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Sample records for human cdna encoding

  1. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Ritsu; Kallen, C.B.; Babalola, G.O.; Rennert, H.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Billheimer, J.T. )

    1991-01-15

    The authors report the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding human sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP{sub 2}). The 1.3-kilobase (kb) cDNA contains an open reading frame which encompasses a 143-amino acid sequence which is 89% identical to the rat SCP{sub 2} amino acid sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence of the polypeptide reveals a 20-residue amino-terminal leader sequence in front of the mature polypeptide, which contains a carboxyl-terminal tripeptide (Ala-Lys-Leu) related to the peroxisome targeting sequence. The expressed cDNA in COS-7 cells yields a 15.3-kDa polypeptide and increased amounts of a 13.2-kDa polypeptide, both reacting with a specific rabbit antiserum to rat liver SCP{sub 2}. The cDNA insert hybridizes with 3.2- and 1.8-kb mRNA species in human liver poly(A){sup +} RNA. In human fibroblasts and placenta the 1.8-kb mRNA was most abundant. Southern blot analysis suggests either that there are multiple copies of the SCP{sub 2} gene in the human genome or that the SCP{sub 2} gene is very large. Coexpression of the SCP{sub 2} cDNA with expression vectors for cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme and adrenodoxin resulted in a 2.5-fold enhancement of progestin synthesis over that obtained with expression of the steroidogenic enzyme system alone. These findings are concordant with the notion that SCP{sub 2} plays a role in regulating steroidogenesis, among other possible functions.

  2. Human brain n-chimaerin cDNA encodes a novel phorbol ester receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, S; Kozma, R; Monfries, C; Hall, C; Lim, H H; Smith, P; Lim, L

    1990-01-01

    A human brain-specific cDNA encoding n-chimaerin, a protein of predicted molecular mass 34 kDa, has sequence identity with two different proteins: protein kinase C (PKC) at the N-terminus and BCR protein [product of the breakpoint-cluster-region (BCR) gene, involved in Philadelphia chromosome translocation] at the C-terminus [Hall, Monfries, Smith, Lim, Kozma, Ahmed, Vannaisungham, Leung & Lim (1990) J. Mol. Biol. 211, 11-16]. The sequence identity of n-chimaerin with PKC includes the cysteine-rich motif CX2CX13CX2CX7CX7C, and amino acids upstream of the first cysteine residue, but not the kinase domain. This region of PKC has been implicated in the binding of diacylglycerol and phorbol esters in a phospholipid-dependent fashion. Part of this cysteine-rich motif (CX2CX13CX2C) has the potential of forming a 'Zn-finger' structure. Phorbol esters cause a variety of physiological changes and are among the most potent tumour promoters that have been described. PKC is the only known protein target for these compounds. We now report that n-chimaerin cDNA encodes a novel phospholipid-dependent phorbol ester receptor, with the cysteine-rich region being responsible for this activity. This finding has wide implications for previous studies equating phorbol ester binding with the presence of PKC in the brain. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2268301

  3. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding the human Sm-D autoantigen

    SciTech Connect

    Rokeach, L.A.; Haselby, J.A.; Hoch, S.O. )

    1988-07-01

    Antibodies to the Sm-D polypeptide antigen are closely associated with the rheumatic disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Sm-D exists in the cell as one of the core proteins of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes implicated in RNA processing. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone, D45-2, coding for the Sm-D human nuclear antigen by screening a human B-lymphocyte cDNA library with synthetic oligonucleotide probes. The 1633-base-pair clone contains an open reading frame (ORF) 357 nucleotides long, capable of encoding a 13,282-dalton polypeptide. The Sm-D coding region is initiated at an AUG codon downstream from a sequence with excellent match to the consensus for the eukaryotic ribosome-binding site. The Sm-D ORF is preceded by a 150-nucleotide-long untranslated leader and followed by a 1126-nucleotide-long untranslated region containing four putative poly(A) signals. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals a (Gly-Arg){sub 9} repeated motif at the C terminus, which may constitute one of the Sm-D immunoreactive determinants. Moreover, this C terminus shows interesting features: (i) a good homology to protamines as expected for a nucleic acid binding protein and (ii) a striking similarity to a region in the Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen.

  4. Cloning, characterization, and DNA sequence of a human cDNA encoding neuropeptide tyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Minth, C D; Bloom, S R; Polak, J M; Dixon, J E

    1984-01-01

    In vitro translation of the RNA isolated from a human pheochromocytoma demonstrated that this tumor contained a mRNA encoding a 10.5-kDa protein, which was immunoprecipitated with antiserum raised against porcine neuropeptide Y. Double-stranded cDNA was synthesized from total RNA and inserted into the Pst I site of pUC8. Transformants containing the neuropeptide Y cDNA were identified using the mixed hybridization probe d[A-(A,G)-(A,G)-T-T-(A,G,T)-A-T-(A,G)-T-A-(A,G)-T-G]. The probe sequences were based on the known amino acid sequence, His-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Leu, found in porcine neuropeptide Y. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA was determined and contained 86 and 174 bases in the 5'- and 3'-untranslated regions, respectively. The coding sequence consisted of 291 bases, suggesting a precursor to neuropeptide Y that was 97 amino acids long (10,839 Da). The deduced amino acid sequence of the precursor suggested that there were at least two sites of proteolytic processing, which would generate three peptides having 28 (signal peptide), 36 (human neuropeptide Y), and 30 (COOH-terminal peptide) amino acid residues. A partial NH2-terminal sequence obtained by Edman degradation of the immunoprecipitated in vitro translation product identified the positions of methionine and leucine in the first 30 residues of the prepropeptide. A highly sensitive single-stranded complementary mRNA hybridization probe specific for neuropeptide Y mRNA was prepared using the bacteriophage SP6 promoter. This probe was used to identify a mRNA corresponding to neuropeptide Y of approximately 800 bases. Images PMID:6589611

  5. Cloning, characterization, and expression of a cDNA encoding an inducible nitric oxide synthase from the human chondrocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, I G; Palmer, R M; Hickery, M S; Bayliss, M T; Chubb, A P; Hall, V S; Moss, D W; Moncada, S

    1993-01-01

    Incubation of human articular chondrocytes with interleukin 1 beta results in the time-dependent expression of nitric oxide (NO) synthase. We report here the isolation of a cDNA clone which encodes a protein of 1153 amino acids with a molecular mass of 131,213 Da and a calculated isoelectric point of 7.9. CHO cells transfected with a plasmid harboring this cDNA clone expressed NO synthase activity that was inhibited by some L-arginine analogues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human chondrocyte inducible NO synthase shows 51% identity and 68% similarity with the endothelial NO synthase and 54% identity and 70% similarity with the neuronal NO synthase. The similarity (88%) between the human chondrocyte NO synthase cDNA sequence and that reported for the murine macrophage suggests that the inducible class of enzyme is conserved between different cell types and across species. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7504305

  6. Sanfilippo syndrome type B: cDNA and gene encoding human {alpha}-N-acetylglucosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H.G.; Lopez, R.; Rennecker, J.

    1994-09-01

    Deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme {alpha}-N-acetlyglucosaminidase underlies the type B Sanfilippo syndrome (MPS III B), a mucopolysaccharide storage disease with profound neurologic deterioration. We are acquiring tools to study the molecular basis of the disorder. The enzyme was purified from bovine testis; after ConA-, DEAE- and phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, it was subjected to SDS-PAGE without preheating. Of two bands of activity detected on the gel, 170 kDa and 87 kDa, the larger one, which coincided with a well-defined Coomassie blue band, was selected for sequence analysis. Degenerate 17-base oligonucleotides, corresponding to the ends of an internal 23 amino acid sequence, were used for RT-PCR of RNA from human fibroblasts. A 41-mer was synthesized from the sequence of the RT-PCR product and used to screen a human testis cDNA library. A number of cDNA inserts were isolated, all lacking the 5{prime} end and none longer than 1.7 kb. An additional 300 bp segment has been obtained by RACE. The cDNA sequence accounts for 9 of 11 peptides, allowing for species difference. Northern analysis of fibroblast RNA with a 1.5 kb cDNA probe showed the presence of a 3 kb mRNA; marked deficiency of this mRNA in two MPS III B fibroblast lines confirmed the authenticity of the cloned cDNA. While no homologous amino acid sequence has been found in a search of GenBank, the nucleotide sequence (interrupted by 4 introns) is present in a flanking region upstream of an unrelated gene on chromosome 17q11-21 (human 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase). This must therefore be the chromosomal locus of the {alpha}-N-acetylglucosaminidase gene and of MPS III B.

  7. Pez: a novel human cDNA encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase- and ezrin-like domains.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Mitchell, P J; Shipley, J; Gusterson, B A; Rogers, M V; Crompton, M R

    1995-04-26

    We have isolated cDNAs from normal human breast tissue and breast tumour cells that encode a protein (pez) with features of a novel non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase possessing N-terminal sequence homology to the ezrin-band 4.1-merlin-radixin protein family. Northern blot analysis indicates that pez is expressed in a variety of human tissues including kidney, skeletal muscle, lung and placenta. Fluorescence in situ hybridization has mapped pez to chromosome 1 region q32.2-41. Sequence identity to a characterized polymorphic marker confirms this localization. PMID:7733990

  8. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding transformation-sensitive tropomyosin isoform 3 from tumorigenic human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.S.; Leavitt, J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone from the tumorigenic human fibroblast cell line HuT-14 that contains the entire protein coding region of tropomyosin isoform 3 (Tm3) and 781 base pairs of 5'- and 3'-untranslated sequences. Tm3, despite its apparent smaller molecular weight than Tm1 in two-dimensional gels, has the same peptide length as Tm1 (284 amino acids) and shares 83% homology with Tm1. Tm3 cDNA hybridized to an abundant mRNA of 1.3 kilobases in fetal muscle and cardiac muscle, suggesting that Tm3 is related to an ..cap alpha../sub fast/-tropomyosin. The first 188 amino acids of Tm3 are identical to those of rat or rabbit skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin, and the last 71 amino acids differ from those of rat smooth muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin by only 1 residue. Tm3 therefore appears to be encoded by the same gene that encodes the fast skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin and the smooth muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin via an alternative RNA-splicing mechanism. In contrast to Tm4 and Tm5, Tm3 has a small gene family, with, at best, only one pseudogene.

  9. Isolation and structure of a cDNA encoding the B1 (CD20) cell-surface antigen of human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, T F; Streuli, M; Schlossman, S F; Saito, H

    1988-01-01

    The B1 (CD20) molecule is a Mr 33,000 phosphoprotein on the surface of human B lymphocytes that may serve a central role in the humoral immune response by regulating B-cell proliferation and differentiation. In this report, a cDNA clone that encodes the B1 molecule was isolated and the amino acid sequence of B1 was determined. B-cell-specific cDNA clones were selected from a human tonsillar cDNA library by differential hybridization with labeled cDNA derived from either size-fractionated B-cell mRNA or size-fractionated T-cell mRNA. Of the 261 cDNA clones isolated, 3 cross-hybridizing cDNA clones were chosen as potential candidates for encoding B1 based on their selective hybridization to RNA from B1-positive cell lines. The longest clone, pB1-21, contained a 2.8-kilobase insert with an 891-base-pair open reading frame that encodes a protein of 33 kDa. mRNA synthesized from the pB1-21 cDNA clone in vitro was translated into a protein of the same apparent molecular weight as B1. Limited proteinase digestion of the pB1-21 translation product and B1 generated peptides of the same sizes, indicating that the pB1-21 cDNA encodes the B1 molecule. Gel blot analysis indicated that pB1-21 hybridized with two mRNA species of 2.8 and 3.4 kilobases only in B1-positive cell lines. The amino acid sequence deduced from the pB1-21 nucleotide sequence apparently lacks a signal sequence and contains three extensive hydrophobic regions. The deduced B1 amino acid sequence shows no significant homology with other known proteins. Images PMID:2448768

  10. Isolation and characterization of human cDNA clones encoding the. alpha. and the. alpha. prime subunits of casein kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Lozeman, F.J.; Litchfield, D.W.; Piening, C.; Takio, Koji; Walsh, K.A.; Krebs E.G. )

    1990-09-11

    Casein kinase II is a widely distributed protein serine/threonine kinase. The holoenzyme appears to be a tetramer, containing two {alpha} or {alpha}{prime} subunits (or one of each) and two {beta} subunits. Complementary DNA clones encoding the subunits of casein kinase II were isolated from a human T-cell {lambda}gt 10 library using cDNA clones isolated from Drosophila melanogasten. One of the human cDNA clones (hT4.1) was 2.2 kb long, including a coding region of 1176 bp preceded by 156 bp (5{prime} untranslated region) and followed by 871 bp (3{prime} untranslated region). The hT4.1 close was nearly identical in size and sequence with a cDNA clone from HepG2 human hepatoma cultured cells. Another of the human T-cell cDNA clones (hT9.1) was 1.8 kb long, containing a coding region of 1053 bp preceded by 171 by (5{prime} untranslated region) and followed by 550 bp (3{prime} untranslated region). Amino acid sequences deduced from these two cDNA clones were about 85% identical. Most of the difference between the two encoded polypeptides was in the carboxy-terminal region, but heterogeneity was distributed throughout the molecules. Partial amino acid sequence was determined in a mixture of {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} subunits from bovine lung casein kinase II. The bovine sequences aligned with the 2 human cDNA-encoded polypeptides with only 2 discrepancies out of 535 amino acid positions. This confirmed that the two human T-cell cDNA clones encoded the {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} subunits of casein kinase II. These studies show that there are two distinct catalytic subunits for casein II ({alpha} and {alpha}{prime}) and that the sequence of these subunits is largely conserved between the bovine and the human.

  11. Cloning and expression of the cDNA encoding human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the enzyme deficient in hereditary tyrosinemia: assignment of the gene to chromosome 15.

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, D; Labelle, Y; Bérubé, D; Arden, K; Cavenee, W; Gagné, R; Tanguay, R M

    1991-01-01

    Type 1 hereditary tyrosinemia (HT) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH; E.C.3.7.1.2). We have isolated human FAH cDNA clones by screening a liver cDNA expression library using specific antibodies and plaque hybridization with a rat FAH cDNA probe. A 1,477-bp cDNA was sequenced and shown to code for FAH by an in vitro transcription-translation assay and sequence homology with tryptic fragments of purified FAH. Transient expression of this FAH cDNA in transfected CV-1 mammalian cells resulted in the synthesis of an immunoreactive protein comigrating with purified human liver FAH on SDS-PAGE and having enzymatic activity as shown by the hydrolysis of the natural substrate fumarylacetoacetate. This indicates that the single polypeptide chain encoded by the FAH gene contains all the genetic information required for functional activity, suggesting that the dimer found in vivo is a homodimer. The human FAH cDNA was used as a probe to determine the gene's chromosomal localization using somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization. The human FAH gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 15 in the region q23-q25. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:1998338

  12. Cloning and expression of the cDNA encoding human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the enzyme deficient in hereditary tyrosinemia: assignment of the gene to chromosome 15.

    PubMed

    Phaneuf, D; Labelle, Y; Bérubé, D; Arden, K; Cavenee, W; Gagné, R; Tanguay, R M

    1991-03-01

    Type 1 hereditary tyrosinemia (HT) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH; E.C.3.7.1.2). We have isolated human FAH cDNA clones by screening a liver cDNA expression library using specific antibodies and plaque hybridization with a rat FAH cDNA probe. A 1,477-bp cDNA was sequenced and shown to code for FAH by an in vitro transcription-translation assay and sequence homology with tryptic fragments of purified FAH. Transient expression of this FAH cDNA in transfected CV-1 mammalian cells resulted in the synthesis of an immunoreactive protein comigrating with purified human liver FAH on SDS-PAGE and having enzymatic activity as shown by the hydrolysis of the natural substrate fumarylacetoacetate. This indicates that the single polypeptide chain encoded by the FAH gene contains all the genetic information required for functional activity, suggesting that the dimer found in vivo is a homodimer. The human FAH cDNA was used as a probe to determine the gene's chromosomal localization using somatic cell hybrids and in situ hybridization. The human FAH gene maps to the long arm of chromosome 15 in the region q23-q25.

  13. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease.

    PubMed Central

    Gershenfeld, H K; Hershberger, R J; Shows, T B; Weissman, I L

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage lambda gt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16+ natural killer cells and CD3+, CD16- T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The predicted protein has a 22-amino acid presegment, a 6-amino acid prosegment, and an active enzyme of 234 amino acids with a calculated unglycosylated molecular weight of 25,820. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. We propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Images PMID:3257574

  14. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding the human ribosomal protein L11 mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, V.P.; Filipenko, M.L.; Muravlev, A.I.

    1995-02-01

    To clone the RPL11 cDNA, we used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the single-stranded cDNA synthesized on the total placentary poly(A){sup +}mRNA with the use of primer M245 containing a 3{prime}-terminal oligo(dT)-tract, the 5{prime}terminal hexadecanucleotide sequence of the M13 universal primer, and a NotiI restriction site between them. On the basis of the known sequence of the 5{prime}-end of the human ribosomal protein L11 mRNA, we chose two partially overlapping deoxyribooligonucleotides as 5{prime}-terminal primers in the amplification of the RPL11 cDNA. A pair of partially overlapping oligonucleotides complementary to the oligo(dT)-containing primer were used as 3{prime}-terminal primers.

  15. The human CYP2F gene subfamily: Identification of a cDNA encoding a new cytochrome P450, cDNA-directed expression, and chromosome mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Nhamburo, P.T.; Kimura, Shioko; McBride, O.W.; Kozak, C.A.; Gelboin, H.V.; Gonzalez, F.J. )

    1990-06-12

    A cDNA coding for a P450, designated IIF1, was isolated from a human lung {lambda}gt11 library by screening with a human IIC9 cDNA probe. The cDNA-encoded IIF1 protein had 491 amino acids and a calculated molecular weight of 55,507. IIF1 cDNA, expressed by using a vaccinia virus vector, produced a cytochrome with a {lambda}{sub max} of 454 nm when reduced and complexed with carbon monoxide. This enzyme was able to dealkylate ethoxycoumarin, propoxycoumarin, and pentoxyresorufin but possessed no activity toward ethoxyresorufin and only trace dearylation activity toward benzyloxyresorufin. A variant cDNA, designated IIF1v, was isolated that was identical with IIF1 except for the loss of two segments of 161 and 388 bp within the cDNA coding region. Two mRNAs, consistent with the predicted size of the IIF1 and IIF1v transcripts, were found at very low abundance in lung specimens by Northern blot analysis. A 2-kb transcript, hybridizing with the human IIF1, was also detected as an abundant mRNA in rat lung. The CYP2F gene subfamily was localized to human chromosome 19 and mouse chromosome 7. On the basis of southern blotting analysis with multiple restriction enzymes, the authors conclude that the CYP2F1 gene is flanked by a second highly similar gene.

  16. Ribosomal protein genes are overexpressed in colorectal cancer: isolation of a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Pogue-Geile, K; Geiser, J R; Shu, M; Miller, C; Wool, I G; Meisler, A I; Pipas, J M

    1991-08-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding the human S3 ribosomal protein from a normal human colon cDNA library. The clone was identified as one of many that detected genes whose level of expression was increased in adenocarcinoma of the colon relative to normal colonic mucosa. Increased levels of the S3 transcript were present in the tumors of all eight patients examined. Moreover, the S3 mRNA was also more abundant in 7 of 10 adenomatous polyps, the presumed precursor of carcinoma. Additional studies demonstrated that increased levels of mRNAs encoding several other ribosomal proteins, including S6, S8, S12, L5, and P0, were present in colorectal tumors and polyps. These results suggest that there is increased synthesis of ribosomes in colorectal tumors and that this increase is an early event in colon neoplasia.

  17. Increased mRNA expression of a laminin-binding protein in human colon carcinoma: Complete sequence of a full-length cDNA encoding the protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, Hsiukang; Wong, Jau Min; Chen, Hai Shiene; Lee, C.; Steele, G.D. Jr.; Chen, Lanbo

    1988-09-01

    Reliable markers to distinguish human colon carcinoma from normal colonic epithelium are needed particularly for poorly differentiated tumors where no useful marker is currently available. To search for markers the authors constructed cDNA libraries from human colon carcinoma cell lines and screened for clones that hybridize to a greater degree with mRNAs of colon carcinomas than with their normal counterparts. Here they report one such cDNA clone that hybridizes with a 1.2-kilobase (kb) mRNA, the level of which is /approx/9-fold greater in colon carcinoma than in adjacent normal colonic epithelium. Blot hybridization of total RNA from a variety of human colon carcinoma cell lines shows that the level of this 1.2-kb mRNA in poorly differentiated colon carcinomas is as high as or higher than that in well-differentiated carcinomas. Molecular cloning and complete sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the full-length open reading frame of this 1.2-kb mRNA unexpectedly show it to contain all the partial cDNA sequence encoding 135 amino acid residues previously reported for a human laminin receptor. The deduced amino acid sequence suggests that this putative laminin-binding protein from human colon carcinomas consists of 295 amino acid residues with interesting features. There is an unusual C-terminal 70-amino acid segment, which is trypsin-resistant and highly negatively charged.

  18. Cloning and identification of a cDNA that encodes a novel human protein with thrombospondin type I repeat domain, hPWTSR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Zhong; Wang, Shu; Tang, Rong; Yang, Quan-Sheng; Zhao, Enpeng; Chao, Yaoqiong; Ying, Kang; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yu-Min

    2002-09-01

    A cDNA was isolated from the fetal brain cDNA library by high throughput cDNA sequencing. The 2390 bp cDNA with an open reading fragment (ORF) of 816 bp encodes a 272 amino acids putative protein with a thrombospondin type I repeat (TSR) domain and a cysteine-rich region at the N-terminus, so it is named hPWTSR. We used Northern blot detected two bands with length of about 3 kb and 4 kb respectively, which expressed in human adult tissues with different intensities. The expression pattern was verified by RT-PCR, revealing that the transcripts were expressed ubiquitously in fetal tissues and human tumor tissues too. However, the transcript was detected neither in ovarian carcinoma GI-102 nor in lung carcinoma LX-1. Blast analysis against NCBI database revealed that the new gene contained at least 5 exons and located in human chromosome 6q22.33. Our results demonstrate that the gene is a novel member of TSR supergene family.

  19. cDNA isolated from a human T-cell library encodes a member of the protein-tyrosine-phosphatase family

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, D.E.; Tonks, N.K.; Charbonneau, H.; Walsh, K.A.; Fischer, E.H.; Krebs, E.G. )

    1989-07-01

    A human peripheral T-cell cDNA library was screened with two labeled synthetic oligonucleotides encoding regions of a human placenta protein-tyrosine-phosphatase. One positive clone was isolated and the nucleotide sequence was determined. It contained 1,305 base pairs of open reading frame followed by a TAA stop codon and 978 base pairs of 3{prime} untranslated end, although a poly(A){sup +} tail was not found. An initiator methionine residue was predicted at position 61, which would result in a protein of 415 amino acid residues. This was supported by the synthesis of a M{sub r} 48,000 protein in an in vitro reticulocyte lysate translation system using RNA transcribed from the cloned cDNA and T7 RNA polymerase. The deduced amino acid sequence was compared to other known proteins revealing 65% identity to the low M{sub r} PTPase 1B isolated from placenta. In view of the high degree of similarity, the T-cell cDNA likely encodes a newly discovered protein-tyrosine-phosphatase, thus expanding this family of genes.

  20. Identification of a human cDNA encoding a protein that is structurally and functionally related to the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Matviw, Yu, G.; Young, D. )

    1992-11-01

    The adenylyl cyclases of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe are associated with related proteins named CAP. In S. cerevisiae, CAP is required for cellular responses mediated by the RAS/cyclic AMP pathway. Both yeast CAPs appear to be bifunctional proteins: The N-terminal domains are required for the proper function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains results in morphological and nutritional defects that appear to be unrelated to the cAMP pathways. Expression of either yeast CAP in the heterologous yeast suppresses phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of the endogenous CAP but does not suppress loss of the N-terminal domain. On the basis of the homology between the two yeast CAP proteins, we have designed degenerate oligonucleotides that we used to detect, by the polymerase chain reaction method, a human cDNA fragment encoding a CAP-related peptide. Using the polymerase chain reaction fragment as a probe, we isolated a human cDNA clone encoding a 475-amino-acid protein that is homologous to the yeast CAP proteins. Expressions of the human CAP protein in S. cerevisiae suppresses the phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of CAP but does not suppress phenotypes associated with loss of the N-terminal domain. Thus, CAP proteins have been structurally and, to some extent, functionally conserved in evolution between yeasts and mammals. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Cloning and characterization of the cDNA encoding a novel human pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, B.; Sun, Yinghao; Stearns, G.

    1994-02-01

    A novel gene coding for the pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) has been isolated from a human peripheral blood lymphocyte cDNA library. The expression of this gene is induced by pokeweed mitogen and superinduced by cycloheximide. It is also induced in the T-lymphoblastoid cell line HUT 78 after phorbol ester (phorbol myristate acetate) treatment. The predominant mRNA for PBEF is approximately 2.4 kb long and codes for a 52-kDa secreted protein. The 3{prime} untranslated region of the mRNA has multiple TATT motifs, usually found in cytokine and oncogene messages. The PBEF gene is mainly transcribed in human bone marrow, liver tissue, and muscle. We have expressed PBEF in COS 7 and PA317 cells and have tested the biological activities of the conditioned medium as well as the antibody-purified protein in different in vitro assays. PBEF itself had no activity but synergized the pre-B-cell colony formation activity of stem cell factor and interleukin 7. In the presence of PBEF, the number of pre-B-cell colonies was increased by at least 70% above the amount stimulated by stem cell factor plus interleukin 7. No effect of PBEF was found with cells of myeloid or erythroid lineages. These data define PBEF as a novel cytokine which acts on early B-lineage precursor cells. 33 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Cloning of a human cDNA encoding a putative nucleotide-binding protein related to Escherichia coli MinD.

    PubMed

    Shahrestanifar, M; Saha, D P; Scala, L A; Basu, A; Howells, R D

    1994-09-30

    A novel human cDNA encoding a putative nucleotide-binding protein (NBP) was obtained by screening a human SHSY5Y neuroblastoma library. The deduced protein contains 320 amino acids (aa) with a M(r) of 34,540. NBP displays sequence similarity with the product of the minD gene from Escherichia coli. MinD is involved in the proper placement of the division septum, and has ATPase activity. NBP and MinD contain consensus nucleotide (nt)-binding domains. The NBP mRNA is approx. 1500 nt in length and is expressed in several human cell lines and in all rat tissues examined, with the highest levels in lung and testis.

  3. Cloning and expression of APE, the cDNA encoding the major human apurinic endonuclease: definition of a family of DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Demple, B; Herman, T; Chen, D S

    1991-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites are common, potentially mutagenic DNA damages that are attacked by AP endonucleases. The biological roles of these enzymes in metazoans have not been tested. We have cloned the human cDNA (APE) that encodes the main nuclear AP endonuclease. The predicted Ape protein, which contains likely nuclear transport signals, is a member of a family of DNA repair enzymes that includes two bacterial AP endonucleases (ExoA protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae and exonuclease III of Escherichia coli) and Rrp1 protein of Drosophila melanogaster. Purified Ape protein lacks the 3'-exonuclease activity against undamaged DNA that is found in the bacterial and Drosophila enzymes, but the lack of obvious amino acid changes to account for this difference suggests that the various enzyme functions evolved by fine tuning a conserved active site. Expression of the active human enzyme in AP endonuclease-deficient E. coli conferred significant resistance to killing by the DNA-alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate. The APE cDNA provides a molecular tool for analyzing the role of this central enzyme in maintaining genetic stability in humans. Images PMID:1722334

  4. Cloning of the cDNA encoding human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3) and mapping of the TIMP3 gene to chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, S.S.; Olsen, B.R. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1994-01-01

    The tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are natural inhibitors of the matrix metalloproteinases, a group of zinc-binding endopeptidases involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix. The authors have isolated overlapping cDNAs encoding a novel human TIMP, TIMP-3. The cDNAs contain a 591-bp-long open reading frame encoding 9 amino acid residues of the signal peptide and 188 residues of the mature TIMP-3 polypeptide. Both the nucleotide sequence and the conceptual translation product of the human TIMP3 cDNA have a high degree of similarity to ChIMP-3, a recently cloned metalloproteinase inhibitor in the chicken, and to the TIMP1 and TIMP2 gene products, including 12 conserved cysteinyl residues at the same relative positions. The TIMP3 gene is expressed in many tissues, with highest expression in the placenta. Upon hybridization with a panel of human-hamster somatic cell hybrid DNAs, the TIMP3 gene segregated with clones containing chromosome 22. Using in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes, the authors have assigned the locus for the TIMP3 gene to the q12.1-q13.2 region of human chromosome 22. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  6. Characterization of a cDNA encoding a novel human Golgi alpha 1, 2-mannosidase (IC) involved in N-glycan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, L O; Herscovics, A

    2000-10-13

    A human cDNA encoding a 70.9-kDa type II membrane protein with sequence similarity to class I alpha1,2-mannosidases was isolated. The enzymatic properties of the novel alpha1,2-mannosidase IC were studied by expressing its catalytic domain in Pichia pastoris as a secreted glycoprotein. alpha1,2-Mannosidase IC sequentially hydrolyzes the alpha1,2-linked mannose residues of [(3)H]mannose-labeled Man(9)GlcNAc to form [(3)H]Man(6)GlcNAc and a small amount of [(3)H]Man(5)GlcNAc. The enzyme requires calcium for activity and is inhibited by both 1-deoxymannojirimycin and kifunensine. The order of mannose removal was determined by separating oligosaccharide isomers formed from pyridylaminated Man(9)GlcNAc(2) by high performance liquid chromatography. The terminal alpha1,2-linked mannose residue from the middle branch is the last mannose removed by the enzyme. This residue is the mannose cleaved from Man(9)GlcNAc(2) by the endoplasmic reticulum alpha1, 2-mannosidase I to form Man(8)GlcNAc(2) isomer B. The order of mannose hydrolysis from either pyridylaminated Man(9)GlcNAc(2) or Man(8)GlcNAc(2) isomer B differs from that previously reported for mammalian Golgi alpha1,2-mannosidases IA and IB. The full-length alpha1,2-mannosidase IC was localized to the Golgi of MDBK and MDCK cells by indirect immunofluorescence. Northern blot analysis showed tissue-specific expression of a major transcript of 3.8 kilobase pairs. The expression pattern is different from that of human Golgi alpha1,2-mannosidases IA and IB. Therefore, the human genome contains at least three differentially regulated Golgi alpha1, 2-mannosidase genes encoding enzymes with similar, but not identical specificities. PMID:10915796

  7. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  8. Characterization and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a protein related to the murine 102-kDa cadherin-associated protein ([alpha]-catenin)

    SciTech Connect

    Claverie, J.M. ); Hardelin, J.P.; Legouis, R.; Levilliers, J.; Petit, C. ); Bougueleret, L. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1993-01-01

    We report the characterization of a human cDNA encompassing the complete coding region of a 945-residue putative protein (CAP-R) 80% identical to the recently described murine 102-kDa [alpha]-catenin (CAP102). The CAP-R protein mostly differs from CAP102 by the presence of a 48-residue insert. This insert exhibits similarity with a segment of the type 1 neurofibromatosis gene product. The analysis of a publicly available human [open quote]expressed sequence tag[close quotes] collection revealed the existence of another human cDNA more closely related (89% identical) to CAP 102. This strongly suggests that CAP-R is not the human homologue of the murine 102- kDa [alpha]-catenin but a new closely related gene of the vinculin family. This is further supported by the computed mutation rates falling outside the range observed for mammalian orthologous genes. Using in situ hybridization, the CAP-R gene could be mapped to the pll.l-pl2 region of human chromosome 2 and to the homologous B3-D region of mouse chromosome 6. 32 refs., 4 fig.

  9. cDNA cloning of a human RAB26-related gene encoding a Ras-like GTP-binding protein on chromosome 16p13.3 region.

    PubMed

    Seki, N; Yoshikawa, T; Hattori, A; Miyajima, N; Muramatsu, M; Saito, T

    2000-01-01

    Members of the RAB protein family are important regulators of vesicular fusion and trafficking. A putative new member of the RAB family of genes was identified through a public database search, and its full-length cDNA was isolated from a human fetal brain cDNA library. The predicted protein product of the gene consists of 190 amino acid residues and has 87% identity with rat Rab26. Thus, we designated this gene as the human RAB26-related gene. Reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated that the RAB26-related messenger RNA was predominantly expressed in adult and fetal brain. Furthermore, an RT-PCR experiment for brain subregions showed that the mRNA was highly expressed in the amygdala, cerebellum, caudate nucleus, and hippocampus. By PCR-based analysis with both a human/rodent monochromosomal hybrid cell panel and a radiation hybrid panel, the gene was mapped to the chromosome 16p13.3 region between markers WI-7742 and WI-3061. The RAB26-related gene consists of eight exons that span about 44kb of the genome DNA.

  10. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  11. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1995-03-21

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  12. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  13. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  14. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  15. Cloning of the cDNA encoding the large subunit of human RNase HI, a homologue of the prokaryotic RNase HII.

    PubMed

    Frank, P; Braunshofer-Reiter, C; Wintersberger, U; Grimm, R; Büsen, W

    1998-10-27

    Two RNases H of mammalian tissues have been described: RNase HI, the activity of which was found to rise during DNA replication, and RNase HII, which may be involved in transcription. RNase HI is the major mammalian enzyme representing around 85% of the total RNase H activity in the cell. By using highly purified calf thymus RNase HI we identified the sequences of several tryptic peptides. This information enabled us to determine the sequence of the cDNA coding for the large subunit of human RNase HI. The corresponding ORF of 897 nt defines a polypeptide of relative molecular mass of 33,367, which is in agreement with the molecular mass obtained earlier by SDS/PAGE. Expression of the cloned ORF in Escherichia coli leads to a polypeptide, which is specifically recognized by an antiserum raised against calf thymus RNase HI. Interestingly, the deduced amino acid sequence of this subunit of human RNase HI displays significant homology to RNase HII from E. coli, an enzyme of unknown function and previously judged as a minor activity. This finding suggests an evolutionary link between the mammalian RNases HI and the prokaryotic RNases HII. The idea of a mammalian RNase HI large subunit being a strongly conserved protein is substantiated by the existence of homologous ORFs in the genomes of other eukaryotes and of all eubacteria and archaebacteria that have been completely sequenced.

  16. Cloning of the cDNA encoding the large subunit of human RNase HI, a homologue of the prokaryotic RNase HII

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Peter; Braunshofer-Reiter, Christa; Wintersberger, Ulrike; Grimm, Rudolf; Büsen, Werner

    1998-01-01

    Two RNases H of mammalian tissues have been described: RNase HI, the activity of which was found to rise during DNA replication, and RNase HII, which may be involved in transcription. RNase HI is the major mammalian enzyme representing around 85% of the total RNase H activity in the cell. By using highly purified calf thymus RNase HI we identified the sequences of several tryptic peptides. This information enabled us to determine the sequence of the cDNA coding for the large subunit of human RNase HI. The corresponding ORF of 897 nt defines a polypeptide of relative molecular mass of 33,367, which is in agreement with the molecular mass obtained earlier by SDS/PAGE. Expression of the cloned ORF in Escherichia coli leads to a polypeptide, which is specifically recognized by an antiserum raised against calf thymus RNase HI. Interestingly, the deduced amino acid sequence of this subunit of human RNase HI displays significant homology to RNase HII from E. coli, an enzyme of unknown function and previously judged as a minor activity. This finding suggests an evolutionary link between the mammalian RNases HI and the prokaryotic RNases HII. The idea of a mammalian RNase HI large subunit being a strongly conserved protein is substantiated by the existence of homologous ORFs in the genomes of other eukaryotes and of all eubacteria and archaebacteria that have been completely sequenced. PMID:9789007

  17. Cloning of a human cDNA encoding a CDC2-related kinase by complementation of a budding yeast cdc28 mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun ); Nomoto, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Kunihiro ); Yasuda, Hideyo ); Reed, S.I. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors have cloned two different human cDNAs that can complement cdc28 mutations of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One corresponds to a gene encoding human p34{sup CDC2} kinase, and the other to a gene (CDK2; cell division kinase) that has not been characterized previously. The CDK2 protein is highly homologous to p34{sup CDC2} kinase and more significantly is homologous to Xenopus Eg1 kinase, suggesting that CDK2 is the human homolog of Eg1. The human CDC2 and CDK2 genes were both able to complement the inviability of a null allele of S. cerevisiae CDC28. This result indicates that the CDK2 protein has a biological activity closely related to the CDC28 and p34{sup CDC2} kinases. However, CDK2 was unable to complement cdc2 mutants in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe under the condition where the human CDC2 gene could complement them. CDK2 mRNA appeared late in G{sub 1} or in early S phase, slightly before CDC2 mRNA, after growth stimulation in normal human fibroblast cells. These results suggest that in human cells, two different CDC2-like kinases may regulate the cell cycle at distinct stages.

  18. Comparative mapping on the mouse and human X chromosomes of a human cDNA clone encoding the vasopressin renal-type receptor (AVP2R)

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, C.J.; Gonzales, J.C.; Seibold, A.; Birnbaumer, M.; Herman, G.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Mutation in the gene for the human renal-type vasopressin receptor (V2R) have recently been identified in patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Both V2R and NDI have been independently mapped to Xq28. Using a combination of genetic and physical mapping, we have localized the murine V2r locus to within 100 kb of L1Cam on the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with human Xq28. Based on conserved gene order of mouse and human loci in this region, physical mapping using DNA derived form human lymphoblasts has established that the corresponding human loci V2R and L1CAM are linked within 210 kb. The efficiency and precision of genetic mapping of V2r and other loci in the mouse suggest that it might be easier to map additional human genes in the mouse first and infer the corresponding human location. More precise physical mapping in man could then be performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and/or yeast artificial chromosomes. 16 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  19. Sequence of a cDNA encoding pancreatic preprosomatostatin-22.

    PubMed

    Magazin, M; Minth, C D; Funckes, C L; Deschenes, R; Tavianini, M A; Dixon, J E

    1982-09-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a precursor to somatostatin that upon proteolytic processing may give rise to a hormone of 22 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of a cDNA from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) encodes a precursor to somatostatin that is 105 amino acids (Mr, 11,500). The cDNA coding for somatostatin-22 consists of 36 nucleotides in the 5' untranslated region, 315 nucleotides that code for the precursor to somatostatin-22, 269 nucleotides at the 3' untranslated region, and a variable length of poly(A). The putative preprohormone contains a sequence of hydrophobic amino acids at the amino terminus that has the properties of a "signal" peptide. A connecting sequence of approximately 57 amino acids is followed by a single Arg-Arg sequence, which immediately precedes the hormone. Somatostatin-22 is homologous to somatostatin-14 in 7 of the 14 amino acids, including the Phe-Trp-Lys sequence. Hybridization selection of mRNA, followed by its translation in a wheat germ cell-free system, resulted in the synthesis of a single polypeptide having a molecular weight of approximately 10,000 as estimated on Na-DodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. PMID:6127673

  20. Sequence of a cDNA encoding pancreatic preprosomatostatin-22.

    PubMed Central

    Magazin, M; Minth, C D; Funckes, C L; Deschenes, R; Tavianini, M A; Dixon, J E

    1982-01-01

    We report the nucleotide sequence of a precursor to somatostatin that upon proteolytic processing may give rise to a hormone of 22 amino acids. The nucleotide sequence of a cDNA from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) encodes a precursor to somatostatin that is 105 amino acids (Mr, 11,500). The cDNA coding for somatostatin-22 consists of 36 nucleotides in the 5' untranslated region, 315 nucleotides that code for the precursor to somatostatin-22, 269 nucleotides at the 3' untranslated region, and a variable length of poly(A). The putative preprohormone contains a sequence of hydrophobic amino acids at the amino terminus that has the properties of a "signal" peptide. A connecting sequence of approximately 57 amino acids is followed by a single Arg-Arg sequence, which immediately precedes the hormone. Somatostatin-22 is homologous to somatostatin-14 in 7 of the 14 amino acids, including the Phe-Trp-Lys sequence. Hybridization selection of mRNA, followed by its translation in a wheat germ cell-free system, resulted in the synthesis of a single polypeptide having a molecular weight of approximately 10,000 as estimated on Na-DodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. Images PMID:6127673

  1. Horse cDNA clones encoding two MHC class I genes

    SciTech Connect

    Barbis, D.P.; Maher, J.K.; Stanek, J.; Klaunberg, B.A.; Antczak, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    Two full-length clones encoding MHC class I genes were isolated by screening a horse cDNA library, using a probe encoding in human HLA-A2.2Y allele. The library was made in the pcDNA1 vector (Invitrogen, San Diego, CA), using mRNA from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from a Thoroughbred stallion (No. 0834) homozygous for a common horse MHC haplotype (ELA-A2, -B2, -D2; Antczak et al. 1984; Donaldson et al. 1988). The clones were sequenced, using SP6 and T7 universal primers and horse-specific oligonucleotides designed to extend previously determined sequences.

  2. Signal sequence and keyword trap in silico for selection of full-length human cDNAs encoding secretion or membrane proteins from oligo-capped cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Tetsuji; Ota, Toshio; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Koji; Suzuki, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Jun-ichi; Wakamatsu, Ai; Kimura, Kouichi; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Hatano, Naoto; Kawai, Yuri; Ishii, Shizuko; Saito, Kaoru; Kojima, Shin-ichi; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu; Ono, Tetsuyoshi; Okano, Kazunori; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Aotsuka, Satoshi; Sasaki, Naokazu; Hattori, Atsushi; Okumura, Koji; Nagai, Keiichi; Sugano, Sumio; Isogai, Takao

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an in silico method of selection of human full-length cDNAs encoding secretion or membrane proteins from oligo-capped cDNA libraries. Fullness rates were increased to about 80% by combination of the oligo-capping method and ATGpr, software for prediction of translation start point and the coding potential. Then, using 5'-end single-pass sequences, cDNAs having the signal sequence were selected by PSORT ('signal sequence trap'). We also applied 'secretion or membrane protein-related keyword trap' based on the result of BLAST search against the SWISS-PROT database for the cDNAs which could not be selected by PSORT. Using the above procedures, 789 cDNAs were primarily selected and subjected to full-length sequencing, and 334 of these cDNAs were finally selected as novel. Most of the cDNAs (295 cDNAs: 88.3%) were predicted to encode secretion or membrane proteins. In particular, 165(80.5%) of the 205 cDNAs selected by PSORT were predicted to have signal sequences, while 70 (54.2%) of the 129 cDNAs selected by 'keyword trap' preserved the secretion or membrane protein-related keywords. Many important cDNAs were obtained, including transporters, receptors, and ligands, involved in significant cellular functions. Thus, an efficient method of selecting secretion or membrane protein-encoding cDNAs was developed by combining the above four procedures.

  3. A cDNA encoding tyrosinase-related protein maps to the brown locus in mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, I J

    1988-01-01

    A mouse melanoma cDNA clone was isolated by virtue of its reactivity with two antisera raised against tyrosinase (EC 1.14.18.1) from two species, hamster and mouse. The cDNA (5A) cross-hybridizes with another, pMT4 [Shibahara, S., Tomita, V., Sakakura, T., Nager, C., Bhabatosh, C. & Muller, R. (1986) Nucleic Acids Res. 14, 2413-2427], previously thought to encode mouse tyrosinase. Two other cDNAs, one human and one mouse, have been reported recently [Kwon, B. S., Haq, A. K., Pomerantz, S. H. & Halaban, R. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 7473-7477; and Yamamoto, H., Takeuchi, S., Kudo, T., Makino, K., Nakata, A., Shinoda, T. & Takeuchi, T. (1987) Jpn. J. Genet. 62, 271-277] as candidates for tyrosinase, and they map at or very close to the mouse albino (c) locus. The proteins they encode are very similar to each other but are distinct from (although related to) the pMT4-encoded protein. Here I use recombinant inbred strains to localize pMT4 at or close to the mouse brown (b) locus. I suggest that the gene mapping to c is the authentic tyrosinase gene, whereas that mapping to b encodes a tyrosinase-related protein. All b mutations in laboratory strains are associated with the same diagnostic Taq I fragment, suggesting that all derive from the same original mutation. I discuss possible function(s) of the tyrosinase-related protein. Images PMID:3132713

  4. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding human SPH-binding factor, a conserved protein that binds to the enhancer-like region of the U6 small nuclear RNA gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Rincon, J C; Engler, S K; Hargrove, B W; Kunkel, G R

    1998-11-01

    Many vertebrate small nuclear RNA gene promoters contain an SPH motif in their distal control regions that can confer transcriptional stimulation by RNA polymerase II or RNA polymerase III. Using the human U6 gene SPH motif as a probe, we isolated a cDNA encoding human SPH-binding factor (hSBF) from a HeLa cell expression library. The coding region of hSBF is almost identical to ZNF143, a 626 amino acid, seven zinc finger protein of previously unknown function. Furthermore, the predicted amino acid sequence of hSBF is highly homologous to Xenopus laevis and mouse Staf proteins, that bind to SPH motifs and stimulate transcription of selenocysteine tRNA gene promoters. Recombinant hSBF expressed in vitro or from Escherichia coli bound specifically to the human U6 gene SPH motif as shown by DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays using various mutant SPH sites as competitors. Antibodies prepared against recombinant hSBF inhibited assembly of native SBF-DNA complexes. Immunodepleted HeLa S100 transcription extract no longer supported elevated levels of transcription by RNA polymerase III from a U6 promoter containing an SPH motif, whereas addition of recombinant hSBF protein to the immunodepleted extract reconstituted stimulated transcription.

  5. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein/Apolipoprotein E receptor and assignment of the gene to chromosome 9pter-p23[sup 6

    SciTech Connect

    Gafvels, M.E.; Strauss, J.F. III ); Caird, M.; Patterson, D. ); Britt, D.; Jackson, C.L. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors report the cloning of a 3656-bp cDNA encoding a putative human very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)/apolipoprotein E (ApoE) receptor. The gene encoding this protein was mapped to chromosome 9pter-p23. Northern analysis of human RNA identified cognate mRNAs of 6.0 and 3.8 kb with most abundant expression in heart and skeletal muscle, followed by kidney, placenta, pancreas, and brain. The pattern of expression generally paralleled that of lipoprotein lipase mRNA but differed from that of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/[alpha][sub 2]-macroglobulin receptor (LRP), which are members of the same gene family. VLDL/ApoE receptor message was not detected in liver, whereas mRNAs for both LDL receptor and LRP were found in hepatic tissue. In mouse 3T3-L1 cells, VLDL/ApoE receptor mRNA was induced during the transformation of the cells into adipocytes. Expression was also detected in human choriocarcinoma cells, suggesting that at least part of the expression observed in placenta may be in trophoblasts, cells which would be exposed to maternal blood. Expression in brain may be related to high levels of ApoE expression in that organ, an observation of potential relevance to the recently hypothesized role for ApoE in late onset Alzheimer disease. The results suggest that the putative VLDL/ApoE receptor could play a role in the uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles by specific organs including striated and cardiac muscle and adipose tissue and in the transport of maternal lipids across the placenta. The findings presented here, together with recent observations from other laboratories, bring up the possibility that a single gene, the VLDL/ApoE receptor, may play a role in the pathogenesis of certain forms of atherosclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and obesity.

  6. Molecular cloning and functional expression of cDNA encoding a mammalian inorganic pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Wensel, T G

    1992-12-01

    Extracts of soluble proteins from bovine retina contain multiple species of inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPase) that can be resolved by hydroxylapatite or ion exchange chromatography. We have purified one of these isoforms by a combination of chromatography and electrophoresis under denaturing conditions and have partially sequenced four peptides generated from it by CNBr digestion. This sequence information was used to clone PPase cDNA from a retinal cDNA library. Of five cDNA inserts, three were 1.3 kilobase pairs in length and two of these contained a complete open reading frame that was 867 base pairs long and encoded a 289-amino acid protein of 33 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence is 49.5% identical to that of PPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and contains identical amino acid residues at all of the positions previously identified as essential for catalytic activity in that enzyme. When the bovine PPase cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli, catalytically active PPase was produced that comigrated with bovine retinal PPase in a nondenaturing gel and was clearly distinguishable from the host PPase. Northern analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from human, canine, and bovine retinas revealed that each contained a single major band of 1.4 kilobases that hybridized strongly with a pyrophosphatase cDNA probe. Southern analysis of bovine genomic DNA was consistent with the existence of one PPase gene. Thus, the multiple forms separated by chromatography may be derived from a common precursor or from mRNAs of very similar size.

  7. Rabbit muscle creatine phosphokinase. CDNA cloning, primary structure and detection of human homologues.

    PubMed

    Putney, S; Herlihy, W; Royal, N; Pang, H; Aposhian, H V; Pickering, L; Belagaje, R; Biemann, K; Page, D; Kuby, S

    1984-12-10

    A cDNA library was constructed from rabbit muscle poly(A) RNA. Limited amino acid sequence information was obtained on rabbit muscle creatine phosphokinase and this was the basis for design and synthesis of two oligonucleotide probes complementary to a creatine kinase cDNA sequence which encodes a pentapeptide. Colony hybridizations with the probes and subsequent steps led to isolation of two clones, whose cDNA segments partially overlap and which together encode the entire protein. The primary structure was established from the sequence of two cDNA clones and from independently determined sequences of scattered portions of the polypeptide. The reactive cysteine has been located to position 282 within the 380 amino acid polypeptide. The rabbit cDNA hybridizes to digests of human chromosomal DNA. This reveals a restriction fragment length polymorphism associated with the human homologue(s) which hybridizes to the rabbit cDNA.

  8. Cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Nirasawa, S; Nakaya, K; Kurihara, Y

    1995-08-19

    A cDNA clone encoding a taste-modifying protein, miraculin (MIR), was isolated and sequenced. The encoded precursor to MIR was composed of 220 amino acid (aa) residues, including a possible signal sequence of 29 aa. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA encoding MIR was already expressed in fruits of Richadella dulcifica at 3 weeks after pollination and was present specifically in the pulp. PMID:7665074

  9. Functional cloning of an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA encoding cycloeucalenol cycloisomerase.

    PubMed

    Lovato, M A; Hart, E A; Segura, M J; Giner, J L; Matsuda, S P

    2000-05-01

    Plants and certain protists use cycloeucalenol cycloisomerase (EC ) to convert pentacyclic cyclopropyl sterols to conventional tetracyclic sterols. We used a novel complementation strategy to clone a cycloeucalenol cycloisomerase cDNA. Expressing an Arabidopsis thaliana cycloartenol synthase cDNA in a yeast lanosterol synthase mutant provided a sterol auxotroph that could be genetically complemented with the isomerase. We transformed this yeast strain with an Arabidopsis yeast expression library and selected sterol prototrophs to obtain a strain that accumulated biosynthetic ergosterol. The novel phenotype was conferred by an Arabidopsis cDNA that potentially encodes a 36-kDa protein. We expressed this cDNA (CPI1) in Escherichia coli and showed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that extracts from this strain isomerized cycloeucalenol to obtusifoliol in vitro. The cDNA will be useful for obtaining heterologously expressed protein for catalytic studies and elucidating the in vivo roles of cyclopropyl sterols.

  10. Cloning and sequencing of dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus, Coryphaenidae) growth hormone-encoding cDNA.

    PubMed

    Peduel, A D; Elizur, A; Knibb, W

    1994-01-01

    The cDNA encoding the preprotein growth hormone from the dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) has been cloned and sequenced. The cDNA was derived by reverse transcription of RNA from the pituitary of a young fish using the method known as Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). An oligonucleotide primer corresponding to the 5' region of Pagrus major and the universal RACE primer enabled amplification using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The dolphinfish and yellow-tail, Seriola quineqeradiata, are both members of the sub-order Percoidei (Perciforme) and their GH sequences show a high level of homology. PMID:7703505

  11. Cloning and functional expression of a human pancreatic islet glucose-transporter cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Permutt, M.A.; Koranyi, L.; Keller, K.; Lacy, P.E.; Scharp, D.W.; Mueckler, M. )

    1989-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic islet glucose transport is mediated by a high-K{sub m}, low-affinity facilitated transporter similar to that expressed in liver. To determine the relationship between islet and liver glucose transporters, liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clone hybridized to mRNA transcripts of the same size in human liver and pancreatic islet RNA. A cDNA library was prepared from purified human pancreatic islet tissue and screened with human liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA. The authors isolated two overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 2600 base pairs, which encode a pancreatic islet protein identical in sequence to that of the putative liver-type glucose-transporter protein. Xenopus oocytes injected with synthetic mRNA transcribed from a full-length cDNA construct exhibited increased uptake of 2-deoxyglucose, confirming the functional identity of the clone. These cDNA clones can now be used to study regulation of expression of the gene and to assess the role of inherited defects in this gene as a candidate for inherited susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  12. Cloning of cDNA and genomic DNA encoding human type XVIII collagen and localization of the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen gene to mouse chromosome 10 and human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, S.P.; Warman, M.L.; Timmons, S.; Olsen, B.R.; Knoll, J.H.M. ); Seldin, M.F. ); Cheng, Sou-De )

    1994-02-01

    Types XV and XVIII collagen belong to a unique and novel subclass of the collagen superfamily for which the authors have proposed the name the MULTIPLEXIN family. Members of this class contain polypeptides with multiple triple-helical domains separated and flanked by non-triple-helical regions. In this paper, they report the isolation of human cDNAs and genomic DNAs encoding the [alpha]1 (XVIII) collagen chain. Utilizing a genomic clone as probe, they have mapped the COL18A1 gene to chromosome 21q22.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In addition, using an interspecific backcross panel, they have shown that the murine Col18a1 locus is on chromosome 10, close to the loci for Col6a1 and Col6a2. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Molecular cloning of Phaseolus vulgaris cDNA encoding proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Ziemienowicz, Alicja

    2007-02-01

    A cDNA fragment encoding a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was isolated using rapid amplification of cDNA 3' end (3' RACE) method, cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of this clone contains an open reading frame of 798 nucleotides encoding a protein of 265 amino acids. Alignment of the common bean PCNA predicted sequence shows its high degree of identity with PCNA from other plant species. Analysis of PCNA content in the germinating embryos of common bean showed a decrease in the protein level after 60h of germination. Moreover, PCNA was not detected in the tested plant organs (root, stem, leaf and flower). The presence of PCNA in the germinating seeds and its absence from mature plants suggests that this protein plays a crucial role during early stages of plant development.

  14. Human DNA ligase I cDNA: Cloning and functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.E.; Kodama, Kenichi; Tomkinson, A.E.; Lindahl, T.; Lasko, D.D. ); Johnston, L.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Human cDNA clones encoding the major DNA ligase activity in proliferating cells, DNA ligase I, were isolated by two independent methods. In one approach, a human cDNA library was screened by hybridization with oligonucleotides deduced from partial amino acid sequence of purified bovine DNA ligase I. In an alternative approach, a human cDNA library was screened for functional expression of a polypeptide able to complement a cdc9 temperature-sensitive DNA ligase mutant of Saccharomuces cerevisiae. The sequence of an apparently full-length cDNA encodes a 102-kDa protein, indistinguishable in size from authentic human DNA ligase I. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human DNA ligase I cDNA is 40% homologous to the smaller DNA ligases of S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, homology being confined to the carboxyl-terminal regions of the respective proteins. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is transcribed from a single-copy gene on chromosome 19.

  15. Molecular cloning and bacterial expression of cDNA encoding a plant cysteine synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, K; Miura, N; Yamazaki, M; Hirano, H; Murakoshi, I

    1992-01-01

    Cysteine synthase (CSase) [O-acetyl-L-serine acetate-lyase (adding hydrogen sulfide), EC 4.2.99.8] catalyzes the formation of L-cysteine, the key step in sulfur assimilation in plants, from O-acetyl-L-serine and hydrogen sulfide. We report here the isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding cysteine synthase from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Internal peptide sequences were obtained from V8 protease-digested fragments of purified CSase. A lambda gt10 cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+ RNA of young green leaves of spinach. Screening with two synthetic mixed nucleotides encoding the partial peptide sequences revealed 19 positively hybridized clones among 2 x 10(5) clones. Nucleotide sequence analysis of two independent cDNA clones revealed a continuous open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 325 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 34,185 Da. Sequence comparison of the deduced amino acids revealed 53% identity with CSases of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Sequence homology was also observed with other metabolic enzymes for amino acids in bacteria and yeast and with rat hemoprotein H-450. A bacterial expression vector was constructed and could genetically complement an E. coli auxotroph that lacks CSases. The accumulation of functionally active spinach CSase in E. coli was also demonstrated by immunoblotting and assaying enzymatic activity. Southern hybridization analysis showed the presence of two to three copies of the cDNA sequence in the genome of spinach. RNA blot hybridization suggested constitutive expression in leaves and roots of spinach. Images PMID:1518833

  16. Molecular cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding partial putative molt-inhibiting hormone from Penaeus chinensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zai-Zhao; Xiang, Jian-Hai

    2002-09-01

    Total RNA was extracted from eyestalks of shrimp Penaeus chinensis. Eyestalk cDNA was obtained from total RNA by reverse transcription. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was initiated using eyestalk cDNA and degenerate primers designed from the amino acid sequence of molt-inhibiting hormone from shrimp Penaeus japonicus. A specific cDNA was obtained and cloned into a T vector for sequencing. The cDNA consisted of 201 base pairs and encoding for a peptide of 67 amino acid residues. The peptide of P. chinensis had the highest identity with molt-inhibiting hormones of P. japonicus. The cDNA could be a partial gene of molt-inhibiting hormones from P. chinensis. This paper reports for the first time cDNA encoding for neuropeptide of P. chinensis.

  17. Identification, molecular characterization, and chromosomal localization of the cDNA encoding a novel leucine zipper motif-containing protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Der-Shan; Chang, Nan-Chi A.; Chang, A.C.

    1996-08-15

    cDNA clones encoding a novel protein (LUZP) with three leucine zipper motifs were first identified from a murine bone marrow cDNA library. After screening two additional cDNA libraries of activated peritoneal exudate cells, 32 positive clones were obtained from 1.3 x 10{sup 7} phage plaques. Four overlapping clones constituting a total of 7399 hp were sequenced on both strands. The complete open reading frame of LUZP is 1067 amino acids. In addition to three leucine zipper motifs located at the NH2 terminus, there are three nuclear localization signals and a large number of putative Ser/Thr phosphorylation sites. Western blot analyses indicate that LUZP is predominantly expressed in brain, whereas immunocytochemistry data clearly reveal its presence in the nucleus of neutrons. Interspecific backcross analyses have mapped Luzp to mouse chromosome 4 in proximity to Gpcr14. Comparative mapping data suggest that the human homolog of Luzp will map to human chromosome 1p36. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding endonuclease from potato (Solanum tuberosum).

    PubMed

    Larsen, Knud

    2005-11-01

    A cDNA, StEN1, encoding a potato (Solanum tuberosum) endonuclease was cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of this clone contains an open reading frame of 906 nucleotides encoding a protein of 302 amino acids, and with a calculated molecular mass of 34.4kDa and a Pi of 5.6. The deduced StEN1 protein contains a putative signal sequence of 25 amino acid residues. The StEN1 encoded protein shows substantial homology to both plant and fungal endonucleases isolated and cloned from other sources. The highest identity (73%) was observed with AgCEL I from celery, Apium graveolens, ZEN1 from Zinnia elegans (69%) and DSA6 from daylily, Hemerocallis (68%). RT-PCR expression analysis demonstrated that the potato StEN1 gene is constitutively expressed in potato, although minor differences in expression level in different tissues were observed. PMID:16323278

  19. Cloning and Sequencing of the cDNA Encoding the Rubber Elongation Factor of Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, Elisabeth; Dennis, Mark; Light, David; Chua, Nam-Hai

    1991-01-01

    In Hevea brasiliensis, the rubber particle in the laticiferous vessel is the site of rubber (cis-1-4-polyisoprene) biosynthesis. A 14 kilodalton protein, rubber elongation factor (REF), is associated with the rubber particle in a ratio of one REF to one rubber molecule (Dennis M, Henzel W, Bell J, Kohr W, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18618-18628; Dennis M, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18608-18617). To obtain more information concerning the function of REF and its synthesis and assembly in the rubber particle, we isolated cDNA clones encoding REF. We used antibodies to REF to screen a Hevea leaf γgt11 cDNA expression library and obtained several positive clones. Sequence analysis of the REF cDNA clones showed that the REF mRNA contains 121 nucleotides of 5′-nontranslated sequences and a 205 nucleotide 3′-nontranslated region. The open reading frame encodes the entire 14 kilodalton REF protein without any extra amino acids (Dennis M, Henzel W, Bell J, Kohr W, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18618-18628). The REF cDNA was subcloned in pGEM-3Z/-4Z and expressed in vitro. The translation product is a 14 kilodalton protein that can be immunoprecipitated with antibodies to REF. Addition of microsomal membranes to the in vitro translation product did not alter the mobility of the REF protein. This, and the sequence data, indicate that REF is not made as a preprotein. Our results suggest that REF is synthesized on free polysomes in the laticifer cytoplasm and that assembly of the rubber particles is likely to occur in the cytosol. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668388

  20. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding hexokinase from tomato.

    PubMed

    Menu, T; Rothan, C; Dai, N; Petreikov, M; Etienne, C; Destrac-Irvine, A; Schaffer, A; Granot, D; Ricard, B

    2001-01-01

    Two different partial sequences encoding putative hexokinase (HXK, ATP: hexose-6-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.1) were isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) by RT-PCR using degenerate primers. Southern blot analysis suggested the existence of two divergent HXK genes. A complete cDNA of one HXK was isolated by screening a cDNA library prepared from young cherry tomato fruit. The 1770 bp cDNA of LeHXK2 contained an open reading frame encoding a 496 amino acid protein that has 69% identity with the two Arabidopsis HXKs, 83 and 85% identity with potato StHXK1 and tobacco NtHXK, respectively. However, this clone had 97% amino acid identity with potato StHXK2 and, therefore, was named LeHXK2. LeHXK2 cDNA was expressed in a triple mutant yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strain which lacked the ability to phosphorylate glucose and fructose and, therefore, was unable to grow on these sugars as carbon sources. Mutant cells expressing LeHXK2 grew on both glucose and fructose with shorter doubling time on glucose. The kinetic properties of LeHXK2 expressed in yeast were determined after the purification of LeHXK2 by HPLC-ion exchange chromatography, confirming the identity of LeHXK2 as hexokinase with higher affinity to glucose. LeHXK2 mRNA was detected by RT-PCR expression analysis in all organs and tissues and at all stages of fruit development. However, semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that LeHXK2 was most highly expressed in flowers.

  1. Isolation and expression of cDNA clones encoding mammalian poly(A) polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Wahle, E; Martin, G; Schiltz, E; Keller, W

    1991-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding mammalian poly(A) polymerase were isolated with probes generated by the polymerase chain reaction based on amino acid sequences derived from the purified enzyme. A bovine cDNA clone was obtained encoding a protein of 82 kDa. Expression in Escherichia coli resulted in the appearance of a poly(A) polymerase activity that was dependent on the addition of the purified specificity factor CPF and the presence of the polyadenylation signal AAUAAA in the RNA substrate. The activity copurified with a polypeptide of the expected size. A second class of cDNAs encoded a polypeptide of 43 kDa which was closely related to the N-terminal half of the 82 kDa protein. Northern blots showed two mRNAs of 4.2 and 2.4 kb that probably correspond to the two classes of cDNAs, as well as a third band of 1.3 kb. The sequence of the N-terminal half of bovine poly(A) polymerase is 47% identical with the amino acid sequence of the corresponding part of yeast poly(A) polymerase. Homologies to other proteins are of uncertain significance. Images PMID:1756732

  2. cDNA cloning of rat and human medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Y.; Kraus, J.P.; Rosenberg, L.E.; Tanaka, K.

    1986-05-01

    MCAD is one of three mitochondrial flavoenzymes which catalyze the first step in the ..beta..-oxidation of straight chain fatty acids. It is a tetramer with a subunit Mr of 45 kDa. MCAD is synthesized in the cytosol as a 49 kDa precursor polypeptide (pMCAD), imported into mitochondria, and cleaved to the mature form. Genetic deficiency of MCAD causes recurrent episodes of hypoglycemic coma accompanied by medium chain dicarboxylic aciduria. Employing a novel approach, the authors now report isolation of partial rat and human cDNA clones encoding pMCAD. mRNA encoding pMCAD was purified to near homogeneity by polysome immunoadsorption using polyclonal monospecific antibody. Single-stranded (/sup 32/P)labeled cDNA probe was synthesized using the enriched mRNA as template, and was used to screen directly 16,000 colonies from a total rat liver cDNA library constructed in pBR322. One clone (600 bp) was detected by in situ hybridization. Hybrid-selected translation with this cDNA yielded a 49 kDa polypeptide indistinguishable in size from rat pMCAD and immunoprecipitable with anti-MCAD antibody. Using the rat cDNA as probe, 43,000 colonies from a human liver cDNA library were screened. Four identical positive clones (400 bp) were isolated and positively identified by hybrid-selected translation and immunoprecipitation. The sizes of rat and human mRNAs encoding pMCAD were 2.2 kb and 2.4 kb, respectively, as determined by Northern blotting.

  3. Strategies to enhance immunogenicity of cDNA vaccine encoded antigens by modulation of antigen processing.

    PubMed

    Platteel, Anouk C M; Marit de Groot, A; Keller, Christin; Andersen, Peter; Ovaa, Huib; Kloetzel, Peter M; Mishto, Michele; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2016-09-30

    Most vaccines are based on protective humoral responses while for intracellular pathogens CD8(+) T cells are regularly needed to provide protection. However, poor processing efficiency of antigens is often a limiting factor in CD8(+) T cell priming, hampering vaccine efficacy. The multistage cDNA vaccine H56, encoding three secreted Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, was used to test a complete strategy to enhance vaccine' immunogenicity. Potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in H56 were predicted using the NetMHC3.4/ANN program. Mice were immunized with H56 cDNA using dermal DNA tattoo immunization and epitope candidates were tested for recognition by responding CD8(+) T cells in ex vivo assays. Seven novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes were identified. H56 immunogenicity could be substantially enhanced by two strategies: (i) fusion of the H56 sequence to cDNA of proteins that modify intracellular antigen processing or provide CD4(+) T cell help, (ii) by substitution of the epitope's hydrophobic C-terminal flanking residues for polar glutamic acid, which facilitated their proteasome-mediated generation. We conclude that this whole strategy of in silico prediction of potential CD8(+) T cell epitopes in novel antigens, followed by fusion to sequences with immunogenicity-enhancing properties or modification of epitope flanking sequences to improve proteasome-mediated processing, may be exploited to design novel vaccines against emerging or 'hard to treat' intracellular pathogens. PMID:27593157

  4. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hev ein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.; Broekaert, Willem F.; Chua, Nam-Hai; Kush, Anil

    2000-07-04

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  5. Cloning and expression of cDNA encoding a bovine adrenal cytochrome P-450 specific for steroid 21-hydroxylation.

    PubMed Central

    White, P C; New, M I; Dupont, B

    1984-01-01

    We isolated a cDNA clone encoding a bovine adrenal cytochrome P-450 specific for steroid 21-hydroxylation (P-450C21). Serum from rabbits immunized with purified P-450C21 precipitated a single protein from the products of an in vitro translation reaction using bovine adrenal mRNA. This protein migrated with P-450C21 on NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After sucrose gradient sedimentation, mRNA encoding P-450C21 was found in the 19S fraction. This fraction was reverse transcribed into double-stranded cDNA and inserted into the Pst I site of pBR322 by the dC X dG tailing procedure. Escherichia coli cells transformed with recombinant plasmids were screened with an in situ immunoassay using anti-P-450C21 serum and 125I-labeled staphylococcal protein A. Two colonies consistently bound anti-P-450C21 serum. They were identified as carrying the same plasmid by restriction mapping. This plasmid, pC21a, contains an insert of 520 base pairs. It hybridizes with mRNA encoding P-450C21. The peptide encoded by the insert in pC21a is highly homologous to two peptides isolated from porcine P-450C21 and shows limited homology to the P-450 induced by phenobarbital in rat liver. This clone may be useful in studying the molecular genetics of human congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Images PMID:6609358

  6. A putative peroxidase cDNA from turnip and analysis of the encoded protein sequence.

    PubMed

    Romero-Gómez, S; Duarte-Vázquez, M A; García-Almendárez, B E; Mayorga-Martínez, L; Cervantes-Avilés, O; Regalado, C

    2008-12-01

    A putative peroxidase cDNA was isolated from turnip roots (Brassica napus L. var. purple top white globe) by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Total RNA extracted from mature turnip roots was used as a template for RT-PCR, using a degenerated primer designed to amplify the highly conserved distal motif of plant peroxidases. The resulting partial sequence was used to design the rest of the specific primers for 5' and 3' RACE. Two cDNA fragments were purified, sequenced, and aligned with the partial sequence from RT-PCR, and a complete overlapping sequence was obtained and labeled as BbPA (Genbank Accession No. AY423440, named as podC). The full length cDNA is 1167bp long and contains a 1077bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 358 deduced amino acid peroxidase polypeptide. The putative peroxidase (BnPA) showed a calculated Mr of 34kDa, and isoelectric point (pI) of 4.5, with no significant identity with other reported turnip peroxidases. Sequence alignment showed that only three peroxidases have a significant identity with BnPA namely AtP29a (84%), and AtPA2 (81%) from Arabidopsis thaliana, and HRPA2 (82%) from horseradish (Armoracia rusticana). Work is in progress to clone this gene into an adequate host to study the specific role and possible biotechnological applications of this alternative peroxidase source. PMID:18686036

  7. Isolation and analysis of a cDNA clone encoding an S. guttatum alternataive oxidase protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, D.M.; McIntosh, L. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing )

    1990-05-01

    Antibodies that recognize the 35, 36, and 37 kilodalton (kDa) alternative oxidase proteins were used to isolate a cDNA proteins were used to isolate a cDNA clone of a nuclearly encoded protein of Sauromatum guttatum. The amino acid sequence deduced from clone pAOSG81 revealed a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 44 kDa, while a 42 kDa protein is immunoprecipitated from in vitro translation products made using S. guttatum poly A+ RNA. The protein contains a 60-65 amino acid transit peptide which is predicted to form amphiphilic helices. We have also identified regions of the mature 42 kDa protein which are likely to be membrane associated. Clone pAOSG81 is being used to screen a genomic library. The genomic clone encoding the 42 kDa protein will be used to investigate the salicylic-acid-controlled transcriptional regulation of the S. guttatum alternative oxidase proteins.

  8. Isolation of a cDNA encoding a glutathione S-transferase (GST) class-pi from the bovine ocular ciliary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hernando, N; Martín-Alonso, J M; Ghosh, S; Coca-Prados, M

    1992-11-01

    We have used a polyclonal antiserum to bovine ciliary epithelium, a secretory tissue involved in the formation of aqueous humor, to immunoscreen a directional lambda gt11 Sfi-Not cDNA expression library prepared from bovine ciliary epithelium poly(A)+ RNA. After immunoscreening 6 x 10(5) independent clones, 41 cDNA clones positive for ciliary epithelium were isolated and characterized. About one-third of the positive cDNA clones were found to be identical and to encode a glutathione S-transferase (GST) class-pi. The largest bovine GST cDNA clone isolated, pCN11, contains an open reading frame of 630 bases, encoding a protein of 210 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 23,335 Da. The corresponding amino acid sequence showed an overall identity of 85.6% with the human, and 85.2% with the rat and mouse GST class-pi. Northern analysis of bovine ocular tissues revealed that the GST class-pi gene encodes a 0.8-kilobase mRNA which is expressed most abundantly in cornea, ciliary epithelium and retina, and in lower levels in iris and lens. Cell lines derived from non-pigmented or pigmented bovine ciliary epithelium also showed high levels of GST-pi mRNA expression. These results provide additional evidence for differential gene expression of GST class-pi mRNA in various areas of the bovine eye.

  9. A Potato cDNA Encoding a Homologue of Mammalian Multidrug Resistant P-Glycoprotein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    A homologue of the multidrug resistance (MDR) gene was obtained while screening a potato stolon tip cDNA expression library with S-15-labeled calmodulin. The mammalian MDR gene codes for a membrane-bound P-glycoprotein (170-180 kDa) which imparts multidrug resistance to cancerous cells. The potato cDNA (PMDR1) codes for a polypeptide of 1313 amino acid residues (ca. 144 kDa) and its structural features are very similar to the MDR P-glycoprotein. The N-terminal half of the PMDR1-encoded protein shares striking homology with its C-terminal half, and each half contains a conserved ATP-binding site and six putative transmembrane domains. Southern blot analysis indicated that potato has one or two MDR-like genes. PMDR1 mRNA is constitutively expressed in all organs studied with higher expression in the stem and stolon tip. The PMDR1 expression was highest during tuber initiation and decreased during tuber development.

  10. Characterization of a cDNA encoding cysteine proteinase inhibitor from Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. pekinensis) flower buds.

    PubMed

    Lim, C O; Lee, S I; Chung, W S; Park, S H; Hwang, I; Cho, M J

    1996-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a new phytocystatin isotype named BCPI-1 was isolated from a cDNA library of Chinese cabbage flower buds. The BCPI-1 clone encodes 199 amino acids resulting in a protein much larger than other known phytocystatins. BCPI-1 has an unusually long C-terminus. A BCPI-1 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli strongly inhibits the enzymatic activity of papain, a cysteine proteinase. Genomic Southern blot analysis revealed that the BCPI gene is a member of a small multi-gene family in Chinese cabbage. Northern blot analysis showed that it is differentially expressed in the flower bud, leaf and root.

  11. Cloning and sequence analysis of cDNA for human argininosuccinate lyase.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, W E; McInnes, R; Kalumuck, K; Adcock, M

    1986-01-01

    Using antibodies specific for argininosuccinate lyase (EC 4.3.2.1), we isolated two cDNA clones by screening a human liver cDNA library constructed in the lambda gt11 expression vector. The identity of these isolates was confirmed by in vitro translation of plasmid-selected mRNA. One of these isolates was used to rescreen the cDNA library and a 1565-base-pair (bp) clone was identified. The entire nucleotide sequence of this clone was determined. An open reading frame was identified which encoded a protein of 463 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 51,663. The clone included 115 bp of 5' untranslated sequence and 46 bp of 3' untranslated sequence. A canonical poly(A) addition site was present in the 3' end, 16 bp from the beginning of the poly(A) tract. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the human enzyme with that of the yeast enzyme revealed a 56% homology, when conservative amino acid changes were taken into consideration. The yeast protein is also 463 amino acids long, with a molecular weight of 51,944. By use of a genomic DNA panel from human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids, the human gene was mapped to chromosome 7. Another hybridizing region, corresponding to a portion of the 5' end of the cDNA, was found on chromosome 22. Images PMID:3463959

  12. Serine protease variants encoded by Echis ocellatus venom gland cDNA: cloning and sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Hasson, S S; Mothana, R A; Sallam, T A; Al-balushi, M S; Rahman, M T; Al-Jabri, A A

    2010-01-01

    Envenoming by Echis saw-scaled viper is the leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa due to snake bite. Despite its medical importance, there have been few investigations into the toxin composition of the venom of this viper. Here, we report the cloning of cDNA sequences encoding four groups or isoforms of the haemostasis-disruptive Serine protease proteins (SPs) from the venom glands of Echis ocellatus. All these SP sequences encoded the cysteine residues scaffold that form the 6-disulphide bonds responsible for the characteristic tertiary structure of venom serine proteases. All the Echis ocellatus EoSP groups showed varying degrees of sequence similarity to published viper venom SPs. However, these groups also showed marked intercluster sequence conservation across them which were significantly different from that of previously published viper SPs. Because viper venom SPs exhibit a high degree of sequence similarity and yet exert profoundly different effects on the mammalian haemostatic system, no attempt was made to assign functionality to the new Echis ocellatus EoSPs on the basis of sequence alone. The extraordinary level of interspecific and intergeneric sequence conservation exhibited by the Echis ocellatus EoSPs and analogous serine proteases from other viper species leads us to speculate that antibodies to representative molecules should neutralise (that we will exploit, by epidermal DNA immunization) the biological function of this important group of venom toxins in vipers that are distributed throughout Africa, the Middle East, and the Indian subcontinent. PMID:20936075

  13. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA clone encoding calreticulin from Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinliang; Luo, Jianxun; Fan, Ruiquan; Fingerle, Volker; Guan, Guiquan; Liu, Zhijie; Li, Youquan; Zhao, Haiping; Ma, Miling; Liu, Junlong; Liu, Aihong; Ren, Qiaoyun; Dang, Zhisheng; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Yin, Hong

    2008-03-01

    The application of anti-tick vaccine has been shown to be the most promising alternative strategy compared to the current use of acaricides that suffer from a number of serious limitations. The success of this method is dependent upon identification and cloning of potential tick vaccine antigens. Previously, we have cloned 21 positive clones (named from Hq02 to Hq22) by immunoscreening complimentary DNA (cDNA) libraries of Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis; however, some of those clones did not contain open reading frames (ORF). In this study, we amplified the entire sequence of Hq07 by using rapid amplification of the cDNA ends. Hq07 contains an ORF of 1,233 bp that encodes for 410 amino acid residues with a coding capacity of 47 kDa. Search of the cloned sequences against GenBank revealed that Hq07 is a calreticulin (CRT)-similar clone and designated HqCRT. Expression analysis by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that this gene is ubiquitously expressed at different developmental stages and in different tissues of H. qinghaiensis. The gene was expressed as glutathione S-transferase-fused proteins in a prokaryotic system. Western blot analysis revealed that native HqCRT was secreted into their hosts by ticks during blood sucking. Vaccination of sheep with rHqCRT conferred protective immunity against ticks, resulting in 54.3% mortality in adult ticks, compared to the 38.7% death rate in the control group. These results demonstrated that rHqCRT might be a useful vaccine candidate antigen for biological control of H. qinghaiensis.

  14. Isolation of human cDNA clones of ski and the ski-related gene, sno.

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, N; Sasamoto, S; Ishii, S; Date, T; Matsui, M; Ishizaki, R

    1989-01-01

    cDNA clones of ski and the ski-related gene, sno, were obtained by screening human cDNA libraries. The predicted open reading frame of h-ski could encode a protein of 728 amino acid residues. The h-ski protein is highly homologous with the v-ski protein. The overall homology between h-ski and v-ski is 91% at the amino acid level. DNA sequencing analysis revealed two types of cDNA clones from the sno (ski-related novel gene) gene, possibly due to alternative splicing. The first type, named snoN (non Alu-containing), encoded a protein of 684 amino acid residues. The second type, named snoA (Alu-containing), encoded a protein of 415 amino acid residues. The first 366 amino acid residues of snoN and snoA are the same, but subsequent amino acids show divergence. Several transcripts of h-ski (6.0, 4.7, 3.8, 3.0, 2.1 and 1.8 kb) were detected. The mRNAs of h-sno were 6.2, 4.4 and 3.2kb. Images PMID:2762147

  15. Isolation of cDNA from Jacaratia mexicana encoding a mexicain-like cysteine protease gene.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martínez, Erick M; Herrera-Ramírez, Alejandra C; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín; Garibay-Orijel, Claudio; González-Rábade, Nuria; Oliver-Salvador, María Del Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Cysteine proteases (CPs) from the C1 family, which are similar to papain, can be found in animals and plants, as well as some viruses and prokaryotes. These enzymes have diverse physiological functions and are thus very attractive for science and industry. Jacaratia mexicana, a member of the Caricaceae plant family, contains several CPs, the principal being mexicain, found to favorably compete against papain for many industrial applications due to its high stability and specific activity. In this study, leaves of J. mexicana were used to isolate a CP-coding gene, similar to those that code for mexicain and chymomexicain. By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) as well as oligonucleotide design from papain-like conserved amino acids (aa), a sequence of 1404 bp consisting of a 5' terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 153 bp, a 3' terminal UTR of 131 bp, with a polyadenylation (poly(A)) signal sequence and a poly(A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1046 bp, was obtained by overlapping three partial sequences. Two full-length cDNA sequences that encode for mexicain-like proteases were cloned from mRNA (JmCP4 and JmCP5). JmCP4 is predicted to have an ORF of 1044 bp, which codifies for polypeptides that have a 26 aa signal peptide region, a 108 aa propeptide region and a mature enzyme of 214 aa. A 969 bp fragment (JmCP5) encodes for a partial sequence of a CP gene, without the signal peptide region but with a full-length propeptide region. The sequence analysis showed that this protease presented a high similarity to other plant CPs from J. mexicana, Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis, Vasconcellea stipulata, and Carica papaya, among others, mainly at the conserved catalytic site. Obtaining the sequence of this CP gene from J. mexicana provides an alternative for production in a standard system and could be an initial step towards the commercialization of this enzyme.

  16. Human kidney amiloride-binding protein: cDNA structure and functional expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barbry, P.; Chassande, O.; Champigny, G.; Lingueglia, E.; Frelin, C.; Lazdunski, M. ); Champe, M.; Munemitsu, S.; Ullrich, A. ); Maes, P.; Tartar, A. Institut Pasteur de Lille )

    1990-10-01

    Phenamil, an analog of amiloride, is a potent blocker of the epithelial Na{sup plus} channel. It has been used to purify the porcine kidney amiloride-binding protein. Synthetic oligonucleotides derived from partial sequences have been used to screen a human kidney cDNA library and to isolate the cDNA encoding the human amiloride-binding protein. The primary structure was deduced from the DNA sequence analysis. The protein is 713 residues long, with a 19-amino acid signal peptide. The mRNA was expressed in 293-S and NIH 3T3 cells, yielding a glycoprotein (i) that binds amiloride and amiloride analogs with affinities similar to the amiloride receptor associated with the apical Na{sup plus} channel in pig kidney membranes and (ii) that is immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies raised against pig kidney amiloride-binding protein.

  17. Human kidney amiloride-binding protein: cDNA structure and functional expression.

    PubMed Central

    Barbry, P; Champe, M; Chassande, O; Munemitsu, S; Champigny, G; Lingueglia, E; Maes, P; Frelin, C; Tartar, A; Ullrich, A

    1990-01-01

    Phenamil, an analog of amiloride, is a potent blocker of the epithelial Na+ channel. It has been used to purify the porcine kidney amiloride-binding protein. Synthetic oligonucleotides derived from partial sequences have been used to screen a human kidney cDNA library and to isolate the cDNA encoding the human amiloride-binding protein. The primary structure was deduced from the DNA sequence analysis. The protein is 713 residues long, with a 19-amino acid signal peptide. The mRNA was expressed in 293-S and NIH 3T3 cells, yielding a glycoprotein (i) that binds amiloride and amiloride analogs with affinities similar to the amiloride receptor associated with the apical Na+ channel in pig kidney membranes and (ii) that is immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies raised against pig kidney amiloride-binding protein. Images PMID:2217167

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the cerebrovascular and the neuritic plaque amyloid peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Robakis, N.K.; Ramakrishna, N.; Wolfe, G.; Wisniewski, H.M.

    1987-06-01

    Deposits of amyloid fibers are found in large numbers in the walls of blood vessels and in neuritic plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease and adults with Down syndrome. The authors used the amino acid sequence of the amyloid peptide to synthesize oligonucleotide probes specific for the gene encoding this peptide. When a human brain cDNA library was screened with this probe, a clone was found with a 1.7-kilobase insert that contains a long open reading frame coding for 412 amino acid residues including the 28 amino acids of the amyloid peptide. RNA gel blots revealed that a 3.3-kilobase mRNA species was present in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer disease, with Down syndrome, or with not apparent neurological disorders. Southern blots showed that homologous genes are present in the genomic DNA of humans, rabbits, sheep, hamsters, and mice, suggesting that this gene has been conserved through mammalian evolution. Localization of the corresponding genomic sequences on human chromosome 21 suggest a genetic relationship between Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome, and it may explain the early appearance of large numbers of neuritic plaques in adult Down syndrome patients.

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the cerebrovascular and the neuritic plaque amyloid peptides.

    PubMed

    Robakis, N K; Ramakrishna, N; Wolfe, G; Wisniewski, H M

    1987-06-01

    Deposits of amyloid fibers are found in large numbers in the walls of blood vessels and in neuritic plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease and adults with Down syndrome. We used the amino acid sequence of the amyloid peptide to synthesize oligonucleotide probes specific for the gene encoding this peptide. When a human brain cDNA library was screened with this probe, a clone was found with a 1.7-kilobase insert that contains a long open reading frame coding for 412 amino acid residues including the 28 amino acids of the amyloid peptide. RNA gel blots revealed that a 3.3-kilobase mRNA species was present in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer disease, with Down syndrome, or with no apparent neurological disorders. Southern blots showed that homologous genes are present in the genomic DNA of humans, rabbits, sheep, hamsters, and mice, suggesting that this gene has been conserved through mammalian evolution. Localization of the corresponding genomic sequences on human chromosome 21 suggests a genetic relationship between Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome, and it may explain the early appearance of large numbers of neuritic plaques in adult Down syndrome patients.

  20. Cloning and characterization of cDNA encoding an elicitor of Phytophthora colocasiae.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Sharma, Kamal; Misra, Raj Shekhar

    2010-02-28

    The rapid and effective activation of disease resistance responses is essential for plant defense against pathogen attack. These responses are initiated when pathogen-derived molecules (elicitors) are recognized by the host. A cDNA encoding elicitor, the major secreted extracellular glycoprotein of Phytophthora colocasiae, a pathogen of taro (Colocasia esculenta) plants, was isolated, sequenced and characterized. The expression of the corresponding elicitor gene during the disease cycle of P. colocasiae was analyzed. Elicitor was shown to be expressed in mycelium grown in culture media, whereas it was not expressed in sporangiospores and zoospores. In planta, during infection of taro, particularly during the biotrophic stage, expression of elicitor was down-regulated compared to in vitro. The highest levels of expression of elicitor were observed in in vitro grown mycelium and in late stages of infection when profuse sporulation and leaf necrosis occur. The elicitation of the suspension-cultured taro cells was effective in the induction of the enzyme activity of l-phenylalanine-ammonia lyase, peroxidase and lipoxygenase as well as the expression of defense-related endochitinase gene. All these biological activities were exerted within a low concentration range. The glycoprotein represents a powerful tool to investigate further the signals and their transduction pathways involved in induced disease resistance. It may also be useful to engineer broad disease protection in taro plant against Phytophthora leaf blight. PMID:19230634

  1. Identification and characterization of a cDNA encoding mouse CAP: a homolog of the yeast adenylyl cyclase associated protein.

    PubMed

    Vojtek, A B; Cooper, J A

    1993-07-01

    CAP, an adenylyl cyclase associated protein, is present in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In both organisms, CAP is bifunctional: the N-terminal domain binds to adenylyl cyclase, thereby enabling adenylyl cyclase to respond appropriately to upstream regulatory signals, such as RAS in S. cerevisiae; the C-terminal domain is required for cellular morphogenesis. Here, we describe the isolation of a cDNA encoding a CAP homolog from a higher eukaryote. The mouse CAP cDNA contains an open reading frame capable of encoding a 474 amino acid protein. The protein encoded by the mouse CAP cDNA shows extensive homology to the yeast CAP proteins, particularly in the central poly-proline rich region and in the C-terminal domain. By northern analysis, the CAP message appears to be ubiquitous, but not uniform. By indirect immunofluorescence, ectopically expressed mouse CAP protein is found in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts and, in migrating cells, at the leading edge. Expression of the mouse CAP cDNA in S. cerevisiae complements defects associated with loss of the yeast CAP carboxy-terminal domain. Hence, the function of the CAP carboxy-terminal domain has been conserved from yeast to mouse.

  2. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding an A-kinase anchoring protein located in the centrosome, AKAP450.

    PubMed Central

    Witczak, O; Skålhegg, B S; Keryer, G; Bornens, M; Taskén, K; Jahnsen, T; Orstavik, S

    1999-01-01

    A combination of protein kinase A type II (RII) overlay screening, database searches and PCR was used to identify a centrosomal A-kinase anchoring protein. A cDNA with an 11.7 kb open reading frame was characterized and found to correspond to 50 exons of genomic sequence on human chromosome 7q21-22. This cDNA clone encoded a 3908 amino acid protein of 453 kDa, that was designated AKAP450 (DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank accession No. AJ131693). Sequence comparison demonstrated that the open reading frame contained a previously characterized cDNA encoding Yotiao, as well as the human homologue of AKAP120. Numerous coiled-coil structures were predicted from AKAP450, and weak homology to pericentrin, giantin and other structural proteins was observed. A putative RII-binding site was identified involving amino acid 2556 of AKAP450 by mutation analysis combined with RII overlay and an amphipatic helix was predicted in this region. Immunoprecipitation of RII from RIPA-buffer extracts of HeLa cells demonstrated co-precipitation of AKAP450. By immunofluorecent labeling with specific antibodies it was demonstrated that AKAP450 localized to centrosomes. Furthermore, AKAP450 was shown to co-purify in centrosomal preparations. The observation of two mRNAs and several splice products suggests additional functions for the AKAP450 gene. PMID:10202149

  3. Human {beta}2 chain of laminin (formerly S chain): cDNA cloning, chromosomal localization, and expression in carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wewer, U.M.; Durkin, M.E.; Albrechtsen, R.

    1994-11-15

    Overlapping cDNA clones that encode the full-length human laminin {beta}2 chain, formerly called the S chain, were isolated. The cDNA of 5680 nt contains a 5391-nt open reading frame encoding 1797 amino acids. At the amino terminus is a 32-amino-acid signal peptide that is followed by the mature {beta}2 chain polypeptide of 1765 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 192,389 Da. The human {beta}2 chain is predicted to have all of the seven structural domains typical of the {beta} chains of laminin, including the short cysteine-rich {alpha} region. The amino acid sequence of human {beta}2 chain showed 86.1% sequence identity to the rat {beta}2 chain, 50.0% to human {beta}1 chain, and 36.3% to the human {beta}3 chain. The greatest sequence identity was in domains VI, V, and III. The sequence of a 24-amino-acid peptide fragment isolated from the {beta}2 chain of laminin purified from human amniotic basement membrane matched the sequence predicted from the cDNA, confirming that the cDNA encodes human {beta}2 laminin. The cDNA was used to assign the gene (LAMB2) to human chromosome 3p21 by in situ hybridization. It is not linked to genes for human laminin chains {alpha}1, {beta}1, and {gamma}1 or other known laminin genes. Immunostaining showed that the {beta}2 chain is localized to the smooth muscle basement membranes of the arteries, while the homologous {beta}1 chain is confined to the subendothelial basement membranes. The {beta}2 chain was found in the basement membranes of ovarian carcinomas but not colon carcinomas. These results indicate that the expression of the {beta}2 chain gene is tightly regulated in normal human tissues and in disease. 43 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Identification and characterization of a cDNA clone-encoding antigen of Eimeria acervulina.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huili; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Song, Xiaokai; Tang, Fang; Wang, Song; Li, Xiangrui

    2012-11-01

    Eimeria spp. are the causative agents of coccidiosis, a major disease affecting the poultry industry. So far, only a few antigen genes of E. acervulina have been reported. In this study, a clone, named as cSZ-JN2, was identified from a cDNA expression library prepared from E. acervulina sporozoite stage with the ability to stimulate the chicken immune response. The sequence analysis showed that the open reading fragment (ORF) of cSZ-JN2 was 153 bp in size and encoded a predicted protein of 50 amino acids of Mr 5·3 kDa. BLASTN search revealed that cSZ-JN2 had no significant homology with the known genes of E. acervulina or any other organism (GenBank). The recombinant cSZ-JN2 antigen expressed in E. coli was recognized strongly by serum from chickens experimentally infected with E. acervulina. Immunofluorescence analysis using antibody against recombinant cSZ-JN2 indicated that this protein was expressed in sporozoite and merozoite developmental stages. Animal challenge experiments demonstrated that the recombinant protein of cSZ-JN2 and DNA vaccine carrying cSZ-JN2 could significantly increase the average body weight gains, decrease the mean lesion scores and the oocyst outputs of the immunized chickens and presented anti-coccidial indices of more than 165. All the above results suggested that the cSZ-JN2 was a novel E. acervulina antigen and could be an effective candidate for the development of a new vaccine against E. acervulina infection.

  5. [Expression and cloning of cDNA encoding 43 kD rubber particle membrane protein of Hevea brasiliensis].

    PubMed

    Peng, Shi-Qing; Chen, Shou-Cai

    2004-06-01

    A rubber particle protein with apparent molecular mass of 43 kD as determined by SDS-PAGE was purified. A degenerate oligonucleotide primer based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of this purified protein was used to amplify a 1385 bp cDNA by 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (3'RACE). The cDNA contains five repeats in a head-to-tail arrangement without intervening sequences, each encoding a ubiquitin unit of 76 amino acids. The last ubiquitin unit is followed by an extraphenylanaline residue at the carboxyl-terminal end. The structure of the cDNA is consistent with the structure of other known polyubiquitin genes. Western blot demonstrated that 43 kD rubber particle protein might be a polyubiquitin. Southern blot analysis revealed that there were multiple copies of gene encoding 43 kD rubber particle protein in Hevea brasiliensis. The results of Northern blot analysis indicated that the gene was expressed in latex, young leaves and bark tissue. PMID:15599030

  6. Cloning and sequence analysis of an Ophiophagus hannah cDNA encoding a precursor of two natriuretic peptide domains.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Guoyu; Jiang, Ping; He, Yingying; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2011-04-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake. Despite the components are mainly neurotoxins, the venom contains several proteins affecting blood system. Natriuretic peptide (NP), one of the important components of snake venoms, could cause local vasodilatation and a promoted capillary permeability facilitating a rapid diffusion of other toxins into the prey tissues. Due to the low abundance, it is hard to purify the snake venom NPs. The cDNA cloning of the NPs become a useful approach. In this study, a 957 bp natriuretic peptide-encoding cDNA clone was isolated from an O. hannah venom gland cDNA library. The open-reading frame of the cDNA encodes a 210-amino acid residues precursor protein named Oh-NP. Oh-NP has a typical signal peptide sequence of 26 amino acid residues. Surprisingly, Oh-NP has two typical NP domains which consist of the typical sequence of 17-residue loop of CFGXXDRIGC, so it is an unusual NP precursor. These two NP domains share high amino acid sequence identity. In addition, there are two homologous peptides of unknown function within the Oh-NP precursor. To our knowledge, Oh-NP is the first protein precursor containing two NP domains. It might belong to another subclass of snake venom NPs. PMID:21334357

  7. Cloning and sequence analysis of an Ophiophagus hannah cDNA encoding a precursor of two natriuretic peptide domains.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Guoyu; Jiang, Ping; He, Yingying; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2011-04-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake. Despite the components are mainly neurotoxins, the venom contains several proteins affecting blood system. Natriuretic peptide (NP), one of the important components of snake venoms, could cause local vasodilatation and a promoted capillary permeability facilitating a rapid diffusion of other toxins into the prey tissues. Due to the low abundance, it is hard to purify the snake venom NPs. The cDNA cloning of the NPs become a useful approach. In this study, a 957 bp natriuretic peptide-encoding cDNA clone was isolated from an O. hannah venom gland cDNA library. The open-reading frame of the cDNA encodes a 210-amino acid residues precursor protein named Oh-NP. Oh-NP has a typical signal peptide sequence of 26 amino acid residues. Surprisingly, Oh-NP has two typical NP domains which consist of the typical sequence of 17-residue loop of CFGXXDRIGC, so it is an unusual NP precursor. These two NP domains share high amino acid sequence identity. In addition, there are two homologous peptides of unknown function within the Oh-NP precursor. To our knowledge, Oh-NP is the first protein precursor containing two NP domains. It might belong to another subclass of snake venom NPs.

  8. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V.

    PubMed Central

    Jenny, R J; Pittman, D D; Toole, J J; Kriz, R W; Aldape, R A; Hewick, R M; Kaufman, R J; Mann, K G

    1987-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approximately equal to 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approximately 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approximately 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues. Images PMID:3110773

  9. Complete cDNA and derived amino acid sequence of human factor V

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, R.J.; Pittman, D.D.; Toole, J.J.; Kriz, R.W.; Aldape, R.A.; Hewick, R.M.; Kaufman, R.J.; Mann, K.G.

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones encoding human factor V have been isolated from an oligo(dT)-primed human fetal liver cDNA library prepared with vector Charon 21A. The cDNA sequence of factor V from three overlapping clones includes a 6672-base-pair (bp) coding region, a 90-bp 5' untranslated region, and a 163-bp 3' untranslated region within which is a poly(A)tail. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 2224 amino acids inclusive of a 28-amino acid leader peptide. Direct comparison with human factor VIII reveals considerable homology between proteins in amino acid sequence and domain structure: a triplicated A domain and duplicated C domain show approx. 40% identity with the corresponding domains in factor VIII. As in factor VIII, the A domains of factor V share approx. 40% amino acid-sequence homology with the three highly conserved domains in ceruloplasmin. The B domain of factor V contains 35 tandem and approx. 9 additional semiconserved repeats of nine amino acids of the form Asp-Leu-Ser-Gln-Thr-Thr/Asn-Leu-Ser-Pro and 2 additional semiconserved repeats of 17 amino acids. Factor V contains 37 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 25 of which are in the B domain, and a total of 19 cysteine residues.

  10. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones for human erythrocyte. beta. -spectrin

    SciTech Connect

    Prchal, J.T.; Morley, B.J.; Yoon, S.H.; Coetzer, T.L.; Palek, J.; Conboy, J.G.; Kan, Y.W.

    1987-11-01

    Spectrin is an important structural component of the membrane skeleton that underlies and supports the erythrocyte plasma membrane. It is composed of nonidentical ..cap alpha.. (M/sub r/ 240,000) and ..beta.. (M/sub r/ 220,000) subunits, each of which contains multiple homologous 106-amino acid segments. The authors report here the isolation and characterization of a human erythroid-specific ..beta..-spectrin cDNA clone that encodes parts of the ..beta..-9 through ..beta..-12 repeat segments. This cDNA was used as a hybridization probe to assign the ..beta..-spectrin gene to human chromosome 14 and to begin molecular analysis of the gene and its mRNA transcripts. RNA transfer blot analysis showed that the reticulocyte ..beta..-spectrin mRNA is 7.8 kilobases in length. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA revealed the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) within the ..beta..-spectrin gene locus. The isolation of human spectrin cDNA probes and the identification of closely linked RFLPs will facilitate analysis of mutant spectrin genes causing congenital hemolytic anemias associated with quantitative and qualitative spectrin abnormalities.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a potential morphogen from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium that is conserved in higher metazoans.

    PubMed Central

    Pahler, S; Krasko, A; Schütze, J; Müller, I M; Müller, W E

    1998-01-01

    Species belonging to the lowest metazoan phylum, the sponges (Porifera), exhibit a surprisingly complex and multifaceted Bauplan (body plan). Recently, key molecules have been isolated from sponges which demonstrate that the cells of these animals are provided with characteristic metazoan adhesion and signal transduction molecules, allowing tissue formation. In order to understand which factors control the spatial organization of these cells in the sponge body plan, we screened for a cDNA encoding a soluble modulator of the behaviour of endothelial cells. A cDNA encoding a putative protein, which is highly similar to the human and mouse endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide (EMAP) II has been isolated from a library of the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. The sponge EMAP-related polypeptide (EMAPR) has been termed EMAPR1_GC. The full-length cDNA clone, GCEMAPR1, has a size of 592 nucleotides (nt) and contains a 447 nt-long potential open reading frame; the molecular weight (MW) of the deduced amino acid sequence, 16,499 Da, is close to that of mature mammalian EMAP II (ca. 18 kDa). The sponge polypeptide is also closely related to a deduced polypeptide from the cosmid clone F58B3 isolated from Caenorhabditis elegans. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the sponge and the nematode EMAPR molecules form a cluster which is significantly separated from the corresponding mammalian EMAP molecules. The function of the first cloned putative soluble modulator of endothelial cells in sponges remains to be determined. PMID:9523439

  12. cDNA cloning, gene organization and expression analysis of human peptidylarginine deiminase type I.

    PubMed Central

    Guerrin, Marina; Ishigami, Akihito; Méchin, Marie-Claire; Nachat, Rachida; Valmary, Séverine; Sebbag, Mireille; Simon, Michel; Senshu, Tatsuo; Serre, Guy

    2003-01-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs) catalyse a post-translational modification of proteins through the conversion of arginine residues into citrullines. The existence of four isoforms of PAD (types I, II, III and IV) encoded by four different genes, which are distinct in their substrate specificities and tissue-specific expression, was reported in rodents. In the present study, starting from epidermis polyadenylated RNA, we cloned by reverse transcriptase-PCR a full-length cDNA encoding human PAD type I. The cDNA was 2711 bp in length and encoded a 663-amino-acid sequence. The predicted protein shares 75% identity with the rat PAD type I sequence, but displays only 50-57% identity with the three other known human isoforms. We have described the organization of the human PAD type I gene on chromosome 1p36. A recombinant PAD type I was produced in Escherichia coli and shown to be enzymically active. Human PAD type I mRNAs were detected by reverse transcriptase-PCR not only in the epidermis, but also in various organs, including prostate, testis, placenta, spleen and thymus. In human epidermis extracts analysed by Western blotting, PAD type I was detected as a 70 kDa polypeptide, in agreement with its predicted molecular mass. As shown by immunohistochemistry, the enzyme was expressed in all the living layers of human epidermis, with the labelling being increased in the granular layer. This is the first description of the human PAD type I gene and the first demonstration of its expression in epidermis. PMID:12416996

  13. Molecular cloning and analysis of cDNA encoding a plant tryptophan decarboxylase: comparison with animal dopa decarboxylases.

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, V; Marineau, C; Brisson, N

    1989-01-01

    The sequence of a cDNA clone that includes the complete coding region of tryptophan decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.28, formerly EC 4.1.1.27) from periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is reported. The cDNA clone (1747 base pairs) was isolated by antibody screening of a cDNA expression library produced from poly(A)+ RNA found in developing seedlings of C. roseus. The clone hybridized to a 1.8-kilobase mRNA from developing seedlings and from young leaves of mature plants. The identity of the clone was confirmed when extracts of transformed Escherichia coli expressed a protein containing tryptophan decarboxylase enzyme activity. The tryptophan decarboxylase cDNA clone encodes a protein of 500 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 56,142 Da. The amino acid sequence shows a high degree of similarity with the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (dopa decarboxylase) and the alpha-methyldopa-hypersensitive protein of Drosophila melanogaster. The tryptophan decarboxylase sequence also showed significant similarity to feline glutamate decarboxylase and mouse ornithine decarboxylase, suggesting a possible evolutionary link between these amino acid decarboxylases. Images PMID:2704736

  14. Human TOP3: a single-copy gene encoding DNA topoisomerase III.

    PubMed Central

    Hanai, R; Caron, P R; Wang, J C

    1996-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a protein homologous to the Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I subfamily of enzymes has been identified through cloning and sequencing. Expressing the cloned human cDNA in yeast (delta)top1 cells lacking endogenous DNA topoisomerase I yielded an activity in cell extracts that specifically reduces the number of supercoils in a highly negatively supercoiled DNA. On the basis of these results, the human gene containing the cDNA sequence has been denoted TOP3, and the protein it encodes has been denoted DNA topoisomerase III. Screening of a panel of human-rodent somatic hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization of cloned TOP3 genomic DNA to metaphase chromosomes indicate that human TOP3 is a single-copy gene located at chromosome 17p11.2-12. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8622991

  15. Isolation of a cDNA for HSF 2: Evidence for two heat shock factor genes in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, T.J.; Gallo, G.J.; Sheldon, L.; Kingston, R.E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Tempst, P. )

    1991-08-15

    The heat shock response is transcriptionally regulated by an evolutionarily conserved protein termed heat shock factor (HSF). The authors report the purification to homogeneity and the partial peptide sequence of HSF from HeLa cells. The peptide sequence was used to isolate a human cDNA with a predicted open reading frame that has homology to the DNA binding domains of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila HSFs. The cDNA directs the synthesis of a protein that binds to the heat shock element with specificity identical to HeLa HSF and stimulates transcription from a heat shock promoter. The expressed protein cross-reacts with anti-HSF antibodies. Surprisingly, however, this cDNA does not encode all of the peptides obtained from purified HeLa HSF. These peptides are encoded by a distinct human cDNA. HSF1. It therefore appears that there is a human heat shock factor gene family and that at least two separate but related HSF proteins regulate the stress response in humans.

  16. Isolation and sequencing of cDNA clones encoding ethylene-induced putative peroxidases from cucumber cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Morgens, P H; Callahan, A M; Dunn, L J; Abeles, F B

    1990-05-01

    A cDNA library from ethephon-treated cucumber cotyledons (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Poinsett 76) was constructed. Two cDNA clones encoding putative peroxidases were isolated by means of a synthetic probe based on a partial amino acid sequence of a 33 kDa cationic peroxidase that had been previously shown to be induced by ethylene. DNA sequencing indicates that the two clones were derived from two closely related RNA species that are related to published plant peroxidase sequences. Southern analysis indicates that there are 1-5 copies in a haploid genome of a gene homologous to the cDNA clones. The deduced amino acid sequences are homologous with a tobacco (55% sequence identity), a horseradish (53%), a turnip (45%), and a potato (41%) peroxidase. The cloned sequences do not encode the 33 kDa peroxidase from which the original synthetic probe was been derived, but rather other putative peroxidases. An increase in the level of mRNA is evident by 3 hours after ethephon or ethylene treatment and plateaus by 15 hours. PMID:2102850

  17. Structure and sequence of the gene encoding human keratocan.

    PubMed

    Tasheva, E S; Funderburgh, J L; Funderburgh, M L; Corpuz, L M; Conrad, G W

    1999-01-01

    Keratocan is one of the three major keratan sulfate proteoglycans characteristically expressed in cornea. We have isolated cDNA and genomic clones and determined the sequence of the entire human keratocan (Kera) gene. The gene is spread over 7.65 kb of DNA and contains three exons. An open reading frame starting at the beginning of the second exon encodes a protein of 352 aa. The amino acid sequence of keratocan shows high identity among mammalian species. This evolutionary conservation between the keratocan proteins as well as the restricted expression of Kera gene in cornea suggests that this molecule might be important in developing and maintaining corneal transparency.

  18. Homology probing: identification of cDNA clones encoding members of the protein-serine kinase family

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Mixed /sup 32/P-labeled oligonucleotide probes were used to screen a HeLa cDNA library for clones encoding amino acid contiguities whose conservation is characteristic of the protein-serine kinase family. Eighty thousand clones were screened, from which 19 were identified as showing strong hybridization to two distinct probes. Four clones were chosen for characterization by partial DNA sequence analysis and 3 of these were found to encode amino acid sequences typical of protein-serine kinases. One deduced amino acid sequence shares 72% identify with rabbit skeletal muscle phosphorylase kinase ..gamma..-subunit, while another is closely related to the yeast protein-serine kinases CDC2 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and CDC28 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This screening approach should have applications in the identification of clones encoding previously unknown or poorly characterized members of other protein families.

  19. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA from Cuphea lanceolata encoding a beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase.

    PubMed

    Klein, B; Pawlowski, K; Höricke-Grandpierre, C; Schell, J; Töpfer, R

    1992-05-01

    A cDNA encoding beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase (EC 1.1.1.100), an integral part of the fatty acid synthase type II, was cloned from Cuphea lanceolata. This cDNA of 1276 bp codes for a polypeptide of 320 amino acids with 63 N-terminal residues presumably representing a transit peptide and 257 residues corresponding to the mature protein of 27 kDa. The encoded protein shows strong homology with the amino-terminal sequence and two tryptic peptides from avocado mesocarp beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase, and its total amino acid composition is highly similar to those of the beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductases of avocado and spinach. Amino acid sequence homologies to polyketide synthase, beta-ketoreductases and short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases are discussed. An engineered fusion protein lacking most of the transit peptide, which was produced in Escherichia coli, was isolated and proved to possess beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase activity. Hybridization studies revealed that in C. lanceolata beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase is encoded by a small family of at least two genes and that members of this family are expressed in roots, leaves, flowers and seeds.

  20. Cloning and sequence analysis of a cDNA encoding rat preprocholecystokinin.

    PubMed Central

    Deschenes, R J; Lorenz, L J; Haun, R S; Roos, B A; Collier, K J; Dixon, J E

    1984-01-01

    Poly(A) RNA was isolated from a rat medullary thyroid carcinoma that exhibited high levels of immunoreactive cholecystokinin (CCK). Double-stranded cDNA was synthesized from the poly(A) RNA and inserted into the Pst I site of pBR322. Bacterial colonies containing CCK cDNA were identified using the hybridization probe d(T-C-C-A-T-C-C-A-N-C-C-C-A-T-G-T-A-G-T-C). The sequence of the probe was deduced from the known amino acid sequence of porcine CCK-8, Asp-Tyr-Met-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2. The nucleotide sequence of the cDNA complementary to the mRNA of rat preprocholecystokinin was determined. The cDNA contains 33 nucleotides in the 5'-noncoding region, 199 nucleotides in the 3'-noncoding region, and 345 nucleotides coding for a precursor to CCK, which is 115 amino acids (Mr, 12,826). Examination of the rat CCK gene revealed a suggested transcriptional control sequence analogous to the "TATA" sequence located 33 nucleotides upstream from a proposed transcriptional start site. The amino acid sequence of CCK-39 is flanked by both amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal extensions. Analysis of CCK mRNA showed that it is approximately equal to 750 nucleotides long. CCK mRNA of the rat brain and intestine appeared to be identical in size to the CCK mRNA of the carcinoma. Images PMID:6199787

  1. Molecular Cloning and Functional Expression of Chitinase-Encoding cDNA from the Cabbage Moth, Mamestra brassicae

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Aron; Park, Hee Yun; Jeong, Seong Eun

    2012-01-01

    Chitinase is a rate-limiting and endo-splitting enzyme involved in the bio-degradation of chitin, an important component of the cuticular exoskeleton and peritrophic matrix in insects. We isolated a cDNA-encoding chitinase from the last larval integument of the cabbage moth, Mamestra brassicae (Lepidoptera; Noctuidae), cloned the ORF cDNA into E. coli to confirm its functionality, and analyzed the deduced amino acid sequence in comparison with previously described lepidopteran chitinases. M. brassicae chitinase expressed in the transformed E. coli cells with the chitinase-encoding cDNA enhanced cell proliferation to about 1.6 times of the untransformed wild type strain in a colloidal chitin-including medium with only a very limited amount of other nutrients. Compared with the wild type strain, the intracellular levels of chitin degradation derivatives, glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine were about 7.2 and 2.3 times higher, respectively, while the extracellular chitinase activity was about 2.2 times higher in the transformed strain. The ORF of M. brassicae chitinase-encoding cDNA consisted of 1686 nucleotides (562 amino acid residues) except for the stop codon, and its deduced amino acid composition revealed a calculated molecular weight of 62.7 and theoretical pI of 5.3. The ORF was composed of N-terminal leading signal peptide (AA 1-20), catalytic domain (AA 21–392), linker region (AA 393–498), and C-terminal chitin-binding domain (AA 499–562) showing its characteristic structure as a molting fluid chitinase. In phylogenetic analysis, the enzymes from 6 noctuid species were grouped together, separately from a group of 3 bombycid and 1 tortricid enzymes, corresponding to their taxonomic relationships at both the family and genus levels. PMID:22124732

  2. Cloning and expression analysis of a cDNA encoding fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase: post-transcriptional modulation in rat liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Labelle, Y; Phaneuf, D; Tanguay, R M

    1991-08-15

    Fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) is an enzyme which is deficient in human hereditary tyrosinemia type 1. We have cloned and sequenced a rat liver cDNA encoding FAH. The identity of the clone was ascertained by hybrid-selection experiments and deduced amino acid (aa) sequence homologies with sequenced oligopeptide fragments of the purified rat liver protein. The cDNA codes for a 419-aa protein of 45,946 daltons. We used this cDNA as a probe in conjunction with a specific anti-rat FAH antibody to study the expression pattern of the FAH gene in rat liver and kidney. Northern blot analysis indicates that the kidney contains slightly more FAH mRNA that the liver. Western blotting shows, however, that the liver contains about twice as much FAH protein as the kidney. Primer extension experiments suggest that there are no differences in the 5'-untranslated (UT) ends of the FAH mRNA of both tissues. We conclude that synthesis of the FAH protein is in part regulated at the post-transcriptional level in rats liver and kidney, and that this regulation does not appear to be mediated by the 5'-UT sequence of the FAH mRNA.

  3. Cloning and mapping of a novel human cDNA homologous to DROER, the enhancer of the Drosophila melanogaster rudimentary gene

    SciTech Connect

    Isomura, Minoru; Okui, Keiko; Nakamura, Yusuke

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the isolation and localization to human chromosome 7q34 of a human cDNA clone that encodes a protein which is homologous to DROER, the enhancer of the Drosophila melanogaster rudimentary gene. The structure and expression of this gene is also discussed. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Sequence analysis and expression of a cDNA clone encoding tropomysin in Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Song, Juanjuan; Li, Li; Liu, Zhigang; Li, Qiyuan; Ran, Pixin

    2009-02-01

    Shellfish can cause severe anaphylactic reactions. Tropomyosin has been assumed partly responsible for the cross-reactivity among shellfish and other invertebrates. In this study, cDNA of Sinonovacula constricta was amplified by RT-PCR and 3'-RACE from total RNA. The obtained tropomyosin cDNA included an open reading frame coding for 284 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein shared high identity with other allergenic tropomyosins. Expression of the recombinant tropomyosin was carried out in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) using vector PET28a and the purification of the recombinant protein was performed via affinity chromatography. IgE reactivity of recombinant tropomyosin was investigated by immunoblot and the sensized precentage was 36% which indicated that tropomyosin was the minor allergens in S. constricta. Moreover, the character of the purified protein was analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS.

  5. Isolation of genomic and cDNA clones encoding bovine poly(A) binding protein II.

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, A; Krause, S; Blank, D; Jenny, A; Jenö, P; Lustig, A; Wahle, E

    1995-01-01

    cDNA clones for bovine poly(A) binding protein II (PAB II) were isolated. Their sequence predicts a protein of 32.8 kDa, revising earlier estimates of molecular mass. The protein contains one putative RNA-binding domain of the RNP type, an acidic N-terminal and a basic C-terminal domain. Analyses of authentic PAB II were in good agreement with all predictions from the cDNA sequence except that a number of arginine residues appeared to be post-translationally modified. Poly(A) binding protein II expressed in Escherichia coli was active in poly(A) binding and reconstitution of processive polyadenylation, including poly(A) tail length control. The cDNA clones showed a number of potential PAB II binding sites in the 3' untranslated sequence. Bovine poly(A)+RNA contained two mRNAs hybridizing to a PAB II-specific probe. Analysis of a genomic clone revealed six introns in the coding sequence. The revised molecular mass led to a demonstration of PAB II oligomer formation and a reinterpretation of earlier data concerning the protein's binding to poly(A). Images PMID:7479061

  6. Molecular cloning and expression of the porcine trigeminal ganglion cDNA encoding a 5-ht(1F) receptor.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Pankaj; Sharma, Hari S; Wurch, Thierry; Pauwels, Petrus J; Saxena, Pramod R

    2002-02-01

    Using a combination of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and inverse-PCR techniques, we amplified, cloned and sequenced a full-length porcine 5-hydroxytryptamine 1F (5-ht(1F)) receptor complementary DNA (cDNA) derived from porcine trigeminal ganglion. Sequence analysis revealed 1101 base pairs (bp) encoding an open reading frame of 366 amino acids showing a high similarity (>90%) with the 5-ht(1F) receptor sequences from other species, including human. The recombinant porcine 5-ht(1F) receptor was expressed in African green monkey kidney cell lines (COS-7 cells) and its ligand binding profile was determined using [3H]5-HT. The affinities of several agonists (LY334370 (5-(4-fluorobenzoyl)amino-3-(1-methylpiperidin-4-yl)-1H-indole fumarate)>CP122638 (N-methyl-3 [pyrrolidin 2(R)-yl methyl]-1H-indol-5-ylmethyl sulphonamide)=naratriptan =5HT>eletriptan>sumatriptan>frovatriptan =avitriptan>dihydroergotamine>zolmitriptan>5-carboxamidotryptamine>rizatriptan>alniditan=donitriptan>L694247 (2-[5-[3-(4-methylsulphonylamino)benzyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]-1H-indole-3-yl] ethylamine) and putative antagonists (methiothepin>GR127935 (N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl) phenyl]-2'-methyl 4'-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl) [1,1-biphenyl]-4-carboxamide hydrochloride)>ritanserin>SB224289 (2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-1'-methyl-5-[2'-methyl-4'(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl) biphenyl-4-carbonyl] furo [2,3-f] indole-3-spiro-4'-piperidine hydrochloride)>BRL155572 ([1-(3-chlorophenyl)-4-[3,3-diphenyl (2-(S,R) hydroxypropanyl)piperazine] hydrochloride)>ketanserin=pindolol) correlated highly with those described for the recombinant human 5-ht(1F) receptor (Spearman correlation coefficient; r(s)=0.942). Nevertheless, as compared to the human homologue, some triptans (i.e. sumatriptan, zolmitriptan and rizatriptan) displayed a 10- to 15-fold lower affinity for the porcine 5-ht(1F) receptor. Using RT-PCR technique, the expression of porcine 5-ht(1F) receptor mRNA was observed in

  7. Cloning of the full length pig PIT1 (POU1F1) CDNA and a novel alternative PIT1 transcript, and functional studies of their encoded proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, T P; Sun, H S; Wahls, S; Sanchez-Serrano, I; Rothschild, M F; Tuggle, C K

    2001-05-01

    PIT1 is an essential regulatory gene of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and thyrotropin beta subunit (TSHbeta). Previously, a partial pig PIT1 cDNA and a genomic clone of the entire 3' end of the PIT1 gene was isolated, and polymorphisms at PIT1 were associated with several performance traits in the pig. In order to understand the biological function of the pig PIT1 gene and its possible application in swine genetics, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to complete the cloning of the full length cDNA for pig PIT1. The pig PIT1 cDNA and its deduced protein sequence have approximately 90% and 95% identity, respectively, with the PIT1 cDNA and protein of other mammals (human, bovine, sheep and rodents). Surprisingly, sequence comparison to other pig PIT1 sequences indicated only approximately 93% identity. Additional sequencing confirmed our sequence, and identified a new polymorphism in exon 4. Phylogenetic analysis of several mammalian PIT1 sequences indicates sequencing errors may account for the discrepancies observed in the other pig sequences reported. Several PIT1 alternative spliced forms were also identified by RT-PCR. They were the delta3PIT1 (missing entire exon 3), delta4PIT1 (missing entire exon 4) and PIT1beta (additional 26 amino acids inserted in front of exon 2) transcripts. The delta4PIT1 and PIT1beta transcripts have been found to encode functionally different proteins in rodents. The delta3PIT1 transcript is a novel isoform of PIT1. Potentially different functions between pig delta3PIT1 and PIT1 were analyzed by expressing these proteins in bacteria. The E. coli-expressed PIT1 and delta3PIT1 proteins were used with rat growth hormone (rGH) and rat prolactin (rPRL) promoter DNA in DNA mobility shift assays. The results showed that pig PIT1 can specifically bind rGH and rPRL promoter regions, but that the pig delta3PIT1 cannot, even at very high protein concentrations. Possible protein-protein interactions between

  8. Putative multiadhesive protein from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium: cloning of the cDNA encoding a fibronectin-, an SRCR-, and a complement control protein module.

    PubMed

    Pahler, S; Blumbach, B; Müller, I; Müller, W E

    1998-10-15

    Sponges (Porifera) representing the simplest metazoan phylum so far have been thought to possess no basal lamina tissue structures. One major extracellular matrix protein that is also a constitutive glycoprotein of the basal lamina is fibronectin. It was the aim of the present study to identify the native protein from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium and to isolate the corresponding cDNA. In crude extracts from this sponge protein(s) of M(r) of approximately 230 and approximately 210 kDa could be visualized by Western-blotting using an anti-fibronectin [human] antibody. By PCR cloning from a cDNA library of G. cydonium we isolated a cDNA comprising one element of fibronectin, the type-III (FN3) module. The cDNA (2.3 kb long), encoding a 701 amino acid [aa] long putative "multiadhesive protein" termed MAP_GEOCY, was found to contain (i) a fibronectin-, (ii) a scavenger receptor cysteine-rich [SRCR]-, and (iii) a short consensus repeat [SCR] module. The 89 aa long fibronectin module comprises the characteristic topology and conserved aa found in fibronectin type-III (FN3) elements. The SRCR module (101 aa) features the characteristics of group B SRCR molecules. The predominant proteins belonging to this group are the mammalian WC1-, M130-, CD6- and CD5 antigens that probably are involved in immunological reactions. The SCR module (54 aa) shows the characteristics of type III SCR modules found in complement receptors. Phylogenetic analyses performed with all three building blocks of the "multiadhesive protein" showed that the respective sponge modules form independent, possibly basal, lineages in trees that include the corresponding modules from higher metazoan animals. In summary, these data demonstrate for the first time that the phylogenetically oldest Metazoa, the sponges, contain protein modules seen in higher animals in proteins of the extracellular matrix and in molecules involved in cell-mediated immune reactions in vertebrates. PMID:9755483

  9. Cloning of the Trichoderma reesei cDNA Encoding a Glucuronan Lyase Belonging to a Novel Polysaccharide Lyase Family▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Naotake; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Habu, Naoto; Samejima, Masahiro; Isogai, Akira

    2009-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei produces glucuronan lyase (TrGL) when it is grown on β-(1→4)-polyglucuronate (cellouronate) as a sole carbon source. The cDNA encoding TrGL was cloned, and the recombinant enzyme was heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. The cDNA of TrGL includes a 777-bp open reading frame encoding a 20-amino-acid signal peptide and the 238-amino-acid mature protein. The amino acid sequence showed no similarity to the amino acid sequences of previously described functional proteins, indicating that the enzyme should be classified in a novel polysaccharide lyase (PL) family. Recombinant TrGL catalyzed depolymerization of cellouronate endolytically by β-elimination and was highly specific for cellouronate. The enzyme was most active at pH 6.5 and 50°C, and its activity and thermostability increased in the presence of Ca2+, suggesting that its calcium dependence is similar to that of other PLs, such as pectate lyases. PMID:18978091

  10. Characterization and expression of a cDNA encoding a tubuliform silk protein of the golden web spider Nephila antipodiana.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Lin, Z; Sin, Y M; Li, D; Gong, Z; Yang, D

    2006-07-01

    Spider silks are renowned for their excellent mechanical properties. Although several spider fibroin genes, mainly from dragline and capture silks, have been identified, there are still many members in the spider fibroin gene family remain uncharacterized. In this study, a novel silk cDNA clone from the golden web spider Nephila antipodiana was isolated. It is serine rich and contains two almost identical fragments with one varied gap region and one conserved spider fibroin-like C-terminal domain. Both in situ hybridization and immunoblot analyses have shown that it is specifically expressed in the tubuliform gland. Thus, it likely encodes the silk fibroin from the tubuliform gland, which supplies the main component of the inner egg case. Unlike other silk proteins, the protein encoded by the novel cDNA in water solution exhibits the characteristic of an alpha-helical protein, which implies the distinct property of the egg case silk, though the fiber of tubuliform silk is mainly composed of beta-sheet structure. Its sequence information facilitates elucidation of the evolutionary history of the araneoid fibroin genes.

  11. [Molecular cloning and characteristics of cDNA encoding pig beta6 subunit for FMDV receptor].

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan-Dian; Du, Jun-Zheng; Chang, Hui-Yun; Cong, Guo-Zheng; Shao, Jun-Jun; Shan, Yi Hua; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Xie, Qing-Ge

    2007-09-01

    In order to study the roles of integrin beta6 in Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus infection, pig integrin beta6 was firstly molecularly cloned from RNA of the tongue and lung of recovered pig infected experimentally with foot-and-mouth-disease virus (FMDV), and was compared with the beta6 gene of other animals available in GenBank at nucleotide and amino acid leves. GeneBank association number of the beta6 gene is EF432729. Pig integrin beta6 gene (2367bp) encodes a polypeptide of 788 amino acids consisting of 9 potential N-linked glycosylation sites, 3 Glycosaminoglycan attachment sites, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site, 10 Protein kinase C phosphorylation sites, 2 EGF-like domains and 2 cysteine-rich regions. Pig integrin beta6 subunit has a 26-residue putative signal peptide, a 681-residue ectodomain, a 29-residue transmembrane domain, and a 52-residue cytoplasmic domain. 11 mutant nucleotides were found in beta6 gene coding region and 9 amino acids were changed. The nucleotide sequence similarity of integrin beta6 gene between rheses monkey, mouse, Norway rat, dog, guinea pig, human, bovine, sheep is 79.5%, 84.9%, 85.4%, 85.2%, 88.7%, 90.1%, 91.9% and 91.9%, and the amino acid sequence similarity is 93.5%, 88.2%, 88.5%, 88.3%, 91.0%, 92.8%, 93.3% and 93.4% respectively. This study will lay a foundation for understanding the interactions of FMDV with receptors. PMID:18064756

  12. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding rat liver cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD).

    PubMed

    Reymond, I; Sergeant, A; Tappaz, M

    1996-06-01

    The taurine biosynthesis enzyme, cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD), was purified to homogeneity from rat liver. Three CSD peptides generated by tryptic cleavage were isolated and partially sequenced. Two of them showed a marked homology with glutamate decarboxylase and their respective position on the CSD amino acid sequence was postulated accordingly. Using appropriate degenerated primers derived from these two peptides, a PCR amplified DNA fragment was generated from liver poly(A)+ mRNA, cloned and used as a probe to screen a rat liver cDNA library. Three cDNAs, length around 1800 bp, were isolated which all contained an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 493 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 55.2 kDa close to the experimental values for CSD. The encoded protein contained the sequence of the three peptides isolated from homogenous liver CSD. Our data confirm and significantly extend those recently published (Kaisaki et al. (1995) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1262, 79-82). Indeed, an additional base pair found 1371 bp downstream from the initiation codon led to a shift in the open reading frame which extended the carboxy-terminal end by 15 amino acid residues and altogether modified 36 amino acids. The validity of this correction is supported by the finding that the corrected reading frame encoded a peptide issued from CSD tryptic cleavage that was not encoded anywhere in the CSD sequence previously reported. PMID:8679699

  13. Isolation and characterization of full-length cDNA clones coding for cholinesterase from fetal human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Prody, C.A.; Zevin-Sonkin, D.; Gnatt, A.; Goldberg, O.; Soreq, H.

    1987-06-01

    To study the primary structure and regulation of human cholinesterases, oligodeoxynucleotide probes were prepared according to a consensus peptide sequence present in the active site of both human serum pseudocholinesterase and Torpedo electric organ true acetylcholinesterase. Using these probes, the authors isolated several cDNA clones from lambdagt10 libraries of fetal brain and liver origins. These include 2.4-kilobase cDNA clones that code for a polypeptide containing a putative signal peptide and the N-terminal, active site, and C-terminal peptides of human BtChoEase, suggesting that they code either for BtChoEase itself or for a very similar but distinct fetal form of cholinesterase. In RNA blots of poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from the cholinesterase-producing fetal brain and liver, these cDNAs hybridized with a single 2.5-kilobase band. Blot hybridization to human genomic DNA revealed that these fetal BtChoEase cDNA clones hybridize with DNA fragments of the total length of 17.5 kilobases, and signal intensities indicated that these sequences are not present in many copies. Both the cDNA-encoded protein and its nucleotide sequence display striking homology to parallel sequences published for Torpedo AcChoEase. These finding demonstrate extensive homologies between the fetal BtChoEase encoded by these clones and other cholinesterases of various forms and species.

  14. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of a full-length cDNA for human alpha enolase.

    PubMed Central

    Giallongo, A; Feo, S; Moore, R; Croce, C M; Showe, L C

    1986-01-01

    We previously purified a 48-kDa protein (p48) that specifically reacts with an antiserum directed against the 12 carboxyl-terminal amino acids of the c-myc gene product. Using an antiserum directed against the purified p48, we have cloned a cDNA from a human expression library. This cDNA hybrid-selects an mRNA that translates to a 48-kDa protein that specifically reacts with anti-p48 serum. We have isolated a full-length cDNA that encodes p48 and spans 1755 bases. The coding region is 1299 bases long; 94 bases are 5' noncoding and 359 bases are 3' noncoding. The cDNA encodes a 433 amino acid protein that is 67% homologous to yeast enolase and 94% homologous to the rat non-neuronal enolase. The purified protein has been shown to have enolase activity and has been identified to be of the alpha type by isoenzyme analysis. The transcriptional regulation of enolase expression in response to mitogenic stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes and in response to heat shock is also discussed. Images PMID:3529090

  15. Molecular cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding the rabbit ileal villus cell basolateral membrane Na+/H+ exchanger.

    PubMed Central

    Tse, C M; Ma, A I; Yang, V W; Watson, A J; Levine, S; Montrose, M H; Potter, J; Sardet, C; Pouyssegur, J; Donowitz, M

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a rabbit ileal villus cell Na+/H+ exchanger was isolated and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined. The cDNA is 4 kb long and contains 322 bp of 5'-untranslated region, 2451 bp of open reading frame and 1163 bp of 3'-untranslated area, with 70%, 91% and 40% identity to the human sequence, respectively. Amino acid sequence deduced from the longest open reading frame indicated a protein of 816 residues (predicted Mr 90,716) which exhibits 95% amino acid identity to the human Na+/H+ exchanger. The two putative glycosylation sites in the human Na+/H+ exchanger are conserved in this protein, suggesting that it is a glycoprotein. Stable transfection of the cDNA into an Na+/H+ exchanger deficient fibroblast cell line, established Na+/H+ exchange. The Na+/H+ exchanger was stimulated by serum and a phorbol ester but not by 8-Br-cAMP. In Northern blot analysis, the cDNA hybridized to a 4.8 kb message in rabbit ileal villus cells, kidney cortex, kidney medulla, adrenal gland, brain and descending colon and to a 5.2 kb message in cultured human colonic cancer cell lines, HT29-18 and Caco-2. In immunoblotting, a polyclonal antibody raised against a fusion protein of beta-galactosidase and the C-terminal 158 amino acids of the human Na+/H+ exchanger identified a rabbit ileal basolateral membrane protein of 94 kd and only weakly interacted with the ileal brush border membrane. In immunocytochemical studies using ileal villus and crypt epithelial cells, the same antibody identified basolateral and not brush border epitopes. Restriction analysis of genomic DNA with a 462 bp PstI-AccI fragment of the rabbit Na+/H+ exchanger strongly suggests the existence of closely related Na+/H+ exchanger genes. The near identity of the basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger and the human Na+/H+ exchanger plus the ubiquitous expression of this message suggests that the ileal basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger is the 'housekeeping' Na+/H+ exchanger. Images PMID:1712287

  16. Expression cloning of genes encoding human peroxisomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Spathaky, J.M.; Tate, A.W.; Cox, T.M.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous metabolic disorders associated with diverse peroxisomal defects have been identified but their molecular characterization has been hampered by difficulties associated with the purification of proteins from this fragile organelle. We have utilized antibodies directed against the C-terminal tripeptide peroxisomal targeting signal to detect hitherto unknown peroxisomal proteins in tissue fractions and to isolate genes encoding peroxisonal proteins from human expression libraries. We immunized rabbits with a peptide conjugate encompassing the C-terminal nine amino acids of rat peroxisomal acyl CoA oxidase. Immunoprecipitation assays using radio-labelled peptide showed that the antibody specifically recognizes the terminal SKL motif as well as C-terminal SHL and SRL but not SHL at an internal position. Affinity-purified antibody was used to probe Western blots of crude and peroxisome-enriched monkey liver preparations and detected 8-10 proteins specifically in the peroxisome fractions. 100 positive clones were identified on screening a human liver cDNA expression library in {lambda}-gt11. Sequence analysis has confirmed the identity of cDNA clones for human acyl CoA oxidase and epoxide hydrolase. Four clones show no sequence identity and their putative role in the human peroxisome is being explored.

  17. Isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding jacalin isolectins.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Czapla, T H

    1993-03-15

    Four jacalin cDNA clones (pSKcJA1, pSKcJA3, pSKcJA15, and pSKcJA17) have been obtained from an Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit) seed cDNA library. These clones share over 94% sequence homology, and their deduced polypeptide sequences confirm the existence of multiple jacalin isolectins in jackfruit seeds. The deduced amino acid sequences show that jacalin appears to be initially synthesized as a prepropeptide with the following structure: N-signal (21 residues)-->propeptide (39 residues)-->beta-peptide (20 residues)-->linker region (4 residues)-->alpha-peptide (133 residues). These observations are supported by Western blot analysis of jackfruit seed extract and by immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated products of both pSKcJA3 transcript and jackfruit seed poly(A)+ RNA. Sequence analysis of the 39-residue propeptide reveals that it has the potential to facilitate proper folding of jacalin protein. The unusual primary structure of jacalin prepropeptide suggests a quite interesting processing of this lectin precursor into mature alpha- and beta-subunits.

  18. Identification and characterization of cDNA clones encoding hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase from tobacco.

    PubMed

    Farmer, M J; Czernic, P; Michael, A; Negrel, J

    1999-08-01

    The sequences of three cDNA clones that include the complete coding region of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (THT) from tobacco are reported. The three cDNAs were isolated by antibody screening of a cDNA expression library produced from poly(A)+RNA purified from tobacco leaves (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Bottom Special), previously infiltrated with an incompatible strain of Ralstonia solanacearum. The identity of these clones was confirmed by the detection of THT activity in extracts of transformed Escherichia coli and by matching the translated polypeptides with tryptic enzyme sequences. cDNA clones tht4 and tht11 differ only by their 5' leader and 3' UTRs and therefore encode the same protein, whereas tht10 and tht11 exhibit 95 and 99% sequence identity at the DNA and deduced amino acid levels, respectively. The three clones encode proteins of 226 amino acids with calculated molecular masses of 26 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequences show no similarity with the sequence of anthranilate hydroxycinnamoyl/benzoyltransferase from Dianthus caryophyllus, the only enzyme exhibiting hydroxycinnamoyltransferase activity to be cloned so far in plants. In contrast, comparison of the THT amino acid sequence with protein sequence databases revealed substantial homology with mammalian diamine acetyltransferases. The THT clones hybridized to a 0.95-kb mRNA from elicited tobacco cell-suspension cultures and also to a mRNA of similar size from wound-healing potato tubers. The messengers for THT were also found to be expressed at relatively high levels in tobacco root tissues. Southern hybridization of tobacco genomic DNA with THT cDNA suggests that several copies of the THT gene occur in the tobacco genome. Inhibition experiments using amino-acid-specific reagents demonstrated that both histidyl and cysteyl residues are required for THT activity. In the course of these experiments THT was also found to be inhibited by (2-hydroxyphenyl) amino sulfinyl

  19. Cytochrome P3-450 cDNA encodes aflatoxin B1-4-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Faletto, M B; Koser, P L; Battula, N; Townsend, G K; Maccubbin, A E; Gelboin, H V; Gurtoo, H L

    1988-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a potent hepatocarcinogen and ubiquitous dietary contaminant in some countries, is detoxified to aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) via cytochrome P-450-mediated AFB1-4-hydroxylase. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that the expression of AFB1-4-hydroxylase is regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon locus and suggested that different cytochrome P-450 isozymes catalyze AFB1-4-hydroxylase and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activities. We have now examined lysates from mammalian cells infected with recombinant vaccinia viruses containing expressible cytochrome P1-450 or P3-450 cDNAs for their ability to metabolize AFB1 to AFM1. Our results show that cytochrome P3-450 cDNA specifies AFB1-4-hydroxylase. This is the first direct assignment of a specific cytochrome P-450 to an AFB1 detoxification pathway. This finding may have relevance to the dietary modulation of AFB1 hepatocarcinogenesis.

  20. Characterization of a cDNA encoding a 34-kDa Purkinje neuron protein recognized by sera from patients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Furneaux, H.M.; Dropcho, E.J.; Barbut, D.; Chen, Yaotseng; Rosenblum, M.K.; Old, L.J.; Posner, J.B. )

    1989-04-01

    Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is a neurological disorder of unknown cause occurring in patients with an identified or occult cancer. An autoimmune etiology is likely since autoantibodies directed against the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum have been found in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of some patients. Two Purkinje cell-specific antigens are recognized by these autoantibodies, a major antigen of 62 kDa (CDR 62, cerebellar degeneration-related 62-kDa protein) and a minor antigen of 34 kDa (CDR 34). Previous studies have described the isolation and characterization of a human cerebellar cDNA that encodes an epitope recognized by sera from patients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. The authors have now established by two independent methods that this gene is uniquely expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and corresponds to the minor antigen CDR 34. This antigen is also expressed in tumor tissue from a patient with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

  1. Molecular cloning of the flavin-containing monooxygenase (form II) cDNA from adult human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Lomri, N; Gu, Q; Cashman, J R

    1992-01-01

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) clones encoding the adult human liver flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO; dimethylaniline N-oxidase, EC 1.14.13.8) were isolated from lambda gt10 and lambda gt11 libraries. The cDNA libraries were screened with three synthetic 36-mer oligonucleotide probes derived from the nucleic acid sequence of the pig liver FMO cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence for the adult human liver FMO was quite distinct from the pig liver FMO, and adult human liver FMO was designated form II (HLFMO II). The full-length cDNA sequence of HLFMO II [2119 base pairs (bp)] had an open reading frame of 1599 nucleotides, which encoded a 533-amino acid protein of Mr 59,179, a 5'-noncoding region of 136 nucleotides and a 3'-noncoding region of 369 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence of HLFMO II had 80% similarity with the rabbit liver FMO II but only a 52%, 55%, and 53% amino acid similarity with the rabbit liver (form I), the pig liver (form I), and fetal human liver (form I) FMOs, respectively. RNA analysis of adult human liver RNA showed that there was one HLFMO II mRNA species. Analysis of genomic DNA indicated that HLFMO II was the product of a single gene. These results indicated that the deduced amino acid sequence for HLFMO II contained highly conserved residues and suggested that FMO enzymes were closely related and, undoubtedly, derived from the same ancestral gene. Images PMID:1542660

  2. Molecular characterization of a cDNA encoding copper/zinc superoxide dismutase from cultured cells of Manihot esculenta.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Yong; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Kwon, Soon-Tae; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2005-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) cDNA, mSOD2, encoding cytosolic copper/zinc SOD (CuZnSOD) cDNA was isolated from suspension-cultured cells of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by cDNA library screening, and its expression was investigated in relation to environmental stress. mSOD2 is 774 bp in length with an open reading frame (ORF) of 152 amino acids, corresponding to a protein of predicted molecular mass 15 kDa and a pI of 5.22. One copy of the mSOD2 gene was found to be present in the cassava genome by Southern analysis using an mSOD2 cDNA-specific probe. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed diverse expression patterns for the mSOD2 gene in various tissues of intact cassava plants, at various stages of the growth in suspension cultures, and in the leaf tissues exposed to different stresses. The mSOD2 gene was highly expressed in suspension-cultured cells and in the stems of intact plants. However, it was expressed at low levels in leaves and roots. During suspension cell growth, the mSOD2 transcript progressively increased during culture. Moreover, the mSOD2 gene in excised cassava leaves responded to various stresses in different ways. In particular, it was highly induced in leaf tissue by several abiotic stresses, including high temperature (37 degrees C), chilling (4 degrees C), methyl viologen (MV) exposure, and wounding treatment. These results indicate that the mSOD2 gene is involved in the antioxidative process triggered by oxidative stress induced by environmental change.

  3. Identification of cDNA clones encoding HMG 2, a major protein of the mexican axolotl hydrocortisone-sensitive thymocytes.

    PubMed

    de Guerra, A; Guillet, F; Charlemagne, J; Fellah, J S

    1995-01-01

    We have identified and analyzed cDNA clones encoding a major 26 kDa protein of the HMG1-2 family which is abundant in the cytoplasm and nucleus of axolotl hydrocortisone-sensitive thymocytes. The axolotl HMG2 protein is very similar to proteins belonging to the HMG1-2 family, from teleost fish to mammals. All the molecular features of the HMG1-2 proteins are conserved, including the high proportion of basic and aromatic residues, and the characteristic acidic C-terminus tail. The 3'-untranslated region of the HMG2 axolotl cDNA is also similar to the avian and mammalian HMG2 3'-UT sequences, suggesting that some selective events have acted at the DNA level to conserve this region, which could be important in the differential expression of the HMG1 and HMG2 genes. The axolotl HMG2 protein contains the two well conserved HMG boxes which are thought to be the DNA-binding domains of the molecule. Axolotl thymocytes and spleen cells contain almost identical amounts of HMG2 mRNAs but HMG2 polypeptide is undetectable in spleen cells using anti-26 kDa antibodies. The reason for the accumulation of HMG1-2 molecules in vertebrate hydrocortisone-sensitive thymocytes is discussed, as well as their possible role in apoptosis. PMID:8654668

  4. Cloning and sequence analysis of cDNA encoding urotensin I precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, I; Ichikawa, T; Deguchi, T

    1986-01-01

    The primary structure of the precursor of urotensin I, a neuropeptide hormone from the caudal neurosecretory system of the carp Cyprinus carpio, has been determined by analyzing the nucleotide sequence of cloned DNA complementary to the mRNA encoding it. The precursor consists of 145 amino acid residues and the carboxyl terminus represents the 41-amino acid sequence of urotensin I, preceded by Lys-Arg and followed by Gly-Lys. Sequence homology as well as similar organization of the precursors of urotensin I and mammalian corticotropin-releasing factors suggest that they are evolutionarily related. RNA transfer blot analysis indicates that mRNA encoding the precursor of urotensin I is present only in the spinal cord and not in the brain, intestine, liver, or kidney of the carp. Images PMID:3484550

  5. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA sequence encoding the precursor of a chlorotoxin-like peptide from the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X C; Li, W X; Zhu, S Y; Peng, F; Zhu, Z H; Wu, K L; Yiang, F H

    2000-08-01

    A full-length cDNA sequence encoding the precursor of a venom peptide with homology to chlorotoxin (named BmKCT) was isolated from a cDNA library made from the venom glands of the Chinese Scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch. The encoded precursor of BmKCT was 59 amino acid residues long including a signal peptide of 24 residues and a mature toxin of 35 residues with four disulfide bridges. The sequence of BmKCT is similar (68% identities) to that of chlorotoxin isolated from Leiurus quinguestriatus quinquestriatus. BmKCT is the first report of the cDNA sequences encoding four-disulfide-bridged short-chain toxins from Buthus martensuii Karsch so far.

  6. Sequence analysis of the cDNA for the human casein kinase I {delta} (CSNK1D) gene and its chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuda, Jun; Hidari, Nobuko; Hirai, Momoki; Hashimoto, Katsuyuki

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the genetic mapping of a cDNA clone encoding human casein kinase I (CK1) using fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction analysis of human-rodent hybrid cell panels. When compared to the amino acid sequence in the kinase domain of the rat, this cDNA seems to be a human homologue of the CK1 {delta} isoform. Sequence similarity to the kinase domains and function in DNA repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces pombe are discussed. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Isolation of cDNA, chromosome mapping, and expression of the human TBP-like protein.

    PubMed

    Ohbayashi, T; Kishimoto, T; Makino, Y; Shimada, M; Nakadai, T; Aoki, T; Kawata, T; Niwa, S; Tamura, T

    1999-02-01

    TBP is an essential factor for eukaryotic transcription. In this study, we identified a human cDNA encoding 21-kDa TBP-like protein (TLP). The TLP ORF, carrying 186 amino acids, covered the entire 180 amino acids of the C-terminal conserved domain of human TBP with 39% identity and 76% similarity. FISH determined that human tlp gene was located at chromosome 6 region q22.1-22.3. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that TLP mRNAs were expressed in various human tissues ubiquitously. We found that the TLP proteins exist in multiple mammalian cells and chicken cells. Although the Drosophila TBP-related factor (TRF) is a neurogenesis-related transcription factor, expression of TLP was nearly constant throughout the neural differentiation of P19 cells. Unlike TRF, TLP did not bind to the TATA-box nor direct transcription initiation in vitro. Similarity between TRF and TLP was considerably lower (35 in alignment score) than that between Drosophila TBP and human TBP (88 in alignment score). Multiple amino acids critical for the TBP function were deleted or substituted in TLP. We suggest that TLP is not a bona fide vertebrate counterpart nor a direct descendant of TRF.

  8. Nucleotide sequence of the cDNA encoding the proenzyme of phenol oxidase A1 of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, K; Okino, N; Kawabata, S; Iwanaga, S; Ohnishi, E

    1995-01-01

    Clones encoding pro-phenol oxidase [pro-PO; zymogen of phenol oxidase (monophenol, L-dopa:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.14.18.1)] A1 were isolated from a lambda gt10 library that originated from Drosophila melanogaster strain Oregon-R male adults. The 2294 bp of the cDNA included a 13-bp 5'-noncoding region, a 2070-bp encoding open reading frame of 690 amino acids, and a 211-bp 3'-noncoding region. A hydrophobic NH2-terminal sequence for a signal peptide is absent in the protein. Furthermore, there are six potential N-glycosylation sites in the sequence, but no amino sugar was detected in the purified protein by amino acid analysis, indicating the lack of an N-linked sugar chain. The potential copper-binding sites, amino acids 200-248 and 359-414, are highly homologous to the corresponding sites of hemocyanin of the tarantula Eurypelma californicum, the horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus, and the spiny lobster Panulirus interruptus. On the basis of the phylogenetic tree constructed by the neighbor-joining method, vertebrate tyrosinases and molluscan hemocyanins constitute one family, whereas pro-POs and arthropod hemocyanins group with another family. It seems, therefore, likely that pro-PO originates from a common ancestor with arthropod hemocyanins, independently to the vertebrate and microbial tyrosinases. PMID:7644493

  9. Human liver apolipoprotein B-100 cDNA: complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Law, S W; Grant, S M; Higuchi, K; Hospattankar, A; Lackner, K; Lee, N; Brewer, H B

    1986-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), the ligand on low density lipoproteins that interacts with the low density lipoprotein receptor and initiates receptor-mediated endocytosis and low density lipoprotein catabolism, has been cloned, and the complete nucleic acid and derived amino acid sequences have been determined. ApoB-100 cDNAs were isolated from normal human liver cDNA libraries utilizing immunoscreening as well as filter hybridization with radiolabeled apoB-100 oligodeoxynucleotides. The apoB-100 mRNA is 14.1 kilobases long encoding a mature apoB-100 protein of 4536 amino acids with a calculated amino acid molecular weight of 512,723. ApoB-100 contains 20 potential glycosylation sites, and 12 of a total of 25 cysteine residues are located in the amino-terminal region of the apolipoprotein providing a potential globular structure of the amino terminus of the protein. ApoB-100 contains relatively few regions of amphipathic helices, but compared to other human apolipoproteins it is enriched in beta-structure. The delineation of the entire human apoB-100 sequence will now permit a detailed analysis of the conformation of the protein, the low density lipoprotein receptor binding domain(s), and the structural relationship between apoB-100 and apoB-48 and will provide the basis for the study of genetic defects in apoB-100 in patients with dyslipoproteinemias. PMID:3464946

  10. Human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gunning, P.; Kedes, L.

    1982-06-01

    The authors characterized nine human actin genes that they isolated from a library of cloned human DNA. Measurements of the thermal stability of hybrids formed between each cloned actin gene and ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-actin mRNA demonstrated that only one of the clones is most homologous to sarcomeric actin mRNA, whereas the remaining eight clones are most homologous to cytoplasmic actin mRNA. By the following criteria they show that these nine clones represent nine different actin gene loci rather than different alleles or different parts of a single gene: (i) the restriction enzyme maps of the coding regions are dissimilar; (ii) each clone contains sufficient coding region to encode all or most of an entire actin gene; and (iii) each clone contains sequences homologous to both the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region of a cloned chicken ..beta..-actin cDNA. They conclude, therefore, that the human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family.

  11. Characterization and chromosomal localization of a cDNA encoding brain amyloid of Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldgaber, D.; Lerman, M.I.; McBride, O.W.; Saffiotti, U.; Gajdusek, D.C.

    1987-02-20

    Four clones were isolated from an adult human brain complementary DNA library with an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to the first 20 amino acids of the ..beta.. peptide of brain amyloid from Alzheimer's disease. The open reading frame of the sequenced clone coded for 97 amino acids, including the known amino acid sequence of this polypeptide. The 3.5-kilobase messenger RNA was detected in mammalian brains and human thymus. The gene is highly conserved in evolution and has been mapped to human chromosome 21.

  12. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of a full-length cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Shihfeng; Bishop, D.F.; Desnick, R.J. )

    1988-10-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, is responsible for conversion of the linear tetrapyrrole, hydroxymethylbilane, to the cyclic tetrapyrrole, uroporphyrinogen III. The deficient activity of URO-synthase is the enzymatic defect in the autosomal recessive disorder congenital erythropoietic porphyria. To facilitate the isolation of a full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase, the human erythrocyte enzyme was purified to homogeneity and 81 nonoverlapping amino acids were determined by microsequencing the N terminus and four tryptic peptides. Two synthetic oligonucleotide mixtures were used to screen 1.2 {times} 10{sup 6} recombinants from a human adult liver cDNA library. Eight clones were positive with both oligonucleotide mixtures. Of these, dideoxy sequencing of the 1.3 kilobase insert from clone pUROS-2 revealed 5' and 3' untranslated sequences of 196 and 284 base pairs, respectively, and an open reading frame of 798 base pairs encoding a protein of 265 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 28,607 Da. The isolation and expression of this full-length cDNA for human URO-synthase should facilitate studies of the structure, organization, and chromosomal localization of this heme biosynthetic gene as well as the characterization of the molecular lesions causing congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of a new cDNA sequence encoding a venom peptide from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wanhong; Luo, Feng; He, Jing; Cao, Zhijian; Miao, Lixia

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on venomous peptides derived from animals. However, little of this research has focused on peptides from centipede venoms. Here, a venom gland cDNA library was successfully constructed for the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans. A new cDNA encoding the precursor of a venom peptide, named SsmTx, was cloned from the venomous gland cDNA library of the centipede S. subspinipes mutilans. The full-length SsmTx cDNA sequence is 465 nt, including a 249 nt ORF, a 45 nt 5' UTR and a 171 nt 3' UTR. There is a signal tail AATAAA 31 nt upstream of the poly (A) tail. The precursor nucleotide sequence of SsmTx encodes a signal peptide of 25 residues and a mature peptide of 57 residues, which is bridged by two pairs of disulfide bonds. SsmTx displays a unique cysteine motif that is completely different from that of other venomous animal toxins. This is the first reported cDNA sequence encoding a venom peptide from the centipede S. subspinipes mutilans.

  14. Human {gamma}-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH9): cDNA sequence, genomic organization, polymorphism, chromosomal localization, and tissue expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.W.; Chen, J.C.; Hsu, L.C.

    1996-06-15

    The cDNA and the gene (ALDH9) for a human aldehyde dehydrogenase isozyme, which has a high activity for oxidation of {gamma}-aminobutyraldehyde and other amino aldehydes, were cloned and characterized. The cDNA has an open reading frame of 1479 bp encoding 493 amino acid residues. The gene is about 45 kb and consists of 10 coding exons interrupted by nine introns. The gene was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23, using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Northern blot hybridization indicated that the size of the mRNA is about 2.4 kb and that the gene is expressed at high levels in adult liver, skeletal muscle, and kidney and low levels in heart, pancreas, lung, and brain. The gene is polymorphic, i.e., C or T at nt 327 and C or G at nt 344. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Identification and characterization of the cDNA sequence encoding amelogenin in rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Bai, Chunyan; Li, Yumei; Yan, Shouqing; Fang, Hengtong; Sun, Boxing; Zhang, Jiabao; Zhao, Zhihui

    2016-02-01

    Amelogenins, the most abundant proteins in tooth enamel extracellular matrix (ECM), are essential for tooth amelogenesis. The nucleotide sequence of amelogenin gene (AMEL) for rabbit, as an important member of mammals and good continuously growing incisor model, is important for comparative and evolutional study. Previous studies about rabbit amelogenin proteins got no consensus yet even as to their existence or size. In this study, with combined usage of in silico and molecular cloning technologies, we identified sequences of two transcripts of rabbit amelogenin, resulting from the alternative splicing of the 45-bp exon 4. The coding regions of the two transcripts are of 567- and 522-bp, encoding 188 and 173 amino acids including a 17-residue signal peptide, respectively. Sequence analysis revealed that rabbit amelogenin features in extremely high GC-content in nucleotide sequence and Alanine content in protein sequence. Detailed comparison of amino acid sequence with other mammals showed that the rabbit amelogenin protein is conserved in the sites and regions important for protein functions. Overall, our results uncovered the mysteries about rabbit amelogenin and revealed its sequence peculiarities. PMID:26551300

  16. Isolation, characterization and cloning of a cDNA encoding a new antifungal defensin from Phaseolus vulgaris L. seeds.

    PubMed

    Games, Patrícia D; Dos Santos, Izabela S; Mello, Erica O; Diz, Mariângela S S; Carvalho, André O; de Souza-Filho, Gonçalo A; Da Cunha, Maura; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Ferreira, Beatriz Dos S; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2008-12-01

    The PvD1 defensin was purified from Phaseolus vulgaris (cv. Pérola) seeds, basically as described by Terras et al. [Terras FRG, Schoofs HME, De Bolle MFC, Van Leuven F, Ress SB, Vanderleyden J, Cammue BPA, Broekaer TWF. Analysis of two novel classes of plant antifungal proteins from radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seeds. J Biol Chem 1992;267(22):15301-9], with some modifications. A DEAE-Sepharose, equilibrated with 20mM Tris-HCl, pH 8.0, was initially utilized for the separation of peptides after ammonium sulfate fractionation. The basic fraction (the non-retained peak) obtained showed the presence of one unique band in SDS-Tricine gel electrophoresis with a molecular mass of approximately 6kDa. The purification of this peptide was confirmed after a reverse-phase chromatography in a C2/C18 column by HPLC, where once again only one peak was observed and denominated H1. H1 was submitted to N-terminal sequencing and the comparative analysis in databanks revealed high similarity with sequences of different defensins isolated from other plants species. The N-terminal sequence of the mature defensin isolated was used to produce a degenerated primer. This primer allowed the amplification of the defensin cDNA by RT-PCR from mRNA of P. vulgaris seeds. The sequence analysis of the cloned cDNA, named PVD1, demonstrated 314bp encoding a polypeptide of 47 amino acids. The deduced peptide presented high similarity with plant defensins of Vigna unguiculata (93%), Cicer arietinum (95%) and Pachyrhizus erosus (87%). PvD1 inhibited the growth of the yeasts, Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida guilliermondii, Kluyveromyces marxiannus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PvD1 also presented an inhibitory activity against the growth of phytopathogenic fungi including Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, Fusarium lateritium and Rizoctonia solani. PMID:18786582

  17. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone encoding an alternative oxidase protein of Sauromatum guttatum (Schott).

    PubMed Central

    Rhoads, D M; McIntosh, L

    1991-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that recognize the 35-, 36-, and 37-kDa alternative oxidase proteins of Sauromatum guttatum (Schott) were used to isolate a cDNA clone, pAOSG81, from an S. guttatum cDNA expression library. A fusion protein with an apparent molecular mass of 48 kDa was expressed from a pUC119 derivative of pAOSG81 (pAOSG81-119) in Escherichia coli cells and was recognized by the monoclonal antibodies. When the in vitro translated and immunoprecipitated products made from mRNA hybrid-selected by pAOSG81 were analyzed, a single band corresponding to a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 42 kDa was observed. DNA sequence characterization showed that pAOSG81 contains the entire coding region of a protein with a calculated molecular mass of 38.9 kDa, a putative 63-amino acid transit peptide, and a 9-amino acid match to the authentic N-terminal sequence of the 36-kDa alternative oxidase protein. Analyses of the deduced amino acid sequence indicate: (i) that the transit peptide is predicted to form amphiphilic helices, and (ii) that three regions of the processed protein are likely to form transmembrane alpha-helices. We conclude from these data that pAOSG81 represents a nuclear gene, aox1, encoding a precursor protein of one or more of the alternative oxidase proteins of S. guttatum. Images PMID:1706518

  18. Identification of a cDNA encoding a novel small secretory protein, neurosecretory protein GL, in the chicken hypothalamic infundibulum.

    PubMed

    Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Iwakoshi-Ukena, Eiko; Taniuchi, Shusuke; Bessho, Yuki; Maejima, Sho; Masuda, Keiko; Shikano, Kenshiro; Kondo, Kunihiro; Furumitsu, Megumi; Tachibana, Tetsuya

    2014-03-28

    To find novel neuropeptide and/or peptide hormone precursors in the avian brain, we performed a cDNA subtractive screen of the chicken hypothalamic infundibulum, which contains one of the feeding and neuroendocrine centers. After sequencing 596 clones, we identified a novel cDNA encoding a previously unknown protein. The deduced precursor protein consisted of 182 amino acid residues, including one putative small secretory protein of 80 amino acid residues. This small protein was flanked at the N-terminus by a signal peptide and at the C-terminus by a glycine amidation signal and a dibasic amino acid cleavage site. Because the predicted C-terminal amino acids of the small protein were Gly-Leu-NH2, the small protein was named neurosecretory protein GL (NPGL). Quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated specific expression of the NPGL precursor mRNA in the hypothalamic infundibulum. Furthermore, the mRNA levels in the hypothalamic infundibulum increased during post-hatching development. In situ hybridization analysis showed that the cells containing the NPGL precursor mRNA were localized in the medial mammillary nucleus and infundibular nucleus within the hypothalamic infundibulum of 8- and 15-day-old chicks. Subcutaneous infusion of NPGL in chicks increased body weight gain without affecting food intake. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the identification and localization of the NPGL precursor mRNA and the function of its translated product in animals. Our findings indicate that NPGL may participate in the growth process in chicks.

  19. Characterization of a cytosolic malate dehydrogenase cDNA which encodes an isozyme toward oxaloacetate reduction in wheat.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Ma, Qing-Hu

    2004-08-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH), which is ubiquitous in nature, catalyzes the interconversion of oxaloacetate and malate. Higher plants contain multiple forms of MDH that differ in co-enzyme specificity, subcellular localization and physiological function. Cytosolic NAD-dependent MDH (cyMDH) is one class of MDH that has not been extensively characterized in plants. Here we report the cloning of a cDNA from wheat by RT-PCR and cDNA library screening, which is designated as TaMDH. Sequence analysis indicated that TaMDH exhibits a highly similarity to other plant cyMDHs. Immunological analysis confirmed that TaMDH encoded a cytosolic NAD-dependent MDH. The secondary and three-dimensional structures of TaMDH were analyzed by molecular modeling. DNA gel-blot analyses demonstrated that TaMDH gene exists as two copies in the wheat genome. RNA and protein gel-blot hybridization indicated that both TaMDH mRNA and protein were constitutively expressed in vegetative tissues of wheat, with slightly lower levels in roots than in leaves and stems. In silico analysis indicated that TaMDH was also expressed in various reproductive tissues and tissues under many different stress conditions. Kinetic analysis of bacterially expressed and purified protein confirmed that TaMDH catalyzed a reaction driven towards malate synthesis, which is consistent with other cyMDHs. Evolutionary analysis showed that this class of genes evolved from a very ancestral gene. The cyMDH represents an ancestral form of MDH, which is highly conserved in plants, animals and bacteria. This implies that cyMDHs are housekeeping genes and may have very essential functions in plant metabolism.

  20. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the cytosolic copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase from sweet potato tuberous root.

    PubMed

    Lin, C T; Yeh, K W; Kao, M C; Shaw, J F

    1993-11-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding a putative copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD) of sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. cv Tainong 57, was isolated from a cDNA library constructed in lambda gt10 from tuber root mRNA. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this cDNA clone revealed that it comprises a complete open reading frame coding for 152 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed higher homology (78-86%) with the sequence of the cytosolic SOD than that of the chloroplast SOD from other plant species. The residues required for coordinating copper and zinc are conserved as they are among all reported Cu/Zn-SOD sequences. In addition, it lacks recognizable plastic or mitochondrial targeting sequences. These data suggest that the isolated sweet potato clone encodes a cytosolic Cu/Zn-SOD.

  1. Characterisation of mRNAs encoding the precursor for human apolipoprotein CI.

    PubMed Central

    Knott, T J; Robertson, M E; Priestley, L M; Urdea, M; Wallis, S; Scott, J

    1984-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human apolipoprotein CI have been isolated from an adult liver cDNA library. Apo CI mRNA was shown to have two species of approximately 580 and 560 bases by RNA blot hybridisation. The intracellular precursor of apo CI was inferred from the cDNA sequence to be an 83 amino acid polypeptide consisting of the 57 residue mature protein and an additional 26 residue amino terminal signal peptide. The 5' untranslated regions of the messages are 63 and 40 bases as determined by primer extension and the 3' untranslated region 111 bases. A polyadenylation signal is situated 10 bases 3' of the poly(A) tall. The mRNA level of apo CI in human liver was significantly greater than that of apo All and apo E. Images PMID:6328444

  2. Human platelet/erythroleukemia cell prostaglandin G/H synthase: cDNA cloning, expression, and gene chromosomal assignment

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, C.D.; Funk, L.B.; Kennedy, M.E.; Pong, A.S.; Fitzgerald, G.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Platelets metabolize arachidonic acid to thromboxane A{sub 2}, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor compound. The first step of this transformation is catalyzed by prostaglandin (PG) G/H synthase, a target site for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We have isolated the cDNA for both human platelet and human erythroleukemia cell PGG/H synthase using the polymerase chain reaction and conventional screening procedures. The cDNA encoding the full-length protein was expressed in COS-M6 cells. Microsomal fractions from transfected cells produced prostaglandin endoperoxide derived products which were inhibited by indomethacin and aspirin. Mutagenesis of the serine residue at position 529, the putative aspirin acetylation site, to an asparagine reduced cyclooxygenase activity to barely detectable levels, an effect observed previously with the expressed sheep vesicular gland enzyme. Platelet-derived growth factor and phorbol ester differentially regulated the expression of PGG/H synthase mRNA levels in the megakaryocytic/platelet-like HEL cell line. The PGG/H synthase gene was assigned to chromosome 9 by analysis of a human-hamster somatic hybrid DNA panel. The availability of platelet PGG/H synthase cDNA should enhance our understanding of the important structure/function domains of this protein and it gene regulation.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of cDNA Encoding Three Dehydrins Expressed During Coffea canephora (Robusta) Grain Development

    PubMed Central

    HINNIGER, CÉCILE; CAILLET, VICTORIA; MICHOUX, FRANCK; BEN AMOR, MOHAMED; TANKSLEY, STEVE; LIN, CHENWEI; MCCARTHY, JAMES

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Dehydrins, or group 2 late embryogenic abundant proteins (LEA), are hydrophilic Gly-rich proteins that are induced in vegetative tissues in response to dehydration, elevated salt, and low temperature, in addition to being expressed during the late stages of seed maturation. With the aim of characterizing and studying genes involved in osmotic stress tolerance in coffee, several full-length cDNA-encoding dehydrins (CcDH1, CcDH2 and CcDH3) and an LEA protein (CcLEA1) from Coffea canephora (robusta) were isolated and characterized. • Methods The protein sequences deduced from the full-length cDNA were analysed to classify each dehydrin/LEA gene product and RT–PCR was used to determine the expression pattern of all four genes during pericarp and grain development, and in several other tissues of C. arabica and C. canephora. Primer-assisted genome walking was used to isolate the promoter region of the grain specific dehydrin gene (CcDH2). • Key Results The CcDH1 and CcDH2 genes encode Y3SK2 dehydrins and the CcDH3 gene encodes an SK3 dehydrin. CcDH1 and CcDH2 are expressed during the final stages of arabica and robusta grain development, but only the CcDH1 transcripts are clearly detected in other tissues such as pericarp, leaves and flowers. CcDH3 transcripts are also found in developing arabica and robusta grain, in addition to being detected in pericarp, stem, leaves and flowers. CcLEA1 transcripts were only detected during a brief period of grain development. Finally, over 1 kb of genomic sequence potentially encoding the entire grain-specific promoter region of the CcDH2 gene was isolated and characterized. • Conclusions cDNA sequences for three dehydrins and one LEA protein have been obtained and the expression of the associated genes has been determined in various tissues of arabica and robusta coffees. Because induction of dehydrin gene expression is associated with osmotic stress in other plants, the dehydrin sequences

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of the human folate-binding protein cDNA from placenta and malignant tissue culture (KB) cells.

    PubMed

    Elwood, P C

    1989-09-01

    Human folate-binding proteins (FBPs) are single chain glycoproteins that contain a high affinity binding site for folates and methotrexate and occur in a soluble or membrane-associated form. The membrane-associated FBP is involved in the uptake of physiologic folates and methotrexate. In this study, human FBP cDNA clones were isolated from human malignant nasopharyngeal carcinoma (KB) cell and placental cDNA libraries by means of oligonucleotide probes derived from determined internal amino acid sequences. The longest cDNA nucleotide sequence is 1126 base pairs and encodes a polypeptide that contains 257 amino acid residues (calculated molecular mass = 29,817). The deduced amino acid sequence is 80% homologous to a bovine soluble FBP, is greater than 99% homologous to the reported partial amino acid sequence of the human soluble FBP, contains three potential N-linked glycosylation sites, and has hydrophobic amino- and carboxylterminal regions which are consistent with a signal peptide and a potential membrane-anchoring domain, respectively. On Northern blot analysis, radiolabeled cDNA probes hybridize to a single 1100-base pair mRNA species that is expressed to a variable degree in human KB cells, placenta, brain, and epithelial mRNA but is not detectable in human liver mRNA. In vitro translation of RNA transcripts from the FBP cDNA inserts yields a 30-kDa and a 42-kDa polypeptide in the absence and presence of microsomal membranes, respectively. PMID:2768245

  5. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding a cobalamin-independent methionine synthase from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Zeh, Michaela; Leggewie, Georg; Hoefgen, Rainer; Hesse, Holger

    2002-02-01

    A potato cDNA clone, StMS1, that encodes a methionine synthase was isolated. This protein was identified on the basis of both structural and functional evidence. The predicted sequence of the protein encoded by StMS1 shows a high degree of similarity to methionine synthases from other organisms and the expression of StMS1 in bacterial mutant strains restored the mutant's ability to synthesize methionine. Genomic organization and expression analyses suggest that StMS1 is a low-copy gene and is differentially expressed in potato organs. StMS1 expression was found in all tissues, but at elevated levels in flowers, basal levels in sink and source leaves, roots and stolons, and low levels in stems and tubers. RNA expression data were confirmed by western blot analysis except that the protein content in leaves was less than expected from the RNA data. Western blot analysis of subcellular fractions revealed that the protein is located in the cytosol. However, the changing pattern of gene expression during the day/night period implied a light-dependent control of MS transcription normally seen for enzymes localized in plastids. The expression of MS was shown to be light-inducible with its highest expression at midday. These RNA data were not confirmed at the protein level since protein content levels remained constant over the whole day. Feeding experiments of detached leaves revealed that sucrose or sucrose-derived products are responsible for StMS1 induction. This induction can be blocked by treatment with DCMU during the light period. Western analysis revealed that the amount of StMS1 is not affected by either treatment. This experiment confirmed the presence of a day/night rhythm. Methionine synthase expression is regulated by photoassimilates but this seems not to detectably alter protein levels. PMID:11855727

  6. An Arabidopsis cDNA encoding a DNA-binding protein that is highly similar to the DEAH family of RNA/DNA helicase genes.

    PubMed

    Isono, K; Yamamoto, H; Satoh, K; Kobayashi, H

    1999-09-15

    A cDNA encoding a putative RNA and/or DNA helicase has been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA libraries. The cloned cDNA is 5166 bases long, and its largest open reading frame encodes 1538 amino acids. The central region of the predicted protein is homologous to a group of nucleic acid helicases from the DEAD/H family. However, the N- and C-terminal regions of the Arabidopsis cDNA product are distinct from these animal DEIH proteins. We have found that the C-terminal region contains three characteristic sequences: (i) two DNA-binding segments that form a probe helix (PH) involved in DNA recognition; (ii) an SV40-type nuclear localization signal; and (iii) 11 novel tandem-repeat sequences each consisting of about 28 amino acids. We have designated this cDNA as NIH (nuclear DEIH-boxhelicase). Functional character-ization of a recombinant fusion product containing the repeated region indicates that NIH may form homodimers, and that this is the active form in solution. Based on this information and the observation that the sequence homology is limited to the DEAH regions, we conclude that the biological roles of the plant helicase NIH differ from those of the animal DEIH family. PMID:10471743

  7. The complete cDNA sequence of laminin alpha 4 and its relationship to the other human laminin alpha chains.

    PubMed

    Richards, A; Al-Imara, L; Pope, F M

    1996-06-15

    We previously localised the gene (LAMA4) encoding a novel laminin alpha 4 chain to chromosome 6q21. In this study, we describe the complete coding sequence and compare the protein with the other three known human laminin alpha chains. Although closely linked to LAMA2, the LAMA4 product most closely resembles laminin alpha 3, a constituent of laminin 5. Like laminin alpha 3A, the alpha 4 chain is a truncated version of the alpha 1 and alpha 2 chains, with a much reduced short arm. While the alpha 4 molecule is most similar to alpha 3, it shares some features of the C-terminal domains G4 and G5 in common with alpha 2. Unlike the LAMA3 gene, LAMA4 appears to encode only a single transcript, as determined by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The cDNA sequence encodes 1816 amino acids, which include a 24-residue signal peptide. The gene is expressed in skin, placenta, heart, lung, skeletal muscle, and pancreas. We have also shown that the mRNA can be readily reverse transcribed and amplified from cultured dermal fibroblasts. PMID:8706685

  8. Characterization of cDNA encoding mouse homolog of fission yeast dhp1+ gene: structural and functional conservation.

    PubMed Central

    Shobuike, T; Sugano, S; Yamashita, T; Ikeda, H

    1995-01-01

    The dhp1+ gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HKE1/RAT1/TAP1 gene that is involved in RNA metabolism such as RNA trafficking and RNA synthesis. dhp1+ is also related to S. cerevisiae DST2 (SEP1) that encodes a DNA strand exchange protein required for sporulation and homologous recombination in S.cerevisiae. We isolated several clones of Dhm1, a mouse homolog of dhp1+, from mouse spermatocyte cDNA library and determined its nucleotide sequence. The Dhm1 gene consists of an open reading frame predicting a protein with 947 amino acids and molecular weight of 107,955. Northern blot analysis revealed that Dhm1 is transcribed at high level in testis, liver and kidney. The predicted product of Dhm1 (Dhm1p) has a significant homology with Dhp1p, Hke1p/Rat1p/Tap1p and Dst2p. In particular, Dhm1p, Dhp1p and Hke1p/Rat1p/Tap1p share strong similarity at the two regions of their N- and C-terminal parts. The Dhm1 gene on a multicopy plasmid rescued the temperature-sensitivity of dhp1ts and lethality of dhp1 null mutation, suggesting that Dhm1 is a mouse homolog of S.pombe dhp1+ and functions similarly in mouse as dhp1+. Images PMID:7885830

  9. Human secreted carbonic anhydrase: cDNA cloning, nucleotide sequence, and hybridization histochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Aldred, P.; Fu, Ping; Barrett, G.; Penschow, J.D.; Wright, R.D.; Coghlan, J.P.; Fernley, R.T. )

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones coding for the human secreted carbonic anhydrase isozyme (CAVI) have been isolated and their nucleotide sequences determined. These clones identify a 1.45-kb mRNA that is present in high levels in parotid submandibular salivary glands but absent in other tissues such as the sublingual gland, kidney, liver, and prostate gland. Hybridization histochemistry of human salivary glands shows mRNA for CA VI located in the acinar cells of these glands. The cDNA clones encode a protein of 308 amino acids that includes a 17 amino acid leader sequence typical of secreted proteins. The mature protein has 291 amino acids compared to 259 or 260 for the cytoplasmic isozymes, with most of the extra amino acids present as a carboxyl terminal extension. In comparison, sheep CA VI has a 45 amino acid extension. Overall the human CA VI protein has a sequence identity of 35 {percent} with human CA II, while residues involved in the active site of the enzymes have been conserved. The human and sheep secreted carbonic anhydrases have a sequence identity of 72 {percent}. This includes the two cysteine residues that are known to be involved in an intramolecular disulfide bond in the sheep CA VI. The enzyme is known to be glycosylated and three potential N-glycosylation sites (Asn-X-Thr/Ser) have been identified. Two of these are known to be glycosylated in sheep CA VI. Southern analysis of human DNA indicates that there is only one gene coding for CA VI.

  10. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  11. Cloning of the cDNA (DSC1) coding for human type 1 desmocollin and its assignment to chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    King, I.A.; Buxton, R.S. ); Spurr, N.K.; Arnemann, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Desmosomes are adhesive epithelial junctions that contain two distinct classes of cadherin-related glycoproteins (desmogleins and desmocollins), both of which occur as several different isoforms whose expression is related to epithelial differentiation. The authors have now isolated cDNA clones encoding a human desmocollin that is expressed in the more differentiated layers of human epidermis. The isoform has 53% amino acid identity with the previously isolated human (type 3) desmocollin, which is expressed in the basal layers of the epidermis. However, the N- and C-termini of the mature proteins are more highly conserved. Using a panel of somatic cell hybrids, human type 1 desmocollin (gene DSC1) has been assigned to chromosome 18, the same location as the other desmocollin gene (DSC3) and the three desmoglein (DSG) genes already mapped. 49 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  13. Cloning of the cDNA encoding a myosin heavy chain B isoform of Xenopus nonmuscle myosin with an insert in the head region.

    PubMed

    Bhatia-Dey, N; Adelstein, R S; Dawid, I B

    1993-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of Xenopus laevis nonmuscle myosin heavy chain B (MHC-B) has been deduced from overlapping cDNA clones isolated from an XTC cell library. RNA blots of various developmental stages, adult tissues, and XTC cells detect a single transcript of 7.5 kb which is expressed at similar levels throughout development. MHC-B mRNA was detected in XTC cells, heart, lung, spleen, and brain, at lower levels in ovary, testis, pancreas, stomach, liver, and eye, but not in kidney and skeletal muscle. Protein expression in adult tissues, as detected by immunoblot analysis, correlates well with mRNA expression. In chickens and humans, a fraction of the mRNA encoding the MHC-B isoform was found previously to contain a 10-amino acid insert at amino acid 211 near the ATP-binding site. As reported elsewhere, in the chicken this insert-bearing isoform is nervous system-specific. The Xenopus sequence shows a 16-amino acid insertion at the same position; 7 of 16 residues are identical to those in the chicken and human insertion, and these identical residues include a consensus target sequence for cyclin-p34cdc2 kinase. In contrast to chicken, all frog tissues and embryonic stages tested contained the insert-bearing form, and no evidence for a non-insert-bearing MHC-B isoform was found in Xenopus.

  14. cDNA sequence and mapping of the mouse Copb gene encoding the beta subunit of the COPI coatomer complex.

    PubMed

    LI, W; Elliott, R W; Novak, E K; Swank, R T

    1999-05-01

    COPI-coated vesicles are involved in retrograde-directed selective transport of proteins from the Golgi complex to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as mediate anterograde transport of cargo proteins within the Golgi or in endosomal trafficking. The COPI protein complex contains an ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF1) and seven coatamer subunits (alpha, beta, beta', gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta-COP). The localization and function of human beta subunit of coatamer (COPB) suggests it is likely a candidate gene of ruby-eye-2 (ru2), which is a mouse model of human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome characterized by the dysfunction of several subcellular organelles. In this study, we determined the entire coding sequence of mouse (Copb) cDNA by combining an overlapping mouse EST contig with EST walking. beta-COP was found highly conserved in mouse, rat, and human, and it is ubiquitously expressed in mouse. The Copb gene was mapped to mouse Chr 7 at a position of 53.3 cM by radiation hybrid mapping. Our RH mapping data, sequencing of RT-PCR products, and Western blotting exclude the Copb gene as a candidate for ru2.

  15. Characterization of cDNA for precursor of human luteinizing hormone releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Seeburg, P H; Adelman, J P

    Human reproduction is controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis laid down early in fetal development. Luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH), also termed gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), is a decapeptide and is a key molecule in this control circuit. It is produced by hypothalamic neurones, secreted in a pulsatile manner into the capillary plexus of the median eminence and effects the release of luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone from gonadotropic cells in the anterior pituitary. The peptide may have further functions, including behavioural ones, as LHRH or LHRH-like immunoreactivity has been found in gonadal tissue, placenta and the central nervous system, and exogenously administered LHRH is shown to affect behaviour. To investigate the biosynthesis of LHRH, we have now isolated cloned genomic and cDNA sequences encoding the precursor form of LHRH, the existence of which had been suggested from chromatographic studies of hypothalamic and placental extracts. These DNA sequences code for a protein of 92 amino acids in which the LHRH decapeptide is preceded by a signal peptide of 23 amino acids and followed by a Gly-Lys-Arg sequence, as expected for enzymatic cleavage of the decapeptide from its precursor and amidation of the carboxy-terminal of LHRH.

  16. Identification and expression analysis of a full-length cDNA encoding a Kandelia candel tonoplast intrinsic protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Fang, Xiao-Dong; Lin, Qi-Fen; Li, Guan-Yi; Zhao, Wen-Ming

    2003-03-01

    Soil salinity is an important issue, as most crop plants are low in salt tolerance. Salt tolerance, a complex, multifactorial, and multigenic process, has been known to be a quantitative trait. The identification of the salt stress responsive genes or salt tolerance genes is essential for the breeding programs. Most recent efforts have been focused on the products of structural genes (transport proteins, ion channels, enzymes of solute synthesis) while little attention were paid to the regulatory aspects of these proteins. Since the first aquaporin gene from plants was cloned and functionally expressed in 1993, there has been a growing interest in the molecular biology of MIPs (membrane intrinsic proteins) and their bearing on the biophysics of water flow across plant membranes. In the last decades, studies on Mangroves, a special kind of wood plants, grow in high-salt and flooding conditions have been concentrated almost exclusively on their physiological and ecological characteristics. Kandelia candel, one of the dominant species of mangroves along the Chinese coast, lacks salt glands or salt hairs used for removal of excess salt in other mangroves. This makes K. candel a perfect model to study the molecular mechanism of salt tolerance in mangrove plants. Using cDNA RDA, a cDNA-specific modification of genomic representational difference analysis, a series of salt responsive genes of Kandelia candel were cloned. Among these gene fragments, a 183 bp fragment (termed as SRGKC1) encoding a tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) in Kandelia candel (KCTIP1) was identified. Based on the sequence of SRGKC1, two gene specific primers were designed, and the 3' and 5' end of the KCTIP1 gene were obtained using the SMART RACE cDNA Amplification Kit. RACE products were purified from low-melting agarose, and sequenced directly with GSPs as the sequencing primers. A 500-bp fragment corresponding to the 3'end of this gene was obtained using the GSP1 primer, and a 690 bp fragment

  17. Identification and expression analysis of a full-length cDNA encoding a Kandelia candel tonoplast intrinsic protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Fang, Xiao-Dong; Lin, Qi-Fen; Li, Guan-Yi; Zhao, Wen-Ming

    2003-03-01

    Soil salinity is an important issue, as most crop plants are low in salt tolerance. Salt tolerance, a complex, multifactorial, and multigenic process, has been known to be a quantitative trait. The identification of the salt stress responsive genes or salt tolerance genes is essential for the breeding programs. Most recent efforts have been focused on the products of structural genes (transport proteins, ion channels, enzymes of solute synthesis) while little attention were paid to the regulatory aspects of these proteins. Since the first aquaporin gene from plants was cloned and functionally expressed in 1993, there has been a growing interest in the molecular biology of MIPs (membrane intrinsic proteins) and their bearing on the biophysics of water flow across plant membranes. In the last decades, studies on Mangroves, a special kind of wood plants, grow in high-salt and flooding conditions have been concentrated almost exclusively on their physiological and ecological characteristics. Kandelia candel, one of the dominant species of mangroves along the Chinese coast, lacks salt glands or salt hairs used for removal of excess salt in other mangroves. This makes K. candel a perfect model to study the molecular mechanism of salt tolerance in mangrove plants. Using cDNA RDA, a cDNA-specific modification of genomic representational difference analysis, a series of salt responsive genes of Kandelia candel were cloned. Among these gene fragments, a 183 bp fragment (termed as SRGKC1) encoding a tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) in Kandelia candel (KCTIP1) was identified. Based on the sequence of SRGKC1, two gene specific primers were designed, and the 3' and 5' end of the KCTIP1 gene were obtained using the SMART RACE cDNA Amplification Kit. RACE products were purified from low-melting agarose, and sequenced directly with GSPs as the sequencing primers. A 500-bp fragment corresponding to the 3'end of this gene was obtained using the GSP1 primer, and a 690 bp fragment

  18. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding a new neurocalcin isoform (neurocalcin alpha) from bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, M; Watanabe, Y; Iino, S; Takaoka, Y; Kobayashi, S; Haga, T; Hidaka, H

    1998-01-01

    Neurocalcin (NC), a neuron-specific EF-hand Ca2+-binding protein, purified from bovine brain [Terasawa, Nakano, Kobayashi and Hidaka (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 19596-19599] contains multiple isoforms. We previously cloned NCdelta from bovine brain and showed high expression in neuronal tissues [Okazaki, Watanabe, Ando, Hagiwara, Terasawa and Hidaka (1992) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 185, 147-153]. We report here the molecular cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding bovine brain NCalpha. The translated bovine protein is 191 amino acids long and shares 69.1% of its amino acid sequence with NCdelta. Recombinant NCalpha migrates as a single 23 kDa band and exhibits a Ca2+-dependent mobility shift on SDS/PAGE. Analysis of fluorescence emission spectra showed the Ca2+-induced peak at 337 nm. Interestingly, the mobility shift and the fluorescence intensity at 337 nm were larger for NCalpha than for NCdelta. In Ca2+-overlay experiments, however, the apparent affinity of NCalpha for 45Ca2+ was similar to that of NCdelta. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed NCalpha expression in the granular layer of the rat cerebellar cortex whereas NCdelta was found in the Purkinje cell layer. In the rat olfactory bulb, NCalpha was located in external tufted cells, and NCdelta was found in the periglomerular cells. These data demonstrate that NC isoforms differ in their tissue distribution and conformational changes induced by Ca2+ binding. Thus differential regulation of the two NC isoforms may be involved in control of neuron function. PMID:9560316

  19. Isolation and expression of a cDNA clone encoding an Alternaria alternata Alt a 1 subunit.

    PubMed

    De Vouge, M W; Thaker, A J; Curran, I H; Zhang, L; Muradia, G; Rode, H; Vijay, H M

    1996-12-01

    Alternaria alternata is recognized as an important source of fungal aeroallergens. Alt a 1, the major allergen of this mold, is a dimer of disulfide-linked subunits that migrate in SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions at apparent M(r)s of 14,500 and 16,000. IgE antibodies to this protein are present in the sera of >90% of A. alternata-sensitive individuals. Previous studies from this laboratory showed that the N-termini twenty amino acids of the purified subunits are nearly identical. We now report the isolation of clones from an A. alternata (strain 34-016) cDNA library constructed in lambda(gt)11, using rabbit IgG antiserum against partially purified Alt a 1. One of nineteen clones selected from screens totalling 305,000 pfu (rb51) was sequenced, and determined to harbor an insert of 660 bp. An in-frame open reading frame within the cloned insert encodes a peptide of M(r) 16,960 that bears no significant homology to known allergens or proteins. The size of the rb51 transcript was determined to be approximately 0.7 kb by Northern analysis of A. alternata total RNA. The largely hydrophobic N-terminal region of the peptide contains an alpha-helical domain and other features characteristic of membrane targeting or secretory signals. The peptide sequence downstream of this region matches previously sequenced Alt a 1 N-terminal from two independent sources at 17 of 20, and 24 of 26 positions. Recombinant Alt a 1 expressed as a secreted protein in Pichia pastoris exists as a dimer in conditioned medium, as shown by immunoblotting under nonreducing conditions. Recombinant Alt a 1, like the natural allergen in A. alternata extracts, is also reactive with serum IgE from A. alternata-sensitive individuals.

  20. Cataloging of the genes expressed in human keratinocytes: analysis of 607 randomly isolated cDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Konishi, K; Morishima, Y; Ueda, E; Kibe, Y; Nonomura, K; Yamanishi, K; Yasuno, H

    1994-07-29

    The partial nucleotide sequences of 607 cDNAs randomly isolated from a cDNA library of cultured human epidermal keratinocytes were determined by single pass sequencing. Homology search of the sequences to the non-redundant nucleotide databases revealed that 27% of the cDNAs matched registered human-or non-human genes encoding not only keratinocyte specific genes, but also a variety of functional proteins, the expression of which had not been identified in keratinocytes. Non-matching cDNAs covering 49% of the cDNAs were not homologous even to ESTs from other organs, suggesting that these cDNAs include novel genes expressed in the cells. The large scale sequencing of keratinocyte cDNAs provides a useful molecular source for research into biology and diseases of the skin. PMID:8048971

  1. Molecular cloning and sequence of cDNA encoding polyoma medium tumor antigen-associated 61-kDa protein.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, G; Ferre, F; Espiritu, O; Carbone-Wiley, A

    1989-01-01

    Polyoma virus medium tumor antigen forms specific complexes with several cellular proteins; among these is a protein of approximately 61 kDa. With antibodies directed against medium tumor antigen, the 61-kDa protein was purified from human 293 cells that were infected with a hybrid adenovirus and overexpressed medium tumor antigen. The purified 61-kDa protein was partially digested with protease V8, and one of the protease V8 fragments was isolated and partially sequenced. The amino acid sequence information was used to design mixed oligonucleotide probes for screening a cDNA library from human placenta. A clone was isolated that hybridized with two separate probes; the clone contained an insert with an open reading frame for 589 amino acids. By in vitro translation of the transcript from this insert, a protein was generated that had the same size and yielded the same pattern of protease V8 fragments as the original 61-kDa protein. Its amino acid sequence reveals 15 repeats, the majority of which are 39 amino acids long. This protein bears no resemblance to proteins in the data bank that was searched. Images PMID:2554323

  2. Cloning of a member of the arrestin family from a human thyroid cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, B; Kaufman, K D; Chazenbalk, G D

    1992-04-01

    We used the cDNA of human retinal arrestin as a probe to screen a human thyroid cDNA library. We isolated and plaque-purified one clone (hTHY-ARRX). The nucleotide sequence of the 1.8 kb cDNA insert had an open reading frame of 1227 bp coding for a protein of 409 amino acids. Northern blot analysis revealed a single transcript of 1.7 kb in human thyroid cells. There is significant homology between amino acid sequences of human thyroid arrestin and human retinal arrestin (63%) and bovine beta-arrestin (74%), respectively. The hTHY-ARRX cDNA was stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells already expressing a functional human thyrotropin (TSH) receptor. The cAMP response to TSH stimulation was unaltered in these cells, and homologous desensitization to TSH stimulation was not restored. It is not presently known whether hTHY-ARRX is human beta-adrenergic arrestin or a new member of the arrestin family.

  3. Isolation of a cDNA encoding the alpha-subunit of CAAX-prenyltransferases from Catharanthus roseus and the expression of the active recombinant protein farnesyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Courdavault, Vincent; Burlat, Vincent; St-Pierre, Benoit; Gantet, Pascal; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    Crfta/ggt_Ia (AF525030), a cDNA encoding the ?-subunit of the two types of CaaX-prenyltransferase (CaaX-PTase), i.e. protein farnesyltransferase (PFT) and type I protein geranylgeranyltransferase, was cloned from Catharanthus roseus via a PCR strategy. Crfta/ggt_Ia is 1381-bp long and bears a 999-bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 332 residues (FTA) that shares 66% identity with its Lycopersicon esculentum orthologue. Southern blot analysis revealed that FTA is encoded by a single gene copy per haploid genome. Co-expression of Crfta/ggt_Ia and Crftb encoding the beta-subunit of PFT yielded purified active recombinant PFT. This enzyme is able to prenylate proteins from C. roseus, and could be used as a potent tool for prenylated protein identification.

  4. cDNA sequence of a human skeletal muscle ADP/ATP translocator: lack of a leader peptide, divergence from a fibroblast translocator cDNA, and coevolution with mitochondrial DNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Neckelmann, N.; Li, K.; Wade, R.P.; Shuster, R.; Wallace, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    The authors have characterized a 1400-nucleotide cDNA for the human skeletal muscle ADP/ATP translocator. The deduced amino acid sequence is 94% homologous to the beef heart ADP/ATP translocator protein and contains only a single additional amino-terminal methionine. This implies that the human translocator lacks an amino-terminal targeting peptide, a conclusion substantiated by measuring the molecular weight of the protein synthesized in vitro. A 1400-nucleotide transcript encoding the skeletal muscle translocator was detected on blots of total RNA from human heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and HeLa cells by hybridization with oligonucleotide probes homologous to the coding region and 3' noncoding region of the cDNA. However, the level of this mRNA varied substantially among tissues. Comparison of our skeletal muscle translocator sequence with that of a recently published human fibroblast translocator cognate revealed that the two proteins are 88% identical and diverged about 275 million years ago. Hence, tissues vary both in the level of expression of individual translocator genes and in differential expression of cognate translocator genes. Comparison of the base substitution rates of the ADP/ATP translocator and the oxidative phosphorylation genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA revealed that the mitochondrial DNA genes fix 10 times more synonymous substitutions and 12 times more replacement substitutions; yet, these nuclear and cytoplasmic respiration genes experience comparable evolutionary constraints. This suggest that the mitochondrial DNA genes are highly prone to deleterious mutations.

  5. Cloning and expression of human erythropoietin cDNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Huang, S

    1984-01-01

    Human erythropoietin (Ep) cDNA has been cloned in Escherichia coli by using pBR322 as a vector. Polyadenylylated RNA was isolated from selected human renal carcinomas with elevated Ep titers. The presence of Ep mRNA was detected by immunoprecipitation of in vitro translation products with monoclonal antibody to human Ep. Double-stranded cDNA was synthesized and inserted into the Pst I site of pBR322 by homopolymeric dG . dC tailing. The cDNA library was initially screened by colony hybridization with 32P-labeled cDNA synthesized from size-fractionated mRNA enriched in Ep message. Positive colonies were further screened immunologically by in situ radioimmunoassay with monoclonal antibody to human Ep. Three positive clones were identified that express the Ep gene sequences as a beta-lactamase fusion protein. These clones contain inserts of approximately 1400, 600, and 200 base pairs. Human renal Ep mRNA, of which the translation products immunoreact with anti-Ep on immunoblots, was hybrid-selected by plasmid DNA from these recombinants. Purified human Ep competes with 35S-labeled hybrid-selected translation products for antibody binding. Images PMID:6371819

  6. The cDNA sequences encoding two components of the polymeric fraction of the intracellular hemoglobin of Glycera dibranchiata.

    PubMed

    Zafar, R S; Chow, L H; Stern, M S; Scully, J S; Sharma, P R; Vinogradov, S N; Walz, D A

    1990-12-15

    The intracellular hemoglobin of the polychaete Glycera dibranchiata consists of several components, some of which self-associate into a "polymeric" fraction. The cDNA library constructed from the poly(A+) mRNA of Glycera erythrocytes (Simons, P. C., and Satterlee, J. D. (1989) Biochemistry 28, 8525-8530) was screened with two oligodeoxynucleotide probes corresponding to the amino acid sequences MEEKVP and AMNSKV. Each of the two probes identified a full-length positive insert; these were sequenced using the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. One clone was 630 bases long and contained 36 bases of 5'-untranslated RNA, a reading frame of 441 bases coding for the 147 amino acids of globin P2 including the residues MEEKVP, and a 3'-untranslated region of 153 bases. The other clone was 540 bases long and contained 24 bases of 5'-untranslated RNA, an open reading frame of 441 bases coding for globin P3 including the residues AMNSKV, and a 3'-untranslated region of 75 bases. The inferred amino acid sequences of the two globins were in agreement with the partial amino acid sequences obtained by chemical methods. The P2 and P3 globin sequences, together with the previously determined P1 sequence of a complete insert and partial sequences P4, P5, and P6 obtained from partial inserts (Zafar, R. S., Chow, L. H., Stern, M. S., Vinogradov, S. N., and Walz, D. A. (1990) Biochim. Biophys. Acta, in press) suggest that there are at least six components in the polymeric fraction of Glycera hemoglobin, which is in agreement with the results of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in Tris/glycine buffer, pH 8.3, 6 M urea. Nothern and dot blot analyses of Glycera erythrocyte poly(A+) mRNA using the foregoing two cDNA probes clearly demonstrated the presence of mature messages encoding both types of globins. Comparison of the polymeric sequences P1, P2, and P3 with the "monomeric" globins M-II and M-IV using the alignment and templates of Bashford et al. (Bashford, D., Chothia, C

  7. Recovery of Avian Metapneumovirus Subgroup C from cDNA: Cross-Recognition of Avian and Human Metapneumovirus Support Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Samal, Siba K.

    2006-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) causes an acute respiratory disease in turkeys and is associated with “swollen head syndrome” in chickens, contributing to significant economic losses for the U.S. poultry industry. With a long-term goal of developing a better vaccine for controlling AMPV in the United States, we established a reverse genetics system to produce infectious AMPV of subgroup C entirely from cDNA. A cDNA clone encoding the entire 14,150-nucleotide genome of AMPV subgroup C strain Colorado (AMPV/CO) was generated by assembling five cDNA fragments between the T7 RNA polymerase promoter and the autocatalytic hepatitis delta virus ribozyme of a transcription plasmid, pBR 322. Transfection of this plasmid, along with the expression plasmids encoding the N, P, M2-1, and L proteins of AMPV/CO, into cells stably expressing T7 RNA polymerase resulted in the recovery of infectious AMPV/CO. Characterization of the recombinant AMPV/CO showed that its growth properties in tissue culture were similar to those of the parental virus. The potential of AMPV/CO to serve as a viral vector was also assessed by generating another recombinant virus, rAMPV/CO-GFP, that expressed the enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a foreign protein. Interestingly, GFP-expressing AMPV and GFP-expressing human metapneumovirus (HMPV) could be recovered using the support plasmids of either virus, denoting that the genome promoters are conserved between the two metapneumoviruses and can be cross-recognized by the polymerase complex proteins of either virus. These results indicate a close functional relationship between AMPV/CO and HMPV. PMID:16731918

  8. Characterization of cDNA encoding mouse DNA repair protein O sup 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and high-level expression of the wild-type and mutant proteins in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Shiota, Susumu; Tano, Keizo ); von Wronski, M.A.; Brent, T.P. ); Bigner, D.D. ); Mitra, S. )

    1992-02-25

    A mouse cDNA clone encoding O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), responsible for repair of mutagenic O{sup 6}-alkylguanine in DNA, was cloned from a {lambda}gt11 library. On the basis of an open reading frame in cDNA, the mouse protein contains 211 amino acids with a molecular mass of 22 kDa. The size and the predicted N-terminal sequence of the mouse protein were confirmed experimentally. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse MGMT is 70% homologous to that of the human MGMT. Cysteine-149 was shown to be the only alkyl acceptor residue in the mouse protein, in confirmation of the prediction based on conserved sequences of different MGMTs. Mouse MGMT protein is recognized by some monoclonal antibodies specific for human MGMT. Site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to reclone the mouse cDNA in a T7 promoter-based vector for overexpression of the native repair protein in Escherichia coli. The mouse protein has a tetrapeptide sequence, Pro-Glu-Gly-Val at positions 56-59, absent in the human protein. Neither deletion of this tetrapeptide nor substitution of valine-169 with alanine affected the activity of the mutant proteins.

  9. A human oncogene of the RAS superfamily unmasked by expression cDNA cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, A M; Miki, T; Meyers, K A; Aaronson, S A

    1994-01-01

    As an approach to identify human oncogenes, we generated an expression cDNA library from an ovarian carcinoma line. A potent transforming gene was detected by transfection analysis and identified as TC21, a recently cloned member of the RAS gene superfamily. A single point mutation substituting glutamine for leucine at position 72 was shown to be responsible for activation of transforming properties. While the cDNA clone possessed high transforming activity, the ovarian tumor genomic DNA, which contained the mutated TC21 allele, failed to induce transformed foci. Thus, expression cDNA cloning made it possible to identify and isolate a human oncogene that has evaded detection by conventional approaches. Images PMID:8052619

  10. Subtractive cDNA cloning using oligo(dT)30-latex and PCR: isolation of cDNA clones specific to undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hara, E; Kato, T; Nakada, S; Sekiya, S; Oda, K

    1991-01-01

    The human embryonal carcinoma cell line NEC14 can be induced to differentiate by the addition of 10(-2)M N,N'-hexamethylene-bis-acetamide (HMBA). A subtractive cDNA library specific to undifferentiated NEC14 cells was constructed using oligo(dT)30-Latex and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method was designed to improve the efficiency of subtraction and the enrichment of cDNA clones corresponding to low abundance mRNAs. The single strand of cDNA was made from mRNA prepared from the HMBA-treated NEC14 cells using an oligo(dT)30 primer covalently linked to Latex particles. After removal of the mRNA template by heat-denaturation and centrifugation, the subtractive hybridization was carried out between the cDNA-oligo(dT)30-Latex and mRNA from untreated NEC14 cells. Unhybridized mRNA collected by centrifugation was hybridized repeatedly to the cDNA-oligo(dT)30-Latex and subtractive mRNA was converted to cDNA. The subtractive cDNA was then amplified by PCR and cloned into pBluescript II KS-. The cDNA library thus constructed consisted of approximately 10,000 independent clones with cDNA inserts of 1.7 Kb on average. Differential hybridization of these transformants indicated that approximately 3% of them contained cDNA inserts specific to the undifferentiated EC cells, some of which were derived from low abundance mRNAs. Images PMID:1766870

  11. Characterization and distribution of a maize cDNA encoding a peptide similar to the catalytic region of second messenger dependent protein kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, B.; Johnson, E. M.; Feldman, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) roots respond to a variety of environmental stimuli which are perceived by a specialized group of cells, the root cap. We are studying the transduction of extracellular signals by roots, particularly the role of protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation by kinases is an important step in many eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. As a first phase of this research we have isolated a cDNA encoding a maize protein similar to fungal and animal protein kinases known to be involved in the transduction of extracellular signals. The deduced sequence of this cDNA encodes a polypeptide containing amino acids corresponding to 33 out of 34 invariant or nearly invariant sequence features characteristic of protein kinase catalytic domains. The maize cDNA gene product is more closely related to the branch of serine/threonine protein kinase catalytic domains composed of the cyclic-nucleotide- and calcium-phospholipid-dependent subfamilies than to other protein kinases. Sequence identity is 35% or more between the deduced maize polypeptide and all members of this branch. The high structural similarity strongly suggests that catalytic activity of the encoded maize protein kinase may be regulated by second messengers, like that of all members of this branch whose regulation has been characterized. Northern hybridization with the maize cDNA clone shows a single 2400 base transcript at roughly similar levels in maize coleoptiles, root meristems, and the zone of root elongation, but the transcript is less abundant in mature leaves. In situ hybridization confirms the presence of the transcript in all regions of primary maize root tissue.

  12. GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN CDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN cDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    B.S. Pukazhenthi1, J. C. Rockett2, M. Ouyang3, D.J. Dix2, J.G. Howard1, P. Georgopoulos4, W.J. J. Welsh3 and D. E. Wildt1

    1Department of Reproductiv...

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va from the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae).

    PubMed

    Ayala, Jorge; Dowdy, Alan K; Beeman, Richard W; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2003-10-01

    A cDNA encoding subunit Va of cytochrome c oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1) was cloned and characterized from a lesser grain borer (Rhyzopertha dominica) cDNA library. The complete cDNA consists of 693-bp and contains an open reading frame of 450-bp that encodes 150 amino acid residues. The sequence includes a 28-bp putative N-terminal and a 122-bp putative mature protein. The estimated molecular weight and pI for the predicted mature protein are 13,962 and 4.60, respectively. The cDNA-deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein shows 73% identity to that of a corresponding subunit of African malaria mosquito (Anopheles gambiae) and 59% identity to that of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). In addition, 31% of all amino acid residues are conserved among six different animal species. Evolutionary distance analysis suggests that cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va from R. dominica is most similar to the corresponding subunit from the malaria mosquito. Northern analysis revealed a single 4.9-kb transcript that is much larger than that found in mammalian species.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone encoding the pokeweed antiviral protein II from Phytolacca americana and its expression in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Poyet, J L; Radom, J; Hoeveler, A

    1994-06-27

    Three distinct ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were isolated from pokeweed (Phytolacca americana). We identified and sequenced for the first time a complete cDNA encoding the pokeweed antiviral protein II (PAP II), which is expressed in the late summer leaves of pokeweed. The cDNA of PAP II consists of 1,187 nucleotides and encodes a mature protein of 285 amino acids. Its predicted amino acid sequence is only 33% similar to PAP and PAP-S. The NH2 terminal extrapeptide (25 amino acid residues) was similar but not identical to that of PAP's extrapeptide. The cDNA of PAP II was expressed in E. coli. The growth of the transformants was strongly inhibited after induction of the gene. Furthermore, PAP II, which was produced in E. coli, inhibited protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte translation system. Thus, recombinant PAP II would appear to be as functional as native PAP in inhibiting protein synthesis in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  15. Molecular cloning of the cDNA and chromosomal localization of the gene for a putative seven-transmembrane segment (7-TMS) receptor isolated from human spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Federsppiel, B.; Melhado, I.G.; Delaney, A.; Clark-Lewis, I. ); Duncan, A.M.V. ); Jirik, F.R. )

    1993-06-01

    A family of proinflammatory cytokines sharing several structural features has been described and includes, for example, interleukin-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and melanocyte growth stimulatory activity. Recently, the receptors for interleukin-8 have been isolated and found to belong to the seven-transmembrane domain class of G protein-coupled receptors. As other members of this cytokine family likely interact with similar receptors, the polymerase chain reaction was employed to isolate related receptors from human peripheral blood adherent cells. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on the rabbit interleukin-8 receptor sequence were used. The corresponding full-length cDNA was isolated from a human spleen cDNA library. The predicted protein sequence of this clone, designated pBE1.3, was 93% identical to that of a cDNA isolated from bovine locus coeruleus, which apparently encodes a neuropeptide Y receptor, and also shows similarity with the interleukin-8 receptor and the human cytomegalovirus US28 sequences. The gene, designated D2S201E, was localized to human chromosome 2q21. By Northern blotting, transcripts hybridizing to this cDNA were present in a variety of tissues and cells, including those of hemopoietic origin. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Encoding of human action in Broca's area.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Patrik; Cantagallo, Anna; Craighero, Laila; D'Ausilio, Alessandro; Roy, Alice C; Pozzo, Thierry; Calzolari, Ferdinando; Granieri, Enrico; Fadiga, Luciano

    2009-07-01

    Broca's area has been considered, for over a century, as the brain centre responsible for speech production. Modern neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence have suggested a wider functional role is played by this area. In addition to the evidence that it is involved in syntactical analysis, mathematical calculation and music processing, it has recently been shown that Broca's area may play some role in language comprehension and, more generally, in understanding actions of other individuals. As shown by functional magnetic resonance imaging, Broca's area is one of the cortical areas activated by hand/mouth action observation and it has been proposed that it may form a crucial node of a human mirror-neuron system. If, on the one hand, neuroimaging studies use a correlational approach which cannot offer a final proof for such claims, available neuropsychological data fail to offer a conclusive demonstration for two main reasons: (i) they use tasks taxing both language and action systems; and (ii) they rarely consider the possibility that Broca's aphasics may also be affected by some form of apraxia. We administered a novel action comprehension test--with almost no linguistic requirements--on selected frontal aphasic patients lacking apraxic symptoms. Patients, as well as matched controls, were shown short movies of human actions or of physical events. Their task consisted of ordering, in a temporal sequence, four pictures taken from each movie and randomly presented on the computer screen. Patient's performance showed a specific dissociation in their ability to re-order pictures of human actions (impaired) with respect to physical events (spared). Our study provides a demonstration that frontal aphasics, not affected by apraxia, are specifically impaired in their capability to correctly encode observed human actions.

  17. The human beta-subunit of rod photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase: complete retinal cDNA sequence and evidence for expression in brain.

    PubMed

    Collins, C; Hutchinson, G; Kowbel, D; Riess, O; Weber, B; Hayden, M R

    1992-07-01

    We have identified and sequenced cDNA clones that encode for the human beta-subunit of rod cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDEB). A single 2565-bp open reading frame that codes for an 854-amino-acid protein was identified. The human beta-subunit protein is 90% identical to the bovine beta-subunit and 91% identical to the mouse protein. Northern blot analysis indicates that the gene is expressed as an abundant 3.5-kb transcript in retina and as a rare 2.9-kb transcript in brain. The isolation of cDNAs from human brain cDNA libraries confirms the brain as a site of expression for this gene. The molecular defect underlying retinal degeneration in the rd mouse has been found to be a nonsense mutation in the beta-subunit of the mouse cGMP PDE, resulting in a truncated protein (Pittler et al., 1991b, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 88: 8322-8326). The molecular cloning of the cDNA encoding for the PDEB represents the first step in establishing whether this gene plays a causative role in any one of the several human hereditary retinopathies or, based on its localization to chromosome 4p 16.3, in the pathogenesis of Huntington disease.

  18. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding a novel fatty acid-binding protein from rat skin.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, R; Fujii, H; Odani, S; Sakakibara, J; Yamamoto, A; Ito, M; Ono, T

    1994-04-15

    A novel skin-type fatty acid-binding protein, termed cutaneous(C)-FABP, has been purified from rat skin and a cDNA clone for this protein has been identified. The purified protein had the ability to bind long chain fatty acids like other rat FABPs. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA clone comprises residues yielding a molecular mass for the polypeptide of 15.1 kDa and exhibits around 50% identity to myelin P2 protein, adipocyte FABP and heart FABP. Our results propose that C-FABP is a new member of the FABP family.

  19. Cloning and molecular characterization of the salt-regulated jojoba ScRab cDNA encoding a small GTP-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi-Aviv, Ela; Mills, David; Benzioni, Aliza; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2002-10-01

    Salt stress results in a massive change in gene expression. An 837 bp cDNA designated ScRab was cloned from shoot cultures of the salt tolerant jojoba (Simmondsia chinesis). The cloned cDNA encodes a full length 200 amino acid long polypeptide that bears high homology to the Rab subfamily of small GTP binding proteins, particularly, the Rab5 subfamily. ScRab expression is reduced in shoots grown in the presence of salt compared to shoots from non-stressed cultures. His6-tagged ScRAB protein was expressed in E. coli, and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein bound radiolabelled GTP. The unlabelled guanine nucleotides GTP, GTP gamma S and GDP but not ATP, CTP or UTP competed with GTP binding.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a membrane bound acyl-CoA binding protein from Agave americana L. epidermis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Consuelo; Martín-Rufián, M; Reina, José J; Heredia, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A cDNA encoding an acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) homologue has been cloned from a cDNA library made from mRNA isolated from epidermis of young leaves of Agave americana L. The derived amino acid sequence reveals a protein corresponding to the membrane-associated form of ACBPs only previously described in Arabidopsis and rice. Northern blot analysis showed that the A. americana ACBP gene is mainly expressed in the epidermis of mature zone of the leaves. The epidermis of A. americana leaves have a well developed cuticle with the highest amounts of the cuticular components waxes, cutin and cutan suggesting a potential role of the protein in cuticle formation.

  1. Cloning of cDNA encoding the common alpha subunit precursor molecule of pituitary glycoprotein hormones in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Kubokawa, K; Ishii, S; Joss, J M

    1998-05-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones encoding a putative glycoprotein hormone alpha subunit precursor molecule from a pituitary cDNA library of the Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri) by a two-step plaque hybridization technique initially using cDNA encoding the toad glycoprotein hormone alpha subunit precursor molecule as the hybridization probe. The inserts (799 bp) of two of the isolated cDNA clones contained sequences of 5' and 3' untranslated regions, including a poly(A) stretch, and the entire coding sequence of the alpha subunit precursor molecule. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that its signal peptide consists of 24 residues and its mature protein 97 residues. In the mature protein, there is an insert of one residue (Ala) just after the 9th residue. This insert is unique to the Australian lungfish among vertebrate species studied. The amino acid sequence of the mature protein shares the common, or the same-group, amino acid residues at 9 positions with tetrapod and not actinopterygian vertebrates, while only one residue is common to some teleosts and the lungfish to the exclusion of the tetrapods. The overall sequence of the mature protein of the Australian lungfish also shares more similarity with those of tetrapods (69 to 84%) than it does with teleosts (57 to 74%). These results on the relation of the alpha subunit precursor molecule between the lungfish and other vertebrates are consistent with the recent molecular phylogenetic studies suggesting a closer relationship between lungfish and tetrapods than between lungfish and teleosts. We also found that the primary structure of the lungfish alpha subunit is slightly but significantly more similar to that of homeothermic vertebrates than to that of amphibians. This may be due to specialization of the amphibian alpha subunit molecules.

  2. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  3. Genomic organization of the human NSP gene, prototype of a novel gene family encoding reticulons

    SciTech Connect

    Roebroek, A.J.M.; Ayoubi, T.A.Y.; Velde, H.J.K. van de; Schoenmakers, E.F.P.M.; Pauli, I.G.L.; Van De Ven, W.J.M.

    1996-03-01

    Recently, cDNA cloning and expression of three mRNA variants of the human NSP gene were described. This neuroendocrine-specific gene encodes three NSP protein isoforms with unique amino-terminal parts, but common carboxy-terminal parts. The proteins, with yet unknown function, are associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and therefore are named NSP reticulons. Potentially, these proteins are neuroendocrine markers of a novel category in human lung cancer diagnosis. Here, the genomic organization of this gene was studied by analysis of genomic clones isolated from lambda phage and YAC libraries. The NSP exons were found to be dispersed over a genomic region of about 275 kb. The present elucidation of the genomic organization of the NSP gene explains the generation of NSP mRNA variants encoding NSP protein isoforms. Multiple promoters rather than alternative splicing of internal exons seem to be involved in this diversity. Furthermore, comparison of NSP genomic and cDNA sequences with databank nucleotide sequences resulted in the discovery of other human members of this novel family of reticulons encoding genes. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Human alpha-L-iduronidase: cDNA isolation and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, H S; Anson, D S; Orsborn, A M; Nelson, P V; Clements, P R; Morris, C P; Hopwood, J J

    1991-01-01

    alpha-L-Iduronidase (IDUA; EC 3.2.1.76) is a lysosomal hydrolase in the metabolic pathway responsible for the degradation of the glycosaminoglycans heparan sulfate and dermatan sulfate. A deficiency of IDUA in humans leads to the accumulation of these glycosaminoglycans and results in the lysosomal storage disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type I. We have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones containing part of the human IDUA coding region and used PCR from reverse-transcribed RNA to obtain the full IDUA sequence. Analysis of the predicted 653-amino acid precursor protein shows that IDUA has a 26-amino acid signal peptide that is cleaved immediately prior to the amino terminus of the 74-kDa polypeptide present in human liver IDUA. The protein sequence contains six potential N-glycosylation sites. Northern blot analysis with IDUA cDNA detected only a single 2.3-kilobase mRNA species in human placental RNA; however, PCR analysis of fibroblast, liver, kidney, and placental RNA showed the existence of alternatively spliced mRNA from the IDUA gene. Southern blot analysis failed to detect major deletions or gene rearrangements in any of the 40 mucopolysaccharidosis type I patients studied. Expression of a full-length IDUA cDNA construct in Chinese hamster ovary cells produced human IDUA protein at a level 13-fold higher than, and with a specific activity comparable to, IDUA present in normal human fibroblasts. Images PMID:1946389

  5. A human cDNA expression library in yeast enriched for open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Holz, C; Lueking, A; Bovekamp, L; Gutjahr, C; Bolotina, N; Lehrach, H; Cahill, D J

    2001-10-01

    We developed a high-throughput technique for the generation of cDNA libraries in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae which enables the selection of cloned cDNA inserts containing open reading frames (ORFs). For direct screening of random-primed cDNA libraries, we have constructed a yeast shuttle/expression vector, the so-called ORF vector pYEXTSH3, which allows the enriched growth of protein expression clones. The selection system is based on the HIS3 marker gene fused to the C terminus of the cDNA insert. The cDNAs cloned in-frame result in histidine prototrophic yeast cells growing on minimal medium, whereas clones bearing the vector without insert or out-of-frame inserts should not grow on this medium. A randomly primed cDNA library from human fetal brain tissue was cloned in this novel vector, and using robot technology the selected clones were arrayed in microtiter plates and were analyzed by sequencing and for protein expression. In the constructed cDNA expression library, about 60% of clones bear an insert in the correct reading frame. In comparison to unselected libraries it was possible to increase the clones with inserts in the correct reading frame more than fourfold, from 14% to 60%. With the expression system described here, we could avoid time-consuming and costly techniques for identification of clones expressing protein by using antibody screening on high-density filters and subsequently rearraying the selected clones in a new "daughter" library. The advantage of this ORF vector is that, in a one-step screening procedure, it allows the generation of expression libraries enriched for clones with correct reading frames as sources of recombinant proteins.

  6. Cloning of the genes encoding two murine and human cochlear unconventional type I myosins

    SciTech Connect

    Crozet, F.; El Amraoui, Z.; Blanchard, S.

    1997-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate a crucial role for unconventional myosins in the function of the sensory hair cells of the inner ear. We report here the characterization of the cDNAs encoding two unconventional type I myosins from a mouse cochlear cDNA library. The first cDNA encodes a putative protein named Myo1c, which is likely to be the murine orthologue of the bullfrog myosin I{beta} and which may be involved in the gating of the mechanotransduction channel of the sensory hair cells. This myosin belongs to the group of short-tailed myosins I, with its tail ending shortly after a polybasic, TH-1-like domain. The second cDNA encodes a novel type I myosin Myo1f which displays three regions: a head domain with the conserved ATP- and actin-binding sites, a neck domain with a single IQ motif, and a tail domain with the tripartite structure initially described in protozoan myosins I. The tail of Myo1f includes (1) a TH-1 region rich in basic residues, which may interact with anionic membrane phospholipids; (2) a TH-2 proline-rich region, expected to contain an ATP-insensitive actin-binding site; and (3) an SH-3 domain found in a variety of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. Northern blot analysis indicated that the genes encoding Myo1c and Myo1f display a widespread tissue expression in the adult mouse. Myo1c and Myo1f were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomal regions 11D-11E and 17B-17C, respectively. The human orthologuous genes MYO1C and MYO1F were also characterized, and mapped to the human chromosomal regions 17p13 and 19p13.2- 19p1.3.3, respectively. 45 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Expression of a full-length cDNA for the human MDR1 gene confers resistance to colchicine, doxorubicin, and vinblastine

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, K.; Cardarelli, C.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I.

    1987-05-01

    Intrinsic and acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) is an important problem in cancer therapy. MDR in human KB carcinoma cells selected for resistance to colchicine, vinblastine, or doxorubicin (former generic name adriamycin) is associated with overexpression of the MDR1 gene, which encodes P-glycoprotein. The authors previously have isolated an overlapping set of cDNA clones for the human MDR1 gene from multidrug-resistant KB cells. Here they report the construction of a full-length cDNA for the human MDR1 gene and show that this reconstructed cDNA, when inserted into a retroviral expression vector containing the long terminal repeats of Moloney leukemia virus or Harvey sarcoma virus, functions in mouse NIH 3T3 and human KB cells to confer the complete multidrug-resistance phenotype. These results suggest that the human MDR1 gene may be used as a positive selectable marker to introduce genes into human cells and to transform human cells to multidrug resistance without introducing nonhuman antigens.

  8. cDNA cloning of an intracellular form of the human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist associated with epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Haskill, S; Martin, G; Van Le, L; Morris, J; Peace, A; Bigler, C F; Jaffe, G J; Hammerberg, C; Sporn, S A; Fong, S

    1991-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a receptor antagonist of interleukin 1 (IL-1ra), secreted from human monocytes, has recently been isolated and sequenced [Eisenberg, S. P., Evans, R. J., Arend, W. P., Verderber, E., Brewer, M. T., Hannum, C. H. & Thompson, R. C. (1990) Nature (London) 343, 341-346]. We have identified another version of this IL-1ra, which is predominantly expressed in epithelial cells. This IL-1ra lacks a leader sequence and, thus, is probably intracellular. Both proteins are derived from the same gene through use of an alternative transcriptional start site and internal splice-acceptor site. Expression of intracellular IL-1ra cDNA in COS cells demonstrated that the intracellular product specifically inhibited exogenous interleukin 1-dependent responses. Keratinocytes were shown to contain significant amounts of nonsecreted IL-1ra protein. Constitutive expression of the intracellular IL-1ra may be an intracellular defensive mechanism in exposed epithelial cells and/or may serve to regulate autocrine interleukin 1-mediated pathways of differentiation. Images PMID:1827201

  9. Localization of the gene (LAMA4) to chromosome 6q21 and isolation of a partial cDNA encoding a variant laminin A chain

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, A.J.; Al-Imara, L.; Carter, N.P.

    1994-07-01

    Laminin is a basement membrane glycoprotein composed of three nonidentical chains, A, B1, and B2. Variant chains such as merosin and S-laminin have been found in different tissues. The authors have isolated a cDNA encoding a novel laminin A variant that hybridizes to a 6.45-kb mRNA. Using amplification of genomic DNA and flow-sorted chromosomes they have assigned the gene (LAMA4) for this new laminin A variant to chromosome 6. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of a YAC clone further localized the gene to 6q21. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA from Aspergillus parasiticus encoding an O-methyltransferase involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Cary, J W; Bhatnagar, D; Cleveland, T E; Keller, N P; Chu, F S

    1993-11-01

    Aflatoxins are polyketide-derived secondary metabolites produced by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. Among the catalytic steps in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway, the conversion of sterigmatocystin to O-methylsterigmatocystin and the conversion of dihydrosterigmatocystin to dihydro-O-methylsterigmatocystin are catalyzed by an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent O-methyltransferase. A cDNA library was constructed by using RNA isolated from a 24-h-old culture of wild-type A. parasiticus SRRC 143 and was screened by using polyclonal antiserum raised against a purified 40-kDa O-methyltransferase protein. A clone that harbored a full-length cDNA insert (1,460 bp) containing the 1,254-bp coding region of the gene omt-1 was identified by the antiserum and isolated. The complete cDNA sequence was determined, and the corresponding 418-amino-acid sequence of the native enzyme with a molecular weight of 46,000 was deduced. This 46-kDa native enzyme has a leader sequence of 41 amino acids, and the mature form of the enzyme apparently consists of 377 amino acids and has a molecular weight of 42,000. Direct sequencing of the purified mature enzyme from A. parasiticus SRRC 163 showed that 19 of 22 amino acid residues were identical to the amino acid residues in an internal region of the deduced amino acid sequence of the mature protein. The 1,460-bp omt-1 cDNA was cloned into an Escherichia coli expression system; a Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of crude extracts from this expression system revealed a 51-kDa fusion protein (fused with a 5-kDa beta-galactosidase N-terminal fragment).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8285664

  11. kappa-Opioid receptor in humans: cDNA and genomic cloning, chromosomal assignment, functional expression, pharmacology, and expression pattern in the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, F; Gavériaux-Ruff, C; Befort, K; Matthes, H; Lannes, B; Micheletti, G; Mattéi, M G; Charron, G; Bloch, B; Kieffer, B

    1995-01-01

    Using the mouse delta-opioid receptor cDNA as a probe, we have isolated genomic clones encoding the human mu- and kappa-opioid receptor genes. Their organization appears similar to that of the human delta receptor gene, with exon-intron boundaries located after putative transmembrane domains 1 and 4. The kappa gene was mapped at position q11-12 in human chromosome 8. A full-length cDNA encoding the human kappa-opioid receptor has been isolated. The cloned receptor expressed in COS cells presents a typical kappa 1 pharmacological profile and is negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase. The expression of kappa-opioid receptor mRNA in human brain, as estimated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, is consistent with the involvement of kappa-opioid receptors in pain perception, neuroendocrine physiology, affective behavior, and cognition. In situ hybridization studies performed on human fetal spinal cord demonstrate the presence of the transcript specifically in lamina II of the dorsal horn. Some divergences in structural, pharmacological, and anatomical properties are noted between the cloned human and rodent receptors. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7624359

  12. Identification and molecular characterization of the cDNA encoding Cucumis melo allergen, Cuc m 3, a plant pathogenesis-related protein

    PubMed Central

    Sankian, Mojtaba; Hajavi, Jafar; Moghadam, Malihe; Varasteh, Abdol-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Melon (Cucumis melo) allergy is one of the most common food allergies, characterized by oral allergy syndrome. To date, two allergen molecules, Cuc m 1 and Cuc m 2, have been fully characterized in melon pulp, but there are few reports about the molecular characteristics of Cuc m 3. Methods: The Cuc m 3 cDNA has been characterized by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), which revealed a 456 base-pair (bp) fragment encoding a 151-amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 16.97 kDa, and identified 79 and 178 bp untranslated sequences at the 5′ and 3´ ends, respectively. Results: In silico analysis showed strong similarities between Cuc m 3 and other plant pathogen-related protein 1s from cucumber, grape, bell pepper, and tomato. Conclusion: Here we report the identification and characterization of the Cuc m 3 cDNA, which will be utilized for further analyses of structural and allergenic features of this allergen. PMID:26989726

  13. cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant-associated proteolipid SPL(Phe)

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Fox, J.L.; Whitsett, J.A.

    1987-06-01

    Hydrophobic surfactant-associated protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 was isolated from either/ethanol or chloroform/methanol extracts of mammalian pulmonary surfactant. Automated Edman degradation in a gas-phase sequencer showed the major N-terminus of the human low molecular weight protein to be Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-Try-Cys-Trp-Leu-Cys-Arg-Ala-Leu-. Because of the N-terminal phenylalanine, the surfactant protein was designated SPL(Phe). Antiserum generated against hydrophobic surfactant protein(s) from bovine pulmonary surfactant recognized protein of M/sub r/ 6000-14,000 in immunoblot analysis and was used to screen a lambdagt11 expression library constructed from adult human lung poly(A)/sup +/ RNA. This resulted in identification of a 1.4-kilobase cDNA clone that was shown to encode the N-terminus of the surfactant polypeptide SPL(Phe) (Phe-Pro-Ile-Pro-Leu-Pro-) within an open reading frame for a larger protein. Expression of a fused ..beta..-galactosidase-SPL (Phe) gene in Escherichia coli yielded an immunoreactive M/sub r/ 34,000 fusion peptide. Hybrid-arrested translation with the cDNA and immunoprecipitation of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled in vitro translation products of human poly(A)/sup +/ RNA with a surfactant polyclonal antibody resulted in identification of a M/sub r/ 40,000 precursor protein. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated RNA from human lung detected a 2.0-kilobase RNA that was more abundant in adult lung than in fetal lung. These proteins, and specifically SPL(Phe), may therefore be useful for synthesis of replacement surfactants for treatment of hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants or of other surfactant-deficient states.

  14. Transcript encoded on the opposite strand of the human steroid 21-hydroxylase/complement component C4 gene locus.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Y; Bristow, J; Gitelman, S E; Miller, W L

    1989-01-01

    The gene encoding human adrenal steroid 21-hydroxylase (P450c21) and its highly similar pseudogene are duplicated in tandem with the two genes encoding the fourth component of human serum hemolytic complement (C4). This 60-kilobase gene complex, which lies within the major histocompatibility complex on the short arm of human chromosome 6, has been studied in considerable detail because genetic disorders in steroid 21-hydroxylation and in C4 are common. We have cloned a cDNA encoded by a previously unidentified gene in this region. This gene lies on the strand of DNA opposite from the strand containing the P450c21 and C4 genes, and it overlaps the last exon of P450c21. The newly identified gene encodes mRNAs of 3.5 and 1.8 kilobases that are expressed in the adrenal and in a Leydig cell tumor but are not expressed in nonsteroidogenic tissues. The sequence of the longest cDNA (2.7 kilobases) shows no similarity to known sequences available in two computerized data bases. The 5' end of this sequence is characterized by three repeats, each encoding about 100 amino acids flanked by potential sites for proteolytic cleavage. Although numerous studies have shown that gene deletions causing congenital adrenal hyperplasia occur in this region, none of these gene deletions extends into this newly identified gene, suggesting that it encodes an essential function. Images PMID:2475872

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of a tomato cDNA encoding a systemically wound-inducible bZIP DNA-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankovic, B.; Vian, A.; Henry-Vian, C.; Davies, E.

    2000-01-01

    Localized wounding of one leaf in intact tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) plants triggers rapid systemic transcriptional responses that might be involved in defense. To better understand the mechanism(s) of intercellular signal transmission in wounded tomatoes, and to identify the array of genes systemically up-regulated by wounding, a subtractive cDNA library for wounded tomato leaves was constructed. A novel cDNA clone (designated LebZIP1) encoding a DNA-binding protein was isolated and identified. This clone appears to be encoded by a single gene, and belongs to the family of basic leucine zipper domain (bZIP) transcription factors shown to be up-regulated by cold and dark treatments. Analysis of the mRNA levels suggests that the transcript for LebZIP1 is both organ-specific and up-regulated by wounding. In wounded wild-type tomatoes, the LebZIP1 mRNA levels in distant tissue were maximally up-regulated within only 5 min following localized wounding. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) prevented the rapid wound-induced increase in LebZIP1 mRNA levels, while the basal levels of LebZIP1 transcripts were higher in the ABA mutants notabilis (not), sitiens (sit), and flacca (flc), and wound-induced increases were greater in the ABA-deficient mutants. Together, these results suggest that ABA acts to curtail the wound-induced synthesis of LebZIP1 mRNA.

  16. Sequence analysis and molecular characterization of larval midgut cDNA transcripts encoding peptidases from the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, S; Chen, M-S; Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Smith, C M; Marshall, J; Oppert, B

    2007-08-01

    Peptidase sequences were analysed in randomly picked clones from cDNA libraries of the anterior or posterior midgut or whole larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus. Of a total of 1528 sequences, 92 encoded potential peptidases, from which 50 full-length cDNA sequences were obtained, including serine and cysteine proteinases and metallopeptidases. Serine proteinase transcripts were predominant in the posterior midgut, whereas transcripts encoding cysteine and metallopeptidases were mainly found in the anterior midgut. Alignments with other proteinases indicated that 40% of the serine proteinase sequences were serine proteinase homologues, and the remaining ones were identified as either trypsin, chymotrypsin or other serine proteinases. Cysteine proteinase sequences included cathepsin B- and L-like proteinases, and metallopeptidase transcripts were similar to carboxypeptidase A. Northern blot analysis of representative sequences demonstrated the differential expression profile of selected transcripts across five developmental stages of Te. molitor. These sequences provide insights into peptidases in coleopteran insects as a basis to study the response of coleopteran larvae to external stimuli and to evaluate regulatory features of the response.

  17. Identification of a mouse brain cDNA that encodes a protein related to the Alzheimer disease-associated amyloid beta protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Wasco, W; Bupp, K; Magendantz, M; Gusella, J F; Tanzi, R E; Solomon, F

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA from a mouse brain library that encodes a protein whose predicted amino acid sequence is 42% identical and 64% similar to that of the amyloid beta protein precursor (APP). This 653-amino acid protein, which we have termed the amyloid precursor-like protein (APLP), appears to be similar to APP in overall structure as well as amino acid sequence. The amino acid homologies are concentrated within three distinct regions of the two proteins where the identities are 47%, 54%, and 56%. The APLP cDNA hybridizes to two messages of approximately 2.4 and 1.6 kilobases that are present in mouse brain and neuroblastoma cells. Polyclonal antibodies raised against a peptide derived from the C terminus of APLP stain the cytoplasm in a pattern reminiscent of Golgi staining. In addition to APP, APLP also displays significant homology to the Drosophila APP-like protein APPL and a rat testes APP-like protein. These data indicate that the APP gene is a member of a strongly conserved gene family. Studies aimed at determining the functions of the proteins encoded by this gene family should provide valuable clues to their potential role in Alzheimer disease neuropathology. Images PMID:1279693

  18. Isolation and characterization of two cDNA clones encoding ATP-sulfurylases from potato by complementation of a yeast mutant.

    PubMed

    Klonus, D; Höfgen, R; Willmitzer, L; Riesmeier, J W

    1994-07-01

    Sulfur plays an important role in plants, being used for the biosynthesis of amino acids, sulfolipids and secondary metabolites. After uptake sulfate is activated and subsequently reduced to sulfide or serves as donor for sulfurylation reactions. The first step in the activation of sulfate in all cases studied so far is catalyzed by the enzyme ATP-sulfurylase (E.C. 2.7.7.4.) which catalyzes the formation of adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate (APS). Two cDNA clones from potato encoding ATP-sulfurylases were identified following transformation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant deficient in ATP-sulfurylase activity with a cDNA library from potato source leaf poly(A)+ RNA cloned in a yeast expression vector. Several transformants were able to grow on a medium with sulfate as the only sulfur source, this ability being strictly linked to the presence of two classes of cDNAs. The clones StMet3-1 and StMet3-2 were further analyzed. DNA analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein with a molecular mass of 48 kDa in the case of StMet3-1 and 52 kDa for StMet3-2. The deduced polypeptides are 88% identical at the amino acid level. The clone StMet3-2 has a 48 amino acid N-terminal extension which shows common features of a chloroplast transit peptide. Sequence comparison of the ATP-sulfurylase Met3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the cDNA StMet3-1 (StMet3-2) reveals 31% (30%) identity at the amino acid level. Protein extracts from the yeast mutant transformed with the clone StMet3-1 displayed ATP-sulfurylase activity. RNA blot analysis demonstrated the expression of both genes in potato leaves, root and stem, but not in tubers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Cloning and sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA of SmPP1cb encoding turbot protein phosphatase 1 beta catalytic subunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Fei; Guo, Huarong; Wang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases, is an important and versatile mechanism by which eukaryotic cells regulate almost all the signaling processes. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is the first and well-characterized member of the protein serine/threonine phosphatase family. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the beta isoform of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1(PP1cb), was for the first time isolated and sequenced from the skin tissue of flatfish turbot Scophthalmus maximus, designated SmPP1cb, by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The cDNA sequence of SmPP1cb we obtained contains a 984 bp open reading frame (ORF), flanked by a complete 39 bp 5' untranslated region and 462 bp 3' untranslated region. The ORF encodes a putative 327 amino acid protein, and the N-terminal section of this protein is highly acidic, Met-Ala-Glu-Gly-Glu-Leu-Asp-Val-Asp, a common feature for PP1 catalytic subunit but absent in protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B). And its calculated molecular mass is 37 193 Da and pI 5.8. Sequence analysis indicated that, SmPP1cb is extremely conserved in both amino acid and nucleotide acid levels compared with the PP1cb of other vertebrates and invertebrates, and its Kozak motif contained in the 5'UTR around ATG start codon is GXXAXXGXX ATGG, which is different from mammalian in two positions A-6 and G-3, indicating the possibility of different initiation of translation in turbot, and also the 3'UTR of SmPP1cb is highly diverse in the sequence similarity and length compared with other animals, especially zebrafish. The cloning and sequencing of SmPP1cb gene lays a good foundation for the future work on the biological functions of PP1 in the flatfish turbot.

  20. Characterization of a wheat cDNA encoding mitochondrial ribosomal protein L11: qualitative and quantitative tissue-specific differences in its expression.

    PubMed

    Handa, H; Kobayashi-Uehara, A; Murayama, S

    2001-06-01

    We have cloned a cDNA for a ribosomal protein of wheat that is similar to the bacterial ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11). To determine the subcellular localization of the gene product, we fused the whole cDNA sequence to the coding sequence for Green Fluorescent Protein, and expressed the fusion product transiently in epidermal cells of pea hypocotyls or dayflower leaves. Localized fluorescence was detectable in mitochondria, indicating that this nuclear cDNA encodes a mitochondrial ribosomal protein L11 (MRPL11). In lower protists, mitochondrial RPL11 is encoded by the mitochondrial genome, but higher organisms, including animals, fungi and plants, do not have genes for RPL11 in their mitochondrial genomes, suggesting that transfer of the genetic information for RPL11 from the mitochondrial genome to the nucleus was a very early event in evolution. Transcripts of this wheat gene (TaMRPL11) for mitochondrial RPL11 were found in all tissues examined, although qualitative and quantitative differences in expression were noted. The transcript sizes were different in different plant tissues: 1.0 kb in flowers and roots, and 1.5 kb in shoots. Cold stress transiently increased the steady-state level of TaMRPL11 mRNA in shoots, but the transcription of TaMRPL11 was completely inhibited by cold treatment for longer periods. However, the transcript level in flowers decreased gradually on exposure to low temperature. On the other hand, the accumulation of TaMRPL11 transcripts in roots was not affected by low temperature. These results suggest that the expression of MRPL11 in wheat is regulated precisely, in a tissue-specific manner.

  1. The human serotonin 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor: Complete cDNA, genomic structure, and alternatively spliced variant

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Enzhong; Zhu, Lingyu; Zhao, Lingyun

    1996-08-01

    The complete 4775-nt cDNA encoding the human serotonin 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor (5-HT{sub 2C}R), a G-protein-coupled receptor, has been isolated. It contains a 1377-nt coding region flanked by a 728-nt 5{prime}-untranslated region and a 2670-nt 3{prime}-untranslated region. By using the cloned 5-HT{sub 2C}R cDNA probe, the complete human gene for this receptor has been isolated and shown to contain six exons and five introns spanning at least 230 kb of DNA. The coding region of the human 5-HT{sub 2C}R gene is interrupted by three introns, and the positions of the intron/exon junctions are conserved between the human and the rodent genes. In addition, an alternatively spliced 5-HT{sub 2C}R RNA that contains a 95-nt deletion in the region coding for the second intracellular loop and the fourth transmembrane domain of the receptor has been identified. This deletion leads to a frameshift and premature termination so that the short isoform RNA encodes a putative protein of 248 amino acids. The ratio for the short isoform over the 5-HT{sub 2C}R RNA was found to be higher in choroid plexus tumor than in normal brain tissue, suggesting the possibility of differential regulation of the 5-HT{sub 2C}R gene in different neural tissues or during tumorigenesis. Transcription of the human 5-HT{sub 2C}R gene was found to be initiated at multiple sites. No classical TATA-box sequence was found at the appropriate location, and the 5{prime}-flanking sequence contains many potential transcription factor-binding sites. A 7.3-kb 5{prime}-flanking 5-HT{sub 2C}R DNA directed the efficient expression of a luciferase reported gene in SK-N-SH and IMR32 neuroblastoma cells, indicating that is contains a functional promoter. 69 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Integrative Annotation of 21,037 Human Genes Validated by Full-Length cDNA Clones

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The human genome sequence defines our inherent biological potential; the realization of the biology encoded therein requires knowledge of the function of each gene. Currently, our knowledge in this area is still limited. Several lines of investigation have been used to elucidate the structure and function of the genes in the human genome. Even so, gene prediction remains a difficult task, as the varieties of transcripts of a gene may vary to a great extent. We thus performed an exhaustive integrative characterization of 41,118 full-length cDNAs that capture the gene transcripts as complete functional cassettes, providing an unequivocal report of structural and functional diversity at the gene level. Our international collaboration has validated 21,037 human gene candidates by analysis of high-quality full-length cDNA clones through curation using unified criteria. This led to the identification of 5,155 new gene candidates. It also manifested the most reliable way to control the quality of the cDNA clones. We have developed a human gene database, called the H-Invitational Database (H-InvDB; http://www.h-invitational.jp/). It provides the following: integrative annotation of human genes, description of gene structures, details of novel alternative splicing isoforms, non-protein-coding RNAs, functional domains, subcellular localizations, metabolic pathways, predictions of protein three-dimensional structure, mapping of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identification of polymorphic microsatellite repeats within human genes, and comparative results with mouse full-length cDNAs. The H-InvDB analysis has shown that up to 4% of the human genome sequence (National Center for Biotechnology Information build 34 assembly) may contain misassembled or missing regions. We found that 6.5% of the human gene candidates (1,377 loci) did not have a good protein-coding open reading frame, of which 296 loci are strong candidates for non-protein-coding RNA genes. In

  3. Human cDNA clones for four species of G alpha s signal transduction protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, P; Carter, A; Simons, C; Guo, V; Puckett, C; Kamholz, J; Spiegel, A; Nirenberg, M

    1986-01-01

    lambda gt11 cDNA libraries derived from human brain were screened with oligonucleotide probes for recombinants that code for alpha subunits of G signal transduction proteins. Eleven alpha s clones were detected with both probes and characterized. Four types of alpha s cDNA were cloned that differ in nucleotide sequence in the region that corresponds to amino acid residues 71-88. The clones differ in the codon for alpha s amino acid residue 71 (glutamic acid or aspartic acid), the presence or absence of codons for the next 15 amino acid residues, and the presence or absence of an adjacent serine residue. S1 nuclease protection experiments revealed at least two forms of alpha s mRNA. A mechanism for generating four species of alpha s mRNA by alternative splicing of precursor RNA is proposed. Images PMID:3024154

  4. Molecular cloning of a human histocompatibility antigen cDNA fragment.

    PubMed Central

    Ploegh, H L; Orr, H T; Strominger, J L

    1980-01-01

    A clone (pHLA-1) containing HLA-specific cDNA was constructed by reverse transcription of partially purified HLA mRNA from the human lymphoblastoid cell line LKT. The identity of pHLA-1 was established by its ability to hybridize to HLA heavy chain mRNA and by nucleotide sequence analysis. The pHLA-1 cDNA insert (approximately 525 base pairs) corresponds to the COOH-terminal 46 amino acids of an HLA-A, -B, or -C antigen (15 residues from the hydrophobic region and the remainder from the COOH-termial hydrophilic region), together with a portion of the 3' untranslated region of the mRNA. Images PMID:6934534

  5. The human mitochondrial elongation factor tu (EF-Tu) gene: cDNA sequence, genomic localization, genomic structure, and identification of a pseudogene.

    PubMed

    Ling, M; Merante, F; Chen, H S; Duff, C; Duncan, A M; Robinson, B H

    1997-09-15

    The human mitochondrial elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) is nuclear-encoded and functions in the translational apparatus of mitochondria. The complete human EF-Tu cDNA sequence of 1677 base pairs (bp) with a 101 bp 5'-untranslated region, a 1368 bp coding region, and a 207 bp 3'-untranslated region, has been determined and updated. The predicted protein from this cDNA sequence is approximately 49.8 kDa in size and is composed of 455 amino acids (aa) with a putative N-terminal mitochondrial leader sequence of approximately 50 aa residues. The predicted amino acid sequence shows high similarity to other EF-Tu protein sequences from ox, yeast, and bacteria, and also shows limited similarity to human cystolic elongation factor 1 alpha. The complete size of this cDNA (1677 bp) obtained by cloning and sequencing was confirmed by Northern blot analysis, which showed a single transcript (mRNA) of approximately 1.7 kb in human liver. The genomic structure of this EF-Tu gene has been determined for the first time. This gene contains nine introns with a predicted size of approximately 3.6 kilobases (kb) and has been mapped to chromosome 16p11.2. In addition, an intronless pseudogene of approximately 1.7 kb with 92.6% nucleotide sequence similarity to the EF-Tu gene has also been identified and mapped to chromosome 17q11.2. PMID:9332382

  6. Analysis of the human, bovine and rat 33-kDa proteins and cDNA in retina and pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Abe, T; Nakabayashi, H; Tamada, H; Takagi, T; Sakuragi, S; Yamaki, K; Shinohara, T

    1990-07-16

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb) was produced against a bovine retinal 33-kDa protein. Several clones of 33-kDa protein were isolated from each library of cDNA from human, bovine and rat retinas and rat pineal gland by mAb screening and by hybridization with cDNA probes. Each of the four cDNA sequences was determined and amino acid (aa) sequences were deduced from the nucleotide sequences. The latter were nearly identical in rat retina and rat pineal gland (99.6%) and were similar in human, bovine and rat retina (more than 87%). Each of these cDNAs had one long ORF and encoded 245 or 246 aa. The deduced aa sequences in rat retina and rat pineal gland were virtually identical and the sequences in human, bovine and rat retina were highly homologous (more than 88%). The predicted Mr for each of these proteins was 28,246 in the human, 28,176 in bovine, 28,143 in rat retina, and 28,129 in rat pineal gland. Each of the sequences has a putative site for phosphorylation by A kinase; we have confirmed that the putative site is Ser73. These results show that the 33-kDa proteins in the retina and pineal gland have the same sequences and the same phosphorylation site and suggest that the functional role of this protein is the same in the retina and pineal gland.

  7. Dissociable human perirhinal, hippocampal, and parahippocampal roles during verbal encoding.

    PubMed

    Strange, B A; Otten, L J; Josephs, O; Rugg, M D; Dolan, R J

    2002-01-15

    The precise contribution of perirhinal cortex to human episodic memory is uncertain. Human intracranial recordings highlight a role in successful episodic memory encoding, but encoding-related perirhinal activation has not been observed with functional imaging. By adapting functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning parameters to maximize sensitivity to medial temporal lobe activity, we demonstrate that left perirhinal and hippocampal responses during word list encoding are greater for subsequently recalled than forgotten words. Although perirhinal responses predict memory for all words, successful encoding of initial words in a list, demonstrating a primacy effect, is associated with parahippocampal and anterior hippocampal activation. We conclude that perirhinal cortex and hippocampus participate in successful memory encoding. Encoding-related parahippocampal and anterior hippocampal responses for initial, remembered words most likely reflects enhanced attentional orienting to these positionally distinctive items.

  8. Interspecies diversity of the occludin sequence: cDNA cloning of human, mouse, dog, and rat-kangaroo homologues.

    PubMed

    Ando-Akatsuka, Y; Saitou, M; Hirase, T; Kishi, M; Sakakibara, A; Itoh, M; Yonemura, S; Furuse, M; Tsukita, S

    1996-04-01

    Occludin has been identified from chick liver as a novel integral membrane protein localizing at tight junctions (Furuse, M., T. Hirase, M. Itoh, A. Nagafuchi, S. Yonemura, Sa. Tsukita, and Sh. Tsukita. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 123:1777-1788). To analyze and modulate the functions of tight junctions, it would be advantageous to know the mammalian homologues of occludin and their genes. Here we describe the nucleotide sequences of full length cDNAs encoding occludin of rat-kangaroo (potoroo), human, mouse, and dog. Rat-kangaroo occludin cDNA was prepared from RNA isolated from PtK2 cell culture, using a mAb against chicken occludin, whereas the others were amplified by polymerase chain reaction based on the sequence found around the human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene. The amino acid sequences of the three mammalian (human, murine, and canine) occludins were very closely related to each other (approximately 90% identity), whereas they diverged considerably from those of chicken and rat-kangaroo (approximately 50% identity). Implications of these data and novel experimental options in cell biological research are discussed.

  9. Characterization of a human glycoprotein with a potential role in sperm-egg fusion: cDNA cloning, immunohistochemical localization, and chromosomal assignment of the gene (AEGL1)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Masaru; Fujimoto, Seiichiro; Takano, Hiroko

    1996-03-05

    Acidic epididymal glycoprotein (AEG), thus far identified only in rodents, is one of the sperm surface proteins involved in the fusion of the sperm and egg plasma membranes. In the present study, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding a human glycoprotein related to AEG. Although this protein, designated ARP (AEG-related protein), is not the ortholog of rodent AEG, it resembles AEG in that it is an epididymal secretory glycoprotein that binds to the postacrosomal region of the sperm head. The fact that no AEG mRNA can be detected in the human epididymis suggests that ARP might be the functional counterpart of rodent AEG. The gene encoding ARP (AEGL1) was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to 6p21.1-p21.2. This result indicates that AEGL1 and the mouse gene for AEG are located in the chromosomal segments with conserved syntenies. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Isolation and mapping of human chromosome 21 cDNA: Progress in constructing a chromosome 21 expression map

    SciTech Connect

    Jan-Fang Cheng; Boyartchuk, V.; Zhu Y.

    1994-09-01

    We have isolated 175 cDNA clones from a fetal brain library by direct cDNA selection using genomic DNA isolated from pools of human chromosome 21 (HC21) cosmids. DNA sequences have revealed that 16 of these cDNA clones contain overlapping sequences. Of the other 159 cDNA sequences, 10 match previously identified HC21 genes, and 9 match previously determined cDNA sequences, including the Wilms tumor related transcript (QM), the human testican cDNA, the mammalian calponin cDNA, and 6 anonymous expressed sequence tags. All isolated cDNAs were hybridized to their corresponding cosmids, which suggests that they originated from HC21. We have localized 92 cDNA clones to previously reported HC21q YACs. The remaining unmapped cDNAs contain either sequences not included in the isolated HC21q YACs or sequences that hybridize to yeast DNA. The cDNAs not included in the YACs should be useful in isolating new YACs to bridge the gaps. PCR primers were derived from 4 novel cDNA sequences that had been mapped to the YACs in the suspected Down syndrome region and used in RT-PCR analysis. All 4 primer sequences amplified RNA fragments with the expected sizes, suggesting that these sequences could be used for expression analysis. The construction of a chromosome 21 cDNA map not only is important in the refinement of physical maps, but also will identify a set of genes in the disease regions for detailed characterization. 30 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Cloning and functional expression of a cDNA encoding stearoyl-ACP Δ9-desaturase from the endosperm of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.).

    PubMed

    Gao, Lingchao; Sun, Ruhao; Liang, Yuanxue; Zhang, Mengdan; Zheng, Yusheng; Li, Dongdong

    2014-10-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is an economically tropical fruit tree with special fatty acid compositions. The stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) plays a key role in the properties of the majority of cellular glycerolipids. In this paper, a full-length cDNA of a stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase, designated CocoFAD, was isolated from cDNA library prepared from the endosperm of coconut (C. nucifera L.). An 1176 bp cDNA from overlapped PCR products containing ORF encoding a 391-amino acid (aa) protein was obtained. The coded protein was virtually identical and shared the homology to other Δ9-desaturase plant sequences (greater than 80% as similarity to that of Elaeis guineensis Jacq). The real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR result indicated that the yield of CocoFAD was the highest in the endosperm of 8-month-old coconut and leaf, and the yield was reduced to 50% of the highest level in the endosperm of 15-month-old coconut. The coding region showed heterologous expression in strain INVSc1 of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). GC-MS analysis showed that the levels of palmitoleic acid (16:1) and oleic acid (18:1) were improved significantly; meanwhile stearic acid (18:0) was reduced. These results indicated that the plastidial Δ9 desaturase from the endosperm of coconut was involved in the biosynthesis of hexadecenoic acid and octadecenoic acid, which was similar with other plants. These results may be valuable for understanding the mechanism of fatty acid metabolism and the genetic improvement of CocoFAD gene in palm plants in the future.

  12. A cDNA cloned from Physarum polycephalum encodes new type of family 3 beta-glucosidase that is a fusion protein containing a calx-beta motif.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Akinori; Hayase, Masato; Yubisui, Toshitsugu; Minami, Yoshiko

    2006-01-01

    The microplasmodia of Physarum polycephalum express three types of beta-glucosidases: secretory enzyme, a soluble cytoplasmic enzyme and a membrane-bound enzyme. We are interested in the physiological role of three enzymes. We report the sequence of cDNA for membrane beta-glucosidase 1, which consists of 3825 nucleotides that includes an open reading frame encoding 1248 amino acids. The molecular weight of membrane beta-glucosidase 1 was calculated to be 131,843 based on the predicted amino acid composition. Glycosyl hydrolase family 3 N-terminal and C-terminal domains were found within the N-terminal half of the membrane beta-glucosidase 1 sequence and were highly homologous with the primary structures of fungal beta-glucosidases. Notably, the C-terminal half of membrane beta-glucosidase 1 contains two calx-beta motifs, which are known to be Ca(2+) binding domains in the Drosophila Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger; an RGD sequence, which is known to be a cell attachment sequence; and a transmembrane region. In this way, Physarum membrane beta-glucosidase 1 differs from all previously identified family 3 beta-glucosidases. In addition to cDNA for membrane beta-glucosidase 1, two other distinctly different mRNAs were also isolated. Two sequences were largely identical to cDNA for membrane beta-glucosidase 1, but included a long insert sequence having a stop codon, leading to truncation of their products, which could account for other beta-glucosidase forms occurred in Physarum poycephalum. Thus, the membrane beta-glucosidase is a new type family 3 enzyme fused with the Calx-beta domain. We propose that Calx-beta domain may modulate the beta-glucosidase activity in response to changes in the Ca(2+) concentration.

  13. Cloning and functional expression of a cDNA encoding stearoyl-ACP Δ9-desaturase from the endosperm of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.).

    PubMed

    Gao, Lingchao; Sun, Ruhao; Liang, Yuanxue; Zhang, Mengdan; Zheng, Yusheng; Li, Dongdong

    2014-10-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is an economically tropical fruit tree with special fatty acid compositions. The stearoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase (SAD) plays a key role in the properties of the majority of cellular glycerolipids. In this paper, a full-length cDNA of a stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase, designated CocoFAD, was isolated from cDNA library prepared from the endosperm of coconut (C. nucifera L.). An 1176 bp cDNA from overlapped PCR products containing ORF encoding a 391-amino acid (aa) protein was obtained. The coded protein was virtually identical and shared the homology to other Δ9-desaturase plant sequences (greater than 80% as similarity to that of Elaeis guineensis Jacq). The real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR result indicated that the yield of CocoFAD was the highest in the endosperm of 8-month-old coconut and leaf, and the yield was reduced to 50% of the highest level in the endosperm of 15-month-old coconut. The coding region showed heterologous expression in strain INVSc1 of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). GC-MS analysis showed that the levels of palmitoleic acid (16:1) and oleic acid (18:1) were improved significantly; meanwhile stearic acid (18:0) was reduced. These results indicated that the plastidial Δ9 desaturase from the endosperm of coconut was involved in the biosynthesis of hexadecenoic acid and octadecenoic acid, which was similar with other plants. These results may be valuable for understanding the mechanism of fatty acid metabolism and the genetic improvement of CocoFAD gene in palm plants in the future. PMID:25038276

  14. Characterization of cDNAs encoding human leukosialin and localization of the leukosialin gene to chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Pallant, A.; Eskenazi, A.; Frelinger, J.G. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Fournier, R.E.K. ); Carlsson, S.R.; Fukuda, M. )

    1989-02-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding human leukosialin, a major sialoglycoprotein of human leukocytes. Leukosialin is very closely related or identical to the sialophorin molecule, which is involved in T-cell proliferation and whose expression is altered in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-chromosome-linked immunodeficiency disease. Using a rabbit antiserum to leukosialin, a cDNA clone was isolated from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library constructed from human peripheral blood cells. The {lambda}gt11 clone was used to isolate longer cDNA clones that correspond to the entire coding sequence of leukosialin. DNA sequence analysis reveals three domains in the predicted mature protein. The extracellular domain is enriched for Ser, Thr, and Pro and contains four contiguous 18-amino acid repeats. The transmembrane and intracellular domains of the human leukosialin molecule are highly homologous to the rat W3/13 molecule. RNA gel blot analysis reveals two polyadenylylated species of 2.3 and 8 kilobases. Southern blot analysis suggests that human leukosialin is a single-copy gene. Analysis of monochromosomal cell hybrids indicates that the leukosialin gene is not X chromosome linked and in situ hybridization shows leukosialin is located on chromosome 16. These findings demonstrate that the primary mutation in WAS is not a defect in the structural gene for leukosialin.

  15. A cDNA clone encoding an IgE-binding protein from Brassica anther has significant sequence similarity to Ca(2+)-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Toriyama, K; Okada, T; Watanabe, M; Ide, T; Ashida, T; Xu, H; Singh, M B

    1995-12-01

    Thirteen cDNA clones encoding IgE-binding proteins were isolated from expression libraries of anthers of Brassica rapa L. and B. napus L. using serum IgE from a patient who was specifically allergic to Brassica pollen. These clones were divided into two groups, I and II, based on the sequence similarity. All the group I cDNAs predicted the same protein of 79 amino acids, while the group II predicted a protein of 83 amino acids with microheterogeneity. Both of the deduced amino acid sequences contained two regions with sequence similarity to Ca(2+)-binding sites of Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin. However flanking sequences were distinct from that of calmodulin or other Ca(2+)-binding proteins. RNA-gel blot analysis showed the genes of group I and II were preferentially expressed in anthers at the later developmental stage and in mature pollen. The recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli was recognized in immunoblot analysis by the IgE of a Brassica pollen allergic patient, but not by the Ige of a non-allergic patient. The cDNA clones reported here, therefore, represent pollen allergens of Brassica species.

  16. Identification and characterization of a cDNA encoding a crustin-like, putative antibacterial protein from the American lobster Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Rus, Szymon; Goiney, Christopher C; Smith, Christine M; Towle, David W; Dickinson, Patsy S

    2007-07-01

    Pathogenic challenges in decapod crustaceans are combated by innate immune responses, including the production and secretion of soluble antibacterial proteins into the hemolymph. Among the antibacterials that have been identified in decapod species are the crustins, a group of four-disulfide core/whey-acidic-protein (WAP) domain-containing proteins, which target marine/salt tolerant Gram-positive bacteria. To begin to assess the possible role of crustins in combating bacterial invasion in the American lobster Homarus americanus, we identified and sequenced a 744 base pair cDNA that encodes a novel 96 amino acid crustin-like protein. Comparison of H. americanus crustin (Hoa-crustin) with crustins from other decapod species showed that it is most similar to an isoform predicted from the European lobster Homarus gammarus ( approximately 86% identity). With our identification of the Hoa-crustin cDNA, we are positioned to begin molecular and physiological investigations of the regulation and function of this putative antibacterial protein in H. americanus. PMID:17418897

  17. Identification of cDNA clones encoding valosin-containing protein and other plant plasma membrane-associated proteins by a general immunoscreening strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, J; Dixon, R A; Gonzales, R A; Kjellbom, P; Bhattacharyya, M K

    1995-01-01

    An approach was developed for the isolation and characterization of soybean plasma membrane-associated proteins by immunoscreening of a cDNA expression library. An antiserum was raised against purified plasma membrane vesicles. In a differential screening of approximately 500,000 plaque-forming units with the anti-(plasma membrane) serum and DNA probes derived from highly abundant clones isolated in a preliminary screening, 261 clones were selected from approximately 1,200 antiserum-positive plaques. These clones were classified into 40 groups by hybridization analysis and 5'- and 3'-terminal sequencing. By searching nucleic acid and protein sequence data bases, 11 groups of cDNAs were identified, among which valosin-containing protein (VCP), clathrin heavy chain, phospholipase C, and S-adenosylmethionine:delta 24-sterol-C-methyltransferase have not to date been cloned from plants. The remaining 29 groups did not match any current data base entries and may, therefore, represent additional or yet uncharacterized genes. A full-length cDNA encoding the soybean VCP was sequenced. The high level of amino acid identity with vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein indicates that the soybean protein is a plant homolog of vertebrate VCP and yeast CDC48 protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753826

  18. A catalog of human cDNA expression clones and its application to structural genomics

    PubMed Central

    Büssow, Konrad; Quedenau, Claudia; Sievert, Volker; Tischer, Janett; Scheich, Christoph; Seitz, Harald; Hieke, Brigitte; Niesen, Frank H; Götz, Frank; Harttig, Ulrich; Lehrach, Hans

    2004-01-01

    We describe here a systematic approach to the identification of human proteins and protein fragments that can be expressed as soluble proteins in Escherichia coli. A cDNA expression library of 10,825 clones was screened by small-scale expression and purification and 2,746 clones were identified. Sequence and protein-expression data were entered into a public database. A set of 163 clones was selected for structural analysis and 17 proteins were prepared for crystallization, leading to three new structures. PMID:15345055

  19. cDNA clone for the alpha-chain of human beta-hexosaminidase: deficiency of alpha-chain mRNA in Ashkenazi Tay-Sachs fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Myerowitz, R; Proia, R L

    1984-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone containing sequences complementary to mRNA encoding the alpha-chain of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase. RNA from a human lung fibroblast strain, IMR90, was enriched for beta-hexosaminidase messenger by polysome immunoselection with antiserum against beta-hexosaminidase A. This preparation was used to construct cDNA recombinant plasmids by the Okayama-Berg vector primer procedure. After transformation of Escherichia coli, 385 ampicillin-resistant colonies were obtained, 44 of which contained inserts in the plasmid DNA. Differential hybridization, with cDNA probes prepared from polysomal RNA enriched or depleted for beta-hexosaminidase messenger, was used to screen the recombinant plasmids for sequences encoding beta-hexosaminidase. One clone, p beta H alpha-1, containing a cDNA insert of approximately equal to 240 base pairs, was identified in this manner. The plasmid hybrid-selected a messenger from placental RNA that programed a translation system to synthesize the alpha-chain of beta-hexosaminidase. p beta H alpha-1 hybridized to an mRNA of approximately equal to 1.9 kilobases in preparations enriched separately in messenger for the alpha-chain or for both alpha- and beta-chains (by polysome immunoselection with antiserum against isolated alpha-chain or against beta-hexosaminidase A, respectively). It did not hybridize to an RNA preparation enriched for messenger of beta-chain by immunoselection with antiserum against beta-hexosaminidase B. The 1.9-kilobase mRNA was observed in poly(A)+ RNA preparations from control fibroblasts and from fibroblasts of a Tay-Sachs patient that synthesize an altered alpha-chain; however, it was not seen in similar preparations from fibroblasts of four Ashkenazi Tay-Sachs patients. Images PMID:6236461

  20. Isolation of an additional soybean cDNA encoding Ypt/Rab-related small GTP-binding protein and its functional comparison to Sypt using a yeast ypt1-1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Y; Cheong, N E; Lee, D C; Lee, K O; Je, D Y; Bahk, J D; Cho, M J; Lee, S Y

    1996-07-01

    We have previously reported the isolation of a gene from a soybean cDNA library encoding a Ypt/Rab-related small GTP-binding protein, Sypt. Here, we report the isolation of a second Ypt/Rab-related gene, designated Srab2, from the same soybean cDNA library. And we compare the in vivo function of the two soybean genes utilizing a yeast ypt1-1 mutant. The Srab2 gene encodes 211 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 23 169 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Srab2 is closely related to the rat (76%) and human (75%) Rab2 proteins, but it shares relatively little homology to Sypt (46%) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ypt proteins (41%). Genomic Southern blot analysis using the cDNA insert of Srab2 revealed that it belongs to a multigene family in the soybean genome. The protein encoded by Srab2 gene, when expressed in Escherichia coli, disclosed a GTP-binding activity. The expression pattern of the Srab2 gene is quite different from that of the Sypt gene. The Srab2 gene is predominantly expressed in the plumule region, while expression was very low in the other areas in soybean seedlings. On the other hand, the Sypt mRNA is not detectable in any tissues of soybean seedlings grown in the dark. However, light significantly suppressed the Srab2 gene expression, but enhanced the transcript levels of the Sypt gene in leaf and, at even higher levels, in root tissues. When the Srab2 and Sypt genes are introduced separately into a S cerevisiae defective in vesicular transport function, the Srab2 gene cannot complement the temperature-sensitive yeast ypt1-1 mutation at all, in contrast to the Sypt gene. In conclusion, the difference of functional complementation of the yeast mutation together with differential expression of the two genes suggest that the in vivo roles of the Srab2 and Sypt genes may be different in soybean cells.

  1. Isolation and expression of human cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor cDNA clones: Homology to Epstein-Barr virus open reading frame BCRFI

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, P.; De Waal-Malefyt, R.; Dang, M.N.; Johnson, K.E.; Kastelein, R.; Fiorentino, D.F.; DeVries, J.E.; Roncarolo, M.G.; Mosmann, T.R.; Moore, K.W. )

    1991-02-15

    The authors demonstrated the existence of human cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor (DSIF) (interleukin 10 (IL-10)). cDNA clones encoding human IL-10 (hIL-10) were isolated from a tetanus toxin-specific human T-cell clone. Like mouse IL-10, hIL-10 exhibits strong DNA and amino acid sequence homology to an open reading frame in the Epstein-Barr virus, BDRFL. hIL-10 and the BCRFI product inhibit cytokine synthesis by activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and by a mouse Th1 clone. Both hIL-10 and mouse IL-10 sustain the viability of a mouse mast cell line in culture, but BCRFI lacks comparable activity in this way, suggesting that BCRFI may have conserved only a subset of hIL-10 activities.

  2. Characterisation of three cDNA clones encoding different mRNAs for the precursor to the small subunit of wheat ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S M; Bedbrook, J; Speirs, J

    1983-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced three cDNA clones for the nuclear-encoded precursor to the small subunit of the chloroplast enzyme, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase of wheat. The nucleotide sequences of these clones are different, indicating that they are probably derived from three different mRNAs. This finding is consistent with the proposal that this polypeptide is encoded by a multigene family in wheat, in support of similar data reported by Broglie et al. (Bio/Technology 1:55-61, 1983). We deduce that the mature small subunit polypeptide is comprised of 128 amino acids and that its precursor contains an N-terminal transit peptide sequence. The sequences of both the mature small subunit and its transit peptide differ at several positions from those determined by Broglie et al, (1983) from a different wheat cultivar. Different wheat cultivars might therefore contain different small subunit polypeptides. A comparison of nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the small subunit from wheat, pea, soybean and spinach shows that these sequences are not highly conserved, particularly between monocotyledon and dicotyledon species. Images PMID:6324097

  3. Cloning of a cDNA encoding cytosolic acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase from radish by functional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Vollack, K U; Bach, T J

    1996-01-01

    A cDNA coding for radish (Raphanus sativus L.) acetoacetyl-coenzyme A thiolase (AACT) was cloned by complementation of the erg10 mutation affecting AACT in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The longest reading frame encodes a protein of 406 amino acids with a predicted relative molecular weight of 42,032, with significant similarities to eukaryotic and prokaryotic thiolases. There is no evidence for the presence of a leader peptide characteristic, e.g. of glyoxysomal thiolase. Yeast transformants expressing the radish AACT gene placed under the control of the GAL1 promoter exhibited a 10-fold higher enzyme activity than a wild-type yeast strain after induction by galactose. This enzyme activity is exclusively localized in the soluble fraction but not in membranes. These data indicate that we have cloned a gene encoding cytoplasmic (biosynthetic) AACT. Genomic DNA gel blot analysis suggests the presence of a single AACT gene, which is expressed in all parts of the seedling. Expression in cotyledons appears to be light-stimulated. We present preliminary evidence that a smaller transcript represents an antisense species being read from the same gene. PMID:8756496

  4. Characterization and expression of two cDNA encoding 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase isoforms in coffee (Coffea arabica L.).

    PubMed

    Tiski, Iris; Marraccini, Pierre; Pot, David; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Pereira, Luiz Filipe Protasio

    2011-10-01

    In higher plants there are two independent pathways for isoprenoid biosynthesis, located in the cytosol (mevalonic acid or MVA pathway) or in the plastids [methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway]. The 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) is the first committed step in the MVA pathway. Using the information available from the Brazilian Coffee Genome Project, we found 13 ESTs that originated two isoforms, CaHMGR1 and CaHMGR2, for the enzyme HMGR of Coffea arabica. A complementary DNA encoding the isoform CaHMGR1 was cloned, and its complete nucleotide sequence determined. The full-length cDNA of CaHMGR1 was 2,242 bp containing a 1,812-bp ORF encoding 604 amino acids. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that the deduced CaHMGR1 had extensive homology with other plant HMGRs and contained two transmembrane domains and two putative HMGR binding sites and two NADP(H)-binding sites. Under normal growth conditions, transcripts of isoform CaHMRG1 were detected in fruit tissues (pulp, perisperm, and endosperm) only at the initial stages of development, flower buds and leaves. CaHMRG2 was expressed in all tissues and during all fruit development stages examined. These results suggest a constitutive expression of isoform CaHMGR2, while the isoform CaHMGR1 shows temporal and tissue-specific transcriptional activation.

  5. Human synaptonemal complex protein 1 (SCP1): Isolation and characterization of the cDNA and chromosomal localization of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Meuwissen, R.L.J.; Meerts, I.; Heyting, C.

    1997-02-01

    Synaptonemal complexes (SCs) are structures that are formed between homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiotic prophase. They consist of two proteinaceous axes, one along each homolog, that are connected along their length by numerous transverse filaments (TFs). The cDNA encoding one major component of TFs of SCs of the rat, rnSCP1, has recently been isolated and characterized. In this paper we describe the isolation and characterization of the cDNA encoding the human protein homologous to rnSCP1, hsSCP1. hsSCP1 and rnSCP1 have 75% amino acid identity. The most prominent structural features and amino acid sequence motifs of rnSCP1 have been conserved in hsSCP1. Most probably, hsSCP1 is functionally homologous to rnSCP1. The hsSCP1 gene was assigned to human chromosome 1p12-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 44 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Identification, characterization, and analysis of cDNA and genomic sequences encoding two different small heat shock proteins in Hordeum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, N; Pavesi, A; Di Cola, G; Hartings, H; Raho, G; Conte, M R; Perrotta, C

    1993-12-01

    In vitro translation of mRNAs prepared from barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings (cv. Onice) exposed at 40 degrees C directed the synthesis of major heat shock proteins (HSPs) with molecular masses of 80-90, 70, 42 and 16-22 kDa. A cDNA library prepared from the 40 degrees C mRNAs and screened by differential hybridization led to the isolation of heat shock specific sequences. One of these (Hv hsp18) was confirmed by hybrid-arrested and hybrid-released translation as encoding for an 18-kDa HSP. The barley hsp18 sequence has an open reading frame encoding a 160 amino acid residue 18-kDa protein that is 63% identical to wheat 16.9-kDa HSP (clone C5-8), 54% identical to soybean (Glycine max) 17.5-kDa HSP, and 49% identical to Arabidopsis thaliana 17.6-kDa HSP. Lower similarities were found with class II plant small HSPs such as soybean 17.9-kDa HSP (27%), Pisum sativum 17.7-kDa HSP (30%), wheat (Triticum aestivum) 17.3-kDa HSP (clone Ta hsp 17.3) (30%), and with animal small HSPs and alpha-crystallins. The Hv hsp18 sequence was used to pick up Hv hsp17 genomic sequence encoding for another class I 17-kDa HSP. By computer analysis of the nucleotide sequence the TATA box, two heat shock promoter elements, a metal-ion response element, and the polyadenylation signals were identified. Barley HSP18 has an additional cysteine-rich region when compared with HSP17 mapping at the carboxy terminal end. PMID:8112573

  7. Localization of the human fibromodulin gene (FMOD) to chromosome 1q32 and completion of the cDNA sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.; Roughley, P.J.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the human fibromodulin cDNA and its use to map the gene. For somatic cell hybrids, the generation of the PCR product was concordant with the presence of chromosome 1 and discordant with the presence of all other chromosomes, confirming that the fibromodulin gene is located within region q32 of chromosome 1. The physical mapping of genes is a critical step in the process of identifying which genes may be responsible for various inherited disorders. Specifically, the mapping of the fibromodulin gene now provides the information necessary to evaluate its potential role in genetic disorders of connective tissues. The analysis of previously reported diseases mapped to chromosome 1 reveals two genes located in the proximity of the fibromodulin locus. These are Usher syndrome type II, a recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, and Van der Woude syndrome, a dominant condition associated with abnormalities such as cleft lip and palate and hyperdontia. The genes for both of these disorders have been projected to be localized to 1q32 of a physical map that integrates available genetic linkage and physical data. However, it seems improbable that either of these disorders, exhibiting restricted tissue involvement, could be linked to the fibromodulin gene, given the wide tissue distribution of the encoded proteoglycan, although it remains possible that the relative importance of the quantity and function of the proteoglycan may avry between tissues. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Human cDNA clones that modify radiomimetic sensitivity of Ataxia-telangiectasia (Group A) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ziv, Y.; Bar-Shira, A.; Sartiel, A.

    1995-03-01

    Genes responsible for genetic diseases with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents can be identified using complementation cloning. This strategy is based on in vitro complementation of the cellular sensitivity by gene transfer. Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a multisystem autosomal recessive disorder involving cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation and radiomimetic drugs. A-T is genetically heterogeneous, with four complementation groups. We attempted to identify cDNA clones that modify the radiomimetic sensitivity of A-T cells assigned to complementation group [A-T(A)]. The cells were transfected with human cDNA libraries clones in episomal vectors, and various protocols by radiomimetic selection were applied. Thirteen cDNAs rescued from survivor cells were found to confer various degrees of radiomimetic resistance to A-T(A) cells upon repeated introduction, and one of them also partially influenced another feature of the A-T phenotype, radioresistant DNA synthesis. None of the clones mapped to the A-T locus on chromosome 11q22-23. Nine of the clones were derived from known genes, some of which are involved in cellular stress responses. We concluded that a number of different genes, not necessarily associated with A-T, can influence the response of A-T cells to radiomimetic drugs, and hence the complementation cloning approach may be less applicable to A-T than to other diseases involving abnormal processing of DNA damage. 57 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Human type VII collagen: cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Parente, M.G.; Chung, L.C.; Ryynaenen, J.; Monli Chu; Uitto, J. ); Woodley, D.T.; Wynn, K.C.; Bauer, E.A. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1991-08-15

    A human keratinocyte cDNA expression library in bacteriophage {lambda}gt11 was screened with the purified IgG fraction of serum from a patient with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, which had a high titer of anti-type VII collagen antibodies. Screening of {approx}3 {times} 10{sup 5} plaques identified 8 positive clones, the largest one (K-131) being {approx}1.9 kilobases in size. Dideoxynucleotide sequencing of K-131 indicated that it consisted of 1875 base pairs and contained an open reading frame coding for a putative N-terminal noncollagenous domain of 439 amino acids and a collagenous domain was characterized by repeating Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequences that were interrupted in several positions by insertions or deletions of 1-3 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence also revealed a peptide segment that had a high degree of identity with a published type VII collagen protein sequence. The results mapped the COL7A1 to the locus 3p21. The cDNA clones characterized in this study will be valuable for understanding the protein structure and gene expression of type VII collagen present in anchoring fibrils and its aberrations in the dystrophic forms of heritable epidermolysis bullosa.

  10. Cloning of the cDNA encoding adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase 1 and its mRNA expression in Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Keyong; Sun, Shujuan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Baojie; Meng, Xiaolin; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    AMP deaminase catalyzes the conversion of AMP into IMP and ammonia. In the present study, a full-length cDNA of AMPD1 from skeletal muscle of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus was cloned and characterized. The 2 526 bp cDNA contains a 5'-UTR of 78 bp, a 3'-UTR of 237 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 2 211 bp, which encodes a protein of 736 amino acids. The predicted protein contains a highly conserved AMP deaminase motif (SLSTDDP) and an ATP-binding site sequence (EPLMEEYAIAAQVFK). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AMPD1 and AMPD3 genes originate from the same branch, but are evolutionarily distant from the AMPD2 gene. RT-PCR showed that the flounder AMPD1 gene was expressed only in skeletal muscle. QRT-PCR analysis revealed a statistically significant 2.54 fold higher level of AMPD1 mRNA in adult muscle (750±40 g) compared with juvenile muscle (7.5±2 g) ( P<0.05). HPLC analysis showed that the IMP content in adult muscle (3.35±0.21 mg/g) was also statistically significantly higher than in juvenile muscle (1.08±0.04 mg/g) ( P<0.05). There is a direct relationship between the AMPD1 gene expression level and IMP content in the skeletal muscle of juvenile and adult flounders. These results may provide useful information for quality improvement and molecular breeding of aquatic animals.

  11. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of a novel human GAP (GAP1M), GTPase-activating protein of Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaowei; Nakamura, Shun; Hattori, Seisuke

    1996-08-01

    We have previously isolated a novel Ras GTPase-activating protein (Ras GAP), Gapl{sup m}, from rat brain. Gap1{sup m} is considered to be a negative regulator of the Ras signaling pathways, like other Ras GAPs, neurofibromin, which is a gene product of the neurofibromatosis type I gene, and p120GAP. In this study we have isolated a human cDNA of this Gap and mapped the gene. The gene encodes a protein of 853 amino acids that shows 89% sequence identity to rat Gapl{sup m}. The human gene was mapped to chromosome 3 by PCR analysis on a panel of human-mouse hybrid cells. FISH analysis refined the location of the gene further to 3q22-q23. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M.

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. cDNA microarray reveals signaling pathways involved in hormones expression of human pituitary.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yue-Yun; Qi, Xiao-Fei; Song, Shao-Jun; Zhao, Zhan-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Xin; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Teng, Yun; Han, Ze-Guang

    2005-09-01

    Pituitary, a master gland of neuroendocrine system, secretes hormones that orchestrate many physiological processes, under the regulation of multiple signaling pathways. To investigate the genes involved in hormones expression of human pituitary, homemade cDNA microarray containing 14,800 human genes/ESTs were used to profile the gene expression in both fetal and adult pituitaries. Seven hundred and twelve known genes changed over 2-fold between the both tissues. Of which, 23 genes were changed with hormones expression in aging were confirmed by RT-PCR, not only the known regulators such as Pit1, GATA4, ESRRA, GABA-A, and EMK, but also LOC55884, DUSP3, PNN, and RCL, which had not been reported to be involved in the hormones expression. Correspondingly, the mRNAs of GH, PRL, POMC, TSH-beta, FSH-beta, and LH-beta, was increased as much as 6- to 20-fold in adult pituitary than those in fetal pituitary, by real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay. In addition, the mRNAs of signaling pathways, such as cAMP-PKA-CREB, PI3K-Akt, and PKA-ERK were further investigated. Of them, it was only cAMP-PKA-CREB pathway, but not PI3K-Akt and PKA-ERK have the same expressing pattern as hormones. It suggested that cDNA microarray is highly advantages to profile the differential expressed genes that were involved in hormones expression of human pituitary, but it might ignore some responding proteins regulated posttranscriptionally.

  14. Human cytomegalovirus encoded microRNAs: hitting targets.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kiat Rui; Li, Jordan Y Z; Gleadle, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is of particular concern in immunodeficient individuals notably transplant recipients, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. HCMV is predicted to encode multiple microRNAs (miRNAs) and several have been characterized in vitro. Furthermore, these miRNAs have been shown to target human and viral mRNAs. Pathways involved in human cellular targets have key roles in vesicle trafficking, immune evasion and cell cycle control. This demonstration of viral miRNA targets provides novel insights into viral pathogenesis. This review details the evidence for the existence of HCMV-encoded miRNA and their targets. HCMV miRNA in blood and other tissues is a potential diagnostic tool and blocking the effects of specific HCMV-encoded miRNA with sequence specific antagomirs is a potential new therapy.

  15. cDNA sequences of variant forms of human placenta diamine oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Kim, J.; McIntire, S.

    1995-08-01

    Genes for two forms of human placenta diamine oxidase (dao) were cloned from a cDNA library and sequenced. One gene, pdao1, is identical in length to human kidney dao but differs from it by two bases in the coding region and differs slightly in the 3{prime} - and 5{prime}-noncoding regions. The second gene, pdao2, is nearly identical to these genes in the coding region, except that it has an extra 57-nucleotide coding segment near the 3{prime} end of this region. This segment corresponds to the contiguous sequence of the 3{prime} end of intron 3 of human kidney dao. pdao2 also differs significantly from pdao1 and human kidney dao in a 13-base sequence in the t{prime}-noncoding region. It is proposed that pdao1 and human kidney dao are polymorphic forms of the same allele. Whether pdao2 is a polymorph of these two is not certain, because of the significant differences in the coding and noncoding regions. pdao2 may represent a different allele. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Molecular cloning, sequence, and expression of a human GDP-L-fucose:. beta. -D-galactoside 2-. alpha. -L-fucosyltransferase cDNA that can form the H blood group antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.D.; Ernst, L.K.; Nair, R.P.; Lowe, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors have previously used a gene-transfer scheme to isolate a human genomic DNA fragment that determines expression of a GDP-L-fucose:{beta}D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-L-fucosyltransferase. Although this fragment determined expression of an {alpha}(1,2)FT whose kinetic properties mirror those of the human H blood group {alpha}(1,2)FT, their precise nature remained undefined. They describe here the molecular cloning, sequence, and expression of a human of cDNA corresponding to these human genomic sequences. When expressed in COS-1 cells, the cDNA directs expression of cell surface H structures and a cognate {alpha}(1,2)FT activity with properties analogous to the human H blood group {alpha}(1,2)FT. The cDNA sequence predicts a 365-amino acid polypeptide characteristic of a type II transmembrane glycoprotein with a domain structure analogous to that of other glycosyltransferases but without significant primary sequence similarity to these or other known proteins. To directly demonstrate that the cDNA encodes an {alpha}(1,2)FT, the COOH-terminal domain predicted to be Golgi-resident was expressed in COS-1 cells as a catalytically active, secreted, and soluble protein A fusion peptide. Southern blot analysis showed that this cDNA identified DNA sequences syntenic to the human H locus on chromosome 19. These results strongly suggest that this cloned {alpha}(1,2)FT cDNA represents the product of the human H blood group locus.

  17. Human acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins P0, P1, and P2: Analysis of cDNA clones, in vitro synthesis, and assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, B.E.; Steitz, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    cDNA clones encoding three antigenically related human ribosomal phosophoproteins (P-proteins) P0, P1, and P2 were isolated and sequenced. P1 and P2 are analogous to Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L7/L12, and P0 is likely to be an analog of L10. The three proteins have a nearly identical carboxy-terminal 17-amino-acid sequence (KEESEESD(D/E)DMGFGLFD-COOH) that is the basis of their immunological cross-reactivity. The identifies of the P1 and P2 cDNAs were confirmed by the strong similarities of their encoded amino acid sequences to published primary structures of the homologous rat, brine shrimp, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins. The P0 cDNA was initially identified by translation of hybrid-selected mRNA and immunoprecipitation of the products. To demonstrate that the coding sequences are full length, the P0, P1, and P2 cDNAs were transcribed in vitro by bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and the resulting mRNAs were translated in vitro. The synthetic P0, P1, and P2 proteins were serologically and electrophoretically identical to P-proteins extracted from HeLa cells. These synthetic P-proteins were incorporated into 60S but not 40S ribosomes and also assembled into a complex similar to that described for E. coli L7/L12 and L10.

  18. Molecular cloning and sequencing of zeta-crystallin/quinone reductase cDNA from human liver.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, P; Rao, P V; Zigler, J S

    1993-03-31

    Zeta-crystallin is an enzyme-crystallin highly expressed in the lens of some hystricomorph rodents and camels. It has been shown to have a novel NADPH: quinone oxidoreductase activity and is present at enzymatic levels in a variety of tissues from various mammals. We report here the cDNA cloning of zeta-crystallin from a human liver library. One clone with the complete open reading frame was obtained. Ten nucleotides of the 5' and 796 of the 3' nontranslated regions are present in the clone including two possible polyadenylation signals. The deduced amino acid sequence is 328 residues long with a calculated molecular mass of 34910 daltons and isoelectric point of 8.73. It shows 84% identity with the guinea pig protein.

  19. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase, a betanidin- and flavonoid-specific enzyme with high homology to inducible glucosyltransferases from the Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Vogt, T; Grimm, R; Strack, D

    1999-09-01

    Based on protein sequence data and RT-PCR, a full length cDNA encoding betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase (5-GT) was obtained from a cDNA library of Dorotheanthus bellidiformis (Burm.f.) N.E.Br. (Aizoaceae). 5-GT catalyses the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose to the 5-hydroxyl group of the chromogenic betanidin. Betanidin and its conjugates, referred to as betacyanins, are characteristic fruit and flower pigments in most members of the Caryophyllales, which fail to synthesise anthocyanins. The 5-GT cDNA displayed homology to previously published glucosyltransferase sequences and exhibited high identity to sequences of several inducible glucosyltransferases of tobacco and tomato (Solanaceae). The open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 489 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 55.24 kDa. The corresponding cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein displayed identical substrate specificity compared to the native enzyme purified from D. bellidiformis cell suspension cultures. In addition to the natural substrate betanidin, ortho-dihydroxylated flavonols and flavones were glycosylated preferentially at the B-ring 4'-hydroxyl group. 5-GT is the first enzyme of betalain biosynthesis in plants, of which the corresponding cDNA has been cloned and expressed. The results are discussed in relation to molecular evolution of plant glucosyl- transferases. PMID:10504573

  20. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding epitopes shared by 15- and 60-kilodalton proteins of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, M C; Fayer, R; Tilley, M; Upton, S J

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA (CP15/60) encoding epitopes of Cryptosporidium parvum 15- and 60-kDa sporozoite proteins was isolated and expressed in Escherichia coli toward the goal of developing an immunogen for producing high-titer anticryptosporidial colostrum. Antisera prepared in rats to native C. parvum 15-kDa protein and used to identify the CP15/60 bacteriophage clone recognized both 15- and 60-kDa in vitro translation products derived from sporozoite RNA. Antisera specific for recombinant CP15/60 antigen recognized native 15- and 60-kDa C. parvum sporozoite proteins by immunoblotting and identified both surface and internal antigens on C. parvum sporozoites by immunofluorescence staining. Northern (RNA) and Southern blot hybridization experiments using sporozoite RNA and DNA indicated that CP15/60 DNA is transcribed as a single 1.4-kb RNA species from a single-copy gene. Recombinant CP15/60 antigen was recognized by hyperimmune colostrum from cows immunized with C. parvum oocyst-sporozoite protein and by convalescent-phase sera from C. parvum-infected calves. Images PMID:7684726

  1. Identification, sequence and mRNA expression pattern during metamorphosis of a cDNA encoding a glycine-rich cuticular protein in Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Mathelin, J; Bouhin, H; Quennedey, B; Courrent, A; Delachambre, J

    1995-04-24

    The study of insect cuticular proteins and their sequences is of interest because they are involved in protein-protein and protein-chitin interactions which confer the mechanical properties and fine architecture of the cuticle. Moreover, in the coleopteran Tenebrio molitor there is a dramatic change in cuticular architecture between pre- and postecdysial secretion. We report the isolation, by differential screening, and the sequence characterization of a cDNA clone encoding a cuticular protein of T. molitor, ACP17. After insertion in the expression vector pEX1, the recognition of the fusion protein by an anti-cuticular monoclonal antibody confirmed the cuticular nature of ACP17. Northern hybridization analysis showed that ACP17 mRNA expression begins weakly 3 days before adult ecdysis and strongly increases during the secretion of postecdysial adult cuticle, with a maximum just after ecdysis. In situ hybridization revealed that the ACP17 mRNA is only present in the epidermis which secretes hard cuticle. The deduced amino acid (aa) composition exhibits a high content of Gly (28%) and Ala (20%) and, particularly, two poly(Gx) stretches separated by repetitive motifs with proline AAPVA. A comparison is made with other cuticle aa sequences.

  2. The human brain encodes event frequencies while forming subjective beliefs.

    PubMed

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Schultz, Wolfram; Bossaerts, Peter

    2013-06-26

    To make adaptive choices, humans need to estimate the probability of future events. Based on a Bayesian approach, it is assumed that probabilities are inferred by combining a priori, potentially subjective, knowledge with factual observations, but the precise neurobiological mechanism remains unknown. Here, we study whether neural encoding centers on subjective posterior probabilities, and data merely lead to updates of posteriors, or whether objective data are encoded separately alongside subjective knowledge. During fMRI, young adults acquired prior knowledge regarding uncertain events, repeatedly observed evidence in the form of stimuli, and estimated event probabilities. Participants combined prior knowledge with factual evidence using Bayesian principles. Expected reward inferred from prior knowledge was encoded in striatum. BOLD response in specific nodes of the default mode network (angular gyri, posterior cingulate, and medial prefrontal cortex) encoded the actual frequency of stimuli, unaffected by prior knowledge. In this network, activity increased with frequencies and thus reflected the accumulation of evidence. In contrast, Bayesian posterior probabilities, computed from prior knowledge and stimulus frequencies, were encoded in bilateral inferior frontal gyrus. Here activity increased for improbable events and thus signaled the violation of Bayesian predictions. Thus, subjective beliefs and stimulus frequencies were encoded in separate cortical regions. The advantage of such a separation is that objective evidence can be recombined with newly acquired knowledge when a reinterpretation of the evidence is called for. Overall this study reveals the coexistence in the brain of an experience-based system of inference and a knowledge-based system of inference.

  3. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA coding for human factor IX.

    PubMed

    Kurachi, K; Davie, E W

    1982-11-01

    A cDNA library prepared from human liver has been screened for factor IX (Christmas factor), a clotting factor that participates in the middle phase of blood coagulation. The library was screened with a single-stranded DNA prepared from enriched mRNA for baboon factor IX and a synthetic oligonucleotide mixture. A plasmid was identified that contained a cDNA insert of 1,466 base pairs coding for human factor IX. The insert is flanked by G-C tails of 11 and 18 base pairs at the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. It also included 138 base pairs that code for an amino-terminal leader sequence, 1,248 base pairs that code for the mature protein, a stop codon, and 48 base pairs of noncoding sequence at the 3' end. The leader sequence contains 46 amino acid residues, and it is proposed that this sequence includes both a signal sequence and a pro sequence for the mature protein that circulates in plasma. The 1,248 base pairs code for a polypeptide chain composed of 416 amino acids. The amino-terminal region for this protein contains 12 glutamic acid residues that are converted to gamma-carboxyglutamic acid in the mature protein. These glutamic acid residues are coded for by both GAA and GAG. The arginyl peptide bonds that are cleaved in the conversion of human factor IX to factor IXa by factor XIa were identified as Arg145-Ala146 and Arg180-Val181. The cleavage of these two internal peptide bonds results in the formation of an activation peptide (35 amino acids) and factor IXa, a serine protease composed of a light chain (145 amino acids) and a heavy chain (236 amino acids), and these two chains are held together by a disulfide bond(s). The active site residues including histidine, aspartate, and serine are located in the heavy chain at positions 221, 270, and 366, respectively. These amino acids are homologous with His57, Asp102, and Ser195 in the active site of chymotrypsin. Two potential carbohydrate binding sites (Asn-X-Thr) were identified in the activation peptide, and

  4. Identification and Validation of Human Papillomavirus Encoded microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Rönty, Mikko; Michon, Frederic; Frilander, Mikko J.; Ritari, Jarmo; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Paulín, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Auvinen, Eeva

    2013-01-01

    We report here identification and validation of the first papillomavirus encoded microRNAs expressed in human cervical lesions and cell lines. We established small RNA libraries from ten human papillomavirus associated cervical lesions including cancer and two human papillomavirus harboring cell lines. These libraries were sequenced using SOLiD 4 technology. We used the sequencing data to predict putative viral microRNAs and discovered nine putative papillomavirus encoded microRNAs. Validation was performed for five candidates, four of which were successfully validated by qPCR from cervical tissue samples and cell lines: two were encoded by HPV 16, one by HPV 38 and one by HPV 68. The expression of HPV 16 microRNAs was further confirmed by in situ hybridization, and colocalization with p16INK4A was established. Prediction of cellular target genes of HPV 16 encoded microRNAs suggests that they may play a role in cell cycle, immune functions, cell adhesion and migration, development, and cancer. Two putative viral target sites for the two validated HPV 16 miRNAs were mapped to the E5 gene, one in the E1 gene, two in the L1 gene and one in the LCR region. This is the first report to show that papillomaviruses encode their own microRNA species. Importantly, microRNAs were found in libraries established from human cervical disease and carcinoma cell lines, and their expression was confirmed in additional tissue samples. To our knowledge, this is also the first paper to use in situ hybridization to show the expression of a viral microRNA in human tissue. PMID:23936163

  5. Identification and validation of human papillomavirus encoded microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kui; Pietilä, Tuuli; Rönty, Mikko; Michon, Frederic; Frilander, Mikko J; Ritari, Jarmo; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Paulín, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Auvinen, Eeva

    2013-01-01

    We report here identification and validation of the first papillomavirus encoded microRNAs expressed in human cervical lesions and cell lines. We established small RNA libraries from ten human papillomavirus associated cervical lesions including cancer and two human papillomavirus harboring cell lines. These libraries were sequenced using SOLiD 4 technology. We used the sequencing data to predict putative viral microRNAs and discovered nine putative papillomavirus encoded microRNAs. Validation was performed for five candidates, four of which were successfully validated by qPCR from cervical tissue samples and cell lines: two were encoded by HPV 16, one by HPV 38 and one by HPV 68. The expression of HPV 16 microRNAs was further confirmed by in situ hybridization, and colocalization with p16INK4A was established. Prediction of cellular target genes of HPV 16 encoded microRNAs suggests that they may play a role in cell cycle, immune functions, cell adhesion and migration, development, and cancer. Two putative viral target sites for the two validated HPV 16 miRNAs were mapped to the E5 gene, one in the E1 gene, two in the L1 gene and one in the LCR region. This is the first report to show that papillomaviruses encode their own microRNA species. Importantly, microRNAs were found in libraries established from human cervical disease and carcinoma cell lines, and their expression was confirmed in additional tissue samples. To our knowledge, this is also the first paper to use in situ hybridization to show the expression of a viral microRNA in human tissue.

  6. Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. |

    1994-09-01

    mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

  7. The human homolog of the JE gene encodes a monocyte secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, B J; Stier, P; Ernst, T; Wong, G G

    1989-01-01

    The mouse fibroblast gene, JE, was one of the first platelet-derived growth factor-inducible genes to be described as such. The protein encoded by JE (mJE) is the prototype of a large family of secreted, cytokinelike glycoproteins, all of whose members are induced by a mitogenic or activation signal in monocytes macrophages, and T lymphocytes; JE is the only member to have been identified in fibroblasts. We report the identification of a human homolog for murine JE, cloned from human fibroblasts. The protein predicted by the coding sequence of human JE (hJE) is 55 amino acids shorter than mJE, and its sequence is identical to that of a recently purified monocyte chemoattractant. When expressed in COS cells, the human JE cDNA directed the secretion of N-glycosylated proteins of Mr 16,000 to 18,000 as well as proteins of Mr 15,500, 15,000, and 13,000. Antibodies raised against mJE recognized these hJE species, all of which were secreted by human fibroblasts. hJE expression was stimulated in HL60 cells during phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocytoid differentiation. However, resting human monocytes constitutively secreted hJE; treatment with gamma interferon did not enhance hJE expression in monocytes, and treatment with phorbol myristate acetate or lipopolysaccharide inhibited its expression. Thus, human JE encodes yet another member of the large family of JE-related cytokinelike proteins, in this case a novel human monocyte and fibroblast secretory protein. Images PMID:2513477

  8. Cloning of cDNAs that encode human mast cell carboxypeptidase A, and comparison of the protein with mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A and rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, D.S.; Gurley, D.S.; Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.; Serafin, W.E. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); Sugarbaker, D.J. )

    1989-12-01

    Human skin and lung mast cells and rodent peritoneal cells contain a carboxypeptidase in their secretory granules. The authors have screened human lung cDNA libraries with a mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) cDNA probe to isolate a near-full-length cDNA that encodes human MC-CPA. The 5{prime} end of the human MC-CPA transcript was defined by direct mRNA sequencing and by isolation and partial sequencing of the human MC-CPA gene. Human MC-CPA is predicted to be translated as a 417 amino acid preproenzyme which includes a 15 amino acid signal peptide and a 94-amino acid activation peptide. The mature human MC-CPA enzyme has a predicted size of 36.1 kDa, a net positive charge of 16 at neutral pH, and 86% amino acid sequence identity with mouse MC-CPA. DNA blot analyses showed that human MC-CPA mRNA is transcribed from a single locus in the human genome. Comparison of the human MC-CPA with mouse MC-CPA and with three rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases shows that these enzymes are encoded by distinct but homologous genes.

  9. A human papilloma virus type 11 transcript encoding an E1--E4 protein.

    PubMed

    Nasseri, M; Hirochika, R; Broker, T R; Chow, L T

    1987-08-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) associated with a genital wart (condyloma acuminatum) was determined to be type 11. The majority of the viral DNA molecules were monomeric circles present in the cells at high copy number, as demonstrated by one- and two-dimensional agarose gell electrophoretic separation followed by Southern blot analysis. A cDNA library in phage lambda gt11 was constructed from poly(A)-selected mRNA recovered from the tissue. Recombinant clones corresponding to the most abundant 1.2-kb viral mRNA species detected by Northern blot hybridization and by electron microscopic analysis of R loops were isolated and their nucleotide sequence was determined. Comparison to the prototype HPV-11 DNA sequence revealed that this message consisted of two exons. The promotor-proximal exon spanned nucleotides 716 through 847 and the distal exon included nucleotides 3325 through 4390 or 4392. The mRNAs were alternatively polyadenylated after either of these latter two sites, in both cases following a G and preceding a U residue. Fourteen or sixteen bases upstream from the poly(A) was the hexanucleotide AGUAAA, which apparently serves as the signal for cleavage and polyadenylation of the nascent message. The splice donor and acceptor sites conformed to the usual /GU. . .AG/pattern. The exons joined open reading frame (ORF) E1, which contributed the initiation codon and four additional triplets, to ORF E4, which specified 85 amino acids to encode a protein of 10,022 Da. The cDNA also contained the ORFs E5a and E5b toward the 3' end. The complete sequence of the cDNA revealed three single-base changes from the prototype HPV-11, two resulting in altered amino acids in E4. Neither affects the coding potential of the overlapping E2 ORF. The function of the E1--E4 protein is unknown. PMID:2887066

  10. Isolation and sequence of complementary DNA encoding human extracellular superoxide dismutase

    SciTech Connect

    Hjalmarsson, K.; Marklund, S.L.; Engstroem, A.; Edlund, T.

    1987-09-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) clone from a human placenta cDNA library encoding extracellular superoxide dismutase has been isolated and the nucleotide sequence determined. The cDNA has a very high G + C content. EC-SOD is synthesized with a putative 18-amino acid signal peptide, preceding the 222 amino acids in the mature enzyme, indicating that the enzyme is a secretory protein. The first 95 amino acids of the mature enzyme show no sequence homology with other sequenced proteins and there is one possible N-glycosylation site (Asn-89). The amino acid sequence from residues 96-193 shows strong homology (approx. 50%) with the final two-thirds of the sequences of all know eukaryotic CuZn SODs, whereas the homology with the P. leiognathi CuZn SOD is clearly lower. The ligands to Cu and Zn, the cysteines forming the intrasubunit disulfide bridge in the CuZn SODs, and the arginine found in all CuZn SODs in the entrance to the active site can all be identified in EC-SOD. A comparison with bovine CuZn SOD, the three-dimensional structure of which is known, reveals that the homologies occur in the active site and the divergencies are in the part constituting the subunit contact area in CuZn SOD. Amino acid sequence 194-222 in the carboxyl-terminal end of EC-SOD is strongly hydrophilic and contains nine amino acids with a positive charge. This sequence probably confers the affinity of EC-SOD for heparin and heparan sulfate. An analysis of the amino acid sequence homologies with CuZn SODs from various species indicates that the EC-SODs may have evolved form the CuZn SODs before the evolution of fungi and plants.

  11. Isolation and characterization of human factor IX cDNA: identification of Taq I polymorphism and regional assignment.

    PubMed

    Jagadeeswaran, P; Lavelle, D E; Kaul, R; Mohandas, T; Warren, S T

    1984-09-01

    Hemophilia B or Christmas disease is an X-linked condition caused by absent or reduced levels of functional coagulation factor IX. Based upon the peptide sequence of bovine factor IX, we synthesized a 17-base pair oligonucleotide probe to screen a human liver cDNA library. A recombinant clone was identified with a 917-nucleotide insert whose sequence corresponds to 70% of the coding region of human factor IX. This factor IX cDNA was used to probe restriction endonuclease digested human DNA to identify a Taq I polymorphism associated with the genomic factor IX gene as well as to verify that there is a single copy of this gene per haploid genome. The factor IX cDNA was also used to map the locus for factor IX to a region from Xq26 to Xqter. The cloning of human factor IX cDNA and identification of a Taq I polymorphism and its regional localization will provide a means to study the molecular genetics of hemophilia B and permit linkage analysis with nearby loci.

  12. Sensitive label-free electrochemical analysis of human IgE using an aptasensor with cDNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Yu; Wu, Kuan-Ying; Su, Hsiu-Li; Hung, Huan-Yi; Hsieh, You-Zung

    2013-01-15

    In this study, we developed an ultrasensitive label-free aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor, featuring a highly specific anti-human immunoglobulin E (IgE) aptamer as a capture probe, for human IgE detection. Construction of the aptasensor began with the electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto a graphite-based screen-printed electrode (SPE). After immobilizing the thiol-capped anti-human IgE aptamer onto the AuNPs through self-assembly, we treated the electrode with mercaptohexanol (MCH) to ensure that the remaining unoccupied surfaces of the AuNPs would not undergo nonspecific binding. We employed a designed complementary DNA featuring a guanine-rich section in its sequence (cDNA G1) as a detection probe to bind with the unbound anti-human IgE aptamer. We measured the redox current of methylene blue (MB) to determine the concentration of human IgE in the sample. When the aptamer captured human IgE, the binding of cDNA G1 to the aptamer was inhibited. Using cDNA G1 in the assay greatly amplified the redox signal of MB bound to the detection probe. Accordingly, this approach allowed the linear range (coefficient of determination: 0.996) for the analysis of human IgE to extend from 1 to 100,000pM; the limit of detection was 0.16pM. The fabricated aptasensor exhibited good selectivity toward human IgE even when human IgG, thrombin, and human serum albumin were present at 100-fold concentrations. This method should be readily applicable to the detection of other analytes, merely by replacing the anti-human IgE aptamer/cDNA G1 pair with a suitable anti-target molecule aptamer and cDNA.

  13. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding a pollen extracellular protein as a potential source of a pollen allergen in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Toriyama, K; Hanaoka, K; Okada, T; Watanabe, M

    1998-03-13

    A polyclonal antiserum was raised against the extracellular pollen proteins of Brassica rapa and used for screening the expression cDNA libraries made from immature anthers. We obtained five groups of cDNA clones, including cDNAs similar to PCP1, thioredoxin, and lipid transfer protein (LTP). Recombinant protein of the cDNA clone showing sequence similarity to LTP was demonstrated to bind IgE of a patient allergic to Brassica pollen. The cDNA clone reported here, therefore, represents a novel pollen allergen of Brassica rapa.

  14. Human endogenous retrovirus K10 encodes a functional integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Y; Ayukawa, T; Ishikawa, T; Kanda, T; Yoshiike, K

    1996-01-01

    We cloned a human endogenous retrovirus K1O DNA fragment encoding integrase and expressed it as a fusion protein with Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein. Integrase activities were measured in vitro by using a double-stranded oligonucleotide as a substrate mimicking viral long terminal repeats (LTR). The fusion protein was highly active for both terminal cleavage and strand transfer in the presence of Mn2+ on the K1O LTR substrate. It was also active on both Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 LTR substrates, whereas Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrases were active only on their corresponding LTR substrates. The results strongly suggest that K1O encodes a functional integrase with relaxed substrate specificity. PMID:8627815

  15. cDNA cloning, genomic structure, and chromosome mapping of the human epithelial membrane protein CL-20 gene (EMP1), a member of the PMP22 family.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Medvedev, A; Ruzanov, P; Marvin, K W; Jetten, A M

    1997-04-01

    CL-20 is a novel gene encoding a protein that is structurally related to but distinct from the peripheral myelin protein PMP22. Like PMP22, CL-20 is likely to play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and cell death. In this study, we describe the cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the human homologue of CL-20 and characterize the genomic structure of this gene. The hCL-20 gene (HGMW-approved symbol EMP1) encodes a protein of 157 amino acids that exhibits 76% identity to the rabbit CL-20 and to the rat EMP-1, which have been described recently, and 39% identity to human PMP22. CL-20 contains four hydrophobic domains, suggesting that it is an integral membrane protein. In particular the second hydrophobic domain encoded within the fourth exon is highly conserved among CL-20, EMP-1, and PMP22, suggesting a functional role for this region. CL-20 mRNA is abundant in squamous-differentiated bronchial epithelial cells; however, low levels of CL-20 mRNA can be detected in several human tissues by Northern analysis. Retinoic acid, which inhibits squamous differentiation, represses CL-20 expression in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. The genomic structure of the hCL-20 gene was analyzed using a P1 vector containing this gene. The hCL-20 gene contains five exons about 0.2, 0.12, 0.1, 0.14, and 2.2 kb and four introns about 15, 1.9, 0.1, and 0.7 kb. We have mapped the hCL-20 gene to chromosome 12p12 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. PMID:9126480

  16. The human U1-70K snRNP protein: cDNA cloning, chromosomal localization, expression, alternative splicing and RNA-binding.

    PubMed Central

    Spritz, R A; Strunk, K; Surowy, C S; Hoch, S O; Barton, D E; Francke, U

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones encoding the human U1-70K snRNP protein, and have mapped this locus (U1AP1) to human chromosome 19. The gene produces two size classes of RNA, a major 1.7-kb RNA and a minor 3.9-kb RNA. The 1.7-kb species appears to be the functional mRNA; the role of the 3.9-kb RNA, which extends further in the 5' direction, is unclear. The actual size of the hU1-70K protein is probably 52 kd, rather than 70 kd. The protein contains three regions similar to known nucleic acid-binding proteins, and it binds RNA in an in vitro assay. Comparison of the cDNA sequences indicates that there are multiple subclasses of mRNA that arise by alternative pre-mRNA splicing of at least four alternative exon segments. This suggests that multiple forms of the hU1-70K protein may exist, possibly with different functions in vivo. Images PMID:2447561

  17. CDNA cloning of p112, the largest regulatory subunit of the human 26s proteasome, and functional analysis of its yeast homologue, sen3p.

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, K; Kagawa, S; Shimizu, Y; Akioka, H; Tsurumi, C; Noda, C; Fujimuro, M; Yokosawa, H; Fujiwara, T; Takahashi, E; Ohba, M; Yamasaki, M; DeMartino, G N; Slaughter, C A; Toh-e, A; Tanaka, K

    1996-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large multisubunit protease complex, the largest regulatory subunit of which is a component named p112. Molecular cloning of cDNA encoding human p112 revealed a polypeptide predicted to have 953 amino acid residues and a molecular mass of 105,865. The human p112 gene was mapped to the q37.1-q37.2 region of chromosome 2. Computer analysis showed that p112 has strong similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sen3p, which has been listed in a gene bank as a factor affecting tRNA splicing endonuclease. The SEN3 also was identified in a synthetic lethal screen with the nin1-1 mutant, a temperature-sensitive mutant of NIN1. NIN1 encodes p31, another regulatory subunit of the 26S proteasome, which is necessary for activation of Cdc28p kinase. Disruption of the SEN3 did not affect cell viability, but led to temperature-sensitive growth. The human p112 cDNA suppressed the growth defect at high temperature in a SEN3 disruptant, indicating that p112 is a functional homologue of the yeast Sen3p. Maintenance of SEN3 disruptant cells at the restrictive temperature resulted in a variety of cellular dysfunctions, including defects in proteolysis mediated by the ubiquitin pathway, in the N-end rule system, in the stress response upon cadmium exposure, and in nuclear protein transportation. The functional abnormality induced by SEN3 disruption differs considerably from various phenotypes shown by the nin1-1 mutation, suggesting that these two regulatory subunits of the 26S proteasome play distinct roles in the various processes mediated by the 26S proteasome. Images PMID:8816993

  18. Pneumolysin-dependent and -independent gene expression identified by cDNA microarray analysis of THP-1 human mononuclear cells stimulated by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Rogers, P David; Thornton, Justin; Barker, Katherine S; McDaniel, D Olga; Sacks, Gordon S; Swiatlo, Edwin; McDaniel, Larry S

    2003-04-01

    Pneumolysin is an important virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae, interacting with the membranes of host cells to elicit a multitude of inflammatory responses. We used cDNA microarrays to identify genes which are responsive to S. pneumoniae in a pneumolysin-dependent and -independent fashion. The THP-1 human monocytic cell line was coincubated for 3 h with medium alone, with the virulent type 2 S. pneumoniae strain D39, or with the isogenic strain PLN, which does not express pneumolysin. RNA was isolated from the monocytes and hybridized on cDNA microarrays. Of 4,133 genes evaluated, 142 were found to be responsive in a pneumolysin-dependent fashion, whereas 40 were found to be responsive independent of pneumolysin. Genes that were up-regulated in cells exposed to D39 relative to those exposed to PLN included genes encoding proteins such as mannose binding lectin 1, lysozyme, alpha-1 catenin, cadherin 17, caspases 4 and 6, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta (MIP-1beta), interleukin 8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein 3 (MCP-3), IL-2 receptor beta (IL-2Rbeta), IL-15 receptor alpha (IL-15Ralpha), interferon receptor 2, and prostaglandin E synthase. Down-regulated genes included those encoding complement component receptor 2/CD21, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1). Pneumolysin-independent responses included down-regulation of the genes encoding CD68, CD53, CD24, transforming growth factor beta2, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1. These results demonstrate the striking effects of pneumolysin on the host cell upon exposure to S. pneumoniae.

  19. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and expression analysis of cDNA encoding metalloprotein II (MP II) induced by single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) in polychaeta Perinereis aibuhitensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dazuo; Zhou, Yibing; Zhao, Huan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Sun, Na; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Xiutang

    2012-11-01

    We amplified and analyzed the complete cDNA of metalloprotein II (MP II) from the somatic muscle of the polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis, the full length cDNA is 904 bp encoding 119 amino acids. The MP II cDNA sequence was subjected to BLAST searching in NCBI and was found to share high homology with hemerythrin of other worms. MP II expression of P. aibuhitensis exposed to single and combined metals (Cu(II), Cd(II)) was analyzed using real time-PCR. MP II mRNA expression increased at the start of Cu(II) exposure, then decreased and finally return to the normal level. Expression pattern of MP II under Cd(II) exposure was time- and dose-dependent. MP II expression induced by a combination of Cd(II) and Cu(II) was similar to that induced by Cd(II) alone.

  20. Isolation and sequence of a cDNA encoding the Jerusalem artichoke cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, a major plant cytochrome P450 involved in the general phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Teutsch, H G; Hasenfratz, M P; Lesot, A; Stoltz, C; Garnier, J M; Jeltsch, J M; Durst, F; Werck-Reichhart, D

    1993-01-01

    Cinnamate 4-hydroxylase [CA4H; trans-cinnamate,NADPH:oxygen oxidoreductase (4-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.13.11] is a cytochrome P450 that catalyzes the first oxygenation step of the general phenylpropanoid metabolism in higher plants. The compounds formed are essential for lignification and defense against predators and pathogens. We recently reported the purification of this enzyme from Mn(2+)-induced Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tuber tissues. Highly selective polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified protein were used to screen a lambda gt11 cDNA expression library from wound-induced Jerusalem artichoke, allowing isolation of a 1130-base-pair insert. Typical P450 domains were identified in this incomplete sequence, which was used as a probe for the isolation of a 1.7-kilobase clone in a lambda gt10 library. A full-length open reading frame of 1515 base pairs, encoding a P450 protein of 505 residues (M(r) = 57,927), was sequenced. The N terminus, essentially composed of hydrophobic residues, matches perfectly the microsequenced N terminus of the purified protein. The calculated pI is 9.78, in agreement with the chromatographic behavior and two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of CA4H. Synthesis of the corresponding mRNA is induced in wounded plant tissues, in correlation with CA4H enzymatic activity. This P450 protein exhibits the most similarity (28% amino acid identity) with avocado CYP71, but also good similarity with CYP17 and CYP21, or with CYP1 and CYP2 families. According to current criteria, it qualifies as a member of a new P450 family. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8097885

  1. [Cloning and analysis of cDNA encoding key enzyme gene (dxr) of the non-MVA pathway in Taxus chinensis cells].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing-Ping; Yu, Long-Jiang; Liu, Zhi; Li, Mo-Yi; Xiang, Fu; Yang, Qin

    2004-07-01

    Two distinct routes (classical mevalonate pathway and a novel mevalonate-independent pathway) are utilized by plants for the biosynthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate, the universal precursor of isoprenoids (Fig. 1). Present researches indicated that taxol was synthesized mainly via non-mevalonate pathway, but not genetic evidence was showed. The second step in non-mevalonate pathway involves an intramolecular rearrangement and subsequent reduction of deoxyxylulose phosphate to yield 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate, and 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) with responsibility for this reaction was considered as a key enzyme. As a tool for the isolation of genes in terpenoid biosynthesis in plants, total RNA was prepared from Taxus chinensis suspension cells, a cell type highly specialized for diterpene (taxol). A reverse transcription-PCR strategy based on the design of degenerated oligonucleotides was developed for isolating the gene encoding a gymnosperm homolog of this enzyme from Taxus chinensis. Through sequence analysis by Blast P online, the resulting cDNA showed highly homologous to 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerases, with 95% identification compared with Arabidopsis thaliana (Q9XFS9), 94% with Mentha x piperita (Q9XESO), 80% with Synechococcus elongatus (Q8DK30), 78% with Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Q55663) and Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 (Q8YP49), and 73% with Synechococcus leopoliensis (Q9RKT1). Deduced amino acid sequences were also analyzed by PROSITE, ClustalX (1.81) and Phylio (3.6 alpha), and data present evidence for the existence of this deoxyxyluose phosphate reductoisomerase in Taxus chinensis. This is the first report of the dxr gene cloned from gymnosperm. PMID:15968987

  2. Molecular characterization of the body site-specific human epidermal cytokeratin 9: cDNA cloning, amino acid sequence, and tissue specificity of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Langbein, L; Heid, H W; Moll, I; Franke, W W

    1993-12-01

    Differentiation of human plantar and palmar epidermis is characterized by the suprabasal synthesis of a major special intermediate-sized filament (IF) protein, the type I (acidic) cytokeratin 9 (CK 9). Using partial amino acid (aa) sequence information obtained by direct Edman sequencing of peptides resulting from proteolytic digestion of purified CK 9, we synthesized several redundant primers by 'back-translation'. Amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of cDNAs obtained by reverse transcription of mRNAs from human foot sole epidermis, including 5'-primer extension, resulted in multiple overlapping cDNA clones, from which the complete cDNA (2353 bp) could be constructed. This cDNA encoded the CK 9 polypeptide with a calculated molecular weight of 61,987 and an isoelectric point at about pH 5.0. The aa sequence deduced from cDNA was verified in several parts by comparison with the peptide sequences and showed the typical structure of type I CKs, with a head (153 aa), and alpha-helical coiled-coil-forming rod (306 aa), and a tail (163 aa) domain. The protein displayed the highest homology to human CK 10, not only in the highly conserved rod domain but also in large parts of the head and the tail domains. On the other hand, the aa sequence revealed some remarkable differences from CK 10 and other CKs, even in the most conserved segments of the rod domain. The nuclease digestion pattern seen on Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA indicated the existence of a unique CK 9 gene. Using CK 9-specific riboprobes for hybridization on Northern blots of RNAs from various epithelia, a mRNA of about 2.4 kb in length could be identified only in foot sole epidermis, and a weaker cross-hybridization signal was seen in RNA from bovine heel pad epidermis at about 2.0 kb. A large number of tissues and cell cultures were examined by PCR of mRNA-derived cDNAs, using CK 9-specific primers. But even with this very sensitive signal amplification, only palmar

  3. Sequence, tissue distribution, and chromosomal localization of mRNA encoding a human glucose transporter-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Hirofumi; Seino, Susumu; Imura, Hiroo; Seino, Yutaka; Eddy, R.L.; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Byers, M.G.; Shows, T.B.; Bell, G.I. )

    1988-08-01

    Recombinant DNA clones encoding a glucose transporter-like protein have been isolated from adult human liver and kidney cDNA libraries by cross-hybridization with the human HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter cDNA. Analysis of the sequence of this 524-amino acid glucose transporter-like protein indicates that is has 55.5% identity with the HepG2/erythrocyte glucose transporter as well as a similar structural organization. Studies of the tissue distribution of the mRNA coding for this glucose transporter-like protein in adult human tissues indicate that the highest amounts are present in liver with lower amounts in kidney and small intestine. The amounts of glucose transporter-like mRNA in other tissues, including colon, stomach, cerebrum, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, were below the level of sensitivity of our assay. The single-copy gene encoding this glucose transporter-like protein has been localized to the q26.1{yields}q26.3 region of chromosome 3.

  4. Human renal carcinoma expresses two messages encoding a parathyroid hormone-like peptide: Evidence for the alternative splicing of a single-copy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Thiede, M.A.; Strewler, G.J.; Nissenson, R.A.; Rosenblatt, M.; Rodan, G.A. )

    1988-07-01

    A peptide secreted by tumors associated with the clinical syndrome of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy was recently purified from human renal carcinoma cell line 786-0. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this peptide has considerable similarity with those of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and of peptides isolated from human breast and lung carcinoma (cell line BEN). In this study the authors obtained the nucleotide sequence of a 1595-base cDNA complementary to mRNA encoding the PTH-like peptide produced by 786-0 cells. The cDNA contains an open reading frame encoding a leader sequence of 36 amino acids and a 139-residue peptide, in which 8 of the first 13 residues are identical to the N terminus of PTH. Through the first 828 bases the sequence of this cDNA is identical with one recently isolated from a BEN cell cDNA library; however, beginning with base 829 the sequences diverge, shortening the open reading frame by 2 amino acids. Differential RNA blot analysis revealed that 786-0 cells express two major PTH-like peptide mRNAs with different 3{prime} untranslated sequences, one of which hybridizes with the presently described sequence and the other one with that reported for the BEN cell PTH-like peptide cDNA. Primer-extension analysis of 786-0 poly(A){sup +} RNA together with Southern blot analysis of human DNA confirmed the presence of a single-copy gene coding for multiple mRNAs through alternate splicing. In addition, the 3{prime} untranslated sequence of the cDNA described here has significant similarity to the c-myc protooncogene.

  5. Cloning and expression of a human kidney cDNA for an /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Kobilka, T.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Kobilka, B.K.

    1988-09-01

    An /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype has been cloned from a human kidney cDNA library using the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor as a probe. The deduced amino acid sequence resembles the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor and is consistent with the structure of other members of he family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors. The cDNA was expressed in a mammalian cell line (COS-7), and the /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic ligand (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine was bound. Competition curve analysis with a variety of adrenergic ligands suggests that this cDNA clone represents the /alpha//sub 2/B-adrenergic receptor. The gene for this receptor is on human chromosome 4, whereas the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (/alpha//sub 2/A) lies on chromosome 10. This ability to express the receptor in mammalian cells, free of other adrenergic receptor subtypes, should help in developing more selective /alpha/-adrenergic ligands.

  6. Sequence and regulation of a gene encoding a human 89-kilodalton heat shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, E; Brandon, S E; Smale, G; Lloyd, D; Weber, L A

    1989-01-01

    Vertebrate cells synthesize two forms of the 82- to 90-kilodalton heat shock protein that are encoded by distinct gene families. In HeLa cells, both proteins (hsp89 alpha and hsp89 beta) are abundant under normal growth conditions and are synthesized at increased rates in response to heat stress. Only the larger form, hsp89 alpha, is induced by the adenovirus E1A gene product (M. C. Simon, K. Kitchener, H. T. Kao, E. Hickey, L. Weber, R. Voellmy, N. Heintz, and J. R. Nevins, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:2884-2890, 1987). We have isolated a human hsp89 alpha gene that shows complete sequence identity with heat- and E1A-inducible cDNA used as a hybridization probe. The 5'-flanking region contained overlapping and inverted consensus heat shock control elements that can confer heat-inducible expression on a beta-globin reporter gene. The gene contained 10 intervening sequences. The first intron was located adjacent to the translation start codon, an arrangement also found in the Drosophila hsp82 gene. The spliced mRNA sequence contained a single open reading frame encoding an 84,564-dalton polypeptide showing high homology with the hsp82 to hsp90 proteins of other organisms. The deduced hsp89 alpha protein sequence differed from the human hsp89 beta sequence reported elsewhere (N. F. Rebbe, J. Ware, R. M. Bertina, P. Modrich, and D. W. Stafford (Gene 53:235-245, 1987) in at least 99 out of the 732 amino acids. Transcription of the hsp89 alpha gene was induced by serum during normal cell growth, but expression did not appear to be restricted to a particular stage of the cell cycle. hsp89 alpha mRNA was considerably more stable than the mRNA encoding hsp70, which can account for the higher constitutive rate of hsp89 synthesis in unstressed cells. Images PMID:2527334

  7. [ENCODE apophenia or a panglossian analysis of the human genome].

    PubMed

    Casane, Didier; Fumey, Julien; Laurenti, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In September 2012, a batch of more than 30 articles presenting the results of the ENCODE (Encyclopaedia of DNA Elements) project was released. Many of these articles appeared in Nature and Science, the two most prestigious interdisciplinary scientific journals. Since that time, hundreds of other articles dedicated to the further analyses of the Encode data have been published. The time of hundreds of scientists and hundreds of millions of dollars were not invested in vain since this project had led to an apparent paradigm shift: contrary to the classical view, 80% of the human genome is not junk DNA, but is functional. This hypothesis has been criticized by evolutionary biologists, sometimes eagerly, and detailed refutations have been published in specialized journals with impact factors far below those that published the main contribution of the Encode project to our understanding of genome architecture. In 2014, the Encode consortium released a new batch of articles that neither suggested that 80% of the genome is functional nor commented on the disappearance of their 2012 scientific breakthrough. Unfortunately, by that time many biologists had accepted the idea that 80% of the genome is functional, or at least, that this idea is a valid alternative to the long held evolutionary genetic view that it is not. In order to understand the dynamics of the genome, it is necessary to re-examine the basics of evolutionary genetics because, not only are they well established, they also will allow us to avoid the pitfall of a panglossian interpretation of Encode. Actually, the architecture of the genome and its dynamics are the product of trade-offs between various evolutionary forces, and many structural features are not related to functional properties. In other words, evolution does not produce the best of all worlds, not even the best of all possible worlds, but only one possible world.

  8. Cloning and sequencing of human intestinal alkaline phosphatase cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, J.; Garattini, E.; Hua, J.C.; Udenfriend, S.

    1987-02-01

    Partial protein sequence data obtained on intestinal alkaline phosphatase indicated a high degree of homology with the reported sequence of the placental isoenzyme. Accordingly, placental alkaline phosphatase cDNA was cloned and used as a probe to clone intestinal alkaline phosphatase cDNA. The latter is somewhat larger (3.1 kilobases) than the cDNA for the placental isozyme (2.8 kilobases). Although the 3' untranslated regions are quite different, there is almost 90% homology in the translated regions of the two isozymes. There are, however, significant differences at their amino and carboxyl termini and a substitution of an alanine in intestinal alkaline phosphatase for a glycine in the active site of the placental isozyme.

  9. Dynamic encoding of speech sequence probability in human temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Matthew K; Bouchard, Kristofer E; Tang, Claire; Chang, Edward F

    2015-05-01

    Sensory processing involves identification of stimulus features, but also integration with the surrounding sensory and cognitive context. Previous work in animals and humans has shown fine-scale sensitivity to context in the form of learned knowledge about the statistics of the sensory environment, including relative probabilities of discrete units in a stream of sequential auditory input. These statistics are a defining characteristic of one of the most important sequential signals humans encounter: speech. For speech, extensive exposure to a language tunes listeners to the statistics of sound sequences. To address how speech sequence statistics are neurally encoded, we used high-resolution direct cortical recordings from human lateral superior temporal cortex as subjects listened to words and nonwords with varying transition probabilities between sound segments. In addition to their sensitivity to acoustic features (including contextual features, such as coarticulation), we found that neural responses dynamically encoded the language-level probability of both preceding and upcoming speech sounds. Transition probability first negatively modulated neural responses, followed by positive modulation of neural responses, consistent with coordinated predictive and retrospective recognition processes, respectively. Furthermore, transition probability encoding was different for real English words compared with nonwords, providing evidence for online interactions with high-order linguistic knowledge. These results demonstrate that sensory processing of deeply learned stimuli involves integrating physical stimulus features with their contextual sequential structure. Despite not being consciously aware of phoneme sequence statistics, listeners use this information to process spoken input and to link low-level acoustic representations with linguistic information about word identity and meaning.

  10. Mass spectrometry-based cDNA profiling as a potential tool for human body fluid identification.

    PubMed

    Donfack, Joseph; Wiley, Anissa

    2015-05-01

    Several mRNA markers have been exhaustively evaluated for the identification of human venous blood, saliva, and semen in forensic genetics. As new candidate human body fluid specific markers are discovered, evaluated, and reported in the scientific literature, there is an increasing trend toward determining the ideal markers for cDNA profiling of body fluids of forensic interest. However, it has not been determined which molecular genetics-based technique(s) should be utilized to assess the performance of these markers. In recent years, only a few confirmatory, mRNA/cDNA-based methods have been evaluated for applications in body fluid identification. The most frequently described methods tested to date include quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and capillary electrophoresis (CE). However these methods, in particular qPCR, often favor narrow multiplex PCR due to the availability of a limited number of fluorescent dyes/tags. In an attempt to address this technological constraint, this study explored matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for human body fluid identification via cDNA profiling of venous blood, saliva, and semen. Using cDNA samples at 20pg input phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) amounts, body fluid specific markers for the candidate genes were amplified in their corresponding body fluid (i.e., venous blood, saliva, or semen) and absent in the remaining two (100% specificity). The results of this study provide an initial indication that MALDI-TOF MS is a potential fluorescent dye-free alternative method for body fluid identification in forensic casework. However, the inherent issues of low amounts of mRNA, and the damage caused to mRNA by environmental exposures, extraction processes, and storage conditions are important factors that significantly hinder the implementation of cDNA profiling into forensic casework.

  11. Mass spectrometry-based cDNA profiling as a potential tool for human body fluid identification.

    PubMed

    Donfack, Joseph; Wiley, Anissa

    2015-05-01

    Several mRNA markers have been exhaustively evaluated for the identification of human venous blood, saliva, and semen in forensic genetics. As new candidate human body fluid specific markers are discovered, evaluated, and reported in the scientific literature, there is an increasing trend toward determining the ideal markers for cDNA profiling of body fluids of forensic interest. However, it has not been determined which molecular genetics-based technique(s) should be utilized to assess the performance of these markers. In recent years, only a few confirmatory, mRNA/cDNA-based methods have been evaluated for applications in body fluid identification. The most frequently described methods tested to date include quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and capillary electrophoresis (CE). However these methods, in particular qPCR, often favor narrow multiplex PCR due to the availability of a limited number of fluorescent dyes/tags. In an attempt to address this technological constraint, this study explored matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for human body fluid identification via cDNA profiling of venous blood, saliva, and semen. Using cDNA samples at 20pg input phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) amounts, body fluid specific markers for the candidate genes were amplified in their corresponding body fluid (i.e., venous blood, saliva, or semen) and absent in the remaining two (100% specificity). The results of this study provide an initial indication that MALDI-TOF MS is a potential fluorescent dye-free alternative method for body fluid identification in forensic casework. However, the inherent issues of low amounts of mRNA, and the damage caused to mRNA by environmental exposures, extraction processes, and storage conditions are important factors that significantly hinder the implementation of cDNA profiling into forensic casework. PMID:25594487

  12. Random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RRACE) allows for cloning of multiple novel human cDNA fragments containing (CAG)n repeats.

    PubMed

    Carney, J P; McKnight, C; VanEpps, S; Kelley, M R

    1995-04-01

    We describe a new technique for isolating cDNA fragments in which (i) either a partial sequence of the cDNA is known or (ii) a repeat sequence is utilized. We have used this technique, termed random rapid amplification of cDNA ends (random RACE), to isolate a number of trinucleotide repeat (CAG)n-containing genes. Using the random RACE (RRACE) technique, we have isolated over a hundred (CAG)n-containing genes. The results of our initial analysis of ten clones indicate that three are identical to previously cloned (CAG)n-containing genes. Three of our clones matched with expressed sequence tags, one of which contained a CA repeat. The remaining four clones did not match with any sequence in GenBank. These results indicate that this approach provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating trinucleotide repeat-containing cDNA fragments. Finally, this technique may be used for purposes other than cloning repeat-containing cDNA fragments. If only a partial sequence of a gene is known, our system, described here, provides a rapid and efficient method for isolating a fragment of the gene of interest. PMID:7536696

  13. cDNA cloning, molecular characterization, and chromosomal localization of NET(EPHT2), a human EPH-related receptor protein-tyrosine kinase gene preferentially expressed in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.X.; Yoshioka, A.; Pleasure, D.E.

    1995-09-20

    By screening a human fetal brain cDNA expression library using a monoclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibody , we have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a receptor type protein-tyrosine kinase belonging to the EPH family, NET (neuronally expressed EPH-related tyrosine kinase). NET shows 87% homology in nucleotide sequence and 99% homology in the deduced amino acid sequence to rat elk, suggesting that NET is the human homologue of elk. The NET gene is mapped to human chromosome 3q21-q23 by PCR screening of a human rodent somatic cell hybrid panel and by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Examination of NET mRNA expression in several human tissues has shown that the NET gene is expressed preferentially in brain as a 5-kb transcript. Steady-state levels of NET mRNA in human brain are greater in the midterm fetus than in the adult. Lower levels of NET mRNA are found in fetal kidney and adult skeletal muscle. The expression pattern of NET mRNA thus differs from that of elk, suggesting that these two gene products may preform distinct roles in human and rat. NET transcripts are detected in human acid-induced neuronal differentiation. Several human tumor cell lines derived from neuroectoderm including primitive neuroblastoma also express NET transcripts. Since the NET mRNA expression in human brain is developmentally regulated and is induced during neuronal differentiation, NET potentially plays important roles in human neurogenesis. 89 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Human placental Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase. cap alpha. subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue expression, DNA polymorphism, and chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Chehab, F.F.; Kan, Y.W.; Law, M.L.; Hartz, J.; Kao, F.T.; Blostein, R.

    1987-11-01

    A 2.2-kilobase clone comprising a major portion of the coding sequence of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase ..cap alpha.. subunit was cloned from human placenta and its sequence was identical to that encoding the ..cap alpha.. subunit of human kidney and HeLa cells. Transfer blot analysis of the mRNA products of the Na/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase gene from various human tissues and cell lines revealed only one band (approx. = 4.7 kilobases) under low and high stringency washing conditions. The levels of expression in the tissues were intestine > placenta > liver > pancreas, and in the cell lines the levels were human erythroleukemia > butyrate-induced colon > colon > brain > HeLa cells. mRNA was undetectable in reticulocytes, consistent with the authors failure to detect positive clones in a size-selected ( > 2 kilobases) lambdagt11 reticulocyte cDNA library. DNA analysis revealed by a polymorphic EcoRI band and chromosome localization by flow sorting and in situ hybridization showed that the ..cap alpha.. subunit is on the short is on the short arm (band p11-p13) of chromosome 1.

  15. Identification of a cDNA clone encoding a mature blood stage antigen of Plasmodium falciparum by immunization of mice with bacterial lysates.

    PubMed Central

    Coppel, R L; Brown, G V; Mitchell, G F; Anders, R F; Kemp, D J

    1984-01-01

    A cDNA library was constructed in pBR322 using mRNA from blood stages of a Papua New Guinean isolate of Plasmodium falciparum. Expression of parasite antigens was not directly detectable by conventional immunological assays. To circumvent this, mice were immunized with lysates of cDNA clones, and the antisera raised were assayed for anti-parasite reactivity. One cDNA clone was identified which reliably elicited antibodies to P. falciparum. The mouse antisera were used to characterize the native P. falciparum protein as a 120-kd protein, which is antigenic during natural infection. The protein occurs in late trophozoite and schizont stages and is found in isolates of the parasite from widely separated geographical areas. The genomic context of the antigen gene is conserved in the different isolates. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6370681

  16. Cross-species hybridisation of human and bovine orthologous genes on high density cDNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Adjaye, James; Herwig, Ralf; Herrmann, Doris; Wruck, Wasco; BenKahla, Alia; Brink, Thore C; Nowak, Monika; Carnwath, Joseph W; Hultschig, Claus; Niemann, Heiner; Lehrach, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Background Cross-species gene-expression comparison is a powerful tool for the discovery of evolutionarily conserved mechanisms and pathways of expression control. The usefulness of cDNA microarrays in this context is that broad areas of homology are compared and hybridization probes are sufficiently large that small inter-species differences in nucleotide sequence would not affect the analytical results. This comparative genomics approach would allow a common set of genes within a specific developmental, metabolic, or disease-related gene pathway to be evaluated in experimental models of human diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility and reproducibility of cross-species analysis employing a human cDNA microarray as probe. Results As a proof of principle, total RNA derived from human and bovine fetal brains was used as a source of labelled targets for hybridisation onto a human cDNA microarray composed of 349 characterised genes. Each gene was spotted 20 times representing 6,980 data points thus enabling highly reproducible spot quantification. Employing high stringency hybridisation and washing conditions, followed by data analysis, revealed slight differences in the expression levels and reproducibility of the signals between the two species. We also assigned each of the genes into three expression level categories- i.e. high, medium and low. The correlation co-efficient of cross hybridisation between the orthologous genes was 0.94. Verification of the array data by semi-quantitative RT-PCR using common primer sequences enabled co-amplification of both human and bovine transcripts. Finally, we were able to assign gene names to previously uncharacterised bovine ESTs. Conclusions Results of our study demonstrate the harnessing and utilisation power of comparative genomics and prove the feasibility of using human microarrays to facilitate the identification of co-expressed orthologous genes in common tissues derived from different

  17. A neural circuit encoding sexual preference in humans.

    PubMed

    Poeppl, Timm B; Langguth, Berthold; Rupprecht, Rainer; Laird, Angela R; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-09-01

    Sexual preference determines mate choice for reproduction and hence guarantees conservation of species in mammals. Despite this fundamental role in human behavior, current knowledge on its target-specific neurofunctional substrate is based on lesion studies and therefore limited. We used meta-analytic remodeling of neuroimaging data from 364 human subjects with diverse sexual interests during sexual stimulation to quantify neural regions associated with sexual preference manipulations. We found that sexual preference is encoded by four phylogenetically old, subcortical brain structures. More specifically, sexual preference is controlled by the anterior and preoptic area of the hypothalamus, the anterior and mediodorsal thalamus, the septal area, and the perirhinal parahippocampus including the dentate gyrus. In contrast, sexual non-preference is regulated by the substantia innominata. We anticipate the identification of a core neural circuit for sexual preferences to be a starting point for further sophisticated investigations into the neural principles of sexual behavior and particularly of its aberrations.

  18. Molecular Cloning of a cDNA Encoding for Taenia solium TATA-Box Binding Protein 1 (TsTBP1) and Study of Its Interactions with the TATA-Box of Actin 5 and Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin Genes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lima, Oscar; García-Gutierrez, Ponciano; Jiménez, Lucía; Zarain-Herzberg, Ángel; Lazzarini, Roberto; Landa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is an essential regulatory transcription factor for the TATA-box and TATA-box-less gene promoters. We report the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA that encodes a Taenia solium TATA-box binding protein 1 (TsTBP1). Deduced amino acid composition from its nucleotide sequence revealed that encodes a protein of 238 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 26.7 kDa, and a theoretical pI of 10.6. The NH2-terminal domain shows no conservation when compared with to pig and human TBP1s. However, it shows high conservation in size and amino acid identity with taeniids TBP1s. In contrast, the TsTBP1 COOH-terminal domain is highly conserved among organisms, and contains the amino acids involved in interactions with the TATA-box, as well as with TFIIA and TFIIB. In silico TsTBP1 modeling reveals that the COOH-terminal domain forms the classical saddle structure of the TBP family, with one α-helix at the end, not present in pig and human. Native TsTBP1 was detected in T. solium cysticerci´s nuclear extract by western blot using rabbit antibodies generated against two synthetic peptides located in the NH2 and COOH-terminal domains of TsTBP1. These antibodies, through immunofluorescence technique, identified the TBP1 in the nucleus of cells that form the bladder wall of cysticerci of Taenia crassiceps, an organism close related to T. solium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from T. solium cysticerci and antibodies against the NH2-terminal domain of TsTBP1 showed the interaction of native TsTBP1 with the TATA-box present in T. solium actin 5 (pAT5) and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Ts2-CysPrx) gene promoters; in contrast, when antibodies against the anti-COOH-terminal domain of TsTBP1 were used, they inhibited the binding of TsTBP1 to the TATA-box of the pAT5 promoter gene. PMID:26529408

  19. Molecular Cloning of a cDNA Encoding for Taenia solium TATA-Box Binding Protein 1 (TsTBP1) and Study of Its Interactions with the TATA-Box of Actin 5 and Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin Genes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lima, Oscar; García-Gutierrez, Ponciano; Jiménez, Lucía; Zarain-Herzberg, Ángel; Lazzarini, Roberto; Landa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is an essential regulatory transcription factor for the TATA-box and TATA-box-less gene promoters. We report the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA that encodes a Taenia solium TATA-box binding protein 1 (TsTBP1). Deduced amino acid composition from its nucleotide sequence revealed that encodes a protein of 238 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 26.7 kDa, and a theoretical pI of 10.6. The NH2-terminal domain shows no conservation when compared with to pig and human TBP1s. However, it shows high conservation in size and amino acid identity with taeniids TBP1s. In contrast, the TsTBP1 COOH-terminal domain is highly conserved among organisms, and contains the amino acids involved in interactions with the TATA-box, as well as with TFIIA and TFIIB. In silico TsTBP1 modeling reveals that the COOH-terminal domain forms the classical saddle structure of the TBP family, with one α-helix at the end, not present in pig and human. Native TsTBP1 was detected in T. solium cysticerci´s nuclear extract by western blot using rabbit antibodies generated against two synthetic peptides located in the NH2 and COOH-terminal domains of TsTBP1. These antibodies, through immunofluorescence technique, identified the TBP1 in the nucleus of cells that form the bladder wall of cysticerci of Taenia crassiceps, an organism close related to T. solium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from T. solium cysticerci and antibodies against the NH2-terminal domain of TsTBP1 showed the interaction of native TsTBP1 with the TATA-box present in T. solium actin 5 (pAT5) and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Ts2-CysPrx) gene promoters; in contrast, when antibodies against the anti-COOH-terminal domain of TsTBP1 were used, they inhibited the binding of TsTBP1 to the TATA-box of the pAT5 promoter gene.

  20. Molecular Cloning of a cDNA Encoding for Taenia solium TATA-Box Binding Protein 1 (TsTBP1) and Study of Its Interactions with the TATA-Box of Actin 5 and Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lima, Oscar; García-Gutierrez, Ponciano; Jiménez, Lucía; Zarain-Herzberg, Ángel; Lazzarini, Roberto; Landa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    TATA-box binding protein (TBP) is an essential regulatory transcription factor for the TATA-box and TATA-box-less gene promoters. We report the cloning and characterization of a full-length cDNA that encodes a Taenia solium TATA-box binding protein 1 (TsTBP1). Deduced amino acid composition from its nucleotide sequence revealed that encodes a protein of 238 residues with a predicted molecular weight of 26.7 kDa, and a theoretical pI of 10.6. The NH2-terminal domain shows no conservation when compared with to pig and human TBP1s. However, it shows high conservation in size and amino acid identity with taeniids TBP1s. In contrast, the TsTBP1 COOH-terminal domain is highly conserved among organisms, and contains the amino acids involved in interactions with the TATA-box, as well as with TFIIA and TFIIB. In silico TsTBP1 modeling reveals that the COOH-terminal domain forms the classical saddle structure of the TBP family, with one α-helix at the end, not present in pig and human. Native TsTBP1 was detected in T. solium cysticerci´s nuclear extract by western blot using rabbit antibodies generated against two synthetic peptides located in the NH2 and COOH-terminal domains of TsTBP1. These antibodies, through immunofluorescence technique, identified the TBP1 in the nucleus of cells that form the bladder wall of cysticerci of Taenia crassiceps, an organism close related to T. solium. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nuclear extracts from T. solium cysticerci and antibodies against the NH2-terminal domain of TsTBP1 showed the interaction of native TsTBP1 with the TATA-box present in T. solium actin 5 (pAT5) and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Ts2-CysPrx) gene promoters; in contrast, when antibodies against the anti-COOH-terminal domain of TsTBP1 were used, they inhibited the binding of TsTBP1 to the TATA-box of the pAT5 promoter gene. PMID:26529408

  1. Localization of the genes encoding two transcription factors, LMX1 and CDX3, regulating insulin gene expression to human chromosomes 1 and 13

    SciTech Connect

    German, M.S.; Wang, J.; Fernald, A.A.

    1994-11-15

    The human lmx-1 and cdx-3 genomic clones {lambda}F11.1 and {lambda}F4.1, respectively, were isolated from a human genomic library by cross-hybridization with cDNA clones encoding Syrian hamster lmx-1 and cdx-3. The identities of the two clones were confirmed by DNA sequencing. The chromosomal locations of the human lmx-1 (LMX1) and cdx-3 (CDX3) genes were determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. {lambda}F11.1 and {lambda}F4.1 DNAs were labeled with biotin by nick-translation in the presence of biotin-11-dUTP.

  2. Evaluation of the functional involvement of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase in nuclear import of viral cDNA during acute infection.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tamako; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Zhou, Xin; Nara, Nobuo; Ohashi, Takashi; Kannagi, Mari; Masuda, Takao

    2004-11-01

    Nuclear import of viral cDNA is a critical step for establishing the proviral state of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). The contribution of HIV-1 integrase (IN) to the nuclear import of viral cDNA is controversial, partly due to a lack of identification of its bona fide nuclear localization signal. In this study, to address this putative function of HIV-1 IN, the effects of mutations at key residues for viral cDNA recognition (PYNP at positions 142 to 145, K156, K159, and K160) were evaluated in the context of viral replication. During acute infection, some mutations (N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA) severely reduced viral gene expression to less than 1% the wild-type (WT) level. None of the mutations affected the synthesis of viral cDNA. Meanwhile, the levels of integrated viral cDNA produced by N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA mutants were severely reduced to less than 1% the WT level. Quantitative PCR analysis of viral cDNA in nuclei and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that these mutations significantly reduced the level of viral cDNA accumulation in nuclei. Further analysis revealed that IN proteins carrying the N144Q, PYNP>KL, and KKK>AAA mutations showed severely reduced binding to viral cDNA but kept their karyophilic properties. Taken together, these results indicate that mutations that reduced the binding of IN to viral cDNA resulted in severe impairment of virus infectivity, most likely by affecting the nuclear import of viral cDNA that proceeds integration. These results suggest that HIV-1 IN may be one of the critical constituents for the efficient nuclear import of viral cDNA.

  3. Prefrontal Gamma Oscillations Encode Tonic Pain in Humans.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Enrico; May, Elisabeth S; Postorino, Martina; Tiemann, Laura; Nickel, Moritz M; Witkovsky, Viktor; Schmidt, Paul; Gross, Joachim; Ploner, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Under physiological conditions, momentary pain serves vital protective functions. Ongoing pain in chronic pain states, on the other hand, is a pathological condition that causes widespread suffering and whose treatment remains unsatisfactory. The brain mechanisms of ongoing pain are largely unknown. In this study, we applied tonic painful heat stimuli of varying degree to healthy human subjects, obtained continuous pain ratings, and recorded electroencephalograms to relate ongoing pain to brain activity. Our results reveal that the subjective perception of tonic pain is selectively encoded by gamma oscillations in the medial prefrontal cortex. We further observed that the encoding of subjective pain intensity experienced by the participants differs fundamentally from that of objective stimulus intensity and from that of brief pain stimuli. These observations point to a role for gamma oscillations in the medial prefrontal cortex in ongoing, tonic pain and thereby extend current concepts of the brain mechanisms of pain to the clinically relevant state of ongoing pain. Furthermore, our approach might help to identify a brain marker of ongoing pain, which may prove useful for the diagnosis and therapy of chronic pain. PMID:25754338

  4. Prefrontal Gamma Oscillations Encode Tonic Pain in Humans.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Enrico; May, Elisabeth S; Postorino, Martina; Tiemann, Laura; Nickel, Moritz M; Witkovsky, Viktor; Schmidt, Paul; Gross, Joachim; Ploner, Markus

    2015-11-01

    Under physiological conditions, momentary pain serves vital protective functions. Ongoing pain in chronic pain states, on the other hand, is a pathological condition that causes widespread suffering and whose treatment remains unsatisfactory. The brain mechanisms of ongoing pain are largely unknown. In this study, we applied tonic painful heat stimuli of varying degree to healthy human subjects, obtained continuous pain ratings, and recorded electroencephalograms to relate ongoing pain to brain activity. Our results reveal that the subjective perception of tonic pain is selectively encoded by gamma oscillations in the medial prefrontal cortex. We further observed that the encoding of subjective pain intensity experienced by the participants differs fundamentally from that of objective stimulus intensity and from that of brief pain stimuli. These observations point to a role for gamma oscillations in the medial prefrontal cortex in ongoing, tonic pain and thereby extend current concepts of the brain mechanisms of pain to the clinically relevant state of ongoing pain. Furthermore, our approach might help to identify a brain marker of ongoing pain, which may prove useful for the diagnosis and therapy of chronic pain.

  5. Encoding of Sensory Prediction Errors in the Human Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Schlerf, John; Ivry, Richard B.; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    A central tenet of motor neuroscience is that the cerebellum learns from sensory prediction errors. Surprisingly, neuroimaging studies have not revealed definitive signatures of error processing in the cerebellum. Furthermore, neurophysiologic studies suggest an asymmetry, such that the cerebellum may encode errors arising from unexpected sensory events, but not errors reflecting the omission of expected stimuli. We conducted an imaging study to compare the cerebellar response to these two types of errors. Participants made fast out-and-back reaching movements, aiming either for an object that delivered a force pulse if intersected or for a gap between two objects, either of which delivered a force pulse if intersected. Errors (missing the target) could therefore be signaled either through the presence or absence of a force pulse. In an initial analysis, the cerebellar BOLD response was smaller on trials with errors compared with trials without errors. However, we also observed an error-related decrease in heart rate. After correcting for variation in heart rate, increased activation during error trials was observed in the hand area of lobules V and VI. This effect was similar for the two error types. The results provide evidence for the encoding of errors resulting from either the unexpected presence or unexpected absence of sensory stimulation in the human cerebellum. PMID:22492047

  6. Transgenic mice containing expanded CAG trinucleotides within the full length cDNA of the human Huntington disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisler, J.; Goldberg, Y.P.; Tufaro, F.

    1994-09-01

    The absence of the clinical phenotype of HD in patients with the Wolff Hirshorn Syndrome (4p{sup -}) and the equivalent clinical phenotype of homozygotes and heterozygotes for the mutation associated with HD, point to a gain of function of the HD gene underlying the pathogenesis of HD. In an effort to test the hypothesis that HD results from a gain of function of the HD gene, we have constructed a full-length HD cDNA containing 44 CAG repeats. This cDNA was constructed in 7 different stages using 12 clones spanning the HD gene. After each stage, extensive restriction mapping and sequence verification was performed. The 10.3 kb full-length cDNA was cloned into pCMV, linearized and injected into the embryos of B6CBAF{sub 1} x B6CBAF{sub 1} mice. DNA extracted from the tails of 32 founders indicated that 7 founders contained the full-length cDNA with the CAG expansion of 44. In addition, in these litters, there was no increased frequency of miscarriage or perinatal mortality. Growth and development of the mice at birth appeared to be normal. After 3 weeks, these mice did not appear to have any abnormality, suggestive of neurological dysfunction. Further assessment of these mice using Northern and Western Blot analyses will assess their patterns of expression of the HD gene. In human, CAG expansion resulting in juvenile onset of HD is usually greater than 4x than seen on normal alleles. The murine homologue of HD contains 7 CAG repeats adjacent to a polymorphic CCG repeat. The introduction of the HD gene containing 44 repeats represents a 6 times increase in CAG size compared to the wild-type mouse allele. Nevertheless, these mice do not appear at this stage to have in any neurological phenotype compatible with juvenile or early onset of HD.

  7. Nuclear-encoded chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 of Nicotiana tabacum: characterization of mature protein and isolation and sequence analysis of cDNA clones encoding its cytoplasmic precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Elhag, G A; Thomas, F J; McCreery, T P; Bourque, D P

    1992-01-01

    Poly(A)+ mRNA isolated from Nicotiana tabacum (cv. Petite Havana) leaves was used to prepare a cDNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11. Recombinant phage containing cDNAs coding for chloroplast ribosomal protein L12 were identified and sequenced. Mature tobacco L12 protein has 44% amino acid identity with ribosomal protein L7/L12 of Escherichia coli. The longest L12 cDNA (733 nucleotides) codes for a 13,823 molecular weight polypeptide with a transit peptide of 53 amino acids and a mature protein of 133 amino acids. The transit peptide and mature protein share 43% and 79% amino acid identity, respectively, with corresponding regions of spinach chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. The predicted amino terminus of the mature protein was confirmed by partial sequence analysis of HPLC-purified tobacco chloroplast ribosomal protein L12. A single L12 mRNA of about 0.8 kb was detected by hybridization of L12 cDNA to poly(A)+ and total leaf RNA. Hybridization patterns of restriction fragments of tobacco genomic DNA probed with the L12 cDNA suggested the existence of more than one gene for ribosomal protein L12. Characterization of a second cDNA with an identical L12 coding sequence but a different 3'-noncoding sequence provided evidence that at least two L12 genes are expressed in tobacco. Images PMID:1542565

  8. Csa-19, a radiation-responsive human gene, identified by an unbiased two-gel cDNA library screening method in human cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Meltzer, S. J.; Han, L. H.; Zhang, X. F.; Shi, Z. M.; Harrison, G. H.; Abraham, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method was used to identify candidate genes whose expression is altered in cancer cells by ionizing radiation. Transcriptional induction of randomly selected genes in control versus irradiated human HL60 cells was compared. Among several complementary DNA (cDNA) clones recovered by this approach, one cDNA clone (CL68-5) was downregulated in X-irradiated HL60 cells but unaffected by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate, forskolin, or cyclosporin-A. DNA sequencing of the CL68-5 cDNA revealed 100% nucleotide sequence homology to the reported human Csa-19 gene. Northern blot analysis of RNA from control and irradiated cells revealed the expression of a single 0.7-kilobase (kb) messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript. This 0.7-kb Csa-19 mRNA transcript was also expressed in a variety of human adult and corresponding fetal normal tissues. Moreover, when the effect of X- or fission neutron-irradiation on Csa-19 mRNA was compared in cultured human cells differing in p53 gene status (p53-/- versus p53+/+), downregulation of Csa-19 by X-rays or fission neutrons was similar in p53-wild type and p53-null cell lines. Our results provide the first known example of a radiation-responsive gene in human cancer cells whose expression is not associated with p53, adenylate cyclase or protein kinase C.

  9. The human CCGl gene, essential for progression of the G sub 1 phase, encodes a 210-kilodalton nuclear DNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Nohiro, Yukiko; Hisamoto, Naoki; Nishimoto, Takeharu ); Nakamura, Yasuhara )

    1991-06-01

    The human CCGl gene complements tsBN462, a temperature-sensitive G{sup 1} mutant of the BHK21 cell line. The previously cloned cDNA turned out to be a truncated form of the actual CCGl cDNA. The newly cloned CCGl cDNA was 6.0 kb and encoded a protein with a molecular mass of 210 kDa. Using an antibody to a predicted peptide from the CCGl protein, a protein with a molecular mass of over 200 kDa was identified in human, monkey, and hamster cell lines. In the newly defined C-terminal region, an acidic domain was found. It contained four consensus target sequences for casein kinase 2 and was phosphorylated by this enzyme in vitro. However, this C-terminal region was not required to complement tsBN462 mutation since the region encoding the C-terminal part was frequently missing in complemented clones derived by DNA-mediated gene transfer, CCGl contains a sequence similar to the putative DNA-binding domain of HMGl in addition to the previously detected amino acid sequences common in nuclear proteins, such as a proline cluster and a nuclear translocation signal. Consistent with these predictions, CCGl was present in nuclei, possessed DNA-binding activity, and was eluted with similar concentrations of salt, 0.3 to 0.4 M NaCl either from isolated nuclei or from a DNA-cellulose column.

  10. Human herpesvirus 8 encodes a homolog of interleukin-6.

    PubMed Central

    Neipel, F; Albrecht, J C; Ensser, A; Huang, Y Q; Li, J J; Friedman-Kien, A E; Fleckenstein, B

    1997-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifocal lesion that is reported to be greatly influenced by cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and oncostatin M. DNA sequences of a novel human gammaherpesvirus, termed human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) or Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, have been identified in all epidemiological forms of Kaposi's sarcoma with high frequency. The presence of HHV-8 DNA is also clearly associated with certain B-cell lymphomas (body cavity-based lymphomas) and multicentric Castleman's disease. Sequence analysis of a 17-kb fragment revealed that adjacent to a block of conserved herpesvirus genes (major DNA-binding protein, glycoprotein B, and DNA polymerase), the genome of HHV-8 encodes structural homolog of IL-6. This cytokine is involved not only in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma but also in certain B-cell lymphomas and multicentric Castleman's disease. The viral counterpart of IL-6 (vIL-6) has conserved important features such as cysteine residues involved in disulfide bridging or an amino-terminal signal peptide. Most notably, the region known to be involved in receptor binding is highly conserved in vIL-6. This conservation of essential features and the remarkable overlap between diseases associated with HHV-8 and diseases associated with IL-6 disregulation clearly suggest that vIL-6 is involved in HHV-8 pathogenesis. PMID:8985427

  11. Cloning of human basic A1, a distinct 59-kDa dystrophin-associated protein encoded on chromosome 8q23-24

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, A.H.; Yoshida, Mikiharu; Hagiwara, Yasuko; Ozawa, Eijiro; Anderson, M.S.; Feener, C.A.; Selig, S.; Kunkel, L.M. |

    1994-05-10

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by defects of dystrophin, which forms a part of the membrane cytoskeleton of specialized cells such as muscle. It has been previously shown that the dystrophin-associated protein A1 (59-kDa DAP) is actually a heterogeneous group of phosphorylated proteins consisting of an acidic ({alpha}-A1) and a distinct basic ({beta}-A1) component. Partial peptide sequence of the A1 complex purified from rabbit muscle permitted the design of oligonucleotide probes that were used to isolate a cDNA for one human isoform of A1. This cDNA encodes a basic A1 isoform that is distinct from the recently described syntrophins in Torpedo and mouse and is expressed in many tissues with at least five distinct mRNA species of 5.9, 4.8, 4.3, 3.1, and 1.5 kb. A comparison of the human cDNA sequence with the GenBank expressed sequence tag (EST) data base has identified a relative from human skeletal muscle, EST25263, which is probably a human homologue of the published mouse syntrophin 2. The authors have mapped the human basic component of A1 and EST25263 genes to chromosomes 8q23-24 and 16, respectively.

  12. Bioinformatics Annotation of Human Y Chromosome-Encoded Protein Pathways and Interactions.

    PubMed

    Rengaraj, Deivendran; Kwon, Woo-Sung; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2015-09-01

    We performed a comprehensive analysis of human Y chromosome-encoded proteins, their pathways, and their interactions using bioinformatics tools. From the NCBI annotation release 107 of human genome, we retrieved a total of 66 proteins encoded on Y chromosome. Most of the retrieved proteins were also matched with the proteins listed in the core databases of the Human Proteome Project including neXtProt, PeptideAtlas, and the Human Protein Atlas. When we examined the pathways of human Y-encoded proteins through KEGG database and Pathway Studio software, many of proteins fall into the categories related to cell signaling pathways. Using the STRING program, we found a total of 49 human Y-encoded proteins showing strong/medium interaction with each other. While using the Pathway studio software, we found that a total of 16 proteins interact with other chromosome-encoded proteins. In particular, the SRY protein interacted with 17 proteins encoded on other chromosomes. Additionally, we aligned the sequences of human Y-encoded proteins with the sequences of chimpanzee and mouse Y-encoded proteins using the NCBI BLAST program. This analysis resulted in a significant number of orthologous proteins between human, chimpanzee, and mouse. Collectively, our findings provide the scientific community with additional information on the human Y chromosome-encoded proteins.

  13. Localization of the gene encoding peptidylglycine [alpha]-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) to human chromosome 5q14-5q21

    SciTech Connect

    Ouafik, L.H.; Giraud, P.; Oliver, C. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Eipper, B.A.; Mains, R.E. )

    1993-11-01

    Peptidylglycine [alpha]-amidating monooxygenase (PAM; EC 1.14.17.3) is a multifunctional protein containing two enzymes that act sequentially to catalyze the [alpha]-amidation of neuroendocrine peptides. Southern blot analysis of human placental DNA demonstrated that PAM is encoded by a single gene. The chromosomal localization of the PAM gene was established using in situ hybridization. A 2.2-kb human PAM cDNA hybridized to human metaphase chromosomes revealed a significant clustering of silver grains over chromosome 5 bands q14-q21. The gene encoding another enzyme important in the post-translational processing of neuroendocrine precursors, prohormone convertase 1 (PC1), is localized in the same region (5q15-q21). 14 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Transfected human neuropeptide Y cDNA expression in mouse pituitary cells. Inducible high expression, peptide characterization, and secretion.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, I M; Dixon, J E; Mains, R E

    1987-10-01

    An expression vector was constructed that placed the cDNA for human neuropeptide Y (NPY) under the control of the mouse metallothionein promoter and was used to transfect the AtT-20 mouse anterior pituitary corticotrope cell line. AtT-20 cells normally process the pro-ACTH/endorphin precursor but do not produce detectable levels of NPY. The resulting AtT-20/NPY cell line (Mt.NPY1a) was used to study the ability of the corticotrope cells to synthesize, process, and secrete the foreign proNPY-related peptide products. The stable cell line created contains approximately 40 copies of proNPY cDNA per cell. NPY mRNA levels and proNPY synthesis were increased at least 35-fold when maximally induced with cadmium; proNPY synthesis was also induced by glucocorticoids. Upon induction the NPY secretion rate was equimolar to that of the endogenous peptides. ProNPY, NPY, and the COOH-terminal peptide produced by this cell line had molecular weight and amino acid-labeling pattern predicted from cDNA sequence data and from previous isolation of NPY-related molecules from NPY-producing cells. The structures of secreted proNPY, NPY, and COOH-terminal peptide, as well as determination of the site of proteolytic cleavage between NPY and the COOH-terminal peptide, were determined by tryptic mapping and Edman degradation of secreted biosynthetically labeled peptide products. The proNPY molecule appears to be processed in the same pathway responsible for cleavage of the endogenous pro-ACTH/endorphin precursor. Secretion of proNPY-derived peptides paralleled secretion of endogenous pro-ACTH/endorphin-derived products, under both basal and stimulated conditions. With induction proNPY expression there is a dose-dependent inhibition of both proNPY and pro-ACTH/endorphin proteolytic processing.

  15. Molecular characterization of a cDNA encoding Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase from Deschampsia antarctica and its expression regulated by cold and UV stresses

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Venegas, Jaime R; Dinamarca, Jorge; Moraga, Ana Gutiérrez; Gidekel, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Background The Copper/Zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) gene, SOD gene, was isolated from a Deschampsia antarctica Desv. by cDNA library screening. The expression of SOD gene in the leaves of D. antarctica was determined by RT-PCR and its differential expression of gene transcripts in conditions of cold and UV radiation stresses was revealed by northern blot. Findings The molecular characterization shows that SOD cDNA is 709 bp in length, which translates an ORF of 152 amino acids that correspond to a protein of predicted molecular mass of 15 kDa. The assay shows that the expression of SOD gene increases when D. antarctica is acclimatised to 4°C and exposed to UV radiation. These results indicate that the SOD gene of D. antarctica is involved in the antioxidative process triggered by oxidative stress induced by the conditions of environmental change in which they live. Conclusion The present results allow us to know the characteristics of Cu/ZnSOD gene from D. antarctica and understand that its expression is regulated by cold and UV radiation. PMID:19785762

  16. Encoding of marginal utility across time in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Pine, Alex; Seymour, Ben; Roiser, Jonathan P; Bossaerts, Peter; Friston, Karl J; Curran, H Valerie; Dolan, Raymond J

    2009-07-29

    Marginal utility theory prescribes the relationship between the objective property of the magnitude of rewards and their subjective value. Despite its pervasive influence, however, there is remarkably little direct empirical evidence for such a theory of value, let alone of its neurobiological basis. We show that human preferences in an intertemporal choice task are best described by a model that integrates marginally diminishing utility with temporal discounting. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that activity in the dorsal striatum encodes both the marginal utility of rewards, over and above that which can be described by their magnitude alone, and the discounting associated with increasing time. In addition, our data show that dorsal striatum may be involved in integrating subjective valuation systems inherent to time and magnitude, thereby providing an overall metric of value used to guide choice behavior. Furthermore, during choice, we show that anterior cingulate activity correlates with the degree of difficulty associated with dissonance between value and time. Our data support an integrative architecture for decision making, revealing the neural representation of distinct subcomponents of value that may contribute to impulsivity and decisiveness.

  17. Isolation and sequencing of a cDNA coding for the human DF3 breast carcinoma-associated antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, J.; Abe, M.; Hayes, D.; Shani, E.; Yunis, E.; Kufe, D. )

    1988-04-01

    The murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) DF3 reacts with a high molecular weight glycoprotein detectable in human breast carcinomas. DF3 antigen expression correlates with human breast tumor differentiation, and the detection of a cross-reactive species in human milk has suggested that this antigen might be useful as a marker of differentiated mammary epithelium. To further characterize DF3 antigen expression, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone from a {lambda}gt11 library by screening with mAb DF3. The results demonstrate that this 309-base-pair cDNA, designated pDF9.3, codes for the DF3 epitope. Southern blot analyses of EcoRI-digested DNAs from six human tumor cell lines with {sup 32}P-labeled pDF9.3 have revealed a restriction fragment length polymorphism. Variations in size of the alleles detected by pDF9.3 were also identified in Pst I, but not in HindIII, DNA digests. Furthermore, hybridization of {sup 32}P-labeled pDF9.3 with total cellular RNA from each of these cell lines demonstrated either one or two transcripts that varied from 4.1 to 7.1 kilobases in size. The presence of differently sized transcripts detected by pDF9.3 was also found to correspond with the polymorphic expression of DF3 glycoproteins. Nucleotide sequence analysis of pDF9.3 has revealed a highly conserved (G + C)-rich 60-base-pair tandem repeat. These findings suggest that the variation in size of alleles coding for the polymorphic DF3 glycoprotein may represent different numbers of repeats.

  18. Identification of genes differentially expressed in a newly isolated human metastasizing esophageal cancer cell line, T.Tn-AT1, by cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Hitoshi; Furihata, Tadashi; Omotehara, Fumie; Sakai, Taro; Horiuchi, Hideki; Shinagawa, Yasuhiro; Imura, Johji; Ohkura, Yasuo; Tachibana, Masatsugu; Kubota, Keiichi; Terano, Akira; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2003-08-01

    We isolated a metastasizing human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell line, T.Tn-AT1, from a parental non-metastasizing cell line, T.Tn, by in vitro selection and by use of a nude mouse orthotopic inoculation model. Then, we compared the expression profiles of 9206 genes in T.Tn-AT1 and T.Tn by cDNA microarray analysis. The gene expression profiles of T.Tn and T.Tn-AT1 were very similar, and only 34 genes showed more than 3-fold differential expression. Among the 34 genes, 29 genes were down-regulated and only 5 genes were up-regulated in T.Tn-AT1 cells. Subsequently, we confirmed the expression levels of 14 of the 34 genes in T.Tn and T.Tn-AT1 cells by means of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The expression of 8 genes (KAL1, HPGD, NDN, REG1A, CXCR4, SPOCK, DIAPH2 and AIF1) was down-regulated and that of one gene (VNN2) was up-regulated in T.Tn-AT1 cells. These 9 genes encoded proteins associated with metastatic processes, such as adhesion, migration, inflammation, proliferation, and differentiation. Thus, these genes might regulate the metastasis of esophageal SCC, and could be predictive markers for lymph node metastasis of esophageal SCC. PMID:12901795

  19. Cloning and characterisation of cDNA sequences encoding for anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) in Brazilian palaemonid and penaeid shrimps.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rafael Diego; Stoco, Patricia Hermes; Barracco, Margherita Anna

    2008-11-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) are antimicrobial peptides found in limulids and crustaceans that have a potent and broad range of antimicrobial activity. We report here the identification and molecular characterisation of new sequences encoding for ALFs in the haemocytes of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersi and also in two Brazilian penaeid species, Farfantepenaeus paulensis and Litopenaeus schmitti. All obtained sequences encoded for highly cationic peptides containing two conserved cysteine residues flanking a putative LPS-binding domain. They exhibited a significant amino acid similarity with crustacean and limulid ALF sequences, especially with those of penaeid shrimps. This is the first identification of ALF in a freshwater prawn. PMID:18778778

  20. Cloning and characterisation of cDNA sequences encoding for anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) in Brazilian palaemonid and penaeid shrimps.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rafael Diego; Stoco, Patricia Hermes; Barracco, Margherita Anna

    2008-11-01

    Anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) are antimicrobial peptides found in limulids and crustaceans that have a potent and broad range of antimicrobial activity. We report here the identification and molecular characterisation of new sequences encoding for ALFs in the haemocytes of the freshwater prawn Macrobrachium olfersi and also in two Brazilian penaeid species, Farfantepenaeus paulensis and Litopenaeus schmitti. All obtained sequences encoded for highly cationic peptides containing two conserved cysteine residues flanking a putative LPS-binding domain. They exhibited a significant amino acid similarity with crustacean and limulid ALF sequences, especially with those of penaeid shrimps. This is the first identification of ALF in a freshwater prawn.

  1. Cloning and expresion of cDNA for rat O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sakumi, K; Shiraishi, A; Hayakawa, H; Sekiguchi, M

    1991-10-25

    cDNA for O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase was isolated by screening rat liver cDNA libraries, using as a probe the human cDNA sequence for methyltransferase. The rat cDNA encodes a protein with 209 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of the rat methyltransferase exhibits considerable homology with those of the human, yeast and bacterial enzymes, especially around putative methyl acceptor sites. When the cDNA was placed under control of the lac promoter and expressed in methyltransferase-deficient Escherichia coli (ada-, ogt-) cells, a characteristic methyltransferase protein was produced. The rat DNA methyltransferase thus expressed could complement the biological defects of the E. coli cell caused by lack of its own DNA methyltransferases; e.g. increased sensitivity to alkylating agents in terms of both cell death and mutation induction.

  2. Oligosaccharide processing in the expression of human plasminogen cDNA by lepidopteran insect (Spodoptera frugiperda) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, D.J.; Fraser, M.J.; Castellino, F.J. )

    1990-06-12

    A comparison has been made between the Asn{sup 289}-linked oligosaccharide structures of human plasma plasminogen and a recombinant human plasminogen, expressed in lepidopteran insect (Spodoptera frugiperda) cells, after infection of these cells with a recombinant baculovirus containing the entire human plasminogen cDNA. Using anion-exchange liquid chromatography mapping of the oligosaccharide units cleaved from the proteins by glycopeptidase F, compared with elution positions of standard oligosaccharide structures, coupled with monosaccharide compositional analysis, the authors find that the human plasma protein contained only bisialo-biantennary complex-type carbohydrate and asialo-biantennary complex carbohydrate, confirming earlier work published by this laboratory. The glycosylation pattern of the insect cell expressed recombinant human plasminogen showed considerable microheterogeneity, with identifiable high-mannose carbohydrate and truncated high-mannose oligosaccharide. Of major importance, approximately 40% of the oligosaccharide population consisted of complex carbohydrate (bisialo-biantennary), identical in structure with that of the human plasma protein. This the first direct identification of complex carbohydrate in proteins produced in insect cells and demonstrates that trimming and processing of high-mannose carbohydrate into complex-type oligosaccharide can occur. The data indicate that both normal and alternate pathways exist in these cells for incorporation and trimming of high-mannose oligosaccharides and that mannosidases, as well as galactosyl-, hexosaminidasyl-, and sialyltransferases are present, and/or can be induced, in these cells. From these observations, the authors conclude that amino acid sequences and/or protein conformational properties can control oligosaccharide processing events.

  3. Partial purification of the chloroplast ATP synthase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the cloning and sequencing of a cDNA encoding the gamma subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    The chloroplast ATP synthase was partially purified from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by extracting membranes with deoxycholate and KCl, followed by centrifugation and ammonium sulfate fractionation of the supernatant. The enzyme assay involved the reconstitution of such fractions with bacteriorhodopsin and soybean phospholipids to form vesicles capable of light-dependent ({sup 32}P)-phosphate esterification. A cDNA for the gamma subunit from Chlamydomonas was isolated, expressed in vitro and sequenced. It contains the entire coding region for the gamma subunit precursor. A 35 amino acid long transit peptide resides at the NH{sub 2}-terminus of a 323 amino acid long mature peptide that is 77% similar to the spinach gamma subunit. Six cysteines were found; three were conserved in Chlamydomonas and spinach.

  4. Cloning of a cDNA encoding a plasma membrane-associated, uronide binding phosphoprotein with physical properties similar to viral movement proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Reymond, P; Kunz, B; Paul-Pletzer, K; Grimm, R; Eckerskorn, C; Farmer, E E

    1996-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides are structural and regulatory homopolymers from the extracellular pectic matrix of plants. In vitro micromolar concentrations of oligogalacturonates and polygalacturonates were shown previously to stimulate the phosphorylation of a small plasma membrane-associated protein in potato. Immunologically cross-reactive proteins were detected in plasma membrane-enriched fractions from all angiosperm subclasses in the Cronquist system. Polygalacturonate-enhanced phosphorylation of the protein was observed in four of the six dicotyledon subclasses but not in any of the five monocotyledon subclasses. A cDNA for the protein was cloned from potato. The deduced protein is extremely hydrophilic and has a proline-rich N terminus. The C-terminal half of the protein was predicted to be a coiled coil, suggesting that the protein interacts with other macromolecules. The recombinant protein was found to bind both simple and complex galacturonides. The behavior of the protein suggests several parallels with viral proteins involved in intercellular communication. PMID:8989883

  5. Identification of human rotavirus serotype by hybridization to polymerase chain reaction-generated probes derived from a hyperdivergent region of the gene encoding outer capsid protein VP7

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, J.; Sears, J.; Schael, I.P.; White, L.; Garcia, D.; Lanata, C.; Kapikian, A.Z. )

    1990-08-01

    We have synthesized {sup 32}P-labeled hybridization probes from a hyperdivergent region (nucleotides 51 to 392) of the rotavirus gene encoding the VP7 glycoprotein by using the polymerase chain reaction method. Both RNA (after an initial reverse transcription step) and cloned cDNA from human rotavirus serotypes 1 through 4 could be used as templates to amplify this region. High-stringency hybridization of each of the four probes to rotavirus RNAs dotted on nylon membranes allowed the specific detection of corresponding sequences and thus permitted identification of the serotype of the strains dotted. The procedure was useful when applied to rotaviruses isolated from field studies.

  6. Musical experience shapes human brainstem encoding of linguistic pitch patterns.

    PubMed

    Wong, Patrick C M; Skoe, Erika; Russo, Nicole M; Dees, Tasha; Kraus, Nina

    2007-04-01

    Music and speech are very cognitively demanding auditory phenomena generally attributed to cortical rather than subcortical circuitry. We examined brainstem encoding of linguistic pitch and found that musicians show more robust and faithful encoding compared with nonmusicians. These results not only implicate a common subcortical manifestation for two presumed cortical functions, but also a possible reciprocity of corticofugal speech and music tuning, providing neurophysiological explanations for musicians' higher language-learning ability.

  7. Isolation of an insulin-like growth factor II cDNA with a unique 5 prime untranslated region from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shujane; Daimon, Makoto; Wang, Chunyeh; Ilan, J. ); Jansen, M. )

    1988-03-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) cDNA from a placental library was isolated and sequenced. The 5{prime} untranslated region (5{prime}-UTR) sequence of this cDNA differs completely from that of adult human liver and has considerable base sequence identity to the same region of an IGF-II cDNA of a rat liver cell line, BRL-3A. Human placental poly(A){sup +} RNA was probed with either the 5{prime}-UTR of the isolated human placental IGF-II cDNA or the 5{prime}-UTR of the IGF-II cDNA obtained from adult human liver. No transcripts were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the adult liver IGF-II as the probe. In contrast, three transcripts of 6.0, 3.2, and 2.2 kilobases were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the placental IGF-II cDNA as the probe or the probe from the coding sequence. A fourth IGF-II transcript of 4.9 kilobases presumably containing a 5{prime}-UTR consisting of a base sequence dissimilar to that of either IGF-II 5{prime}-UTR was apparent. Therefore, IGF-II transcripts detected may be products of alternative splicing as their 5{prime}-UTR sequence is contained within the human IGF-II gene or they may be a consequence of alternative promoter utilization in placenta.

  8. Subunit organization of the abalone Haliotis tuberculata hemocyanin type 2 (HtH2), and the cDNA sequence encoding its functional units d, e, f, g and h.

    PubMed

    Lieb, B; Altenhein, B; Lehnert, R; Gebauer, W; Markl, J

    1999-10-01

    We have developed a HPLC procedure to isolate the two different hemocyanin types (HtH1 and HtH2) of the European abalone Haliotis tuberculata. On the basis of limited proteolytic cleavage, two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis, PAGE, N-terminal protein sequencing and cDNA sequencing, we have identified eight different 40-60-kDa functional units (FUs) in HtH2, termed HtH2-a to HtH2-h, and determined their linear arrangement within the elongated 400-kDa subunit. From a Haliotis cDNA library, we have isolated and sequenced a cDNA clone which encodes the five C-terminal FUs d, e, f, g and h of HtH2. As shown by multiple sequence alignments, defg of HtH2 correspond structurally to defg from Octopus dofleini hemocyanin. HtH2-e is the first FU of a gastropod hemocyanin to be sequenced. The new Haliotis hemocyanin sequences are compared to their counterparts in Octopus, Helix pomatia and HtH1 (from the latter, the sequences of FU-f, FU-g and FU-h have recently been determined) and discussed in relation to the recent 2.3 A X-ray structure of FU-g from Octopus hemocyanin and the 15 A three-dimensional reconstruction of the Megathura crenulata hemocyanin didecamer from electron micrographs. This data allows, for the first time, an insight into the evolution of the two functionally different hemocyanin isoforms found in marine gastropods. It appears that they evolved several hundred million years ago within the Prosobranchia, after separation of the latter from the branch leading to the Pulmonata. Moreover, as a structural explanation for the inefficiency of the type 1 hemocyanin to form multidecamers in vivo, the additional N-glycosylation sites in HtH1 compared to HtH2 are discussed. PMID:10491167

  9. The complete sequence of a full length cDNA for human liver glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: evidence for multiple mRNA species.

    PubMed Central

    Arcari, P; Martinelli, R; Salvatore, F

    1984-01-01

    A recombinant M13 clone (O42) containing a 65 b.p. cDNA fragment from human fetal liver mRNA coding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase has been identified and it has been used to isolate from a full-length human adult liver cDNA library a recombinant clone, pG1, which has been subcloned in M13 phage and completely sequenced with the chain terminator method. Besides the coding region of 1008 b.p., the cDNA sequence includes 60 nucleotides at the 5'-end and 204 nucleotides at the 3'-end up to the polyA tail. Hybridization of pG1 to human liver total RNA shows only one band about the size of pG1 cDNA. A much stronger hybridization signal was observed using RNA derived from human hepatocarcinoma and kidney carcinoma cell lines. Sequence homology between clone 042 and the homologous region of clone pG1 is 86%. On the other hand, homology among the translated sequences and the known human muscle protein sequence ranges between 77 and 90%; these data demonstrate the existence of more than one gene coding for G3PD. Southern blot of human DNA, digested with several restriction enzymes, also indicate that several homologous sequences are present in the human genome. Images PMID:6096821

  10. Functional expression of a cDNA encoding pea (Pisum sativum L.) raffinose synthase, partial purification of the enzyme from maturing seeds, and steady-state kinetic analysis of raffinose synthesis.

    PubMed

    Peterbauer, Thomas; Mach, Lukas; Mucha, Jan; Richter, Andreas

    2002-09-01

    Raffinose (O-alpha- D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->6)- O-alpha- D-glucopyranosyl-(1<-->2)- O-beta- D-fructofuranoside) is a widespread oligosaccharide in plant seeds and other tissues. Raffinose synthase (EC 2.4.1.82) is the key enzyme that channels sucrose into the raffinose oligosaccharide pathway. We here report on the isolation of a cDNA encoding for raffinose synthase from maturing pea ( Pisum sativum L.) seeds. The coding region of the cDNA was expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf21 insect cells. The recombinant enzyme, a protein of glycoside hydrolase family 36, displayed similar kinetic properties to raffinose synthase partially purified from maturing seeds by anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Apart from the natural galactosyl donor galactinol ( O-alpha- D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->1)- L- myo-inositol), p-nitrophenyl alpha- D-galactopyranoside, an artificial substrate, was utilized as a galactosyl donor. An equilibrium constant of 4.1 was determined for the galactosyl transfer reaction from galactinol to sucrose. Steady-state kinetic analysis suggested that raffinose synthase is a transglycosidase operating by a ping-pong reaction mechanism and may also act as a glycoside hydrolase. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by 1-deoxygalactonojirimycin, a potent inhibitor for alpha-galactosidases (EC 3.2.1.22). The physiological implications of these observations are discussed.

  11. Amino acid sequence of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase and cDNA sequence encoding Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. A new family of fungal peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Baunsgaard, L; Dalbøge, H; Houen, G; Rasmussen, E M; Welinder, K G

    1993-04-01

    Sequence analysis and cDNA cloning of Coprinus peroxidase (CIP) were undertaken to expand the understanding of the relationships of structure, function and molecular genetics of the secretory heme peroxidases from fungi and plants. Amino acid sequencing of Coprinus macrorhizus peroxidase, and cDNA sequencing of Coprinus cinereus peroxidase showed that the mature proteins are identical in amino acid sequence, 343 residues in size and preceded by a 20-residue signal peptide. Their likely identity to peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus is discussed. CIP has an 8-residue, glycine-rich N-terminal extension blocked with a pyroglutamate residue which is absent in other fungal peroxidases. The presence of pyroglutamate, formed by cyclization of glutamine, and the finding of a minor fraction of a variant form lacking the N-terminal residue, indicate that signal peptidase cleavage is followed by further enzymic processing. CIP is 40-45% identical in amino-acid sequence to 11 lignin peroxidases from four fungal species, and 42-43% identical to the two known Mn-peroxidases. Like these white-rot fungal peroxidases, CIP has an additional segment of approximately 40 residues at the C-terminus which is absent in plant peroxidases. Although CIP is much more similar to horseradish peroxidase (HRP C) in substrate specificity, specific activity and pH optimum than to white-rot fungal peroxidases, the sequences of CIP and HRP C showed only 18% identity. Hence, CIP qualifies as the first member of a new family of fungal peroxidases. The nine invariant residues present in all plant, fungal and bacterial heme peroxidases are also found in CIP. The present data support the hypothesis that only one chromosomal CIP gene exists. In contrast, a large number of secretory plant and fungal peroxidases are expressed from several peroxidase gene clusters. Analyses of three batches of CIP protein and of 49 CIP clones revealed the existence of only two highly similar alleles indicating less

  12. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  13. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding (S)-cis-N-methylstylopine 14-hydroxylase from opium poppy, a key enzyme in sanguinarine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2013-02-15

    Sanguinarine is a benzo[c]phenenthridine alkaloid with potent antimicrobial properties found commonly in plants of the Papaveraceae, including the roots of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). Sanguinarine is formed from the central 1-benzylisoquinoline intermediate (S)-reticuline via the protoberberine alkaloid (S)-scoulerine, which undergoes five enzymatic oxidations and an N-methylation. The first four oxidations from (S)-scoulerine are catalyzed by cytochromes P450, whereas the final conversion involves a flavoprotein oxidase. All but one gene in the biosynthetic pathway from (S)-reticuline to sanguinarine has been identified. In this communication, we report the isolation and characterization of (S)-cis-N-methylstylopine 14-hydroxylase (MSH) from opium poppy based on the transcriptional induction in elicitor-treated cell suspension cultures and root-specific expression of the corresponding gene. Along with protopine 6-hydroxylase, which catalyzes the subsequent and penultimate step in sanguinarine biosynthesis, MSH is a member of the CYP82N subfamily of cytochromes P450. The full-length MSH cDNA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the recombinant microsomal protein was tested for enzymatic activity using 25 benzylisoquinoline alkaloids representing a wide range of structural subgroups. The only enzymatic substrates were the N-methylated protoberberine alkaloids N-methylstylopine and N-methylcanadine, which were converted to protopine and allocryptopine, respectively.

  14. A role for glutamate decarboxylase during tomato ripening: the characterisation of a cDNA encoding a putative glutamate decarboxylase with a calmodulin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Gallego, P P; Whotton, L; Picton, S; Grierson, D; Gray, J E

    1995-03-01

    A tomato fruit cDNA library was differentially screened to identify mRNAs present at higher levels in fruit of the tomato ripening mutant rin (ripening inhibitor). Complete sequencing of a unique clone ERT D1 revealed an open reading frame with homology to several glutamate decarboxylases. The deduced polypeptide sequence has 80% overall amino acid sequence similarity to a Petunia hybrida glutamate decarboxylase (petGAD) which carries a calmodulin-binding site at its carboxyl terminus and ERT D1 appears to have a similar domain. ERT D1 mRNA levels peaked at the first visible sign of fruit colour change during normal tomato ripening and then declined, whereas in fruit of the ripening impaired mutant, rin, accumulation of this mRNA continued until at least 14 days after the onset of ripening. This mRNA was present at much lower levels in other tissues, such as leaves, roots and stem, and was not increased by wounding. Possible roles for GAD, and its product gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in fruit, are discussed.

  15. The human gene CGT encoding the UDP-galactose ceramide galactosyl transferase (cerebroside synthase): Cloning, characterization, and assignment to human chromosome 4, band q26

    SciTech Connect

    Bosio, A.; Binczek, E.; Stoffel, W.

    1996-05-15

    We have previously cloned the human UDP-galactose ceramide galactosyltransferase (CGT, E.C. 2.4.1.45) cDNA. Its open reading frame encodes the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of the glycosphingolipids, cerebrosides and sulfatides, essential constituents of the myelin membrane of the central nervous system (CNS) and PNS. Expression of the CGT gene and of the myelin-specific proteins in the terminal differentiated oligodendrocyte of CNS and in Schwann cells of PNS is cell-specific and highly time-regulated. The CGT gene therefore is important in the differentiation program of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Here we report the structural organization and the chromosomal localization of the human CGT gene. The coding sequence is separated into five exons, which are distributed over >40 kb. The CGT locus was mapped to the distal region of human chromosome 4, band q26. The organization of the CGT gene and of the UGT (uridylglucuronosyl-transferases) gene family suggests a correlation to functional domains of the encoded proteins. 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Isolation, characterization, and UV-stimulated expression of two families of genes encoding polypeptides of related structure in human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kartasova, T.; Van de Putte, P.

    1988-05-01

    By screening of a cDNA library made on mRNA isolated from UV-irradiated human epidermal keratinocytes for sequences whose relative concentration increases in the cytoplasm after irradiation, the authors isolated 40 cDNA clones. Here they describe two distinct groups of cDNA clones which do not cross-hybridize to each other but nevertheless encode proteins of very similar primary structure. These polypeptides are small (8 to 10 kilodaltons) and exceptionally rich in proline, cysteine, and glutamine and have similar repeating elements not found elsewhere. The new proteins were designated sprI and sprII (small, proline rich). The presence of prolines and cysteines suggests that they may be either structural proteins with a strong secondary structure or metal-binding proteins such as metallothioneins. Southern blot and sequence analyses of the cDNAs indicate that at least the sprII group of clones represents a family of related genes. The nucleotide sequence of both groups seems to be conserved upon evolution. The level of mRNAs corresponding to the two groups of cDNAs is increased in the cytoplasm of human epidermal keratinocytes after both UV irradiation and treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate.

  17. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  18. Human jagged polypeptide, encoding nucleic acids and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Li, Linheng; Hood, Leroy

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides an isolated polypeptide exhibiting substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the polypeptide does not have the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. The invention further provides an isolated nucleic acid molecule containing a nucleotide sequence encoding substantially the same amino acid sequence as JAGGED, or an active fragment thereof, provided that the nucleotide sequence does not encode the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:5 or SEQ ID NO:6. Also provided herein is a method of inhibiting differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells by contacting the progenitor cells with an isolated JAGGED polypeptide, or active fragment thereof. The invention additionally provides a method of diagnosing Alagille Syndrome in an individual. The method consists of detecting an Alagille Syndrome disease-associated mutation linked to a JAGGED locus.

  19. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this proposal is to create a cDNA map of the human genome. Mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach will generate 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  20. UMD-Predictor: A High-Throughput Sequencing Compliant System for Pathogenicity Prediction of any Human cDNA Substitution.

    PubMed

    Salgado, David; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Rai, Ghadi; Blanchard, Arnaud; Miltgen, Morgane; Pinard, Amélie; Lévy, Nicolas; Collod-Béroud, Gwenaëlle; Béroud, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) is increasingly applied to research and clinical diagnosis of human diseases. It typically results in large amounts of genetic variations. Depending on the mode of inheritance, only one or two correspond to pathogenic mutations responsible for the disease and present in affected individuals. Therefore, it is crucial to filter out nonpathogenic variants and limit downstream analysis to a handful of candidate mutations. We have developed a new computational combinatorial system UMD-Predictor (http://umd-predictor.eu) to efficiently annotate cDNA substitutions of all human transcripts for their potential pathogenicity. It combines biochemical properties, impact on splicing signals, localization in protein domains, variation frequency in the global population, and conservation through the BLOSUM62 global substitution matrix and a protein-specific conservation among 100 species. We compared its accuracy with the seven most used and reliable prediction tools, using the largest reference variation datasets including more than 140,000 annotated variations. This system consistently demonstrated a better accuracy, specificity, Matthews correlation coefficient, diagnostic odds ratio, speed, and provided the shortest list of candidate mutations for WES. Webservices allow its implementation in any bioinformatics pipeline for next-generation sequencing analysis. It could benefit to a wide range of users and applications varying from gene discovery to clinical diagnosis. PMID:26842889

  1. UMD‐Predictor: A High‐Throughput Sequencing Compliant System for Pathogenicity Prediction of any Human cDNA Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, David; Desvignes, Jean‐Pierre; Rai, Ghadi; Blanchard, Arnaud; Miltgen, Morgane; Pinard, Amélie; Lévy, Nicolas; Collod‐Béroud, Gwenaëlle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Whole‐exome sequencing (WES) is increasingly applied to research and clinical diagnosis of human diseases. It typically results in large amounts of genetic variations. Depending on the mode of inheritance, only one or two correspond to pathogenic mutations responsible for the disease and present in affected individuals. Therefore, it is crucial to filter out nonpathogenic variants and limit downstream analysis to a handful of candidate mutations. We have developed a new computational combinatorial system UMD‐Predictor (http://umd‐predictor.eu) to efficiently annotate cDNA substitutions of all human transcripts for their potential pathogenicity. It combines biochemical properties, impact on splicing signals, localization in protein domains, variation frequency in the global population, and conservation through the BLOSUM62 global substitution matrix and a protein‐specific conservation among 100 species. We compared its accuracy with the seven most used and reliable prediction tools, using the largest reference variation datasets including more than 140,000 annotated variations. This system consistently demonstrated a better accuracy, specificity, Matthews correlation coefficient, diagnostic odds ratio, speed, and provided the shortest list of candidate mutations for WES. Webservices allow its implementation in any bioinformatics pipeline for next‐generation sequencing analysis. It could benefit to a wide range of users and applications varying from gene discovery to clinical diagnosis. PMID:26842889

  2. Expression of human epidermal growth factor precursor cDNA in transfected mouse NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mroczkowski, B; Reich, M; Whittaker, J; Bell, G I; Cohen, S

    1988-01-01

    Stable cell lines expressing the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) precursor have been prepared by transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with a bovine papillomavirus-based vector in which the human kidney EGF precursor cDNA has been placed under the control of the inducible mouse metallothionein I promoter. Synthesis of the EGF precursor can be induced by culturing the cells in 5 mM butyric acid or 100 microM ZnCl2. The EGF precursor synthesized by these cells appears to be membrane associated; none is detectable in the cytoplasm. The size of the EGF precursor expressed by these cells is approximately 150-180 kDa, which is larger than expected from its amino acid sequence, suggesting that it is posttranslationally modified, presumably by glycosylation. The EGF precursor was also detected in the conditioned medium from these cells, indicating that some fraction of the EGF precursor synthesized by these transfected cells may be secreted. Preliminary data suggest that this soluble form of the EGF precursor may compete with 125I-labeled EGF for binding to the EGF receptor. These cell lines should be useful for studying the processing of the EGF precursor to EGF as well as determining the properties and possible functions of the EGF precursor itself. Images PMID:3257563

  3. Expression of human epidermal growth factor pressures cDNA in transfected mouse NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mroczkowski, B.; Reich, M.; Whittaker, J.; Bell, G.I.; Cohen, S.

    1988-01-01

    Stable cell lines expressing the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) precursor have been prepared by transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with a bovine papillomavirus-based vector in which the human kidney EGF precursor cDNA has been placed under the control of the inducible mouse metallothionein I promoter. Synthesis of the EGF precursor can be induced by culturing the cells in 5 mM butyric acid or 100 ..mu..M ZnCl/sub 2/. The EGF precursor synthesized by these cells appears to be membrane associated; none is detectable in the cytoplasm. The size of the EGF precursor expressed by these cells is approx. = 150-180 kDa, which is larger than expected from its amino acid sequence, suggesting that it is posttranslationally modified, presumably by glycosylation. The EGF precursor was also detected in the conditioned medium from these cells, indicating that some fraction of the EGF precursor synthesized by these transfected cells may be secreted. Preliminary data suggest that this soluble form of the EGF precursor may compete with /sup 125/I-labeled EGF for binding to the EGF receptor. These cell lines should be useful for studying the processing of the EGF precursor to EGF as well as determining the properties and possible functions of the EGF precursor itself.

  4. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of cDNA encoding cis-prenyltransferases from Hevea brasiliensis. A key factor participating in natural rubber biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Asawatreratanakul, Kasem; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Wititsuwannakul, Dhirayos; Wititsuwannakul, Rapepun; Takahashi, Seiji; Rattanapittayaporn, Atiya; Koyama, Tanetoshi

    2003-12-01

    Natural rubber from Hevea brasiliensis is a high molecular mass polymer of isoprene units with cis-configuration. The enzyme responsible for the cis-1,4-polymerization of isoprene units has been idengified as a particle-bound rubber transferase, but no gene encoding this enzyme has been cloned from rubber-producing plants. By using sequence information from the conserved regions of cis-prenyl chain elongating enzymes that were cloned recently, we have isolated and characterized cDNAs from H. brasiliensis for a functional factor participating in natural rubber biosynthesis. Sequence analysis revealed that all of the five highly conserved regions among cis-prenyl chain elongating enzymes were found in the protein sequences of the Hevea cis-prenyltransferase. Northern blot analysis indicated that the transcript(s) of the Hevea cis-prenyltransferase were expressed predominantly in the latex as compared with other Hevea tissues examined. In vitro rubber transferase assays using the recombinant gene product overexpressed in Escherichia coli revealed that the enzyme catalyzed the formation of long chain polyprenyl products with approximate sizes of 2 x 103-1 x 104 Da. Moreover, in the presence of washed bottom fraction particles from latex, the rubber transferase activity producing rubber product of high molecular size was increased. These results suggest that the Hevea cis-prenyltransferase might require certain activation factors in the washed bottom fraction particles for the production of high molecular mass rubber.

  5. Action of troxacitabine on cells transduced with human cytidine deaminase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Anne-Julie; Gourdeau, Henriette; Momparler, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Troxacitabine (beta-L-Dioxolane-cytidine; Troxatyl) is a beta-L-nucleoside analog, which has shown preclinical antitumor activity in human xenograft tumor models and antileukemic response in patients with relapsed myeloid leukemia. Troxacitabine is activated by cellular kinases and incorporated into DNA, inhibiting its replication. In contrast to other cytosine nucleoside analogs, troxacitabine is resistant to inactivation by cytidine deaminase (CD). In this study we have investigated the effects of increased intracellular levels of CD on the antineoplastic action of troxacitabine and the related antileukemic drug, cytosine arabinoside (ARA-C). Retroviral transduction of the human CD gene in A549 lung carcinoma cells (A549-CD cells) markedly increased the expression of this gene. The A549-CD cells were more resistant to the cytotoxic action of ARA-C than the wild type A549 cells as determined by clonogenic assays. In contrast, the CD-transduced cells were as or more sensitive to the cytotoxic action of troxacitabine than the wild type cells. These results suggest that troxacitabine may be an effective antineoplastic agent against tumors with high levels of CD that show drug resistance to cytosine nucleoside analogs.

  6. YAC contig and cell hybrid mapping of six expressed sequences encoded by human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Cox, M.; Patterson, D.

    1994-09-01

    The candidate gene approach for positional cloning requires a sufficient number of expressed gene sequences from the chromosomal region of interest. Trisomy for human chromosome 21 results in Down syndrome (DS). However, only a limited number of genes on chromosome 21 have been identified and cloned. We used 1,000 single-copy microclones from a microdissection library of chromosome 21 to screen various cDNA libraries and isolated 9 cDNA clones, of which 6 contain unique sequences: 21E-C1, C3, C4, C5, C7, C10. Using a refined regional mapping panel of chromosome 21 which comprised 24 cell hybrids and divided the chromosome into 33 subregions, we assigned 21E-C1 and C7 to subregion No. 22 (distal q22.1), 21E-C3 to No. 25 (proximal q22.2), 21E-C4 to No. 23 (very distal q22.1), 21E-C5 to No. 31 (proximal q22.3), and 21E-C10 to No. 28 (middle q22.2). In addition, we identified YAC clones corresponding to these cDNA clones using the complete YAC contig spanning the entire chromosome 21q. On the average, 10 positive YAC clones were identified for each cDNA. The mapping positions for the 6 cDNAs determined by the STSs in the YAC contig agree well with the cytogenetic map constructed by the hybrid panel. These cDNA clones with refined mapping positions on chromosome 21 should be useful as candidate genes for the specific component phenotypes of DS assigned to the region.

  7. High-level expression of human insulin receptor cDNA in mouse NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, J.; Okamoto, A.K.; Thys, R.; Bell, G.I.; Steiner, D.F.; Hofmann, C.A.

    1987-08-01

    In order to develop a simple, efficient system for the high-level expression of human insulin receptors in eukaryotic cells, a full-length human kidney insulin receptor cDNA was inserted into a bovine papilloma virus vector under the control of the mouse metallothionein promoter. After transfection of mouse NIH 3T3 cells with this construct, seven cell lines expressing insulin receptors were isolated; two cell lines had more than 10/sup 6/ receptors per cell. The cell line with the highest /sup 125/I-insulin binding (NIH 3T3 HIR3.5) had 6 x 10/sup 6/ receptors with a K/sub d/ of 10/sup -9/ M. This level was not dependent on exposure to metals but could be increased further to 2 x 10/sup 7/ receptors per cell by addition of sodium butyrate to the culture medium. The ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits had apparent molecular weights of 147,000 and 105,000, respectively (compared to 135,000 and 95,000 in IM-9 human lymphocytes), values identical to those of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of the insulin receptors of nontransformed NIH 3T3 cells. This size difference was due to altered carbohydrate composition, as N-glycanase digestion reduced the apparent receptor subunit size of the transfected cells and IM-9 lymphocytes to identical values. The alteration in N-linked oligosaccharide composition could not be ascribed to differences in the kinetics of posttranslational processing of the insulin receptors, which was comparable to that of other cells studied. The basal rate of glycogen synthesis in the cells overexpressing insulin receptors was increased 4- to 5-fold compared with controls. Low levels of added insulin (0.1 nM) caused a 50% increase in the rate of glycogen synthesis

  8. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  9. The human and mouse homologs of the yeat RAD52 gene: cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, assignment to human chromosome 12p12.2-p13, and mRNA expression in mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, D.J.; Denison, K.

    1995-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD52 gene is involved in DNA double-strand break repair and mitotic/meiotic recombination. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of yeast S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and Kluyveromyces lactis and chicken is highly conserved. Using the technology of mixed oligonucleotide primed amplification of cDNA (MOPAC), two mouse RAD52 homologous cDNA fragments were amplified and sequenced. Subsequently, we have cloned the cDNA of the human and mouse homologs of yeast RAD52 gene by screening cDNA libraries using the identified mouse cDNA fragments. Sequence analysis of cDNA derived amino acid revealed a highly conserved N-terminus among human, mouse, chicken, and yeast RAD52 genes. The human RAD52 gene was assigned to chromosome 12p12.2-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, R-banding, and DNA analysis of somatic cell hybrids. Unlike chicken RAD52 and mouse RAD51, no significant difference in mouse RAD52 mRNA level was found among mouse heart, brain, spleen, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney, and testis. In addition to an {approximately}1.9-kb RAD52 mRNA band that is present in all of the tested tissues, an extra mRNA species of {approximately}0.85 kb was detectable in mouse testis. 40 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. An Algal Nucleus-encoded Subunit of Mitochondrial ATP Synthase Rescues a Defect in the Analogous Human Mitochondrial-encoded Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ojaimi, Joseline; Pan, Junmin; Santra, Sumana; Snell, William J.; Schon, Eric A.

    2002-01-01

    Unlike most organisms, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a green alga, does not encode subunit 6 of F0F1-ATP synthase. We hypothesized that C. reinhardtii ATPase 6 is nucleus encoded and identified cDNAs and a single-copy nuclear gene specifying this subunit (CrATP6, with eight exons, four of which encode a mitochondrial targeting signal). Although the algal and human ATP6 genes are in different subcellular compartments and the encoded polypeptides are highly diverged, their secondary structures are remarkably similar. When CrATP6 was expressed in human cells, a significant amount of the precursor polypeptide was targeted to mitochondria, the mitochondrial targeting signal was cleaved within the organelle, and the mature polypeptide was assembled into human ATP synthase. In spite of the evolutionary distance between algae and mammals, C. reinhardtii ATPase 6 functioned in human cells, because deficiencies in both cell viability and ATP synthesis in transmitochondrial cell lines harboring a pathogenic mutation in the human mtDNA-encoded ATP6 gene were overcome by expression of CrATP6. The ability to express a nucleus-encoded version of a mammalian mtDNA-encoded protein may provide a way to import other highly hydrophobic proteins into mitochondria and could serve as the basis for a gene therapy approach to treat human mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12429828

  11. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human. beta. -amyloid protein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human {beta}-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone encoding an auxin influx carrier in carnation cuttings. Expression in different organs and cultivars and its relationship with cold storage.

    PubMed

    Oliveros-Valenzuela, María Del Rocío; Reyes, David; Sánchez-Bravo, José; Acosta, Manuel; Nicolás, Carlos

    2008-12-01

    Polar auxin transport (PAT) is necessary for the formation of adventitious roots in the base of leafy stem cuttings, as has been demonstrated in several studies in which the application of PAT inhibitors strongly inhibited the rooting of cuttings. However, unlike in the case of lateral roots, there is almost no information on the molecular mechanism that controls PAT in the formation of adventitious roots. A novel cDNA encoding an auxin influx carrier has been isolated and characterized from carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) cuttings. The full length of DcAUX1 was obtained and the deduced aminoacid sequence revealed a high degree of identity with the corresponding auxin carrier proteins from several species. The expression of this gene depended on the organ, the carnation cultivar and the length of time cuttings had been stored in a cold chamber. As a rule, expression was higher in stem than in leaves, in the basal than in the first internode and in mature than in young leaves irrespective of the cultivar and the duration of the storage. This pattern of expression agrees with the results of a previous study showing that auxin from mature leaves was essential for rooting, while exogenous auxin applied to mature leaves was polarly transported in the stem and accumulated in the basal internode (the rooting zone). Variations in the expression observed during storage (depending of the cultivar) might be related to the variation in PAT and rooting reported in previous studies.

  13. Cloning of the cDNA and functional expression of the 47-kilodalton cytosolic component of human neutrophil respiratory burst oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Volpp, B D; Nauseef, W M; Donelson, J E; Moser, D R; Clark, R A

    1989-01-01

    Neutrophil NADPH oxidase is a multicomponent enzyme that is activated to generate superoxide anion and is defective in the cells of patients with chronic granulomatous disease. It requires both membrane and cytosolic components, the latter including 47- and 67-kDa proteins recognized by the polyclonal antiserum B-1. Immunoscreening of an induced HL-60 lambda ZAP cDNA library yielded seven cross-hybridizing cDNAs encoding the 47-kDa component. Fusion proteins of 22-50 kDa were recognized by B-1. Antiserum against a fusion protein recognized a 47-kDa protein in normal neutrophils but not in those from patients with autosomal chronic granulomatous disease who lack the 47-kDa cytosolic oxidase component. In a cell-free NADPH oxidase system full-length and C-terminal fusion proteins augmented superoxide generation and reconstituted the cytosolic defect of a patient missing the 47-kDa protein. The cDNA hybridized with a 1.4-kilobase mRNA from induced HL-60 cells. The longest cDNA contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 41,440 Da with a calculated pI of 10.4, an N-terminal glycine, sites favorable for phosphorylation, a nucleotide binding domain, and a region of homology to the src protein kinases, phospholipase C, and alpha-fodrin. These structural features are pertinent to proposed functional roles of the protein in the respiratory burst oxidase. Images PMID:2550933

  14. Human mitochondrial HMG CoA synthase: Liver cDNA and partial genomic cloning, chromosome mapping to 1p12-p13, and possible role in vertebrate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1994-10-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (mHS) is the first enzyme of ketogenesis, whereas the cytoplasmic HS isozyme (cHS) mediates an early step in cholersterol synthesis. We here report the sequence of human and mouse liver mHS cDNAs, the sequence of an HS-like cDNA from Caenorhabditis elegans, the structure of a partial human mHS genomic clone, and the mapping of the human mHS gene to chromosome 1p12-p13. the nucleotide sequence of the human mHS cDNA encodes a mature mHS peptide of 471 residues, with a mean amino acid identity of 66.5% with cHS from mammals and chicken. Comparative analysis of all known mHS and cHS protein and DNA sequences shows a high degree of conservation near the N-terminus that decreases progressively toward the C-terminus and suggests that the two isozymes arose from a common ancestor gene 400-900 million years ago. Comparison of the gene structure of mHS and cHS is also consistant with a recent duplication event. We hypothesize that the physiologic result of the HS gene duplication was the appearance of HS within the mitochondria around the time of emergence of early vertebrates, which linked preexisting pathways of beta oxidation and leucine catabolism and created the HMG CoA pathway of ketogenesis, thus providing a lipid-derived energy source for the vertebrate brain. 56 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Construction of human liver cancer vascular endothelium cDNA expression library and screening of the endothelium-associated antigen genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xing; Ran, Yu-Liang; Lou, Jin-Ning; Hu, Dong; Yu, Long; Zhang, Yu-Shan; Zhou, Zhuan; Yang, Zhi-Hua

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To gain tumor endothelium associated antigen genes from human liver cancer vascular endothelial cells (HLCVECs) cDNA expression library, so as to find some new possible targets for the diagnosis and therapy of liver tumor. METHODS: HLCVECs were isolated and purified from a fresh hepatocellular carcinoma tissue sample, and were cultured and proliferated in vitro. A cDNA expression library was constructed with the mRNA extracted from HLCVECs. Anti-sera were prepared from immunized BALB/c mice through subcutaneous injection with high dose of fixed HLCVECs, and were then tested for their specificity against HLCVECs and angiogenic effects in vitro, such as inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of tumor endothelial cells, using immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, cell cycle analysis and MTT assays, etc. The identified xenogeneic sera from immunized mice were employed to screen the library of HLCVECs by modified serological analyses of recombinant cDNA expression libraries (SEREX). The positive clones were sequenced and analyzed by bio-informatics. RESULTS: The primary cDNA library consisted of 2 × 106 recombinants. Thirty-six positive clones were obtained from 6 × 105 independent clones by immunoscreening. Bio-informatics analysis of cDNA sequences indicated that 36 positive clones represented 18 different genes. Among them, 3 were new genes previously unreported, 2 of which were hypothetical genes. The other 15 were already known ones. Series analysis of gene expression (SAGE) database showed that ERP70, GRP58, GAPDH, SSB, S100A6, BMP-6, DVS27, HSP70 and NAC alpha in these genes were associated with endothelium and angiogenesis, but their effects on HLCVECs were still unclear. GAPDH, S100A6, BMP-6 and hsp70 were identified by SEREX in other tumor cDNA expression libraries. CONCLUSION: By screening of HLCVECs cDNA expression library using sera from immunized mice with HLCVECs, the functional genes associated with tumor endothelium or angiogenesis

  16. Identification of a new P450 expressed in human lung: complete cDNA sequence, cDNA-directed expression, and chromosome mapping.

    PubMed

    Nhamburo, P T; Gonzalez, F J; McBride, O W; Gelboin, H V; Kimura, S

    1989-10-01

    A cDNA coding for a P450 expressed in human lung was isolated from a lambda gt11 library constructed from human lung mRNA using a cDNA probe to rat P450 IVA1. The cDNA-deduced amino acid sequence of this P450, designated IVB1, consisted of 511 amino acids and had a calculated molecular weight of 59,558. The IVB1 amino acid sequence bore 51%, 53%, and 52% similarities to rat IVA1, IVA2, and rabbit P450p-2, respectively. Comparison of the primary amino acid sequence of human IVB1 with rat IVA and rabbit p-2 P450 sequences revealed a region of absolute sequence identity of 17 amino acids between residues 304 and 320. However, the functional significance of this conserved sequence is unknown. Human IVB1 also appears to be related to P450 isozyme 5 that has been extensively characterized in rabbits. The IVB1 cDNA was inserted into a vaccinia virus expression vector and the enzyme expressed in human cell lines. The expressed enzyme had an absorption spectrum with a lambda max at 450 nm when reduced and complexed with carbon monoxide, typical of other cytochrome P450s. Unlike rabbit P450 isozyme 5, however, human IVB1 was unable to activate the promutagen 2-aminofluorene. Human lung microsomal P450s were also unable to metabolize this compound despite the presence of IVB1 mRNA in three out of four human lungs analyzed. In contrast to its expression in lung, IVB1 mRNA was undetectable in livers from 14 individuals, including those from which the lungs were derived. IVB1-related mRNA was also expressed in rat lung and was undetectable in untreated rat liver.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Production of Human Albumin in Pigs Through CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Knockin of Human cDNA into Swine Albumin Locus in the Zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jin; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Junyi; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Song, Lei; Wang, Lulu; Ding, Chen; Qin, Jun; Liu, Liping; Wang, Weihua; Liu, Jianqiao; Huang, Xingxu; Wei, Hong; Zhang, Pumin

    2015-01-01

    Precise genome modification in large domesticated animals is desirable under many circumstances. In the past it is only possible through lengthy and burdensome cloning procedures. Here we attempted to achieve that goal through the use of the newest genome-modifying tool CRISPR/Cas9. We set out to knockin human albumin cDNA into pig Alb locus for the production of recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA). HSA is a widely used human blood product and is in high demand. We show that homologous recombination can occur highly efficiently in swine zygotes. All 16 piglets born from the manipulated zygotes carry the expected knockin allele and we demonstrated the presence of human albumin in the blood of these piglets. Furthermore, the knockin allele was successfully transmitted through germline. This success in precision genomic engineering is expected to spur exploration of pigs and other large domesticated animals to be used as bioreactors for the production of biomedical products or creation of livestock strains with more desirable traits. PMID:26560187

  18. Production of Human Albumin in Pigs Through CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Knockin of Human cDNA into Swine Albumin Locus in the Zygotes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Junyi; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Song, Lei; Wang, Lulu; Ding, Chen; Qin, Jun; Liu, Liping; Wang, Weihua; Liu, Jianqiao; Huang, Xingxu; Wei, Hong; Zhang, Pumin

    2015-01-01

    Precise genome modification in large domesticated animals is desirable under many circumstances. In the past it is only possible through lengthy and burdensome cloning procedures. Here we attempted to achieve that goal through the use of the newest genome-modifying tool CRISPR/Cas9. We set out to knockin human albumin cDNA into pig Alb locus for the production of recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA). HSA is a widely used human blood product and is in high demand. We show that homologous recombination can occur highly efficiently in swine zygotes. All 16 piglets born from the manipulated zygotes carry the expected knockin allele and we demonstrated the presence of human albumin in the blood of these piglets. Furthermore, the knockin allele was successfully transmitted through germline. This success in precision genomic engineering is expected to spur exploration of pigs and other large domesticated animals to be used as bioreactors for the production of biomedical products or creation of livestock strains with more desirable traits. PMID:26560187

  19. Isolation of novel and known genes from a human fetal cochlear cDNA library using subtractive hybridization and differential screening

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, N.G.; Gutierrez-Espeleta, G.A.; Bieber, F.R. |

    1994-09-01

    We used a combination of subtractive hybridization and differential screening strategies to identify genes that may function normally in hearing and, when mutated, result in deafness. A human fetal cochlear (membranous labyrinth) cDNA library was subtracted against total human fetal brain RNAs by an avidin-biotin-based procedure to enrich for cochlear transcripts. Subtracted cochlear clones were differentially screened with {sup 32}P-labeled total cochlear and total brain cDNA probes. Sequence analysis of clones that hybridized more intensely with cochlear than with brain cDNA probes revealed some previously characterized genes, including mitochondrial sequences, collagen type I {alpha}-2 (COL1A2), collagen type II {alpha}-1 (COL2A1), collagen type III {alpha}-1 (COL3A1), spermidine/spermine N{sup 1}-acetyltransferase (SAT), osteonectin (SPARC), and peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). Also identified were clones that are potential novel cochlear genes. Northern blots of cochlear and brain RNAs probed with COL1A2, COL2A1, COL3A1, SAT, SPARC, PMP22, and a novel sequence, designated Coch-5B2, confirm results of the subtractive procedure by showing preferential cochlear expression. A number of these genes serve structural or regulatory functions in extracellular matrix or neural conduction; defects in some of these genes are associated with disorders involving hearing loss. Partial sequence analysis of Coch-5B2 reveals a von Willebrand factor type A-like domain in this cDNA. To assess the cochlear specificity of Coch-5B2, a Northern blot panel of 14 human fetal tissue RNAs was probed with Coch-5B2, showing differential expression of this novel gene in the cochlea. 68 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Value of freedom to choose encoded by the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Juri; Usui, Nobuo; Park, Soyoung Q.; Williams, Tony; Iijima, Toshio; Taira, Masato; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Humans and animals value the opportunity to choose by preferring alternatives that offer more rather than fewer choices. This preference for choice may arise not only from an increased probability of obtaining preferred outcomes but also from the freedom it provides. We used human neuroimaging to investigate the neural basis of the preference for choice as well as for the items that could be chosen. In each trial, participants chose between two options, a monetary amount option and a “choice option.” The latter consisted of a number that corresponded to the number of everyday items participants would subsequently be able to choose from. We found that the opportunity to choose from a larger number of items was equivalent to greater amounts of money, indicating that participants valued having more choice; moreover, participants varied in the degree to which they valued having the opportunity to choose, with some valuing it more than the increased probability of obtaining preferred items. Neural activations in the mid striatum increased with the value of the opportunity to choose. The same region also coded the value of the items. Conversely, activation in the dorsolateral striatum was not related to the value of the items but was elevated when participants were offered more choices, particularly in those participants who overvalued the opportunity to choose. These data suggest a functional dissociation of value representations within the striatum, with general representations in mid striatum and specific representations of the value of freedom provided by the opportunity to choose in dorsolateral striatum. PMID:23864380

  1. Encoding of physics concepts: concreteness and presentation modality reflected by human brain dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kevin; She, Hsiao-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Chang; Chou, Wen-Chi; Huang, Li-Yu; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Gramann, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Previous research into working memory has focused on activations in different brain areas accompanying either different presentation modalities (verbal vs. non-verbal) or concreteness (abstract vs. concrete) of non-science concepts. Less research has been conducted investigating how scientific concepts are learned and further processed in working memory. To bridge this gap, the present study investigated human brain dynamics associated with encoding of physics concepts, taking both presentation modality and concreteness into account. Results of this study revealed greater theta and low-beta synchronization in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during encoding of concrete pictures as compared to the encoding of both high and low imageable words. In visual brain areas, greater theta activity accompanying stimulus onsets was observed for words as compared to pictures while stronger alpha suppression was observed in responses to pictures as compared to words. In general, the EEG oscillation patterns for encoding words of different levels of abstractness were comparable but differed significantly from encoding of pictures. These results provide insights into the effects of modality of presentation on human encoding of scientific concepts and thus might help in developing new ways to better teach scientific concepts in class.

  2. Isolation and sequence of a cDNA clone for human tyrosinase that maps at the mouse c-albino locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, B.S.; Haq, A.K.; Pomerantz, S.H.; Halaban, R.

    1987-11-01

    Screening of a lambdagt11 human melanocyte cDNA library with antibodies against hamster tyrosinase resulted in the isolation of 16 clones. The cDNA inserts from 13 of the 16 clones cross-hybridized with each other, indicating that they were form related mRNA species. One of the cDNA clones, Pmel34, detected one mRNA species with an approximate length of 2.4 kilobases that was expressed preferentially in normal and malignant melanocytes but not in other cell types. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence showed that the putative human tyrosinase is composed of 548 amino acids with a molecular weight of 62,610. The deduced protein contains glycosylation sites and histidine-rich sites that could be used for copper binding. Southern blot analysis of DNA derived from newborn mice carrying lethal albino deletion mutations revealed that Pmel34 maps near or at the c-albino locus, the position of the structural gene for tyrosinase.

  3. Cloning of the cDNA for the human ATP synthase OSCP subunit (ATP5O) by exon trapping and mapping to chromosome 21q22.1-q22.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haiming; Morris, M.A.; Rossier, C.

    1995-08-10

    Exon trapping was used to clone portions of potential genes from human chromosome 21. One trapped sequence showed striking homology with the bovine and rat ATP synthase OSCP (oligomycin sensitivity conferring protein) subunit. We subsequently cloned the full-length human ATP synthase OSCP cDNA (GDB/HGMW approved name ATP50) from infant brain and muscle libraries and determined its nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence (EMBL/GenBank Accession No. X83218). The encoded polypeptide contains 213 amino acids, with more than 80% identity to bovine and murine ATPase OSCP subunits and over 35% identity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sweet potato sequences. The human ATP5O gene is located at 21q22.1-q22.2, just proximal to D21S17, in YACs 860G11 and 838C7 of the Chumakov et al. YAC contig. The gene is expressed in all human tissues examined, most strongly in muscle and heart. This ATP5O subunit is a key structural component of the stalk of the mitochondrial respiratory chain F{sub 1}F{sub 0}-ATP synthase and as such may contribute in a gene dosage-dependent manner to the phenotype of Down syndrome (trisomy 21). 39 refs., 5 figs.

  4. GENCODE: the reference human genome annotation for The ENCODE Project.

    PubMed

    Harrow, Jennifer; Frankish, Adam; Gonzalez, Jose M; Tapanari, Electra; Diekhans, Mark; Kokocinski, Felix; Aken, Bronwen L; Barrell, Daniel; Zadissa, Amonida; Searle, Stephen; Barnes, If; Bignell, Alexandra; Boychenko, Veronika; Hunt, Toby; Kay, Mike; Mukherjee, Gaurab; Rajan, Jeena; Despacio-Reyes, Gloria; Saunders, Gary; Steward, Charles; Harte, Rachel; Lin, Michael; Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Derrien, Thomas; Chrast, Jacqueline; Walters, Nathalie; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Pei, Baikang; Tress, Michael; Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Ezkurdia, Iakes; van Baren, Jeltje; Brent, Michael; Haussler, David; Kellis, Manolis; Valencia, Alfonso; Reymond, Alexandre; Gerstein, Mark; Guigó, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J

    2012-09-01

    The GENCODE Consortium aims to identify all gene features in the human genome using a combination of computational analysis, manual annotation, and experimental validation. Since the first public release of this annotation data set, few new protein-coding loci have been added, yet the number of alternative splicing transcripts annotated has steadily increased. The GENCODE 7 release contains 20,687 protein-coding and 9640 long noncoding RNA loci and has 33,977 coding transcripts not represented in UCSC genes and RefSeq. It also has the most comprehensive annotation of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) loci publicly available with the predominant transcript form consisting of two exons. We have examined the completeness of the transcript annotation and found that 35% of transcriptional start sites are supported by CAGE clusters and 62% of protein-coding genes have annotated polyA sites. Over one-third of GENCODE protein-coding genes are supported by peptide hits derived from mass spectrometry spectra submitted to Peptide Atlas. New models derived from the Illumina Body Map 2.0 RNA-seq data identify 3689 new loci not currently in GENCODE, of which 3127 consist of two exon models indicating that they are possibly unannotated long noncoding loci. GENCODE 7 is publicly available from gencodegenes.org and via the Ensembl and UCSC Genome Browsers.

  5. Structural/functional analysis of the human OXR1 protein: identification of exon 8 as the anti-oxidant encoding function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The human OXR1 gene belongs to a class of genes with conserved functions that protect cells from reactive oxygen species (ROS). The gene was found using a screen of a human cDNA library by its ability to suppress the spontaneous mutator phenotype of an E. coli mutH nth strain. The function of OXR1 is unknown. The human and yeast genes are induced by oxidative stress and targeted to the mitochondria; the yeast gene is required for resistance to hydrogen peroxide. Multiple spliced isoforms are expressed in a variety of human tissues, including brain. Results In this report, we use a papillation assay that measures spontaneous mutagenesis of an E. coli mutM mutY strain, a host defective for oxidative DNA repair. Papillation frequencies with this strain are dependent upon a G→T transversion in the lacZ gene (a mutation known to occur as a result of oxidative damage) and are suppressed by in vivo expression of human OXR1. N-terminal, C-terminal and internal deletions of the OXR1 gene were constructed and tested for suppression of the mutagenic phenotype of the mutM mutY strain. We find that the TLDc domain, encoded by the final four exons of the OXR1 gene, is not required for papillation suppression in E. coli. Instead, we show that the protein segment encoded by exon 8 of OXR1 is responsible for the suppression of oxidative damage in E. coli. Conclusion The protein segment encoded by OXR1 exon 8 plays an important role in the anti-oxidative function of the human OXR1 protein. This result suggests that the TLDc domain, found in OXR1 exons 12–16 and common in many proteins with nuclear function, has an alternate (undefined) role other than oxidative repair. PMID:22873401

  6. Can visual information encoded in cortical columns be decoded from magnetoencephalography data in humans?

    PubMed

    Cichy, Radoslaw Martin; Ramirez, Fernando Mario; Pantazis, Dimitrios

    2015-11-01

    It is a principal open question whether noninvasive imaging methods in humans can decode information encoded at a spatial scale as fine as the basic functional unit of cortex: cortical columns. We addressed this question in five magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiments by investigating a columnar-level encoded visual feature: contrast edge orientation. We found that MEG signals contained orientation-specific information as early as approximately 50 ms after stimulus onset even when controlling for confounds, such as overrepresentation of particular orientations, stimulus edge interactions, and global form-related signals. Theoretical modeling confirmed the plausibility of this empirical result. An essential consequence of our results is that information encoded in the human brain at the level of cortical columns should in general be accessible by multivariate analysis of electrophysiological signals.

  7. Cloning and identification of a novel human RNPC3 gene that encodes a protein with two RRM domains and is expressed in the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Enpeng; Li, Jinsong; Xie, Yi; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Jinzhong; Zeng, Li; Yin, Gang; Qian, Ji; Wu, Hai; Ying, Kang; Zhao, Robert Chunhua; Mao, YuMin

    2003-10-01

    The RNA recognition motifs (RRM) domain is one of the most common eukaryotic protein folds. Proteins containing RRM domains function in important steps of posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression and are involved in processing and transport of mRNA precursors. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a novel human RNPC3 gene containing two RNA recognition motifs. The 1870 bp cDNA encodes a protein with 517 amino acids. It also contains two bipartite nuclear targeting sequences, which is important for nuclear targeting for proteins, especially those functioning in the cell nucleus. The GFP location of the RNPC3 gene product shows that this protein is located in the cell nucleus. RT-PCR reveals that it is abundantly expressed in kidney and pancreas.

  8. Cloning of the cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila white gene and mapping to chromosome 21q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Haiming Chen; Lalioti, M.D.; Perrin, G.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    1996-07-01

    In an effort to contribute to the transcript map of human chromosome 21 and the understanding of the pathophysiology of trisomy 21, we have used exon trapping to identify fragments of chromosome 21 genes. Two trapped exons, from pools of chromosome 21-specific cosmids, showed homology to the Drosophila white (w) gene. We subsequently cloned the corresponding cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila w gene (hW) from human retina and fetal brain cDNA libraries. The gene belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter gene family and is homologous to Drosophila w (and to 2 genes from other species) and to a lesser extent to Drosophila brown (bw) and scarlet (st) genes that are all involved in the transport of eye pigment precursor molecules. A DNA polymorphism with 62% heterozygosity due to variation of a poly (T) region in the 3{prime} UTR of the hW has been identified and used for the incorporation of this gene to the genetic map of chromosome 21. The hW is located at 21q22.3 between DNA markers D21S212 and D21S49 in a P1 clone that also contains marker BCEI. The gene is expressed at various levels in many human tissues. The contributions of this gene to the Down syndrome phenotypes, to human eye color, and to the resulting phenotypes of null or missense mutations are presently unknown. 56 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  10. Human collagen genes encoding basement membrane. cap alpha. 1(IV) and. cap alpha. 2(IV) chains map to the distal long arm of chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, C.A.; Emanuel, B.S.; Hansen, J.R.; Cavenee, W.K.; Myers, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    At least 20 genes encode the structurally related collagen chains that comprise > 10 homo- or heterotrimeric types. Six members of this multigene family have been assigned to five chromosomes in the human genome. The two type I genes, ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2, are located on chromosomes 17 and 7, respectively, and the ..cap alpha..1(II) gene is located on chromosome 12. Their recent mapping of the ..cap alpha..1(III) and ..cap alpha..2(V) genes to the q24.3 ..-->.. q31 region of chromosome 2 provided the only evidence that the collagen genes are not entirely dispersed. To further determine their organization, the authors and others localized the ..cap alpha..1(IV) gene to chromosome 13 and in their experiments sublocalized the gene to band q34 by in situ hybridization. Here they show the presence of the ..cap alpha..2 type IV locus also on the distal long arm of chromosome 13 by hybridizing a human ..cap alpha..2(IV) cDNA clone to rodent-human hybrids and to metaphase chromosomes. These studies represent the only demonstration of linkage between genes encoding both polypeptide chains of the same collagen type.

  11. Dissociations within human hippocampal subregions during encoding and retrieval of spatial information.

    PubMed

    Suthana, Nanthia; Ekstrom, Arne; Moshirvaziri, Saba; Knowlton, Barbara; Bookheimer, Susan

    2011-07-01

    Although the hippocampus is critical for the formation and retrieval of spatial memories, it is unclear how subregions are differentially involved in these processes. Previous high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus (CA23DG) regions support the encoding of novel associations, whereas the subicular cortices support the retrieval of these learned associations. Whether these subregions are used in humans during encoding and retrieval of spatial information has yet to be explored. Using high-resolution fMRI (1.6 mm × 1.6-mm in-plane), we found that activity within the right CA23DG increased during encoding compared to retrieval. Conversely, right subicular activity increased during retrieval compared to encoding of spatial associations. These results are consistent with the previous studies illustrating dissociations within human hippocampal subregions and further suggest that these regions are similarly involved during the encoding and retrieval of spatial information.

  12. Perceptual biases are inconsistent with Bayesian encoding of speed in the human visual system.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Omar; Hammett, Stephen T

    2015-02-06

    The notion that Bayesian processes are fundamental to brain function and sensory processing has recently received much support, and a number of Bayesian accounts of how the brain encodes the speed of moving objects have been proposed that challenge earlier mechanistic models. We measured the perceived speed of low contrast patterns at both low (2.5 cd m(-2)) and high (25 cd m(-2)) luminance in order to assess these competing models of how the human visual system encodes speed. At both luminance levels low contrast stimuli are perceptually biased such that they appear slower at slow (< 8 Hz) speeds but faster at higher (16 Hz) speeds. However, we find that the reversal of the perceptual bias from under- to overestimation occurred at slower speeds at low luminance. We also found that the bias was greater at slow speeds at high luminance but greater at fast speeds at low luminance. Moreover, discrimination thresholds were found to be similar at high and low luminance. These findings can be predicted by models in which speed is encoded by the relative activity within two broadly tuned temporal channels but are inconsistent with Bayesian models of speed encoding. We conclude that Bayesian processes cannot adequately account for speed encoding in the human visual system.

  13. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  14. Structure and transforming potential of the human cot oncogene encoding a putative protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, J; Higashi, T; Mukai, H; Ohuchi, T; Kakunaga, T

    1991-01-01

    A new transforming gene has been molecularly cloned from hamster SHOK cells transformed with DNA extracted from a human thyroid carcinoma cell line and named the cot (cancer Osaka thyroid) oncogene. cDNA sequencing disclosed that this oncogene codes for a protein with 415 amino acid residues, and computer matching showed 42 to 48% similarity matches with serine protein kinases. Its gene product was identified as a 52-kDa protein by transcription and translation in vitro. Expression of cot cDNA under transcriptional control by a retroviral long terminal repeat induced morphological transformation of NIH 3T3 cells as well as SHOK cells. Protein kinase activity associated with constructed p60gag-cot was detected by immune complex kinase assay with anti-gag antiserum. The cot oncogene was overexpressed in transformed SHOK cells and found to have a rearranged 3' end in the last coding exon, which probably resulted in a deletion and an altered C' terminus in the transforming protein. This DNA rearrangement appeared to have occurred during transfection of the tumor DNA into hamster SHOK cells and not in the original thyroid tumor. Images PMID:2072910

  15. Generation of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) from cDNA: BRSV NS2 is not essential for virus replication in tissue culture, and the human RSV leader region acts as a functional BRSV genome promoter.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, U J; Finke, S; Conzelmann, K K

    1999-01-01

    In order to generate recombinant bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), the genome of BRSV strain A51908, variant ATue51908, was cloned as cDNA. We provide here the sequence of the BRSV genome ends and of the entire L gene. This completes the sequence of the BRSV genome, which comprises a total of 15,140 nucleotides. To establish a vaccinia virus-free recovery system, a BHK-derived cell line stably expressing T7 RNA polymerase was generated (BSR T7/5). Recombinant BRSV was reproducibly recovered from cDNA constructs after T7 RNA polymerase-driven expression of antigenome sense RNA and of BRSV N, P, M2, and L proteins from transfected plasmids. Chimeric viruses in which the BRSV leader region was replaced by the human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) leader region replicated in cell culture as efficiently as their nonchimeric counterparts, demonstrating that all cis-acting sequences of the HRSV promoter are faithfully recognized by the BRSV polymerase complex. In addition, we report the successful recovery of a BRSV mutant lacking the complete NS2 gene, which encodes a nonstructural protein of unknown function. The NS2-deficient BRSV replicated autonomously and could be passaged, demonstrating that NS2 is not essential for virus replication in cell culture. However, growth of the mutant was considerably slower than and final infectious titers were reduced by a factor of at least 10 compared to wild-type BRSV, indicating that NS2 provides a supporting factor required for full replication capacity.

  16. Effects of acute methamphetamine on emotional memory formation in humans: encoding vs consolidation.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Michael E; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies.

  17. Effects of acute methamphetamine on emotional memory formation in humans: encoding vs consolidation.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Michael E; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies. PMID:25679982

  18. Effects of Acute Methamphetamine on Emotional Memory Formation in Humans: Encoding vs Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies. PMID:25679982

  19. Synthesis in Escherichia coli of human adenovirus type 12 transforming proteins encoded by early region 1A 13S mRNA and 12S mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kimelman, D; Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Ptashne, M; Green, M

    1984-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad)-encoded early region 1A (E1A) tumor (T) antigens have been implicated in the positive regulation of viral early genes, the positive and negative regulation of some cellular genes, and cell immortalization and transformation. To further study the Ad E1A T antigens and to facilitate their purification, we have cloned cDNA copies of the Ad12 E1A 13S mRNA and 12S mRNA downstream of a hybrid Escherichia coli trp-lac (tac) promoter. Up to 8% of the protein synthesized in E. coli cells transformed by each of the two different Ad12 E1A cDNA constructs were immunoprecipitated as a Mr 47,000 protein by antibody to a synthetic peptide encoded in the Ad12 E1A DNA sequence. Both proteins produced in E. coli appear to be authentic and complete Ad12 E1A T antigens because they possess (i) the Ad12 E1A NH2-terminal amino acid sequence predicted from the DNA sequence; (ii) the Ad12 E1A COOH-terminal sequence, as shown by immunoprecipitation with anti-peptide antibody; and (iii) a molecular weight and an acidic isoelectric point similar to that of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected and transformed mammalian cells. The T antigens were purified to near homogeneity in yields of 100-200 micrograms per g wet weight of transformed E. coli cells. Images PMID:6387701

  20. A human RNA polymerase II subunit is encoded by a recently generated multigene family

    PubMed Central

    Grandemange, Sylvie; Schaller, Sophie; Yamano, Shigeru; Du Manoir, Stanislas; Shpakovski, George V; Mattei, Marie-Geneviève; Kedinger, Claude; Vigneron, Marc

    2001-01-01

    Background The sequences encoding the yeast RNA polymerase II (RPB) subunits are single copy genes. Results While those characterized so far for the human (h) RPB are also unique, we show that hRPB subunit 11 (hRPB11) is encoded by a multigene family, mapping on chromosome 7 at loci p12, q11.23 and q22. We focused on two members of this family, hRPB11a and hRPB11b: the first encodes subunit hRPB11a, which represents the major RPB11 component of the mammalian RPB complex ; the second generates polypeptides hRPB11bα and hRPB11bβ through differential splicing of its transcript and shares homologies with components of the hPMS2L multigene family related to genes involved in mismatch-repair functions (MMR). Both hRPB11a and b genes are transcribed in all human tissues tested. Using an inter-species complementation assay, we show that only hRPB11bα is functional in yeast. In marked contrast, we found that the unique murine homolog of RPB11 gene maps on chromosome 5 (band G), and encodes a single polypeptide which is identical to subunit hRPB11a. Conclusions The type hRPB11b gene appears to result from recent genomic recombination events in the evolution of primates, involving sequence elements related to the MMR apparatus. PMID:11747469

  1. Characterization of novel Leishmania infantum recombinant proteins encoded by genes from five families with distinct capacities for serodiagnosis of canine and human visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Geraldo G S; Magalhães, Franklin B; Teixeira, Márcia C A; Pereira, Andrea M; Pinheiro, Cristiane G M; Santos, Lenita R; Nascimento, Marília B; Bedor, Cheila N G; Albuquerque, Alessandra L; dos-Santos, Washington L C; Gomes, Yara M; Moreira, Edson D; Brito, Maria E F; Pontes de Carvalho, Lain C; de Melo Neto, Osvaldo P

    2011-12-01

    To expand the available panel of recombinant proteins that can be useful for identifying Leishmania-infected dogs and for diagnosing human visceral leishmaniasis (VL), we selected recombinant antigens from L. infantum, cDNA, and genomic libraries by using pools of serum samples from infected dogs and humans. The selected DNA fragments encoded homologs of a cytoplasmic heat-shock protein 70, a kinesin, a polyubiquitin, and two novel hypothetical proteins. Histidine-tagged recombinant proteins were produced after subcloning these DNA fragments and evaluated by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with panels of canine and human serum samples. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with different recombinant proteins had different sensitivities (67.4-93.0% and 36.4-97.2%) and specificities (76.1-100% and 90.4-97.3%) when tested with serum samples from Leishmania-infected dogs and human patients with VL. Overall, no single recombinant antigen was sufficient to serodiagnosis all canine or human VL cases. PMID:22144438

  2. Purification and cDNA cloning of the AdoMet-binding subunit of the human mRNA (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Bokar, J A; Shambaugh, M E; Polayes, D; Matera, A G; Rottman, F M

    1997-11-01

    The methylation of internal adenosine residues in eukaryotic mRNA, forming N6-methyladenosine (m6A), is catalyzed by a complex multicomponent enzyme. Previous studies suggested that m6A affects the efficiency of mRNA processing or transport, although the mechanism by which this occurs is not known. As a step toward better understanding the mechanism and function of this ubiquitous posttranscriptional modification, we have shown that HeLa mRNA (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase requires at least two separate protein factors, MT-A and MT-B, and MT-A contains the AdoMet binding site on a 70-kDa subunit (MT-A70). MT-A70 was purified by conventional chromatography and electrophoresis, and was microsequenced. The peptide sequence was used to design a degenerate oligodeoxynucleotide that in turn was used to isolate the cDNA clone coding for MT-A70 from a HeLa cDNA library. Recombinant MT-A70 was expressed as a fusion protein in bacteria and was used to generate anti-MT-A70 antisera in rabbits. These antisera recognize MT-A70 in HeLa nuclear extracts by western blot and are capable of depleting (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase activity from HeLa nuclear extract, confirming that MT-A70 is a critical subunit of (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferase. Northern blot analysis reveals that MT-A70 mRNA is present in a wide variety of human tissues and may undergo alternative splicing. MT-A70 cDNA probe hybridizes to a 2.0-kilobase (kb) polyadenylated RNA isolated from HeLa cells, whereas it hybridizes to two predominant RNA species (approximately 2.0 kb and 3.0 kb) using mRNA isolated from six different human tissues. Analysis of the cDNA sequence indicates that it codes for a 580-amino acid protein with a predicted MW = 65 kDa. The predicted protein contains sequences similar to consensus methylation motifs I and II identified in prokaryotic DNA (N6-adenosine)-methyltransferases, suggesting the functional conservation of peptide motifs. MT-A70 also contains a long region of homology to

  3. Subsecond dopamine fluctuations in human striatum encode superposed error signals about actual and counterfactual reward.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Kenneth T; Saez, Ignacio; Lohrenz, Terry; Witcher, Mark R; Laxton, Adrian W; Tatter, Stephen B; White, Jason P; Ellis, Thomas L; Phillips, Paul E M; Montague, P Read

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, dopamine is a critical neuromodulator whose actions underlie learning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Degeneration of dopamine neurons causes Parkinson's disease, whereas dysregulation of dopamine signaling is believed to contribute to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Experiments in animal models suggest the hypothesis that dopamine release in human striatum encodes reward prediction errors (RPEs) (the difference between actual and expected outcomes) during ongoing decision-making. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging experiments in humans support the idea that RPEs are tracked in the striatum; however, BOLD measurements cannot be used to infer the action of any one specific neurotransmitter. We monitored dopamine levels with subsecond temporal resolution in humans (n = 17) with Parkinson's disease while they executed a sequential decision-making task. Participants placed bets and experienced monetary gains or losses. Dopamine fluctuations in the striatum fail to encode RPEs, as anticipated by a large body of work in model organisms. Instead, subsecond dopamine fluctuations encode an integration of RPEs with counterfactual prediction errors, the latter defined by how much better or worse the experienced outcome could have been. How dopamine fluctuations combine the actual and counterfactual is unknown. One possibility is that this process is the normal behavior of reward processing dopamine neurons, which previously had not been tested by experiments in animal models. Alternatively, this superposition of error terms may result from an additional yet-to-be-identified subclass of dopamine neurons. PMID:26598677

  4. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Skin-Associated Genes Encoding Membrane and Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Martinez, Cynthia; Schrumpf, Holger; Gasis, Marcia; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115), and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7). Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics. PMID:23840300

  5. Subsecond dopamine fluctuations in human striatum encode superposed error signals about actual and counterfactual reward

    PubMed Central

    Kishida, Kenneth T.; Saez, Ignacio; Lohrenz, Terry; Witcher, Mark R.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; White, Jason P.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Phillips, Paul E. M.; Montague, P. Read

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, dopamine is a critical neuromodulator whose actions underlie learning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Degeneration of dopamine neurons causes Parkinson’s disease, whereas dysregulation of dopamine signaling is believed to contribute to psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, addiction, and depression. Experiments in animal models suggest the hypothesis that dopamine release in human striatum encodes reward prediction errors (RPEs) (the difference between actual and expected outcomes) during ongoing decision-making. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) imaging experiments in humans support the idea that RPEs are tracked in the striatum; however, BOLD measurements cannot be used to infer the action of any one specific neurotransmitter. We monitored dopamine levels with subsecond temporal resolution in humans (n = 17) with Parkinson’s disease while they executed a sequential decision-making task. Participants placed bets and experienced monetary gains or losses. Dopamine fluctuations in the striatum fail to encode RPEs, as anticipated by a large body of work in model organisms. Instead, subsecond dopamine fluctuations encode an integration of RPEs with counterfactual prediction errors, the latter defined by how much better or worse the experienced outcome could have been. How dopamine fluctuations combine the actual and counterfactual is unknown. One possibility is that this process is the normal behavior of reward processing dopamine neurons, which previously had not been tested by experiments in animal models. Alternatively, this superposition of error terms may result from an additional yet-to-be-identified subclass of dopamine neurons. PMID:26598677

  6. Detection of the human endogenous retrovirus ERV3-encoded Env-protein in human tissues using antibody-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chen; Atterby, Christina; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Zhang, Wei Wei; Larsson, Erik; Ryan, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is growing evidence to suggest that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) have contributed to human evolution, being expressed in development, normal physiology and disease. A key difficulty in the scientific evaluation of this potential viral contribution is the accurate demonstration of virally expressed protein in specific human cells and tissues. In this study, we have adopted the endogenous retrovirus, ERV3, as our test model in developing a reliable high-capacity methodology for the expression of such endogenous retrovirus-coded protein. Design Two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to ERV3 Env-encoded protein were generated to detect the corresponding protein expression pattern in specific human cells, tissues and organs. Participants Sampling included normal tissues from 144 individuals ranging from childhood to old age. This included more than forty different tissues and organs and some 216 different cancer tissues representing the twenty commonest forms of human cancer. Setting The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Main Outcome Measures The potential expression at likely physiological level of the ERV3Env encoded protein in a wide range of human cells, tissues and organs. Results We found that ERV3 encoded Env protein is expressed at substantive levels in placenta, testis, adrenal gland, corpus luteum, Fallopian tubes, sebaceous glands, astrocytes, bronchial epithelium and the ducts of the salivary glands. Substantive expression was also seen in a variety of epithelial cells as well as cells known to undergo fusion in inflammation and in normal physiology, including fused macrophages, myocardium and striated muscle. This contrasted strongly with the low levels expressed in other tissues types. These findings suggest that this virus plays a significant role in human physiology and may also play a possible role in disease. Conclusion This technique can now be extended to the study

  7. Localization of the human genes encoding the two subunits of general transcription factor TFIIE.

    PubMed

    Purrello, M; Di Pietro, C; Rapisarda, A; Motta, S; Pavone, L; Grzeschik, K H; Sichel, G

    1994-09-01

    TFIIE is a general transcription factor for class II genes composed of two types of subunits, a large one of 56 kDa and a small of 34 kDa. By Southern analysis at high and at low stringency of a panel of mouse/human hybrid cell lines and by in situ chromosomal hybridization, we have demonstrated that both polypeptides are encoded by genes that are single copy in the human genome and are localized at 3q13-q21 and at 8p12, respectively. A TaqI RFLP (heterozygosity index of 0.07) was detected at the locus for the 56-kDa subunit.

  8. Down-regulation in multiple human cancers of a novel gene, DMHC, from 17q25.1 that encodes an integral membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Mikami, I; Harada, H; Nagai, H; Tsuneizumi, M; Nobe, Y; Koizumi, K; Sugano, S; Tanaka, S; Emi, M

    2001-04-01

    Frequent observations of allelic loss in chromosomal band 17q25.1 in a variety of human cancers have suggested that one or more tumor suppressor genes are present in that region. Moreover, a genetic locus for hereditary focal non-epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, a condition associated with cancer of the esophagus (TOC; Tylosis with Oesophageal Cancer), lies in the same region. We screened cell lines derived from a variety of human cancers by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect alterations in expression of genes within the region in question, by examining expressed sequence tags located there. These experiments identified an 1834-bp full-length cDNA encoding a novel, 441-amino acid integral membrane protein with seven putative transmembrane domains. This gene showed loss or extreme decrease of expression in 6 of 10 uterine cancer-cell lines, 2 of 11 hepatic cell carcinoma-cell lines, 2 of 7 lung cancer-cell lines, 1 of 6 gastric cancer-cell lines, and 1 of 10 breast cancer-cell lines. (We named it DMHC ("down-regulated in multiple human cancers").) Our results suggest that loss of expression of DMHC at 17q25.1 may play an important role in development of variety of human cancers.

  9. Identification and chromosome assignment of a human gene encoding a novel phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Seki, N; Nimura, Y; Ohira, M; Saito, T; Ichimiya, S; Nomura, N; Nakagawara, A

    1997-10-31

    We identified a novel phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase by screening human brain cDNA libraries with probes designed from the conserved kinase-domain sequence. Analysis of cDNAs indicated that two different forms of transcripts are present: one is the full-length form composed of 1,044 amino acid residues and the other is the short form that the N-terminal 216 amino acid residues including a putative p85 binding domain has been truncated (828 amino acid residues). Database search revealed the sequence of the full-length form to be identical to that recently registered by D. Chantry et al. (Accession No. U86453 in GenBank release, August 1997). Northern blot analysis showed this mRNA to be ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, with relatively higher expression was observed in spleen, thymus and leukocytes. Based on fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR-based analyses with both human/rodent mono-chromosomal hybrid cell panels and radiation hybrid mapping panels, this gene was localized to chromosome region 1p36.2. This region is frequently lost in a variety of human malignancies, including neuroblastoma. The novel PI3K could be a candidate target of the 1p36 alteration that occurs in neuroendocrine tumors.

  10. Structural organization of the human gene (LMNB1) encoding nuclear lamin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.; Worman, H.J.

    1995-05-20

    The authors have determined the structural organization of the human gene (LMNB1) that encodes nuclear lamin B1, an intermediate filament protein of the nuclear envelope. The transcription unit spans more than 45 kb and the transcription start site is 348 nucleotides upstream from the translation initiation codon. Lamin B1 is encoded by 11 exons. Exon 1 codes for the amino-terminal head domain and the first portion of the central rod domain, exons 2 through 6 the central rod domain, and exons 7 through 11 the carboxyl-terminal tail domain of this intermediate filament protein. Intron positions are conserved in other lamin genes from frogs, mice, and humans but different in lamin genes from Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. In the region encoding the central rod domain, intron positions are also similar to those in the gene for an invertebrate nonneuronal cytoplasmic intermediate filament protein and the genes for most vertebrate cytoplasmic intermediate filament proteins except neurofilaments and nestin. 51 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Discovery of Human sORF-Encoded Polypeptides (SEPs) in Cell Lines and Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The existence of nonannotated protein-coding human short open reading frames (sORFs) has been revealed through the direct detection of their sORF-encoded polypeptide (SEP) products. The discovery of novel SEPs increases the size of the genome and the proteome and provides insights into the molecular biology of mammalian cells, such as the prevalent usage of non-AUG start codons. Through modifications of the existing SEP-discovery workflow, we discover an additional 195 SEPs in K562 cells and extend this methodology to identify novel human SEPs in additional cell lines and human tissue for a final tally of 237 new SEPs. These results continue to expand the human genome and proteome and demonstrate that SEPs are a ubiquitous class of nonannotated polypeptides that require further investigation. PMID:24490786

  12. R-plasmid-encoded adhesive factor in Klebsiella pneumoniae strains responsible for human nosocomial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Darfeuille-Michaud, A; Jallat, C; Aubel, D; Sirot, D; Rich, C; Sirot, J; Joly, B

    1992-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae strains involved in hospital outbreaks of nosocomial infections, such as suppurative lesions, bacteremia, and septicemia, were resistant to multiple antibiotics including broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Epidemiologic investigations revealed that the reservoir for these K. pneumoniae strains was the gastrointestinal tracts of the patients. The study of the adherence ability of the strains reported here showed that these bacteria adhered to the microvilli of the Caco-2 cell line. This adhesion was mediated by a nonfimbrial protein with a molecular mass of 29,000 Da designated CF29K. Pretreatment of bacteria with antibodies raised against CF29K or Caco-2 cells with purified CF29K prevented the adhesion of K. pneumoniae strains to Caco-2 cells. CF29K immunologically cross-reacted with the CS31A surface protein of Escherichia coli strains involved in septicemia in calves. Genes encoding CF29K were located on a high-molecular-weight conjugative R plasmid, which transferred to E. coli K-12. Transconjugants expressed a large amount of CF29K protein and adhered to the brush border of Caco-2 cells. These findings show that K. pneumoniae strains were able to colonize the human intestinal tract through a plasmid-encoded 29,000-Da surface protein. Hybridization experiments indicated that the gene encoding resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins by the production of CAZ-1 enzyme and the gene encoding the adhesive property to intestinal cells were both located on a 20- to 22-kb EcoRI restriction DNA fragment. Genes encoding aerobactin and the ferric aerobactin receptor were also found on this R plasmid. Images PMID:1345909

  13. cDNA cloning, expression and activity of a second human aflatoxin B1-metabolizing member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily, AKR7A3.

    PubMed

    Knight, L P; Primiano, T; Groopman, J D; Kensler, T W; Sutter, T R

    1999-07-01

    The aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) aldehyde metabolite of AFB1 may contribute to the cytotoxicity of this hepatocarcinogen via protein adduction. Aflatoxin B1 aldehyde reductases, specifically the NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductases of rat (AKR7A1) and human (AKR7A2), are known to metabolize the AFB1 dihydrodiol by forming AFB1 dialcohol. Using a rat AKR7A1 cDNA, we isolated and characterized a distinct aldo-keto reductase (AKR7A3) from an adult human liver cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence of AKR7A3 shares 80 and 88% identity with rat AKR7A1 and human AKR7A2, respectively. Recombinant rat AKR7A1 and human AKR7A3 were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli as hexa-histidine tagged fusion proteins. These proteins catalyzed the reduction of several model carbonyl-containing substrates. The NADPH-dependent formation of AFB1 dialcohol by recombinant human AKR7A3 was confirmed by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies produced using recombinant rat AKR7A1 protein were shown to detect nanogram amounts of rat and human AKR7A protein. The amount of AKR7A-related protein in hepatic cytosols of 1, 2-dithiole-3-thione-treated rats was 18-fold greater than in cytosols from untreated animals. These antibodies detected AKR7A-related protein in normal human liver samples ranging from 0.3 to 0.8 microg/mg cytosolic protein. Northern blot analysis showed varying levels of expression of AKR7A RNA in human liver and in several extrahepatic tissues, with relatively high levels in the stomach, pancreas, kidney and liver. Based on the kinetic parameters determined using recombinant human AKR7A3 and AFB1 dihydrodiol at pH 7.4, the catalytic efficiency of this reaction (k2/K, per M/s) equals or exceeds those reported for other enzymes, for example cytochrome P450s and glutathione S-transferases, known to metabolize AFB1 in vivo. These findings indicate that, depending on the extent of AFB1 dihydrodiol formation, AKR

  14. Receptor expression and responsiveness of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a human cytomegalovirus encoded CC chemokine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Xu, Jun; Gao, Huihui; Tao, Ran; Li, Wei; Shang, Shiqiang; Gu, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects the majority of the world's population. After long period of time co-evolving with human being, this pathogen has developed several strategies to evade host immune surveillance. One of the major trick is encoding homologous to those of the host organism or stealing host cellular genes that have significant functions in immune system. To date, we have found several viral immune analogous which include G protein coupled receptor, class I major histocompatibility complex and chemokine. Chemokine is a small group of molecules which is defined by the presence of four cysteines in highly conserved region. The four kinds of chemokines (C, CC, CXC, and CX3C) are classified based on the arrangement of 1 or 2 N-terminal cysteine residues. UL128 protein is one of the analogous that encoded by human cytomegalovirus that has similar amino acid sequences to the human CC chemokine. It has been proved to be one of the essential particles that involved in human cytomegalovirus entry into epithelial/endothelial cells as well as macrophages. It is also the target of potent neutralizing antibodies in human cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals. We had demonstrated the chemotactic trait of UL128 protein in our previous study. Recombinant UL128 in vitro has the ability to attract monocytes to the infection region and enhances peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. However, the way that this viral encoded chemokine interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the detailed mechanism that involving the virus entry into host cells keeps unknown. Here we performed in vitro investigation into the effects of UL128 protein on peripheral blood mononuclear cell's activation and receptor binding, which may help us further understand the immunomodulatory function of UL128 protein as well as human cytomegalovirus diffusion mechanism.

  15. Characterization of the in vitro expressed autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of human titin encoded by TTN exons 248-249

    SciTech Connect

    Zelinka, L.; McCann, S.; Budde, J.; Sethi, S.; Guidos, M.; Giles, R.; Walker, G.R.

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Affinity purification of the autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of titin. {yields} Partial sequence analysis confirms that the peptides is in the I band region of titin. {yields} This region of the human titin shows high degree of homology to mouse titin N2-A. -- Abstract: Autoimmune rippling muscle disease (ARMD) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease associated with myasthenia gravis (MG). Past studies in our laboratory recognized a very high molecular weight skeletal muscle protein antigen identified by ARMD patient antisera as the titin isoform. These past studies used antisera from ARMD and MG patients as probes to screen a human skeletal muscle cDNA library and several pBluescript clones revealed supporting expression of immunoreactive peptides. This study characterizes the products of subcloning the titin immunoreactive domain into pGEX-3X and the subsequent fusion protein. Sequence analysis of the fusion gene indicates the cloned titin domain (GenBank ID: (EU428784)) is in frame and is derived from a sequence of N2-A spanning the exons 248-250 an area that encodes the fibronectin III domain. PCR and EcoR1 restriction mapping studies have demonstrated that the inserted cDNA is of a size that is predicted by bioinformatics analysis of the subclone. Expression of the fusion protein result in the isolation of a polypeptide of 52 kDa consistent with the predicted inferred amino acid sequence. Immunoblot experiments of the fusion protein, using rippling muscle/myasthenia gravis antisera, demonstrate that only the titin domain is immunoreactive.

  16. Roughness Encoding in Human and Biomimetic Artificial Touch: Spatiotemporal Frequency Modulation and Structural Anisotropy of Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Oddo, Calogero Maria; Beccai, Lucia; Wessberg, Johan; Wasling, Helena Backlund; Mattioli, Fabio; Carrozza, Maria Chiara

    2011-01-01

    The influence of fingerprints and their curvature in tactile sensing performance is investigated by comparative analysis of different design parameters in a biomimetic artificial fingertip, having straight or curved fingerprints. The strength in the encoding of the principal spatial period of ridged tactile stimuli (gratings) is evaluated by indenting and sliding the surfaces at controlled normal contact force and tangential sliding velocity, as a function of fingertip rotation along the indentation axis. Curved fingerprints guaranteed higher directional isotropy than straight fingerprints in the encoding of the principal frequency resulting from the ratio between the sliding velocity and the spatial periodicity of the grating. In parallel, human microneurography experiments were performed and a selection of results is included in this work in order to support the significance of the biorobotic study with the artificial tactile system. PMID:22163915

  17. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses. PMID:26880543

  18. Small gene family encoding an eggshell (chorion) protein of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, L.A.; Rekosh, D.M.; Lo Verde, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    The authors isolated six independent genomic clones encoding schistosome chorion or eggshell proteins from a Schistosoma mansoni genomic library. A linkage map of five of the clones spanning 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the S. mansoni genome was constructed. The region contained two eggshell protein genes closely linked, separated by 7.5 kbp of intergenic DNA. The two genes of the cluster were arranged in the same orientation, that is, they were transcribed from the same strand. The sixth clone probably represents a third copy of the eggshell gene that is not contained within the 35-kbp region. The 5- end of the mRNA transcribed from these genes was defined by primer extension directly off the RNA. The ATCAT cap site sequence was homologous to a silkmoth chorion PuTCATT cap site sequence, where Pu indicates any purine. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were no introns in these genes. The DNA sequences of the three genes were very homologous to each other and to a cDNA clone, pSMf61-46, differing only in three or four nucleotices. A multiple TATA box was located at positions -23 to -31, and a CAAAT sequence was located at -52 upstream of the eggshell transcription unit. Comparison of sequences in regions further upstream with silkmoth and Drosophila sequences revealed very short elements that were shared. One such element, TCACGT, recently shown to be an essential cis-regulatory element for silkmoth chorion gene promoter function, was found at a similar position in all three organisms.

  19. Immunomodulatory effects of human neuroblastoma cells transduced with a retroviral vector encoding interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Leimig, T; Foreman, N; Rill, D; Coze, C; Holladay, M; Brenner, M

    1994-12-01

    We have investigated whether retroviral mediated transfer of the IL-2 gene renders human neuroblastoma cells immunogenic, justifying their use in a clinical tumor immunization study. Fourteen neuroblastoma cell lines were established from patients with disseminated neuroblastoma and transduced with the vector G1Ncvl2, which contains the neomycin phosphotransferase gene and the cDNA of the human interleukin-2 gene. Clones secreting > 150 pg/10(6) cells/24 h of IL-2 were selected for further study. Secretion of IL-2 was maintained for at least 3 weeks in nonselective media, implying that production of the cytokine would continue under in vivo conditions. Co-culture of IL-2 transduced cell lines with patient lymphocytes induced potent cytotoxic activity against both transduced and parental neuroblastoma cell lines. This activity was HLA unrestricted, and predominantly mediated by CD16+ or CD56+ and CD8- lymphocytes. These data form the preclinical justification for our current immunization protocol for patients with relapsed or resistant neuroblastoma.

  20. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  1. A brief review on the Human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2013-06-01

    The ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project is an international research consortium that aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. The second phase of the project comprised 1640 datasets from 147 different cell types, yielding a set of 30 publications across several journals. These data revealed that 80.4% of the human genome displays some functionality in at least one cell type. Many of these regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and further form a network or three-dimensional conformation to affect gene expression. These elements are also related to sequence variants associated with diseases or traits. All these findings provide us new insights into the organization and regulation of genes and genome, and serve as an expansive resource for understanding human health and disease.

  2. Expression of the gene encoding growth hormone in the human mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Mol, J.A.; Misdorp, W.; Rijnberk, A.

    1995-10-01

    Progestins cause a syndrome of growth hormone (GH) excess and enhanced mammary tumorigenesis in the dog. This has been regarded as being specific for the dog. Recently we reported that progestin-induced GH excess originates from foci of hyperplastic ductular epithelium of the mammary gland in the dog. In the present report we demonstrate by reverse-transcriptase PCR and immunohistochemistry that a main factor involved in tissue growth, i.e. GH, is also expressed in normal and neoplastic human mammary glands. The gene expressed in the human mammary gland proved to be identical to the gene encoding GH in the pituitary gland. The role of progesterone in the GH expression of the human mammary gland needs, however, to be proven. It is hypothesized that this locally produced hGH may play a pathogenetic role in breast cancer. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Isolation of the human anionic glutathione S-transferase cDNA and the relation of its gene expression to estrogen-receptor content in primary breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Moscow, J A; Townsend, A J; Goldsmith, M E; Whang-Peng, J; Vickers, P J; Poisson, R; Legault-Poisson, S; Myers, C E; Cowan, K H

    1988-01-01

    The development of multidrug resistance in MCF7 human breast cancer cells is associated with overexpression of P-glycoprotein, changes in activities of several detoxication enzymes, and loss of hormone sensitivity and estrogen receptors (ERs). We have cloned the cDNA for one of the drug-detoxifying enzymes overexpressed in multidrug-resistant MCF7 cells (AdrR MCF7), the anionic isozyme of glutathione S-transferase (GST pi). Hybridization with this GST pi cDNA, GST pi-1, demonstrated that increased GST pi activity in AdrR MCF7 cells is associated with overexpression but not with amplification of the gene. We mapped the GST pi gene to human chromosome 11q13 by in situ hybridization. Since multidrug resistance and GST pi overexpression are associated with the loss of ERs in AdrR MCF7 cells, we examined several other breast cancer cell lines that were not selected for drug resistance. In each of these cell lines we found an inverse association between GST pi expression and ER content. We also examined RNA from 21 primary breast cancers and found a similar association between GST pi expression and ER content in vivo. GST pi mRNA content in 11 ER-positive tumors (less than or equal to 10 fmol/mg of protein) was significantly different from the GST pi content of 10 ER-negative tumors (P = 0.002; Mann-Whitney Wilcoxon test for two independent samples). The finding of similar patterns of expression of a drug-detoxifying enzyme and of ERs in vitro as well as in vivo suggests that ER-negative breast cancer cells may have greater protection against antineoplastic agents conferred by GST pi than ER-positive tumors. Images PMID:2842775

  4. Encoding of natural sounds at multiple spectral and temporal resolutions in the human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Roberta; Moerel, Michelle; De Martino, Federico; Goebel, Rainer; Ugurbil, Kamil; Yacoub, Essa; Formisano, Elia

    2014-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging research provides detailed observations of the response patterns that natural sounds (e.g. human voices and speech, animal cries, environmental sounds) evoke in the human brain. The computational and representational mechanisms underlying these observations, however, remain largely unknown. Here we combine high spatial resolution (3 and 7 Tesla) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with computational modeling to reveal how natural sounds are represented in the human brain. We compare competing models of sound representations and select the model that most accurately predicts fMRI response patterns to natural sounds. Our results show that the cortical encoding of natural sounds entails the formation of multiple representations of sound spectrograms with different degrees of spectral and temporal resolution. The cortex derives these multi-resolution representations through frequency-specific neural processing channels and through the combined analysis of the spectral and temporal modulations in the spectrogram. Furthermore, our findings suggest that a spectral-temporal resolution trade-off may govern the modulation tuning of neuronal populations throughout the auditory cortex. Specifically, our fMRI results suggest that neuronal populations in posterior/dorsal auditory regions preferably encode coarse spectral information with high temporal precision. Vice-versa, neuronal populations in anterior/ventral auditory regions preferably encode fine-grained spectral information with low temporal precision. We propose that such a multi-resolution analysis may be crucially relevant for flexible and behaviorally-relevant sound processing and may constitute one of the computational underpinnings of functional specialization in auditory cortex. PMID:24391486

  5. Association between Common Variation in Genes Encoding Sweet Taste Signaling Components and Human Sucrose Perception

    PubMed Central

    Fushan, Alexey A.; Simons, Christopher T.; Slack, Jay P.

    2010-01-01

    Variation in taste perception of different chemical substances is a well-known phenomenon in both humans and animals. Recent advances in the understanding of sweet taste signaling have identified a number of proteins involved in this signal transduction. We evaluated the hypothesis that sequence variations occurring in genes encoding taste signaling molecules can influence sweet taste perception in humans. Our population consisted of unrelated individuals (n = 160) of Caucasian, African–American, and Asian descent. Threshold and suprathreshold sensitivities of participants for sucrose were estimated using a sorting test and signal detection analysis that produced cumulative R-index area under the curve (AUC) scores. Genetic association analysis revealed significant correlation of sucrose AUC scores with genetic variation occurring in the GNAT3 gene (single point P = 10−3 to 10−4), which encodes the taste-specific Gα protein subunit gustducin. Subsequent sequencing identified additional GNAT3 variations having significant association with sucrose AUC scores. Collectively, GNAT3 polymorphisms explain 13% of the variation in sucrose perception. Our findings underscore the importance of common genetic variants influencing human taste perception. PMID:20660057

  6. TMS interference with primacy and recency mechanisms reveals bimodal episodic encoding in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Innocenti, Iglis; Cappa, Stefano F; Feurra, Matteo; Giovannelli, Fabio; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Bianco, Giovanni; Cincotta, Massimo; Rossi, Simone

    2013-01-01

    A classic finding of the psychology of memory is the "serial position effect." Immediate free recall of a word list is more efficient for items presented early (primacy effect) or late (recency effect), with respect to those in the middle. In an event-related, randomized block design, we interfered with the encoding of unrelated words lists with brief trains of repetitive TMS (rTMS), applied coincidently with the acoustic presentation of each word to the left dorsolateral pFC, the left intraparietal lobe, and a control site (vertex). Interference of rTMS with encoding produced a clear-cut double dissociation on accuracy during immediate free recall. The primacy effect was selectively worsened by rTMS of the dorsolateral pFC, whereas recency was selectively worsened by rTMS of the intraparietal lobe. These results are in agreement with the double dissociation between short-term and long-term memory observed in neuropsychological patients and provide direct evidence of distinct cortical mechanisms of encoding in the human brain.

  7. The Roles of Human Lateral Temporal Cortical Neuronal Activity in Recent Verbal Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfield-McNeill, Julie; Corina, David

    2009-01-01

    Activity of 98 single neurons in human lateral temporal cortex was measured during memory encoding for auditory words, text, or pictures and compared with identification of material of the same modality in extracellular recordings during awake neurosurgery for epilepsy. Frequency of activity was divided into early or late epochs or activity sustained throughout both; 44 neurons had significant changes in one or more categories. Polymodal and sustained changes lateralized to dominant hemisphere and late changes to nondominant. The majority of polymodal neurons shifted categories for different modalities. In dominant hemisphere, the timing and nature of changes in activity provide the basis for a model of the roles of temporal cortex in encoding. Superior temporal gyrus excitatory activity was related to the early epoch, when perception and processing occur, and middle gyrus to the late epoch, when semantic labeling occurs. The superior two-thirds of middle gyrus also demonstrated sustained inhibition. In a subset of lateral temporal neurons, memory-encoding activity reflected simultaneous convergence of sustained attentional and early perceptual inputs. PMID:18469317

  8. Isolation, characterization, and mapping of gene encoding dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (E2k) of human [alpha]-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, G.; Cai, Xingang; Sheu, Kwan-Fu R.; Blass, J.P. ); Wasco, W.; Gaston, S.M.; Tanzi, R.E.; Cooper, A.J.L.; Gusella, J.F. ); Szabo, P. )

    1994-03-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced cDNAs representing the full-length (2987-bp) gene for dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (E2k component) of the human [alpha]-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KHDHC) from a human fetal brain cDNA library. The E2k cDNA was mapped to human chromosome 14 using a somatic cell hybrid panel, and more precisely to band 14q24.3 by in situ hybridization. This cDNA also cross-hybridized to an apparent E2k pseudogene on chromosome 1p31. Northern analysis revealed the E2k gene to be ubiquitously expressed in peripheral tissues and brain. Interestingly, chromosome 14q24.3 has recently been reported to contain gene defects for an early-onset form of familial Alzheimer's disease and for Machado-Joseph disease. Future studies will be necessary to determine whether the E2K gene plays a role in either of these two disorders.

  9. Color signal encoding for high dynamic range and wide color gamut based on human perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezamabadi, Mahdi; Miller, Scott; Daly, Scott; Atkins, Robin

    2014-01-01

    A new EOTF based on human perception, called PQ (Perceptual Quantizer), was proposed in a previous work (SMPTE Mot. Imag. J 2013, 122:52-59) and its performance was evaluated for a wide range of luminance levels and encoding bitdepth values. This paper is an extension of that previous work to include the color aspects of the PQ signal encoding. The efficiency of the PQ encoding and bit-depth requirements were evaluated and compared for standard color gamuts of Rec 709 (SRGB), and the wide color gamuts of Rec 2020, P3, and ACES for a variety of signal representations as RGB, YCbCr, and XYZ. In a selected color space for any potential local gray level 26 color samples were simulated by deviating one quantization step from the original color in each signal dimension. The quantization step sizes were simulated based on the PQ and gamma curves for different bit-depth values and luminance ranges for each of the color gamut spaces and signal representations. Color differences between the gray field and the simulated color samples were computed using CIE DE2000 color difference equation. The maximum color difference values (quantization error) were used as a metric to evaluate the performance of the corresponding EOTF curve. Extended color gamuts were found to require more bits to maintain low quantization error. Extended dynamic range required fewer additional bits in to maintain quantization error. Regarding the visual detection thresholds, the minimum bit-depth required by the PQ and gamma encodings are evaluated and compared through visual experiments.

  10. Epistatic interaction of genetic depression risk variants in the human subgenual cingulate cortex during memory encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schott, B H; Assmann, A; Schmierer, P; Soch, J; Erk, S; Garbusow, M; Mohnke, S; Pöhland, L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, N; Barman, A; Wüstenberg, T; Haddad, L; Grimm, O; Witt, S; Richter, S; Klein, M; Schütze, H; Mühleisen, T W; Cichon, S; Rietschel, M; Noethen, M M; Tost, H; Gundelfinger, E D; Düzel, E; Heinz, A; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Seidenbecher, C I; Walter, H

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have pointed to single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the neuronal calcium channel CaV1.2 (CACNA1C; rs1006737) and the presynaptic active zone protein Piccolo (PCLO; rs2522833) as risk factors for affective disorders, particularly major depression. Previous neuroimaging studies of depression-related endophenotypes have highlighted the role of the subgenual cingulate cortex (CG25) in negative mood and depressive psychopathology. Here, we aimed to assess how recently associated PCLO and CACNA1C depression risk alleles jointly affect memory-related CG25 activity as an intermediate phenotype in clinically healthy humans. To investigate the combined effects of rs1006737 and rs2522833 on the CG25 response, we conducted three functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of episodic memory formation in three independent cohorts (N=79, 300, 113). An epistatic interaction of PCLO and CACNA1C risk alleles in CG25 during memory encoding was observed in all groups, with carriers of no risk allele and of both risk alleles showing higher CG25 activation during encoding when compared with carriers of only one risk allele. Moreover, PCLO risk allele carriers showed lower memory performance and reduced encoding-related hippocampal activation. In summary, our results point to region-specific epistatic effects of PCLO and CACNA1C risk variants in CG25, potentially related to episodic memory. Our data further suggest that genetic risk factors on the SNP level do not necessarily have additive effects but may show complex interactions. Such epistatic interactions might contribute to the ‘missing heritability' of complex phenotypes. PMID:24643163

  11. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Final progress report, April 1, 1994--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The ultimate goal of this research is to generate and apply novel technologies to speed completion and integration of the human genome map and sequence with biomedical problems. To do this, techniques were developed and genome-wide resources generated. This includes a genome-wide Mapped and Integrated BAC/PAC Resource that has been used for gene finding, map completion and anchoring, breakpoint definition and sequencing. In the last period of the grant, the Human Mapped BAC/PAC Resource was also applied to determine regions of human variation and to develop a novel paradigm of primate evolution through to humans. Further, in order to more rapidly evaluate animal models of human disease, a BAC Map of the mouse was generated in collaboration with the MTI Genome Center, Dr. Bruce Birren.

  12. The porcine gene TBP10 encodes a protein homologous to the human tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family.

    PubMed

    Leeb, T; Rettenberger, G; Breech, J; Hameister, H; Brenig, B

    1996-03-01

    We have cloned a porcine gene, designated TBP1O, that belongs to the Tat-binding protein/26S protease subunit family. The genomic structure of the porcine TBP1O gene was analyzed after isolation of three overlapping genomic phage lambda clones. The TBP10 gene harbors 12 exons spanning 4.5 kb of chromosomal DNA. The TBP1O gene was assigned to Chromosome (Chr) 12 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on metaphase chromosomes. The chromosomal location was confirmed by PCR analysis of a porcine-rodent hybrid cell panel. The TBP1O protein is encoded by a 1221 nucleotide cDNA and has a molecular mass of 45.6 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence has highest similarity to the human and bovine p45 subunit of the 26S protease and the human transcription factor TRIP1. Further similarities were detected to the slime mold protein DdTBP1O and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein SUG1. Like DdTBP1O and other members of the protein family, the porcine TBP1O harbors a leucine zipper motif in the N-terminal region and a domain characteristics of ATP-dependent proteases in the C-terminal region. PMID:8833236

  13. Role of Broca's area in encoding sequential human actions: a virtual lesion study.

    PubMed

    Clerget, Emeline; Winderickx, Aline; Fadiga, Luciano; Olivier, Etienne

    2009-10-28

    The exact contribution of Broca's area to motor cognition is still controversial. Here we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (5 Hz, five pulses) to interfere transiently with the function of left BA44 in 13 healthy individuals; the task consisted of reordering human actions or nonbiological events based on three pictures presented on a computer screen and extracted from a video showing the entire sequence beforehand. We found that a virtual lesion of left BA44 impairs individual performance only for biological actions, and more specifically for object-oriented syntactic actions. Our finding provides evidence that Broca's area plays a crucial role in encoding complex human movements, a process which may be crucial for understanding and/or programming actions. PMID:19809371

  14. The habenula encodes negative motivational value associated with primary punishment in humans.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Rebecca P; Seymour, Ben; Loh, Eleanor; Lutti, Antoine; Dolan, Raymond J; Dayan, Peter; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2014-08-12

    Learning what to approach, and what to avoid, involves assigning value to environmental cues that predict positive and negative events. Studies in animals indicate that the lateral habenula encodes the previously learned negative motivational value of stimuli. However, involvement of the habenula in dynamic trial-by-trial aversive learning has not been assessed, and the functional role of this structure in humans remains poorly characterized, in part, due to its small size. Using high-resolution functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of reinforcement learning, we demonstrate positive habenula responses to the dynamically changing values of cues signaling painful electric shocks, which predict behavioral suppression of responses to those cues across individuals. By contrast, negative habenula responses to monetary reward cue values predict behavioral invigoration. Our findings show that the habenula plays a key role in an online aversive learning system and in generating associated motivated behavior in humans.

  15. The habenula encodes negative motivational value associated with primary punishment in humans.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Rebecca P; Seymour, Ben; Loh, Eleanor; Lutti, Antoine; Dolan, Raymond J; Dayan, Peter; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2014-08-12

    Learning what to approach, and what to avoid, involves assigning value to environmental cues that predict positive and negative events. Studies in animals indicate that the lateral habenula encodes the previously learned negative motivational value of stimuli. However, involvement of the habenula in dynamic trial-by-trial aversive learning has not been assessed, and the functional role of this structure in humans remains poorly characterized, in part, due to its small size. Using high-resolution functional neuroimaging and computational modeling of reinforcement learning, we demonstrate positive habenula responses to the dynamically changing values of cues signaling painful electric shocks, which predict behavioral suppression of responses to those cues across individuals. By contrast, negative habenula responses to monetary reward cue values predict behavioral invigoration. Our findings show that the habenula plays a key role in an online aversive learning system and in generating associated motivated behavior in humans. PMID:25071182

  16. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; Pérez, José Luis García; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells. PMID:26244523

  17. Genomic organization and complete cDNA sequence of the human phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C {beta}3 gene (PLCB3)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagercrantz, J.; Carson, E.; Phelan, C.

    1995-04-10

    We have characterized the complete cDNA sequence, genomic structure, and expression of the human phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C {beta}3 (PLC {beta}3) gene (gene symbol PLCB3). PLC {beta}3 plays an important role in initiating receptor-mediated signal transduction. Activation of PLC takes place in many cells as a response to stimulation by hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and other ligands. The partial cDNA sequence of PLC {beta}3, previously published, was extended with 876 bp in the 5{prime} direction, giving a transcript of 4400 bp and a total open reading frame of 1234 amino acids. This was in accordance with expression analysis by Northern blotting that revealed a single 4.4-kb transcript in all tissues tested. Genomic data were obtained by sequencing plasmid subclones of a cosmid that contained the whole gene. The size of the complete transcription unit was estimated to be on the order of 15 kb. The gene contains 31 exons, with all splice donor and acceptor sites conforming to the GT/AG rule. No exon exceeds 571 bp in length, and the shortest exon spans only 36 bp. More than half of the introns are smaller than 200 bp, with the smallest being only 79 bp long. The transcription initiation site was determined to be within an 8-bp cluster 328-321 bp upstream of the translation initiation site. The 5{prime} flanking region is highly GC rich, with multiple CpG doublets, and contains multiple binding sites for Sp1. Lacking typical transcriptional regulatory sequences such as TATA and CAAT boxes, the putative promoter region conforms to the group of housekeeping promoters. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Organization, structure, chromosomal assignment, and expression of the gene encoding the human endothelin-A receptor.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, K; Nakao, K; Tamura, N; Arai, H; Ogawa, Y; Suga, S; Nakanishi, S; Imura, H

    1992-09-15

    We have isolated and characterized the gene for the human endothelin-A receptor. Southern blot analyses demonstrated a single copy gene for the receptor. The gene spans more than 40 kilobases and contains eight exons and seven introns. Intron 1 exists in the 5'-noncoding region, and introns 2-7 occur in the coding region. The locations of introns 2-7 exist before or after the regions encoding the membrane-spanning domains. The transcription start site, determined by primer extension experiments, is 502 base pairs upstream of the methionine initiation codon. The 5'-flanking region lacks a typical TATA box but contains a potential SP-1-binding site 27 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site. Using human-rodent somatic hybrid cell DNA, the gene was assigned to human chromosome 4. Northern blot analyses revealed a 4.3-kilobase mRNA in a wide variety of human tissues, at the highest level in the aorta and at a substantial level in the cultured human mesangial cells. This is the first report of cloning of a gene for a member of the endothelin receptor family. The present study should give a clue to the discovery of possible disorders of the endothelin-A receptor, as well as facilitate the elucidation of the mechanisms by which the gene expression is regulated.

  19. Expression cloning of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, S; Maniatis, T

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a receptor for murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) was isolated from an expression library made from murine thymocytes. The clone was identified by transfecting the library into monkey COS cells and probing the transfected monolayer with radiolabeled murine IFN-gamma. Cells expressing the receptor were identified by autoradiography and plasmids encoding the receptor were directly rescued from those cells producing a positive signal. A partial cDNA so obtained was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from mouse L929 cells by conventional means. When this cDNA was expressed in COS cells it produced a specific binding site for murine IFN-gamma with an affinity constant similar to that of the receptor found on L929 cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows homology to that previously reported for the human IFN-gamma receptor. However, although the two proteins are clearly related, they show less than 60% identity in both the putative extracellular domain and the intracellular domain. Images PMID:2531896

  20. Isolation of a human anti-haemophilic factor IX cDNA clone using a unique 52-base synthetic oligonucleotide probe deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine factor IX.

    PubMed

    Jaye, M; de la Salle, H; Schamber, F; Balland, A; Kohli, V; Findeli, A; Tolstoshev, P; Lecocq, J P

    1983-04-25

    A unique 52mer oligonucleotide deduced from the amino acid sequence of bovine Factor IX was synthesized and used as a probe to screen a human liver cDNA bank. The Factor IX clone isolated shows 5 differences in nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence as compared to a previously isolated clone. In addition, precisely one codon has been deleted.Images

  1. Alcohol dehydrogenase of class IV (sigma sigma-ADH) from human stomach. cDNA sequence and structure/function relationships.

    PubMed

    Farrés, J; Moreno, A; Crosas, B; Peralba, J M; Allali-Hassani, A; Hjelmqvist, L; Jörnvall, H; Parés, X

    1994-09-01

    Human stomach mucosa contains a characteristic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzyme, sigma sigma-ADH. Its cDNA has been cloned from a human stomach library and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 59-70% identities with the other human ADH classes, demonstrating that the stomach enzyme represents a distinct structure, constituting class IV, coded by a separate gene, ADH7. The amino acid identity with the rat stomach class IV ADH is 88%, which is intermediate between constant and variable dehydrogenases. This value reflects higher conservation than for the classical liver enzymes of class I, compatible with a separate functional significance of the class IV enzyme. Its enzymic features can be correlated with its structural characteristics. The residues lining the substrate-binding cleft are bulky and hydrophobic, similar to those of the class I enzyme; this explains the similar specificity of both classes, compatible with the origin of class IV from class I. Position 47 has Arg, in contrast to Gly in the rat class IV enzyme, but this Arg is still associated with an extremely high activity (kcat = 1510 min-1) and weak coenzyme binding (KiaNAD+ = 1.6 mM). Thus, the strong interaction with coenzyme imposed by Arg47 in class I is probably compensated for in class IV by changes that may negatively affect coenzyme binding: Glu230, His271, Asn260, Asn261, Asn363. The still higher activity and weaker coenzyme binding of rat class IV (kcat = 2600 min-1, KiaNAD = 4 mM) can be correlated to the exchanges to Gly47, Gln230 and Tyr363. An important change at position 294, with Val in human and Ala in rat class IV, is probably responsible for the dramatic difference in Km values for ethanol between human (37 mM) and rat (2.4 M) class IV enzymes.

  2. A milk protein gene promoter directs the expression of human tissue plasminogen activator cDNA to the mammary gland in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pittius, C.W.; Hennighausen, L.; Lee, E.; Westphal, H.; Nicols, E.; Vitale, J.; Gordon, K. )

    1988-08-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP) is a major whey protein in mouse milk. Its gene is expressed in the lactating mammary gland and is inducible by steroid and peptide hormones. A series of transgenic mice containing a hybrid gene in which human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) cDNA is under the control of the murine WAP gene promoter had previously been generated. In this study, 21 tissues from lactating and virgin transgenic female mice containing the WAP-tPA hybrid gene were screened for the distribution of murine WAP and human tPA transcripts. Like the endogenous WAP RNA, WAP-tPA RNA was expressed predominantly in mammary gland tissue and appeared to be inducible by lactation. Whereas WAP transcripts were not detected in 22 tissues of virgin mice, low levels of WAP-tPA RNA, which were not modulated during lactation, were found in tongue, kidney, and sublingual gland. These studies demonstrate that the WAP gene promoter can target the expression of a transgene to the mammary gland and that this expression is inducible during lactation.

  3. Sequence of the cDNA and 5'-flanking region for human acid alpha-glucosidase, detection of an intron in the 5' untranslated leader sequence, definition of 18-bp polymorphisms, and differences with previous cDNA and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Martiniuk, F; Mehler, M; Tzall, S; Meredith, G; Hirschhorn, R

    1990-03-01

    Acid maltase or acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) is a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes glycogen to glucose and is deficient in glycogen storage disease type II. Previously, we isolated a partial cDNA (1.9 kb) for human GAA; we have now used this cDNA to isolate and determine sequence in longer cDNAs from four additional independent cDNA libraries. Primer extension studies indicated that the mRNA extended approximately 200 bp 5' of the cDNA sequence obtained. Therefore, we isolated a genomic fragment containing 5' cDNA sequences that overlapped the previous cDNA sequence and extended an additional 24 bp to an initiation codon within a Kozak consensus sequence. The sequence of the genomic clone revealed an intron-exon junction 32 bp 5' to the ATG, indicating that the 5' leader sequence was interrupted by an intron. The remaining 186 bp of 5' untranslated sequence was identified approximately 3 kb upstream. The promoter region upstream from the start site of transcription was GC rich and contained areas of homology to Sp1 binding sites but no identifiable CAAT or TATA box. The combined data gave a nucleotide sequence of 2,856 bp for the coding region from the ATG to a stop codon, predicting a protein of 952 amino acids. The 3' untranslated region contained 555 bp with a polyadenylation signal at 3,385 bp followed by 16 bp prior to a poly(A) tail. This sequence of the GAA coding region differs from that reported by Hoefsloot et al. (1988) in three areas that change a total of 42 amino acids. Direct determination of the amino acid sequence in one of these areas confirmed the nucleotide sequence reported here but also disagreed with the directly determined amino acid sequence reported by Hoefsloot et al. (1988). At two other areas, changes in base pairs predicted new restriction sites that were identified in cDNAs from several independent libraries. The amino acid changes in all three ares increased the homology to rabbit-human isomaltase. Therefore, we believe that our

  4. Human anterior prefrontal cortex encodes the 'what' and 'when' of future intentions.

    PubMed

    Momennejad, Ida; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2012-05-15

    On a daily basis we form numerous intentions to perform specific actions. However, we often have to delay the execution of intended actions while engaging in other demanding activities. Previous research has shown that patterns of activity in human prefrontal cortex (PFC) can reveal our current intentions. However, two fundamental questions have remained unresolved: (a) how does the PFC encode information about future tasks while we are busy engaging in other activities, and (b) how does the PFC enable us to commence a stored task at the intended time? Here we investigate how the brain stores and retrieves future intentions during occupied delays, i.e. while a person is busy performing a different task. For this purpose, we conducted a neuroimaging study with a time-based prospective memory paradigm. Using multivariate pattern classification and fMRI we show that during an occupied delay, activity patterns in the anterior PFC encode the content of 'what' subjects intend to do next, and 'when' they intend to do it. Importantly, distinct anterior PFC regions store the 'what' and 'when' components of future intentions during occupied maintenance and self-initiated retrieval. These results show a role for anterior PFC activity patterns in storing future action plans and ensuring their timely retrieval. PMID:22418393

  5. A synergy-based hand control is encoded in human motor cortical areas

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Andrea; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bianchi, Matteo; Marino, Hamal; Gabiccini, Marco; Guidi, Andrea; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Pietrini, Pietro; Bicchi, Antonio; Santello, Marco; Ricciardi, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    How the human brain controls hand movements to carry out different tasks is still debated. The concept of synergy has been proposed to indicate functional modules that may simplify the control of hand postures by simultaneously recruiting sets of muscles and joints. However, whether and to what extent synergic hand postures are encoded as such at a cortical level remains unknown. Here, we combined kinematic, electromyography, and brain activity measures obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects performed a variety of movements towards virtual objects. Hand postural information, encoded through kinematic synergies, were represented in cortical areas devoted to hand motor control and successfully discriminated individual grasping movements, significantly outperforming alternative somatotopic or muscle-based models. Importantly, hand postural synergies were predicted by neural activation patterns within primary motor cortex. These findings support a novel cortical organization for hand movement control and open potential applications for brain-computer interfaces and neuroprostheses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13420.001 PMID:26880543

  6. Four phosphoproteins with common amino termini are encoded by human cytomegalovirus AD169

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.A.; Staprans, S.I.; Spector, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    In this report, the authors identify the proteins encoded by the 2.2-kilobase class of early transcripts arising from a region of the strain AD169 human cytomegalovirus genome (map units 0.682 to 0.713) which contains cell-related sequences. These transcripts, encoded by adjacent EcoRI fragments R and d, have a complex spliced structure with 5' and 3' coterminal ends. Antiserum directed against a synthetic 11-amino-acid peptide corresponding to the predicted amino terminus of the proteins was generated and found to immunoprecipitate four-infected-cell proteins of 84, 50, 43, and 34 kilodaltons. These proteins were phosphorylated and were associated predominantly with the nuclei of infected cells. The 43-kilodalton protein was the most abundant of the four proteins, and its level of expression remained relatively constant throughout the infection. Expression of the other proteins increased as the infection progressed. Pulse-chase analysis failed to show a precursor-product relationship between any of the proteins. A comparison of the (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled tryptic peptide maps of the four proteins from infected cells and an in vitro-generated polypeptide derived from the putative first exon showed that all four infected-cell proteins were of viral origin and contained a common amino-terminal region.

  7. Four phosphoproteins with common amino termini are encoded by human cytomegalovirus AD169.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D A; Staprans, S I; Spector, D H

    1988-01-01

    In this report, we identify the proteins encoded by the 2.2-kilobase class of early transcripts arising from a region of the strain AD169 human cytomegalovirus genome (map units 0.682 to 0.713) which contains cell-related sequences. These transcripts, encoded by adjacent EcoRI fragments R and d, have a complex spliced structure with 5' and 3' coterminal ends. Antiserum directed against a synthetic 11-amino-acid peptide corresponding to the predicted amino terminus of the proteins was generated and found to immunoprecipitate four infected-cell proteins of 84, 50, 43, and 34 kilodaltons. These proteins were phosphorylated and were associated predominantly with the nuclei of infected cells. The 43-kilodalton protein was the most abundant of the four proteins, and its level of expression remained relatively constant throughout the infection. Expression of the other proteins increased as the infection progressed. Pulse-chase analysis failed to show a precursor-product relationship between any of the proteins. A comparison of the [35S]methionine-labeled tryptic peptide maps of the four proteins from infected cells and an in vitro-generated polypeptide derived from the putative first exon showed that all four infected-cell proteins were of viral origin and contained a common amino-terminal region. Images PMID:2824853

  8. The relationship between transcript expression levels of nuclear encoded (TFAM, NRF1) and mitochondrial encoded (MT-CO1) genes in single human oocytes during oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Novin, M Ghaffari; Allahveisi, A; Noruzinia, M; Farhadifar, F; Yousefian, E; Fard, A Dehghani; Salimi, M

    2015-01-01

    In some cases of infertility in women, human oocytes fail to mature when they reach the metaphase II (MII) stage. Mitochondria plays an important role in oocyte maturation. A large number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), copied in oocytes, is essential for providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during oocyte maturation. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between transcript expression levels of the mitochondrial encoded gene (MT-CO1) and two nuclear encoded genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) in various stages of human oocyte maturation. Nine consenting patients, age 21–35 years old, with male factors were selected for ovarian stimulation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedures. mRNA levels of mitochondrial-related genes were performed by singlecell TaqMan® quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). There was no significant relationship between the relative expression levels in germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes (p = 0.62). On the contrary, a significant relationship was seen between the relative expression levels of TFAM and NRF1 and the MT-CO1 genes at the stages of metaphase I (MI) and MII (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002). A relationship exists between the transcript expression levels of TFAM and NRF1, and MT-CO1 genes in various stages of human oocyte maturation. PMID:26929904

  9. Human TRMU encoding the mitochondrial 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate-methyltransferase is a putative nuclear modifier gene for the phenotypic expression of the deafness-associated 12S rRNA mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Qingfeng; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Li Ronghua; Mengesha, Emebet; Shohat, Mordechai; Estivill, Xavier; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@chmcc.org

    2006-04-21

    Nuclear modifier genes have been proposed to modulate the phenotypic manifestation of human mitochondrial 12S rRNA A1491G mutation associated with deafness in many families world-wide. Here we identified and characterized the putative nuclear modifier gene TRMU encoding a highly conserved mitochondrial protein related to tRNA modification. A 1937 bp TRMU cDNA has been isolated and the genomic organization of TRMU has been elucidated. The human TRMU gene containing 11 exons encodes a 421 residue protein with a strong homology to the TRMU-like proteins of bacteria and other homologs. TRMU is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, but abundantly in tissues with high metabolic rates including heart, liver, kidney, and brain. Immunofluorescence analysis of human 143B cells expressing TRMU-GFP fusion protein demonstrated that the human Trmu localizes and functions in mitochondrion. Furthermore, we show that in families with the deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1491G mutation there is highly suggestive linkage and linkage disequilibrium between microsatellite markers adjacent to TRMU and the presence of deafness. These observations suggest that human TRMU may modulate the phenotypic manifestation of the deafness-associated mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutations.

  10. Explicit Encoding of Multimodal Percepts by Single Neurons in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, Rodrigo Quian; Kraskov, Alexander; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2010-01-01

    Summary Different pictures of Marilyn Monroe can evoke the same percept, even if greatly modified as in Andy Warhol’s famous portraits. But how does the brain recognize highly variable pictures as the same percept? Various studies have provided insights into how visual information is processed along the “ventral pathway,” via both single-cell recordings in monkeys [1, 2] and functional imaging in humans [3, 4]. Interestingly, in humans, the same “concept” of Marilyn Monroe can be evoked with other stimulus modalities, for instance by hearing or reading her name. Brain imaging studies have identified cortical areas selective to voices [5, 6] and visual word forms [7, 8]. However, how visual, text, and sound information can elicit a unique percept is still largely unknown. By using presentations of pictures and of spoken and written names, we show that (1) single neurons in the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond selectively to representations of the same individual across different sensory modalities; (2) the degree of multimodal invariance increases along the hierarchical structure within the MTL; and (3) such neuronal representations can be generated within less than a day or two. These results demonstrate that single neurons can encode percepts in an explicit, selective, and invariant manner, even if evoked by different sensory modalities. PMID:19631538

  11. Explicit encoding of multimodal percepts by single neurons in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Kraskov, Alexander; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2009-08-11

    Different pictures of Marilyn Monroe can evoke the same percept, even if greatly modified as in Andy Warhol's famous portraits. But how does the brain recognize highly variable pictures as the same percept? Various studies have provided insights into how visual information is processed along the "ventral pathway," via both single-cell recordings in monkeys and functional imaging in humans. Interestingly, in humans, the same "concept" of Marilyn Monroe can be evoked with other stimulus modalities, for instance by hearing or reading her name. Brain imaging studies have identified cortical areas selective to voices and visual word forms. However, how visual, text, and sound information can elicit a unique percept is still largely unknown. By using presentations of pictures and of spoken and written names, we show that (1) single neurons in the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond selectively to representations of the same individual across different sensory modalities; (2) the degree of multimodal invariance increases along the hierarchical structure within the MTL; and (3) such neuronal representations can be generated within less than a day or two. These results demonstrate that single neurons can encode percepts in an explicit, selective, and invariant manner, even if evoked by different sensory modalities. PMID:19631538

  12. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Lysosomal {beta}-mannosidase: cDNA cloning and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Leipprandt, J.R.; Traviss, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Lysosomal {beta}-mannosidase is an exoglycosidase that cleaves the single {beta}-linked mannose residue from the non-reducing end of all N-linked glycoprotein oligosaccharides. Deficiency of this enzyme results in {beta}-mannosidosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease in goats and cattle. The human cases described have a milder, highly variable presentation. Study of the molecular pathology of this disease in ruminants and humans and development of the animal model for gene therapy studies required cloning of the gene for {beta}-mannosidase has been cloned. {beta}-Mannosidase cDNA were obtained from a bovine thyroid cDNA library by screening with mixed oligonucleotides derived from peptide sequences resulting from microsequencing of bovine {beta}-mannosidase peptides. A total of six independent positive clones were identified from 5 x 10{sup 5} plaques, covering about 80% of the C-terminal region. The missing 5{prime} region was obtained using 5{prime} RACE. The full-length construct contains 3852-bp nucleotides, encoding 879 amino acids. The initiation codon is followed by 17 amino acids containing the characteristics of a typical signal peptide sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence is colinear with all peptide sequences determined by protein microsequencing. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a 4.2 kb single transcript in various tissues from both normal and affected goats and calves. The mRNA level was decreased in affected {beta}-mannosidosis animals. The gene encoding {beta}-mannosidase was localized on human chromosome 4 by Southern analysis of rodent/human somatic cell hybrids. The mutation in bovine {beta}-mannosidosis has been identified. This is the first report of cloning of the {beta}-mannosidase gene.

  14. Assignment of the gene encoding the [beta]-subunit of the electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETFB) to human chromosome 19q13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Antonacci, R. ); Colombo, I.; Volta, M.; DiDonato, S.; Finocchiaro, G. ); Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. )

    1994-01-01

    The electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF), located in the mitochondrial matrix, is a nuclear-encoded enzyme delivering to the respiratory chain electrons by straight-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and other dehydrogenases. ETF is composed of a 35-kDa [alpha]-subunit that is cleaved to a 32-kDa protein during mitochondrial import (ETFA) and a [beta]-subunit that reaches the mitochondrion unmodified (ETFB). The cDNA encoding both these subunits has been cloned and sequenced. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Human cDNA mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Progress report, April 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Korenberg, J.R.

    1993-03-04

    Genetic mapping is approached using the techniques of high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This technology and the results of its application are designed to rapidly generate whole genome as tool box of expressed sequence to speed the identification of human disease genes. The results of this study are intended to dovetail with and to link the results of existing technologies for creating backbone YAC and genetic maps. In the first eight months, this approach generated 60--80% of the expressed sequence map, the remainder expected to be derived through more long-term, labor-intensive, regional chromosomal gene searches or sequencing. The laboratory has made significant progress in the set-up phase, in mapping fetal and adult brain and other cDNAs, in testing a model system for directly linking genetic and physical maps using FISH with small fragments, in setting up a database, and in establishing the validity and throughput of the system.

  16. Identification of genes expressed in human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells by expressed sequence tags and efficient full-length cDNA cloning

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Fu, Gang; Wu, Ji-Sheng; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Zhou, Jun; Kan, Li-Xin; Huang, Qiu-Hua; He, Kai-Li; Gu, Bai-Wei; Han, Ze-Guang; Shen, Yu; Gu, Jian; Yu, Ya-Ping; Xu, Shu-Hua; Wang, Ya-Xin; Chen, Sai-Juan; Chen, Zhu

    1998-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) possess the potentials of self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation toward different lineages of blood cells. These cells not only play a primordial role in hematopoietic development but also have important clinical application. Characterization of the gene expression profile in CD34+ HSPCs may lead to a better understanding of the regulation of normal and pathological hematopoiesis. In the present work, genes expressed in human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells were catalogued by partially sequencing a large amount of cDNA clones [or expressed sequence tags (ESTs)] and analyzing these sequences with the tools of bioinformatics. Among 9,866 ESTs thus obtained, 4,697 (47.6%) showed identity to known genes in the GenBank database, 2,603 (26.4%) matched to the ESTs previously deposited in a public domain database, 1,415 (14.3%) were previously undescribed ESTs, and the remaining 1,151 (11.7%) were mitochondrial DNA, ribosomal RNA, or repetitive (Alu or L1) sequences. Integration of ESTs of known genes generated a profile including 855 genes that could be divided into different categories according to their functions. Some (8.2%) of the genes in this profile were considered related to early hematopoiesis. The possible function of ESTs corresponding to so far unknown genes were approached by means of homology and functional motif searches. Moreover, attempts were made to generate libraries enriched for full-length cDNAs, to better explore the genes in HSPCs. Nearly 60% of the cDNA clones of mRNA under 2 kb in our libraries had 5′ ends upstream of the first ATG codon of the ORF. With this satisfactory result, we have developed an efficient working system that allowed fast sequencing of 32 full-length cDNAs, 16 of them being mapped to the chromosomes with radiation hybrid panels. This work may lay a basis for the further research on the molecular network of hematopoietic regulation. PMID:9653160

  17. Human ubiquitin-activating enzyme, E1. Indication of potential nuclear and cytoplasmic subpopulations using epitope-tagged cDNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Handley-Gearhart, P M; Stephen, A G; Trausch-Azar, J S; Ciechanover, A; Schwartz, A L

    1994-12-30

    The ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 catalyzes the first step in the ubiquitin conjugation pathway. Previously, we have cloned and sequenced the cDNA for human E1. Expression of the E1 cDNA in the ts20 cell line, which harbors a thermolabile E1, abrogated the phenotypic defects associated with this line. However, little is known of the cell biology of the E1 protein or the nature of the E1 doublet. Thus, we constructed epitope-tagged E1 cDNAs in which the HA monoclonal antibody epitope tag sequence (from influenza hemagglutinin and recognized by the 12CA5 monoclonal antibody) was fused to the amino terminus of E1. Because the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of E1 is unknown, three constructs were made in which the HA tag was placed at each of the first three ATGs in the open reading frame (HA-1E1, HA-2E1, and HA-3E1). Western analysis of HeLa cells transfected with the constructs revealed that HA-1E1 closely comigrated with the upper band of the E1 doublet, and HA-2E1 comigrated with the lower band of the E1 doublet; HA-3E1 appeared smaller than either of the E1 bands. Metabolic labeling with 32P and immunoprecipitation with anti-HA antibody revealed that only the HA-1E1 protein product is phosphorylated; polyclonal anti-E1 antibody showed that only the upper band of the endogenous E1 doublet is phosphorylated. Each of the constructs was able to rescue the mutant phenotype of the ts20 cell line. Immunofluorescence studies showed that HA-2E1 and HA-3E1 were distributed in the cytoplasm with both negative and positive nuclei. This pattern of distribution has also been observed when immunostaining with a monoclonal antibody to E1 (1C5). However, the staining pattern associated with a polyclonal anti-E1 antibody (JJJ) is characterized by positive staining cytoplasm and nuclei in all cells. The HA-1E1 construct exhibited apparently exclusive nuclear distribution in HeLa cells. The difference between the staining patterns of the polyclonal and monoclonal anti-E1

  18. Preparation and optimisation of anionic liposomes for delivery of small peptides and cDNA to human corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neves, Luís F; Duan, Jinghua; Voelker, Adrienne; Khanal, Anil; McNally, Lacey; Steinbach-Rankins, Jill; Ceresa, Brian P

    2016-06-01

    Drug delivery to corneal epithelial cells is challenging due to the intrinsic mechanisms that protect the eye. Here, we report a novel liposomal formulation to encapsulate and deliver a short sequence peptide into human corneal epithelial cells (hTCEpi). Using a mixture of Phosphatidylcholine/Caproylamine/Dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (PC/CAP/DOPE), we encapsulated a fluorescent peptide, resulting in anionic liposomes with an average size of 138.8 ± 34 nm and a charge of -18.2 ± 1.3 mV. After 2 h incubation with the peptide-encapsulated liposomes, 66% of corneal epithelial (hTCEpi) cells internalised the FITC-labelled peptide, demonstrating the ability of this formulation to effectively deliver peptide to hTCEpi cells. Additionally, lipoplexes (liposomes complexed with plasmid DNA) were also able to transfect hTCEpi cells, albeit at a modest level (8% of the cells). Here, we describe this novel anionic liposomal formulation intended to enhance the delivery of small cargo molecules in situ. PMID:27530524

  19. Non-human lnc-DC orthologs encode Wdnm1-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Johannes M.; Ballingall, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent publication in Science, Wang et al. found a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) expressed in human dendritic cells (DC), which they designated lnc-DC. Based on lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) experiments in human and murine systems, they concluded that lnc-DC is important in differentiation of monocytes into DC. However, Wang et al. did not mention that their so-called “mouse lnc-DC ortholog” gene was already designated “ Wdnm1-like” and is known to encode a small secreted protein.  We found that incapacitation of the Wdnm1-like open reading frame (ORF) is very rare among mammals, with all investigated primates except for hominids having an intact ORF. The null-hypothesis by Wang et al. therefore should have been that the human lnc-DC transcript might only represent a non-functional relatively young evolutionary remnant of a protein coding locus.  Whether this null-hypothesis can be rejected by the experimental data presented by Wang et al. depends in part on the possible off-target (immunogenic or otherwise) effects of their RNAi procedures, which were not exhaustive in regard to the number of analyzed RNAi sequences and control sequences.  If, however, the conclusions by Wang et al. on their human model are correct, and they may be, current knowledge regarding the Wdnm1-like locus suggests an intriguing combination of different functions mediated by transcript and protein in the maturation of several cell types at some point in evolution. We feel that the article by Wang et al. tends to be misleading without the discussion presented here. PMID:25309733

  20. Pharmacovirological impact of an integrase inhibitor on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 cDNA species in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goffinet, Christine; Allespach, Ina; Oberbremer, Lena; Golden, Pamela L; Foster, Scott A; Johns, Brian A; Weatherhead, Jason G; Novick, Steven J; Chiswell, Karen E; Garvey, Edward P; Keppler, Oliver T

    2009-08-01

    Clinical trials of the first approved integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, have demonstrated a drop in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA loads of infected patients that was unexpectedly more rapid than that with a potent reverse transcriptase inhibitor, and apparently dose independent. These clinical outcomes are not understood. In tissue culture, although their inhibition of integration is well documented, the effects of INIs on levels of unintegrated HIV-1 cDNAs have been variable. Furthermore, there has been no report to date on an INI's effect on these episomal species in vivo. Here, we show that prophylactic treatment of transgenic rats with the strand transfer INI GSK501015 reduced levels of viral integrants in the spleen by up to 99.7%. Episomal two-long-terminal-repeat (LTR) circles accumulated up to sevenfold in this secondary lymphoid organ, and this inversely correlated with the impact on the proviral burden. Contrasting raltegravir's dose-ranging study with HIV patients, titration of GSK501015 in HIV-infected animals demonstrated dependence of the INI's antiviral effect on its serum concentration. Furthermore, the in vivo 50% effective concentration calculated from these data best matched GSK501015's in vitro potency when serum protein binding was accounted for. Collectively, this study demonstrates a titratable, antipodal impact of an INI on integrated and episomal HIV-1 cDNAs in vivo. Based on these findings and known biological characteristics of viral episomes, we discuss how integrase inhibition may result in additional indirect antiviral effects that contribute to more rapid HIV-1 decay in HIV/AIDS patients.

  1. Mapping and Serodiagnostic Application of a Dominant Epitope within the Human Herpesvirus 8 ORF 65-Encoded Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Chou-Pong; Lam, Lee L.; Spira, Thomas J.; Black, Jodi B.; Stewart, John A.; Pellett, Philip E.; Respess, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    A dominant epitope within the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) ORF 65-encoded protein was mapped to an 8-amino-acid (aa) sequence (RKPPSGKK [aa 162 to 169]) by an amino acid replacement method. Using a 14-aa peptide (P4) encompassing this epitope as the antigen, we developed an enzyme immunoassay for HHV8 antibodies. The presence of P4 antibodies in a panel of 61 human serum specimens was highly correlated with biopsy-confirmed Kaposi’s sarcoma. The homologous Epstein-Barr virus peptide derived from BFBR3-encoded protein did not interfere with the assay, suggesting that P4 is specific for HHV8. PMID:9620379

  2. A human gene (DDX10) encoding a putative DEAD-box RNA helicase at 11q22-q23

    SciTech Connect

    Savitsky, K.; Ziv, Y.; Bar-Shira, A.

    1996-04-15

    A human gene encoding a putative RNA helicase, designated DDX10, was identified 400 kb telomeric to the ataxia-telangiectasia gene at chromosome 11q22-q23. The predicted amino acid sequence shows very high similarity to a subgroup of DEAD-box RNA helicases involved in ribosome biogenesis. This novel gene encodes a 3.2-kb transcript in a variety of human tissues. A processed pseudogene of DDX10 was detected at chromosome 9q21-q22. We observed a rare trinucleotide repeat length polymorphism within the coding sequence of DDX10. 39 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Interactions between Proteins Encoded within the Human Cytomegalovirus UL133-UL138 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Petrucelli, Alex; Umashankar, Mahadevaiah; Zagallo, Patricia; Rak, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We previously described a novel genetic locus within the ULb′ region of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome that, while dispensable for replication in fibroblasts, suppresses replication in hematopoietic progenitors and augments replication in endothelial cells. This locus, referred to as the UL133-UL138 locus, encodes four proteins, pUL133, pUL135, pUL136, and pUL138. In this work, we have mapped the interactions among these proteins. An analysis of all pairwise interactions during transient expression revealed a robust interaction between pUL133 and pUL138. Potential interactions between pUL136 and both pUL133 and pUL138 were also revealed. In addition, each of the UL133-UL138 locus proteins self-associated, suggesting a potential to form higher-order homomeric complexes. As both pUL133 and pUL138 function in promoting viral latency in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) infected in vitro, we further focused on this interaction. pUL133 and pUL138 are the predominant complex detected when all proteins are expressed together and require no other proteins in the locus for their association. During infection, the interaction between pUL133 and pUL138 or pUL136 can be detected. A recombinant virus that fails to express both pUL133 and pUL138 exhibited a latency phenotype similar to that of viruses that fail to express either pUL133 or pUL138, indicating that these proteins function cooperatively in latency and do not have independent functions that additively contribute to HCMV latency. These studies identify protein interactions among proteins encoded by the UL133-UL138 locus and demonstrate an important interaction impacting the outcome of HCMV infection. PMID:22674978

  4. A human endogenous retroviral sequence encoding an antigen recognized on melanoma by cytolytic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Schiavetti, Francesca; Thonnard, Joëlle; Colau, Didier; Boon, Thierry; Coulie, Pierre G

    2002-10-01

    We have identified a gene encoding an antigen recognized by cytolytic T lymphocytes on the autologous tumor cells of a melanoma patient, AVL3. The gene shows homologies with members of the HERV-K family of human endogenous retroviruses, and it was provisionally named HERV-K-MEL. It contains many mutations that disrupt the open reading frames coding for all of the viral proteins. The HERV-K-MEL gene is not expressed in normal tissues with the exception of testis and some skin samples. It is expressed in most samples of cutaneous and ocular melanoma. It is also expressed in a majority of naevi and in a minority of carcinomas and sarcomas. The antigenic peptide, presented by HLA-A2 molecules, is encoded by a very short open reading frame present in the env region of a spliced HERV-K-MEL transcript. Anti-HERV.A2 CTLp could not be detected in the blood of three individuals without cancer but were present at a frequency of 3 x 10(-5) among blood CD8 T cells in patient AVL3 and 6 x 10(-7) in another HLA-A2 melanoma patient whose tumor expressed HERV-K-MEL. Anti-HERV.A2 CTL clones derived from each patient lysed melanoma cells. Analysis of T-cell receptor beta chain sequences indicated that the anti-HERV.A2 CTL population was oligoclonal in patient AVL3 and probably monoclonal in the other patient. These results suggest that HERV-K-MEL is a source of antigens that are targeted by CTLs in melanoma patients and could therefore be used for vaccination.

  5. Power shifts track serial position and modulate encoding in human episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Serruya, Mijail D; Sederberg, Per B; Kahana, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    The first events in a series exert a powerful influence on cognition and behavior in both humans and animals. This is known as the law of primacy. Here, we analyze the neural correlates of primacy in humans by analyzing electrocorticographic recordings in 84 neurosurgical patients as they studied and subsequently recalled lists of common words. We found that spectral power in the gamma frequency band (28-100 Hz) was elevated at the start of the list and gradually subsided, whereas lower frequency (2-8 Hz) delta and theta band power exhibited the opposite trend. This gradual shift in the power spectrum was found across a widespread network of brain regions. The degree to which the subsequent memory effect was modulated by list (serial) position was most pronounced in medial temporal lobe structures. These results suggest that globally increased gamma and decreased delta-theta spectral powers reflect a brain state that predisposes medial temporal lobe structures to enhance the encoding and maintenance of early list items.

  6. Functional genomics and SNP analysis of human genes encoding proline metabolic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D. Bart; Zhaorigetu, Siqin; Khalil, Shadi; Wan, Guanghua; Valle, David

    2009-01-01

    Proline metabolism in mammals involves two other amino acids, glutamate and ornithine, and five enzymatic activities, Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (P5CR), proline oxidase, P5C dehydrogenase, P5C synthase and ornithine-δ-aminotransferase (OAT). With the exception of OAT, which catalyzes a reversible reaction, the other 4 enzymes are unidirectional, suggesting that proline metabolism is purpose-driven, tightly regulated, and compartmentalized. In addition, this tri-amino-acid system also links with three other pivotal metabolic systems, namely the TCA cycle, urea cycle, and pentose phosphate pathway. Abnormalities in proline metabolism are relevant in several diseases: six monogenic inborn errors involving metabolism and/or transport of proline and its immediate metabolites have been described. Recent advances in the Human Genome Project, in silico database mining techniques, and research in dissecting the molecular basis of proline metabolism prompted us to utilize functional genomic approaches to analyze human genes which encode proline metabolic enzymes in the context of gene structure, regulation of gene expression, mRNA variants, protein isoforms, and single nucleotide polymorphisms. PMID:18506409

  7. Gene structure and chromosomal localization of the human HSD11K gene encoding the kidney (type 2) isozyme of 11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.K.; Rogerson, F.M.; Mune, T.; White, P.C.

    1995-09-01

    11{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11{beta}HSD) converts glucocorticoids to inactive products and is thus thought to confer specificity for aldosterone on the type I mineralocorticoid receptor in the kidney. Recent studies indicate the presence of at least two isozymes of 11{beta}HSD. In vitro, the NAD{sup +}-dependent kidney (type 2) isozyme catalyzes 11{beta}-dehydrogenase but not reductase reactions, whereas the NADP{sup +}-dependent liver (type 1) isozyme catalyzes both reactions. We have now characterized the human gene encoding kidney 11{beta}HSD (HSD11K). A bacteriophage P1 clone was isolated after screening a human genomic library by hybridization with sheep HSD11K cDNA. The gene consists of 5 exons spread over 6 kb. The nucleotide binding domain lies in the first exon are GC-rich (80%), suggesting that the gene may be transcriptionally regulated by factors that recognize GC-rich sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes with a positive P1 clone localized the gene to chromosome 16q22. In contrast, the HSD11L (liver isozyme) gene is located on chromosome 1 and contains 6 exons; the coding sequences of these genes are only 21% identical. HSD11K is expressed at high levels in the placenta and kidney of midgestation human fetuses and at lower levels in lung and testes. Different transcriptional start sites are utilized in kidney and placenta. These data should be applicable to genetic analysis of the syndrome of apparent mineralocorticoid excess, which may represent a deficiency of 11{beta}HSD. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  8. The human CHC1 gene encoding RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) (CHC1) is localized to human chromosome 1p36.1

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, T.; Seino, H.; Seki, N. |; Hori, T.A.

    1994-10-01

    The human CHC1 gene encoding RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) encodes a chromosomal protein of 45 kDa that has seven internal homologous repeats and functions as a guanine nucleotide releasing factor on the nuclear Ras-like small G protein. We report here the precise localization of the RCC1 gene to human chromosome 1p36.1. There is a conserved region of homology between the 1p36 region of human and a distal region of mouse chromosome 4. Thus, the assignment of the human gene encoding RCC1 adds another marker to the conserved region of homology between human chromosome 1p and mouse chromosome 4. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  9. [Study on a human tissue-type plasminogen activator mutant cDNA knocked-in the beta-casein gene site of murine ES cells].

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu-Yu; Yang, Xiao; Deng, Ji-Xian; Chen, Hong-Xing; Huang, Pei-Tango

    2004-06-01

    A murine beta-casein gene targeting vector was constructed using the cloned genomic sequence. The short arm was 2.7 kb including mouse beta-casein gene 5' flanking sequence, exon1, intron1 and partial exon2. The long arm is a 3.4 kb fragment including partial intron2, exon3 approximately 7, intron3 approximately 6 and partial intron7. The human t-PA mutant cDNA was subcloned in the exon2 and fused with the mice beta-casein signal peptide sequence. The positive selective marker neo was placed in the middle of intron2. A tk negative selective marker was just outside the short arm. TC-1 ES cells were cultured and amplified on G418 resistant feeder layer. The linearized targeting construct DNAs of 45 microg were introduced into 2 x 10(7) ES cells by electroporation. Totally 192 ES clones were picked up after cultured in G418 and Gancyclovir for 7 days. The colonies were amplified and subjected to genomic DNA preparation. The genomic DNAs were digested with EcoR I and used for Southern blot analysis. A probe inside the 5' homologous arm was used for hybridization. A 9.8 kb band was found in wild type, but the band was shift down from 9.8 kb to 6.6 kb in the beta-casein gene targeted allele because a new EcoR I site was introduced into the exon2 along with the human t-PA mutant gene. There were 9.8 kb and 6.6 kb bands in targeted ES cells. One clone of targeted ES cells with correct homologous recombination events was obtained among 78 analyzed clones. It lays foundation for gene targeted mice making.

  10. Localization, expression and genomic structure of the gene encoding the human serine protease testisin.

    PubMed

    Hooper, J D; Bowen, N; Marshall, H; Cullen, L M; Sood, R; Daniels, R; Stuttgen, M A; Normyle, J F; Higgs, D R; Kastner, D L; Ogbourne, S M; Pera, M F; Jazwinska, E C; Antalis, T M

    2000-06-21

    Testisin is a recently identified human serine protease expressed by premeiotic testicular germ cells and is a candidate tumor suppressor for testicular cancer. Here, we report the characterization of the gene encoding testisin, designated PRSS21, and its localization on the short arm of human chromosome 16 (16p13.3) between the microsatellite marker D16S246 and the radiation hybrid breakpoint CY23HA. We have further refined the localization to cosmid 406D6 in this interval and have established that the gene is approximately 4. 5 kb in length, and contains six exons and five intervening introns. The structure of PRSS21 is very similar to the human prostasin gene (PRSS8) which maps nearby on 16p11.2, suggesting that these genes may have evolved through gene duplication. Sequence analysis showed that the two known isoforms of testisin are generated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. A major transcription initiation site was identified 97 nucleotides upstream of the testisin translation start and conforms to a consensus initiator element. The region surrounding the transcription initiation site lacks a TATA consensus sequence, but contains a CCAAT sequence and includes a CpG island. The 5'-flanking region contains several consensus response elements including Sp1, AP1 and several testis-specific elements. Analysis of testisin gene expression in tumor cell lines shows that testisin is not expressed in testicular tumor cells but is aberrantly expressed in some tumor cell lines of non-testis origin. These data provide the basis for identifying potential genetic alterations of PRSS21 that may underlie both testicular abnormalities and tumorigenesis. PMID:11004480

  11. The mouse and human genes encoding the recognition component of the N-end rule pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Tae; Reiss, Yuval; Fried, Victor A.; Hershko, Avram; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; Gonda, David K.; Sangan, Pitchai; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. The N-end rule pathway is one proteolytic pathway of the ubiquitin system. The recognition component of this pathway, called N-recognin or E3, binds to a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a substrate protein and participates in the formation of a substrate-linked multiubiquitin chain. We report the cloning of the mouse and human Ubr1 cDNAs and genes that encode a mammalian N-recognin called E3α. Mouse UBR1p (E3α) is a 1,757-residue (200-kDa) protein that contains regions of sequence similarity to the 225-kDa Ubr1p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mouse and human UBR1p have apparent homologs in other eukaryotes as well, thus defining a distinct family of proteins, the UBR family. The residues essential for substrate recognition by the yeast Ubr1p are conserved in the mouse UBR1p. The regions of similarity among the UBR family members include a putative zinc finger and RING-H2 finger, another zinc-binding domain. Ubr1 is located in the middle of mouse chromosome 2 and in the syntenic 15q15-q21.1 region of human chromosome 15. Mouse Ubr1 spans ≈120 kilobases of genomic DNA and contains ≈50 exons. Ubr1 is ubiquitously expressed in adults, with skeletal muscle and heart being the sites of highest expression. In mouse embryos, the Ubr1 expression is highest in the branchial arches and in the tail and limb buds. The cloning of Ubr1 makes possible the construction of Ubr1-lacking mouse strains, a prerequisite for the functional understanding of the mammalian N-end rule pathway. PMID:9653112

  12. Cloning and analysis of a cDNA encoding an endo-polygalacturonase expressed during the desiccation period of the silique-valves of turnip-tops (Brassica rapa L. cv. Rapa).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gacio, María del Carmen; Nicolás, Carlos; Matilla, Angel J

    2004-02-01

    During zygotic embryogenesis of turnip-tops (Brassica rapa L. cv. Rapa), the polygalacturonase activity (PG; EC 3.2.1.15), measured as a decrease in viscosity of polygalacturonic acid, reached a high when the desiccation process in the seeded silique was triggered and the valves had lost more than 70-75% of their moisture (45-50 DPA). The PG activity was not detected in any phases of developing seeds. This work also characterizes a cDNA with an open reading frame of 1303 bp and that codes for a putative PG called BrPG1. This falls into the category of clade-B, which includes PG related to shattering and abscission processes. The deduced BrPG1 sequence predicted a 434-residue-long precursor protein (46.7kDa) with a transit peptide sequence 23 amino acids long. A molecular mass of 44.3 kDa was calculated for the mature form of BrPG1, which showed high sequence similarity to PGA1 (97%) of B. napus (X98373) and ADPG1 (87%) of Arabidopsis thaliana (AJ002532). All conserved amino acids at the catalytic site of PGs belonging to clade-B were preserved on BrPG1. This BrPG1 gene was specifically expressed in the silique valves of turnip-tops and was temporally expressed at the beginning of its desiccation.

  13. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon. .

  14. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    1994-01-04

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  15. Structural organization of the human S-antigen gene. cDNA, amino acid, intron, exon, promoter, in vitro transcription, retina, and pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, K; Tsuda, M; Kikuchi, T; Chen, K H; Huang, K P; Shinohara, T

    1990-12-01

    S-Antigen (S-Ag) is a major soluble photoreceptor protein involved in the visual transduction cascade. Several S-Ag cDNAs and a gene coding for human S-Ag were isolated from cDNA and gene libraries. The gene sequences of the coding, noncoding, and 5'-flanking regions of the gene were determined. The S-Ag gene was approximately 50 kbp (kilobase pairs) in length and contained 16 exons and 15 introns. The length of most exons was less than 100 base pairs (bp) and the smallest one was only 10 bp. In contrast, the length of most introns was larger than 2 kbp, and the gene comprised 97% intron and 3% exon. The splice sites for donor and acceptor were in good agreement with the GT/AG rule. The S-Ag protein of 403 amino acid residues was translated from a mRNA of 1.9 kbp, and the mRNA was transcribed from a gene of 50 kbp. The 5'-flanking region of the gene, approximately 1.1 kbp long, had no known regulatory elements for transcription such as TATA, GC, and CCAAT boxes. Interestingly, the 5'-flanking region had promoter activity in an in vitro transcription assay using a nuclear extract of rat brain. A major transcription start site was found at 387 bp upstream from the translation start site ATG. Our results indicate that the sequence of S-Ag promoter differs from other known promoters and may, perhaps, be specific for photoreceptor rod cells and pinealocytes.

  16. Direction of Movement Is Encoded in the Human Primary Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Toxopeus, Carolien M.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated how direction of hand movement, which is a well-described parameter in cerebral organization of motor control, is incorporated in the somatotopic representation of the manual effector system in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a manual step-tracking task we found that activation patterns related to movement in different directions were spatially disjoint within the representation area of the hand on M1. Foci of activation related to specific movement directions were segregated within the M1 hand area; activation related to direction 0° (right) was located most laterally/superficially, whereas directions 180° (left) and 270° (down) elicited activation more medially within the hand area. Activation related to direction 90° was located between the other directions. Moreover, by investigating differences between activations related to movement along the horizontal (0°+180°) and vertical (90°+270°) axis, we found that activation related to the horizontal axis was located more anterolaterally/dorsally in M1 than for the vertical axis, supporting that activations related to individual movement directions are direction- and not muscle related. Our results of spatially segregated direction-related activations in M1 are in accordance with findings of recent fMRI studies on neural encoding of direction in human M1. Our results thus provide further evidence for a direct link between direction as an organizational principle in sensorimotor transformation and movement execution coded by effector representations in M1. PMID:22110768

  17. Direction of movement is encoded in the human primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Toxopeus, Carolien M; de Jong, Bauke M; Valsan, Gopal; Conway, Bernard A; Leenders, Klaus L; Maurits, Natasha M

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated how direction of hand movement, which is a well-described parameter in cerebral organization of motor control, is incorporated in the somatotopic representation of the manual effector system in the human primary motor cortex (M1). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a manual step-tracking task we found that activation patterns related to movement in different directions were spatially disjoint within the representation area of the hand on M1. Foci of activation related to specific movement directions were segregated within the M1 hand area; activation related to direction 0° (right) was located most laterally/superficially, whereas directions 180° (left) and 270° (down) elicited activation more medially within the hand area. Activation related to direction 90° was located between the other directions. Moreover, by investigating differences between activations related to movement along the horizontal (0°+180°) and vertical (90°+270°) axis, we found that activation related to the horizontal axis was located more anterolaterally/dorsally in M1 than for the vertical axis, supporting that activations related to individual movement directions are direction- and not muscle related. Our results of spatially segregated direction-related activations in M1 are in accordance with findings of recent fMRI studies on neural encoding of direction in human M1. Our results thus provide further evidence for a direct link between direction as an organizational principle in sensorimotor transformation and movement execution coded by effector representations in M1.

  18. Human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase UGT2A2: cDNA construction, expression, and functional characterization in comparison with UGT2A1 and UGT2A3

    PubMed Central

    Sneitz, Nina; Court, Michael H.; Zhang, Xiuling; Laajanen, Kaisa; Yee, Karen K.; Dalton, Pamela; Ding, Xinxin; Finel, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Characterize the expression and glucuronidation activities of the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2A2. Methods UGT2A1 was cloned from nasal mucosa mRNA. Synthetic cDNA for UGT2A2 was constructed assuming exon sharing between UGT2A1 and UGT2A2 (Mackenzie et al., Pharmacogenetics and Genomics 2005, 15:677–685). Exon 1 of UGT2A2 was amplified from genomic DNA and combined with exons 2–6 of UGT2A1. UGT2A3 was cloned from liver mRNA. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of all the three UGTs of subfamily 2A in different tissues. Recombinant UGT2A1, UGT2A2 and UGT2A3 were expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells and analyzed for glucuronidation activity towards different substrates. Results DNA sequencing of reverse-transcribed PCR (RT-PCR) products from human nasal mucosa mRNA, confirmed exon sharing between UGT2A1 and UGT2A2. In addition, it indicated that the N-terminal signal peptide sequence of UGT2A2 is the longest among the human UGTs. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that both UGT2A1 and UGT2A2 are mainly expressed in the nasal mucosa, and that their expression level in fetal samples was much higher than in adults. Activity assays with recombinant UGTs 2A1–2A3 demonstrated broad substrate selectivity for UGT2A1 and UGT2A2. While glucuronidation rates and substrate affinities were mostly higher in UGT2A1, the Km values for UDP-glucuronic acid were similar in both UGTs. In addition, there were regioselectivity differences between the two UGTs and, with a few substrates, particularly ethinylestradiol, the activity of UGT2A2 was higher. Conclusions UGT2A2 is mainly expressed in the nasal mucosa and it has glucuronidation activity towards several different endo- and xenobiotic substrates. PMID:19858781

  19. Content-Specific Source Encoding in the Human Medial Temporal Lobe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awipi, T.; Davachi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Although the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is known to be essential for episodic encoding, the contributions of individual MTL subregions remain unclear. Data from recognition memory studies have provided evidence that the hippocampus supports relational encoding important for later episodic recollection, whereas the perirhinal cortex has been linked…

  20. Tissue-specific expression and androgen regulation of different genes encoding rat prostatic 22-kilodalton glycoproteins homologous to human and rat cystatin.

    PubMed

    Winderickx, J; Hemschoote, K; De Clercq, N; Van Dijck, P; Peeters, B; Rombauts, W; Verhoeven, G; Heyns, W

    1990-04-01

    22-Kilodalton (kDa) protein cDNA clones were isolated from a rat prostatic library. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed three different cDNA sequences encoding two somewhat different open reading frames of 176 amino acids. The N-terminal 24 amino acids of these sequences show the typical characteristics of signal peptides of secretory proteins. The C-terminal end of the derived protein sequences displays sequence similarity to a number of cysteine proteinase inhibitors, called cystatins, suggesting a common physiological function. Upon Northern blotting with a labeled cDNA fragment, three different 22-kDa protein mRNAs, i.e. 950 nucleotides (nt), 920 nt and 860 nt, could be detected in the rat ventral prostate and the lacrymal gland. In both tissues these messengers were regulated by androgens showing the most rapid androgen response for the 950 nt mRNA form. Administration of cycloheximide nearly completely abolished the observed androgen effect suggesting that a short-living protein is required for the full induction of the 22-kDa protein genes. Hybridization experiments with specific oligonucleotides which distinguish between the mRNAs encoding both 22-kDa protein variants indicate that one protein form is less androgen dependent in the ventral prostate and not expressed in the lacrymal gland.

  1. Rapid and Efficient cDNA Library Screening by Self-Ligation ofInverse PCR Products (SLIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Stapleton, Mark; George, Reed A.; Yu, Charles; Wan, Kenneth H.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2005-04-22

    The production of comprehensive cDNA clone collections is an important goal of the human and model organism genome projects. cDNA sequences are used to determine the structures of transcripts, including splice junctions, polyadenylation sites, and 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). cDNA collections are also valuable resources for functional studies of genes and proteins. Expressed Sequence Tag (EST)sequencing is the method of choice for recovering cDNAs representing a majority of the transcripts encoded in a eukaryotic genome. However, EST sequencing samples a library at random, so it realizes diminishing returns as the project progresses. To drive cDNA collections toward completion new methods are needed to recover cDNAs representing specific genes and alternative transcripts, including transcripts with low expression levels. We describe a simple and effective inverse-PCR-based method for screening plasmid libraries to recover intact cDNAs for specific transcripts. We tested the method by screening libraries used in our Drosophila EST projects for 153 transcription factor genes that were not yet represented by full-length cDNAs. We recovered target-specific clones for 104 of the genes: 46 exactly match, 30 improve and 28partially match current gene annotations. Successful application of the screening method depends on cDNA library complexity and quality of the gene models. The approach should be effective for improving cDNA collections for other model organisms and the human. It also provides a simple and rapid method for isolating cDNAs of interest in any system for which plasmid cDNA libraries and complete or partial gene sequences are available.

  2. The gene for human glutaredoxin (GLRX) is localized to human chromosome 5q14

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, C.A.; Holmgren, A.; Bajalica, S.; Lagercrantz, J.

    1996-03-05

    Glutaredoxin is a small protein (12 kDa) catalyzing glutathione-dependent disulfide oxidoreduction reactions in a coupled system with NADPH, GSH, and glutathione reductase. A cDNA encoding the human glutaredoxin gene (HGMW-approved symbol GLRX) has recently been isolated and cloned from a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human fetal spleen cDNA library. The screening of a human genomic library in Charon 4A led to the identification of three genomic clones. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes with one genomic clone as a probe, the human glutaredoxin gene was localized to chromosomal region 5q14. This localization at chromosome 5 was in agreement with the somatic cell hybrid analysis, using DNA from a human-hamster and a human-mouse hybrid panel and using a human glutaredoxin cDNA as a probe. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Encoding/retrieval dissociation in working memory for human body forms.

    PubMed

    Bauser, Denise A Soria; Mayer, Kerstin; Daum, Irene; Suchan, Boris

    2011-06-20

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of working memory (WM) load on body processing mechanisms by using event-related potentials (ERPs). It is well known that WM load modulates the P3b (amplitude decreases as WM load increases). Additionally, WM load for faces modulates earlier ERPs like the N170. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of WM load for bodies on the P3b which is associated with WM. Additionally, we explored the effect of WM load on the N170, which is thought to be associated with configural processing, and P1, which has been observed in body as well as in face processing. Effects were analyzed during the encoding and retrieval phases. WM load was modulated by presenting one to four unfamiliar bodies simultaneously for memory encoding. The present study showed that early encoding processes (reflected by the P1 and N170) might not be modulated by WM load, whereas during the retrieval phase, early processes associated with structural encoding (N170) were affected by WM load. A possible explanation of the encoding/retrieval differences might be that subjects used distinct processing strategies in both phases. Parallel encoding of the simultaneously presented bodies might play an important role during the encoding phase where one to four bodies have to be stored, whereas serial matching might be used to compare the probe with the stored pictures during the retrieval phase. Additionally, WM load modulations were observed in later processing steps, which might be associated with stimulus identification and matching processes (reflected by the early P3b) during the encoding but not during the retrieval phase. The current findings further showed for both the encoding and the retrieval phase that the late P3b amplitude decreased as WM load for body images increased indicating that the late P3b is involved in WM processes which do not appear to be category-specific.

  4. Structure of the gene encoding the 14.5 kDa subunit of human RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Acker, J; Wintzerith, M; Vigneron, M; Kedinger, C

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the gene encoding the 14.5 kDa subunit of the human RNA polymerase II (or B) has been elucidated. The gene consists of six exons, ranging from 52 to over 101 bp, interspaced with five introns ranging from 84 to 246 bp. It is transcribed into three major RNA species, present at low abundance in exponentially growing HeLa cells. The corresponding messenger RNAs contain the same open reading frame encoding a 125 amino acid residue protein, with a calculated molecular weight of 14,523 Da. This protein (named hRPB14.5) shares strong homologies with the homologous polymerase subunits encoded by the Drosophila (RpII15) and yeast (RPB9) genes. Cysteines characteristic of two zinc fingers are conserved in all three corresponding sequences and, like the yeast protein, the hRPB14.5 subunit exhibits zinc-binding activity. Images PMID:8265347

  5. Androgen regulation of the human FERM domain encoding gene EHM2 in a cell model of steroid-induced differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay; Pandey, Ritu; Way, Jeffrey F.; Sroka, Thomas C.; Demetriou, Manolis C.; Kunz, Susan; Cress, Anne E.; Mount, David W.; Miesfeld, Roger L.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a cell model to investigate steroid control of differentiation using a subline of HT1080 cells (HT-AR1) that have been engineered to express the human androgen receptor. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment of HT-AR1 cells induced growth arrest and cytoskeletal reorganization that was associated with the expression of fibronectin and the neuroendocrine markers chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase. Expression profiling analysis identified the human FERM domain-encoding gene EHM2 as uniquely induced in HT-AR1 cells as compared to 16 other FERM domain containing genes. Since FERM domain proteins control cytoskeletal functions in differentiating cells, and the human EHM2 gene has not been characterized, we investigated EHM2 steroid-regulation, genomic organization, and sequence conservation. We found that DHT, but not dexamethasone, induced the expression of a 3.8 kb transcript in HT-AR1 cells encoding a 504 amino acid protein, and moreover, that human brain tissue contains a 5.8 kb transcript encoding a 913 amino acid isoform. Construction of an unrooted phylogenetic tree using 98 FERM domain proteins revealed that the human EHM2 gene is a member of a distinct subfamily consisting of nine members, all of which contain a highly conserved 325 amino acid FERM domain. PMID:14521927

  6. Encoding and retrieval in human medial temporal lobes: an empirical investigation using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

    PubMed

    Dolan, R J; Fletcher, P F

    1999-01-01

    The precise functional role of the hippocampus in human episodic memory is an unresolved question though it has recently been suggested that distinct medial temporal lobe (MTL) regions are involved in encoding and retrieval operations respectively. For example, a recent meta-analysis of positron emission tomography (PET) literature has suggested a rostral-caudal functional division in the medial temporal lobes (MTL), with rostral MTL mediating encoding and caudal MTL retrieval operations. However, a review of the combined PET and fMRI literature, reported in the present issue, while noting systematic discrepancies between PET and fMRI, reaches a conclusion that posterior MTL is involved in encoding. Here we present fMRI data, from a modified artificial grammar learning paradigm, that examines two questions concerning the functional role of the hippocampus, and related MTL structures in episodic memory. Firstly, we test a hypothesis that anterior hippocampus is activated during encoding and that this response is greater for novel items. Secondly, we test whether increasing familiarity with stimulus material is associated with a posterior MTL neural response. Our empirical findings support both hypotheses in that we demonstrate a left anterior hippocampal response sensitive to encoding demands and a posterior parahippocampal response sensitive to retrieval demands. Furthermore, we show that both anterior and posterior hippocampal responses are modulated to the degree to which stimuli can be assimilated into a meaningful rule-based framework.

  7. Differential cytokine modulation of the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2, encoding the constitutive polypeptides, alpha 3, beta 3, and gamma 2, of human laminin 5 in epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Korang, K; Christiano, A M; Uitto, J; Mauviel, A

    1995-07-24

    Laminin 5, an anchoring filament protein previously known as nicein/kalinin/epiligrin, consists of three polypeptide chains, alpha 3, beta 3, and gamma 2, encoded by the genes LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2, respectively. The expression of laminin 5 was detected by Northern hybridization with specific cDNA probes in various epidermal keratinocyte cultures, whereas no expression of any of the three genes could be detected in foreskin fibroblast cultures. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) enhanced LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2 gene expression in human epidermal keratinocytes, as well as in HaCaT and Balb/K cells in culture, although the extent of enhancement was greater for LAMA3 and LAMC2 genes than for LAMB3. Interestingly, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, (TNF-alpha) alone did not alter the expression of LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes in human epidermal keratinocytes, whereas it inhibited the expression of LAMA3. These results suggest that the expression of the three genes encoding the laminin 5 subunits is not coordinately regulated by the cytokines tested. PMID:7635220

  8. Cloning and partial nucleotide sequence of human immunoglobulin mu chain cDNA from B cells and mouse-human hybridomas.

    PubMed Central

    Dolby, T W; Devuono, J; Croce, C M

    1980-01-01

    Purified mRNAs coding for mu and kappa human immunoglobulin polypeptides were translated in vitro and their products were characterized. The mu-specific mRNAs, derived from both human lymphoblastoid cells (GM607) and from a mouse-human somatic cell hybrid secreting human mu chains (alpha D5-H11-BC11), were copied into cDNAs and inserted into the plasmid pBR322. Several recombinant cDNAs that were obtained were identified by a combination of colony hybridization with labeled probes, in vitro translation of plasmid-selected mu mRNAs, and DNA nucleotide sequence determination. One recombinant DNA, for which the sequence has been partially determined, contains the codons for part of the C3 constant region domain through the carboxy-terminal piece (155 amino acids total) as well as the entire 3' noncoding sequence up to the poly(A) site of the human mu mRNA. The sequence A-A-U-A-A occurs 12 nucleotides prior to the poly(A) addition site in the human mu mRNA. Considerable sequence homology is observed in the mouse and human mu mRNA 3' coding and noncoding sequences. Images PMID:6777778

  9. Cloning, characterisation and bacterial expression of full length cDNA for the mouse liver microsomal glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Raza, H; Mullick, J; John, A; Bhagwat, S V; Avadhani, N G

    2000-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA encoding full length microsomal glutathione S-transferase (MGST) from mouse liver. The cDNA was isolated by RT-PCR using primers designed from published cDNA sequence of rat MGST with the addition of 5' Nde-1 and 3' HindIII sites, and cloned into bacterial expression vector pSP19T7LT. Deduced amino acid sequence (155 amino acids, calculated mol.mass 17512 Dalton) confirmed the identity of microsomal GST from mouse liver which has sequence homology with that of rat and human liver MGST1. Recombinant GST cDNA (Genbank accession # 159050) was expressed in BL21(DE3) in the presence of 1 mM IPTG at 30 degrees C. The expressed GST protein was found to be localised in the bacterial membrane as determined by measuring catalytic activity using CDNB and cumene hydroperoxide substrates, SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. We have demonstrated the cloning and expression of full length cDNA for MGST from mouse liver and have characterised the functionally active product as MGST protein. These results should facilitate studies on the role of MGST in the regulation of chemical carcinogenesis and in the prevention of oxidative stress caused by endogenous and exogenous chemicals.

  10. Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica: cDNA cloning of a histone H3 with a divergent primary structure.

    PubMed

    Födinger, M; Ortner, S; Plaimauer, B; Wiedermann, G; Scheiner, O; Duchêne, M

    1993-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica has an unusual nuclear structure characterized by a low degree of chromatin condensation and the absence of stainable metaphase chromosomes. Although nucleosome-like particles were observed, no information about histones was available so far. In this paper we describe a cDNA clone with significant homology to H3 histones that was isolated from a library of pathogenic E. histolytica. The complete cDNA encodes a 15-kDa polypeptide, which like the histone sequence from Volvox carteri is shorter by one residue than the human homologue. The amino acid sequence has only 69% identity with human H3.3 histone and 67% identity with the human H3.1 histone. This is the highest degree of sequence divergence observed for any eukaryote H3 histone sequence. Our results indicate that this divergence may contribute to the unusual chromatin structure of E. histolytica. PMID:8341328

  11. A strategy for isolation of cDNAs encoding proteins affecting human intestinal epithelial cell growth and differentiation: characterization of a novel gut-specific N-myristoylated annexin.

    PubMed

    Wice, B M; Gordon, J I

    1992-01-01

    The human intestinal epithelium is rapidly and perpetually renewed as the descendants of multipotent stem cells located in crypts undergo proliferation, differentiation, and eventual exfoliation during a very well organized migration along the crypt to villus axis. The mechanisms that establish and maintain this balance between proliferation and differentiation are largely unknown. We have utilized HT-29 cells, derived from a human colon adenocarcinoma, as a model system for identifying gene products that may regulate these processes. Proliferating HT-29 cells cultured in the absence of glucose (e.g., using inosine as the carbon source) have some of the characteristics of undifferentiated but committed crypt epithelial cells while postconfluent cells cultured in the absence of glucose resemble terminally differentiated enterocytes or goblet cells. A cDNA library, constructed from exponentially growing HT-29 cells maintained in inosine-containing media, was sequentially screened with a series of probes depleted of sequences encoding housekeeping functions and enriched for intestine-specific sequences that are expressed in proliferating committed, but not differentiated, epithelial cells. Of 100,000 recombinant phage surveyed, one was found whose cDNA was derived from an apparently gut-specific mRNA. It encodes a 316 residue, 35,463-D protein that is a new member of the annexin/lipocortin family. Other family members have been implicated in regulation of cellular growth and in signal transduction pathways. RNA blot and in situ hybridization studies indicate that the gene encoding this new annexin exhibits region-specific expression along both axes of the human gut: (a) highest levels of mRNA are present in the jejunum with marked and progressive reductions occurring distally; (b) its mRNA appears in crypt-associated epithelial cells and increases in concentration as they exit the crypt. Villus-associated epithelial cells continue to transcribe this gene during their

  12. Molecular Cloning of cDNA Encoding an Aquaglyceroporin, AQP-h9, in the Japanese Tree Frog, Hyla japonica: Possible Roles of AQP-h9 in Freeze Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Atsushi; Takiya, Yu; Sakamoto, Joe; Shiojiri, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Masakazu; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Okada, Reiko

    2015-06-01

    In order to study the freeze-tolerance mechanism in the Japanese tree frog, Hyla japonica, wecloned a eDNA encoding aquaporin (AQP) 9 from its liver. The predicted amino acid sequence ofH. japonica AQP9 (AQP-h9) contained six putative transmembrane domains and two conservedAsn-Pro-Aia motifs, which are characteristic of AQPs. A swelling assay using Xenopus laevisoocytes injected with AQP-h9 cRNA showed that AQP-h9 facilitated water and glycerol permeation,confirming its property as an aquaglyceroporin. Subsequently, glycerol concentrations in serumand tissue extracts were compared among tree frogs that were hibernating, frozen, or thawed afterfreezing. Serum glycerol concentration of thawed frogs was significantly higher than that of hibernatingfrogs. Glycerol content in the liver did not change in the freezing experiment, whereas thatin the skeletal muscle was elevated in thawed frogs as compared with hibernating or frozen frogs. Histological examination of the liver showed that erythrocytes aggregated in the sinusoids during hibernation and freezing, and immunoreactive AQP-h9 protein was detected over the erythrocytes. The AQP-h9 labeling was more intense in frozen frogs than in hibernating frogs, but nearly undetectable in thawed frogs. For the skeletal muscle, weak labels for AQP-h9 were observed in the cytoplasm of myocytes of hibernating frogs. AQP-h9 labeling was markedly enhanced by freezing and was decreased by thawing. These results indicate that glycerol may act as a c;:ryoprotectant in H. japonica and that during hibernation, particularly during freezing, AQP-h9 may be involved in glycerol uptake in erythrocytes in the liver and in intracellular glycerol transport in the skeletal muscle cells. PMID:26402924

  13. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-κB through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses. PMID:25309527

  14. Human herpesvirus-8 encoded Kaposin: subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and biochemical approaches.

    PubMed

    Tomkowicz, Brian; Singh, Satya P; Cartas, Maria; Srinivasan, Alagarsamy

    2002-03-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) has been causally linked to the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). DNA sequence analysis of the viral genome revealed a total of 81 open reading frames (ORF). Interestingly, only a small subset of these ORFs has been shown to be transcribed in cells latently infected with HHV-8 and in cells of the KS lesions. Among the genes active during latency, kaposin, is noted for its abundance and ability to transform cells in culture, thus implicating a potential role in KS pathogenesis. This has prompted us to undertake an investigation on elucidating the mechanism(s) by which Kaposin brings about transformation of cells. Towards this goal, we have generated an eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding Kaposin (Kap). As Kaposin is predicted to be a type II membrane protein, several strategies were utilized to address this, including the generation of Kaposin with the Flag (FL) epitope (DYKDDDDK) at the C-terminus of the protein (Kap-C-FL). Antibodies specific for Kaposin (kap-2), recognized both Kaposin and Kaposin-Flag, while antibodies against the Flag epitope recognized only Kaposin-Flag. Transfection of Kap and Kap-C-FL expression plasmid DNA into NIH3T3 cells resulted in cellular clones that exhibited a phenotypic property of transformation by forming large, multiclustered cells, when grown on soft agar. Because there is controversial data regarding the localization of Kaposin in cells, we examined the subcellular localization of Kaposin using confocal microscopy. We observed that Kaposin and Kaposin-Flag showed an intense staining surrounding the nucleus. Although there was no staining at the cell membrane of transfected cells, FACS analysis using kap-2 or Flag antibodies, under nonpermeable conditions, showed positivity. Cell fractionation studies further showed that the majority of Kaposin was detected in the nuclear fraction by Western blot analysis. The cytoplasmic and detergent soluble membrane fractions did not show Kaposin protein

  15. Molecular characterization of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C S; Muthukumaran, G; Frost, L J; Noe, M; Ahn, Y H; Mariano, T M; Pestka, S

    1989-10-25

    Interferon gamma receptors (IFN-gamma R) exhibit remarkable species specificity. In order to understand the basis for this phenomenon, we have isolated a recombinant cDNA clone corresponding to the mouse (Mu) IFN-gamma R. Microinjection of the mRNA synthesized in vitro corresponding to the cloned cDNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in the synthesis of a protein that specifically binds Mu-IFN-gamma. Analysis of murine genomic and RNA blots with the cDNA probe indicates the presence of a single gene and a single mRNA species of about 2300 bases. Sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding the Mu-IFN-gamma R and comparison with the corresponding human IFN-gamma R sequence shows about 68% conservation of the extracellular domains and 51% conservation of the cytoplasmic domains at the nucleotide level. The results indicate that, as expected, the sequence of the receptor confers species specificity for the binding of IFN-gamma to the cell surface receptor. Moreover, it was previously shown that a human factor is required in addition to the receptor for the human IFN-gamma to function in hamster or mouse cells (Jung, V., Rashidbaigi, A., Jones, C., Tischfield, J.A., Shows, T.B., and Pestka, S. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 4151-4155). These results suggest an explanation for the second species-specific event required for function of the human receptor in mouse or hamster cells in that the intracellular domains are significantly different and thus cannot interact with the corresponding heterologous factor. PMID:2530216

  16. Molecular characterization of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C S; Muthukumaran, G; Frost, L J; Noe, M; Ahn, Y H; Mariano, T M; Pestka, S

    1989-10-25

    Interferon gamma receptors (IFN-gamma R) exhibit remarkable species specificity. In order to understand the basis for this phenomenon, we have isolated a recombinant cDNA clone corresponding to the mouse (Mu) IFN-gamma R. Microinjection of the mRNA synthesized in vitro corresponding to the cloned cDNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes resulted in the synthesis of a protein that specifically binds Mu-IFN-gamma. Analysis of murine genomic and RNA blots with the cDNA probe indicates the presence of a single gene and a single mRNA species of about 2300 bases. Sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding the Mu-IFN-gamma R and comparison with the corresponding human IFN-gamma R sequence shows about 68% conservation of the extracellular domains and 51% conservation of the cytoplasmic domains at the nucleotide level. The results indicate that, as expected, the sequence of the receptor confers species specificity for the binding of IFN-gamma to the cell surface receptor. Moreover, it was previously shown that a human factor is required in addition to the receptor for the human IFN-gamma to function in hamster or mouse cells (Jung, V., Rashidbaigi, A., Jones, C., Tischfield, J.A., Shows, T.B., and Pestka, S. (1987) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84, 4151-4155). These results suggest an explanation for the second species-specific event required for function of the human receptor in mouse or hamster cells in that the intracellular domains are significantly different and thus cannot interact with the corresponding heterologous factor.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone of UDP-galactose: flavonoid 3-O-galactosyltransferase (UF3GaT) expressed in Vigna mungo seedlings.

    PubMed

    Mato, M; Ozeki, Y; Itoh, Y; Higeta, D; Yoshitama, K; Teramoto, S; Aida, R; Ishikura, N; Shibata, M

    1998-11-01

    Four cDNA clones were isolated from Vigna mungo seedlings by the screening with cDNA encoding UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UF3GT) of Antirrhinum majus as a probe; the product of the gene corresponding to one cDNA was more highly expressed in the first simple leaves than in stems. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed 1,691 bp (including 326 bp non-reading) containing an open reading frame of 455 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 42% and 23% identity with those of A. majus UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UF3GT) and Petunia hybrida UDP-rhamnose:anthocyanidin 3-O-glucoside rhamnosyltransferase (RT), respectively. One region of the cDNA (amino acids 325 to 387) showed similarity to ceramide UDP-galactosyltransferases of mice, rats and humans. A crude extract from Escherichia coli, in which the protein was expressed from the cDNA, showed high UF3GaT activity but low UF3GT activity, and was similar in K(m), optimal pH and substrate specificity to UF3GaT from V. mungo. We conclude that we have obtained UDP-galactose:flavonoid 3-O-galactosyltransferase (UF3GaT) cDNA from V. mungo.

  18. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  19. On the immortality of television sets: "function" in the human genome according to the evolution-free gospel of ENCODE.

    PubMed

    Graur, Dan; Zheng, Yichen; Price, Nicholas; Azevedo, Ricardo B R; Zufall, Rebecca A; Elhaik, Eran

    2013-01-01

    A recent slew of ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Consortium publications, specifically the article signed by all Consortium members, put forward the idea that more than 80% of the human genome is functional. This claim flies in the face of current estimates according to which the fraction of the genome that is evolutionarily conserved through purifying selection is less than 10%. Thus, according to the ENCODE Consortium, a biological function can be maintained indefinitely without selection, which implies that at least 80 - 10 = 70% of the genome is perfectly invulnerable to deleterious mutations, either because no mutation can ever occur in these "functional" regions or because no mutation in these regions can ever be deleterious. This absurd conclusion was reached through various means, chiefly by employing the seldom used "causal role" definition of biological function and then applying it inconsistently to different biochemical properties, by committing a logical fallacy known as "affirming the consequent," by failing to appreciate the crucial difference between "junk DNA" and "garbage DNA," by using analytical methods that yield biased errors and inflate estimates of functionality, by favoring statistical sensitivity over specificity, and by emphasizing statistical significance rather than the magnitude of the effect. Here, we detail the many logical and methodological transgressions involved in assigning functionality to almost every nucleotide in the human genome. The ENCODE results were predicted by one of its authors to necessitate the rewriting of textbooks. We agree, many textbooks dealing with marketing, mass-media hype, and public relations may well have to be rewritten.

  20. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Barton F.; Gao, Feng; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Kothe, Denise; Li, Ying Ying; Decker, Julie; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  1. Neurons in the human amygdala encode face identity but not gaze direction

    PubMed Central

    Mormann, Florian; Niediek, Johannes; Tudusciuc, Oana; Quesada, Carlos M.; Coenen, Volker; Elger, Christian; Adolphs, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The amygdala is a key structure in face processing, and direction of eye gaze is one of the most socially salient facial signals. Recording from over 200 neurons in the amygdala of neurosurgical patients, we here find robust encoding of the identity of neutral-expression faces, but not to their direction of gaze. Processing of gaze direction may rely on a predominantly cortical network rather than the amygdala. PMID:26479589

  2. Persistent schema-dependent hippocampal-neocortical connectivity during memory encoding and postencoding rest in humans

    PubMed Central

    van Kesteren, Marlieke T. R.; Fernández, Guillén; Norris, David G.; Hermans, Erno J.

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus is thought to promote gradual incorporation of novel information into long-term memory by binding, reactivating, and strengthening distributed cortical-cortical connections. Recent studies implicate a key role in this process for hippocampally driven crosstalk with the (ventro)medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which is proposed to become a central node in such representational networks over time. The existence of a relevant prior associative network, or schema, may moreover facilitate this process. Thus, hippocampal-vmPFC crosstalk may support integration of new memories, particularly in the absence of a relevant prior schema. To address this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and prior schema manipulation to track hippocampal-vmPFC connectivity during encoding and postencoding rest. We manipulated prior schema knowledge by exposing 30 participants to the first part of a movie that was temporally scrambled for 15 participants. The next day, participants underwent fMRI while encoding the movie's final 15 min in original order and, subsequently, while resting. Schema knowledge and item recognition performance show that prior schema was successfully and selectively manipulated. Intersubject synchronization (ISS) and interregional partial correlation analyses furthermore show that stronger prior schema was associated with more vmPFC ISS and less hippocampal-vmPFC interregional connectivity during encoding. Notably, this connectivity pattern persisted during postencoding rest. These findings suggest that additional crosstalk between hippocampus and vmPFC is required to compensate for difficulty integrating novel information during encoding and provide tentative support for the notion that functionally relevant hippocampal-neocortical crosstalk persists during off-line periods after learning. PMID:20363957

  3. Nuclear-encoded factors involved in post-transcriptional processing and modification of mitochondrial tRNAs in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Christopher A.; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) encodes 22 tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) that are necessary for the intraorganellar translation of the 13 mtDNA-encoded subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes. Maturation of mt-tRNAs involves 5′ and 3′ nucleolytic excision from precursor RNAs, as well as extensive post-transcriptional modifications. Recent data suggest that over 7% of all mt-tRNA residues in mammals undergo post-transcriptional modification, with over 30 different modified mt-tRNA positions so far described. These processing and modification steps are necessary for proper mt-tRNA function, and are performed by dedicated, nuclear-encoded enzymes. Recent growing evidence suggests that mutations in these nuclear genes (nDNA), leading to incorrect maturation of mt-tRNAs, are a cause of human mitochondrial disease. Furthermore, mtDNA mutations in mt-tRNA genes, which may also affect mt-tRNA function, processing, and modification, are also frequently associated with human disease. In theory, all pathogenic mt-tRNA variants should be expected to affect only a single process, which is mitochondrial translation, albeit to various extents. However, the clinical manifestations of mitochondrial disorders linked to mutations in mt-tRNAs are extremely heterogeneous, ranging from defects of a single tissue to complex multisystem disorders. This review focuses on the current knowledge of nDNA coding for proteins involved in mt-tRNA maturation that have been linked to human mitochondrial pathologies. We further discuss the possibility that tissue specific regulation of mt-tRNA modifying enzymes could play an important role in the clinical heterogeneity observed for mitochondrial diseases caused by mutations in mt-tRNA genes. PMID:25806043

  4. Combining RT-PCR-seq and RNA-seq to catalog all genic elements encoded in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Howald, Cédric; Tanzer, Andrea; Chrast, Jacqueline; Kokocinski, Felix; Derrien, Thomas; Walters, Nathalie; Gonzalez, Jose M; Frankish, Adam; Aken, Bronwen L; Hourlier, Thibaut; Vogel, Jan-Hinnerk; White, Simon; Searle, Stephen; Harrow, Jennifer; Hubbard, Tim J; Guigó, Roderic; Reymond, Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    Within the ENCODE Consortium, GENCODE aimed to accurately annotate all protein-coding genes, pseudogenes, and noncoding transcribed loci in the human genome through manual curation and computational methods. Annotated transcript structures were assessed, and less well-supported loci were systematically, experimentally validated. Predicted exon-exon junctions were evaluated by RT-PCR amplification followed by highly multiplexed sequencing readout, a method we called RT-PCR-seq. Seventy-nine percent of all assessed junctions are confirmed by this evaluation procedure, demonstrating the high quality of the GENCODE gene set. RT-PCR-seq was also efficient to screen gene models predicted using the Human Body Map (HBM) RNA-seq data. We validated 73% of these predictions, thus confirming 1168 novel genes, mostly noncoding, which will further complement the GENCODE annotation. Our novel experimental validation pipeline is extremely sensitive, far more than unbiased transcriptome profiling through RNA sequencing, which is becoming the norm. For example, exon-exon junctions unique to GENCODE annotated transcripts are five times more likely to be corroborated with our targeted approach than with extensive large human transcriptome profiling. Data sets such as the HBM and ENCODE RNA-seq data fail sampling of low-expressed transcripts. Our RT-PCR-seq targeted approach also has the advantage of identifying novel exons of known genes, as we discovered unannotated exons in ~11% of assessed introns. We thus estimate that at least 18% of known loci have yet-unannotated exons. Our work demonstrates that the cataloging of all of the genic elements encoded in the human genome will necessitate a coordinated effort between unbiased and targeted approaches, like RNA-seq and RT-PCR-seq.

  5. Sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W; Posse, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provides spatially resolved metabolite information that is invaluable for both neuroscience studies and clinical applications. However, lengthy data acquisition times, which are a result of time-consuming phase encoding, represent a major challenge for MRSI. Fast MRSI pulse sequences that use echo-planar readout gradients, such as proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), are capable of fast spectral-spatial encoding and thus enable acceleration of image acquisition times. Combining PEPSI with recent advances in parallel MRI utilizing RF coil arrays can further accelerate MRSI data acquisition. Here we investigate the feasibility of ultrafast spectroscopic imaging at high field (3T and 4T) by combining PEPSI with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) MRI using eight-channel head coil arrays. We show that the acquisition of single-average SENSE-PEPSI data at a short TE (15 ms) can be accelerated to 32 s or less, depending on the field strength, to obtain metabolic images of choline (Cho), creatine (Cre), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), and J-coupled metabolites (e.g., glutamate (Glu) and inositol (Ino)) with acceptable spectral quality and localization. The experimentally measured reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of metabolite resonances were well explained by both the g-factor and reduced measurement times. Thus, this technology is a promising means of reducing the scan times of 3D acquisitions and time-resolved 2D measurements.

  6. Sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W; Posse, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provides spatially resolved metabolite information that is invaluable for both neuroscience studies and clinical applications. However, lengthy data acquisition times, which are a result of time-consuming phase encoding, represent a major challenge for MRSI. Fast MRSI pulse sequences that use echo-planar readout gradients, such as proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), are capable of fast spectral-spatial encoding and thus enable acceleration of image acquisition times. Combining PEPSI with recent advances in parallel MRI utilizing RF coil arrays can further accelerate MRSI data acquisition. Here we investigate the feasibility of ultrafast spectroscopic imaging at high field (3T and 4T) by combining PEPSI with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) MRI using eight-channel head coil arrays. We show that the acquisition of single-average SENSE-PEPSI data at a short TE (15 ms) can be accelerated to 32 s or less, depending on the field strength, to obtain metabolic images of choline (Cho), creatine (Cre), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), and J-coupled metabolites (e.g., glutamate (Glu) and inositol (Ino)) with acceptable spectral quality and localization. The experimentally measured reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of metabolite resonances were well explained by both the g-factor and reduced measurement times. Thus, this technology is a promising means of reducing the scan times of 3D acquisitions and time-resolved 2D measurements. PMID:17260356

  7. A human serotonin 1D receptor variant (5HT1D beta) encoded by an intronless gene on chromosome 6.

    PubMed Central

    Demchyshyn, L; Sunahara, R K; Miller, K; Teitler, M; Hoffman, B J; Kennedy, J L; Seeman, P; Van Tol, H H; Niznik, H B

    1992-01-01

    An intronless gene encoding a serotonin receptor (5HT1D beta) has been cloned and functionally expressed in mammalian fibroblast cultures. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, the gene encodes a 390-amino acid protein displaying considerable homology, within putative transmembrane domains (approximately 75% identity) to the canine and human 5HT1D receptors. Membranes prepared from CHO cells stably expressing the receptor bound [3H]serotonin with high affinity (Kd 4 nM) and displayed a pharmacological profile consistent, but not identical, with that of the characterized serotonin 5HT1D receptor. Most notably, metergoline and serotonergic piperazine derivatives, as a group, display 3- to 8-fold lower affinity for the 5HT1D beta receptor than for the 5HT1D receptor, whereas both receptors display similar affinities for tryptamine derivatives, including the antimigraine drug sumatriptan. Northern blot analysis revealed an mRNA of approximately 5.5 kilobases expressed in human and monkey frontal cortex, medulla, striatum, hippocampus and amygdala but not in cerebellum, olfactory tubercle, and pituitary. The 5HT1D beta gene maps to human chromosome 6. The existence of multiple neuronal 5HT1D-like receptors may help account for some of the complexities associated with [3H]serotonin binding patterns in native membranes. Images PMID:1351684

  8. Expression of a synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I in cultured mouse fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, M.L.; Cascieri, M.A.; Kelder, B.; Applebaum, J.; Chicchi, G.; Shapiro, J.A.; Pasleau, F.; Kopchick, J.J.

    1987-05-01

    A synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) was assembled and inserted into an expression vector containing the cytomegalovirus immediate early (CMV-IE) transcriptional regulatory region and portions of the bovine growth hormone gene. The recombinant plasmid encodes a 97 amino acid fusion protein containing the first 27 amino acids of the bovine growth hormone precursor and the 70 amino acids of hIGF-I. This plasmid, when transiently introduced into cultured mouse fibroblasts, directs synthesis of the fusion protein, subsequent proteolytic removal of the bovine growth hormone signal peptide, and secretion of hIGF-I into the culture medium. Conditioned medium from transfected cells inhibits binding of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-I to type I IGF receptors on human placental membranes and to acid-stable human serum carrier proteins. The recombinant hIGF-I produced is biologically active, as monitored by the stimulation of DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  9. Human Cytomegalovirus-Encoded Human Interleukin-10 (IL-10) Homolog Amplifies Its Immunomodulatory Potential by Upregulating Human IL-10 in Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Avdic, Selmir; McSharry, Brian P.; Steain, Megan; Poole, Emma; Sinclair, John; Abendroth, Allison

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gene UL111A encodes cytomegalovirus-encoded human interleukin-10 (cmvIL-10), a homolog of the potent immunomodulatory cytokine human interleukin 10 (hIL-10). This viral homolog exhibits a range of immunomodulatory functions, including suppression of proinflammatory cytokine production and dendritic cell (DC) maturation, as well as inhibition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II. Here, we present data showing that cmvIL-10 upregulates hIL-10, and we identify CD14+ monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages and DCs as major sources of hIL-10 secretion in response to cmvIL-10. Monocyte activation was not a prerequisite for cmvIL-10-mediated upregulation of hIL-10, which was dose dependent and controlled at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, cmvIL-10 upregulated expression of tumor progression locus 2 (TPL2), which is a regulator of the positive hIL-10 feedback loop, whereas expression of a negative regulator of the hIL-10 feedback loop, dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1), remained unchanged. Engagement of the hIL-10 receptor (hIL-10R) by cmvIL-10 led to upregulation of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), an enzyme linked with suppression of inflammatory responses, and this upregulation was required for cmvIL-10-mediated upregulation of hIL-10. We also demonstrate an important role for both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and STAT3 in the upregulation of HO-1 and hIL-10 by cmvIL-10. In addition to upregulating hIL-10, cmvIL-10 could exert a direct immunomodulatory function, as demonstrated by its capacity to upregulate expression of cell surface CD163 when hIL-10 was neutralized. This study identifies a mechanistic basis for cmvIL-10 function, including the capacity of this viral cytokine to potentially amplify its immunosuppressive impact by upregulating hIL-10 expression. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a large, double-stranded DNA virus that causes significant human disease

  10. Met-ase: Cloning and distinct chromosomal location of a serine protease preferentially expressed in human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, M.J.; Trapani, J.A. ); Sayers, T.J.; Wiltrout, T. ); Powers, J.C. )

    1993-12-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human NK serine protease was obtained by screening a [lambda]-gt10 library from the Lopez NK leukemia with the rat natural killer Met-ase (RNK-Met-1) cDNA clone. In Northern blot analysis human Met-ase (Hu-Met-1) cDNA hybridized with a 0.9-kb mRNA in two human NK leukemia cell lines, unstimulated human PBMC, and untreated purified CD3[sup [minus

  11. Isolation and characterization of a full length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Oyake, M.; Onodera, O.; Ikeuchi, T.

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar degeneration characterized by anticipation and variable combination of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choleoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a B37 gene on chromosome 12. To characterize functions of the DRPLA gene product, we isolated several cDNA clones for the DRPLA gene from human adult and fetus brain cDNA libraries, using an oligonucleotide flanking the CAG repeat. The cDNA spans 4247 bp in length and there is only an open reading frame coding for 986 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 291 bp downstream from the initiation methionine and encodes a polyglutamine tract. The deduced amino acid sequence from amino acids residues 582 to 707 has a high homology to published human hippocampus derived expressed sequence (M78755) located at chromosome 1p (63.8% identity), and 3{prime}-untranslated region of the DRPLA cDNA revealed homology to the mouse small nuclear RNA U7 gene (X54165). Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7 knt transcript which is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. In human adult brain, the transcript was broadly expressed including amygdala, caudate nucleus, corpus callosum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus and thalamus, and was not specific to the dentatorubral-pallidoluysian system. The availability of a full length cDNA will be highly useful for analyzing the pathogenesis of this unique neurodegenerative disease as well as for analyzing other CAG repeat related neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Fatal autoimmunity in mice reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells encoding defective FOXP3.

    PubMed

    Goettel, Jeremy A; Biswas, Subhabrata; Lexmond, Willem S; Yeste, Ada; Passerini, Laura; Patel, Bonny; Yang, Siyoung; Sun, Jiusong; Ouahed, Jodie; Shouval, Dror S; McCann, Katelyn J; Horwitz, Bruce H; Mathis, Diane; Milford, Edgar L; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Fiebiger, Edda; Marasco, Wayne A; Bacchetta, Rosa; Quintana, Francisco J; Pai, Sung-Yun; Klein, Christoph; Muise, Aleixo M; Snapper, Scott B

    2015-06-18

    Mice reconstituted with a human immune system provide a tractable in vivo model to assess human immune cell function. To date, reconstitution of murine strains with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from patients with monogenic immune disorders have not been reported. One obstacle precluding the development of immune-disease specific "humanized" mice is that optimal adaptive immune responses in current strains have required implantation of autologous human thymic tissue. To address this issue, we developed a mouse strain that lacks murine major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) and instead expresses human leukocyte antigen DR1 (HLA-DR1). These mice displayed improved adaptive immune responses when reconstituted with human HSCs including enhanced T-cell reconstitution, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, and class-switch recombination. Following immune reconstitution of this novel strain with HSCs from a patient with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, associated with aberrant FOXP3 function, mice developed a lethal inflammatory disorder with multiorgan involvement and autoantibody production mimicking the pathology seen in affected humans. This humanized mouse model permits in vivo evaluation of immune responses associated with genetically altered HSCs, including primary immunodeficiencies, and should facilitate the study of human immune pathobiology and the development of targeted therapeutics.

  13. Fatal autoimmunity in mice reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells encoding defective FOXP3.

    PubMed

    Goettel, Jeremy A; Biswas, Subhabrata; Lexmond, Willem S; Yeste, Ada; Passerini, Laura; Patel, Bonny; Yang, Siyoung; Sun, Jiusong; Ouahed, Jodie; Shouval, Dror S; McCann, Katelyn J; Horwitz, Bruce H; Mathis, Diane; Milford, Edgar L; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Fiebiger, Edda; Marasco, Wayne A; Bacchetta, Rosa; Quintana, Francisco J; Pai, Sung-Yun; Klein, Christoph; Muise, Aleixo M; Snapper, Scott B

    2015-06-18

    Mice reconstituted with a human immune system provide a tractable in vivo model to assess human immune cell function. To date, reconstitution of murine strains with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from patients with monogenic immune disorders have not been reported. One obstacle precluding the development of immune-disease specific "humanized" mice is that optimal adaptive immune responses in current strains have required implantation of autologous human thymic tissue. To address this issue, we developed a mouse strain that lacks murine major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) and instead expresses human leukocyte antigen DR1 (HLA-DR1). These mice displayed improved adaptive immune responses when reconstituted with human HSCs including enhanced T-cell reconstitution, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, and class-switch recombination. Following immune reconstitution of this novel strain with HSCs from a patient with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, associated with aberrant FOXP3 function, mice developed a lethal inflammatory disorder with multiorgan involvement and autoantibody production mimicking the pathology seen in affected humans. This humanized mouse model permits in vivo evaluation of immune responses associated with genetically altered HSCs, including primary immunodeficiencies, and should facilitate the study of human immune pathobiology and the development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:25833964

  14. GANP protein encoded on human chromosome 21/mouse chromosome 10 is associated with resistance to mammary tumor development.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Phimsen, Suchada; Gondo, Naomi; Yamashita, Hiroko; Takeo, Toru; Nakagata, Naomi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Fukushima, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Iwata, Hiroji; Saya, Hideyuki; Kondo, Eisaku; Matsuo, Keitaro; Takeya, Motohiro; Iwase, Hirotaka; Sakaguchi, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    Human chromosome 21 is known to be associated with the high risk of hematological malignancy but with resistance to breast cancer in the study of Down syndrome. In human cancers, we previously observed the significant alterations of the protein expression encoded by the ganp/MCM3AP gene on human chromosome 21q22.3. Here, we investigated GANP protein alterations in human breast cancer samples (416 cases) at various stages by immunohistochemical analysis. This cohort study clearly showed that expression of GANP is significantly decreased in human breast cancer cases with poor prognosis as an independent risk factor (relapse-free survival, hazard ratio = 2.37, 95% confidence interval, 1.27-4.42, P = 0.007 [univariate analysis]; hazard ratio = 2.70, 95% confidence interval, 1.42-5.13, P = 0.002 [multivariate analysis]). To investigate whether the altered GANP expression is associated with mammary tumorigenesis, we created mutant mice that were conditionally deficient in the ganp/MCM3AP gene using wap-cre recombinase transgenic mice. Mammary gland tumors occurred at a very high incidence in female mammary gland-specific GANP-deficient mice after severe impairment of mammary gland development during pregnancy. Moreover, tumor development also occurred in female post parous GANP-heterodeficient mice. GANP has a significant role in the suppression of DNA damage caused by estrogen in human breast cancer cell lines. These results indicated that the GANP protein is associated with breast cancer resistance. PMID:26749495

  15. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Encodes a cAMP-Dependent Chloride Channel in Heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Padraig; Warth, John D.; Levesque, Paul C.; Collier, Mei Lin; Geary, Yvonne; Horowitz, Burton; Hume, Joseph R.

    1996-06-01

    cAMP-dependent chloride channels in heart contribute to autonomic regulation of action potential duration and membrane potential and have been inferred to be due to cardiac expression of the epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. In this report, a cDNA from rabbit ventricle was isolated and sequenced, which encodes an exon 5 splice variant (exon 5-) of CFTR, with >90% identity to human CFTR cDNA present in epithelial cells. Expression of this cDNA in Xenopus oocytes gave rise to robust cAMP-activated chloride currents that were absent in control water-injected oocytes. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides directed against CFTR significnatly reduced the density of cAMP-dependent chloride currents in acutely cultured myocytes, thereby establishing a direct functional link between cardiac expression of CFTR protein and an endogenous chloride channel in native cardiac myocytes.

  16. cDNA cloning and characterisation of an alpha-glucosidase gene from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Taylor, M A; George, L A; Ross, H A; Davies, H V

    1998-02-01

    Using an Arabidopsis thaliana expressed sequence tag with sequence similarity to human lysosomal alpha-glucosidase as a probe, a potato cDNA was isolated. The cDNA encodes a polypeptide with an Mr value of 105,400 and the most significant matches of the deduced amino acid sequence are with members of family 31 of glucosyl transferase. The potato cDNA was expressed in a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is deficient in maltase activity and unable to grow using maltose as a carbon source (ABYSMAL81). Expression of the potato cDNA in the mutant yeast strain restores its ability to use maltose as a carbon source for growth. Additionally, alpha-glucosidase activity could be measured in extracts of the yeast cells following complementation. A range of maltodextrins were substrates for this activity. The steady-state expression level of the potato alpha-glucosidase gene was low in most tissues examined, the highest levels occurring in sprouting tubers and source leaves.

  17. Architecture and anatomy of the chromosomal locus in human chromosome 21 encoding the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed Central

    Levanon, D; Lieman-Hurwitz, J; Dafni, N; Wigderson, M; Sherman, L; Bernstein, Y; Laver-Rudich, Z; Danciger, E; Stein, O; Groner, Y

    1985-01-01

    The SOD-1 gene on chromosome 21 and approximately 100 kb of chromosomal DNA from the 21q22 region have been isolated and characterized. The gene which is present as a single copy per haploid genome spans 11 kb of chromosomal DNA. Heteroduplex analysis and DNA sequencing reveals five rather small exons and four introns that interrupt the coding region. The donor sequence at the first intron contains an unusual variant dinucleotide 5'-G-C, rather than the highly conserved 5'-GT. The unusual splice junction is functional in vivo since it was detected in both alleles of the SOD-1 gene, which were defined by differences in the length of restriction endonuclease fragments (RFLPs) that hybridize to the cDNA probe. Genomic blots of human DNA isolated from cells trisomic for chromosome 21 (Down's syndrome patients) show the normal pattern of bands. At the 5' end of gene there are the 'TATA' and 'CAT' promoter sequences as well as four copies of the -GGCGGG- hexanucleotide. Two of these -GC- elements are contained within a 13 nucleotide inverted repeat that could form a stem-loop structure with stability of -33 kcal. The 3'-non coding region of the gene contains five short open reading-frames starting with ATG and terminating with stop codons. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 7. PMID:3160582

  18. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  19. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOEpatents

    Soares, Marcelo B.; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  20. Rapid Encoding of New Memories by Individual Neurons in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Matias J.; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Fried, Itzhak

    2015-01-01

    Summary The creation of memories about real-life episodes requires rapid neuronal changes that may appear after a single occurrence of an event. How is such demand met by neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL), which plays a fundamental role in episodic memory formation? We recorded the activity of MTL neurons in neurosurgical patients while they learned new associations. Pairs of unrelated pictures, one of a person and another of a place, were used to construct a meaningful association modeling the episodic memory of meeting a person in a particular place. We found that a large proportion of responsive MTL neurons expanded their selectivity to encode these specific associations within a few trials: cells initially responsive to one picture started firing to the associated one but not to others. Our results provide a plausible neural substrate for the inception of associations, which are crucial for the formation of episodic memories. PMID:26139375

  1. Adhesion domain of human T11 (CD2) is encoded by a single exon.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, N E; Chang, H C; Brown, N R; Hussey, R E; Sayre, P H; Reinherz, E L

    1988-01-01

    The 50-kDa T11 (CD2) T-lymphocyte surface glycoprotein facilitates physical adhesion between T-lineage cells and their cognate cellular counterparts (cytotoxic T-lymphocytes-target cells, helper T lymphocytes-antigen-presenting cells, or thymocytes-thymic epithelium) as well as signaling through the antigen-specific T3-Ti receptor complex. To examine the relationship between the structure and function of the T11 molecule, we have utilized a baculoviral expression system to produce milligram quantities of the hydrophilic extracellular T11 segment. Enzyme cleavage, microsequencing, and HPLC analyses of the expressed protein in conjunction with genomic cloning information show that the domain involved in cellular adhesion is encoded by a single 321-base-pair exon. Images PMID:2455894

  2. Monitoring Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes with Genetically Encoded Calcium and Voltage Fluorescent Reporters

    PubMed Central

    Shinnawi, Rami; Huber, Irit; Maizels, Leonid; Shaheen, Naim; Gepstein, Amira; Arbel, Gil; Tijsen, Anke J.; Gepstein, Lior

    2015-01-01

    Summary The advent of the human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technology has transformed biomedical research, providing new tools for human disease modeling, drug development, and regenerative medicine. To fulfill its unique potential in the cardiovascular field, efficient methods should be developed for high-resolution, large-scale, long-term, and serial functional cellular phenotyping of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). To achieve this goal, we combined the hiPSC technology with genetically encoded voltage (ArcLight) and calcium (GCaMP5G) fluorescent indicators. Expression of ArcLight and GCaMP5G in hiPSC-CMs permitted to reliably follow changes in transmembrane potential and intracellular calcium levels, respectively. This allowed monitoring short- and long-term changes in action-potential and calcium-handling properties and the development of arrhythmias in response to several pharmaceutical agents and in hiPSC-CMs derived from patients with different inherited arrhythmogenic syndromes. Combining genetically encoded fluorescent reporters with hiPSC-CMs may bring a unique value to the study of inherited disorders, developmental biology, and drug development and testing. PMID:26372632

  3. Analysis of the gene start and gene end signals of human respiratory syncytial virus: quasi-templated initiation at position 1 of the encoded mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, L; Fearns, R; Collins, P L

    1997-01-01

    The gene start (GS) and gene end (GE) transcription signals of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) strain A2 were analyzed in helper-dependent monocistronic and dicistronic minireplicons which were complemented by a standard RSV strain. The GS signal, which is the start site for mRNA synthesis, is highly conserved for the first nine genes: 3'-CCCCGUUUA(U/C) (negative sense). This conserved version of the signal was analyzed by "saturation" mutagenesis, in which all 10 positions, as well as one downstream and one upstream position, were changed one at a time into each of the other three nucleotides. Most of the positions appear to contribute to the signal: positions 1, 3, 6, 7, and, in particular, 9 were the most sensitive, whereas position 5 was relatively insensitive. The effect of nucleotide substitution in the first position of the signal was examined further by cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of the residual mRNA which was produced. For the two mutants examined (1C to U, and 1C to A), the site of initiation was unchanged. However, the mRNAs were dimorphic with regard to the assignment of the 5'-terminal nucleotide: two-thirds contained the predicted mutant substitution, and one-third contained the parental assignment. Intracellular minigenome contained only the mutant assignment, indicating that the heterogeneity was at the level of transcription by the RSV polymerase. This suggests that the templated mutant assignment at position 1 can sometimes be overridden by an innate preference for the parental assignment, a phenomenon which we dubbed quasi-templated initiation. The GS signal of the L gene, encoding the 10th RSV mRNA, contains three differences (3'-CCCUGUUUUA) compared to the conserved version. It was shown to be equal in efficiency to the conserved version. This was unexpected, since the saturation mutagenesis described above indicated that U in place of A at position 9 should be highly inhibitory. Instead, the A at position 10 of the L GS signal