sepsis, cirrhosis, and myocardial infarction indicate that cannabinoids play a greater role in human and animal pathophysiology than initially anticipated. Anandamide is the first of the endogenous cannabinoid ligands discovered. Its intravenous administration produces a characteristic three-phase response in the circulatory systems of experimental animals: In phase 1--a short-lasting decrease in heart rate and systemic blood pressure is related to activation of vanilloid TRPV1 receptors. In phase 2 an increase in blood pressure involves multiple mechanisms, both central (probably through the rostral ventrolateral medulla) and peripheral (vascular, Ca2+-dependent). In phase 3 there is a prolonged decrease in blood pressure and sometimes bradycardia, related to the activation of cannabinoid CB1 and vanilloid TRPV1 receptors. On the basis of this three-phase mechanism, the present paper intends to describe the participation of anandamide in the circulatory system under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. It also discusses the possibility of applying cannabinoid ligands as new therapeutic agents for the treatment of some pathologies.

  19. Behavioural consequences of maternal exposure to natural cannabinoids in rats.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M; Rubio, P; de Fonseca, F R

    1995-11-01

    Cannabis sativa preparations (hashish, marijuana) are the most widely used illicit drugs during pregnancy in Western countries. The possible long-term consequences for the child of in utero exposure to cannabis derivatives are still poorly understood. Animal models of perinatal cannabinoid exposure provide a useful tool for examining the developmental effects of cannabinoids. Behavioral consequences of maternal exposure to either cannabis preparations or to its main psychoactive component, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in rat models are reviewed in this paper. Maternal exposure to cannabinoids resulted in alteration in the pattern of ontogeny of spontaneous locomotor and exploratory behavior in the offspring. Adult animals exposed during gestational and lactational periods exhibited persistent alterations in the behavioral response to novelty, social interactions, sexual orientation and sexual behavior. They also showed a lack of habituation and reactivity to different illumination conditions. Adult offspring of both sexes also displayed a characteristic increase in spontaneous and water-induced grooming behavior. Some of the effects were dependent on the sex of the animals being studied, and the dose of cannabinoid administered to the mother during gestational and lactational periods. Maternal exposure to low doses of THC sensitized the adult offspring of both sexes to the reinforcing effects of morphine, as measured in a conditioned place preference paradigm. The existence of sexual dimorphisms on the developmental effects of cannabinoids, the role of sex steroids, glucocorticoids, and pituitary hormones, the possible participation of cortical projecting monoaminergic systems, and the mediation of the recently described cannabinoid receptors are also analyzed. The information obtained in animal studies is compared to the few data available on the long-term behavioral and cognitive effects on in utero exposure to cannabis in humans.

  20. Reversible and regionally selective downregulation of brain cannabinoid CB1 receptors in chronic daily cannabis smokers

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, J; Goodwin, RS; Li, C-T; Terry, GE; Zoghbi, SS; Morse, C; Pike, VW; Volkow, ND; Huestis, MA; Innis, RB

    2011-01-01

    Chronic cannabis (marijuana, hashish) smoking can result in dependence. Rodent studies show reversible downregulation of brain cannabinoid CB1 (cannabinoid receptor type 1) receptors after chronic exposure to cannabis. However, whether downregulation occurs in humans who chronically smoke cannabis is unknown. Here we show, using positron emission tomography imaging, reversible and regionally selective downregulation of brain cannabinoid CB1 receptors in human subjects who chronically smoke cannabis. Downregulation correlated with years of cannabis smoking and was selective to cortical brain regions. After ~4 weeks of continuously monitored abstinence from cannabis on a secure research unit, CB1 receptor density returned to normal levels. This is the first direct demonstration of cortical cannabinoid CB1 receptor downregulation as a neuroadaptation that may promote cannabis dependence in human brain. PMID:21747398

  1. [Evaluation of an on-site drug-testing device for the detection of synthetic cannabinoids in illegal herbal products].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Hakamatsuka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, illegal herbal or liquid products containing psychoactive compounds have been a serious problem damaging human health and causing numerous traffic accidents. Reports indicate that most of those herbal products contain various types of synthetic cannabinoids. There are many on-site drug-testing devices; however, synthetic cannabinoids are not targeted compounds for such devices. In this study, we evaluated the on-site drug-testing device "K2/Spice Test" for the detection of 12 different types of 38 synthetic cannabinoids (including 13 naphthoylindole-type synthetic cannabinoids) and a natural cannabinoid (Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol). Although this device is primarily used for the detection of metabolites of naphthoylindole-type synthetic cannabinoids in urine samples, we applied it to detect synthetic cannabinoids in illegal herbal products for rapid screening analyses. As a result of the on-site examination of synthetic cannabinoids, 10 naphthoylindole-type synthetic cannabinoids [five narcotics (JWH-018, JWH-073, AM-2201, MAM-2201, and JWH-122); five designated substances (JWH-015, JWH-200, AM-1220, JWH-019, and JWH-020)], and two other types of synthetic cannabinoid [designated substances (a benzoylindole AM-694 and a naphthoylnaphthalene CB-13)] showed positive results (the limit of detection ranged from 50 to 250 μg/mL). Furthermore, MeOH extracts of illegal herbal products containing naphthoylindole-type synthetic cannabinoids also showed positive results (the limit of detection ranged from 2.5 to 10 mg herbal products/mL). Therefore, we found that this device may be useful for the on-site examination of some naphthoylindole-type synthetic cannabinoids not only in urine samples but also in illegal herbal products.

  2. Cannabinoids for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Walitt, Brian; Klose, Petra; Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Phillips, Tudor; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-07-18

    This review is one of a series on drugs used to treat fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition of unknown aetiology characterised by chronic widespread pain that often co-exists with sleep problems and fatigue affecting approximately 2% of the general population. People often report high disability levels and poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Drug therapy focuses on reducing key symptoms and disability, and improving HRQoL. Cannabis has been used for millennia to reduce pain and other somatic and psychological symptoms. To assess the efficacy, tolerability and safety of cannabinoids for fibromyalgia symptoms in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE to April 2016, together with reference lists of retrieved papers and reviews, three clinical trial registries, and contact with trial authors. We selected randomised controlled trials of at least four weeks' duration of any formulation of cannabis products used for the treatment of adults with fibromyalgia. Two review authors independently extracted the data of all included studies and assessed risk of bias. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. We performed analysis using three tiers of evidence. First tier evidence was derived from data meeting current best standards and subject to minimal risk of bias (outcome equivalent to substantial pain intensity reduction, intention-to-treat analysis without imputation for drop-outs; at least 200 participants in the comparison, eight to 12 weeks' duration, parallel design), second tier evidence from data that did not meet one or more of these criteria and were considered at some risk of bias but with adequate numbers (i.e. data from at least 200 participants) in the comparison, and third tier evidence from data involving small numbers of participants that were considered very likely to be biased or used outcomes of limited clinical utility, or both. We assessed the

  3. Hallucinogens and cannabinoids for headache.

    PubMed

    McGeeney, Brian E

    2012-10-01

    Most hallucinogens and cannabinoids fall into Federal Controlled Substances schedule 1, meaning they cannot be prescribed by practitioners, allegedly have no accepted medical use, and have a high abuse potential. The legal and regulatory status has inhibited clinical research on these substances such that there are no blinded studies from which to assess true efficacy. Despite such classification, hallucinogens and cannabinoids are used by patients with headache on occasion. Cannabinoids in particular have a long history of use for headache and migraine before prohibition and are still used by patients as a migraine abortive. Hallucinogens are being increasing used by cluster headache patients outside of physician recommendation mainly to abort a cluster period and to maintain quiescence for which there is considerable anecdotal success.

  4. Synthetic cannabinoids: analysis and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Wanas, Amira S; Radwan, Mohamed M

    2014-02-27

    Cannabimimetics (commonly referred to as synthetic cannabinoids), a group of compounds encompassing a wide range of chemical structures, have been developed by scientists with the hope of achieving selectivity toward one or the other of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The goal was to have compounds that could possess high therapeutic activity without many side effects. However, underground laboratories have used the information generated by the scientific community to develop these compounds for illicit use as marijuana substitutes. This chapter reviews the different classes of these "synthetic cannabinoids" with particular emphasis on the methods used for their identification in the herbal products with which they are mixed and identification of their metabolites in biological specimens.

  5. Striatal adenosine A2A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors form functional heteromeric complexes that mediate the motor effects of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Carriba, Paulina; Ortiz, Oskar; Patkar, Kshitij; Justinova, Zuzana; Stroik, Jessica; Themann, Andrea; Müller, Christa; Woods, Anima S; Hope, Bruce T; Ciruela, Francisco; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I; Lluis, Carme; Goldberg, Steven R; Moratalla, Rosario; Franco, Rafael; Ferré, Sergi

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of action responsible for the motor depressant effects of cannabinoids, which operate through centrally expressed cannabinoid CB1 receptors, is still a matter of debate. In the present study, we report that CB1 and adenosine A2A receptors form heteromeric complexes in co-transfected HEK-293T cells and rat striatum, where they colocalize in fibrilar structures. In a human neuroblastoma cell line, CB1 receptor signaling was found to be completely dependent on A2A receptor activation. Accordingly, blockade of A2A receptors counteracted the motor depressant effects produced by the intrastriatal administration of a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist. These biochemical and behavioral findings demonstrate that the profound motor effects of cannabinoids depend on physical and functional interactions between striatal A2A and CB1 receptors.

  6. Beta-caryophyllene is a dietary cannabinoid

    PubMed Central

    Gertsch, Jürg; Leonti, Marco; Raduner, Stefan; Racz, Ildiko; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Karsak, Meliha; Zimmer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The psychoactive cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. and the arachidonic acid-derived endocannabinoids are nonselective natural ligands for cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors. Although the CB1 receptor is responsible for the psychomodulatory effects, activation of the CB2 receptor is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammation, pain, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis. Here, we report that the widespread plant volatile (E)-β-caryophyllene [(E)-BCP] selectively binds to the CB2 receptor (Ki = 155 ± 4 nM) and that it is a functional CB2 agonist. Intriguingly, (E)-BCP is a common constituent of the essential oils of numerous spice and food plants and a major component in Cannabis. Molecular docking simulations have identified a putative binding site of (E)-BCP in the CB2 receptor, showing ligand π–π stacking interactions with residues F117 and W258. Upon binding to the CB2 receptor, (E)-BCP inhibits adenylate cylcase, leads to intracellular calcium transients and weakly activates the mitogen-activated kinases Erk1/2 and p38 in primary human monocytes. (E)-BCP (500 nM) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression in peripheral blood and attenuates LPS-stimulated Erk1/2 and JNK1/2 phosphorylation in monocytes. Furthermore, peroral (E)-BCP at 5 mg/kg strongly reduces the carrageenan-induced inflammatory response in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking CB2 receptors, providing evidence that this natural product exerts cannabimimetic effects in vivo. These results identify (E)-BCP as a functional nonpsychoactive CB2 receptor ligand in foodstuff and as a macrocyclic antiinflammatory cannabinoid in Cannabis. PMID:18574142

  7. Simultaneous quantification of 20 synthetic cannabinoids and 21 metabolites, and semi-quantification of 12 alkyl hydroxy metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-01-31

    Clandestine laboratories constantly produce new synthetic cannabinoids to circumvent legislative efforts, complicating toxicological analysis. No extensive synthetic cannabinoid quantitative urinary methods are reported in the literature. We developed and validated a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for simultaneously quantifying JWH-018, JWH-019, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-200, JWH-210, JWH-250, JWH-398, RCS-4, AM-2201, MAM-2201, UR-144, CP 47,497-C7, CP 47,497-C8 and their metabolites, and JWH-203, AM-694, RCS-8, XLR-11 and HU-210 parent compounds in urine. Non-chromatographically resolved alkyl hydroxy metabolite isomers were considered semi-quantitative. β-Glucuronidase hydrolyzed urine was extracted with 1ml Biotage SLE+ columns. Specimens were reconstituted in 150μL mobile phase consisting of 50% A (0.01% formic acid in water) and 50% B (0.01% formic acid in 50:50 methanol:acetonitrile). 4 and 25μL injections were performed to acquire data in positive and negative ionization modes, respectively. The LC-MS/MS instrument consisted of a Shimadzu UFLCxr system and an ABSciex 5500 Qtrap mass spectrometer with an electrospray source. Gradient chromatographic separation was achieved utilizing a Restek Ultra Biphenyl column with a 0.5ml/min flow rate and an overall run time of 19.5 and 11.4min for positive and negative mode methods, respectively. Quantification was by multiple reaction monitoring with CP 47,497 compounds and HU-210 ionized via negative polarity; all other analytes were acquired in positive mode. Lower and upper limits of linearity were 0.1-1.0 and 50-100μg/l (r(2)>0.994). Validation parameters were evaluated at three concentrations spanning linear dynamic ranges. Inter-day analytical recovery (bias) and imprecision (N=20) were 88.3-112.2% and 4.3-13.5% coefficient of variation, respectively. Extraction efficiencies and matrix effect (N=10) were 44-110 and -73 to 52%, respectively. We present a novel LC

  8. Are cannabinoids effective for epilepsy?

    PubMed

    Peña, Javier; Rada, Gabriel

    2017-01-13

    Several beneficial effects have been proposed for cannabinoids in different clinical conditions, including epilepsy. However, their clinical role is controversial. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases, we identified five systematic reviews including four randomized trials addressing the question of this article. We extracted data and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether cannabinoids reduce the frequency of seizures in epilepsy because the certainty of the evidence is very low, and they probably increase adverse effects.

  9. The influence of cannabinoids on learning and memory processes of the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G

    2015-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the mammalian endocannabinoid system plays an integral role in learning and memory. Our understanding of how cannabinoids influence memory comes predominantly from studies examining cognitive and emotional memory systems mediated by the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. However, recent evidence suggests that cannabinoids also affect habit or stimulus-response (S-R) memory mediated by the dorsal striatum. Studies implementing a variety of maze tasks in rats indicate that systemic or intra-dorsolateral striatum infusions of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists impair habit memory. In mice, cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor knockdown can enhance or impair habit formation, whereas Δ(9)THC tolerance enhances habit formation. Studies in human cannabis users also suggest an enhancement of S-R/habit memory. A tentative conclusion based on the available data is that acute disruption of the endocannabinoid system with either agonists or antagonists impairs, whereas chronic cannabinoid exposure enhances, dorsal striatum-dependent S-R/habit memory. CB1 receptors are required for multiple forms of striatal synaptic plasticity implicated in memory, including short-term and long-term depression. Interactions with the hippocampus-dependent memory system may also have a role in some of the observed effects of cannabinoids on habit memory. The impairing effect often observed with acute cannabinoid administration argues for cannabinoid-based treatments for human psychopathologies associated with a dysfunctional habit memory system (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction/relapse). In addition, the enhancing effect of repeated cannabinoid exposure on habit memory suggests a novel neurobehavioral mechanism for marijuana addiction involving the dorsal striatum-dependent memory system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors that can be activated by endogenously released ‘endocannabinoids’ or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)) and Sativex (Δ9-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive ‘multi-targeting’. PMID:23108552

  11. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2012-12-05

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released 'endocannabinoids' or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive 'multi-targeting'.

  12. Preclinical and Clinical Assessment of Cannabinoids as Anti-Cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Ladin, Daniel A; Soliman, Eman; Griffin, LaToya; Van Dross, Rukiyah

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States with 1.7 million new cases estimated to be diagnosed in 2016. This disease remains a formidable clinical challenge and represents a substantial financial burden to the US health care system. Therefore, research and development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of cancer is of high priority. Cannabinoids and their derivatives have been utilized for their medicinal and therapeutic properties throughout history. Cannabinoid activity is regulated by the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is comprised of cannabinoid receptors, transporters, and enzymes involved in cannabinoid synthesis and breakdown. More recently, cannabinoids have gained special attention for their role in cancer cell proliferation and death. However, many studies investigated these effects using in vitro models which may not adequately mimic tumor growth and metastasis. As such, this article aims to review study results which evaluated effects of cannabinoids from plant, synthetic and endogenous origins on cancer development in preclinical animal models and to examine the current standing of cannabinoids that are being tested in human cancer patients.

  13. Preclinical and Clinical Assessment of Cannabinoids as Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ladin, Daniel A.; Soliman, Eman; Griffin, LaToya; Van Dross, Rukiyah

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States with 1.7 million new cases estimated to be diagnosed in 2016. This disease remains a formidable clinical challenge and represents a substantial financial burden to the US health care system. Therefore, research and development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of cancer is of high priority. Cannabinoids and their derivatives have been utilized for their medicinal and therapeutic properties throughout history. Cannabinoid activity is regulated by the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which is comprised of cannabinoid receptors, transporters, and enzymes involved in cannabinoid synthesis and breakdown. More recently, cannabinoids have gained special attention for their role in cancer cell proliferation and death. However, many studies investigated these effects using in vitro models which may not adequately mimic tumor growth and metastasis. As such, this article aims to review study results which evaluated effects of cannabinoids from plant, synthetic and endogenous origins on cancer development in preclinical animal models and to examine the current standing of cannabinoids that are being tested in human cancer patients. PMID:27774065

  14. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 1 (HER1)-Based Vaccine in Prostate Castration-Resistant Carcinoma Patients: A Dose-Escalation Phase I Study Trial

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, Iraida; Aira, Lazaro E.; Lavastida, Anabel; Popa, Xitlally; Rivero, Javier; González, Joaquín; Mesa, Mónica; González, Narjara; Coba, Kelly; Lorenzo-Luaces, Patricia; Wilkinson, Barbara; Santiesteban, Yuliannis; Santiesteban, Yanela; Troche, Mayelin; Suarez, Eduardo; Crombet, Tania; Sánchez, Belinda; Casacó, Angel; Macías, Amparo; Mazorra, Zaima

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains incurable due to the lack of effective therapies. Activation of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (HER1) in prostate cancer contributes to metastatic progression as well as to disease relapse. Here, we determined the toxicity and immunogenicity of a HER1-based cancer vaccine in CRPC patients included in a phase I clinical trial. CRPC patients (n = 24) were intramuscularly vaccinated with HER1 vaccine consisting of the extracellular domain of HER1 molecule (ECD) and very small size proteoliposome from Neisseria meningitidis (VSSP) and Montanide ISA-51 VG as adjuvants. Patients were included in five groups according to the vaccine dose (100, 200, 400, 600, and 800 μg). The primary endpoints were safety and immunogenicity. The anti-HER1 antibodies were measured by an ELISA, the recognition of an HER1 positive tumor cell line and the inhibition of HER1 phosphorylation by sera were determined by flow cytometry and western blot analysis, respectively. The HER1-specific T cell response was assessed by determination of IFN-γ-producing T cells using ELISpot assay. The vaccine was well tolerated. No grade III or IV adverse events were reported. High titers of anti-HER1 antibodies were observed in most of the evaluated patients. There were no significant differences regarding the geometric means of the anti-HER1 titers among the dose groups except the group of 100 μg in which antibody titers were significantly lower. A Th1-type IgG subclasses pattern was predominant in most patients. Only patients receiving the higher doses of vaccine showed significant tumor cell recognition and HER1 phosphorylation inhibition by hyperimmune sera. Forty two percent of the patients showed a specific T cell response against HER1 peptides pool in post-treatment samples. There was a trend toward survival benefit in those patients showing high anti-HER1 specific antibody titers and a significant association between

  15. Cannabinoids and hallucinogens for headache.

    PubMed

    McGeeney, Brian E

    2013-03-01

    Hallucinogens and most cannabinoids are classified under schedule 1 of the Federal Controlled Substances Act 1970, along with heroin and ecstacy. Hence they cannot be prescribed by physicians, and by implication, have no accepted medical use with a high abuse potential. Despite their legal status, hallucinogens and cannabinoids are used by patients for relief of headache, helped by the growing number of American states that have legalized medical marijuana. Cannabinoids in particular have a long history of use in the abortive and prophylactic treatment of migraine before prohibition and are still used by patients as a migraine abortive in particular. Most practitioners are unaware of the prominence cannabis or "marijuana" once held in medical practice. Hallucinogens are being increasingly used by cluster headache patients outside of physician recommendation mainly to abort a cluster period and maintain quiescence for which there is considerable anecdotal success. The legal status of cannabinoids and hallucinogens has for a long time severely inhibited medical research, and there are still no blinded studies on headache subjects, from which we could assess true efficacy.

  16. The role of cannabinoid receptors and the endocannabinoid system in mantle cell lymphoma and other non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Agata M; Christensson, Birger; Sander, Birgitta

    2011-11-01

    The initiating oncogenic event in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is the translocation of cyclin D1, t(11;14)(q13;q32). However, other genetic aberrations are necessary for an overt lymphoma to arise. Like other B cell lymphomas, MCL at some points during the oncogenesis is dependent on interactions with other cells and factors in the microenvironment. The G protein coupled receptors cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) are expressed at low levels on non-malignant lymphocytes and at higher levels in MCL and other lymphoma subtypes. In this review we give an overview of what is known on the role of the cannabinoid receptors and their ligands in lymphoma as compared to non-malignant T and B lymphocytes. In MCL cannabinoids mainly reduce cell proliferation and induce cell death. Importantly, our recent findings demonstrate that cannabinoids may induce either apoptosis or another type of programmed cell death, cytoplasmic vacuolation/paraptosis in MCL. The signalling to death has been partly characterized. Even though cannabinoid receptors seem to be expressed in many other types of B cell lymphoma, the functional role of cannabinoid receptor targeting is yet largely unknown. In non-malignant B and T lymphocytes, cannabinoid receptors are up-regulated in response to antigen receptor signalling or CD40. For T lymphocytes IL-4 has also a crucial role in transcriptional regulation of CB1. In lymphocytes, cannabinoid act in several ways - by affecting cell migration, cytokine response, at high doses inhibit cell proliferation and inducing cell death. The possible role for the endocannabinoid system in the immune microenvironment of lymphoma is discussed.

  17. Cannabinoids in medicine: A review of their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, Mohamed

    2006-04-21

    In order to assess the current knowledge on the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids, a meta-analysis was performed through Medline and PubMed up to July 1, 2005. The key words used were cannabis, marijuana, marihuana, hashish, hashich, haschich, cannabinoids, tetrahydrocannabinol, THC, dronabinol, nabilone, levonantradol, randomised, randomized, double-blind, simple blind, placebo-controlled, and human. The research also included the reports and reviews published in English, French and Spanish. For the final selection, only properly controlled clinical trials were retained, thus open-label studies were excluded. Seventy-two controlled studies evaluating the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids were identified. For each clinical trial, the country where the project was held, the number of patients assessed, the type of study and comparisons done, the products and the dosages used, their efficacy and their adverse effects are described. Cannabinoids present an interesting therapeutic potential as antiemetics, appetite stimulants in debilitating diseases (cancer and AIDS), analgesics, and in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, Tourette's syndrome, epilepsy and glaucoma.

  18. Cannabinoids for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gloss, David; Vickrey, Barbara

    2012-06-13

    Marijuana appears to have anti-epileptic effects in animals. It is not currently known if it is effective in patients with epilepsy. Some states in the United States of America have explicitly approved its use for epilepsy. To assess the efficacy of marijuana, or one of marijuana's constituents in the treatment of people with epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (May 15, 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL issue 4 of 12, The Cochrane Library 2012),MEDLINE (PubMed, searched on May 15, 2012), ISI Web of Knowledge (May 15, 2012), CINAHL (EBSCOhost, May 15, 2012), and ClinicalTrials.gov (May 15, 2012). In addition, we included studies we personally knew about that were not found by the searches, as well as references in the identified studies. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), whether blinded or not. Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. The primary outcome investigated was seizure freedom at one year or more, or three times the longest interseizure interval. Secondary outcomes included: responder rate at six months or more, objective quality of life data, and adverse events. We found four randomized reports which included a total of 48 patients, each of which used cannabidiol as the treatment agent. One report was an abstract, and another was a letter to the editor. Anti-epileptic drugs were continued in all. Details of randomisation were not included in any study. There was no investigation of whether control and treatment groups were the same or different. All the reports were low quality.The four reports only answered the secondary outcome about adverse effects. None of the patients in the treatment groups suffered adverse effects. No reliable conclusions can be drawn at present regarding the efficacy of cannabinoids as a treatment for epilepsy. The dose of 200 to 300 mg daily of cannabidiol was safely administered to small numbers of patients, for generally

  19. The atypical cannabinoid O-1602 protects against experimental colitis and inhibits neutrophil recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Schicho, Rudolf; Bashashati, Mohammad; Bawa, Misha; McHugh, Douglas; Saur, Dieter; Hu, Huang-Ming; Zimmer, Andreas; Lutz, Beat; Mackie, Ken; Bradshaw, Heather B.; McCafferty, Donna-Marie; Sharkey, Keith A.; Storr, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background Cannabinoids are known to reduce intestinal inflammation. Atypical cannabinoids produce pharmacological effects via unidentified targets. We were interested whether the atypical cannabinoid O-1602, reportedly an agonist of the putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55, reduces disease severity of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in C57BL/6N and CD1 mice. Methods DSS (2.5% and 4%) was supplied in drinking water for one week while TNBS (4 mg) was applied as a single intrarectal bolus. Results Both treatments caused severe colitis. Injection of O-1602 (5 mg/kg i.p.) significantly reduced macroscopic and histological colitis scores, and myeloperoxidase activity. The protective effect was still present in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) double knockout mice and mice lacking the GPR55 gene. To investigate a potential mechanism underlying the protection by O-1602 we performed neutrophil chemotactic assays. O-1602 concentration-dependently inhibited migration of murine neutrophils to keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and the N-formyl-peptide receptor ligand WKYMVm. The inhibitory effect of O-1602 was preserved in neutrophils from CB1/CB2 double knockout and GPR55 knockout mice. No differences were seen in locomotor activity between O-1602-treated and control mice indicating lack of central sedation by this compound. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that O-1602 is protective against experimentally induced colitis and inhibits neutrophil recruitment independently of CB1, CB2 and GPR55 receptors. Thus, atypical cannabinoids represent a novel class of therapeutics that may be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:21744421

  20. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides ‘proof of principle’ for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. PMID:26703965

  1. Cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to alleviate pain in sickle cell anemia via inhibition of mast cell activation and neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Benson, Barbara; Lei, Jianxun; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a manifestation of a single point mutation in hemoglobin, but inflammation and pain are the insignia of this disease which can start in infancy and continue throughout life. Earlier studies showed that mast cell activation contributes to neurogenic inflammation and pain in sickle mice. Morphine is the common analgesic treatment but also remains a major challenge due to its side effects and ability to activate mast cells. We, therefore, examined cannabinoid receptor-specific mechanisms to mitigate mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation and hyperalgesia, using HbSS-BERK sickle and cannabinoid receptor-2-deleted sickle mice. We show that cannabinoids mitigate mast cell activation, inflammation and neurogenic inflammation in sickle mice via both cannabinoid receptors 1 and 2. Thus, cannabinoids influence systemic and neural mechanisms, ameliorating the disease pathobiology and hyperalgesia in sickle mice. This study provides 'proof of principle' for the potential of cannabinoid/cannabinoid receptor-based therapeutics to treat several manifestations of sickle cell anemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  2. The use of cannabinoids as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Guillermo; Hernández-Tiedra, Sonia; Dávila, David; Lorente, Mar

    2016-01-04

    It is well-established that cannabinoids exert palliative effects on some cancer-associated symptoms. In addition evidences obtained during the last fifteen years support that these compounds can reduce tumor growth in animal models of cancer. Cannabinoids have been shown to activate an ER-stress related pathway that leads to the stimulation of autophagy-mediated cancer cell death. In addition, cannabinoids inhibit tumor angiogenesis and decrease cancer cell migration. The mechanisms of resistance to cannabinoid anticancer action as well as the possible strategies to develop cannabinoid-based combinational therapies to fight cancer have also started to be explored. In this review we will summarize these observations (that have already helped to set the bases for the development of the first clinical studies to investigate the potential clinical benefit of using cannabinoids in anticancer therapies) and will discuss the possible future avenues of research in this area. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An update on PPAR activation by cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Some cannabinoids activate the different isoforms of PPARs (α, β and γ), as shown through the use of reporter gene assays, binding studies, selective antagonists and knockout studies. Activation of all isoforms, but primarily PPARα and γ, mediates some (but not all) of the analgesic, neuroprotective, neuronal function modulation, anti‐inflammatory, metabolic, anti‐tumour, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects of some cannabinoids, often in conjunction with activation of the more traditional target sites of action such as the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and the TRPV1 ion channel. PPARs also mediate some of the effects of inhibitors of endocannabinoid degradation or transport. Cannabinoids may be chaperoned to the PPARs by fatty acid binding proteins. The aims of this review are to update the evidence supporting PPAR activation by cannabinoids and to review the physiological responses to cannabinoids that are mediated, and not mediated, by PPAR activation. PMID:27077495

  4. Behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of chronic alcohol or cannabinoids on HIV/AIDs: Studies in the Non-Human Primate SIV model

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Patricia E.; Amedee, Angela M.; Winsauer, Peter; Nelson, Steve; Bagby, Gregory; Simon, Liz

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated mortality has been significantly reduced with antiretroviral therapy (ART), and HIV infection has become a chronic disease that frequently coexists with many disorders, including substance abuse (Azar et al. 2010; Phillips et al. 2001). Alcohol and drugs of abuse may modify host-pathogen interactions at various levels including behavioral, metabolic, and immune consequences of HIV infection, as well as the ability of the virus to integrate into the genome and replicate in host cells. Identifying mechanisms responsible for these interactions is complicated by many factors, such as the tissue specific responses to viral infection, multiple cellular mechanisms involved in inflammatory responses, neuroendocrine and localized responses to infection, and kinetics of viral replication. An integrated physiological analysis of the biomedical consequences of chronic alcohol and drug use or abuse on disease progression is possible using rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a relevant model of HIV infection. This review will provide an overview of the data gathered using this model to show that chronic administration of two of the most commonly abused substances, alcohol and cannabinoids (Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol; THC), affect host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25795088

  5. Metabolism of classical cannabinoids and the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018.

    PubMed

    Su, M K; Seely, K A; Moran, J H; Hoffman, R S

    2015-06-01

    Although the putative pharmacological targets of synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) abused in "K2" and "Spice" are similar to Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC), it remains unclear why SCB toxicity is similar yet different from marijuana. There are obvious potency and efficacy differences, but also important metabolic differences that help explain the unique adverse reactions associated with SCBs. This brief review discusses the limited research on the metabolism of the SCB JWH-018 and contrasts that with the metabolism of Δ(9) -THC.

  6. Cannabinoid receptor signaling regulates liver development and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Leah Y.; Alexa, Kristen; Cortes, Mauricio; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Kim, Andrew J.; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; North, Trista E.; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoid (EC) signaling mediates psychotropic effects and regulates appetite. By contrast, potential roles in organ development and embryonic energy consumption remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that genetic or chemical inhibition of cannabinoid receptor (Cnr) activity disrupts liver development and metabolic function in zebrafish (Danio rerio), impacting hepatic differentiation, but not endodermal specification: loss of cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) and cnr2 activity leads to smaller livers with fewer hepatocytes, reduced liver-specific gene expression and proliferation. Functional assays reveal abnormal biliary anatomy and lipid handling. Adult cnr2 mutants are susceptible to hepatic steatosis. Metabolomic analysis reveals reduced methionine content in Cnr mutants. Methionine supplementation rescues developmental and metabolic defects in Cnr mutant livers, suggesting a causal relationship between EC signaling, methionine deficiency and impaired liver development. The effect of Cnr on methionine metabolism is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factors (Srebfs), as their overexpression rescues Cnr mutant liver phenotypes in a methionine-dependent manner. Our work describes a novel developmental role for EC signaling, whereby Cnr-mediated regulation of Srebfs and methionine metabolism impacts liver development and function. PMID:26884397

  7. Cannabinoid receptor signaling regulates liver development and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Leah Y; Alexa, Kristen; Cortes, Mauricio; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Kim, Andrew J; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; North, Trista E; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-02-15

    Endocannabinoid (EC) signaling mediates psychotropic effects and regulates appetite. By contrast, potential roles in organ development and embryonic energy consumption remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that genetic or chemical inhibition of cannabinoid receptor (Cnr) activity disrupts liver development and metabolic function in zebrafish (Danio rerio), impacting hepatic differentiation, but not endodermal specification: loss of cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) and cnr2 activity leads to smaller livers with fewer hepatocytes, reduced liver-specific gene expression and proliferation. Functional assays reveal abnormal biliary anatomy and lipid handling. Adult cnr2 mutants are susceptible to hepatic steatosis. Metabolomic analysis reveals reduced methionine content in Cnr mutants. Methionine supplementation rescues developmental and metabolic defects in Cnr mutant livers, suggesting a causal relationship between EC signaling, methionine deficiency and impaired liver development. The effect of Cnr on methionine metabolism is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factors (Srebfs), as their overexpression rescues Cnr mutant liver phenotypes in a methionine-dependent manner. Our work describes a novel developmental role for EC signaling, whereby Cnr-mediated regulation of Srebfs and methionine metabolism impacts liver development and function.

  8. The role of cannabinoids in regulation of nausea and vomiting, and visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Malik, Zubair; Baik, Daniel; Schey, Ron

    2015-02-01

    Marijuana derived from the plant Cannabis sativa has been used for the treatment of many gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and others. However, its psychotropic side effects have often limited its use. Several cannabinoid receptors, which include the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), CB2, and possibly GPR55, have been identified throughout the GI tract. These receptors may play a role in the regulation of food intake, nausea and emesis, gastric secretion and gastroprotection, GI motility, ion transport, visceral sensation, intestinal inflammation, and cell proliferation in the gut. However, the regulation of nausea and vomiting by cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system has shed new knowledge in this field. Thus far, despite evidence of visceral sensitivity inhibition in animal models, data in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients is scarce and not supportive. Furthermore, many compounds that either act directly at the receptor or increase (or reduce) ligand availability have the potential to affect other brain functions and cause side effects. Novel drug targets such as FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitors appear to be promising in animal models, but more studies are necessary to prove their efficiency. The promise of emerging drugs that are more selective and peripherally acting suggest that, in the near future, cannabinoids will play a major role in managing an array of GI diseases.

  9. The role of cannabinoids in adult neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Prenderville, Jack A; Kelly, Áine M; Downer, Eric J

    2015-01-01

    The processes underpinning post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain continue to be defined. Such processes involve the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neuronal migration, differentiation and integration into a network of functional synapses within the brain. Both intrinsic (cell signalling cascades) and extrinsic (neurotrophins, neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones) signalling molecules are intimately associated with adult neurogenesis and largely dictate the proliferative activity and differentiation capacity of neural cells. Cannabinoids are a unique class of chemical compounds incorporating plant-derived cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa), the endogenous cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid ligands, and these compounds are becoming increasingly recognized for their roles in neural developmental processes. Indeed, cannabinoids have clear modulatory roles in adult neurogenesis, probably through activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, a large body of literature has deciphered the signalling networks involved in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of neurogenesis. This timely review summarizes the evidence that the cannabinoid system is intricately associated with neuronal differentiation and maturation of NPCs and highlights intrinsic/extrinsic signalling mechanisms that are cannabinoid targets. Overall, these findings identify the central role of the cannabinoid system in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and the lateral ventricles and hence provide insight into the processes underlying post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. PMID:25951750

  10. MicroRNA let-7d is a target of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and controls cannabinoid signaling.

    PubMed

    Chiarlone, Anna; Börner, Christine; Martín-Gómez, Laura; Jiménez-González, Ada; García-Concejo, Adrián; García-Bermejo, María L; Lorente, Mar; Blázquez, Cristina; García-Taboada, Elena; de Haro, Amador; Martella, Elisa; Höllt, Volker; Rodríguez, Raquel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Kraus, Jürgen; Guzmán, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor, the molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is one of the most abundant metabotropic receptors in the brain. Cannabis is widely used for both recreational and medicinal purposes. Despite the ever-growing fundamental roles of microRNAs in the brain, the possible molecular connections between the CB1 receptor and microRNAs are surprisingly unknown. Here, by using reporter gene constructs that express interaction sequences for microRNAs in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that CB1 receptor activation enhances the expression of several microRNAs, including let-7d. This was confirmed by measuring hsa-let-7d expression levels. Accordingly, knocking-down CB1 receptor in zebrafish reduced dre-let-7d levels, and knocking-out CB1 receptor in mice decreased mmu-let-7d levels in the cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Conversely, knocking-down let-7d increased CB1 receptor mRNA expression in zebrafish, SH-SY5Y cells and primary striatal neurons. Likewise, in primary striatal neurons chronically exposed to a cannabinoid or opioid agonist, a let-7d-inhibiting sequence facilitated not only cannabinoid or opioid signaling but also cannabinoid/opioid cross-signaling. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence for a bidirectional link between the CB1 receptor and a microRNA, namely let-7d, and thus unveil a new player in the complex process of cannabinoid action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced Brain Cannabinoid Receptor Availability in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Cortes-Briones, Jose; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Thurnauer, Halle; Planeta, Beata; Skosnik, Patrick; Gao, Hong; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Pittman, Brian; Surti, Toral; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2016-06-15

    Several lines of evidence suggest the presence of abnormalities in the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in schizophrenia (SCZ). However, there are limited in vivo measures of the eCB system in SCZ. Twenty five male SCZ subjects (SCZs) (18 antipsychotic treated and 7 antipsychotic free) were compared with 18 age-matched male healthy control subjects (HCs). Subjects underwent one positron emission tomography scan each with the cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1R) selective radiotracer [(11)C]OMAR on the high resolution research tomography scanner. Regional volume of distribution (VT) values were determined using kinetic modeling of positron emission tomography data as a measure of CB1R availability. Group differences in mean composite [(11)C]OMAR VT values were compared between SCZs and HCs. Exploratory comparisons of CB1R availability within 15 brain regions were also conducted. All analyses were covaried for age and body mass index. SCZs showed significantly (p = .02) lower composite [(11)C]OMAR VT relative to HCs (~12% difference, effect size d = .73). [(11)C]OMAR VT was significantly (all ps < .05) lower in SCZs in the amygdala, caudate, posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and insula. Composite [11]OMAR VT was HCs > antipsychotic treated SZCs > antipsychotic free SZCs. Furthermore, composite [(11)C]OMAR VT was greater in HCs than SCZ smokers (n = 11) and SCZ nonsmokers (n = 14). CB1R availability is lower in male SCZ subjects compared with HCs. Furthermore, antipsychotics and tobacco use may increase CB1R availability in this population. The findings of the study provide further evidence supporting the hypothesis that alterations in the eCB system might contribute to the pathophysiology of SCZ. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Reduced Brain Cannabinoid Receptor Availability In Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Mohini; Cortes, Jose; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Thurnauer, Halle; Planeta, Beata; Skosnik, Patrick; Gao, Hong; Labaree, David; Neumeister, Alexander; Pittman, Brian; Surti, Toral; Huang, Yiyun; Carson, Richard E.; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several lines of evidence suggest the presence of abnormalities in the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in schizophrenia (SCZ). However, there are limited in vivo measures of the eCB system in SCZ. METHODS Twenty five male SCZ subjects (SCZs), 18 antipsychotic treated [SCZ-MED] and 7 antipsychotic free [SCZ-UNMED]) were compared to 18 age- matched male healthy control subjects (HCs). Subjects underwent one Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan each with the cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1R) selective radiotracer [11C]OMAR on the High Resolution Research Tomography (HRRT) scanner. Regional volume of distribution (VT) values were determined using kinetic modeling of PET data as a measure of CB1R availability. Group differences in mean composite [11C]OMAR VT values were compared between SCZs and HCs. Exploratory comparisons of CB1R availability within 15 brain regions were also conducted. All analyses were covaried for age and body mass index. RESULTS SCZs showed significantly (p =0.02) lower composite [11C]OMAR VT relative to HCs (~12% difference, effect size d= 0.73). [11C]OMAR VT was significantly (all ps <0.05) lower in SCZs in the amygdala, caudate, posterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and insula. Composite [11C]OMAR VT was greater in HCs> SCZ-MED>SCZ-UNMED. Furthermore, composite [11C]OMAR VT was greater in HCs> SCZ smokers (n=11) > SCZ non-smokers (n=14). CONCLUSIONS CB1R availability is lower in males SCZs compared to HCs. Furthermore, antipsychotics and tobacco use may increase CB1R availability in this population. The findings of the study provide further evidence supporting the hypothesis that alterations in the eCB system might contribute to the pathophysiology of SCZ. PMID:26432420

  13. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid medicines.

    PubMed

    Robson, P J

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis was extensively used as a medicine throughout the developed world in the nineteenth century but went into decline early in the twentieth century ahead of its emergence as the most widely used illicit recreational drug later that century. Recent advances in cannabinoid pharmacology alongside the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) have re-ignited interest in cannabis-based medicines. The ECS has emerged as an important physiological system and plausible target for new medicines. Its receptors and endogenous ligands play a vital modulatory role in diverse functions including immune response, food intake, cognition, emotion, perception, behavioural reinforcement, motor co-ordination, body temperature, wake/sleep cycle, bone formation and resorption, and various aspects of hormonal control. In disease it may act as part of the physiological response or as a component of the underlying pathology. In the forefront of clinical research are the cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and their contrasting pharmacology will be briefly outlined. The therapeutic potential and possible risks of drugs that inhibit the ECS will also be considered. This paper will then go on to review clinical research exploring the potential of cannabinoid medicines in the following indications: symptomatic relief in multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, intractable nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight in the context of cancer or AIDS, psychosis, epilepsy, addiction, and metabolic disorders.

  14. The Toll-like receptor 1/2 agonists Pam(3) CSK(4) and human β-defensin-3 differentially induce interleukin-10 and nuclear factor-κB signalling patterns in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Funderburg, Nicholas T; Jadlowsky, Julie K; Lederman, Michael M; Feng, Zhimin; Weinberg, Aaron; Sieg, Scott F

    2011-10-01

    Human β-defensin 3 (hBD-3) activates antigen-presenting cells through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1/2. Several TLR1/2 agonists have been identified but little is known about how they might differentially affect cellular activation. We compared the effects of hBD-3 with those of another TLR1/2 agonist, Pam(3) CSK(4) , in human monocytes. Monocytes incubated with hBD-3 or Pam(3) CSK(4) produced interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8 and IL-1β, but only Pam(3) CSK(4) induced IL-10. The IL-10 induction by Pam(3) CSK(4) caused down-modulation of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD86, whereas CD86 expression was increased in monocytes exposed to hBD-3. Assessment of signalling pathways linked to IL-10 induction indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinases were activated similarly by hBD-3 or Pam(3) CSK(4) , whereas the non-canonical nuclear factor-κB pathway was only induced by Pam(3) CSK(4) . Our data suggest that the lack of non-canonical nuclear factor-κB signalling by hBD-3 could contribute to the failure of this TLR agonist to induce production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in human monocytes. © 2011 The Authors. Immunology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Separate and combined effects of the cannabinoid agonists nabilone and Δ⁹-THC in humans discriminating Δ⁹-THC.

    PubMed

    Lile, Joshua A; Kelly, Thomas H; Hays, Lon R

    2011-07-01

    Agonist replacement treatment is a promising strategy to manage cannabis-use disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the combined effects of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist nabilone and Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ⁹-THC) using drug-discrimination procedures, which are sensitive to drug interactions. Testing the concurrent administration of nabilone and Δ⁹-THC was also conducted to provide initial safety and tolerability data, which is important because cannabis users will likely lapse during treatment. Six cannabis users learned to discriminate 30 mg oral Δ⁹-THC from placebo and then received nabilone (0, 1 and 3mg) and Δ⁹-THC (0, 5, 15 and 30 mg), alone and in combination. Subjects completed the multiple-choice procedure to assess drug reinforcement, and self-report, task performance and physiological measures were collected. Δ⁹-THC and nabilone alone shared discriminative-stimulus effects with the training dose of Δ⁹-THC, increased crossover point on the multiple-choice procedure, produced overlapping subject ratings and decreased skin temperature. Nabilone alone also elevated heart rate. In combination, nabilone shifted the discriminative-stimulus effects of Δ⁹-THC leftward/upward and enhanced Δ⁹-THC effects on the other outcome measures. These results replicate a previous study demonstrating that nabilone shares agonist effects with the active constituent of cannabis in cannabis users, and contribute further by indicating that nabilone would likely be safe and well tolerated when combined with cannabis. These data support the conduct of future studies to determine if nabilone treatment would produce cross-tolerance to the abuse-related effects of cannabis and reduce cannabis use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Triphasic blood pressure responses to cannabinoids: do we understand the mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Malinowska, Barbara; Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    The cannabinoids comprise three major classes of substances, including compounds derived from the cannabis plant (e.g. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and the chemically related substances CP55940 and HU210), endogenously formed (e.g. anandamide) and synthetic compounds (e.g. WIN55212-2). Beyond their psychotropic effects, cannabinoids have complex effects on blood pressure, including biphasic changes of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and WIN55212-2 and an even triphasic effect of anandamide. The differing pattern of blood pressure changes displayed by the three types of compounds is not really surprising since, although they share an agonistic effect at cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, some compounds have additional effects. In particular, anandamide is known for its pleiotropic effects, and there is overwhelming evidence that anandamide influences blood pressure via (i) CB1 receptors, (ii) TRPV1 receptors, (iii) endothelial cannabinoid receptors and (iv) degradation products. This review is dedicated to the description of the effects of externally added cannabinoids on cardiovascular parameters in vivo. First, the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids in anaesthetized animals will be highlighted since most data have been generated in experiments of that type. The text will follow the three phases of anandamide on blood pressure, and we will check to which extent cardiovascular changes elicited by other cannabinoids show overlap with those effects or differ. The second part will be dedicated to the cardiovascular effects of the cannabinoids in conscious animals. In the third part, cardiovascular effects in humans will be discussed, and similarities and differences with respect to the data from animals will be examined. PMID:22022923

  17. Caffeine drinking potentiates cannabinoid transmission in the striatum: interaction with stress effects.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Silvia; De Chiara, Valentina; Musella, Alessandra; Mataluni, Giorgia; Sacchetti, Lucia; Siracusano, Alberto; Bernardi, Giorgio; Usiello, Alessandro; Centonze, Diego

    2009-03-01

    Caffeine, the psychoactive ingredient of coffee and of many soft drinks, is frequently abused by humans especially during stressful live events. The endocannabinoid system is involved in the central effects of many psychoactive compounds and of stress. Whether caffeine alters the cannabinoid system and interferes with stress-induced synaptic alterations is however unknown. We have studied electrophysiologically the sensitivity of cannabinoid receptors modulating synaptic transmission in the striatum of mice exposed to caffeine in their drinking solution. Chronic caffeine assumption sensitized GABAergic synapses to the presynaptic effect of cannabinoid CB1 receptor stimulation by exo- and endocannabinoids. Caffeine was conversely unable to affect the sensitivity of cannabinoid receptors modulating glutamate transmission. The synaptic effects of caffeine were slowly reversible after its removal from the drinking solution. Furthermore, although exposure to caffeine for only 24h did not produce measurable changes of the sensitivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, it was able to contrast the down-regulation of CB1 receptor-mediated responses after social defeat stress. Our data suggest that the cannabinoid system is implicated in the psychoactive properties of caffeine and in the ability of caffeine to reduce the pathological consequences of stress.

  18. Cannabinoid 2 receptor- and beta Arrestin 2-dependent upregulation of serotonin 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Franklin, J M; Vasiljevik, T; Prisinzano, T E; Carrasco, G A

    2013-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that cannabinoid receptor agonists may regulate serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor neurotransmission in the brain, although no molecular mechanism has been identified. Here, we present experimental evidence that sustained treatment with a non-selective cannabinoid agonist (CP55,940) or selective CB2 receptor agonists (JWH133 or GP1a) upregulate 5-HT(2A) receptors in a neuronal cell line. Furthermore, this cannabinoid receptor agonist-induced upregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors was prevented in cells stably transfected with either CB2 or β-Arrestin 2 shRNA lentiviral particles. Additionally, inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis also prevented the cannabinoid receptor-induced upregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptors. Our results indicate that cannabinoid agonists might upregulate 5-HT(2A) receptors by a mechanism that requires CB2 receptors and β-Arrestin 2 in cells that express both CB2 and 5-HT(2A) receptors. 5-HT(2A) receptors have been associated with several physiological functions and neuropsychiatric disorders such as stress response, anxiety and depression, and schizophrenia. Therefore, these results might provide a molecular mechanism by which activation of cannabinoid receptors might be relevant to some cognitive and mood disorders in humans.

  19. Prevention of cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome by lithium: involvement of oxytocinergic neuronal activation.

    PubMed

    Cui, S S; Bowen, R C; Gu, G B; Hannesson, D K; Yu, P H; Zhang, X

    2001-12-15

    Cannabis (i.e., marijuana and cannabinoids) is the most commonly used illicit drug in developed countries, and the lifetime prevalence of marijuana dependence is the highest of all illicit drugs in the United States. To provide clues for finding effective pharmacological treatment for cannabis-dependent patients, we examined the effects and possible mechanism of lithium administration on the cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome in rats. A systemic injection of the mood stabilizer lithium, at serum levels that were clinically relevant, prevented the cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome. The effects of lithium were accompanied by expression of the cellular activation marker Fos proteins within most oxytocin-immunoreactive neurons and a significant increase in oxytocin mRNA expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. Lithium also produced a significant elevation of oxytocin levels in the peripheral blood. We suggest that the effects of lithium against the cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome are mediated by oxytocinergic neuronal activation and subsequent release and action of oxytocin within the CNS. In support of our hypothesis, we found that the effects of lithium against the cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome were antagonized by systemic preapplication of an oxytocin antagonist and mimicked by systemic or intracerebroventricular injection of oxytocin. These results demonstrate that oxytocinergic neuronal activation plays a critical role in the action of lithium against the cannabinoid withdrawal syndrome in rats, thus providing a potentially novel strategy for the treatment of cannabis dependence in humans.

  20. Thujone exhibits low affinity for cannabinoid receptors but fails to evoke cannabimimetic responses.

    PubMed

    Meschler, J P; Howlett, A C

    1999-03-01

    Absinthe, an abused drug in the early 1900s, has been speculated to activate the receptors responsible for marijuana intoxication (the CB1 cannabinoid receptor) (Nature 253:365-356; 1975). To test this hypothesis, we investigated oil of wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) the active plant product found in absinthe, and thujone, the active compound found in oil of wormwood. Radioligand receptor binding assays employing membrane preparations from rat brains containing CB1 cannabinoid receptors, and human tonsils containing CB2 receptors, demonstrated that thujone displaced [3H]CP55940, a cannabinoid agonist, only at concentrations above 10 microM. HPLC analysis of oil of wormwood revealed that only the fractions having mobility close to thujone displaced [3H]CP55940 from the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. [35S]GTPgammaS binding assays revealed that thujone failed to stimulate G-proteins even at 0.1 mM. Thujone failed to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in N18TG2 membranes at 1 mM. Rats administered thujone exhibited different behavioral characteristics compared with rats administered a potent cannabinoid agonist, levonantradol. Therefore, the hypothesis that activation of cannabinoid receptors is responsible for the intoxicating effects of thujone is not supported by the present data.

  1. Elucidating Cannabinoid Biology in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Randall G.; Clark, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    The number of annual cannabinoid users exceeds 100,000,000 globally and an estimated 9 % of these individuals will suffer from dependency. Although exogenous cannabinoids, like those contained in marijuana, are known to exert their effects by disrupting the endocannabinoid system, a dearth of knowledge exists about the potential toxicological consequences on public health. Conversely, the endocannabinoid system represents a promising therapeutic target for a plethora of disorders because it functions to endogenously regulate a vast repertoire of physiological functions. Accordingly, the rapidly expanding field of cannabinoid biology has sought to leverage model organisms in order to provide both toxicological and therapeutic insights about altered endocannabinoid signaling. The primary goal of this manuscript is to review the existing field of cannabinoid research in the genetically tractable zebrafish model—focusing on the cannabinoid receptor genes, cnr1 and cnr2, and the genes that produce enzymes for synthesis and degradation of the cognate ligands anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol. Consideration is also given to research that has studied the effects of exposure to exogenous phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids that are known to interact with cannabinoid receptors. These results are considered in the context of either endocannabinoid gene expression or endocannabinoid gene function, and are integrated with findings from rodent studies. This provides the framework for a discussion of how zebrafish may be leveraged in the future to provide novel toxicological and therapeutic insights in the field of cannabinoid biology, which has become increasingly significant given recent trends in cannabis legislation. PMID:26192460

  2. Cannabinoid Receptors: Nomenclature and Pharmacological Principles

    PubMed Central

    Console-Bram, Linda; Marcu, Jahan; Abood, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    The CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family that are pharmacologically well defined. However, the discovery of additional sites of action for endocannabinoids as well as synthetic cannabinoid compounds suggests the existence of additional cannabinoid receptors. Here we review this evidence, as well as the current nomenclature for classifying a target as a cannabinoid receptor. Basic pharmacological definitions, principles and experimental conditions are discussed in order to place in context the mechanisms underlying cannabinoid receptor activation. Constitutive (agonist-independent) activity is observed with the overexpression of many GPCRs, including cannabinoid receptors. Allosteric modulators can alter the pharmacological responses of cannabinoid receptors. The complex molecular architecture of each of the cannabinoid receptors allows for a single receptor to recognize multiple classes of compounds and produce an array of distinct downstream effects. Natural polymorphisms and alternative splice variants may also contribute to their pharmacological diversity. As our knowledge of the distinct differences grows, we may be able to target select receptor conformations and their corresponding pharmacological responses. Importantly, the basic biology of the endocannabinoid system will continue to be revealed by ongoing investigations. PMID:22421596

  3. Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/PKB pathway by CB(1) and CB(2) cannabinoid receptors expressed in prostate PC-3 cells. Involvement in Raf-1 stimulation and NGF induction.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, María G; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia; Sánchez, Ana M; Díaz-Laviada, Inés

    2003-09-01

    Cannabinoids exert a variety of physiological and pharmacological responses in humans through interaction with specific cannabinoid receptors. Cannabinoid receptors described to date belong to the seven-transmembrane-domain receptor superfamily and are coupled through the inhibitory G(i) protein to adenylyl cyclase inhibition. However, downstream signal transduction mechanisms triggered by cannabinoids are poorly understood. We examined here the involvement of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PKB pathway in the mechanism of action of cannabinoids in human prostate epithelial PC-3 cells. Cannabinoid receptors CB(1) and CB(2) are expressed in these cells, as shown by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence techniques. Treatment of PC-3 cells with either Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, or R-(+)-methanandamide (MET), an analogue of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide, increased phosphorylation of PKB in Thr308 and Ser473. The stimulation of PKB induced by cannabinoids was blocked by the two cannabinoid receptor antagonists, SR 141716 and SR 144528, and by the PI3K inhibitor LY 294002. These results indicate that activation of cannabinoid receptors in PC-3 cells stimulate the PI3K/PKB pathway. We further investigated the involvement of Raf-1/Erk activation in the mechanism of action of cannabinoid receptors. THC and MET induced translocation of Raf-1 to the membrane and phosphorylation of p44/42 Erk kinase, which was reversed by cannabinoid receptor antagonists and PI3K inhibitor. These results point to a sequential connection between cannabinoid receptors/PI3K/PKB pathway and Raf-1/Erk in prostate PC-3 cells. We also show that this pathway is involved in the mechanism of NGF induction exerted by cannabinoids in PC-3 cells.

  4. Cannabinoids in eating disorders and obesity.

    PubMed

    Arias Horcajadas, Francisco

    2007-08-01

    Cannabinoid system is a crucial mechanism in regulating food intake and energy metabolism. It is involved in central and peripheral mechanisms regulating such behavior, interacting with many other signaling systems with a role in metabolic regulation. Cannabinoid agonists promote food intake, and soon a cannabinoid antagonist, rimonabant, will be marketed for the treatment of obesity. It not only causes weight loss, but also alleviates metabolic syndrome. We present a review of current knowledge on this subject, along with data from our own research: genetic studies on this system in eating disorders and obesity and studies locating cannabinoid receptors in areas related to food intake. Such studies suggest cannabinoid hyperactivity in obesity, and this excessive activity may have prognostic implications.

  5. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption

    PubMed Central

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child’s hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke. PMID:26443501

  6. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption.

    PubMed

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-10-07

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child's hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke.

  7. 1-Benzhydryl-3-phenylurea and 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylthiourea derivatives: new templates among the CB1 cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Muccioli, Giulio G; Wouters, Johan; Scriba, Gerhard K E; Poppitz, Wolfgang; Poupaert, Jacques H; Lambert, Didier M

    2005-11-17

    New 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylurea derivatives and their 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylthiourea isosteres were synthesized and evaluated for their human CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor affinity. These compounds proved to be selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor ligands, acting as inverse agonists in a [35S]-GTPgammaS assay. The affinity of 3,5,5'-triphenylimidazolidine-2,4-dione and 3,5,5'-triphenyl-2-thioxoimidazolidin-4-one derivatives, possessing the 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylurea and 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylthiourea moiety, respectively, was also evaluated. In conclusion, the 1-benzhydryl-3-phenylurea scaffold seems to be a new interesting template of CB1 cannabinoid receptor inverse agonists.

  8. Mastering tricyclic ring systems for desirable functional cannabinoid activity

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ravil R.; Knight, Lindsay; Chen, Shao-Rui; Wager-Miller, Jim; McDaniel, Steven W.; Diaz, Fanny; Barth, Francis; Pan, Hui-Lin; Mackie, Ken; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Diaz, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in using cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) agonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain and other indications. In continuation of our ongoing program aiming for the development of new small molecule cannabinoid ligands, we have synthesized a novel series of carbazole and γ-carboline derivatives. The affinities of the newly synthesized compounds were determined by a competitive radioligand displacement assay for human CB2 cannabinoid receptor and rat CB1 cannabinoid receptor. Functional activity and selectivity at human CB1 and CB2 receptors were characterized using receptor internalization and [35S]GTP-γ-S assays. The structure-activity relationship and optimization studies of the carbazole series have led to the discovery of a non-selective CB1 and CB2 agonist, compound 4. Our subsequent research efforts to increase CB2 selectivity of this lead compound have led to the discovery of CB2 selective compound 64, which robustly internalized CB2 receptors. Compound 64 had potent inhibitory effects on pain hypersensitivity in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Other potent and CB2 receptor–selective compounds, including compounds 63 and 68, and a selective CB1 agonist, compound 74 were also discovered. In addition, we identified the CB2 ligand 35 which failed to promote CB2 receptor internalization and inhibited compound CP55,940-induced CB2 internalization despite a high CB2 receptor affinity. The present study provides novel tricyclic series as a starting point for further investigations of CB2 pharmacology and pain treatment. PMID:24125850

  9. Safety and Toxicology of Cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Jane; McGlade, Erin; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    There is extensive research on the safety, toxicology, potency, and therapeutic potential of cannabis. However, uncertainty remains facilitating continued debate on medical and recreational cannabis policies at the state and federal levels. This review will include a brief description of cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system; a summary of the acute and long-term effects of cannabis; and a discussion of the therapeutic potential of cannabis. The conclusions about safety and efficacy will then be compared with the current social and political climate to suggest future policy directions and general guidelines.

  10. Immunoactive effects of cannabinoids: considerations for the therapeutic use of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Greineisen, William E; Turner, Helen

    2010-05-01

    The active constituents of Cannabis sativa have been used for centuries as recreational drugs and medicinal agents. Today, marijuana is the most prevalent drug of abuse in the United States and, conversely, therapeutic use of marijuana constituents are gaining mainstream clinical and political acceptance. Given the documented contributions of endocannabinoid signaling to a range of physiological systems, including cognitive function, and the control of eating behaviors, it is unsurprising that cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are showing significant clinical potential. In addition to the neuroactive effects of cannabinoids, an emerging body of data suggests that both endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids are potently immunoactive. The central premise of this review article is that the immunological effects of cannabinoids should be considered in the context of each prescribing decision. We present evidence that the immunological effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are highly relevant to the spectrum of disorders for which cannabinoid therapeutics are currently offered.

  11. Immunoactive effects of cannabinoids: considerations for the therapeutic use of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Greineisen, William E.; Turner., Helen

    2013-01-01

    The active constituents of Cannabis sativa have been used for centuries as recreational drugs and medicinal agents. Today, marijuana is the most prevalent drug of abuse in the United States and, conversely, therapeutic use of marijuana constituents are gaining mainstream clinical and political acceptance. Given the documented contributions of endocannabinoid signaling to a range of physiological systems, including cognitive function, and the control of eating behaviors, it is unsurprising that cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are showing significant clinical potential. In addition to the neuroactive effects of cannabinoids, an emerging body of data suggests that both endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids are potently immunoactive. The central premise of this review article is that the immunological effects of cannabinoids should be considered in the context of each prescribing decision. We present evidence that the immunological effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are highly relevant to the spectrum of disorders for which cannabinoid therapeutics are currently offered. PMID:20219697

  12. Synthetic Cannabinoids and Cathinones: Prevalence and Markets.

    PubMed

    Bretteville-Jensen, A L; Tuv, S S; Bilgrei, O R; Fjeld, B; Bachs, L

    2013-03-01

    Over the past few years, the phenomenon of new designer drugs has attracted much attention. Synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones are the two main classes of these drugs. Both are potent drugs of abuse, and several cases of severe toxicity and deaths are reported. The present work is based on a systematic review of studies that have assessed the market and prevalence of synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones, and integrates pharmacological, sociological, and epidemiological aspects of these two groups of emerging synthetic drugs. The review reflects that the Internet has made synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones widely available. Furthermore, aggressive and widespread marketing, as well as the low price level of these drugs, their juridical status and their lack of detection on standard drug tests may serve as major motivations for drug use. The number of prevalence studies is small and derived from a limited number of countries. In spite of the many methodological shortcomings, some conclusions may be cautiously drawn. Taken together, the results point toward higher prevalence of use for synthetic cathinones than for synthetic cannabinoids. In the general population, the prevalence of use of synthetic cathinones is reported to be around 4% compared to figures lower than 1% for synthetic cannabinoids. Among students, the prevalence varies from 1-20% for synthetic cathinones and 2-10% for synthetic cannabinoids. Among groups with high rates of drug use, the prevalence varies between 4% to more than 60% for synthetic cathinones and around 10% for synthetic cannabinoids.

  13. Signal transduction activated by cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery that cannabinoids exert biological actions through binding to specific receptors, signal mechanisms triggered by these receptors have been focus of extensive study. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signalling events produced by cannabinoids from membrane receptors to downstream regulators. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: CB(1) and CB(2) both belonging to the heptahelichoidal receptor family but with different tissue distribution and signalling mechanisms. Coupling to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and thus inhibition of adenylyl cyclase has been observed in both receptors but other signal transduction pathways that are regulated or not by these G proteins are differently activated upon ligand-receptor binding including ion channels, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, ceramide generation, phospholipases activation and downstream targets as MAP kinase cascade, PI3K, FAK or NOS regulation. Cannabinoids may also act independently of CB(1)or CB(2) receptors. The existence of new unidentified putative cannabinoid receptors has been claimed by many investigators. Endocannabinoids activate vanilloid TRPV1 receptors that may mediate some of the cannabinoid effects. Other actions of cannabinoids can occur through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  14. Cannabinoid-like anti-inflammatory compounds from flax fiber.

    PubMed

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kulma, Anna; Ratajczak, Katarzyna; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Szopa, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Flax is a valuable source of fibers, linseed and oil. The compounds of the latter two products have already been widely examined and have been proven to possess many health-beneficial properties. In the course of analysis of fibers extract from previously generated transgenic plants overproducing phenylpropanoids a new terpenoid compound was discovered.The UV spectra and the retention time in UPLC analysis of this new compound reveal similarity to a cannabinoid-like compound, probably cannabidiol (CBD). This was confirmed by finding two ions at m/z 174.1 and 231.2 in mass spectra analysis. Further confirmation of the nature of the compound was based on a biological activity assay. It was found that the compound affects the expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes in mouse and human fibroblasts and likely the CBD from Cannabis sativa activates the specific peripheral cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) gene expression. Besides fibers, the compound was also found in all other flax tissues. It should be pointed out that the industrial process of fabric production does not affect CBD activity.The presented data suggest for the first time that flax products can be a source of biologically active cannabinoid-like compounds that are able to influence the cell immunological response. These findings might open up many new applications for medical flax products, especially for the fabric as a material for wound dressing with anti-inflammatory properties.

  15. The potential role of cannabinoids in epilepsy treatment.

    PubMed

    De Caro, Carmen; Leo, Antonio; Citraro, Rita; De Sarro, Caterina; Russo, Roberto; Calignano, Antonio; Russo, Emilio

    2017-09-04

    Epilepsy is one of the world's oldest recognized and prevalent neurological diseases. It has a great negative impact on patients' quality of life (QOL) as a consequence of treatment resistant seizures in about 30% of patients together with drugs' side effects and comorbidities. Therefore, new drugs are needed and cannabinoids, above all cannabidiol, have recently gathered attention. Areas covered: This review summarizes the scientific data from human and animal studies on the major cannabinoids which have been of interest in the treatment of epilepsy, including drugs acting on the endocannabinoid system. Expert commentary: Despite the fact that cannabis has been used for many purposes over 4 millennia, the development of drugs based on cannabinoids has been very slow. Only recently, research has focused on their potential effects and CBD is the first treatment of this group with clinical evidence of efficacy in children with Dravet syndrome; moreover, other studies are currently ongoing to confirm its effectiveness in patients with epilepsy. On the other hand, it will be of interest to understand whether drugs acting on the endocannabinoid system will be able to reach the market and prove their known preclinical efficacy also in patients with epilepsy.

  16. Lack of response suppression follows repeated ventral tegmental cannabinoid administration: an in vitro electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Cheer, J F; Marsden, C A; Kendall, D A; Mason, R

    2000-01-01

    . To assess the role of GABA in cannabinoid-mediated excitation, HU210 was added in the presence of bicuculline. HU210 did not affect the initial bicuculline-induced increase in firing, suggesting different sites of action for the two compounds. Our data fail to support previously reported findings using repeated cannabinoid administration and cell preparations. The maintained increase in DA drive elicited by the potent cannabinoid agonist HU210 in the in vitro ventral tegmental circuit could explain some of the behavioural properties of cannabinoids, such as the lack of tolerance for the psychotropic effects of marijuana seen in human users.

  17. Cannabinoids as novel anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Nagarkatti, Prakash; Pandey, Rupal; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Hegde, Venkatesh L; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2009-10-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds that mediate their effects through cannabinoid receptors. The discovery of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as the major psychoactive principle in marijuana, as well as the identification of cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, has led to a significant growth in research aimed at understanding the physiological functions of cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptors include CB1, which is predominantly expressed in the brain, and CB2, which is primarily found on the cells of the immune system. The fact that both CB1 and CB2 receptors have been found on immune cells suggests that cannabinoids play an important role in the regulation of the immune system. Recent studies demonstrated that administration of THC into mice triggered marked apoptosis in T cells and dendritic cells, resulting in immunosuppression. In addition, several studies showed that cannabinoids downregulate cytokine and chemokine production and, in some models, upregulate T-regulatory cells (Tregs) as a mechanism to suppress inflammatory responses. The endocannabinoid system is also involved in immunoregulation. For example, administration of endocannabinoids or use of inhibitors of enzymes that break down the endocannabinoids, led to immunosuppression and recovery from immune-mediated injury to organs such as the liver. Manipulation of endocannabinoids and/or use of exogenous cannabinoids in vivo can constitute a potent treatment modality against inflammatory disorders. This review will focus on the potential use of cannabinoids as a new class of anti-inflammatory agents against a number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases that are primarily triggered by activated T cells or other cellular immune components.

  18. Pharmacology of cannabinoids in the treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Tyler E; Friedman, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    The use of cannabis products in the treatment of epilepsy has long been of interest to researchers and clinicians alike; however, until recently very little published data were available to support its use. This article summarizes the available scientific data of pharmacology from human and animal studies on the major cannabinoids which have been of interest in the treatment of epilepsy, including ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC), cannabidiol (CBD), ∆9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (∆9-THCV), cannabidivarin (CBDV), and ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (Δ9-THCA). It has long been known that ∆9-THC has partial agonist activity at the endocannab