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Sample records for human cell models

  1. Human embryonic stem cell lines model experimental human cytomegalovirus latency.

    PubMed

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2013-05-28

    Herpesviruses are highly successful pathogens that persist for the lifetime of their hosts primarily because of their ability to establish and maintain latent infections from which the virus is capable of productively reactivating. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, establishes latency in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells during natural infections in the body. Experimental infection of CD34(+) cells ex vivo has demonstrated that expression of the viral gene products that drive productive infection is silenced by an intrinsic immune defense mediated by Daxx and histone deacetylases through heterochromatinization of the viral genome during the establishment of latency. Additional mechanistic details about the establishment, let alone maintenance and reactivation, of HCMV latency remain scarce. This is partly due to the technical challenges of CD34(+) cell culture, most notably, the difficulty in preventing spontaneous differentiation that drives reactivation and renders them permissive for productive infection. Here we demonstrate that HCMV can establish, maintain, and reactivate in vitro from experimental latency in cultures of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for which spurious differentiation can be prevented or controlled. Furthermore, we show that known molecular aspects of HCMV latency are faithfully recapitulated in these cells. In total, we present ESCs as a novel, tractable model for studies of HCMV latency.

  2. Human stem cell models of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Livesey, Frederick J.

    2014-01-01

    Positive predictions were made in the aftermath of the development of induced pluripotent stem cell technology for the use of patient-specific iPSCs to model neurological diseases, including dementia. Here, we review the current state of the field and explore how close we are to the goal of in vitro models that capture all aspects of the cell and molecular biology of dementia. PMID:24939911

  3. Modelling human disease with pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Siller, Richard; Greenhough, Sebastian; Park, In-Hyun; Sullivan, Gareth J

    2013-04-01

    Recent progress in the field of cellular reprogramming has opened up the doors to a new era of disease modelling, as pluripotent stem cells representing a myriad of genetic diseases can now be produced from patient tissue. These cells can be expanded and differentiated to produce a potentially limitless supply of the affected cell type, which can then be used as a tool to improve understanding of disease mechanisms and test therapeutic interventions. This process requires high levels of scrutiny and validation at every stage, but international standards for the characterisation of pluripotent cells and their progeny have yet to be established. Here we discuss the current state of the art with regard to modelling diseases affecting the ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal lineages, focussing on studies which have demonstrated a disease phenotype in the tissue of interest. We also discuss the utility of pluripotent cell technology for the modelling of cancer and infectious disease. Finally, we spell out the technical and scientific challenges which must be addressed if the field is to deliver on its potential and produce improved patient outcomes in the clinic.

  4. Generative models: Human embryonic stem cells and multiple modeling relations.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Melinda Bonnie

    2016-04-01

    Model organisms are at once scientific models and concrete living things. It is widely assumed by philosophers of science that (1) model organisms function much like other kinds of models, and (2) that insofar as their scientific role is distinctive, it is in virtue of representing a wide range of biological species and providing a basis for generalizations about those targets. This paper uses the case of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to challenge both assumptions. I first argue that hESC can be considered model organisms, analogous to classic examples such as Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster. I then discuss four contrasts between the epistemic role of hESC in practice, and the assumptions about model organisms noted above. These contrasts motivate an alternative view of model organisms as a network of systems related constructively and developmentally to one another. I conclude by relating this result to other accounts of model organisms in recent philosophy of science. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Model Skeletal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Barruet, Emilie; Hsiao, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders affecting the bones and joints are major health problems among children and adults. Major challenges such as the genetic origins or poor diagnostics of severe skeletal disease hinder our understanding of human skeletal diseases. The recent advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (human iPS cells) provides an unparalleled opportunity to create human-specific models of human skeletal diseases. iPS cells have the ability to self-renew, allowing us to obtain large amounts of starting material, and have the potential to differentiate into any cell types in the body. In addition, they can carry one or more mutations responsible for the disease of interest or be genetically corrected to create isogenic controls. Our work has focused on modeling rare musculoskeletal disorders including fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive (FOP), a congenital disease of increased heterotopic ossification. In this review, we will discuss our experiences and protocols differentiating human iPS cells toward the osteogenic lineage and their application to model skeletal diseases. A number of critical challenges and exciting new approaches are also discussed, which will allow the skeletal biology field to harness the potential of human iPS cells as a critical model system for understanding diseases of abnormal skeletal formation and bone regeneration.

  6. Modeling human neurological disorders with induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Yoichi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2014-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells obtained by reprogramming technology are a source of great hope, not only in terms of applications in regenerative medicine, such as cell transplantation therapy, but also for modeling human diseases and new drug development. In particular, the production of iPS cells from the somatic cells of patients with intractable diseases and their subsequent differentiation into cells at affected sites (e.g., neurons, cardiomyocytes, hepatocytes, and myocytes) has permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. For example, disease-specific iPS cells have been established from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and autism, as well as from those with neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. A multi-omics analysis of neural cells originating from patient-derived iPS cells may thus enable investigators to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of neurological diseases that have heretofore been unknown. In addition, large-scale screening of chemical libraries with disease-specific iPS cells is currently underway and is expected to lead to new drug discovery. Accordingly, this review outlines the progress made via the use of patient-derived iPS cells toward the modeling of neurological disorders, the testing of existing drugs, and the discovery of new drugs. The production of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from the patients' somatic cells and their subsequent differentiation into specific cells have permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. Furthermore, innovations of gene-editing technologies on iPS cells are enabling new approaches for illuminating the pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases. In this review article, we outlined the current status of neurological diseases-specific iPS cell research and described recently obtained

  7. [Development of human embryonic stem cell model for toxicity evaluation].

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-yan; Cao, Tong; Ouyang, Hong-wei; Peng, Shuang-qing; Deng, Xu-liang; Li, Sheng-lin; Liu, He; Zou, Xiao-hui; Fu, Xin; Peng, Hui; Wang, Xiao-ying; Zhan, Yuan

    2013-02-18

    The current international standard for toxicity screening of biomedical devices and materials recommend the use of immortalized cell lines because of their homogeneous morphologies and infinite proliferation which provide good reproducibility for in vitro cytotoxicity screening. However, most of the widely used immortalized cell lines are derived from animals and may not be representative of normal human cell behavior in vivo, in particular in terms of the cytotoxic and genotoxic response. Therefore, It is vital to develop a model for toxicity evaluation. In our studies, two Chinese human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines as toxicity model were established. hESC derived tissue/organ cell model for tissue/organ specific toxicity evaluation were developed. The efficiency and accuracy of using hESC model for cytoxicity, embryotoxicity and genotoxicity evaluation were confirmed. The results indicated that hESCs might be good tools for toxicity testing and biosafety evaluation in vitro.

  8. Human pluripotent stem cells: an emerging model in developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengrong; Huangfu, Danwei

    2013-02-01

    Developmental biology has long benefited from studies of classic model organisms. Recently, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, have emerged as a new model system that offers unique advantages for developmental studies. Here, we discuss how studies of hPSCs can complement classic approaches using model organisms, and how hPSCs can be used to recapitulate aspects of human embryonic development 'in a dish'. We also summarize some of the recently developed genetic tools that greatly facilitate the interrogation of gene function during hPSC differentiation. With the development of high-throughput screening technologies, hPSCs have the potential to revolutionize gene discovery in mammalian development.

  9. Modeling anesthetic developmental neurotoxicity using human stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiaowen; Twaroski, Danielle; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.

    2013-01-01

    Mounting pre-clinical evidence in rodents and non-human primates has demonstrated that prolonged exposure of developing animals to general anesthetics can induce widespread neuronal cell death followed by long-term memory and learning disabilities. In vitro experimental evidence from cultured neonatal animal neurons confirmed the in vivo findings. However, there is no direct clinical evidence of the detrimental effects of anesthetics in human fetuses, infants, or children. Development of an in vitro neurogenesis system using human stem cells has opened up avenues of research for advancing our understanding of human brain development and the issues relevant to anesthetic-induced developmental toxicity in human neuronal lineages. Recent studies from our group, as well as other groups, showed that isoflurane influences human neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis, while ketamine induces neuroapoptosis. Application of this high throughput in vitro stem cell neurogenesis approach is a major stride toward assuring the safety of anesthetic agents in young children. This in vitro human model allows us to (1) screen the toxic effects of various anesthetics under controlled conditions during intense neuronal growth, (2) find the trigger for the anesthetic-induced catastrophic chain of toxic events, and (3) develop prevention strategies to avoid this toxic effect. In this paper, we reviewed the current findings in anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity studies, specifically focusing on the in vitro human stem cell model. PMID:23859832

  10. Therapeutic efficacy of human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells in humanized mouse models harboring a human immune system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heung-Mo; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Choi, Young-Sil; Park, Soon-Jung; Lee, Yong-Soo; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Sung-Joo; Chung, Hyung-Min

    2013-12-01

    Allogeneic transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derivatives has the potential to elicit the patient's immune response and lead to graft rejection. Although hESCs and their derivatives have been shown to have advantageous immune properties in vitro, such observations could not be determined experimentally in vivo because of ethical and technical constraints. However, the generation of humanized mice (hu-mice) harboring a human immune system has provided a tool to perform in vivo immunologic studies of human cells and tissues. Using this model, we sought to examine the therapeutic potential of hESC-derived endothelial cells, human embryonic fibroblasts, and cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells in a human immune system environment. All cell types transplanted in hu-mice showed significantly reduced cell survival during the first 14 days post-transplantation compared with that observed in immunodeficient mice. During this period, no observable therapeutic effects were detected in the hindlimb ischemic mouse models. After this point, the cells demonstrated improved survival and contributed to a long-term improvement in blood perfusion. All cell types showed reduced therapeutic efficacy in hu-mice compared with NOD scid IL2 receptor gamma chain knockout mice. Interestingly, the eventual improvement in blood flow caused by the hESC-derived endothelial cells in hu-mice was not much lower than that observed in NOD scid IL2 receptor gamma chain knockout mice. These findings suggest that hESC derivatives may be considered a good source for cell therapy and that hu-mice could be used as a preclinical in vivo animal model for the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy to predict the outcomes of human clinical trials.

  11. Modelling familial dysautonomia in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gabsang; Studer, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have considerable promise as a novel tool for modelling human disease and for drug discovery. While the generation of disease-specific iPS cells has become routine, realizing the potential of iPS cells in disease modelling poses challenges at multiple fronts. Such challenges include selecting a suitable disease target, directing the fate of iPS cells into symptom-relevant cell populations, identifying disease-related phenotypes and showing reversibility of such phenotypes using genetic or pharmacological approaches. Finally, the system needs to be scalable for use in modern drug discovery. Here, we will discuss these points in the context of modelling familial dysautonomia (FD, Riley–Day syndrome, hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III (HSAN-III)), a rare genetic disorder in the peripheral nervous system. We have demonstrated three disease-specific phenotypes in FD-iPS-derived cells that can be partially rescued by treating cells with the plant hormone kinetin. Here, we will discuss how to use FD-iPS cells further in high throughput drug discovery assays, in modelling disease severity and in performing mechanistic studies aimed at understanding disease pathogenesis. FD is a rare disease but represents an important testing ground for exploring the potential of iPS cell technology in modelling and treating human disease. PMID:21727134

  12. Three-dimensional cell culture models for investigating human viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Bing; Chen, Guomin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are physiologically relevant, as they provide reproducible results, experimental flexibility and can be adapted for high-throughput experiments. Moreover, these models bridge the gap between traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures and animal models. 3D culture systems have significantly advanced basic cell science and tissue engineering, especially in the fields of cell biology and physiology, stem cell research, regenerative medicine, cancer research, drug discovery, and gene and protein expression studies. In addition, 3D models can provide unique insight into bacteriology, virology, parasitology and host-pathogen interactions. This review summarizes and analyzes recent progress in human virological research with 3D cell culture models. We discuss viral growth, replication, proliferation, infection, virus-host interactions and antiviral drugs in 3D culture models.

  13. Development and function of human innate immune cells in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rongvaux, Anthony; Willinger, Tim; Martinek, Jan; Strowig, Till; Gearty, Sofia V.; Teichmann, Lino L.; Saito, Yasuyuki; Marches, Florentina; Halene, Stephanie; Palucka, A. Karolina; Manz, Markus G.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Mice repopulated with human hematopoietic cells are a powerful tool for the study of human hematopoiesis and immune function in vivo. However, existing humanized mouse models are unable to support development of human innate immune cells, including myeloid cells and NK cells. Here we describe a mouse strain, called MI(S)TRG, in which human versions of four genes encoding cytokines important for innate immune cell development are knocked in to their respective mouse loci. The human cytokines support the development and function of monocytes/macrophages and natural killer cells derived from human fetal liver or adult CD34+ progenitor cells injected into the mice. Human macrophages infiltrated a human tumor xenograft in MI(S)TRG mice in a manner resembling that observed in tumors obtained from human patients. This humanized mouse model may be used to model the human immune system in scenarios of health and pathology, and may enable evaluation of therapeutic candidates in an in vivo setting relevant to human physiology. PMID:24633240

  14. New paradigms for metabolic modeling of human cells.

    PubMed

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Abnormalities in cellular functions are associated with the progression of human diseases, often resulting in metabolic reprogramming. GEnome-scale metabolic Models (GEMs) have enabled studying global metabolic reprogramming in connection with disease development in a systematic manner. Here we review recent work on reconstruction of GEMs for human cell/tissue types and cancer, and the use of GEMs for identification of metabolic changes occurring in response to disease development. We further discuss how GEMs can be used for the development of efficient therapeutic strategies. Finally, challenges in integration of cell/tissue models for simulation of whole body functions as well as integration of GEMs with other biological networks for generating complete cell/tissue models are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Exocytotic dynamics in human chromaffin cells: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Albillos, Almudena; Gil, Amparo; González-Vélez, Virginia; Pérez-Álvarez, Alberto; Segura, Javier; Hernández-Vivanco, Alicia; Caba-González, José Carlos

    2013-02-01

    Chromaffin cells have been widely used to study neurosecretion since they exhibit similar calcium dependence of several exocytotic steps as synaptic terminals do, but having the enormous advantage of being neither as small or fast as neurons, nor as slow as endocrine cells. In the present study, secretion associated to experimental measurements of the exocytotic dynamics in human chromaffin cells of the adrenal gland was simulated by using a model that combines stochastic and deterministic approaches for short and longer depolarizing pulses, respectively. Experimental data were recorded from human chromaffin cells, obtained from healthy organ donors, using the perforated patch configuration of the patch-clamp technique. We have found that in human chromaffin cells, secretion would be mainly managed by small pools of non-equally fusion competent vesicles, slowly refilled over time. Fast secretion evoked by brief pulses can be predicted only when 75% of one of these pools (the "ready releasable pool" of vesicles, abbreviated as RRP) are co-localized to Ca²⁺ channels, indicating an immediately releasable pool in the range reported for isolated cells of bovine and rat (Álvarez and Marengo, J Neurochem 116:155-163, 2011). The need for spatial correlation and close proximity of vesicles to Ca²⁺ channels suggests that in human chromaffin cells there is a tight control of those releasable vesicles available for fast secretion.

  16. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro. Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described. PMID:27385595

  17. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described.

  18. Differentiation and Genomic Instability in a Human Mammary Cell Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R.; Kale, R.; Pettengill, O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Harvest of prophylactic mastectomy specimens from an obligate heterozygote for ataxia-telangiectasia provided autologous fibroblasts as well epithelial cells (HMEC). The routine availability of these autologous cells has provided an opportunity to study cell-cell interactions in coculture and monoculture, and in 3-dimensional cultures grown in the NASA rotating bioreactor. HMEC and stromal fibroblasts grown in 2-dimensional monoculture were both observed to produce extracellular matrix. Similar matrix was encountered in 3-dimensional cultures containing HMEC. Metaphases were analyzed. For stromal fibroblasts, genomic aberrations were found in 18% of metaphase spreads. For HMEC, aberrations were greater such that a majority were found to be abnormal. The level of genomic instability determined for these noncancerous cells in 2-dimensional monoculture should be useful for generating a human cell model that can correlate the effects of differentiation in 3-dimensional coculture on the level of genomic instability.

  19. Differentiation and Genomic Instability in a Human Mammary Cell Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R.; Kale, R.; Pettengill, O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Harvest of prophylactic mastectomy specimens from an obligate heterozygote for ataxia-telangiectasia provided autologous fibroblasts as well epithelial cells (HMEC). The routine availability of these autologous cells has provided an opportunity to study cell-cell interactions in coculture and monoculture, and in 3-dimensional cultures grown in the NASA rotating bioreactor. HMEC and stromal fibroblasts grown in 2-dimensional monoculture were both observed to produce extracellular matrix. Similar matrix was encountered in 3-dimensional cultures containing HMEC. Metaphases were analyzed. For stromal fibroblasts, genomic aberrations were found in 18% of metaphase spreads. For HMEC, aberrations were greater such that a majority were found to be abnormal. The level of genomic instability determined for these noncancerous cells in 2-dimensional monoculture should be useful for generating a human cell model that can correlate the effects of differentiation in 3-dimensional coculture on the level of genomic instability.

  20. Culture models of human mammary epithelial cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2000-11-10

    Human pre-malignant breast diseases, particularly ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)3 already display several of the aberrant phenotypes found in primary breast cancers, including chromosomal abnormalities, telomerase activity, inactivation of the p53 gene and overexpression of some oncogenes. Efforts to model early breast carcinogenesis in human cell cultures have largely involved studies in vitro transformation of normal finite lifespan human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to immortality and malignancy. We present a model of HMEC immortal transformation consistent with the know in vivo data. This model includes a recently described, presumably epigenetic process, termed conversion, which occurs in cells that have overcome stringent replicative senescence and are thus able to maintain proliferation with critically short telomeres. The conversion process involves reactivation of telomerase activity, and acquisition of good uniform growth in the absence and presence of TFGB. We propose th at overcoming the proliferative constraints set by senescence, and undergoing conversion, represent key rate-limiting steps in human breast carcinogenesis, and occur during early stage breast cancer progression.

  1. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hui; Birch, Nigel P; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10-8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10-8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  2. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Nigel P.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10−8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10−8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  3. Human Normal Bronchial Epithelial Cells: A Novel In Vitro Cell Model for Toxicity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery. PMID:25861018

  4. Being human: The role of pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine and humanizing Alzheimer's disease models.

    PubMed

    Sproul, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the capacity to revolutionize medicine by allowing the generation of functional cell types such as neurons for cell replacement therapy. However, the more immediate impact of PSCs on treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) will be through improved human AD model systems for mechanistic studies and therapeutic screening. This review will first briefly discuss different types of PSCs and genome-editing techniques that can be used to modify PSCs for disease modeling or for personalized medicine. This will be followed by a more in depth analysis of current AD iPSC models and a discussion of the need for more complex multicellular models, including cell types such as microglia. It will finish with a discussion on current clinical trials using PSC-derived cells and the long-term potential of such strategies for treating AD.

  5. Effects of mesenchymal stromal cells on human myeloid dendritic cell differentiation and maturation in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huang, Yanfei; Womer, Karl L

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have shown promise as cellular therapy in allogeneic transplantation, although the precise mechanisms underlying their benefit in clinical trials are difficult to study. We previously demonstrated that MSCs exert immunoregulatory effects in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (DC) culture. Since mouse studies do not reliably reproduce human events, we used a humanized mouse model to study the immunomodulatory effects of human MSCs on human DC immunobiology. Humanized mice were established by injection of cord blood CD34(+) cells into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl/SzJ) (NOD scid gamma, NSG) mice. Human cells were detected in the mouse bone marrow, blood, and spleen 12weeks after transplantation. Human DCs were differentiated from humanized mouse bone marrow cells during human MSC co-culture. MSCs inhibited DC differentiation and kept DCs in an immature state as demonstrated by phenotype and function. In conclusion, humanized mouse models represent a useful method to study the function of human MSCs on human DC immunobiology.

  6. Voltage-Gated ion currents of schwann cells in cell culture models of human neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Lynne A

    2003-11-01

    K(+) (K) channels play a role in the proliferation of many cell types in normal cells and certain disease states. Several laboratories have studied K currents in cultured Schwann cells from models of the human diseases, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). These diseases are characterized by the growth of Schwann cell tumors. In all cell culture NF models the K current properties differ in tumor-derived and normal Schwann cells. Depending on the model however, the type of K channel abnormality differs. K channels appear to play a role in the proliferation of Schwann cell cultures of these disease models, because a link has been established between K current blockade and the inhibition of Schwann cell proliferation in NF1 and NF2. Differences in the proliferation response of normal Schwann cells to K channel blockers suggest that in vitro regulation of proliferation in neoplastic and normal Schwann cells is complex.

  7. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models.

    PubMed

    Musunuru, Kiran

    2013-07-01

    Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  8. Human vascular tissue models formed from human induced pluripotent stem cell derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Belair, David G.; Whisler, Jordan A.; Valdez, Jorge; Velazquez, Jeremy; Molenda, James A.; Vickerman, Vernella; Lewis, Rachel; Daigh, Christine; Hansen, Tyler D.; Mann, David A.; Thomson, James A.; Griffith, Linda G.; Kamm, Roger D.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Murphy, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a strategy to model blood vessel development using a well-defined iPSC-derived endothelial cell type (iPSC-EC) cultured within engineered platforms that mimic the 3D microenvironment. The iPSC-ECs used here were first characterized by expression of endothelial markers and functional properties that included VEGF responsiveness, TNF-α-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules (MCAM/CD146; ICAM1/CD54), thrombin-dependent barrier function, shear stress-induced alignment, and 2D and 3D capillary-like network formation in Matrigel. The iPSC-ECs also formed 3D vascular networks in a variety of engineering contexts, yielded perfusable, interconnected lumen when co-cultured with primary human fibroblasts, and aligned with flow in microfluidics devices. iPSC-EC function during tubule network formation, barrier formation, and sprouting was consistent with that of primary ECs, and the results suggest a VEGF-independent mechanism for sprouting, which is relevant to therapeutic anti-angiogenesis strategies. Our combined results demonstrate the feasibility of using a well-defined, stable source of iPSC-ECs to model blood vessel formation within a variety of contexts using standard in vitro formats. PMID:25190668

  9. Comparison of the Gene Expression Profiles of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells between Humans and a Humanized Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Hideyuki; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yahata, Takashi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2017-04-20

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of NOD/Shi-scid-IL2Rγ(null)(NOG) mice transplanted with human CD34(+)/CD38(-)/Lin(-/low) hematopoietic cells from cord blood (CB) as an experimental model of the gene expression in human hematopoiesis. We compared the gene expressions of human CD34(+)/CD38(-)/Lin(-/low) cells from human bone marrow (BM) and in xenograft models. The microarray data revealed that 25 KEGG pathways were extracted from the comparison of human CD34(+)/CD38(-)/Lin(-/low) HSCs between CB and BM, and that 17 of them--which were mostly related to cellular survival, RNA metabolism and lymphoid development--were shared with the xenograft model. When the probes that were commonly altered in CD34(+)/CD38(-)/Lin(-/low) cells from both human and xenograft BM were analyzed, most of them, including the genes related hypoxia, hematopoietic differentiation, epigenetic modification, translation initiation, and RNA degradation, were downregulated. These alterations of gene expression suggest a reduced differentiation capacity and likely include key alterations of gene expression for settlement of CB CD34(+)/CD38(-)/Lin(-/low) cells in BM. Our findings demonstrate that the xenograft model of human CB CD34(+)/CD38(-)/Lin(-/low) cells using NOG mice was useful, at least in part, for the evaluation of the gene expression profile of human hematopoietic stem cells.

  10. Biological Analysis of Human CML Stem Cells; Xenograft Model of Chronic Phase Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sheela A

    2016-01-01

    Xenograft mouse models have been instrumental in expanding our knowledge of hematopoiesis and can provide a functional description of stem cells that possess engrafting potential. Here we describe methodology outlining one way of analyzing human malignant cells that are able to engraft immune compromised mice. Using models such as these will allow researchers to gain valuable insight into the primitive leukemic subtypes that evade current therapy regimes and are critical to understand, in order to eradicate malignancy.

  11. Modeling Fragile X Syndrome Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mor-Shaked, Hagar; Eiges, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common heritable form of cognitive impairment. It results from a loss-of-function mutation by a CGG repeat expansion at the 5′ untranslated region of the X-linked fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Expansion of the CGG repeats beyond 200 copies results in protein deficiency by leading to aberrant methylation of the FMR1 promoter and the switch from active to repressive histone modifications. Additionally, the CGGs become increasingly unstable, resulting in high degree of variation in expansion size between and within tissues of affected individuals. It is still unclear how the FMR1 protein (FMRP) deficiency leads to disease pathology in neurons. Nor do we know the mechanisms by which the CGG expansion results in aberrant DNA methylation, or becomes unstable in somatic cells of patients, at least in part due to the lack of appropriate animal or cellular models. This review summarizes the current contribution of pluripotent stem cells, mutant human embryonic stem cells, and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells to disease modeling of FXS for basic and applied research, including the development of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27690107

  12. Human embryonic stem cells as models for aneuploid chromosomal syndromes.

    PubMed

    Biancotti, Juan-Carlos; Narwani, Kavita; Buehler, Nicole; Mandefro, Berhan; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Yanuka, Ofra; Clark, Amander; Hill, David; Benvenisty, Nissim; Lavon, Neta

    2010-09-01

    Syndromes caused by chromosomal aneuploidies are widely recognized genetic disorders in humans and often lead to spontaneous miscarriage. Preimplantation genetic screening is used to detect chromosomal aneuploidies in early embryos. Our aim was to derive aneuploid human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines that may serve as models for human syndromes caused by aneuploidies. We have established 25 hESC lines from blastocysts diagnosed as aneuploid on day 3 of their in vitro development. The hESC lines exhibited morphology and expressed markers typical of hESCs. They demonstrated long-term proliferation capacity and pluripotent differentiation. Karyotype analysis revealed that two-third of the cell lines carry a normal euploid karyotype, while one-third remained aneuploid throughout the derivation, resulting in eight hESC lines carrying either trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), 16, 17, 21 (Down syndrome), X (Triple X syndrome), or monosomy X (Turner syndrome). On the basis of the level of single nucleotide polymorphism heterozygosity in the aneuploid chromosomes, we determined whether the aneuploidy originated from meiotic or mitotic chromosomal nondisjunction. Gene expression profiles of the trisomic cell lines suggested that all three chromosomes are actively transcribed. Our analysis allowed us to determine which tissues are most affected by the presence of a third copy of either chromosome 13, 16, 17 or 21 and highlighted the effects of trisomies on embryonic development. The results presented here suggest that aneuploid embryos can serve as an alternative source for either normal euploid or aneuploid hESC lines, which represent an invaluable tool to study developmental aspects of chromosomal abnormalities in humans.

  13. Modeling Human Natural Killer Cell Development in the Era of Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Decades after the discovery of natural killer (NK) cells, their developmental pathways in mice and humans have not yet been completely deciphered. Accumulating evidence indicates that NK cells can develop in multiple tissues throughout the body. Moreover, detailed and comprehensive models of NK cell development were proposed soon after the turn of the century. However, with the recent identification and characterization of other subtypes of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), which show some overlapping functional and phenotypic features with NK cell developmental intermediates, the distinct stages through which human NK cells develop from early hematopoietic progenitor cells remain unclear. Thus, there is a need to reassess and refine older models of NK cell development in the context of new data and in the era of ILCs. Our group has focused on elucidating the developmental pathway of human NK cells in secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs), including tonsils and lymph nodes. Here, we provide an update of recent progress that has been made with regard to human NK cell development in SLTs, and we discuss these new findings in the context of contemporary models of ILC development.

  14. Modeling Human Natural Killer Cell Development in the Era of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scoville, Steven D.; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Decades after the discovery of natural killer (NK) cells, their developmental pathways in mice and humans have not yet been completely deciphered. Accumulating evidence indicates that NK cells can develop in multiple tissues throughout the body. Moreover, detailed and comprehensive models of NK cell development were proposed soon after the turn of the century. However, with the recent identification and characterization of other subtypes of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), which show some overlapping functional and phenotypic features with NK cell developmental intermediates, the distinct stages through which human NK cells develop from early hematopoietic progenitor cells remain unclear. Thus, there is a need to reassess and refine older models of NK cell development in the context of new data and in the era of ILCs. Our group has focused on elucidating the developmental pathway of human NK cells in secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs), including tonsils and lymph nodes. Here, we provide an update of recent progress that has been made with regard to human NK cell development in SLTs, and we discuss these new findings in the context of contemporary models of ILC development. PMID:28396671

  15. Modeling Rett Syndrome Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Inouye, Michiko O; Miyake, Kunio; Kubota, Takeo; Okano, Hideyuki; Akamatsu, Wado

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is one of a group of neurodevelopmental disorders typically characterized by deficits in the X-linked gene MECP2 (methyl-CpG binding protein 2). The MECP2 gene encodes a multifunctional protein involved in transcriptional repression, transcriptional activation, chromatin remodeling, and RNA splicing. Genetic deletion of Mecp2 in mice revealed neuronal disabilities including RTT-like phenotypes and provided an excellent platform for understanding the pathogenesis of RTT. So far, there are no effective pharmacological treatments for RTT because the role of MECP2 in RTT is incompletely understood. Recently, human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technologies have improved our knowledge of neurological and neurodevelopmental diseases including RTT because neurons derived from RTT-hiPSCs can be used for disease modeling to understand RTT phenotypes and to perform high throughput pharmaceutical drug screening. In this review, we provide an overview of RTT, including MeCP2 function and mouse models of RTT. In addition, we introduce recent advances in disease modeling of RTT using hiPSC-derived neural cells.

  16. A Human Corneal Epithelial Cell Line Model for Limbal Stem Cell Biology and Limbal Immunobiology.

    PubMed

    Shaharuddin, Bakiah; Ahmad, Sajjad; Md Latar, Nani; Ali, Simi; Meeson, Annette

    2017-03-01

    Limbal stem cell (LSC) deficiency is a visually debilitating condition caused by abnormal maintenance of LSCs. It is treated by transplantation of donor-derived limbal epithelial cells (LECs), the success of which depends on the presence and quality of LSCs within the transplant. Understanding the immunobiological responses of these cells within the transplants could improve cell engraftment and survival. However, human corneal rings used as a source of LSCs are not always readily available for research purposes. As an alternative, we hypothesized that a human telomerase-immortalized corneal epithelial cell (HTCEC) line could be used as a model for studying LSC immunobiology. HTCEC constitutively expressed human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I but not class II molecules. However, when stimulated by interferon-γ, HTCECs then expressed HLA class II antigens. Some HTCECs were also migratory in response to CXCL12 and expressed stem cell markers, Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2. In addition because both HTCECs and LECs contain side population (SP) cells, which are an enriched LSC population, we used these SP cells to show that some HTCEC SP cells coexpressed ABCG2 and ABCB5. HTCEC SP and non-side population (NSP) cells also expressed CXCR4, but the SP cells expressed higher levels. Both were capable of colony formation, but the NSP colonies were smaller and contained fewer cells. In addition, HTCECs expressed ΔNp63α. These results suggest the HTCEC line is a useful model for further understanding LSC biology by using an in vitro approach without reliance on a supply of human tissue. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:761-766. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  17. A Human Corneal Epithelial Cell Line Model for Limbal Stem Cell Biology and Limbal Immunobiology.

    PubMed

    Shaharuddin, Bakiah; Ahmad, Sajjad; Md Latar, Nani; Ali, Simi; Meeson, Annette

    2016-10-14

    : Limbal stem cell (LSC) deficiency is a visually debilitating condition caused by abnormal maintenance of LSCs. It is treated by transplantation of donor-derived limbal epithelial cells (LECs), the success of which depends on the presence and quality of LSCs within the transplant. Understanding the immunobiological responses of these cells within the transplants could improve cell engraftment and survival. However, human corneal rings used as a source of LSCs are not always readily available for research purposes. As an alternative, we hypothesized that a human telomerase-immortalized corneal epithelial cell (HTCEC) line could be used as a model for studying LSC immunobiology. HTCEC constitutively expressed human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I but not class II molecules. However, when stimulated by interferon-γ, HTCECs then expressed HLA class II antigens. Some HTCECs were also migratory in response to CXCL12 and expressed stem cell markers, Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2. In addition because both HTCECs and LECs contain side population (SP) cells, which are an enriched LSC population, we used these SP cells to show that some HTCEC SP cells coexpressed ABCG2 and ABCB5. HTCEC SP and non-side population (NSP) cells also expressed CXCR4, but the SP cells expressed higher levels. Both were capable of colony formation, but the NSP colonies were smaller and contained fewer cells. In addition, HTCECs expressed ΔNp63α. These results suggest the HTCEC line is a useful model for further understanding LSC biology by using an in vitro approach without reliance on a supply of human tissue.

  18. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells can prolong survival of a human islet allograft in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Douglas C; Hester, Joanna; Nadig, Satish N; Zhang, Wei; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Gray, Derek; Hughes, Stephen; Johnson, Paul; Wood, Kathryn J

    2013-10-27

    Human regulatory T cells (Treg) offer an attractive adjunctive therapy to reduce current reliance on lifelong, nonspecific immunosuppression after transplantation. Here, we evaluated the ability of ex vivo expanded human Treg to prevent the rejection of islets of Langerhans in a humanized mouse model and examined the mechanisms involved. We engrafted human pancreatic islets of Langerhans into the renal subcapsular space of immunodeficient BALB/c.rag2(-/-).cγ(-/-) mice, previously rendered diabetic via injection of the β-cell toxin streptozocin. After the establishment of stable euglycemia, mice were reconstituted with allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the resultant alloreactive response studied. Ex vivo expanded CD25high CD4+ human Treg, which expressed FoxP3, CTLA-4, and CD62L and remained CD127low, were then cotransferred together with human PBMC and islet allografts and monitored for evidence of rejection. Human islets transplanted into diabetic immunodeficient mice reversed diabetes but were rejected rapidly after the mice were reconstituted with allogeneic human PBMC. Cotransfer of purified, ex vivo expanded human Treg prolonged islet allograft survival resulting in the accumulation of Treg in the peripheral lymphoid tissue and suppression of proliferation and interferon-γ production by T cells. In vitro, Treg suppressed activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription and inhibited the effector differentiation of responder T cells. Ex vivo expanded Treg retain regulatory activity in vivo, can protect a human islet allograft from rejection by suppressing signal transducers and activators of transcription activation and inhibiting T-cell differentiation, and have clinical potential as an adjunctive cellular therapy.

  19. HUMAN CORNEAL ENDOTHELIAL CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN A HUMAN EX VIVO MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sanjay V.; Bachman, Lori A.; Hann, Cheryl R.; Bahler, Cindy K.; Fautsch, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effects of incorporating superparamagnetic microspheres (SPMs) into cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), and to describe preliminary experiments of HCEC transplantation, facilitated by SPMs and an external magnetic field, in a human anterior segment ex vivo model. Methods HCECs were cultured in monolayer and incorporated with magnetite oxide SPMs (900 nm, 300 nm, and 100 nm) at different concentrations. Cell viability, migration toward a magnetic field, and light transmittance were measured after incorporation of SPMs. HCEC transplantation to human recipients was investigated with anterior segments in organ culture subjected to an external magnetic field. Light and electron microscopy were used to assess HCEC attachment to corneal stroma. Results SPMs were incorporated into the cytoplasm of HCECs after overnight incubation. None of the SPMs affected the short-term viability of cultured HCECs (P>0.14, n=6) or their light transmittance (P>0.06, n=5), although there was a trend toward decreased transmittance with higher concentrations of the 900 nm SPM. Cell migration toward a magnetic field was higher for HCECs with incorporated SPMs than for HCECs without SPMs (P≤ 0.01, n=6), with dose-response relationships evident for the 300 nm and 100 nm SPMs. SPMs facilitated the attachment of HCECs to corneal stroma in the human anterior segment model with minimal change in intracameral (intraocular) pressure. Conclusions SPMs facilitate migration of HCECs toward a magnetic source and attachment of cells to corneal stroma without affecting cell viability or light transmittance. The human anterior segment model can be used to study HCEC transplantation. PMID:19136716

  20. Modeling complex neuropsychiatric disorders with human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Brian T D; Snyder, Evan Y; Nye, Jeffrey S

    2011-10-01

    Identifying the molecular and cellular basis of complex neuropsychiatric disorders (cNPDs) has been limited by the inaccessibility of central neurons, variability within broad diagnostic classifications, and the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Recent work utilizing neuronally differentiated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from Mendelian and polygenic cNPDs is beginning to illuminate neuritic, synaptic or cell body variations accompanied by specific gene or protein expression alterations largely mimicking known pathology. In some cases, phenotypes have only emerged after application of cellular stress or long duration of differentiation. Pathological and cellular expression features are fully or partially responsive to pharmacological treatment highlighting the potential utility of differentiated hiPSCs for discovery of personalized therapeutics and for identifying pathogenetically relevant targets in subgroups of patients within a broad syndromic classification. Because of the inherent variability in developing and differentiating hiPSC lines and the multiple comparisons implicit in 'omics' technologies, rigorous algorithms for assuring statistical significance and independent confirmation of results, will be required for robust modeling of cNPDs.

  1. Stem cells on the brain: modeling neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases using human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Priya; Young-Pearse, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Seven years have passed since the initial report of the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from adult human somatic cells, and in the intervening time the field of neuroscience has developed numerous disease models using this technology. Here, we review progress in the field and describe both the advantages and potential pitfalls of modeling neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases using this technology. We include tables with information on neural differentiation protocols and studies that developed human iPSC lines to model neurological diseases. We also discuss how one can: investigate effects of genetic mutations with iPSCs, examine cell fate-specific phenotypes, best determine the specificity of a phenotype, and bring in vivo relevance to this in vitro technique.

  2. QGP-1 cells release 5-HT via TRPA1 activation; a model of human enterochromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Doihara, Hitoshi; Nozawa, Katsura; Kojima, Ryosuke; Kawabata-Shoda, Eri; Yokoyama, Toshihide; Ito, Hiroyuki

    2009-11-01

    Recently, we discovered that transient receptor potential ankyrin1 channel (TRPA1) is highly expressed in human and rat enterochromaffin (EC) cells, and those TRPA1 agonists such as allyl isothiocyanates (AITC) and cinnamaldehyde (CA) enhance the release of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) from EC cells in vitro. In this study, QGP-1 cells, a human pancreatic endocrine cell line, were found to highly express TRPA1 and EC cell marker genes, such as tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), chromogranin A (CgA), synaptophysin, ATP-dependent vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1), metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGluR4), beta1-adrenergic receptor (ADB1), muscarinic 4 acetylcholine receptor (ACM4), substance P, serotonin transporter (SERT), and guanylin. Furthermore, the TRPA1 agonists AITC, CA, and acrolein concentration dependently evoked an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) influx and the release of 5-HT in QGP-1 cells. The effects of these TRPA1 agonists were inhibited by ruthenium red, a TRPA1 antagonist, and TRPA1-specific siRNA. These results indicate that the Ca(2+) influx increase and 5-HT release induced by AITC, CA and acrolein in QGP-1 cells were mediated by TRPA1, and that the QGP-1 cell line could be a new model for the investigation of TRPA1 function in the human EC cell.

  3. Human mast cells decrease SLPI levels in type II – like alveolar cell model, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Camilla; Nyström, Max; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Westin, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    Background Mast cells are known to accumulate at sites of inflammation and upon activation to release their granule content, e.g. histamine, cytokines and proteases. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is produced in the respiratory mucous and plays a role in regulating the activity of the proteases. Result We have used the HMC-1 cell line as a model for human mast cells to investigate their effect on SLPI expression and its levels in cell co-culture experiments, in vitro. In comparison with controls, we found a significant reduction in SLPI levels (by 2.35-fold, p < 0.01) in a SLPI-producing, type II-like alveolar cell line, (A549) when co-cultured with HMC-1 cells, but not in an HMC-1-conditioned medium, for 96 hours. By contrast, increased SLPI mRNA expression (by 1.58-fold, p < 0.05) was found under the same experimental conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed mast cell transmigration in co-culture with SLPI-producing A549 cells for 72 and 96 hours. Conclusion These results indicate that SLPI-producing cells may assist mast cell migration and that the regulation of SLPI release and/or consumption by mast cells requires interaction between these cell types. Therefore, a "local relationship" between mast cells and airway epithelial cells might be an important step in the inflammatory response. PMID:12952550

  4. [Study of injury model in human umbilical vein endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Chang, Hong; Xie, Zhenyuan

    2004-01-01

    To establishment the injury by oxidized low density lipoprotein in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Huvecs were exposed to OX-LDL in vitro, then MTT and MDA of Huvecs were measured. After endothelium cells were exposed to different dose of OX-LDL 24 hours, MTT was decreased significantly, especially in the high dose OX-LDL group. OX-LDL could lead injury to Huvecs and might be related to atherosclerosis.

  5. Human trophoblast in trisomy 21: a model for cell-cell fusion dynamic investigation.

    PubMed

    Malassiné, André; Pidoux, Guillaume; Gerbaud, Pascale; Frendo, Jean Louis; Evain-Brion, Danièle

    2011-01-01

    Trophoblastic cell fusion is one essential step of the human trophoblast differentiation leading to formation of the syncytiotrophoblast, site of the numerous placental functions. This process is multifactorial and finely regulated. Using the physiological model of primary culture of trophoblastic cells isolated from human placenta, we have identified different membrane proteins directly involved in trophoblastic cell fusion: connexin 43, ZO-1 and recently syncytins. These fusogenic membrane retroviral envelop glycoproteins: syncytin-1 (encoded by the HERV-W gene) and syncytin-2 (encoded by the FRD gene) and their receptors are major factors involved in human placental development. Disturbances of syncytiotrophoblast formation are observed in trisomy 21-affected placentas. Overexpression of the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), encoded by chromosome 21 as well as an abnormal hCG signaling are implicated in the defect of syncytiotrophoblast formation. This abnormal trophoblast fusion and differentiation in trisomy 21-affected placenta is reversible in vitro by different ways.

  6. Characterization of Human Huntington's Disease Cell Model from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ningzhe; An, Mahru C.; Montoro, Daniel; Ellerby, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the first exon of the gene Huntingtin (Htt). A dramatic pathological change in HD is the massive loss of striatal neurons as the disease progresses. A useful advance in HD would be the generation of a human-derived HD model to use for drug screening and understanding mechanisms of HD. We utilized the recently established human iPS cell line derived from HD patient fibroblasts to derive neuronal precursors and human striatal neurons. To achieve this goal, the differentiation of the HD-iPS cells into striatal fate required several steps. First, we generated nestin+/PAX6+/SOX1+/OCT4- neural stem cells (NSCs) from HD-iPS cells using the method of embryoid body formation. HD-NSCs were then subjected to a differentiation condition combining morphogens and neurotrophins to induce striatal lineage commitment. Striatal neuronal precursors/immature neurons stained with β-III tubulin, calbindin and GABA but not DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein, Mr = 32,000) were produced in this step. Finally, maturation and terminal differentiation of the striatal neuronal precursors/immature neurons resulted in striatal neurons expressing markers like DARPP-32. The HD-iPS cells derived striatal neurons and neuronal precursors contain the same CAG expansion as the mutation in the HD patient from whom the iPS cell line was established. Moreover, the HD-NSCs showed enhanced caspase activity upon growth factor deprivation compared to normal NSCs (from iPS or H9 NSCs). Therefore, these differentiated cells may produce a human HD cell model useful in the study of HD mechanisms and drug screening. PMID:21037797

  7. Transplantation of human stem cell-derived hepatocytes in an animal model of acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Pettinato, Giuseppe; Beeston, John T; Lee, David D; Wen, Xuejun; Mangino, Martin J; Fisher, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocyte cell transplantation can be life-saving in patients with acute liver failure (ALF); however, primary human hepatocyte transplantation is limited by the scarcity of donor hepatocytes. We investigated the effect of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells in an animal xenotransplant model of ALF. Intraperitoneal d-galactosamine was used to develop a lethal model of ALF in the rat. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), human mesenchymal stem cells, and human iPSC combined with human endothelial cells (iPSC + EC) were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells and transplanted into the spleens of athymic nude rats with ALF. A reproducible lethal model of ALF was achieved with nearly 90% death within 3 days. Compared with negative controls, rats transplanted with stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells were associated with increased survival. Human albumin was detected in the rat serum 3 days after transplantation in more than one-half the animals transplanted with hepatocyte-like cells. Only animals transplanted with iPSC + EC-derived hepatocytes had serum human albumin at 14 days posttransplant. Transplanted hepatocyte-like cells homed to the injured rat liver, whereas the ECs were only detected in the spleen. Transplantation of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells improved survival with evidence of in vivo human albumin production. Combining ECs may prolong cell function after transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  9. Human natural regulatory T cell development, suppressive function and post-thymic maturation in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Onoe, Takashi; Kalscheuer, Hannes; Danzl, Nichole; Chittenden, Meredith; Zhao, Guiling; Yang, Yong-Guang; Sykes, Megan

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells control adaptive immune responses and promote self-tolerance. Various humanized mouse models have been developed in efforts to reproduce and study a human immune system. However, in models that require T cell differentiation in the recipient murine thymus, only low numbers of T cells populate the peripheral immune systems. T cells are positively selected by mouse MHC and therefore do not function well in an HLA-restricted manner. In contrast, cotransplantation of human fetal thymus/liver and i.v. injection of CD34+ cells from the same donor achieves multilineage human lymphohematopoietic reconstitution, including dendritic cells (DCs) and formation of secondary lymphoid organs, in NOD/SCID mice. Strong antigen-specific immune responses and homeostatic expansion of human T cells that is dependent on peripheral human APCs occurs. We now demonstrate that FoxP3+ Helios+ “natural” Tregs develop normally in human fetal thymic grafts and are present in peripheral blood, spleen and lymph nodes of these humanized mice. Humanized mice exhibit normal reversal of CD45 isoform expression in association with thymic egress, post-thymic “naïve” to “activated” phenotypic conversion, and suppressive function. These studies demonstrate the utility of this humanized mouse model for the study of human Treg ontogeny, immunobiology and therapy. PMID:21876039

  10. Modeling Hippocampal Neurogenesis Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Diana Xuan; Di Giorgio, Francesco Paolo; Yao, Jun; Marchetto, Maria Carolina; Brennand, Kristen; Wright, Rebecca; Mei, Arianna; Mchenry, Lauren; Lisuk, David; Grasmick, Jaeson Michael; Silberman, Pedro; Silberman, Giovanna; Jappelli, Roberto; Gage, Fred H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The availability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offers the opportunity to generate lineage-specific cells to investigate mechanisms of human diseases specific to brain regions. Here, we report a differentiation paradigm for hPSCs that enriches for hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) granule neurons. This differentiation paradigm recapitulates the expression patterns of key developmental genes during hippocampal neurogenesis, exhibits characteristics of neuronal network maturation, and produces PROX1+ neurons that functionally integrate into the DG. Because hippocampal neurogenesis has been implicated in schizophrenia (SCZD), we applied our protocol to SCZD patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We found deficits in the generation of DG granule neurons from SCZD hiPSC-derived hippocampal NPCs with lowered levels of NEUROD1, PROX1, and TBR1, reduced neuronal activity, and reduced levels of spontaneous neurotransmitter release. Our approach offers important insights into the neurodevelopmental aspects of SCZD and may be a promising tool for drug screening and personalized medicine. PMID:24672753

  11. Modeling hippocampal neurogenesis using human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Diana Xuan; Di Giorgio, Francesco Paolo; Yao, Jun; Marchetto, Maria Carolina; Brennand, Kristen; Wright, Rebecca; Mei, Arianna; McHenry, Lauren; Lisuk, David; Grasmick, Jaeson Michael; Silberman, Pedro; Silberman, Giovanna; Jappelli, Roberto; Gage, Fred H

    2014-03-11

    The availability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offers the opportunity to generate lineage-specific cells to investigate mechanisms of human diseases specific to brain regions. Here, we report a differentiation paradigm for hPSCs that enriches for hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) granule neurons. This differentiation paradigm recapitulates the expression patterns of key developmental genes during hippocampal neurogenesis, exhibits characteristics of neuronal network maturation, and produces PROX1+ neurons that functionally integrate into the DG. Because hippocampal neurogenesis has been implicated in schizophrenia (SCZD), we applied our protocol to SCZD patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We found deficits in the generation of DG granule neurons from SCZD hiPSC-derived hippocampal NPCs with lowered levels of NEUROD1, PROX1, and TBR1, reduced neuronal activity, and reduced levels of spontaneous neurotransmitter release. Our approach offers important insights into the neurodevelopmental aspects of SCZD and may be a promising tool for drug screening and personalized medicine.

  12. Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    investigate the role of individual’s distinctive genetic background in carcinogen sensitivity and medulloblastoma susceptibility. none provided 14...distinctive genetic background in carcinogen sensitivity and MB susceptibility. By studying this human MYC-driven MB model, we will further provide novel...distinctive genetic background in carcinogen sensitivity and medulloblastoma susceptibility. Impact on other disciplines: nothing to report. Impact on

  13. Epithelial cell culture from human adenoids: a functional study model for ciliated and secretory cells.

    PubMed

    González, Claudia; Espinosa, Marisol; Sánchez, María Trinidad; Droguett, Karla; Ríos, Mariana; Fonseca, Ximena; Villalón, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Mucociliary transport (MCT) is a defense mechanism of the airway. To study the underlying mechanisms of MCT, we have both developed an experimental model of cultures, from human adenoid tissue of ciliated and secretory cells, and characterized the response to local chemical signals that control ciliary activity and the secretion of respiratory mucins in vitro. In ciliated cell cultures, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and intracellular Ca(2+) levels were measured in response to ATP, UTP, and adenosine. In secretory cultures, mucin synthesis and secretion were identified by using immunodetection. Mucin content was taken from conditioned medium and analyzed in the presence or absence of UTP. Enriched ciliated cell monolayers and secretory cells were obtained. Ciliated cells showed a basal CBF of 10.7 Hz that increased significantly after exposure to ATP, UTP, or adenosine. Mature secretory cells showed active secretion of granules containing different glycoproteins, including MUC5AC. Culture of ciliated and secretory cells grown from adenoid epithelium is a reproducible and feasible experimental model, in which it is possible to observe ciliary and secretory activities, with a potential use as a model to understand mucociliary transport control mechanisms.

  14. Epithelial Cell Culture from Human Adenoids: A Functional Study Model for Ciliated and Secretory Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, Claudia; Espinosa, Marisol; Sánchez, María Trinidad; Droguett, Karla; Ríos, Mariana; Fonseca, Ximena; Villalón, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Mucociliary transport (MCT) is a defense mechanism of the airway. To study the underlying mechanisms of MCT, we have both developed an experimental model of cultures, from human adenoid tissue of ciliated and secretory cells, and characterized the response to local chemical signals that control ciliary activity and the secretion of respiratory mucins in vitro. Materials and Methods. In ciliated cell cultures, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and intracellular Ca2+ levels were measured in response to ATP, UTP, and adenosine. In secretory cultures, mucin synthesis and secretion were identified by using immunodetection. Mucin content was taken from conditioned medium and analyzed in the presence or absence of UTP. Results. Enriched ciliated cell monolayers and secretory cells were obtained. Ciliated cells showed a basal CBF of 10.7 Hz that increased significantly after exposure to ATP, UTP, or adenosine. Mature secretory cells showed active secretion of granules containing different glycoproteins, including MUC5AC. Conclusion. Culture of ciliated and secretory cells grown from adenoid epithelium is a reproducible and feasible experimental model, in which it is possible to observe ciliary and secretory activities, with a potential use as a model to understand mucociliary transport control mechanisms. PMID:23484122

  15. A novel model for evaluating therapies targeting human tumor vasculature and human cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Ojeda, Daniela; McLean, Karen; Bai, Shoumei; Pulaski, Heather; Gong, Yusong; Silva, Ines; Skorecki, Karl; Tzukerman, Maty; Buckanovich, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Human tumor vessels express tumor vascular markers (TVMs), proteins that are not expressed in normal blood vessels. Antibodies targeting TVMs could act as potent therapeutics. Unfortunately, preclinical in vivo studies testing anti-human TVM therapies have been difficult to perform due to a lack of in vivo models with confirmed expression of human TVMs. We therefore evaluated TVM expression in a human embryonic stem cell derived teratoma (hESCT) tumor model previously shown to have human vessels. We now report that, in the presence of tumor cells, hESCT tumor vessels express human TVMs. The addition of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human tumor endothelial cells significantly increases the number of human tumor vessels. TVM induction is mostly tumor type specific with ovarian cancer cells inducing primarily ovarian TVMs while breast cancer cells induce breast cancer specific TVMs. We demonstrate the utility of this model to test an anti-human specific TVM immunotherapeutics; anti-human Thy-1 TVM immunotherapy results in central tumor necrosis and a three-fold reduction in human tumor vascular density. Finally, we tested the ability of the hESCT model, with human tumor vascular niche, to enhance the engraftment rate of primary human ovarian cancer stem-like cells (CSC). ALDH+ CSC from patients (n=6) engrafted in hESCT within 4–12 weeks whereas none engrafted in the flank. ALDH- ovarian cancer cells showed no engraftment in the hESCT or flank (n=3). Thus this model represents a useful tool to test anti-human TVM therapy and evaluate in vivo human CSC tumor biology. PMID:23576551

  16. Generation of human/rat xenograft animal model for the study of human donor stem cell behaviors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Xiao, Dong; Pan, Xing-Hua; Zhang, Ruo-Shuang; Cui, Guang-Hui; Chen, Xi-Gu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To accurately and realistically elucidate human stem cell behaviors in vivo and the fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in vivo, which is urgently required in regenerative medicine and treatments for some human diseases, a surrogate human-rat chimera model was developed. METHODS: Human-rat chimeras were achieved by in utero transplanting low-density mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood into the fetal rats at 9-11 d of gestation, and subsequently, a variety of methods, including flow cytometry, PCR as well as immunohistochemical assay, were used to test the human donor contribution in the recipients. RESULTS: Of 29 live-born recipients, 19 had the presence of human CD45+ cells in peripheral blood (PB) detected by flow cytometry, while PCR analysis on genomic DNA from 11 different adult tissues showed that 14 selected from flow cytometry-positive 19 animals possessed of donor-derived human cell engraftment in multiple tissues (i.e. liver, spleen, thymus, heart, kidney, blood, lung, muscle, gut and skin) examined at the time of tissue collection, as confirmed by detecting human β2-microglobulin expression using immunohistochemistry. In this xenogeneic system, the engrafted donor-derived human cells persisted in multiple tissues for at least 6 mo after birth. Moreover, transplanted human donor cells underwent site-specific differentiation into CK18-positive human cells in chimeric liver and CD45-positive human cells in chimeric spleen and thymus of recipients. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these findings suggest that we successfully developed human-rat chimeras, in which xenogeneic human cells exist up to 6 mo later. This humanized small animal model, which offers an in vivo environment more closely resembling to the situations in human, provides an invaluable and effective approach for in vivo investigating human stem cell behaviors, and further in vivo examining fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in the

  17. Notch Signaling and Schwann Cell Transformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    TITLE: Notch Signaling and Schwann Cell Transformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Schwann cell transformation: Development of a model system and 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER application to human MPNSTs . 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0209...of neurofibromas to MPNSTs in patients with NF1. Our previous work has shown that constitutive expression of Notch can transform rat Schwann cells

  18. Humanized mouse model of mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and passive systemic anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Paul J; Falahati, Rustom; Kenney, Laurie L; Leung, John; Bebbington, Christopher; Tomasevic, Nenad; Krier, Rebecca A; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    Mast cells are a critical component of allergic responses in humans, and animal models that allow the in vivo investigation of their contribution to allergy and evaluation of new human-specific therapeutics are urgently needed. To develop a new humanized mouse model that supports human mast cell engraftment and human IgE-dependent allergic responses. This model is based on the NOD-scid IL2rg(null)SCF/GM-CSF/IL3 (NSG-SGM3) strain of mice engrafted with human thymus, liver, and hematopoietic stem cells (termed Bone marrow, Liver, Thymus [BLT]). Large numbers of human mast cells develop in NSG-SGM3 BLT mice and populate the immune system, peritoneal cavity, and peripheral tissues. The human mast cells in NSG-SGM3 BLT mice are phenotypically similar to primary human mast cells and express CD117, tryptase, and FcεRI. These mast cells undergo degranulation in an IgE-dependent and -independent manner, and can be readily cultured in vitro for additional studies. Intradermal priming of engrafted NSG-SGM3 mice with a chimeric IgE containing human constant regions resulted in the development of a robust passive cutaneous anaphylaxis response. Moreover, we describe the first report of a human mast cell antigen-dependent passive systemic anaphylaxis response in primed mice. NSG-SGM3 BLT mice provide a readily available source of human mast cells for investigation of mast cell biology and a preclinical model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and passive systemic anaphylaxis that can be used to investigate the pathogenesis of human allergic responses and to test new therapeutics before their advancement to the clinic. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mucosal-associated invariant T cells from induced pluripotent stem cells: A novel approach for modeling human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Chie; Fujita, Hiroyoshi; Wakao, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Mice have frequently been used to model human diseases involving immune dysregulation such as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. These models help elucidate the mechanisms underlying the disease and in the development of novel therapies. However, if mice are deficient in certain cells and/or effectors associated with human diseases, how can their functions be investigated in this species? Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, a novel innate-like T cell family member, are a good example. MAIT cells are abundant in humans but scarce in laboratory mice. MAIT cells harbor an invariant T cell receptor and recognize nonpeptidic antigens vitamin B2 metabolites from bacteria and yeasts. Recent studies have shown that MAIT cells play a pivotal role in human diseases such as bacterial infections and autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. MAIT cells possess granulysin, a human-specific effector molecule, but granulysin and its homologue are absent in mice. Furthermore, MAIT cells show poor proliferation in vitro. To overcome these problems and further our knowledge of MAIT cells, we have established a method to expand MAIT cells via induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this review, we describe recent advances in the field of MAIT cell research and our approach for human disease modeling with iPSC-derived MAIT cells. PMID:27114747

  20. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    ABT-263/AZD8055 treatment (Fig. 3D) were performed within the same experiment. Traditional human cell-line xenograft experiments 6-10 week-old... performed on human cell lines, following mouse sacrifice and tumor collection, tissue was fixed in paraformaldehyde overnight, and stored in 70% EtOH until...Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts General Hospital

  1. Impact of Mixed Xenogeneic Porcine Hematopoietic Chimerism on Human NK Cell Recognition in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Li, H W; Vishwasrao, P; Hölzl, M A; Chen, S; Choi, G; Zhao, G; Sykes, M

    2017-02-01

    Mixed chimerism is a promising approach to inducing allograft and xenograft tolerance. Mixed allogeneic and xenogeneic chimerism in mouse models induced specific tolerance and global hyporesponsiveness, respectively, of host mouse natural killer (NK) cells. In this study, we investigated whether pig/human mixed chimerism could tolerize human NK cells in a humanized mouse model. Our results showed no impact of induced human NK cell reconstitution on porcine chimerism. NK cells from most pig/human mixed chimeric mice showed either specifically decreased cytotoxicity to pig cells or global hyporesponsiveness in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Mixed xenogeneic chimerism did not hamper the maturation of human NK cells but was associated with an alteration in NK cell subset distribution and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in the bone marrow. In summary, we demonstrate that mixed xenogeneic chimerism induces human NK cell hyporesponsiveness to pig cells. Our results support the use of this approach to inducing xenogeneic tolerance in the clinical setting. However, additional approaches are required to improve the efficacy of tolerance induction while ensuring adequate NK cell functions.

  2. Visualizing Human Hematopoietic Stem Cell Trafficking In Vivo Using a Zebrafish Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Staal, Frank J T; Spaink, Herman P; Fibbe, Willem E

    2016-02-15

    Zebrafish is gaining increased popularity as a model organism to study stem cell biology. It also is widely used as model system to visualize human leukemic stem cells. However, xenotransplantation of primary human stem/progenitor cells has not been described. Here, we use casper pigmentation mutant fish that are transparent crossed to fli-GFP transgenic fish as recipients of red labeled human CD34(+) cells. We have investigated various conditions and protocols with the aim to monitor and visualize the fate of transplanted human CD34(+) cells. We here report successful use of casper mutant zebrafish embryos for the direct monitoring of human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, differentiation, and trafficking in vivo.

  3. Highly Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells: a Model to Study Host cell-parasite Interactions in Pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Claudia; Zhang, Chengxian; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Iqbal, Junaid; Guerra, Julio; Greenberg, David P.; Decker, Michael D.; Carbonetti, Nicholas; Starner, Timothy D.; McCray, Paul B.; Mooi, Frits R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bordetella pertussis colonizes the human respiratory mucosa. Most studies on B. pertussis adherence have relied on cultured mammalian cells that lack key features present in differentiated human airway cells or on animal models that are not natural hosts of B. pertussis. The objectives of this work are to evaluate B. pertussis infection on highly differentiated human airway cells in vitro and to show the role of B. pertussis fimbriae in cell adherence. Methods Primary human airway epithelial (PHAE) cells from human bronchi and a human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cell line were grown in vitro under air-liquid interface conditions. Results PHAE and HBE cells infected with B. pertussis wild type strain revealed bacterial adherence to cell’s apical surface and bacterial induced cytoskeleton changes and cell detachment. Mutations in the major fimbrial subunits Fim2/3 or in the minor fimbrial adhesin subunit FimD affected B. pertussis adherence to predominantly HBE cells. This cell model recapitulates the morphologic features of the human airway infected by B. pertussis and confirms the role of fimbriae in B. pertussis adherence. Furthemore, HBE cells show that fimbrial subunits, and specifically FimD adhesin, are critical in B. pertussis adherence to airway cells. Conclusions The relevance of this model to study host-parasite interaction in pertussis lies in the striking physiologic and morphologic similarity between the PHAE and HBE cells and the human airway ciliated and goblet cells in vivo. These cells can proliferate in vitro, differentiate, and express the same genetic profile as human respiratory cells in vivo. PMID:26492208

  4. Reprogramming of human cancer cells to pluripotency for models of cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungsun; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2015-01-01

    The ability to study live cells as they progress through the stages of cancer provides the opportunity to discover dynamic networks underlying pathology, markers of early stages, and ways to assess therapeutics. Genetically engineered animal models of cancer, where it is possible to study the consequences of temporal-specific induction of oncogenes or deletion of tumor suppressors, have yielded major insights into cancer progression. Yet differences exist between animal and human cancers, such as in markers of progression and response to therapeutics. Thus, there is a need for human cell models of cancer progression. Most human cell models of cancer are based on tumor cell lines and xenografts of primary tumor cells that resemble the advanced tumor state, from which the cells were derived, and thus do not recapitulate disease progression. Yet a subset of cancer types have been reprogrammed to pluripotency or near-pluripotency by blastocyst injection, by somatic cell nuclear transfer and by induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) technology. The reprogrammed cancer cells show that pluripotency can transiently dominate over the cancer phenotype. Diverse studies show that reprogrammed cancer cells can, in some cases, exhibit early-stage phenotypes reflective of only partial expression of the cancer genome. In one case, reprogrammed human pancreatic cancer cells have been shown to recapitulate stages of cancer progression, from early to late stages, thus providing a model for studying pancreatic cancer development in human cells where previously such could only be discerned from mouse models. We discuss these findings, the challenges in developing such models and their current limitations, and ways that iPS reprogramming may be enhanced to develop human cell models of cancer progression. PMID:25712212

  5. Alzheimer's disease in a dish: promises and challenges of human stem cell models.

    PubMed

    Young, Jessica E; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2012-10-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into disease-relevant cell types, which capture the unique genome of an individual patient and provide insight into pathological mechanisms of human disease. Recently, human stem cell models for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative dementia, have been described. Stem cell-derived neurons from patients with familial and sporadic AD and Down's syndrome recapitulate human disease phenotypes such as amyloid β peptide production, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein and endosomal abnormalities. Treatment of human neurons with small molecules can modulate these phenotypes, demonstrating the utility of this system for drug development and screening. This review will highlight the current AD stem cell models and discuss the remaining challenges and potential future directions of this field.

  6. Human induced pluripotent stem cells in Parkinson's disease: A novel cell source of cell therapy and disease modeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Chen, Shengdi; Li, Jia-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are two novel cell sources for studying neurodegenerative diseases. Dopaminergic neurons derived from hiPSCs/hESCs have been implicated to be very useful in Parkinson's disease (PD) research, including cell replacement therapy, disease modeling and drug screening. Recently, great efforts have been made to improve the application of hiPSCs/hESCs in PD research. Considerable advances have been made in recent years, including advanced reprogramming strategies without the use of viruses or using fewer transcriptional factors, optimized methods for generating highly homogeneous neural progenitors with a larger proportion of mature dopaminergic neurons and better survival and integration after transplantation. Here we outline the progress that has been made in these aspects in recent years, particularly during the last year, and also discuss existing issues that need to be addressed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transport of chitosan microparticles for mucosal vaccine delivery in a human intestinal M-cell model.

    PubMed

    van der Lubben, I M; van Opdorp, F A C; Hengeveld, M R; Onderwater, J J M; Koerten, H K; Verhoef, J C; Borchard, G; Junginger, H E

    2002-09-01

    Uptake of particulate antigen carrier systems by specialized M-cells of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue is still a limiting step in inducing efficient immune responses after oral vaccination. Although transport of soluble drugs over the epithelial barrier of the gut is extensively studied in vitro by using the Caco-2 cell model, this was for long time not possible for particles due to the absence of M-cells. By co-culturing Caco-2 cells with cultured human B-lymphocytes (Raji-cells), cells which are morphologically and functionally similar to M-cells can be induced. This human M-cells model makes it possible to study the uptake of microparticles for oral vaccine delivery. In this way, chitosan microparticles, which have demonstrated to target the Peyer's patches efficiently in vivo, could be tested in vitro. The development of this M-cells model facilitates the optimization of the microparticles in order to target them even more efficiently to the M-cells in the gut. In this study, the integrity of the human M-cell model was investigated by determining the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), 14C-mannitol transport and morphology using scanning electron microscopy. The uptake of particles was investigated by measuring transport of both fluorescently labeled microspheres (Fluospheres) and chitosan microparticles using flowcytometry. No discontinuities or abnormalities could be found in the co-culture. Scanning electron microscopy showed that morphologically different cells were present in the human M-cell model. Both commercially available Fluospheres (size 0.2 microm) and chitosan microparticles (size 1.7 microm) for oral vaccine delivery were transported at a significantly higher amount by the human M-cell model compared to the transport by the Caco-2 cell monoculture. Since chitosan microparticles were proven to be taken up by Peyer's patches in mice as well, this human M-cell model is able to predict the M-cell uptake of microparticles for oral

  8. Lung endothelial cells strengthen, but brain endothelial cells weaken barrier properties of a human alveolar epithelium cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Winfried; Samwer, Fabian; Kunzmann, Steffen; Muellenbach, Ralf M; Wirth, Michael; Speer, Christian P; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola Y

    2012-11-01

    The blood-air barrier in the lung consists of the alveolar epithelium, the underlying capillary endothelium, their basement membranes and the interstitial space between the cell layers. Little is known about the interactions between the alveolar and the blood compartment. The aim of the present study was to gain first insights into the possible interplay between these two neighbored cell layers. We established an in vitro Transwell model of the alveolar epithelium based on human cell line H441 and investigated the influence of conditioned medium obtained from human lung endothelial cell line HPMEC-ST1.6R on the barrier properties of the H441 layers. As control for tissue specificity H441 layers were exposed to conditioned medium from human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Addition of dexamethasone was necessary to obtain stable H441 cell layers. Moreover, dexamethasone increased expression of cell type I markers (caveolin-1, RAGE) and cell type II marker SP-B, whereas decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in a concentration dependent manner. Soluble factors obtained from the lung endothelial cell line increased the barrier significantly proven by TEER values and fluorescein permeability on the functional level and by the differential expression of tight junctional proteins on the molecular level. In contrast to this, soluble factors derived from brain endothelial cells weakened the barrier significantly. In conclusion, soluble factors from lung endothelial cells can strengthen the alveolar epithelium barrier in vitro, which suggests communication between endothelial and epithelial cells regulating the integrity of the blood-air barrier.

  9. An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Carey L; Mahe, Maxime M; Múnera, Jorge; Howell, Jonathan C; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Poling, Holly M; Schweitzer, Jamie I; Vallance, Jefferson E; Mayhew, Christopher N; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Spence, Jason R; Shroyer, Noah F; Wells, James M; Helmrath, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into organ-specific subtypes offers an exciting avenue for the study of embryonic development and disease processes, for pharmacologic studies and as a potential resource for therapeutic transplant. To date, limited in vivo models exist for human intestine, all of which are dependent upon primary epithelial cultures or digested tissue from surgical biopsies that include mesenchymal cells transplanted on biodegradable scaffolds. Here, we generated human intestinal organoids (HIOs) produced in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can engraft in vivo. These HIOs form mature human intestinal epithelium with intestinal stem cells contributing to the crypt-villus architecture and a laminated human mesenchyme, both supported by mouse vasculature ingrowth. In vivo transplantation resulted in marked expansion and maturation of the epithelium and mesenchyme, as demonstrated by differentiated intestinal cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, tuft cells and enteroendocrine cells), presence of functional brush-border enzymes (lactase, sucrase-isomaltase and dipeptidyl peptidase 4) and visible subepithelial and smooth muscle layers when compared with HIOs in vitro. Transplanted intestinal tissues demonstrated digestive functions as shown by permeability and peptide uptake studies. Furthermore, transplanted HIO-derived tissue was responsive to systemic signals from the host mouse following ileocecal resection, suggesting a role for circulating factors in the intestinal adaptive response. This model of the human small intestine may pave the way for studies of intestinal physiology, disease and translational studies.

  10. Cultured Human Airway Epithelial Cells (Calu-3): A Model of Human Respiratory Function, Structure, and Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Chidekel, Aaron; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the application of the human airway Calu-3 cell line as a respiratory model for studying the effects of gas concentrations, exposure time, biophysical stress, and biological agents on human airway epithelial cells. Calu-3 cells are grown to confluence at an air-liquid interface on permeable supports. To model human respiratory conditions and treatment modalities, monolayers are placed in an environmental chamber, and exposed to specific levels of oxygen or other therapeutic modalities such as positive pressure and medications to assess the effect of interventions on inflammatory mediators, immunologic proteins, and antibacterial outcomes. Monolayer integrity and permeability and cell histology and viability also measure cellular response to therapeutic interventions. Calu-3 cells exposed to graded oxygen concentrations demonstrate cell dysfunction and inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Modeling positive airway pressure reveals that pressure may exert a greater injurious effect and cytokine response than oxygen. In experiments with pharmacological agents, Lucinactant is protective of Calu-3 cells compared with Beractant and control, and perfluorocarbons also protect against hyperoxia-induced airway epithelial cell injury. The Calu-3 cell preparation is a sensitive and efficient preclinical model to study human respiratory processes and diseases related to oxygen- and ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:20948883

  11. Development of human cell models for assessing the carcinogenic potential of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Pang Yaqin; Li Wenxue; Ma Rulin; Ji Weidong; Wang Qing; Li Daochuan; Xiao Yongmei; Wei Qing; Lai Yandong; Yang Ping; Chen Liping; Tang Shifu; Lin Yuchun; Zhuang Zhixiong; Zheng Yuxin; Chen Wen

    2008-11-01

    To develop human cell models for assessing the carcinogenic potential of chemicals, we established transgenic human cell lines and tested the sensitivity of known carcinogens using a cell transformation assay. A retroviral vector encoding an oncogenic allele of H-Ras (HBER) or c-Myc (HBEM) was introduced into human bronchial epithelial cells (HBE) immortalized by SV40 large T (LT) antigen, leading to increased cell proliferation but failing to confer a transformed phenotype characterized by anchorage-independent cell growth and tumor formation of immunodeficient mice. When these pre-transformed cells were treated with nickel sulfate (NiSO{sub 4}), we found that it shortened the latency of malignant transformation at least by 19 wk in HBER cells or 16 wk in HBEM cells compared to vector control cells. Similarly, the latency of cell transformation was shorter by 15 wk in HBER cells or 9 wk in HBEM cells when cells were treated with benzo(a)pyrenediol epoxide (BPDE). HBER cells appeared to be more sensitive to TPA, NiSO{sub 4} or BPDE-induced cell transformation compared to human embryonic kidney cells expressing H-Ras (HEKR), implying that cell-type specificity is one of important factors determining the effectiveness of the assay. Using AFB{sub 1} and BaP as the representative pro-carcinogens, we also compared the efficiency of three different metabolic conditions in mediating cell transformation. Low dose chemical induction seems to be a prospective system used for metabolic activation of pro-carcinogens. Our findings provided direct evidence that a genetically modified human cell transformation model can be applied to the assessment of potent carcinogens.

  12. Disease modeling using human induced pluripotent stem cells: Lessons from the liver☆

    PubMed Central

    Gieseck, Richard L.; Colquhoun, Jennifer; Hannan, Nicholas R.F.

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into any of the hundreds of distinct cell types that comprise the human body. This unique characteristic has resulted in considerable interest in the field of regenerative medicine, given the potential for these cells to be used to protect, repair, or replace diseased, injured, and aged cells within the human body. In addition to their potential in therapeutics, hPSCs can be used to study the earliest stages of human development and to provide a platform for both drug screening and disease modeling using human cells. Recently, the description of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) has allowed the field of disease modeling to become far more accessible and physiologically relevant, as pluripotent cells can be generated from patients of any genetic background. Disease models derived from hIPSCs that manifest cellular disease phenotypes have been established to study several monogenic diseases; furthermore, hIPSCs can be used for phenotype-based drug screens to investigate complex diseases for which the underlying genetic mechanism is unknown. As a result, the use of stem cells as research tools has seen an unprecedented growth within the last decade as researchers look for in vitro disease models which closely mimic in vivo responses in humans. Here, we discuss the beginnings of hPSCs, starting with isolation of human embryonic stem cells, moving into the development and optimization of hIPSC technology, and ending with the application of hIPSCs towards disease modeling and drug screening applications, with specific examples highlighting the modeling of inherited metabolic disorders of the liver. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics. PMID:24943800

  13. Disease modeling using human induced pluripotent stem cells: lessons from the liver.

    PubMed

    Gieseck, Richard L; Colquhoun, Jennifer; Hannan, Nicholas R F

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into any of the hundreds of distinct cell types that comprise the human body. This unique characteristic has resulted in considerable interest in the field of regenerative medicine, given the potential for these cells to be used to protect, repair, or replace diseased, injured, and aged cells within the human body. In addition to their potential in therapeutics, hPSCs can be used to study the earliest stages of human development and to provide a platform for both drug screening and disease modeling using human cells. Recently, the description of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) has allowed the field of disease modeling to become far more accessible and physiologically relevant, as pluripotent cells can be generated from patients of any genetic background. Disease models derived from hIPSCs that manifest cellular disease phenotypes have been established to study several monogenic diseases; furthermore, hIPSCs can be used for phenotype-based drug screens to investigate complex diseases for which the underlying genetic mechanism is unknown. As a result, the use of stem cells as research tools has seen an unprecedented growth within the last decade as researchers look for in vitro disease models which closely mimic in vivo responses in humans. Here, we discuss the beginnings of hPSCs, starting with isolation of human embryonic stem cells, moving into the development and optimization of hIPSC technology, and ending with the application of hIPSCs towards disease modeling and drug screening applications, with specific examples highlighting the modeling of inherited metabolic disorders of the liver. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells to model monogenic metabolic disorders of the liver.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Maria Paulina; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2012-11-01

    A crucial problem in liver disease biology and a major obstacle to the development of new therapies is the inability to conduct mechanistic studies of live human hepatocytes. Liver tissue from patients is difficult to obtain and only reveals the disease aftermath, while animal models lack the significant genetic diversity of humans. Monogenic metabolic disorders of the liver are an ideal platform to explore the complex gene-environment interactions and the role of genetic variation in the onset and progression of liver disease. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC) technology provides an unprecedented opportunity to generate live cellular models of disease for therapeutic candidate discovery and cell replacement therapy. In this review, we discuss the potential of hIPSC to increase our understanding of human disease with a focus on the current efforts to model metabolic diseases of the liver and to generate suitable populations of human hepatocytes for cell transplantation.

  15. Mathematical modeling of gap junction coupling and electrical activity in human β-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loppini, Alessandro; Braun, Matthias; Filippi, Simonetta; Gram Pedersen, Morten

    2015-12-01

    Coordinated insulin secretion is controlled by electrical coupling of pancreatic β-cells due to connexin-36 gap junctions. Gap junction coupling not only synchronizes the heterogeneous β-cell population, but can also modify the electrical behavior of the cells. These phenomena have been widely studied with mathematical models based on data from mouse β-cells. However, it is now known that human β-cell electrophysiology shows important differences to its rodent counterpart, and although human pancreatic islets express connexin-36 and show evidence of β-cell coupling, these aspects have been little investigated in human β-cells. Here we investigate theoretically, the gap junction coupling strength required for synchronizing electrical activity in a small cluster of cells simulated with a recent mathematical model of human β-cell electrophysiology. We find a lower limit for the coupling strength of approximately 20 pS (i.e., normalized to cell size, ˜2 pS pF-1) below which spiking electrical activity is asynchronous. To confront this theoretical lower bound with data, we use our model to estimate from an experimental patch clamp recording that the coupling strength is approximately 100-200 pS (10-20 pS pF-1), similar to previous estimates in mouse β-cells. We then investigate the role of gap junction coupling in synchronizing and modifying other forms of electrical activity in human β-cell clusters. We find that electrical coupling can prolong the period of rapid bursting electrical activity, and synchronize metabolically driven slow bursting, in particular when the metabolic oscillators are in phase. Our results show that realistic coupling conductances are sufficient to promote synchrony in small clusters of human β-cells as observed experimentally, and provide motivation for further detailed studies of electrical coupling in human pancreatic islets.

  16. An animal model of adult T-cell leukemia: humanized mice with HTLV-1-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Kenta; Xun, Runze; Tei, Mami; Ueno, Takaharu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-16

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy with a poor prognosis. To elucidate ATL pathogenesis in vivo, a variety of animal models have been established; however, the mechanisms driving this disorder remain poorly understood due to deficiencies in each of these animal models. Here, we report a novel HTLV-1-infected humanized mouse model generated by intra-bone marrow injection of human CD133(+) stem cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc null (NOG) mice (IBMI-huNOG mice). Upon infection, the number of CD4(+) human T cells in the periphery increased rapidly, and atypical lymphocytes with lobulated nuclei resembling ATL-specific flower cells were observed 4 to 5 months after infection. Proliferation was seen in both CD25(-) and CD25(+) CD4 T cells with identical proviral integration sites; however, a limited number of CD25(+)-infected T-cell clones eventually dominated, indicating an association between clonal selection of infected T cells and expression of CD25. Additionally, HTLV-1-specific adaptive immune responses were induced in infected mice and might be involved in the control of HTLV-1-infected cells. Thus, the HTLV-1-infected IBMI-huNOG mouse model successfully recapitulated the development of ATL and may serve as an important tool for investigating in vivo mechanisms of ATL leukemogenesis and evaluating anti-ATL drug and vaccine candidates.

  17. Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Improve Cardiac Perfusion in an Ovine Immunocompetent Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Victor; Sotelo, Veronica; Delfina, Valentina; Delgado, Natalia; Rodriguez, Carlos; Suanes, Carol; Langhain, María; Ferrando, Rodolfo; Keating, Armand; Benech, Alejandro; Touriño, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) hold considerable promise in the treatment of ischemic heart disease. Most preclinical studies of MSCs for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have been performed either in syngeneic animal models or with human cells in xenogeneic immunodeficient animals. A preferable pre-clinical model, however, would involve human MSCs in an immunocompetent animal. AMI was generated in adult sheep by inducing ischemia reperfusion of the second diagonal branch. Sheep (n = 10) were randomized to receive an intravenous injection of human MSCs (1 × 10(6) cells/kg) or phosphate buffered saline. Cardiac function and remodeling were evaluated with echocardiography. Perfusion scintigraphy was used to identify sustained myocardial ischemia. Interaction between human MSCs and ovine lymphocytes was assessed by a mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). Sheep receiving human MSCs showed significant improvement in myocardial perfusion at 1 month compared with baseline measurements. There was no change in ventricular dimensions in either group after 1 month of AMI. No adverse events or symptoms were observed in the sheep receiving human MSCs. The MLR was negative. The immunocompetent ovine AMI model demonstrates the clinical safety and efficacy of human MSCs. The human cells do not appear to be immunogenic, further suggesting that immunocompetent sheep may serve as a suitable pre-clinical large animal model for testing human MSCs.

  18. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Microencapsulated Human Pheochromocytoma Cell in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Li, Guoqi; Wu, Shaoling; Zhang, Baiyu; Wan, Qing; Yu, Ding; Zhou, Ruijun; Ma, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Human pheochromocytoma cells, which are demonstrated to contain and release met-enkephalin and norepinephrine, may be a promising resource for cell therapy in cancer-induced intractable pain. Intrathecal injection of alginate-poly (l) lysine-alginate (APA) microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells leads to antinociceptive effect in a rat model of bone cancer pain, and this effect was blocked by opioid antagonist naloxone and alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist rauwolscine. Neurochemical changes of cerebrospinal fluid are in accordance with the analgesic responses. Taken together, these data support that human pheochromocytoma cell implant-induced antinociception was mediated by met-enkephalin and norepinephrine secreted from the cell implants and acting at spinal receptors. Spinal implantation of microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells may provide an alternative approach for the therapy of chronic intractable pain. PMID:25007069

  19. Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

  20. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells: A Novel Source for Modeling of Human Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Ivana; Provenzano, Martina; Rodrigues, Melissa; Pantalone, Andrea; Salini, Vincenzo; Ballerini, Patrizia; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Stuppia, Liborio

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been devoted to the use of Induced Pluripotent Stem cells (iPS) for modeling of human genetic diseases, due to the possibility of reprogramming somatic cells of affected patients into pluripotent cells, enabling differentiation into several cell types, and allowing investigations into the molecular mechanisms of the disease. However, the protocol of iPS generation still suffers from technical limitations, showing low efficiency, being expensive and time consuming. Amniotic Fluid Stem cells (AFS) represent a potential alternative novel source of stem cells for modeling of human genetic diseases. In fact, by means of prenatal diagnosis, a number of fetuses affected by chromosomal or Mendelian diseases can be identified, and the amniotic fluid collected for genetic testing can be used, after diagnosis, for the isolation, culture and differentiation of AFS cells. This can provide a useful stem cell model for the investigation of the molecular basis of the diagnosed disease without the necessity of producing iPS, since AFS cells show some features of pluripotency and are able to differentiate in cells derived from all three germ layers “in vitro”. In this article, we describe the potential benefits provided by using AFS cells in the modeling of human genetic diseases. PMID:27110774

  1. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells: A Novel Source for Modeling of Human Genetic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Ivana; Provenzano, Martina; Rodrigues, Melissa; Pantalone, Andrea; Salini, Vincenzo; Ballerini, Patrizia; Borlongan, Cesar V; Stuppia, Liborio

    2016-04-22

    In recent years, great interest has been devoted to the use of Induced Pluripotent Stem cells (iPS) for modeling of human genetic diseases, due to the possibility of reprogramming somatic cells of affected patients into pluripotent cells, enabling differentiation into several cell types, and allowing investigations into the molecular mechanisms of the disease. However, the protocol of iPS generation still suffers from technical limitations, showing low efficiency, being expensive and time consuming. Amniotic Fluid Stem cells (AFS) represent a potential alternative novel source of stem cells for modeling of human genetic diseases. In fact, by means of prenatal diagnosis, a number of fetuses affected by chromosomal or Mendelian diseases can be identified, and the amniotic fluid collected for genetic testing can be used, after diagnosis, for the isolation, culture and differentiation of AFS cells. This can provide a useful stem cell model for the investigation of the molecular basis of the diagnosed disease without the necessity of producing iPS, since AFS cells show some features of pluripotency and are able to differentiate in cells derived from all three germ layers "in vitro". In this article, we describe the potential benefits provided by using AFS cells in the modeling of human genetic diseases.

  2. Large-scale in silico modeling of metabolic interactions between cell types in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nathan E; Schramm, Gunnar; Bordbar, Aarash; Schellenberger, Jan; Andersen, Michael P; Cheng, Jeffrey K; Patel, Nilam; Yee, Alex; Lewis, Randall A; Eils, Roland; König, Rainer; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2010-12-01

    Metabolic interactions between multiple cell types are difficult to model using existing approaches. Here we present a workflow that integrates gene expression data, proteomics data and literature-based manual curation to model human metabolism within and between different types of cells. Transport reactions are used to account for the transfer of metabolites between models of different cell types via the interstitial fluid. We apply the method to create models of brain energy metabolism that recapitulate metabolic interactions between astrocytes and various neuron types relevant to Alzheimer's disease. Analysis of the models identifies genes and pathways that may explain observed experimental phenomena, including the differential effects of the disease on cell types and regions of the brain. Constraint-based modeling can thus contribute to the study and analysis of multicellular metabolic processes in the human tissue microenvironment and provide detailed mechanistic insight into high-throughput data analysis.

  3. Human pluripotent stem cells as tools for neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disease modeling and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Corti, Stefania; Faravelli, Irene; Cardano, Marina; Conti, Luciano

    2015-06-01

    Although intensive efforts have been made, effective treatments for neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases have not been yet discovered. Possible reasons for this include the lack of appropriate disease models of human neurons and a limited understanding of the etiological and neurobiological mechanisms. Recent advances in pluripotent stem cell (PSC) research have now opened the path to the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) starting from somatic cells, thus offering an unlimited source of patient-specific disease-relevant neuronal cells. In this review, the authors focus on the use of human PSC-derived cells in modeling neurological disorders and discovering of new drugs and provide their expert perspectives on the field. The advent of human iPSC-based disease models has fuelled renewed enthusiasm and enormous expectations for insights of disease mechanisms and identification of more disease-relevant and novel molecular targets. Human PSCs offer a unique tool that is being profitably exploited for high-throughput screening (HTS) platforms. This process can lead to the identification and optimization of molecules/drugs and thus move forward new pharmacological therapies for a wide range of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental conditions. It is predicted that improvements in the production of mature neuronal subtypes, from patient-specific human-induced pluripotent stem cells and their adaptation to culture, to HTS platforms will allow the increased exploitation of human pluripotent stem cells in drug discovery programs.

  4. Survival and differentiation of transplanted neural stem cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells in a rat stroke model.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Matthew B; Yan, Hongmei; Krishnaney-Davison, Rajeev; Al Sawaf, Abdullah; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2013-05-01

    Although administration of various stem cells has shown promise in stroke models, neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have advantages over other cell types. We studied whether these cells could survive, differentiate, and improve stroke recovery in an ischemic stroke model. Human iPSCs were induced in vitro to an early NSC stage. One week after focal cerebral ischemia, 20 rats received cells or vehicle by intracerebral injection. Graft cell fate, infarct volume, and behavioral deficits were assessed. Graft cells were found in 8 of the transplanted rats (80%), with estimated mean graft cell numbers nearly double the amount transplanted 1 month later. Graft cells also expressed markers of NSCs in 5 rats (63%), neurons in all 8 rats (100%), rare astrocytes in 4 rats (50%), and signs of proliferation in 4 rats (50%), but no tumor formation was observed. Stroke volume and behavioral recovery were similar between the groups. To our knowledge, this is the first report of transplantation of NSCs derived from human iPSCs in a stroke model. Human iPSC-derived NSCs survived in the postischemic rat brain and appeared to differentiate, primarily into neurons. This cell transplantation approach for stroke appears to be feasible, but further optimization is needed. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A severe combined immunodeficient-hu in vivo mouse model of human primary mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Michael; Zhang, Liang; Han, Xiaohong; Yang, Jing; Qian, Jianfei; Hong, Sungyoul; Lin, Pei; Shi, Yuankai; Romaguera, Jorge; Kwak, Larry W; Yi, Qing

    2008-04-01

    To establish a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-hu in vivo mouse model of human primary mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) for the study of the biology and novel therapy of human MCL. Primary MCL cells were isolated from spleen, lymph node, bone marrow aspirates, or peripheral blood of six different patients and injected respectively into human bone chips, which had been s.c. implanted in SCID-hu. Circulating human beta(2)-microglobulin in mouse serum was used to monitor the engraftment and growth of patient's MCL cells. H&E staining and immunohistochemical staining with anti-human CD20 and cyclin D1 antibodies were used to confirm the tumor growth and migration. Increasing levels of circulating human beta(2)-microglobulin in mouse serum indicated that the patient's MCL cells were engrafted successfully into human bone chip of SCID-hu mice. The engraftment and growth of patient's MCL cells were dependent on human bone marrow microenvironment. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-human CD20 and cyclin D1 antibodies confirmed that patient's MCL cells were able to not only survive and propagate in the bone marrow microenvironment of the human fetal bone chips, but also similar to the human disease, migrate to lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and gastrointestinal tract of host mice. Treatment of MCL-bearing SCID-hu mice with atiprimod, a novel antitumor compound against the protection of bone marrow stromal cells, induced tumor regression. This is the first human primary MCL animal model that should be useful for the biological and therapeutic research on MCL.

  6. Modeling inherited metabolic disorders of the liver using human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, S. Tamir; Corbineau, Sebastien; Hannan, Nick; Marciniak, Stefan J.; Miranda, Elena; Alexander, Graeme; Huang-Doran, Isabel; Griffin, Julian; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars; Skepper, Jeremy; Semple, Robert; Weber, Anne; Lomas, David A.; Vallier, Ludovic

    2010-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells hold great promise for advancements in developmental biology, cell-based therapy, and modeling of human disease. Here, we examined the use of human iPS cells for modeling inherited metabolic disorders of the liver. Dermal fibroblasts from patients with various inherited metabolic diseases of the liver were used to generate a library of patient-specific human iPS cell lines. Each line was differentiated into hepatocytes using what we believe to be a novel 3-step differentiation protocol in chemically defined conditions. The resulting cells exhibited properties of mature hepatocytes, such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 metabolism. Moreover, cells generated from patients with 3 of the inherited metabolic conditions studied in further detail (α1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial hypercholesterolemia, and glycogen storage disease type 1a) were found to recapitulate key pathological features of the diseases affecting the patients from which they were derived, such as aggregation of misfolded α1-antitrypsin in the endoplasmic reticulum, deficient LDL receptor–mediated cholesterol uptake, and elevated lipid and glycogen accumulation. Therefore, we report a simple and effective platform for hepatocyte generation from patient-specific human iPS cells. These patient-derived hepatocytes demonstrate that it is possible to model diseases whose phenotypes are caused by pathological dysregulation of key processes within adult cells. PMID:20739751

  7. Derivation of Neural Stem Cells from Human Adult Peripheral CD34+ Cells for an Autologous Model of Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongguang; Choi, Elliot; Monaco, Maria Chiara G.; Campanac, Emilie; Medynets, Marie; Do, Thao; Rao, Prashant; Johnson, Kory R.; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Von Geldern, Gloria; Johnson, Tory; Subramaniam, Sriram; Hoffman, Dax; Major, Eugene; Nath, Avindra

    2013-01-01

    Proinflammatory factors from activated T cells inhibit neurogenesis in adult animal brain and cultured human fetal neural stem cells (NSC). However, the role of inhibition of neurogenesis in human neuroinflammatory diseases is still uncertain because of the difficulty in obtaining adult NSC from patients. Recent developments in cell reprogramming suggest that NSC may be derived directly from adult fibroblasts. We generated NSC from adult human peripheral CD34+ cells by transfecting the cells with Sendai virus constructs containing Sox2, Oct3/4, c-Myc and Klf4. The derived NSC could be differentiated to glial cells and action potential firing neurons. Co-culturing NSC with activated autologous T cells or treatment with recombinant granzyme B caused inhibition of neurogenesis as indicated by decreased NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Thus, we have established a unique autologous in vitro model to study the pathophysiology of neuroinflammatory diseases that has potential for usage in personalized medicine. PMID:24303066

  8. Characterization of human follicular thyroid cancer cell lines in preclinical mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, Ashley N; Ziegler, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) is the second most common type of thyroid cancers. In order to develop more effective personalized therapies, it is necessary to thoroughly evaluate patient-derived cell lines in in vivo preclinical models before using them to test new, targeted therapies. This study evaluates the tumorigenic and metastatic potential of a panel of three human FTC cell lines (WRO, FTC-238, and TT1609-CO2) with defined genetic mutations in two in vivo murine models: an orthotopic thyroid cancer model to study tumor progression and a tail vein injection model to study metastasis. All cell lines developed tumors in the orthotopic model, with take rates of 100%. Notably, WRO-derived tumors grew two to four times faster than tumors arising from the FTC-238 and TT2609-CO2 cell lines. These results mirrored those of a tail vein injection model for lung metastasis: one hundred percent of mice injected with WRO cells in the tail vein exhibited aggressive growth of bilateral lung metastases within 35 days. In contrast, tail vein injection of FTC-238 or TT2609-CO2 cells did not result in lung metastasis. Together, our work demonstrates that these human FTC cell lines display highly varied tumorigenic and metastatic potential in vivo with WRO being the most aggressive cell line in both orthotopic and lung metastasis models. This information will be valuable when selecting cell lines for preclinical drug testing. PMID:26830329

  9. Modelling human development and disease in pluripotent stem-cell-derived gastric organoids.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Kyle W; Catá, Emily M; Crawford, Calyn M; Sinagoga, Katie L; Schumacher, Michael; Rockich, Briana E; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Mayhew, Christopher N; Spence, Jason R; Zavros, Yana; Wells, James M

    2014-12-18

    Gastric diseases, including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, affect 10% of the world's population and are largely due to chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. Species differences in embryonic development and architecture of the adult stomach make animal models suboptimal for studying human stomach organogenesis and pathogenesis, and there is no experimental model of normal human gastric mucosa. Here we report the de novo generation of three-dimensional human gastric tissue in vitro through the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. We show that temporal manipulation of the FGF, WNT, BMP, retinoic acid and EGF signalling pathways and three-dimensional growth are sufficient to generate human gastric organoids (hGOs). Developing hGOs progressed through molecular and morphogenetic stages that were nearly identical to the developing antrum of the mouse stomach. Organoids formed primitive gastric gland- and pit-like domains, proliferative zones containing LGR5-expressing cells, surface and antral mucous cells, and a diversity of gastric endocrine cells. We used hGO cultures to identify novel signalling mechanisms that regulate early endoderm patterning and gastric endocrine cell differentiation upstream of the transcription factor NEUROG3. Using hGOs to model pathogenesis of human disease, we found that H. pylori infection resulted in rapid association of the virulence factor CagA with the c-Met receptor, activation of signalling and induction of epithelial proliferation. Together, these studies describe a new and robust in vitro system for elucidating the mechanisms underlying human stomach development and disease.

  10. Validation of Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells as a Model for Influenza A Infections in Human Distal Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A. Sally; Chertow, Daniel S.; Moyer, Jenna E.; Suzich, Jon; Sandouk, Aline; Dorward, David W.; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Primary normal human bronchial/tracheal epithelial (NHBE) cells, derived from the distal-most aspect of the trachea at the bifurcation, have been used for a number of studies in respiratory disease research. Differences between the source tissue and the differentiated primary cells may impact infection studies based on this model. Therefore, we examined how well-differentiated NHBE cells compared with their source tissue, the human distal trachea, as well as the ramifications of these differences on influenza A viral pathogenesis research using this model. We employed a histological analysis including morphological measurements, electron microscopy, multi-label immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, lectin histochemistry, and microarray expression analysis to compare differentiated NHBEs to human distal tracheal epithelium. Pseudostratified epithelial height, cell type variety and distribution varied significantly. Electron microscopy confirmed differences in cellular attachment and paracellular junctions. Influenza receptor lectin histochemistry revealed that α2,3 sialic acids were rarely present on the apical aspect of the differentiated NHBE cells, but were present in low numbers in the distal trachea. We bound fluorochrome bioconjugated virus to respiratory tissue and NHBE cells and infected NHBE cells with human influenza A viruses. Both indicated that the pattern of infection progression in these cells correlated with autopsy studies of fatal cases from the 2009 pandemic. PMID:25604814

  11. Restorative effect of hair follicular dermal cells on injured human hair follicles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamao, Mikaru; Inamatsu, Mutsumi; Okada, Taro; Ogawa, Yuko; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2015-03-01

    No model is available for examining whether in vivo-damaged human hair follicles (hu-HFs) are rescued by transplanting cultured hu-HF dermal cells (dermal papilla and dermal sheath cells). Such a model might be valuable for examining whether in vivo-damaged hu-HFs such as miniaturized hu-HFs in androgenic alopecia are improvable by auto-transplanting hu-HF dermal cells. In this study, we first developed mice with humanized skin composed of hu-keratinocytes and hu-dermal fibroblasts. Then, a 'humanized scalp model mouse' was generated by transplanting hu-scalp HFs into the humanized skin. To demonstrate the usability of the model, the lower halves of the hu-HFs in the model were amputated in situ, and cultured hu-HF dermal cells were injected around the amputated area. The results demonstrated that the transplanted cells contributed to the restoration of the damaged HFs. This model could be used to explore clinically effective technologies for hair restoration therapy by autologous cell transplantation.

  12. Establishment of a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Su, G; Cai, S J; Gong, X; Wang, L L; Li, H H; Wang, L M

    2016-06-24

    To establish a blue-light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fourth-generation human RPE cells were randomly divided into two groups. In group A, cells were exposed to blue light (2000 ± 500 lux) for 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h, and cell culture was stopped after 12 h. In group B, cells were exposed to blue light at the same intensity and time periods, but cell culture was stopped after 24 h. TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to determine the most suitable illuminating time with apoptotic index. Flow cytometry was used to determine apoptotic ratio of RPEs. In group A, the apoptotic index of cells that received 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light was higher than that of control. The apoptotic index of cells receiving 9 and 12 h was higher than that of 6 h (P = 0.000). In group B, the apoptotic index and RPE cell apoptosis ratio of cells exposed to 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light were higher than that of 3 h (P = 0.000); and cells receiving 9 and 12 h had higher values than that of 6 h. This study demonstrated that the best conditions to establish a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro are 2000 ± 500 lux light intensity for 6 h, with 24 h of cell culture post-exposure.

  13. Large animal induced pluripotent stem cells as pre-clinical models for studying human disease.

    PubMed

    Plews, Jordan R; Gu, Mingxia; Longaker, Michael T; Wu, Joseph C

    2012-06-01

    The path to induced pluripotency Discovery of a pan-species pluripotency network Animal iPSCs and disease modelling Issues with large animal iPSCs Conclusions The derivation of human embryonic stem cells and subsequently human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has energized regenerative medicine research and enabled seemingly limitless applications. Although small animal models, such as mouse models, have played an important role in the progression of the field, typically, they are poor representations of the human disease phenotype. As an alternative, large animal models should be explored as a potentially better approach for clinical translation of cellular therapies. However, only fragmented information regarding the derivation, characterization and clinical usefulness of pluripotent large animal cells is currently available. Here, we briefly review the latest advances regarding the derivation and use of large animal iPSCs. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Using the BLT humanized mouse as a stem cell based gene therapy tumor model.

    PubMed

    Vatakis, Dimitrios N; Bristol, Gregory C; Kim, Sohn G; Levin, Bernard; Liu, Wei; Radu, Caius G; Kitchen, Scott G; Zack, Jerome A

    2012-12-18

    Small animal models such as mice have been extensively used to study human disease and to develop new therapeutic interventions. Despite the wealth of information gained from these studies, the unique characteristics of mouse immunity as well as the species specificity of viral diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to the development of humanized mouse models. The earlier models involved the use of C. B 17 scid/scid mice and the transplantation of human fetal thymus and fetal liver termed thy/liv (SCID-hu) (1, 2) or the adoptive transfer of human peripheral blood leukocytes (SCID-huPBL) (3). Both models were mainly utilized for the study of HIV infection. One of the main limitations of both of these models was the lack of stable reconstitution of human immune cells in the periphery to make them a more physiologically relevant model to study HIV disease. To this end, the BLT humanized mouse model was developed. BLT stands for bone marrow/liver/thymus. In this model, 6 to 8 week old NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) immunocompromised mice receive the thy/liv implant as in the SCID-hu mouse model only to be followed by a second human hematopoietic stem cell transplant (4). The advantage of this system is the full reconstitution of the human immune system in the periphery. This model has been used to study HIV infection and latency (5-8). We have generated a modified version of this model in which we use genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) to construct the thy/liv implant followed by injection of transduced autologous hHSC (7, 9). This approach results in the generation of genetically modified lineages. More importantly, we adapted this system to examine the potential of generating functional cytotoxic T cells (CTL) expressing a melanoma specific T cell receptor. Using this model we were able to assess the functionality of our transgenic CTL utilizing live positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to determine

  15. Using the BLT Humanized Mouse as a Stem Cell based Gene Therapy Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Vatakis, Dimitrios N.; Bristol, Gregory C.; Kim, Sohn G.; Levin, Bernard; Liu, Wei; Radu, Caius G.; Kitchen, Scott G.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2012-01-01

    Small animal models such as mice have been extensively used to study human disease and to develop new therapeutic interventions. Despite the wealth of information gained from these studies, the unique characteristics of mouse immunity as well as the species specificity of viral diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to the development of humanized mouse models. The earlier models involved the use of C. B 17 scid/scid mice and the transplantation of human fetal thymus and fetal liver termed thy/liv (SCID-hu) 1, 2 or the adoptive transfer of human peripheral blood leukocytes (SCID-huPBL) 3. Both models were mainly utilized for the study of HIV infection. One of the main limitations of both of these models was the lack of stable reconstitution of human immune cells in the periphery to make them a more physiologically relevant model to study HIV disease. To this end, the BLT humanized mouse model was developed. BLT stands for bone marrow/liver/thymus. In this model, 6 to 8 week old NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) immunocompromised mice receive the thy/liv implant as in the SCID-hu mouse model only to be followed by a second human hematopoietic stem cell transplant 4. The advantage of this system is the full reconstitution of the human immune system in the periphery. This model has been used to study HIV infection and latency 5-8. We have generated a modified version of this model in which we use genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) to construct the thy/liv implant followed by injection of transduced autologous hHSC 7, 9. This approach results in the generation of genetically modified lineages. More importantly, we adapted this system to examine the potential of generating functional cytotoxic T cells (CTL) expressing a melanoma specific T cell receptor. Using this model we were able to assess the functionality of our transgenic CTL utilizing live positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to determine tumor

  16. Stem cells on the brain: modeling neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases using human iPSCs

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Priya; Young-Pearse, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Seven years have passed since the initial report of the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from adult humans, and in the intervening time the field of neuroscience has developed numerous disease models using this technology. Here, we review the progress in the field, and describe both the advantages and potential pitfalls of modeling neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases using this technology. PMID:24628482

  17. An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Carey L; Mahe, Maxime M; Múnera, Jorge; Howell, Jonathan C; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Poling, Holly M; Schweitzer, Jamie I; Vallance, Jefferson E; Mayhew, Christopher N; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Spence, Jason R; Shroyer, Noah F; Wells, James M; Helmrath, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into organ-specific subtypes offers an exciting avenue for the study of embryonic development and disease processes, for pharmacologic studies and as a potential resource for therapeutic transplant1,2. To date, limited in vivo models exist for human intestine, all of which are dependent upon primary epithelial cultures or digested tissue from surgical biopsies that include mesenchymal cells transplanted on biodegradable scaffolds3,4. Here, we generated human intestinal organoids (HIOs) produced in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)5,6 that can engraft in vivo. These HIOs form mature human intestinal epithelium with intestinal stem cells contributing to the cryptvillus architecture and a laminated human mesenchyme, both supported by mouse vasculature ingrowth. In vivo transplantation resulted in marked expansion and maturation of the epithelium and mesenchyme, as demonstrated by differentiated intestinal cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, tuft cells and enteroendocrine cells), presence of functional brush-border enzymes (lactase, sucrase-isomaltase and dipeptidyl peptidase 4) and visible subepithelial and smooth muscle layers when compared with HIOs in vitro. Transplanted intestinal tissues demonstrated digestive functions as shown by permeability and peptide uptake studies. Furthermore, transplanted HIO-derived tissue was responsive to systemic signals from the host mouse following ileocecal resection, suggesting a role for circulating factors in the intestinal adaptive response7–9. This model of the human small intestine may pave the way for studies of intestinal physiology, disease and translational studies. PMID:25326803

  18. Human cancer classification: a systems biology- based model integrating morphology, cancer stem cells, proteomics, and genomics.

    PubMed

    Idikio, Halliday A

    2011-02-22

    Human cancer classification is currently based on the idea of cell of origin, light and electron microscopic attributes of the cancer. What is not yet integrated into cancer classification are the functional attributes of these cancer cells. Recent innovative techniques in biology have provided a wealth of information on the genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in cancer cells. The emergence of the concept of cancer stem cells needs to be included in a classification model to capture the known attributes of cancer stem cells and their potential contribution to treatment response, and metastases. The integrated model of cancer classification presented here incorporates all morphology, cancer stem cell contributions, genetic, and functional attributes of cancer. Integrated cancer classification models could eliminate the unclassifiable cancers as used in current classifications. Future cancer treatment may be advanced by using an integrated model of cancer classification.

  19. T Cell-Mediated Rejection of Human CD34(+) Cells Is Prevented by Costimulatory Blockade in a Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Oh, Annie L; Mahmud, Dolores; Nicolini, Benedetta; Mahmud, Nadim; Senyuk, Vitalyi; Patel, Pritesh R; Bonetti, Elisa; Arpinati, Mario; Ferrara, James L M; Rondelli, Damiano

    2017-08-14

    A xenograft model of stem cell rejection was developed by co-transplantating human CD34(+) and allogeneic CD3(+) T cells into NOD-scid ɣ-chain(null) mice. T cells caused graft failure when transplanted at any CD34/CD3 ratio between 1:50 and 1:.1. Kinetics experiments showed that 2 weeks after transplantation CD34(+) cells engrafted the marrow and T cells expanded in the spleen. Then, at 4 weeks only memory T cells populated both sites and rejected CD34(+) cells. Blockade of T cell costimulation was tested by injecting the mice with abatacept (CTLA4-IgG1) from day -1 to +27 (group A), from day -1 to +13 (group B), or from day +14 to +28 (group C). On day +56 groups B and C had rejected the graft, whereas in group A graft failure was completely prevented, although with lower stem cell engraftment than in controls (P = .03). Retransplantation of group A mice with same CD34(+) cells obtained a complete reconstitution of human myeloid and B cell lineages and excluded latent alloreactivity. In this first xenograft model of stem cell rejection we showed that transplantation of HLA mismatched CD34(+) cells may be facilitated by treatment with abatacept and late stem cell boost. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A suspended carbon fiber culture to model myelination by human Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Merolli, Antonio; Mao, Yong; Kohn, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Understanding of myelination/remyelination process is essential to guide tissue engineering for nerve regeneration. In vitro models currently used are limited to cell population studies and cannot easily identify individual cell contribution to the process. We established a novel model to study the contribution of human Schwann cells to the myelination process. The model avoids the presence of neurons in culture; Schwann cells respond solely to the biophysical properties of an artificial axon. The model uses a single carbon fiber suspended in culture media far from the floor of the well. The fiber provides an elongated structure of defined diameter with 360-degree of surface available for human Schwann cells to wrap around. This model enabled us to spatially and temporally track the myelination by individual Schwann cells along the fiber. We observed cell attachment, elongation and wrapping over a period of 9 days. Cells remained alive and expressed Myelin Basic Protein and Myelin Associated Glycoprotein as expected. Natural and artificial molecules, and external physical factors (e.g., p atterned electrical impulses), may be tested with this model as possible regulators of myelination.

  1. Human amniotic fluid stem cells as a model for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Margit; Dolznig, Helmut; Schipany, Katharina; Mikula, Mario; Brandau, Oliver; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    functions in AFS cells was established. Since AFS cells are not tumorigenic, gene modulations not only allow to investigate the role of endogenous genes involved in human genetic diseases but also may help to reveal putative oncogenic gene functions in different biological models, both in vitro and in vivo. This concept is discussed and a "proof of principle", already obtained via modulating genes involved in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in AFS cells, is presented.

  2. Reperfusion injury intensifies the adaptive human T cell alloresponse in a human-mouse chimeric artery model.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tai; Fogal, Birgit; Hao, Zhengrong; Tobiasova, Zuzana; Wang, Chen; Rao, Deepak A; Al-Lamki, Rafia S; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy C; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Bradley, John R; Bothwell, Alfred L M; Sessa, William C; Tellides, George; Pober, Jordan S

    2012-02-01

    Perioperative nonimmune injuries to an allograft can decrease graft survival. We have developed a model for studying this process using human materials. Human artery segments were transplanted as infrarenal aortic interposition grafts into an immunodeficient mouse host, allowed to "heal in" for 30 days, and then retransplanted into a second mouse host. To induce a reperfusion injury, the healed-in artery segments were incubated for 3 hours under hypoxic conditions ex vivo before retransplantation. To induce immunologic rejection, the animals receiving the retransplanted artery segment were adoptively transferred with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or purified T cells from a donor allogeneic to the artery 1 week before surgery. To compare rejection of injured versus healthy tissues, these manipulations were combined. Results were analyzed ex vivo by histology, morphometry, immunohistochemistry, and mRNA quantitation or in vivo by ultrasound. Our results showed that reperfusion injury, which otherwise heals with minimal sequelae, intensifies the degree of allogeneic T cell-mediated injury to human artery segments. We developed a new human-mouse chimeric model demonstrating interactions of reperfusion injury and alloimmunity using human cells and tissues that may be adapted to study other forms of nonimmune injury and other types of adaptive immune responses.

  3. Human Muse Cells Reconstruct Neuronal Circuitry in Subacute Lacunar Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hiroki; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Wakao, Shohei; Tominaga, Teiji; Borlongan, Cesario V; Dezawa, Mari

    2017-02-01

    Multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (muse) cells are endogenous nontumorigenic stem cells with pluripotency harvestable as pluripotent marker SSEA-3(+) cells from the bone marrow from cultured bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells. After transplantation into neurological disease models, muse cells exert repair effects, but the exact mechanism remains inconclusive. We conducted mechanism-based experiments by transplanting serum/xeno-free cultured-human bone marrow-muse cells into the perilesion brain at 2 weeks after lacunar infarction in immunodeficient mice. Approximately 28% of initially transplanted muse cells remained in the host brain at 8 weeks, spontaneously differentiated into cells expressing NeuN (≈62%), MAP2 (≈30%), and GST-pi (≈12%). Dextran tracing revealed connections between host neurons and muse cells at the lesioned motor cortex and the anterior horn. Muse cells extended neurites through the ipsilateral pyramidal tract, crossed to contralateral side, and reached to the pyramidal tract in the dorsal funiculus of spinal cord. Muse-transplanted stroke mice displayed significant recovery in cylinder tests, which was reverted by the human-selective diphtheria toxin. At 10 months post-transplantation, human-specific Alu sequence was detected only in the brain but not in other organs, with no evidence of tumor formation. Transplantation at the delayed subacute phase showed muse cells differentiated into neural cells, facilitated neural reconstruction, improved functions, and displayed solid safety outcomes over prolonged graft maturation period, indicating their therapeutic potential for lacunar stroke. © 2016 The Authors.

  4. A human intestinal M-cell-like model for investigating particle, antigen and microorganism translocation.

    PubMed

    Beloqui, Ana; Brayden, David J; Artursson, Per; Préat, Véronique; des Rieux, Anne

    2017-07-01

    The specialized microfold cells (M cells) in the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) of intestinal Peyer's patches serve as antigen-sampling cells of the intestinal innate immune system. Unlike 'classical' enterocytes, they are able to translocate diverse particulates without digesting them. They act as pathways for microorganism invasion and mediate food tolerance by transcellular transport of intestinal microbiota and antigens. Their ability to transcytose intact particles can be used to develop oral drug delivery and oral immunization strategies. This protocol describes a reproducible and versatile human M-cell-like in vitro model. This model can be exploited to evaluate M-cell transport of microparticles and nanoparticles for protein, drug or vaccine delivery and to study bacterial adherence and translocation across M cells. The inverted in vitro M-cell model consists of three main steps. First, Caco-2 cells are seeded at the apical side of the inserts. Second, the inserts are inverted and B lymphocytes are seeded at the basolateral side of the inserts. Third, the conversion to M cells is assessed. Although various M-cell culture systems exist, this model provides several advantages over the rest: (i) it is based on coculture with well-established differentiated human cell lines; (ii) it is reproducible under the conditions described herein; (iii) it can be easily mastered; and (iv) it does not require the isolation of primary cells or the use of animals. The protocol requires skills in cell culture and microscopy analysis. The model is obtained after 3 weeks, and transport experiments across the differentiated model can be carried out over periods of up to 10 h.

  5. A Stable and Reproducible Human Blood-Brain Barrier Model Derived from Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sevin, Emmanuel; Almeida, Catarina; Culot, Maxime; Dehouck, Lucie; Coisne, Caroline; Engelhardt, Britta; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Ferreira, Lino

    2014-01-01

    The human blood brain barrier (BBB) is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs), which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS) from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs) express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes. PMID:24936790

  6. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna; Shoaie, Saeed; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted 85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25640694

  7. Cytotoxicity evaluation of large cyanobacterial strain set using selected human and murine in vitro cell models.

    PubMed

    Hrouzek, Pavel; Kapuścik, Aleksandra; Vacek, Jan; Voráčová, Kateřina; Paichlová, Jindřiška; Kosina, Pavel; Voloshko, Ludmila; Ventura, Stefano; Kopecký, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The production of cytotoxic molecules interfering with mammalian cells is extensively reported in cyanobacteria. These compounds may have a use in pharmacological applications; however, their potential toxicity needs to be considered. We performed cytotoxicity tests of crude cyanobacterial extracts in six cell models in order to address the frequency of cyanobacterial cytotoxicity to human cells and the level of specificity to a particular cell line. A set of more than 100 cyanobacterial crude extracts isolated from soil habitats (mainly genera Nostoc and Tolypothrix) was tested by MTT test for in vitro toxicity on the hepatic and non-hepatic human cell lines HepG2 and HeLa, and three cell systems of rodent origin: Yac-1, Sp-2 and Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts. Furthermore, a subset of the extracts was assessed for cytotoxicity against primary cultures of human hepatocytes as a model for evaluating potential hepatotoxicity. Roughly one third of cyanobacterial extracts caused cytotoxic effects (i.e. viability<75%) on human cell lines. Despite the sensitivity differences, high correlation coefficients among the inhibition values were obtained for particular cell systems. This suggests a prevailing general cytotoxic effect of extracts and their constituents. The non-transformed immortalized fibroblasts (Balb/c 3T3) and hepatic cancer line HepG2 exhibited good correlations with primary cultures of human hepatocytes. The presence of cytotoxic fractions in strongly cytotoxic extracts was confirmed by an activity-guided HPLC fractionation, and it was demonstrated that cyanobacterial cytotoxicity is caused by a mixture of components with similar hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties. The data presented here could be used in further research into in vitro testing based on human models for the toxicological monitoring of complex cyanobacterial samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons as a model for Cerebral Toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naomi; Ashour, Danah; Dratz, Edward; Halonen, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous protozoan parasite with approximately one-third of the worlds' population chronically infected. In chronically infected individuals, the parasite resides primarily in cysts within neurons in the central nervous system. The chronic infection in immunocompetent individuals has been considered to be asymptomatic but increasing evidence indicates the chronic infection can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders such as Schizophrenia, prenatal depression and suicidal thoughts. A better understanding of the mechanism(s) by which the parasite exerts effects on human behavior is limited due to lack of suitable human neuronal models. In this paper, we report the use of human neurons derived from normal cord blood CD34+ cells generated via genetic reprogramming, as an in vitro model for the study T. gondii in neurons. This culture method resulted in a relatively pure monolayer of induced human neuronal-like cells that stained positive for neuronal markers, MAP2, NFL, NFH and NeuN. These induced human neuronal-like cells (iHNs) were efficiently infected by the Prugniad strain of the parasite and supported replication of the tachyzoite stage and development of the cyst stage. Infected iHNs could be maintained through 5 days of infection, allowing for formation of large cysts. This induced human neuronal model represents a novel culture method to study both tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages of T. gondii in human neurons. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. [Establishment of human infancy hemangioma-derived endothelial cell line XPTS-1 and animal model of human infancy hemangioma].

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Xiao, Xiao-e; Xu, Quan; Guo, Zheng-tuan

    2011-03-01

    To establish an immortalized human infancy hemangioma-derived endothelial cell line (HemEC) and animal model of human infancy hemangioma. Hemangioma-derived endothelial cells from specimen of human infancy hemangioma were cultured in vitro and monocloed, and then its growth curve was made, karyomorphism of chromosome analyzed, morphologic characteristics observe, factor VIII related antigen identified by immunohistochemical method.Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) was detected by flow cytometry. HemEC were inoculated subcutaneously in athymic mouse to establish animal model of infancy hemangioma. The animal model was observed closely and its pathological characteristic was also studied. The cultural cells grew active, and immortalized spontaneously when they were subcultured on sixteenth generation. This cell line was cultivated for more than 70 times within one year and in good condition after freezing and resuscitating once and again, and had the morphologic character of HemEC. The cell population doubling time was 22 h. Factor VIII and VEGFR-2 were expressed positively. Karyo type analysis of the cell line showed abnormal diploid with the modal chromosomal number varying between diploid and triploid. The cell line was then named XPTS-1. The animal model of infancy hemangioma was successfully established and its character of histopathology was similar with that of infancy hemangioma. The cell line of HemEC was successfully established and immortalized spontaneously, and had the morphologic and biological character of HemEC. The animal model of infancy hemangioma was successfully established and showed the character of histopathology similar with that of infancy hemangioma.

  10. Evaluation of cloned cells, animal model, and ATRA sensitivity of human testicular yolk sac tumor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The testicular yolk sac tumor (TYST) is the most common neoplasm originated from germ cells differentiated abnormally, a major part of pediatric malignant testicular tumors. The present study aimed at developing and validating the in vitro and vivo models of TYST and evaluating the sensitivity of TYST to treatments, by cloning human TYST cells and investigating the histology, ultra-structure, growth kinetics and expression of specific proteins of cloned cells. We found biological characteristics of cloned TYST cells were similar to the yolk sac tumor and differentiated from the columnar to glandular-like or goblet cells-like cells. Chromosomes for tumor identification in each passage met nature of the primary tumor. TYST cells were more sensitive to all-trans-retinoic acid which had significantly inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Cisplatin induced apoptosis of TYST cells through the activation of p53 expression and down-regulation of Bcl- expression. Thus, we believe that cloned TYST cells and the animal model developed here are useful to understand the molecular mechanism of TYST cells and develop potential therapies for human TYST. PMID:22410253

  11. Modeling Cystic Fibrosis Using Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Human Pancreatic Ductal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Senem; Zhou, Ting; Robinson, Christopher L; Tsai, Su-Yi; Crespo, Miguel; Amin, Sadaf; Lin, Xiangyi; Hon, Jane; Evans, Todd; Chen, Shuibing

    2016-05-01

    We established an efficient strategy to direct human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line derived from patients with cystic fibrosis, to differentiate into pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs). After purification, more than 98% of hESC-derived PDECs expressed functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. In addition, iPSC lines were derived from a patient with CF carrying compound frameshift and mRNA splicing mutations and were differentiated to PDECs. PDECs derived from Weill Cornell cystic fibrosis (WCCF)-iPSCs showed defective expression of mature CFTR protein and impaired chloride ion channel activity, recapitulating functional defects of patients with CF at the cellular level. These studies provide a new methodology to derive pure PDECs expressing CFTR and establish a "disease in a dish" platform to identify drug candidates to rescue the pancreatic defects of patients with CF. An efficient strategy was established to direct human pluripotent stem cells, including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and an induced pluripotent stem cell line derived from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF-iPSCs), to differentiate into pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs). After purification, more than 98% of hESC-PDECs derived from CF-iPSCs showed defective expression of mature cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein and impaired chloride ion channel activity, recapitulating functional pancreatic defects of patients with CF at the cellular level. These studies provide a new methodology for deriving pure PDECs expressing CFTR, and they establish a "disease-in-a-dish" platform for identifying drug candidates to rescue the pancreatic defects of these patients. ©AlphaMed Press.

  12. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Sandra; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Dollinger, Matthias; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Christ, Bruno

    2014-08-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver. - Highlights: • First time to show NASH in an immune-deficient mouse model. • Human MSC attenuate NASH and improve lipid homeostasis. • MSC act anti-fibrotic and augment liver regeneration by stimulation of proliferation. • Pre-clinical assessment of human MSC for stem cell-based therapy of NASH.

  13. A differentiated porcine bronchial epithelial cell culture model for studying human adenovirus tropism and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lam, E; Ramke, M; Groos, S; Warnecke, G; Heim, A

    2011-12-01

    The species specificity of human adenoviruses (HAdV) almost precludes studying virulence and tropism in animal models, e.g. rodent models, or derived tissue and cell culture models. However, replication of HAdV type 5 (HAdV-C5) has been shown after intravenous injection in swine. In order to study adenovirus replication in airway tissue propagation of bronchial epithelial cells from porcine lungs was established. These primary cells proved to be fully permissive for HAdV-C5 infection in submerged culture, demonstrating efficient HAdV genome replication, infectious viral particle release (1.07×10(8) TCID(50)/ml±6.63×10(7)) and development of cytopathic effect (CPE). Differentiation of porcine bronchial epithelial cells was achieved at the air-liquid interface on collagen I coated 0.4μm polyester membranes. Morphology, expression of tubulin and occludin, the development of tight-junctions and cilia were similar to human bronchial epithelial cells. Infection with HAdV-C5 from the basolateral side resulted in release of infectious virus progeny (2.05×10(7) TCID(50)/ml±2.39×10(7)) to the apical surface as described recently in human bronchial epithelial cells, although complete CPE was not observed. Differentiated porcine bronchial epithelial cells hold promise as a novel method for studying the virulence and pathophysiology of pneumonia associated HAdV types.

  14. Longitudinal Tracking of Human Dendritic Cells in Murine Models Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Leboeuf, Marylene; Dickson, Stephen; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Merad, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Ex vivo generated dendritic cells are currently used to induce therapeutic immunity in solid tumors. Effective immune response requires dendritic cells to home and remain in lymphoid organs to allow for adequate interaction with T lymphocytes. The aim of the current study was to detect and track Feridex labeled human dendritic cells in murine models using magnetic resonance imaging. Human dendritic cells were incubated with Feridex and the effect of labeling on dendritic cells immune function was evaluated. Ex vivo dendritic cell phantoms were used to estimate sensitivity of the magnetic resonance methods and in vivo homing was evaluated after intravenous or subcutaneous injection. R2*-maps of liver, spleen, and draining lymph nodes were obtained and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or relaxometry methods were used to quantify the Feridex tissue concentrations. Correlations between in vivo R2* values and iron content were then determined. Feridex labeling did not affect dendritic cell maturation or function. Phantom results indicated that it was possible to detect 125 dendritic cells within a given slice. Strong correlation between in vivo R2* values and iron deposition was observed. Importantly, Feridex-labeled dendritic cells were detected in the spleen for up to 2 weeks postintravenous injection. This study suggests that magnetic resonance imaging may be used to longitudinally track Feridex-labeled human dendritic cells for up to 2 weeks after injection. PMID:20593373

  15. Human corneal equivalent as cell culture model for in vitro drug permeation studies

    PubMed Central

    Reichl, S; Bednarz, J; Müller-Goymann, C C

    2004-01-01

    Aims: For the study of transcorneal in vitro permeation of ophthalmic drugs, excised animal cornea or corneal epithelial cell culture are frequently used as a replacement for the human cornea. The main purposes of this study were to reconstruct a complete human organotypic cornea equivalent, consisting of all three different cell types (epithelial, stromal, and endothelial); to test the barrier function of this bio-engineered human cornea using three different model drugs (pilocarpine hydrochloride (PHCl), befunolol hydrochloride (BHCl), and hydrocortisone (HC)); and to determine its usefulness as an in vitro model for prediction of ocular drug absorption into the human eye. Methods: A multilayer tissue construct was created step by step in Transwell cell culture insert using SV-40 immortalised human endothelial and epithelial cells and native stromal cells (fibroblasts). Morphology was characterised by light microscopy using routine H&E staining. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate ultrastructural features. Ocular permeation of drugs across the human cornea construct was tested using modified Franz cells and compared with data obtained from excised porcine cornea and previously described porcine cornea constructs. Results and conclusion: The cornea construct exhibited typical corneal structures such as a monolayer of hexagonally shaped endothelial cells and a multilayered epithelium consisting of seven to nine cell layers with flat superficial cells. The formation of microplicae and microvilli was also confirmed. The human cornea construct showed similar permeation behaviour for all substances compared with excised porcine cornea. However, permeability (permeation coefficients Kp) of the human cornea equivalent (PHCl 13.4•10−6 (SD 3.01•10−6); BHCl 9.88•10−6 (SD 1.79•10−6); HC 5.41•10−6 (SD 0.40•10−6) cm/s) was about 1.6–1.8 fold higher than excised porcine cornea. Compared with data from the porcine cornea construct the

  16. Precancerous model of human breast epithelial cells induced by NNK for prevention.

    PubMed

    Siriwardhana, Nalin; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2008-06-01

    Epidemiological investigations have suggested that exposure to tobacco and environmental carcinogens increase the risk of developing human breast cancer. In light of the chronic exposure of human breast tissues to tobacco and environmental carcinogens, we have taken an approach of analyzing cellular changes of immortalized non-cancerous human breast epithelial MCF10A cells during the acquisition of cancerous properties induced by repeated exposure to the tobacco-specific carcinogen 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) at a low concentration of 100 pM. We found that accumulated exposures of MCF10A cells to NNK result in progressive development of cellular carcinogenesis from a stage of immortalization to precancerous sub-stages of acquiring a reduced dependence on growth factors and acquiring anchorage-independent growth. Using Matrigel for MCF10A cells to form size-restricted acini, we detected that exposures to NNK resulted in altered acinar conformation. Analysis of gene expression profiles by cDNA microarrays revealed up- and down-regulated genes associated with NNK-induced carcinogenesis. Using this cellular carcinogenesis model as a target system to identify anticancer agents, we detected that grape seed proanthocyanadin extract significantly suppressed NNK-induced carcinogenesis of MCF10A cells. Our studies provide a carcinogenesis-cellular model mimicking the accumulative exposure to carcinogens in the progression of human breast epithelial cells to increasingly acquire cancerous properties, as likely occurs in the development of precancerous human breast cells. Our cellular model also serves as a cost-efficient, in vitro system to identify preventive agents that inhibit human breast cell carcinogenesis induced by chronic exposures to carcinogens.

  17. Evaluation of two endometriosis models by transplantation of human endometrial tissue fragments and human endometrial mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarabadi, Mina; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Sadafi, Rana

    2017-01-01

    Background: The animal models of endometriosis could be a valuable alternative tool for clarifying the etiology of endometriosis. Objective: In this study two endometriosis models at the morphological and molecular levels was evaluated and compared. Materials and Methods: The human endometrial tissues were cut into small fragments then they were randomly considered for transplantation into γ irradiated mice as model A; or they were isolated and cultured up to fourth passages. 2×106 cultured stromal cells were transplanted into γ irradiated mice subcutaneously as model B. twenty days later the ectopic tissues in both models were studied morphologically by Periodic acid-Schiff and hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of osteopontin (OPN) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) genes were also assessed using real time RT-PCR. 17-β estradiol levels of mice sera were compared before and after transplantation. Results: The endometrial like glands and stromal cells were formed in the implanted subcutaneous tissue of both endometriosis models. The gland sections per cubic millimeter, the expression of OPN and MMP2 genes and the level of 17-β estradiol were higher in model B than model A (p=0.03). Conclusion: Our observation demonstrated that endometrial mesenchymal stromal cells showed more efficiency to establish endometriosis model than human endometrial tissue fragments. PMID:28280797

  18. Effect of Secreted Molecules of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Acute Hepatic Failure Model.

    PubMed

    Lotfinia, Majid; Kadivar, Mehdi; Piryaei, Abbas; Pournasr, Behshad; Sardari, Soroush; Sodeifi, Niloofar; Sayahpour, Forugh-Azam; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-12-15

    Adult tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show tremendous promise for a wide array of therapeutic applications predominantly through paracrine activity. Recent reports showed that human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived MSCs are an alternative for regenerative cellular therapy due to manufacturing large quantities of MSCs from a single donor. However, no study has been reported to uncover the secretome of human ESC-MSCs as treatment of an acute liver failure (ALF) mouse model. We demonstrated that human ESC-MSCs showed similar morphology and cell surface markers compared with bone marrow-derived MSCs. ESC-MSCs exhibited a higher growth rate during early in vitro expansion, along with adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. Treatment with ESC-MSC-conditioned medium (CM) led to statistically significant enhancement of primary hepatocyte viability and increased immunomodulatory interleukin-10 secretion from lipopolysaccharide-induced human blood mononuclear cells. Analysis of the MSCs secretome by a protein array screen showed an association between higher frequencies of secretory proteins such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and regulation of cell proliferation, cell migration, the development process, immune system process, and apoptosis. In this thioacetamide-induced mouse model of acute liver injury, we observed that systemic infusion of VEGF led to significant survival. These data have provided the first experimental evidence of the therapeutic potential of human ESC-MSC-derived molecules. These molecules show trophic support to hepatocytes, which potentially creates new avenues for the treatment of ALF, as an inflammatory condition.

  19. Novel metastasis model of human lung cancer in SCID mice depleted of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Nishioka, Y; Izumi, K; Tsuruo, T; Tanaka, T; Miyasaka, M; Sone, S

    1996-07-17

    Metastasis is a critical problem in the treatment of human lung cancer. Thus, a suitable animal model of metastasis of human lung cancer is required for in vivo biological and preclinical studies. In this study, we tried to establish a suitable model for this, using SCID mice. Neither human SCLC H69/VP cells (5 x 10(6)) nor squamous-cell carcinoma RERF-LC-AI cells (1 x 10(6)), injected through a tail vein, formed metastases in untreated SCID mice. Pre-treatment of SCID mice with anti-asialo GM1 serum resulted in only a few metastases of H69/VP cells, but pre-treatment with anti-mouse IL-2 receptor beta chain Ab (TM-beta 1) resulted in numerous lymph-node metastases 56 days after tumor inoculation. H69/VP-M cells, an in vivo-selected variant line, formed significant numbers of lymph-node metastases even in SCID mice pre-treated with anti-asialo GM1 serum. SCID mice depleted of NK cells by treatment with TM-beta 1 showed different patterns of metastasis when inoculated intravenously with the 2 different human lung cancer cell lines (H69/VP and RERF-LC-AI cells): H69/VP cells formed metastases mainly in systemic lymph nodes and the liver, whereas RERF-LC-AI cells formed metastases mainly in the liver and kidneys, with only a few in lymph nodes. A histopathological study showed that the metastatic colonies consisted of cancer cells. The numbers of metastatic colonies formed by the 2 cell lines increased with the number of cells inoculated. TM-beta 1 treatment of SCID mice efficiently removed NK cells from peripheral blood for at least 6 weeks, whereas, after treatment of the mice with anti-asialo GM1 serum, NK cells were recovered within 9 days. These findings suggest that NK-cell-depleted SCID mice may be useful as a model in biological and pre-clinical studies on metastasis of human lung cancer.

  20. Spontaneous transformation of human granulosa cell tumours into an aggressive phenotype: a metastasis model cell line

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Misa; Muraki, Miho; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi; Saito, Hidekazu; Seiki, Motoharu; Takahashi, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    Background Granulosa cell tumours (GCTs) are frequently seen in menopausal women and are relatively indolent. Although the physiological properties of normal granulosa cells have been studied extensively, little is known about the molecular mechanism of GCT progression. Here, we characterise the unique behavioural properties of a granulosa tumour cell line, KGN cells, for the molecular analysis of GCT progression. Methods Population doubling was carried out to examine the proliferation capacity of KGN cells. Moreover, the invasive capacity of these cells was determined using the in vitro invasion assay. The expression level of tumour markers in KGN cells at different passages was then determined by Western blot analysis. Finally, the growth and metastasis of KGN cells injected subcutaneously (s.c.) into nude mice was observed 3 months after injection. Results During in vitro culture, the advanced passage KGN cells grew 2-fold faster than the early passage cells, as determined by the population doubling assay. Moreover, we found that the advanced passage cells were 2-fold more invasive than the early passage cells. The expression pattern of tumour markers, such as p53, osteopontin, BAX and BAG-1, supported the notion that with passage, KGN cells became more aggressive. Strikingly, KGN cells at both early and advanced passages metastasized to the bowel when injected s.c. into nude mice. In addition, more tumour nodules were formed when the advanced passage cells were implanted. Conclusion KGN cells cultured in vitro acquire an aggressive phenotype, which was confirmed by the analysis of cellular activities and the expression of biomarkers. Interestingly, KGN cells injected s.c. are metastatic with nodule formation occurring mostly in the bowel. Thus, this cell line is a good model for analysing GCT progression and the mechanism of metastasis in vivo. PMID:18980698

  1. A Single-Cell Roadmap of Lineage Bifurcation in Human ESC Models of Embryonic Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zizhen; Mich, John K; Ku, Sherman; Menon, Vilas; Krostag, Anne-Rachel; Martinez, Refugio A; Furchtgott, Leon; Mulholland, Heather; Bort, Susan; Fuqua, Margaret A; Gregor, Ben W; Hodge, Rebecca D; Jayabalu, Anu; May, Ryan C; Melton, Samuel; Nelson, Angelique M; Ngo, N Kiet; Shapovalova, Nadiya V; Shehata, Soraya I; Smith, Michael W; Tait, Leah J; Thompson, Carol L; Thomsen, Elliot R; Ye, Chaoyang; Glass, Ian A; Kaykas, Ajamete; Yao, Shuyuan; Phillips, John W; Grimley, Joshua S; Levi, Boaz P; Wang, Yanling; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2017-01-05

    During human brain development, multiple signaling pathways generate diverse cell types with varied regional identities. Here, we integrate single-cell RNA sequencing and clonal analyses to reveal lineage trees and molecular signals underlying early forebrain and mid/hindbrain cell differentiation from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Clustering single-cell transcriptomic data identified 41 distinct populations of progenitor, neuronal, and non-neural cells across our differentiation time course. Comparisons with primary mouse and human gene expression data demonstrated rostral and caudal progenitor and neuronal identities from early brain development. Bayesian analyses inferred a unified cell-type lineage tree that bifurcates between cortical and mid/hindbrain cell types. Two methods of clonal analyses confirmed these findings and further revealed the importance of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in controlling this lineage decision. Together, these findings provide a rich transcriptome-based lineage map for studying human brain development and modeling developmental disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell Senescence Abrogates the Therapeutic Potential of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Lethal Endotoxemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, Juan Carlos; Tomé, María; Fernández, María Eugenia; Delgado, Mario; Campisi, Judith; Bernad, Antonio; González, Manuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess unique paracrine and immunosuppressive properties, which make them useful candidates for cellular therapy. Here, we address how cellular senescence influences the therapeutic potential of human MSCs (hMSCs). Senescence was induced in bone marrow-derived hMSC cultures with gamma irradiation. Control and senescent cells were tested for their immunoregulatory activity in vitro and in vivo, and an extensive molecular characterization of the phenotypic changes induced by senescence was performed. We also compared the gene expression profiles of senescent hMSCs with a collection of hMSCs used in an ongoing clinical study of Graft Versus Host disease (GVHD). Our results show that senescence induces extensive phenotypic changes in hMSCs and abrogates their protective activity in a murine model of LPS-induced lethal endotoxemia. Although senescent hMSCs retain an ability to regulate the inflammatory response on macrophages in vitro, and, in part retain their capacity to significantly inhibit lymphocyte proliferation, they have a severely impaired migratory capacity in response to proinflammatory signals, which is associated with an inhibition of the AP-1 pathway. Additionally, expression analysis identified PLEC, C8orf48, TRPC4, and ZNF14, as differentially regulated genes in senescent hMSCs that were similarly regulated in those hMSCs which failed to produce a therapeutic effect in a GVHD trial. All the observed phenotypic alterations were confirmed in replicative-senescent hMSCs. In conclusion, this study highlights important changes in the immunomodulatory phenotype of senescent hMSCs and provides candidate gene signatures which may be useful to evaluate the therapeutic potential of hMSCs used in future clinical studies. PMID:24496748

  3. Pathway Analysis and Modeling of the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Hepatocyte-like Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalaki, Andriani; Jozefczuk, Justyna; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James; Wierling, Christoph

    2011-06-01

    A more detailed understanding of the differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells can help to improve therapies for liver diseases, like steatohepatitis. In this work we used microarray-based expression data to analyze the in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into hepatocytes. Pathway analysis has been carried out on gene expression data of different stages of the differentiation process from embryonic stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells via definitive endoderm and hepatic endoderm. Based on pathway analysis we identified signaling pathways, like the GPCR signaling pathway as well as FOXA2 regulatory networks. Based on these highly enriched pathways we constructed a model prototype to better understand and study the differentiation of stem cells into hepatocytes.

  4. Development and validation of primary human myometrial cell culture models to study pregnancy and labour.

    PubMed

    Mosher, Andrea A; Rainey, Kelly J; Bolstad, Seunghwa S; Lye, Stephen J; Mitchell, Bryan F; Olson, David M; Wood, Stephen L; Slater, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    The development of the in vitro cell culture model has greatly facilitated the ability to study gene expression and regulation within human tissues. Within the human uterus, the upper (fundal) segment and the lower segment may provide distinct functions throughout pregnancy and during labour. We have established primary cultured human myometrial cells, isolated from both upper and lower segment regions of the pregnant human uterus, and validated them for the purpose of studying human pregnancy and labour. The specific objectives of this study were to monitor the viability and characterize the expression profile using selected cellular, contractile and pregnancy associated markers in the primary cultured human myometrial cells. Labour has been described as an inflammatory process; therefore, the ability of these cells to respond to an inflammatory stimulus was also investigated. Myometrial cells isolated from paired upper segment (US) and lower segment (LS) biopsies, obtained from women undergoing Caesarean section deliveries at term prior to the onset of labour, were used to identify expression of; α smooth muscle actin, calponin, caldesmon, connexin 43, cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), oxytocin receptor, tropomyosin and vimentin, by RT-PCR and/or immunocytochemistry. Interleukin (IL)-1β was used to treat cells, subsequently expression of COX-2 mRNA and release of interleukin-8 (CXCL8), were measured. ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's multiple comparisons test was performed. We demonstrate that US and LS human myometrial cells stably express all markers examined to at least passage ten (p10). Connexin 43, COX-2 and vimentin mRNA expression were significantly higher in LS cells compared to US cells. Both cell populations respond to IL-1β, demonstrated by a robust release of CXCL8 and increased expression of COX-2 mRNA from passage one (p1) through to p10. Isolated primary myometrial cells maintain expression of smooth muscle and pregnancy-associated markers and retain

  5. Cortical Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Cells for In Vitro Modeling of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Saurat, Nathalie G; Livesey, Frederick J; Moore, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell models of Alzheimer's disease provide an opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying disease pathology at a resolution that is not possible in animal models. Furthermore, the ability to reprogram patient somatic cells to a pluripotent state ensures that the disease can be investigated in the correct genetic context. Here, we describe the directed differentiation of human pluripotent cells to cortical progenitors by recapitulating key developmental signaling events in vitro. Over a timeframe that mirrors human development, these progenitors give rise to functional lower and upper layer neurons. We also describe biochemical and imaging based methods to analyse key APP and Tau phenotypes in neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells from individuals with either monogenic familial Alzheimer's disease or Down's syndrome.

  6. Differentiated SH-SY5Y human cells provide a reductionist model of HSV-1 neurotropism.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Mackenzie M; Mangold, Colleen A; Kuny, Chad V; Szpara, Moriah L

    2017-09-27

    Neuron-virus interactions that occur during herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection are not fully understood. Neurons are the site of lifelong latency and are a crucial target for long-term suppressive therapy or viral clearance. A reproducible neuronal model of human origin would facilitate studies of HSV and other neurotropic viruses. Current neuronal models in the herpesvirus field vary widely and have caveats including incomplete differentiation, non-human origins, or the use of dividing cells that have neuropotential, but lack neuronal morphology. Here we use a robust approach to differentiate human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells over 2.5 weeks, producing a uniform population of mature human neuronal cells. We demonstrate that terminally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells have neuronal morphology and express proteins with subcellular localization indicative of mature neurons. These neuronal cells are able to support a productive HSV-1 infection, with kinetics and overall titer similar to those seen in undifferentiated SH-SY5Y cells and the related SK-N-SH cell line. However terminally differentiated, neuronal SH-SY5Y cells release significantly less extracellular HSV-1 by 24 hpi, suggesting a unique neuronal response to viral infection. With this model, we are able to distinguish differences in neuronal spread between two strains of HSV-1. We also show expression of the antiviral protein cGAS in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells, which is the first demonstration of the presence of this protein in non-epithelial cells. These data provide a model for studying neuron-virus interactions at the single-cell level as well as via bulk biochemistry, and will be advantageous for the study of neurotropic viruses in vitroImportance Herpes simplex virus (HSV) affects millions of people worldwide, causing painful oral and genital lesions, in addition to a multitude of more severe symptoms such as eye disease, neonatal infection, and in rare cases, encephalitis. Presently, there is no cure

  7. Characterization of Human Neural Progenitor Cell Models for Developmental Neurotoxicity Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current testing methods for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) make evaluation of the effects of large numbers of chemicals impractical and prohibitively expensive. As such, we are evaluating two different human neural progenitor cell (hNPC) models for their utility in screens for...

  8. Notch Signaling and Schwann Cell Transformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    MPNSTs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Tom R. Kadesch, Ph.D...Signaling and Schwann Cell Tranformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs 6. AUTHOR(S) Tom R. Kadesch, Ph.D. W81XWH-04-1...the malignant transformation of neurofibromas to MPNSTs in patients with NF1. Our previous work has shown that constitutive expression of Notch can

  9. Characterization of Human Neural Progenitor Cell Models for Developmental Neurotoxicity Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current testing methods for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) make evaluation of the effects of large numbers of chemicals impractical and prohibitively expensive. As such, we are evaluating two different human neural progenitor cell (hNPC) models for their utility in screens for...

  10. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sandra; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Dollinger, Matthias; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Christ, Bruno

    2014-08-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver.

  11. Modeling human development and disease in pluripotent stem cell-derived gastric organoids

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Kyle W.; Catá, Emily M.; Crawford, Calyn M.; Sinagoga, Katie L.; Schumacher, Michael; Rockich, Briana E.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Mayhew, Christopher N.; Spence, Jason R.; Zavros, Yana; Wells, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric diseases, including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, affect 10% of the world’s population and are largely due to chronic H. pylori infection1–3. Species differences in embryonic development and architecture of the adult stomach make animal models suboptimal for studying human stomach organogenesis and pathogenesis4, and there is no experimental model of normal human gastric mucosa. Here we report the de novo generation of three-dimensional human gastric tissue in vitro through the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We identified that temporal manipulation of the FGF, WNT, BMP, retinoic acid and EGF signaling pathways and three-dimensional growth are sufficient to generate human gastric organoids (hGOs). Developing hGOs progressed through molecular and morphogenetic stages that were nearly identical to the developing antrum of the mouse stomach. Organoids formed primitive gastric gland- and pit-like domains, proliferative zones containing LGR5-expressing cells, surface and antral mucous cells, and a diversity of gastric endocrine cells. We used hGO cultures to identify novel signaling mechanisms that regulate early endoderm patterning and gastric endocrine cell differentiation upstream of the transcription factor NEUROG3. Using hGOs to model pathogenesis of human disease, we found that H. pylori infection resulted in rapid association of the virulence factor CagA with the c-Met receptor, activation of signaling and induction of epithelial proliferation. Together, these studies describe a novel and robust in vitro system for elucidating the mechanisms underlying human stomach development and disease. PMID:25363776

  12. Cell-free transmission of human adenovirus by passive mass transfer in cell culture simulated in a computer model.

    PubMed

    Yakimovich, Artur; Gumpert, Heidi; Burckhardt, Christoph J; Lütschg, Verena A; Jurgeit, Andreas; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Greber, Urs F

    2012-09-01

    Viruses spread between cells, tissues, and organisms by cell-free and cell-cell transmissions. Both mechanisms enhance disease development, but it is difficult to distinguish between them. Here, we analyzed the transmission mode of human adenovirus (HAdV) in monolayers of epithelial cells by wet laboratory experimentation and a computer simulation. Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy and replication-competent HAdV2 expressing green fluorescent protein, we found that the spread of infection invariably occurred after cell lysis. It was affected by convection and blocked by neutralizing antibodies but was independent of second-round infections. If cells were overlaid with agarose, convection was blocked and round plaques developed around lytic infected cells. Infected cells that did not lyse did not give rise to plaques, highlighting the importance of cell-free transmission. Key parameters for cell-free virus transmission were the time from infection to lysis, the dose of free viruses determining infection probability, and the diffusion of single HAdV particles in aqueous medium. With these parameters, we developed an in silico model using multiscale hybrid dynamics, cellular automata, and particle strength exchange. This so-called white box model is based on experimentally determined parameters and reproduces viral infection spreading as a function of the local concentration of free viruses. These analyses imply that the extent of lytic infections can be determined by either direct plaque assays or can be predicted by calculations of virus diffusion constants and modeling.

  13. Cell-Free Transmission of Human Adenovirus by Passive Mass Transfer in Cell Culture Simulated in a Computer Model

    PubMed Central

    Yakimovich, Artur; Gumpert, Heidi; Burckhardt, Christoph J.; Lütschg, Verena A.; Jurgeit, Andreas; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.

    2012-01-01

    Viruses spread between cells, tissues, and organisms by cell-free and cell-cell transmissions. Both mechanisms enhance disease development, but it is difficult to distinguish between them. Here, we analyzed the transmission mode of human adenovirus (HAdV) in monolayers of epithelial cells by wet laboratory experimentation and a computer simulation. Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy and replication-competent HAdV2 expressing green fluorescent protein, we found that the spread of infection invariably occurred after cell lysis. It was affected by convection and blocked by neutralizing antibodies but was independent of second-round infections. If cells were overlaid with agarose, convection was blocked and round plaques developed around lytic infected cells. Infected cells that did not lyse did not give rise to plaques, highlighting the importance of cell-free transmission. Key parameters for cell-free virus transmission were the time from infection to lysis, the dose of free viruses determining infection probability, and the diffusion of single HAdV particles in aqueous medium. With these parameters, we developed an in silico model using multiscale hybrid dynamics, cellular automata, and particle strength exchange. This so-called white box model is based on experimentally determined parameters and reproduces viral infection spreading as a function of the local concentration of free viruses. These analyses imply that the extent of lytic infections can be determined by either direct plaque assays or can be predicted by calculations of virus diffusion constants and modeling. PMID:22787215

  14. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34+ human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary. PMID:27034390

  15. A three-dimensional human neural cell culture model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Se Hoon; Kim, Young Hye; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Lee, Seungkyu; D'Avanzo, Carla; Chen, Hechao; Hooli, Basavaraj; Asselin, Caroline; Muffat, Julien; Klee, Justin B; Zhang, Can; Wainger, Brian J; Peitz, Michael; Kovacs, Dora M; Woolf, Clifford J; Wagner, Steven L; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2014-11-13

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease posits that the excessive accumulation of amyloid-β peptide leads to neurofibrillary tangles composed of aggregated hyperphosphorylated tau. However, to date, no single disease model has serially linked these two pathological events using human neuronal cells. Mouse models with familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) mutations exhibit amyloid-β-induced synaptic and memory deficits but they do not fully recapitulate other key pathological events of Alzheimer's disease, including distinct neurofibrillary tangle pathology. Human neurons derived from Alzheimer's disease patients have shown elevated levels of toxic amyloid-β species and phosphorylated tau but did not demonstrate amyloid-β plaques or neurofibrillary tangles. Here we report that FAD mutations in β-amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 are able to induce robust extracellular deposition of amyloid-β, including amyloid-β plaques, in a human neural stem-cell-derived three-dimensional (3D) culture system. More importantly, the 3D-differentiated neuronal cells expressing FAD mutations exhibited high levels of detergent-resistant, silver-positive aggregates of phosphorylated tau in the soma and neurites, as well as filamentous tau, as detected by immunoelectron microscopy. Inhibition of amyloid-β generation with β- or γ-secretase inhibitors not only decreased amyloid-β pathology, but also attenuated tauopathy. We also found that glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) regulated amyloid-β-mediated tau phosphorylation. We have successfully recapitulated amyloid-β and tau pathology in a single 3D human neural cell culture system. Our unique strategy for recapitulating Alzheimer's disease pathology in a 3D neural cell culture model should also serve to facilitate the development of more precise human neural cell

  16. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary.

  17. Alzheimer's disease modeling: ups, downs, and perspectives for human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wojda, Urszula; Kuznicki, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Major breakthroughs are required to win the war against the increasing threat of Alzheimer's disease. Until now, however, despite enormous efforts and funds, effective therapies are lacking, and adequate models for drug validation are still unavailable. In this article, we review the available animal and cellular models of different features of human Alzheimer's disease and critically evaluate their usefulness for understanding the mechanisms of the disease. The majority of the presently used models are based on the amyloid-β and hyperphosphorylated tau hypothesis, which resembles features of familial Alzheimer's disease. Unfortunately, these models offer limited help for understanding the pathomechanisms of the early stages of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Thus, new models are needed to discover ways to treat or delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease, and we discuss the prospects for such desperately needed models, including human induced pluripotent stem cells and in silico brain models.

  18. Impact of modeled microgravity on migration, differentiation, and cell cycle control of primitive human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Plett, P Artur; Abonour, Rafat; Frankovitz, Stacy M; Orschell, Christie M

    2004-08-01

    Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are important factors in maintaining hematopoietic homeostasis. Homeostatic control of erythrocytes and lymphocytes is perturbed in humans exposed to microgravity (micro-g), resulting in space flight-induced anemia and immunosuppression. We sought to determine whether any of these anomalies can be explained by micro-g-induced changes in migration, proliferation, and differentiation of human BM CD34+ cells, and whether such changes can begin to explain any of the shifts in hematopoietic homeostasis observed in astronauts. BM CD34+ cells were cultured in modeled micro-g (mmicro-g) using NASA's rotating wall vessels (RWV), or in control cultures at earth gravity for 2 to 18 days. Cells were harvested at different times and CD34+ cells assessed for migration potential, cell-cycle kinetics and regulatory proteins, and maturation status. Culture of BM CD34+ cells in RWV for 2 to 3 days resulted in a significant reduction of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1alpha)-directed migration, which correlated with decreased expression of F-actin. Modeled micro-g induced alterations in cell-cycle kinetics that were characterized by prolonged S phase and reduced cyclin A expression. Differentiation of primitive CD34+ cells cultured for 14 to 18 days in RWV favored myeloid cell development at the expense of erythroid development, which was significantly reduced compared to controls. These results illustrate that mmicro-g significantly inhibits the migration potential, cell-cycle progression, and differentiation patterns of primitive BM CD34+ cells, which may contribute to some of the hematologic abnormalities observed in humans during space flight.

  19. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Afford New Opportunities in Inherited Cardiovascular Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Bayzigitov, Daniel R.; Medvedev, Sergey P.; Dementyeva, Elena V.; Bayramova, Sevda A.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Karaskov, Alexander M.; Zakian, Suren M.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis are required to create more effective and safer methods of their therapy. The studies can be carried out only when model systems that fully recapitulate pathological phenotype seen in patients are used. Application of laboratory animals for cardiovascular disease modeling is limited because of physiological differences with humans. Since discovery of induced pluripotency generating induced pluripotent stem cells has become a breakthrough technology in human disease modeling. In this review, we discuss a progress that has been made in modeling inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, studying molecular mechanisms of the diseases, and searching for and testing drug compounds using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:27110425

  20. Human induced pluripotent stem cells for monogenic disease modelling and therapy.

    PubMed

    Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Valentina Rosa; Murdocca, Michela; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-04-26

    Recent and advanced protocols are now available to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from patients affected by genetic diseases. No curative treatments are available for many of these diseases; thus, hiPSCs represent a major impact on patient' health. hiPSCs represent a valid model for the in vitro study of monogenic diseases, together with a better comprehension of the pathogenic mechanisms of the pathology, for both cell and gene therapy protocol applications. Moreover, these pluripotent cells represent a good opportunity to test innovative pharmacological treatments focused on evaluating the efficacy and toxicity of novel drugs. Today, innovative gene therapy protocols, especially gene editing-based, are being developed, allowing the use of these cells not only as in vitro disease models but also as an unlimited source of cells useful for tissue regeneration and regenerative medicine, eluding ethical and immune rejection problems. In this review, we will provide an up-to-date of modelling monogenic disease by using hiPSCs and the ultimate applications of these in vitro models for cell therapy. We consider and summarize some peculiar aspects such as the type of parental cells used for reprogramming, the methods currently used to induce the transcription of the reprogramming factors, and the type of iPSC-derived differentiated cells, relating them to the genetic basis of diseases and to their inheritance model.

  1. Human induced pluripotent stem cells for monogenic disease modelling and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Valentina Rosa; Murdocca, Michela; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Recent and advanced protocols are now available to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from patients affected by genetic diseases. No curative treatments are available for many of these diseases; thus, hiPSCs represent a major impact on patient’ health. hiPSCs represent a valid model for the in vitro study of monogenic diseases, together with a better comprehension of the pathogenic mechanisms of the pathology, for both cell and gene therapy protocol applications. Moreover, these pluripotent cells represent a good opportunity to test innovative pharmacological treatments focused on evaluating the efficacy and toxicity of novel drugs. Today, innovative gene therapy protocols, especially gene editing-based, are being developed, allowing the use of these cells not only as in vitro disease models but also as an unlimited source of cells useful for tissue regeneration and regenerative medicine, eluding ethical and immune rejection problems. In this review, we will provide an up-to-date of modelling monogenic disease by using hiPSCs and the ultimate applications of these in vitro models for cell therapy. We consider and summarize some peculiar aspects such as the type of parental cells used for reprogramming, the methods currently used to induce the transcription of the reprogramming factors, and the type of iPSC-derived differentiated cells, relating them to the genetic basis of diseases and to their inheritance model. PMID:27114745

  2. Magnetically Bioprinted Human Myometrial 3D Cell Rings as A Model for Uterine Contractility.

    PubMed

    Souza, Glauco R; Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A; Mani, Arunmani; Desai, Pujan; Leonard, Fransisca; Liao, Angela; Longo, Monica; Refuerzo, Jerrie S; Godin, Biana

    2017-03-23

    Deregulation in uterine contractility can cause common pathological disorders of the female reproductive system, including preterm labor, infertility, inappropriate implantation, and irregular menstrual cycle. A better understanding of human myometrium contractility is essential to designing and testing interventions for these important clinical problems. Robust studies on the physiology of human uterine contractions require in vitro models, utilizing a human source. Importantly, uterine contractility is a three-dimensionally (3D)-coordinated phenomenon and should be studied in a 3D environment. Here, we propose and assess for the first time a 3D in vitro model for the evaluation of human uterine contractility. Magnetic 3D bioprinting is applied to pattern human myometrium cells into rings, which are then monitored for contractility over time and as a function of various clinically relevant agents. Commercially available and patient-derived myometrium cells were magnetically bioprinted into rings in 384-well formats for throughput uterine contractility analysis. The bioprinted uterine rings from various cell origins and patients show different patterns of contractility and respond differently to clinically relevant uterine contractility inhibitors, indomethacin and nifedipine. We believe that the novel system will serve as a useful tool to evaluate the physiology of human parturition while enabling high-throughput testing of multiple agents and conditions.

  3. Use of human stem cells in Huntington disease modeling and translational research.

    PubMed

    Golas, Monika M; Sander, Bjoern

    2016-04-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by an extended CAG repeat in exon 1 of the gene that encodes the huntingtin (HTT) protein. HD pathology involves a loss of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and progressive neurodegeneration affects the striatum and other brain regions. Because HTT is involved in multiple cellular processes, the molecular mechanisms of HD pathogenesis should be investigated on multiple levels. On the cellular level, in vitro stem cell models, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from HD patients and HD embryonic stem cells (ESCs), have yielded progress. Approaches to differentiate functional MSNs from ESCs, iPSCs, and neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) have been established, enabling MSN differentiation to be studied and disease phenotypes to be recapitulated. Isolation of target stem cells and precursor cells may also provide a resource for grafting. In animal models, transplantation of striatal precursors differentiated in vitro to the striatum has been reported to improve disease phenotype. Initial clinical trials examining intrastriatal transplantation of fetal neural tissue suggest a more favorable clinical course in a subset of HD patients, though shortcomings persist. Here, we review recent advances in the development of cellular HD models and approaches aimed at cell regeneration with human stem cells. We also describe how genome editing tools could be used to correct the HTT mutation in patient-specific stem cells. Finally, we discuss the potential and the remaining challenges of stem cell-based approaches in HD research and therapy development.

  4. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  5. Recreating the Cardiac Microenvironment in Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Human Physiology and Disease.

    PubMed

    Atmanli, Ayhan; Domian, Ibrahim John

    2016-12-19

    The advent of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) biology has opened unprecedented opportunities for the use of tissue engineering to generate human cardiac tissue for in vitro study. Engineering cardiac constructs that recapitulate human development and disease requires faithful recreation of the cardiac niche in vitro. Here we discuss recent progress in translating the in vivo cardiac microenvironment into PSC models of the human heart. We review three key physiologic features required to recreate the cardiac niche and facilitate normal cardiac differentiation and maturation: the biochemical, biophysical, and bioelectrical signaling cues. Finally, we discuss key barriers that must be overcome to fulfill the promise of stem cell biology in preclinical applications and ultimately in clinical practice.

  6. Follicular Helper CD4+ T Cells in Human Neuroautoimmune Diseases and Their Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xueli; Lin, Chenhong; Han, Jinming; Jiang, Xinmei; Zhu, Jie; Jin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Follicular helper CD4(+) T (TFH) cells play a fundamental role in humoral immunity deriving from their ability to provide help for germinal center (GC) formation, B cell differentiation into plasma cells and memory cells, and antibody production in secondary lymphoid tissues. TFH cells can be identified by a combination of markers, including the chemokine receptor CXCR5, costimulatory molecules ICOS and PD-1, transcription repressor Bcl-6, and cytokine IL-21. It is difficult and impossible to get access to secondary lymphoid tissues in humans, so studies are usually performed with human peripheral blood samples as circulating counterparts of tissue TFH cells. A balance of TFH cell generation and function is critical for protective antibody response, whereas overactivation of TFH cells or overexpression of TFH-associated molecules may result in autoimmune diseases. Emerging data have shown that TFH cells and TFH-associated molecules may be involved in the pathogenesis of neuroautoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS), neuromyelitis optica (NMO)/neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD), and myasthenia gravis (MG). This review summarizes the features of TFH cells, including their development, function, and roles as well as TFH-associated molecules in neuroautoimmune diseases and their animal models.

  7. Effect of human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on cerebral ischemic volume‐controlled photothrombotic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun‐Kyong; Urnukhsaikhan, Enerelt; Yoon, Hee‐Hoon; Seo, Young‐Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Various animal models of stroke have been developed to simulate the human stroke with the development of the ischemic method facilitates preclinical stroke research. The photothrombotic ischemia model, based on the intravascular photochemical reaction, is widely used for in vivo studies. However, this study has limitations, which generated a relatively small‐sized infarction model on superficial cortex compared to that of the MCAO stroke model. In this study, the photothorombosis mouse model is adapted and the optimum conditions for generation of cell death and deficits with high reproducibility is determined. The extent of damage within the cortex was assessed by infarct volume and cellular/behavioral analyses. In this model, the neural cell death and inflammatory responses is detected; moreover, the degree of behavioral impairment is correlated with the brain infarct volume. Further, to enhance the understanding of neural repair, the effect of neural differentiation by transplantation of human bone marrow‐derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM‐MSCs) is analyzed. The authors demonstrated that transplantation of BM‐MSCs promoted the neural differentiation and behavioral performance in their photothrombosis model. Therefore, this research was meaningful to provide a stable animal model of stroke with low variability. Moreover, this model will facilitate development of novel MSC‐based therapeutics for stroke. PMID:27440447

  8. Human pluripotent stem cells as a model of trophoblast differentiation in both normal development and disease.

    PubMed

    Horii, Mariko; Li, Yingchun; Wakeland, Anna K; Pizzo, Donald P; Nelson, Katharine K; Sabatini, Karen; Laurent, Louise Chang; Liu, Ying; Parast, Mana M

    2016-07-05

    Trophoblast is the primary epithelial cell type in the placenta, a transient organ required for proper fetal growth and development. Different trophoblast subtypes are responsible for gas/nutrient exchange (syncytiotrophoblasts, STBs) and invasion and maternal vascular remodeling (extravillous trophoblasts, EVTs). Studies of early human placental development are severely hampered by the lack of a representative trophoblast stem cell (TSC) model with the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into both STBs and EVTs. Primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) isolated from early-gestation (6-8 wk) human placentas are bipotential, a phenotype that is lost with increasing gestational age. We have identified a CDX2(+)/p63(+) CTB subpopulation in the early postimplantation human placenta that is significantly reduced later in gestation. We describe a reproducible protocol, using defined medium containing bone morphogenetic protein 4 by which human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can be differentiated into CDX2(+)/p63(+) CTB stem-like cells. These cells can be replated and further differentiated into STB- and EVT-like cells, based on marker expression, hormone secretion, and invasive ability. As in primary CTBs, differentiation of hPSC-derived CTBs in low oxygen leads to reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and STB-associated gene expression, instead promoting differentiation into HLA-G(+) EVTs in an hypoxia-inducible, factor-dependent manner. To validate further the utility of hPSC-derived CTBs, we demonstrated that differentiation of trisomy 21 (T21) hPSCs recapitulates the delayed CTB maturation and blunted STB differentiation seen in T21 placentae. Collectively, our data suggest that hPSCs are a valuable model of human placental development, enabling us to recapitulate processes that result in both normal and diseased pregnancies.

  9. Neuro-immune interactions of neural stem cell transplants: from animal disease models to human trials.

    PubMed

    Giusto, Elena; Donegà, Matteo; Cossetti, Chiara; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    Stem cell technology is a promising branch of regenerative medicine that is aimed at developing new approaches for the treatment of severely debilitating human diseases, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Despite the increasing understanding of the mechanisms governing their biology, the application of stem cell therapeutics remains challenging. The initial idea that stem cell transplants work in vivo via the replacement of endogenous cells lost or damaged owing to disease has been challenged by accumulating evidence of their therapeutic plasticity. This new concept covers the remarkable immune regulatory and tissue trophic effects that transplanted stem cells exert at the level of the neural microenvironment to promote tissue healing via combination of immune modulatory and tissue protective actions, while retaining predominantly undifferentiated features. Among a number of promising candidate stem cell sources, neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are under extensive investigation with regard to their therapeutic plasticity after transplantation. The significant impact in vivo of experimental NPC therapies in animal models of inflammatory CNS diseases has raised great expectations that these stem cells, or the manipulation of the mechanisms behind their therapeutic impact, could soon be translated to human studies. This review aims to provide an update on the most recent evidence of therapeutically-relevant neuro-immune interactions following NPC transplants in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral stroke and traumas of the spinal cord, and consideration of the forthcoming challenges related to the early translation of some of these exciting experimental outcomes into clinical medicines.

  10. Neuro-immune interactions of neural stem cell transplants: From animal disease models to human trials

    PubMed Central

    Cossetti, Chiara; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell technology is a promising branch of regenerative medicine that is aimed at developing new approaches for the treatment of severely debilitating human diseases, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Despite the increasing understanding of the mechanisms governing their biology, the application of stem cell therapeutics remains challenging. The initial idea that stem cell transplants work in vivo via the replacement of endogenous cells lost or damaged owing to disease has been challenged by accumulating evidence of their therapeutic plasticity. This new concept covers the remarkable immune regulatory and tissue trophic effects that transplanted stem cells exert at the level of the neural microenvironment to promote tissue healing via combination of immune modulatory and tissue protective actions, while retaining predominantly undifferentiated features. Among a number of promising candidate stem cell sources, neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are under extensive investigation with regard to their therapeutic plasticity after transplantation. The significant impact in vivo of experimental NPC therapies in animal models of inflammatory CNS diseases has raised great expectations that these stem cells, or the manipulation of the mechanisms behind their therapeutic impact, could soon be translated to human studies. This review aims to provide an update on the most recent evidence of therapeutically-relevant neuroimmune interactions following NPC transplants in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral stroke and traumas of the spinal cord, and consideration of the forthcoming challenges related to the early translation of some of these exciting experimental outcomes into clinical medicines. PMID:23507035

  11. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Restore Function in a Human Cell Loss Model of Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Hassan, Diala W; Li, Xinbo; Ryan, Eileen I; Acott, Ted S; Kelley, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Normally, trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelial cells within the aqueous humor outflow pathway maintain intraocular pressure within a narrow safe range. Elevation in intraocular pressure, because of the loss of homeostatic regulation by these outflow pathway cells, is the primary risk factor for vision loss due to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. A notable feature associated with glaucoma is outflow pathway cell loss. Using controlled cell loss in ex vivo perfused human outflow pathway organ culture, we developed compelling experimental evidence that this level of cell loss compromises intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This function was restored by repopulation of the model with fresh TM cells. We then differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and used them to repopulate this cell depletion model. These differentiated cells (TM-like iPSCs) became similar to TM cells in both morphology and expression patterns. When transplanted, they were able to fully restore intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This successful transplantation of TM-like iPSCs establishes the conceptual feasibility of using autologous stem cells to restore intraocular pressure regulatory function in open-angle glaucoma patients, providing a novel alternative treatment option. Stem Cells 2015;33:751–761 PMID:25377070

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cells restore function in a human cell loss model of open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Abu-Hassan, Diala W; Li, Xinbo; Ryan, Eileen I; Acott, Ted S; Kelley, Mary J

    2015-03-01

    Normally, trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelial cells within the aqueous humor outflow pathway maintain intraocular pressure within a narrow safe range. Elevation in intraocular pressure, because of the loss of homeostatic regulation by these outflow pathway cells, is the primary risk factor for vision loss due to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. A notable feature associated with glaucoma is outflow pathway cell loss. Using controlled cell loss in ex vivo perfused human outflow pathway organ culture, we developed compelling experimental evidence that this level of cell loss compromises intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This function was restored by repopulation of the model with fresh TM cells. We then differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and used them to repopulate this cell depletion model. These differentiated cells (TM-like iPSCs) became similar to TM cells in both morphology and expression patterns. When transplanted, they were able to fully restore intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This successful transplantation of TM-like iPSCs establishes the conceptual feasibility of using autologous stem cells to restore intraocular pressure regulatory function in open-angle glaucoma patients, providing a novel alternative treatment option. © 2014 The Authors. STEM CELLS Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  13. A human breast cell model of pre-invasive to invasive transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Lee, Sun-Young; Rozenberg, Gabriela I.; Chin, Koei; Myers, Connie A.; Bascom, Jamie L.; Mott, Joni D.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Grate, Leslie R.; Mian, I. Saira; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Jensen, Roy A.; Idowu, Michael O.; Chen, Fanqing; Chen, David J.; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-03-10

    A crucial step in human breast cancer progression is the acquisition of invasiveness. There is a distinct lack of human cell culture models to study the transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype as it may occur 'spontaneously' in vivo. To delineate molecular alterations important for this transition, we isolated human breast epithelial cell lines that showed partial loss of tissue polarity in three-dimensional reconstituted-basement membrane cultures. These cells remained non-invasive; however, unlike their non-malignant counterparts, they exhibited a high propensity to acquire invasiveness through basement membrane in culture. The genomic aberrations and gene expression profiles of the cells in this model showed a high degree of similarity to primary breast tumor profiles. The xenograft tumors formed by the cell lines in three different microenvironments in nude mice displayed metaplastic phenotypes, including squamous and basal characteristics, with invasive cells exhibiting features of higher grade tumors. To find functionally significant changes in transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype, we performed attribute profile clustering analysis on the list of genes differentially expressed between pre-invasive and invasive cells. We found integral membrane proteins, transcription factors, kinases, transport molecules, and chemokines to be highly represented. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9,-13,-15,-17 was up regulated in the invasive cells. Using siRNA based approaches, we found these MMPs to be required for the invasive phenotype. This model provides a new tool for dissection of mechanisms by which pre-invasive breast cells could acquire invasiveness in a metaplastic context.

  14. Lentiviral-Transduced Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Persistently Express Therapeutic Levels of Enzyme in a Xenotransplantation Model of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meyerrose, Todd E.; Roberts, Marie; Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Vogler, Carole A.; Wirthlin, Louisa; Nolta, Jan A.; Sands, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising platform for cell- and gene-based treatment of inherited and acquired disorders. We recently showed that human MSCs distribute widely in a murine xenotransplantation model. In the current study, we have determined the distribution, persistence, and ability of lentivirally transduced human MSCs to express therapeutic levels of enzyme in a xenotransplantation model of human disease (nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mucopolysaccharidosis type VII [NOD-SCID MPSVII]). Primary human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral vector expressing either enhanced green fluorescent protein or the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (MSCs-GUSB). Lentiviral transduction did not affect any in vitro parameters of MSC function or potency. One million cells from each population were transplanted intraperitoneally into separate groups of neonatal NOD-SCID MPSVII mice. Transduced MSCs persisted in the animals that underwent transplantation, and comparable numbers of donor MSCs were detected at 2 and 4 months after transplantation in multiple organs. MSCs-GUSB expressed therapeutic levels of protein in the recipients, raising circulating serum levels of GUSB to nearly 40% of normal. This level of circulating enzyme was sufficient to normalize the secondary elevation of other lysosomal enzymes and reduce lysosomal distention in several tissues. In addition, at least one physiologic marker of disease, retinal function, was normalized following transplantation of MSCs-GUSB. These data provide evidence that transduced human MSCs retain their normal trafficking ability in vivo and persist for at least 4 months, delivering therapeutic levels of protein in an authentic xenotransplantation model of human disease. PMID:18436861

  15. Challenges of Culturing Human Norovirus in Three-Dimensional Organoid Intestinal Cell Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Papafragkou, Efstathia; Hewitt, Joanne; Park, Geun Woo; Greening, Gail; Vinjé, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Human noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Recently, cell culture systems have been described using either human embryonic intestinal epithelial cells (Int-407) or human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2) growing on collagen-I porous micro carrier beads in a rotating bioreactor under conditions of physiological fluid shear. Here, we describe the efforts from two independent laboratories to implement this three dimensional (3D) cell culture system for the replication of norovirus. Int-407 and Caco-2 were grown in a rotating bioreactor for up to 28 days. Prior to infection, cells were screened for the presence of microvilli by electron microscopy and stained for junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and β-catenin). Differentiated 3D cells were transferred to 24-well plates and infected with bacteria-free filtrates of various norovirus genotypes (GI.1, GI.3, GI.8, GII.2, GII.4, GII.7, and GII.8). At 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h post inoculation, viral RNA from both cells and supernatants were collected and analyzed for norovirus RNA by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Despite observations of high expression of junction proteins and microvilli development in stained thin sections, our data suggest no significant increase in viral titer based on norovirus RNA copy number during the first 48 h after inoculation for the different samples and virus culture conditions tested. Our combined efforts demonstrate that 3D cell culture models using Int-407 or Caco-2 cells do not support norovirus replication and highlight the complexity and difficulty of developing a reproducible in vitro cell culture system for human norovirus. PMID:23755105

  16. Rotator cuff repair using cell sheets derived from human rotator cuff in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yoshifumi; Mifune, Yutaka; Inui, Atsuyuki; Sakata, Ryosuke; Muto, Tomoyuki; Takase, Fumiaki; Ueda, Yasuhiro; Kataoka, Takeshi; Kokubu, Takeshi; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2017-02-01

    To achieve biological regeneration of tendon-bone junctions, cell sheets of human rotator-cuff derived cells were used in a rat rotator cuff injury model. Human rotator-cuff derived cells were isolated, and cell sheets were made using temperature-responsive culture plates. Infraspinatus tendons in immunodeficient rats were resected bilaterally at the enthesis. In right shoulders, infraspinatus tendons were repaired by the transosseous method and covered with the cell sheet (sheet group), whereas the left infraspinatus tendons were repaired in the same way without the cell sheet (control group). Histological examinations (safranin-O and fast green staining, isolectin B4, type II collagen, and human-specific CD31) and mRNA expression (vascular endothelial growth factor; VEGF, type II collagen; Col2, and tenomodulin; TeM) were analyzed 4 weeks after surgery. Biomechanical tests were performed at 8 weeks. In the sheet group, proteoglycan at the enthesis with more type II collagen and isolectin B4 positive cells were seen compared with in the control group. Human specific CD31-positive cells were detected only in the sheet group. VEGF and Col2 gene expressions were higher and TeM gene expression was lower in the sheet group than in the control group. In mechanical testing, the sheet group showed a significantly higher ultimate failure load than the control group at 8 weeks. Our results indicated that the rotator-cuff derived cell sheet could promote cartilage regeneration and angiogenesis at the enthesis, with superior mechanical strength compared with the control. Treatment for rotator cuff injury using cell sheets could be a promising strategy for enthesis of tendon tissue engineering. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:289-296, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Challenges of culturing human norovirus in three-dimensional organoid intestinal cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Papafragkou, Efstathia; Hewitt, Joanne; Park, Geun Woo; Greening, Gail; Vinjé, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Human noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Recently, cell culture systems have been described using either human embryonic intestinal epithelial cells (Int-407) or human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2) growing on collagen-I porous micro carrier beads in a rotating bioreactor under conditions of physiological fluid shear. Here, we describe the efforts from two independent laboratories to implement this three dimensional (3D) cell culture system for the replication of norovirus. Int-407 and Caco-2 were grown in a rotating bioreactor for up to 28 days. Prior to infection, cells were screened for the presence of microvilli by electron microscopy and stained for junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and β-catenin). Differentiated 3D cells were transferred to 24-well plates and infected with bacteria-free filtrates of various norovirus genotypes (GI.1, GI.3, GI.8, GII.2, GII.4, GII.7, and GII.8). At 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h post inoculation, viral RNA from both cells and supernatants were collected and analyzed for norovirus RNA by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Despite observations of high expression of junction proteins and microvilli development in stained thin sections, our data suggest no significant increase in viral titer based on norovirus RNA copy number during the first 48 h after inoculation for the different samples and virus culture conditions tested. Our combined efforts demonstrate that 3D cell culture models using Int-407 or Caco-2 cells do not support norovirus replication and highlight the complexity and difficulty of developing a reproducible in vitro cell culture system for human norovirus.

  18. Human mesenchymal stromal cells exert HGF dependent cytoprotective effects in a human relevant pre-clinical model of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kennelly, Helen; Mahon, Bernard P.; English, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have potent immunomodulatory and tissue reparative properties, which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as COPD. This study examined the mechanisms by which human MSCs protect against elastase induced emphysema. Using a novel human relevant pre-clinical model of emphysema the efficacy of human MSC therapy and optimal cell dose were investigated. Protective effects were examined in the lung through histological examination. Further in vivo experiments examined the reparative abilities of MSCs after tissue damage was established and the role played by soluble factors secreted by MSCs. The mechanism of MSC action was determined in using shRNA gene knockdown. Human MSC therapy and MSC conditioned media exerted significant cytoprotective effects when administered early at the onset of the disease. These protective effects were due to significant anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic mechanisms, mediated in part through MSC production of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). When MSC administration was delayed, significant protection of the lung architecture was observed but this was less extensive. MSC cell therapy was more effective than MSC conditioned medium in this emphysema model. PMID:27922052

  19. Modelling human embryoid body cell adhesion to a combinatorial library of polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Epa, V Chandana; Yang, Jing; Mei, Ying; Hook, Andrew L; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Winkler, David A

    2012-09-18

    Designing materials to control biology is an intense focus of biomaterials and regenerative medicine research. Discovering and designing materials with appropriate biological compatibility or active control of cells and tissues is being increasingly undertaken using high throughput synthesis and assessment methods. We report a relatively simple but powerful machine-learning method of generating models that link microscopic or molecular properties of polymers or other materials to their biological effects. We illustrate the potential of these methods by developing the first robust, predictive, quantitative, and purely computational models of adhesion of human embryonic stem cell embryoid bodies (hEB) to the surfaces of a 496-member polymer micro array library.

  20. Modelling human embryoid body cell adhesion to a combinatorial library of polymer surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Epa, V. Chandana; Yang, Jing; Mei, Ying; Hook, Andrew L.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Davies, Martyn C.; Alexander, Morgan R.; Winkler, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Designing materials to control biology is an intense focus of biomaterials and regenerative medicine research. Discovering and designing materials with appropriate biological compatibility or active control of cells and tissues is being increasingly undertaken using high throughput synthesis and assessment methods. We report a relatively simple but powerful machine-learning method of generating models that link microscopic or molecular properties of polymers or other materials to their biological effects. We illustrate the potential of these methods by developing the first robust, predictive, quantitative, and purely computational models of adhesion of human embryonic stem cell embryoid bodies (hEB) to the surfaces of a 496-member polymer micro array library. PMID:24092955

  1. Human alveolar epithelial cells expressing tight junctions to model the air-blood barrier.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Anna; Kletting, Stephanie; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Fischer, Ulrike; Meese, Eckart; Huwer, Hanno; Wirth, Dagmar; May, Tobias; Schneider-Daum, Nicole; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a new human alveolar epithelial cell line (hAELVi - human Alveolar Epithelial Lentivirus immortalized) with type I-like characteristics and functional tight junctions, suitable to model the air-blood barrier of the peripheral lung. Primary human alveolar epithelial cells were immortalized by a novel regimen, grown as monolayers on permeable filter supports and characterized morphologically, biochemically and biophysically. hAELVi cells maintain the capacity to form tight intercellular junctions, with high trans-epithelial electrical resistance (> 1000 Ω*cm²). The cells could be kept in culture over several days, up to passage 75, under liquid-liquid as well as air-liquid conditions. Ultrastructural analysis and real time PCR revealed type I-like cell properties, such as the presence of caveolae, expression of caveolin-1, and absence of surfactant protein C. Accounting for the barrier properties, inter-digitations sealed with tight junctions and desmosomes were also observed. Low permeability of the hydrophilic marker sodium fluorescein confirmed the suitability of hAELVi cells for in vitro transport studies across the alveolar epithelium. These results suggest that hAELVi cells reflect the essential features of the air-blood barrier, as needed for an alternative to animal testing to study absorption and toxicity of inhaled drugs, chemicals and nanomaterials.

  2. Molecular analyses of neurogenic defects in a human pluripotent stem cell model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Michael J; Nazor, Kristopher L; Tran, Ha T; Szücs, Attila; Lynch, Candace L; Paredes, Ryder; Tassone, Flora; Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Hagerman, Randi J; Loring, Jeanne F

    2017-03-01

    New research suggests that common pathways are altered in many neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder; however, little is known about early molecular events that contribute to the pathology of these diseases. The study of monogenic, neurodevelopmental disorders with a high incidence of autistic behaviours, such as fragile X syndrome, has the potential to identify genes and pathways that are dysregulated in autism spectrum disorder as well as fragile X syndrome. In vitro generation of human disease-relevant cell types provides the ability to investigate aspects of disease that are impossible to study in patients or animal models. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells recapitulates development of the neocortex, an area affected in both fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. We have generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from several individuals clinically diagnosed with fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. When differentiated to dorsal forebrain cell fates, our fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cell lines exhibited reproducible aberrant neurogenic phenotypes. Using global gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, we have analysed the early stages of neurogenesis in fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cells. We discovered aberrant DNA methylation patterns at specific genomic regions in fragile X syndrome cells, and identified dysregulated gene- and network-level correlates of fragile X syndrome that are associated with developmental signalling, cell migration, and neuronal maturation. Integration of our gene expression and epigenetic analysis identified altered epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation of a distinct set of genes in fragile X syndrome. These fragile X syndrome-aberrant networks are significantly enriched for genes associated with autism spectrum disorder, giving support to the idea that underlying similarities exist among these neurodevelopmental diseases.

  3. Viscum album neutralizes tumor-induced immunosuppression in a human in vitro cell model

    PubMed Central

    Steinborn, Carmen; Klemd, Amy Marisa; Sauer, Barbara; Garcia-Käufer, Manuel; Urech, Konrad; Follo, Marie; Ücker, Annekathrin; Kienle, Gunver Sophia; Huber, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells have the capacity to secrete immunosuppressive substances in order to diminish dendritic cell (DC) activity and thereby escape from immune responses. The impact of mistletoe (Viscum album) extracts (VAE), which are frequently used as an additive anti-cancer therapy to stimulate the immune response, is still unknown. Using a human cellular system, the impact of two different VAE (VAEA + VAEI) on the maturation of human dendritic cells and on T cell function has been investigated using flow cytometry, automated fluorescence microscopy and cytokine bead array assays. Furthermore, we examined whether VAEI was able to counteract tumor-induced immunosuppression within this cellular system using a renal cancer cell model. The role of mistletoe lectin (ML) was analyzed using ML-specific antibodies and ML-depleted VAEI. VAEI and VAEA augmented the maturation of dendritic cells. VAEI abrogated tumor-induced immunosuppression of dendritic cells and both processes were partially mediated by ML since ML-depleted VAEI and ML-specific antibodies almost neutralized the rehabilitative effects of VAEI on DC maturation. Using these settings, co-culture experiments with purified CD4+ T cells had no influence on T cell proliferation and activation but did have an impact on IFN-γ secretion. The study provides a potential mode-of-action of VAE as an additive cancer therapy based on immunomodulatory effects. However, the impact on the in vivo situation has to be evaluated in further studies. PMID:28719632

  4. A chromatin structure-based model accurately predicts DNA replication timing in human cells.

    PubMed

    Gindin, Yevgeniy; Valenzuela, Manuel S; Aladjem, Mirit I; Meltzer, Paul S; Bilke, Sven

    2014-03-28

    The metazoan genome is replicated in precise cell lineage-specific temporal order. However, the mechanism controlling this orchestrated process is poorly understood as no molecular mechanisms have been identified that actively regulate the firing sequence of genome replication. Here, we develop a mechanistic model of genome replication capable of predicting, with accuracy rivaling experimental repeats, observed empirical replication timing program in humans. In our model, replication is initiated in an uncoordinated (time-stochastic) manner at well-defined sites. The model contains, in addition to the choice of the genomic landmark that localizes initiation, only a single adjustable parameter of direct biological relevance: the number of replication forks. We find that DNase-hypersensitive sites are optimal and independent determinants of DNA replication initiation. We demonstrate that the DNA replication timing program in human cells is a robust emergent phenomenon that, by its very nature, does not require a regulatory mechanism determining a proper replication initiation firing sequence.

  5. Generation of fluorescently labeled cell lines, C3A hepatoma cells, and human adult skin fibroblasts to study coculture models.

    PubMed

    Samluk, Anna; Zakrzewska, Karolina Ewa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2013-07-01

    Hepatic/nonhepatic cell cocultures are widely used in studies on the role of homo- and heterotypic interactions in liver physiology and pathophysiology. In this article, for the first time, establishment of the coculture model employing hepatoma C3A cells and human skin fibroblasts, stably expressing fluorescent markers, is described. Suitability of the model in studying coculture conditions using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry was examined. C3A cells spontaneously formed island-like growth patterns surrounded by fibroblasts. The "islands" size and resulting intensity of the homo- and heterotypic interactions can easily be tuned by applying various plated cells ratios. We examined the capability of the hepatoma cells to produce albumin in hepatic/nonhepatic cell cocultures. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests showed that greater number of fibroblasts in coculture, resulting in smaller sizes of hepatoma "islands," and thus, a larger heterotypic interface, promoted higher albumin synthesis. The use of fluorescently labeled cells in flow cytometry measurements enabled us to separately gate two cell populations and to evaluate protein expression only in/on cells of interest. Flow cytometry confirmed ELISA results indicating the highest albumin production in hepatoma cells cocultured with the greatest number of fibroblasts and the inhibited protein synthesis in coculture with osteosarcoma cells.

  6. Visualizing tropoelastin in a long-term human elastic fibre cell culture model

    PubMed Central

    Halm, M.; Schenke-Layland, K.; Jaspers, S.; Wenck, H.; Fischer, F.

    2016-01-01

    Elastin is an essential protein found in a variety of tissues where resilience and flexibility are needed, such as the skin and the heart. When aiming to engineer suitable implants, elastic fibres are needed to allow adequate tissue renewal. However, the visualization of human elastogenesis remains in the dark. To date, the visualization of human tropoelastin (TE) production in a human cell context and its fibre assembly under live cell conditions has not been achieved. Here, we present a long-term cell culture model of human dermal fibroblasts expressing fluorescence-labelled human TE. We employed a lentiviral system to stably overexpress Citrine-labelled TE to build a fluorescent fibre network. Using immunofluorescence, we confirmed the functionality of the Citrine-tagged TE. Furthermore, we visualized the fibre assembly over the course of several days using confocal microscopy. Applying super resolution microscopy, we were able to investigate the inner structure of the elastin–fibrillin-1 fibre network. Future investigations will allow the tracking of TE produced under various conditions. In tissue engineering applications the fluorescent fibre network can be visualized under various conditions or it serves as a tool for investigating fibre degradation processes in disease-in-a-dish-models. PMID:26842906

  7. A Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy-Affected Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Caron, Leslie; Kher, Devaki; Lee, Kian Leong; McKernan, Robert; Dumevska, Biljana; Hidalgo, Alejandro; Li, Jia; Yang, Henry; Main, Heather; Ferri, Giulia; Petek, Lisa M; Poellinger, Lorenz; Miller, Daniel G; Gabellini, Davide; Schmidt, Uli

    2016-09-01

    : Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) represents a major unmet clinical need arising from the progressive weakness and atrophy of skeletal muscles. The dearth of adequate experimental models has severely hampered our understanding of the disease. To date, no treatment is available for FSHD. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) potentially represent a renewable source of skeletal muscle cells (SkMCs) and provide an alternative to invasive patient biopsies. We developed a scalable monolayer system to differentiate hESCs into mature SkMCs within 26 days, without cell sorting or genetic manipulation. Here we show that SkMCs derived from FSHD1-affected hESC lines exclusively express the FSHD pathogenic marker double homeobox 4 and exhibit some of the defects reported in FSHD. FSHD1 myotubes are thinner when compared with unaffected and Becker muscular dystrophy myotubes, and differentially regulate genes involved in cell cycle control, oxidative stress response, and cell adhesion. This cellular model will be a powerful tool for studying FSHD and will ultimately assist in the development of effective treatments for muscular dystrophies. This work describes an efficient and highly scalable monolayer system to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into skeletal muscle cells (SkMCs) and demonstrates disease-specific phenotypes in SkMCs derived from both embryonic and induced hPSCs affected with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. This study represents the first human stem cell-based cellular model for a muscular dystrophy that is suitable for high-throughput screening and drug development. ©AlphaMed Press.

  8. Electrophysiological properties of computational human ventricular cell action potential models under acute ischemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sara; Mincholé, Ana; Quinn, T Alexander; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2017-10-01

    Acute myocardial ischemia is one of the main causes of sudden cardiac death. The mechanisms have been investigated primarily in experimental and computational studies using different animal species, but human studies remain scarce. In this study, we assess the ability of four human ventricular action potential models (ten Tusscher and Panfilov, 2006; Grandi et al., 2010; Carro et al., 2011; O'Hara et al., 2011) to simulate key electrophysiological consequences of acute myocardial ischemia in single cell and tissue simulations. We specifically focus on evaluating the effect of extracellular potassium concentration and activation of the ATP-sensitive inward-rectifying potassium current on action potential duration, post-repolarization refractoriness, and conduction velocity, as the most critical factors in determining reentry vulnerability during ischemia. Our results show that the Grandi and O'Hara models required modifications to reproduce expected ischemic changes, specifically modifying the intracellular potassium concentration in the Grandi model and the sodium current in the O'Hara model. With these modifications, the four human ventricular cell AP models analyzed in this study reproduce the electrophysiological alterations in repolarization, refractoriness, and conduction velocity caused by acute myocardial ischemia. However, quantitative differences are observed between the models and overall, the ten Tusscher and modified O'Hara models show closest agreement to experimental data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R.; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H.; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44+ cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380

  10. A novel human gastric primary cell culture system for modelling Helicobacter pylori infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schlaermann, Philipp; Toelle, Benjamin; Berger, Hilmar; Schmidt, Sven C; Glanemann, Matthias; Ordemann, Jürgen; Bartfeld, Sina; Mollenkopf, Hans J; Meyer, Thomas F

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent of gastric diseases and the main risk factor in the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. In vitro studies with this bacterial pathogen largely rely on the use of transformed cell lines as infection model. However, this approach is intrinsically artificial and especially inappropriate when it comes to investigating the mechanisms of cancerogenesis. Moreover, common cell lines are often defective in crucial signalling pathways relevant to infection and cancer. A long-lived primary cell system would be preferable in order to better approximate the human in vivo situation. Gastric glands were isolated from healthy human stomach tissue and grown in Matrigel containing media supplemented with various growth factors, developmental regulators and apoptosis inhibitors to generate long-lasting normal epithelial cell cultures. Culture conditions were developed which support the formation and quasi-indefinite growth of three dimensional (3D) spheroids derived from various sites of the human stomach. Spheroids could be differentiated to gastric organoids after withdrawal of Wnt3A and R-spondin1 from the medium. The 3D cultures exhibit typical morphological features of human stomach tissue. Transfer of sheared spheroids into 2D culture led to the formation of dense planar cultures of polarised epithelial cells serving as a suitable in vitro model of H. pylori infection. A robust and quasi-immortal 3D organoid model has been established, which is considered instrumental for future research aimed to understand the underlying mechanisms of infection, mucosal immunity and cancer of the human stomach. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Human epidermal neural crest stem cells as candidates for cell-based therapies, disease modeling, and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sieber-Blum, Maya

    2014-09-01

    In this review article I explore the suitability of human epidermal neural crest stem cells (hEPI-NCSC) for translational medicine. hEPI-NCSC are multipotent somatic stem cells that are derived from the embryonic neural crest. hEPI-NCSC are located in the bulge of hair follicles where they persist postnatally and into adulthood. Because of their location in the hairy skin and their migratory behavior, hEPI-NCSC can be easily isolated as a highly pure population of stem cells without the need for purification. Furthermore they can be expanded ex vivo into millions of stem cells, they do not form tumors in vivo, and they can undergo directed differentiation into crest and noncrest-derived cell types of clinical relevance. Taken together, these characteristics make hEPI-NCSC attractive candidates for cell-based therapies, drug discovery, and disease modeling. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Human kidney cell reprogramming: applications for disease modeling and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Adam C; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-09-01

    The ability to reprogram fully differentiated cells into a pluripotent embryonic state, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), has been met with great excitement. iPSC technology has advanced the fundamental study of disease modeling with the potential for cell-replacement therapy, especially in the neuronal and cardiac fields. However, renal medicine as of yet has not benefited from similar advancements. This review summarizes the unique characteristics of iPSCs and their potential applications for modeling kidney disease. Pioneering such endeavors could yield constructs that recapitulate disease phenotypes, open avenues for more targeted drug development, and potentially serve as replenishable sources for replacement of kidney cells in the setting of human disease.

  13. Modeling the effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 on human cell growth.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Gemma M A; Shorten, Paul R; Wake, Graeme C; Guan, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) plays a key role in human growth and development. The interactions of IGF-1 with IGF-1 receptors and IGF-1 binding proteins (IGFBPs) regulate IGF-1 function. Recent research suggests that a metabolite of IGF-1, cyclo-glycyl-proline (cGP), has a role in regulating IGF-1 homeostasis. A component of this interaction is believed to be the competitive binding of IGF-1 and cGP to IGFBPs. In this paper we describe a mathematical model of the interaction between IGF-1 and cGP on human cell growth. The model can be used to understand the interaction between IGF-1, IGFBPs, cGP and IGF-1 receptors along with the kinetics of cell growth. An explicit model of the known interactions between IGF-1, cGP, IGFBPs, IGF-1 receptors explained a large portion of the variance in cell growth (R(2) = 0.83). An implicit model of the interactions between IGF-1, cGP, IGFBPs, IGF-1 receptors that included a hypothesized feedback of cGP on IGF-1 receptors explained nonlinear features of interaction between IGF-1 and cGP not described by the explicit model (R(2) = 0.84). The model also explained the effect of IGFBP antibody on the interaction between cGP and IGF-1 (R(2) = 0.78). This demonstrates that the competitive binding of IGF-1 and cGP to IGFBPs plays a large role in the interaction between IGF-1 and cGP, but that other factors potentially play a role in the interaction between cGP and IGF-1. These models can be used to predict the complex interaction between IGF-1 and cGP on human cell growth and form a basis for further research in this field.

  14. Urine-derived induced pluripotent stem cells as a modeling tool to study rare human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Summary Rare diseases with a low prevalence are a key public health issue because the causes of those diseases are difficult to determine and those diseases lack a clearly established or curative treatment. Thus, investigating the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathology of rare diseases and facilitating the development of novel therapies using disease models is crucial. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are well suited to modeling rare diseases since they have the capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency. In addition, iPSC technology provides a valuable tool to generate patient-specific iPSCs. These cells can be differentiated into cell types that have been affected by a disease. These cells would circumvent ethical concerns and avoid immunological rejection, so they could be used in cell replacement therapy or regenerative medicine. To date, human iPSCs could have been generated from multiple donor sources, such as skin, adipose tissue, and peripheral blood. However, these cells are obtained via invasive procedures. In contrast, several groups of researchers have found that urine may be a better source for producing iPSCs from normal individuals or patients. This review discusses urinary iPSC (UiPSC) as a candidate for modeling rare diseases. Cells obtained from urine have overwhelming advantages compared to other donor sources since they are safely, affordably, and frequently obtained and they are readily obtained from patients. The use of iPSC-based models is also discussed. UiPSCs may prove to be a key means of modeling rare diseases and they may facilitate the treatment of those diseases in the future. PMID:27672542

  15. Urine-derived induced pluripotent stem cells as a modeling tool to study rare human diseases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2016-08-01

    Rare diseases with a low prevalence are a key public health issue because the causes of those diseases are difficult to determine and those diseases lack a clearly established or curative treatment. Thus, investigating the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathology of rare diseases and facilitating the development of novel therapies using disease models is crucial. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are well suited to modeling rare diseases since they have the capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency. In addition, iPSC technology provides a valuable tool to generate patient-specific iPSCs. These cells can be differentiated into cell types that have been affected by a disease. These cells would circumvent ethical concerns and avoid immunological rejection, so they could be used in cell replacement therapy or regenerative medicine. To date, human iPSCs could have been generated from multiple donor sources, such as skin, adipose tissue, and peripheral blood. However, these cells are obtained via invasive procedures. In contrast, several groups of researchers have found that urine may be a better source for producing iPSCs from normal individuals or patients. This review discusses urinary iPSC (UiPSC) as a candidate for modeling rare diseases. Cells obtained from urine have overwhelming advantages compared to other donor sources since they are safely, affordably, and frequently obtained and they are readily obtained from patients. The use of iPSC-based models is also discussed. UiPSCs may prove to be a key means of modeling rare diseases and they may facilitate the treatment of those diseases in the future.

  16. New metastatic model of human small-cell lung cancer by orthotopic transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shuichi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ohba, Shunichi; Kohda, Yasuko; Usami, Ihomi; Masuda, Tohru; Kawada, Manabu; Nomoto, Akio

    2015-04-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive cancer with high metastatic ability and novel strategies against the metastasis are urgently needed to improve SCLC treatment. However, the mechanism of metastasis of SCLC remains largely to be elucidated. For further studies of SCLC metastasis, we developed a new orthotopic transplantation model in mice. We established a GFP-labeled subline from the human SCLC cell line DMS273 and transplanted them orthotopically into the lung of nude mice with Matrigel. The GFP-labeled cells showed significant metastatic activity and formed metastatic foci in distant tissues such as bone, kidney, and brain, as observed in SCLC patients. From a bone metastasis focus of the mouse, we isolated another subline, termed G3H, with enhanced metastatic potential and higher hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) expression than the parental line. Further studies indicated that the HGF/MET signaling pathway was involved in in vitro motility and invasion activities of the G3H cells and treatments with MET inhibitors decreased formation of distant metastases in our orthotopic model using G3H cells. These data indicated that our model mimics the clinical aspect of SCLC such as metastatic tropism and autocrine of HGF/MET signaling. Compared with other orthotopic SCLC models, our model has a superior ability to form distant metastases. Therefore, our model will provide a valuable tool for the study of SCLC metastasis. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  17. The therapeutic effects of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Chang, Keun-A; Kim, Hee Jin; Joo, Yuyoung; Ha, Sungji; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease, still lacking proper clinical treatment. Therefore, many researchers have focused on the possibility of therapeutic use of stem cells for AD. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from adipose tissue, are well known for their pluripotency and their ability to differentiate into multiple tissue types and have immune modulatory properties similar to those of MSCs from other origins. Because of their biological properties, ASCs can be considered for cell therapy and neuroregeneration. Our recent results clearly showed the therapeutic potential of these cells after transplantation into Tg2576 mice (an AD mouse model). Intravenously or intracerebrally transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) greatly improved the memory impairment and the neuropathology, suggesting that hASCs have a high therapeutic potential for AD.

  18. A model of metabolic changes in respiration-deficient human cells.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, F Mathias

    2007-09-01

    Cells lacking aerobic metabolism because of damaged mtDNA accumulate in many postmitotic tissues in the course aging. Although being only a small fraction of cells, they might play a major role in oxidative stress affecting the whole body. However, it remains unclear how such cells, which are under normal circumstances dependent on aerobic metabolism, are able to survive for decades in vivo. Here a new model is presented that proposes a coexistence of anaerobic glycolysis and a partly reversed TCA cycle. Succinate plays a key role in the changed metabolic pathways because it has to be exported by the cell. This hypothesis supports the view that some respiration-deficient cells are able to survive permanently within the body and contribute to human aging.

  19. Transplantation of human mesenchymal stems cells into intervertebral discs in a xenogeneic porcine model.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Helena B; Svanvik, Teresia; Jonsson, Marianne; Hagman, Margret; Horn, Michael; Lindahl, Anders; Brisby, Helena

    2009-01-15

    Experimental and descriptive study of a xenotransplantation model in minipigs. To study survival and function of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) after transplantation into injured porcine spinal discs, as a model for cell therapy. Biologic treatment options of the intervertebral disc are suggested for patients with chronic low back pain caused by disc degeneration. Three lumbar discs in each of 9 minipigs were injured by aspiration of the nucleus pulposus (NP), 2 weeks later hMSCs were injected in F12 media suspension (cell/med) or with a hydrogel carrier (Puramatrix) (cell/gel). The animals were sacrificed after 1, 3, or 6 months. Disc appearance was visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Immunohistochemistry methods were used to detect hMSCs by antihuman nuclear antibody staining, and further performed for Collagen II, Aggrecan, and Collagen I. SOX 9, Aggrecan, Versican, Collagen IA, and Collagen IIA and Collagen IIB human mRNA expression was analyzed by real-time PCR. At magnetic resonance imaging all injured discs demonstrated degenerative signs. Cell/gel discs showed fewer changes compared with cell/med discs and only injured discs at later time points. hMSCs were detected in 9 of 10 of the cell/gel discs and in 8 of 9 of the cell/med discs. Immunostaining for Aggrecan and Collagen type II expression were observed in NP after 3 and 6 months in gel/cell discs and colocalized with the antihuman nuclear antibody. mRNA expression of Collagen IIA, Collagen IIB, Versican, Collagen 1A, Aggrecan, and SOX9 were detected in both cell/med and cell/gel discs at the time points 3 and 6 months by real-time PCR. hMSCs survive in the porcine disc for at least 6 months and express typical chondrocyte markers suggesting differentiation toward disc-like cells. As in autologous animal models the combination with a three-dimensional-hydrogel carrier seems to facilitate differentiation and survival of MSCs in the disc. Xenotransplantation seems to be valuable in evaluating

  20. Human neural stem cells alleviate Alzheimer-like pathology in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il-Shin; Jung, Kwangsoo; Kim, Il-Sun; Lee, Haejin; Kim, Miri; Yun, Seokhwan; Hwang, Kyujin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Kook In

    2015-08-21

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an inexorable neurodegenerative disease that commonly occurs in the elderly. The cognitive impairment caused by AD is associated with abnormal accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau, which are accompanied by inflammation. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are self-renewing, multipotential cells that differentiate into distinct neural cells. When transplanted into a diseased brain, NSCs repair and replace injured tissues after migration toward and engraftment within lesions. We investigated the therapeutic effects in an AD mouse model of human NSCs (hNSCs) that derived from an aborted human fetal telencephalon at 13 weeks of gestation. Cells were transplanted into the cerebral lateral ventricles of neuron-specific enolase promoter-controlled APPsw-expressing (NSE/APPsw) transgenic mice at 13 months of age. Implanted cells extensively migrated and engrafted, and some differentiated into neuronal and glial cells, although most hNSCs remained immature. The hNSC transplantation improved spatial memory in these mice, which also showed decreased tau phosphorylation and Aβ42 levels and attenuated microgliosis and astrogliosis. The hNSC transplantation reduced tau phosphorylation via Trk-dependent Akt/GSK3β signaling, down-regulated Aβ production through an Akt/GSK3β signaling-mediated decrease in BACE1, and decreased expression of inflammatory mediators through deactivation of microglia that was mediated by cell-to-cell contact, secretion of anti-inflammatory factors generated from hNSCs, or both. The hNSC transplantation also facilitated synaptic plasticity and anti-apoptotic function via trophic supplies. Furthermore, the safety and feasibility of hNSC transplantation are supported. These findings demonstrate the hNSC transplantation modulates diverse AD pathologies and rescue impaired memory via multiple mechanisms in an AD model. Thus, our data provide tangible preclinical evidence that human NSC transplantation could be a

  1. Nephron organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells model kidney development and injury.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Ryuji; Lam, Albert Q; Freedman, Benjamin S; Kishi, Seiji; Valerius, M Todd; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2015-11-01

    Kidney cells and tissues derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) may enable organ regeneration, disease modeling and drug screening. We report an efficient, chemically defined protocol for differentiating hPSCs into multipotent nephron progenitor cells (NPCs) that can form nephron-like structures. By recapitulating metanephric kidney development in vitro, we generate SIX2+ SALL1+ WT1+ PAX2+ NPCs with 90% efficiency within 9 days of differentiation. The NPCs possess the developmental potential of their in vivo counterparts and form PAX8+ LHX1+ renal vesicles that self-organize into nephron structures. In both two- and three-dimensional culture, NPCs form kidney organoids containing epithelial nephron-like structures expressing markers of podocytes, proximal tubules, loops of Henle and distal tubules in an organized, continuous arrangement that resembles the nephron in vivo. We also show that this organoid culture system can be used to study mechanisms of human kidney development and toxicity.

  2. Standardized 3D Bioprinting of Soft Tissue Models with Human Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Rimann, Markus; Bono, Epifania; Annaheim, Helene; Bleisch, Matthias; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    Cells grown in 3D are more physiologically relevant than cells cultured in 2D. To use 3D models in substance testing and regenerative medicine, reproducibility and standardization are important. Bioprinting offers not only automated standardizable processes but also the production of complex tissue-like structures in an additive manner. We developed an all-in-one bioprinting solution to produce soft tissue models. The holistic approach included (1) a bioprinter in a sterile environment, (2) a light-induced bioink polymerization unit, (3) a user-friendly software, (4) the capability to print in standard labware for high-throughput screening, (5) cell-compatible inkjet-based printheads, (6) a cell-compatible ready-to-use BioInk, and (7) standard operating procedures. In a proof-of-concept study, skin as a reference soft tissue model was printed. To produce dermal equivalents, primary human dermal fibroblasts were printed in alternating layers with BioInk and cultured for up to 7 weeks. During long-term cultures, the models were remodeled and fully populated with viable and spreaded fibroblasts. Primary human dermal keratinocytes were seeded on top of dermal equivalents, and epidermis-like structures were formed as verified with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunostaining. However, a fully stratified epidermis was not achieved. Nevertheless, this is one of the first reports of an integrative bioprinting strategy for industrial routine application.

  3. Modeling the biological response of normal human cells, including repair processes, to fractionated carbon beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Mami; Suzuki, Masao; Liu, Cuihua; Kaneko, Yumiko; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Ando, Koichi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro

    2013-01-01

    To understand the biological response of normal cells to fractionated carbon beam irradiation, the effects of potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and sublethal damage repair (SLDR) were both taken into account in a linear-quadratic (LQ) model. The model was verified by the results of a fractionated cell survival experiment with normal human fibroblast cells. Cells were irradiated with 200-kV X-rays and monoenergetic carbon ion beams (290 MeV/u) at two irradiation depths, corresponding to linear energy transfers (LETs) of approximately 13 keV/μm and 75 keV/μm, respectively, at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. When we only took into account the repair factor of PLDR, γ, which was derived from the delayed assay, the cell survival response to fractionated carbon ion irradiation was not fully explained in some cases. When both the effects of SLDR and PLDR were taken into account in the LQ model, the cell survival response was well reproduced. The model analysis suggested that PLDR occurs in any type of radiation. The γ factors ranged from 0.36–0.93. In addition, SLD was perfectly repaired during the fraction interval for the lower LET irradiations but remained at about 30% for the high-LET irradiation. PMID:23449640

  4. Osteogenic potential of cultured human periosteum-derived cells - a pilot study of human cell transplantation into a rat calvarial defect model.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yoshiro; Ueno, Takaaki; Kagawa, Toshimasa; Kanou, Miwa; Fujii, Takashi; Yamachika, Eiki; Sugahara, Toshio

    2006-12-01

    Periosteum shows osteogenic potential and has received considerable attention as a grafting material for the repair of bone and joint defects. The osteogenic potential of cultured periosteal cells has also been reported. The findings of bone formation induced by cultured human periosteum-derived cells using a rat model are presented. Human mandibular periosteum was placed into a culture medium with 10% foetal bovine serum for 14 days. After reaching confluence, periosteal cells were re-suspended with 0.25% trypsin/EDTA and then re-cultured three dimensionally on a collagen sponge. The periosteal cell/collagen complex was grafted into rat calvarial defects and an immunosuppressant (FK506, 1.0 mg/kg/day) was administered intramuscularly. At 2, 3, and 5 weeks postoperatively, grafted tissue was extirpated and compared histologically and radiographically with tissue from a collagen-only grafted group. In the experimental group, periosteal cells had proliferated and differentiated into osteogenic cells by 2 weeks post grafting. At 3 weeks, new bone formation was evident. By 5 weeks, bone growth was observed and new calcification was detected in the defect. Cultured human periosteum-derived cells showed osteogenic potential in a xenogeneic graft model using rat calvarial defects.

  5. Aging stem cells. A Werner syndrome stem cell model unveils heterochromatin alterations as a driver of human aging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiqi; Li, Jingyi; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Qu, Jing; Wang, Ping; Zhou, Junzhi; Liu, Xiaomeng; Ren, Ruotong; Xu, Xiuling; Ocampo, Alejandro; Yuan, Tingting; Yang, Jiping; Li, Ying; Shi, Liang; Guan, Dee; Pan, Huize; Duan, Shunlei; Ding, Zhichao; Li, Mo; Yi, Fei; Bai, Ruijun; Wang, Yayu; Chen, Chang; Yang, Fuquan; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zimei; Aizawa, Emi; Goebl, April; Soligalla, Rupa Devi; Reddy, Pradeep; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; Tang, Fuchou; Liu, Guang-Hui; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua

    2015-06-05

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a premature aging disorder caused by WRN protein deficiency. Here, we report on the generation of a human WS model in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Differentiation of WRN-null ESCs to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) recapitulates features of premature cellular aging, a global loss of H3K9me3, and changes in heterochromatin architecture. We show that WRN associates with heterochromatin proteins SUV39H1 and HP1α and nuclear lamina-heterochromatin anchoring protein LAP2β. Targeted knock-in of catalytically inactive SUV39H1 in wild-type MSCs recapitulates accelerated cellular senescence, resembling WRN-deficient MSCs. Moreover, decrease in WRN and heterochromatin marks are detected in MSCs from older individuals. Our observations uncover a role for WRN in maintaining heterochromatin stability and highlight heterochromatin disorganization as a potential determinant of human aging. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. A 3D human neural cell culture system for modeling Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; D’Avanzo, Carla; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Bylykbashi, Enjana; Washicosky, Kevin J.; Klee, Justin B.; Brüstle, Oliver; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell technologies have facilitated the development of human cellular disease models that can be used to study pathogenesis and test therapeutic candidates. These models hold promise for complex neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because existing animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate all aspects of pathology. We recently reported the characterization of a novel three-dimensional (3D) culture system that exhibits key events in AD pathogenesis, including extracellular aggregation of β-amyloid and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we provide instructions for the generation and analysis of 3D human neural cell cultures, including the production of genetically modified human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) with familial AD mutations, the differentiation of the hNPCs in a 3D matrix, and the analysis of AD pathogenesis. The 3D culture generation takes 1–2 days. The aggregation of β-amyloid is observed after 6-weeks of differentiation followed by robust tau pathology after 10–14 weeks. PMID:26068894

  7. A 3D human neural cell culture system for modeling Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; D'Avanzo, Carla; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Bylykbashi, Enjana; Washicosky, Kevin J; Klee, Justin B; Brüstle, Oliver; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-07-01

    Stem cell technologies have facilitated the development of human cellular disease models that can be used to study pathogenesis and test therapeutic candidates. These models hold promise for complex neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), because existing animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate all aspects of pathology. We recently reported the characterization of a novel 3D culture system that exhibits key events in AD pathogenesis, including extracellular aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we provide instructions for the generation and analysis of 3D human neural cell cultures, including the production of genetically modified human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) with familial AD mutations, the differentiation of the hNPCs in a 3D matrix and the analysis of AD pathogenesis. The 3D culture generation takes 1-2 d. The aggregation of Aβ is observed after 6 weeks of differentiation, followed by robust tau pathology after 10-14 weeks.

  8. Enhancement of zidovudine transfer to molt-4 cells, a human t-cell model, by dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Jun; Tomi, Masatoshi; Seki, Yoshiaki; Kose, Noriko; Sai, Yoshimichi; Nakashima, Emi

    2011-09-01

    A possible approach to improve antiretroviral therapy with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors is to enhance inhibitor delivery to CD4-positive T cells. We previously showed that dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) enhances zidovudine (AZT) transfer into syncytiotrophoblast. Here, we investigated whether DHEAS also enhances AZT transfer into a cellular model of human T lymphocytes, and whether AZT is taken up by a specific transport system. The effects of DHEAS and related compounds on the uptake of [(3) H]AZT and other nucleosides by Molt-4 cells (a model of human CD4-positive T cells) were measured. [(3) H]AZT uptake by Molt-4 cells was nitrobenzylthioinosine insensitive and pH dependent, and the uptake was significantly inhibited by 1 mM ethylisopropylamiloride. [(3) H]AZT uptake by Molt-4 cells was increased in the presence of DHEAS, whereas uptake of other nucleosides was reduced. Kinetic study revealed that the maximum uptake velocity (up to 30 min) was increased in the presence of DHEAS. The structural requirements for AZT uptake-enhancing activity were studied using structural analogues of DHEAS. Estrone-3-sulfate and 16α-hydroxy DHEAS also enhanced AZT uptake into Molt-4 cells. The use of uptake enhancers may be a good strategy to improve the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy.

  9. Model for assessing radiation dose to epithelial cells of the human respiratory tract from radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.; Hui, T.E.; James, A.C.

    1990-07-01

    A computational model was developed to evaluate radiation doses to sensitive cells from exposure to radon progeny throughout human bronchial epithelium. The model incorporated current information on nasal and oral filtration efficiencies for unattached radon progeny, characteristics of bronchial deposition by diffusive and inertial processes, mucous clearance and possible transfer of radon progeny to the airway epithelium, locations of target nuclei of secretory and basal cells in different regions of the bronchial tree epithelium, and other features. The model is useful for evaluating absorbed doses to various populations of target cell nuclei, the associated microdosimetric probability densities in specific energy, and the likelihood that target nuclei are hit one or more times by alpha-particle tracks. The model was applied to extrapolating lung cancer risks observed in underground miners to the general population exposed to low-level radon progeny in indoor home environments. The effect of increasing exposure rates by one and two orders of magnitude in both environments was modeled to determine the frequency of radiation events in target cell nuclei. The implications of dosimetric modeling for lung cancer risk analysis were also examined. 28 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Current status of drug screening and disease modelling in human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rajamohan, Divya; Matsa, Elena; Kalra, Spandan; Crutchley, James; Patel, Asha; George, Vinoj; Denning, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The emphasis in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) technologies has shifted from cell therapy to in vitro disease modelling and drug screening. This review examines why this shift has occurred, and how current technological limitations might be overcome to fully realise the potential of hPSCs. Details are provided for all disease-specific human induced pluripotent stem cell lines spanning a dozen dysfunctional organ systems. Phenotype and pharmacology have been examined in only 17 of 63 lines, primarily those that model neurological and cardiac conditions. Drug screening is most advanced in hPSC-cardiomyocytes. Responses for almost 60 agents include examples of how careful tests in hPSC-cardiomyocytes have improved on existing in vitro assays, and how these cells have been integrated into high throughput imaging and electrophysiology industrial platforms. Such successes will provide an incentive to overcome bottlenecks in hPSC technology such as improving cell maturity and industrial scalability whilst reducing cost. PMID:22886688

  11. Cardiac repair in a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiovascular cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Chang, Ying-Hua; Xiong, Qiang; Zhang, Pengyuan; Zhang, Liying; Somasundaram, Porur; Lepley, Mike; Swingen, Cory; Su, Liping; Wendel, Jacqueline S; Guo, Jing; Jang, Albert; Rosenbush, Daniel; Greder, Lucas; Dutton, James R; Zhang, Jianhua; Kamp, Timothy J; Kaufman, Dan S; Ge, Ying; Zhang, Jianyi

    2014-12-04

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) hold promise for myocardial repair following injury, but preclinical studies in large animal models are required to determine optimal cell preparation and delivery strategies to maximize functional benefits and to evaluate safety. Here, we utilized a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction (MI) to investigate the functional impact of intramyocardial transplantation of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells, in combination with a 3D fibrin patch loaded with insulin growth factor (IGF)-encapsulated microspheres. hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes integrated into host myocardium and generated organized sarcomeric structures, and endothelial and smooth muscle cells contributed to host vasculature. Trilineage cell transplantation significantly improved left ventricular function, myocardial metabolism, and arteriole density, while reducing infarct size, ventricular wall stress, and apoptosis without inducing ventricular arrhythmias. These findings in a large animal MI model highlight the potential of utilizing hiPSC-derived cells for cardiac repair. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The BIANCA model/code of radiation-induced cell death: application to human cells exposed to different radiation types.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, Francesca; Altieri, Saverio; Bortolussi, Silva; Carante, Mario; Giroletti, Elio; Protti, Nicoletta

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a biophysical model of radiation-induced cell death, implemented as a Monte Carlo code called BIophysical ANalysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations (BIANCA), based on the assumption that some chromosome aberrations (dicentrics, rings, and large deletions, called ‘‘lethal aberrations’’) lead to clonogenic inactivation. In turn, chromosome aberrations are assumed to derive from clustered, and thus severe, DNA lesions (called ‘‘cluster lesions,’’ or CL) interacting at the micrometer scale; the CL yield and the threshold distance governing CL interaction are the only model parameters. After a pilot study on V79 hamster cells exposed to protons and carbon ions, in the present work the model was extended and applied to AG1522 human cells exposed to photons, He ions, and heavier ions including carbon and neon. The agreement with experimental survival data taken from the literature supported the assumptions. In particular, the inactivation of AG1522 cells was explained by lethal aberrations not only for X-rays, as already reported by others, but also for the aforementioned radiation types. Furthermore, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the critical initial lesions leading to cell death are DNA cluster lesions having yields in the order of *2 CL Gy-1 cell-1 at low LET and*20 CL Gy-1 cell-1 at high LET, and that the processing of these lesions is modulated by proximity effects at the micrometer scale related to interphase chromatin organization. The model was then applied to calculate the fraction of inactivated cells, as well as the yields of lethal aberrations and cluster lesions, as a function of LET; the results showed a maximum around 130 keV/lm, and such maximum was much higher for cluster lesions and lethal aberrations than for cell inactivation.

  13. Human neuronal cell based assay: A new in vitro model for toxicity evaluation of ciguatoxin.

    PubMed

    Coccini, Teresa; Caloni, Francesca; De Simone, Uliana

    2017-06-01

    Ciguatoxins (CTXs) are emerging marine neurotoxins representing the main cause of ciguatera fish poisoning, an intoxication syndrome which configures a health emergency and constitutes an evolving issue constantly changing due to new vectors and derivatives of CTXs, as well as their presence in new non-endemic areas. The study applied the neuroblastoma cell model of human origin (SH-SY5Y) to evaluate species-specific mechanistic information on CTX toxicity. Metabolic functionality, cell morphology, cytosolic Ca(2+)i responses, neuronal cell growth and proliferation were assessed after short- (4-24h) and long-term exposure (10days) to P-CTX-3C. In SH-SY5Y, P-CTX-3C displayed a powerful cytotoxicity requiring the presence of both Veratridine and Ouabain. SH-SY5Y were very sensitive to Ouabain: 10 and 0.25nM appeared the optimal concentrations, for short- and long-term toxicity studies, respectively, to be used in co-incubation with Veratridine (25μM), simulating the physiological and pathological endogenous Ouabain levels in humans. P-CTX-3C cytotoxic effect, on human neurons co-incubated with OV (Ouabain+Veratridine) mix, was expressed starting from 100pM after short- and 25pM after long-term exposure. Notably, P-CTX-3C alone at 25nM induced cytotoxicity after 24h and prolonged exposure. This human brain-derived cell line appears a suitable cell-based-model to evaluate cytotoxicity of CTX present in marine food contaminated at low toxic levels and to characterize the toxicological profile of other/new congeners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a realistic in vivo bone metastasis model of human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Valta, Maija P; Zhao, Hongjuan; Ingels, Alexandre; Thong, Alan E; Nolley, Rosalie; Saar, Matthias; Peehl, Donna M

    2014-06-01

    About one-third of patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) have bone metastases. The incidence of RCC is increasing and bone metastatic RCC merits greater focus. Realistic preclinical bone metastasis models of RCC are lacking, hampering the development of effective therapies. We developed a realistic in vivo bone metastasis model of human RCC by implanting precision-cut tissue slices under the renal capsule of immunodeficient mice. The presence of disseminated cells in bone marrow of tissue slice graft (TSG)-bearing mice was screened by human-specific polymerase chain reaction and confirmed by immunohistology using human-specific antibody. Disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow of TSG-bearing mice derived from three of seven RCC patients were detected as early as 1 month after tissue implantation at a high frequency with close resemblance to parent tumors (e.g., CAIX expression and high vascularity). The metastatic patterns of TSGs correlated with disease progression in patients. In addition, TSGs retained capacity to metastasize to bone at high frequency after serial passaging and cryopreservation. Moreover, bone metastases in mice responded to Temsirolimus treatment. Intratibial injections of single cells generated from TSGs showed 100 % engraftment and produced X-ray-visible tumors as early as 3 weeks after cancer cell inoculation. Micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histological analysis revealed osteolytic characteristics of these lesions. Our results demonstrated that orthotopic RCC TSGs have potential to develop bone metastases that respond to standard therapy. This first reported primary RCC bone metastasis model provides a realistic setting to test therapeutics to prevent or treat bone metastases in RCC.

  15. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake and transport in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability. In the present study, we measured the uptake and transport of various Se compounds in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. We found that two sources...

  16. In Vitro Modeling of RSV Infection and Cytopathogenesis in Well-Differentiated Human Primary Airway Epithelial Cells (WD-PAECs).

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Lindsay; Villenave, Remi; Guo-Parke, Hong; Douglas, Isobel; Shields, Michael D; Power, Ultan F

    2016-01-01

    The choice of model used to study human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is extremely important. RSV is a human pathogen that is exquisitely adapted to infection of human hosts. Rodent models, such as mice and cotton rats, are semi-permissive to RSV infection and do not faithfully reproduce hallmarks of RSV disease in humans. Furthermore, immortalized airway-derived cell lines, such as HEp-2, BEAS-2B, and A549 cells, are poorly representative of the complexity of the respiratory epithelium. The development of a well-differentiated primary pediatric airway epithelial cell models (WD-PAECs) allows us to simulate several hallmarks of RSV infection of infant airways. They therefore represent important additions to RSV pathogenesis modeling in human-relevant tissues. The following protocols describe how to culture and differentiate both bronchial and nasal primary pediatric airway epithelial cells and how to use these cultures to study RSV cytopathogenesis.

  17. Population based model of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation during endoderm induction.

    PubMed

    Task, Keith; Jaramillo, Maria; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which human embryonic stem cells (hESC) differentiate to endodermal lineage have not been extensively studied. Mathematical models can aid in the identification of mechanistic information. In this work we use a population-based modeling approach to understand the mechanism of endoderm induction in hESC, performed experimentally with exposure to Activin A and Activin A supplemented with growth factors (basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4)). The differentiating cell population is analyzed daily for cellular growth, cell death, and expression of the endoderm proteins Sox17 and CXCR4. The stochastic model starts with a population of undifferentiated cells, wherefrom it evolves in time by assigning each cell a propensity to proliferate, die and differentiate using certain user defined rules. Twelve alternate mechanisms which might describe the observed dynamics were simulated, and an ensemble parameter estimation was performed on each mechanism. A comparison of the quality of agreement of experimental data with simulations for several competing mechanisms led to the identification of one which adequately describes the observed dynamics under both induction conditions. The results indicate that hESC commitment to endoderm occurs through an intermediate mesendoderm germ layer which further differentiates into mesoderm and endoderm, and that during induction proliferation of the endoderm germ layer is promoted. Furthermore, our model suggests that CXCR4 is expressed in mesendoderm and endoderm, but is not expressed in mesoderm. Comparison between the two induction conditions indicates that supplementing FGF2 and BMP4 to Activin A enhances the kinetics of differentiation than Activin A alone. This mechanistic information can aid in the derivation of functional, mature cells from their progenitors. While applied to initial endoderm commitment of hESC, the model is general enough to be applicable either to a system of

  18. Cutaneous manifestations of human T cell leukemia virus type I infection in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M; Leno, M; Hubbard, B S; Kindt, T J

    1996-03-01

    Skin diseases ranging from infective dermatitis to cutaneous lymphoma have been associated with human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV) type I. A generalized exfoliative papillated dermatopathy occurred in a rabbit 20 months into a course of chronic HTLV-I infection. Biopsies revealed epidermotropic T cell infiltrates, including Sezary-like cells, that resulted in a pattern mimicking cutaneous T cell lymphoma. HTLV-I was isolated from affected skin, and virus expression was detected in cutaneous cultures. Sezary-like cells also occurred in circulation. Interleukin-2-independent lymphocyte cultures, established from blood exhibiting elevated CD8 T cell levels and CD25 expression, had polyclonal integration of provirus. The findings are similar to those in evolving adult T cell leukemia lymphoma and may represent a prelymphomatous change. The cutaneous lymphoproliferative lesion resulted from HTLV-I infection and further establishes the New Zealand White rabbit inoculated with the RH/K34 cell line as a suitable model for investigation of HTLV-I pathogenesis.

  19. Cardiomyopathy in a dish: using human inducible pluripotent stem cells to model inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Forum; Klaassen Kamdar, Andre; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Mary G; Garry, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathies, arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and other inherited forms of heart failure, represent a unique set of genetically defined cardiovascular disease processes. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms of these deadly forms of human heart disease has been challenging, but recent groundbreaking scientific advances in stem cell technology have allowed for the generation of patient-specific human inducible stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs). hiPSC-derived CMs retain the genetic blueprint of the patient, they can be maintained in culture, and they recapitulate the phenotypic characteristics of the disease in vitro, thus serving as a disease in a dish. This review provides an overview of in vitro modeling of inherited cardiomyopathies with the use of patient-specific hiPSC-derived CMs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Cardiomyopathy in a dish: Using human inducible pluripotent stem cells to model inherited cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Forum; Kamdar, Andre Klaassen; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Mary G.; Garry, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM), arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and other inherited forms of heart failure represent a unique set of genetically defined cardiovascular disease processes. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms of these deadly forms of human heart disease has been challenging, however recent groundbreaking scientific advances in stem cell technology has allowed for the generation of patient-specific human inducible stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-derived CMs). hiPSC-derived CMs retain the genetic blueprint of the patient, they can be maintained in culture, and they recapitulate the phenotypic characteristics of the disease in vitro, thus serving as a disease in a dish. This review provides an overview of in vitro modeling of inherited cardiomyopathies using patient-specific hiPSC-derived CMs. PMID:25934595

  1. Expression kinetics of hepatic progenitor markers in cellular models of human liver development recapitulating hepatocyte and biliary cell fate commitment.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Pooja; Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-09-01

    Due to the limitations of research using human embryos and the lack of a biological model of human liver development, the roles of the various markers associated with liver stem or progenitor cell potential in humans are largely speculative, and based on studies utilizing animal models and certain patient tissues. Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro multistage hepatic differentiation systems may serve as good surrogate models for mimicking normal human liver development, pathogenesis and injury/regeneration studies. Here, we describe the implications of various liver stem or progenitor cell markers and their bipotency (i.e. hepatocytic- and biliary-epithelial cell differentiation), based on the pluripotent stem cell-derived model of human liver development. Future studies using the human cellular model(s) of liver and biliary development will provide more human relevant biological and/or pathological roles of distinct markers expressed in heterogeneous liver stem/progenitor cell populations. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  2. Human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells as an in vitro model of human hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Mitani, Seiji; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Takayama, Kazuo; Tachibana, Masashi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Iijima, Sayuki; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-04

    In order to understand the life cycle of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and to develop efficient anti-HBV drugs, a useful in vitro cell culture system which allows HBV infection and recapitulates virus-host interactions is essential; however, pre-existing in vitro HBV infection models are often problematic. Here, we examined the potential of human induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-HLCs) as an in vitro HBV infection model. Expression levels of several genes involved in HBV infection, including the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) gene, were gradually elevated as the differentiation status of human iPS cells proceeded to iPS-HLCs. The mRNA levels of these genes were comparable between primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and iPS-HLCs. Following inoculation with HBV, we found significant production of HBV proteins and viral RNAs in iPS-HLCs. The three major forms of the HBV genome were detected in iPS-HLCs by Southern blotting analysis. Anti-HBV agents entecavir and Myrcludex-B, which are a nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a synthetic pre-S1 peptide, respectively, significantly inhibited HBV infection in iPS-HLCs. These data demonstrate that iPS-HLCs can be used as a promising in vitro HBV infection model.

  3. Human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells as an in vitro model of human hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Mitani, Seiji; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Takayama, Kazuo; Tachibana, Masashi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Iijima, Sayuki; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    In order to understand the life cycle of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and to develop efficient anti-HBV drugs, a useful in vitro cell culture system which allows HBV infection and recapitulates virus-host interactions is essential; however, pre-existing in vitro HBV infection models are often problematic. Here, we examined the potential of human induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-HLCs) as an in vitro HBV infection model. Expression levels of several genes involved in HBV infection, including the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) gene, were gradually elevated as the differentiation status of human iPS cells proceeded to iPS-HLCs. The mRNA levels of these genes were comparable between primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and iPS-HLCs. Following inoculation with HBV, we found significant production of HBV proteins and viral RNAs in iPS-HLCs. The three major forms of the HBV genome were detected in iPS-HLCs by Southern blotting analysis. Anti-HBV agents entecavir and Myrcludex-B, which are a nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a synthetic pre-S1 peptide, respectively, significantly inhibited HBV infection in iPS-HLCs. These data demonstrate that iPS-HLCs can be used as a promising in vitro HBV infection model. PMID:28374759

  4. Effects of an antimalarial quinazoline derivative on human erythrocytes and on cell membrane molecular models.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Aguirre, Yareli; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Mendoza-Martínez, César; Sotomayor, Carlos Patricio; Aguilar, Luis Felipe; Villena, Fernando; Castillo, Ivan; Hernández, David J; Suwalsky, Mario

    2012-03-01

    Plasmodium, the parasite which causes malaria in humans multiplies in the liver and then infects circulating erythrocytes. Thus, the role of the erythrocyte cell membrane in antimalarial drug activity and resistance has key importance. The effects of the antiplasmodial N(6)-(4-methoxybenzyl)quinazoline-2,4,6-triamine (M4), and its inclusion complex (M4/HPβCD) with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) on human erythrocytes and on cell membrane molecular models are herein reported. This work evidences that M4/HPβCD interacts with red cells as follows: a) in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on human erythrocytes induced shape changes at a 10μM concentration; b) in isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) a concentration as low as 1μM induced sharp DPH fluorescence anisotropy decrease whereas increasing concentrations produced a monotonically decrease of DPH fluorescence lifetime at 37°C; c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that 200μM induced a complete structural perturbation of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers whereas no significant effects were detected in dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) bilayers, classes of lipids present in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively; d) fluorescence spectroscopy data showed that increasing concentrations of the complex interacted with the deep hydrophobic core of DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) at 18°C. All these experiments are consistent with the insertion of M4/HPβCD in the outer monolayer of the human erythrocyte membrane; thus, it can be considered a promising and novel antimalarial agent.

  5. QSAR model for predicting cell viability of human embryonic kidney cells exposed to SiO₂ nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Serena; Leone, Caterina; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Benfenati, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    A predictive model for the viability (%) of cultured human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) exposed to 20 and 50 nm silica nanoparticles was built using 'optimal descriptors' as mathematical functions of size, concentration and exposure time. The calculation was carried out with CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral/) on five random splits of combined systems (particle size-particle concentration-cell exposure time) into training, calibration, and validation sets. The R(2) values of the best models were above 0.68. The average statistical quality of the model for the viability (%) of HEK293 exposed to different concentrations of silica nanoparticles measured by MTT assay is satisfactory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antioxidant and Cytoprotective Activities of Fucus spiralis Seaweed on a Human Cell in Vitro Model.

    PubMed

    Pinteus, Susete; Silva, Joana; Alves, Celso; Horta, André; Thomas, Olivier P; Pedrosa, Rui

    2017-01-29

    Antioxidants play an important role as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) chelating agents and, therefore, the screening for potent antioxidants from natural sources as potential protective agents is of great relevance. The main aim of this study was to obtain antioxidant-enriched fractions from the common seaweed Fucus spiralis and evaluate their activity and efficiency in protecting human cells (MCF-7 cells) on an oxidative stress condition induced by H₂O₂. Five fractions, F1-F5, were obtained by reversed-phase vacuum liquid chromatography. F3, F4 and F5 revealed the highest phlorotannin content, also showing the strongest antioxidant effects. The cell death induced by H₂O₂ was reduced by all fractions following the potency order F4 > F2 > F3 > F5 > F1. Only fraction F4 completely inhibited the H₂O₂ effect. To understand the possible mechanisms of action of these fractions, the cellular production of H₂O₂, the mitochondrial membrane potential and the caspase 9 activity were studied. Fractions F3 and F4 presented the highest reduction on H₂O₂ cell production. All fractions decreased both caspase-9 activity and cell membrane depolarization (except F1). Taken all together, the edible F. spiralis reveal that they provide protection against oxidative stress induced by H₂O₂ on the human MCF-7 cellular model, probably acting as upstream blockers of apoptosis.

  7. Antioxidant and Cytoprotective Activities of Fucus spiralis Seaweed on a Human Cell in Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Pinteus, Susete; Silva, Joana; Alves, Celso; Horta, André; Thomas, Olivier P.; Pedrosa, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Antioxidants play an important role as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) chelating agents and, therefore, the screening for potent antioxidants from natural sources as potential protective agents is of great relevance. The main aim of this study was to obtain antioxidant-enriched fractions from the common seaweed Fucus spiralis and evaluate their activity and efficiency in protecting human cells (MCF-7 cells) on an oxidative stress condition induced by H2O2. Five fractions, F1–F5, were obtained by reversed-phase vacuum liquid chromatography. F3, F4 and F5 revealed the highest phlorotannin content, also showing the strongest antioxidant effects. The cell death induced by H2O2 was reduced by all fractions following the potency order F4 > F2 > F3 > F5 > F1. Only fraction F4 completely inhibited the H2O2 effect. To understand the possible mechanisms of action of these fractions, the cellular production of H2O2, the mitochondrial membrane potential and the caspase 9 activity were studied. Fractions F3 and F4 presented the highest reduction on H2O2 cell production. All fractions decreased both caspase-9 activity and cell membrane depolarization (except F1). Taken all together, the edible F. spiralis reveal that they provide protection against oxidative stress induced by H2O2 on the human MCF-7 cellular model, probably acting as upstream blockers of apoptosis. PMID:28146076

  8. A human stem cell model of early Alzheimer's disease pathology in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yichen; Kirwan, Peter; Smith, James; MacLean, Glenn; Orkin, Stuart H; Livesey, Frederick J

    2012-03-07

    Human cellular models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis would enable the investigation of candidate pathogenic mechanisms in AD and the testing and developing of new therapeutic strategies. We report the development of AD pathologies in cortical neurons generated from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from patients with Down syndrome. Adults with Down syndrome (caused by trisomy of chromosome 21) develop early-onset AD, probably due to increased expression of a gene on chromosome 21 that encodes the amyloid precursor protein (APP). We found that cortical neurons generated from iPS cells and embryonic stem cells from Down syndrome patients developed AD pathologies over months in culture, rather than years in vivo. These cortical neurons processed the transmembrane APP protein, resulting in secretion of the pathogenic peptide fragment amyloid-β42 (Aβ42), which formed insoluble intracellular and extracellular amyloid aggregates. Production of Aβ peptides was blocked by a γ-secretase inhibitor. Finally, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, a pathological hallmark of AD, was found to be localized to cell bodies and dendrites in iPS cell-derived cortical neurons from Down syndrome patients, recapitulating later stages of the AD pathogenic process.

  9. Modeling HSV-1 Latency in Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pourchet, Aldo; Modrek, Aram S.; Placantonakis, Dimitris G.; Mohr, Ian; Wilson, Angus C.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) uses latency in peripheral ganglia to persist in its human host, however, recurrent reactivation from this reservoir can cause debilitating and potentially life-threatening disease. Most studies of latency use live-animal infection models, but these are complex, multilayered systems and can be difficult to manipulate. Infection of cultured primary neurons provides a powerful alternative, yielding important insights into host signaling pathways controlling latency. However, small animal models do not recapitulate all aspects of HSV-1 infection in humans and are limited in terms of the available molecular tools. To address this, we have developed a latency model based on human neurons differentiated in culture from an NIH-approved embryonic stem cell line. The resulting neurons are highly permissive for replication of wild-type HSV-1, but establish a non-productive infection state resembling latency when infected at low viral doses in the presence of the antivirals acyclovir and interferon-α. In this state, viral replication and expression of a late viral gene marker are not detected but there is an accumulation of the viral latency-associated transcript (LAT) RNA. After a six-day establishment period, antivirals can be removed and the infected cultures maintained for several weeks. Subsequent treatment with sodium butyrate induces reactivation and production of new infectious virus. Human neurons derived from stem cells provide the appropriate species context to study this exclusively human virus with the potential for more extensive manipulation of the progenitors and access to a wide range of preexisting molecular tools. PMID:28594343

  10. A model for neural development and treatment of Rett syndrome using human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Marchetto, Maria C N; Carromeu, Cassiano; Acab, Allan; Yu, Diana; Yeo, Gene W; Mu, Yangling; Chen, Gong; Gage, Fred H; Muotri, Alysson R

    2010-11-12

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental diseases in which different combinations of genetic mutations may contribute to the phenotype. Using Rett syndrome (RTT) as an ASD genetic model, we developed a culture system using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from RTT patients' fibroblasts. RTT patients' iPSCs are able to undergo X-inactivation and generate functional neurons. Neurons derived from RTT-iPSCs had fewer synapses, reduced spine density, smaller soma size, altered calcium signaling and electrophysiological defects when compared to controls. Our data uncovered early alterations in developing human RTT neurons. Finally, we used RTT neurons to test the effects of drugs in rescuing synaptic defects. Our data provide evidence of an unexplored developmental window, before disease onset, in RTT syndrome where potential therapies could be successfully employed. Our model recapitulates early stages of a human neurodevelopmental disease and represents a promising cellular tool for drug screening, diagnosis and personalized treatment.

  11. A model for neural development and treatment of Rett Syndrome using human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Marchetto, Maria C. N.; Carromeu, Cassiano; Acab, Allan; Yu, Diana; Yeo, Gene; Mu, Yangling; Chen, Gong; Gage, Fred H.; Muotri, Alysson R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental diseases in which different combinations of genetic mutations may contribute to the phenotype. Using Rett syndrome (RTT) as an ASD genetic model, we developed a culture system using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from RTT patients’ fibroblasts. RTT patients’ iPSCs are able to undergo X-inactivation and generate functional neurons. Neurons derived from RTT-iPSCs had fewer synapses, reduced spine density, smaller soma size, altered calcium signaling and electrophysiological defects when compared to controls. Our data uncovered early alterations in developing human RTT neurons. Finally, we used RTT neurons to test the effects of drugs in rescuing synaptic defects. Our data provide evidence of an unexplored developmental window, before disease onset, in RTT syndrome where potential therapies could be successfully employed. Our model recapitulates early stages of a human neurodevelopmental disease and represents a promising cellular tool for drug screening, diagnosis and personalized treatment. PMID:21074045

  12. Modeling human cortical development in vitro using induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Jessica; Simonini, Maria Vittoria; Palejev, Dean; Tomasini, Livia; Coppola, Gianfilippo; Szekely, Anna M.; Horvath, Tamas L.; Vaccarino, Flora M.

    2012-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are emerging as a tool for understanding human brain development at cellular, molecular, and genomic levels. Here we show that hiPSCs grown in suspension in the presence of rostral neuralizing factors can generate 3D structures containing polarized radial glia, intermediate progenitors, and a spectrum of layer-specific cortical neurons reminiscent of their organization in vivo. The hiPSC-derived multilayered structures express a gene expression profile typical of the embryonic telencephalon but not that of other CNS regions. Their transcriptome is highly enriched in transcription factors controlling the specification, growth, and patterning of the dorsal telencephalon and displays highest correlation with that of the early human cerebral cortical wall at 8–10 wk after conception. Thus, hiPSC are capable of enacting a transcriptional program specifying human telencephalic (pallial) development. This model will allow the study of human brain development as well as disorders of the human cerebral cortex. PMID:22761314

  13. A Model of Giant Vacuole Dynamics in Human Schlemm’s Canal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Simon, David; Reed, Ashley; Stamer, W. Daniel; Overby, Darryl R.

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous humour transport across the inner wall endothelium of Schlemm’s canal likely involves flow through giant vacuoles and pores, but the mechanics of how these structures form and how they influence the regulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) are not well understood. In this study, we developed an in vitro model of giant vacuole formation in human Schlemm’s canal endothelial cells (HSCECs) perfused in the basal-to-apical direction (i.e., the direction that flow crosses the inner wall in vivo) under controlled pressure drops (2 or 6 mmHg). The system was mounted on a confocal microscope for time-lapse en face imaging, and cells were stained with calcein, a fluorescent vital dye. At the onset of perfusion, elliptical void regions appeared within an otherwise uniformly stained cytoplasm, and 3-dimensional reconstructions revealed that these voids were dome-like outpouchings of the cell to form giant vacuole-like structures or GVLs that reproduced the classic “signet ring” appearance of true giant vacuoles. Increasing pressure drop from 2 to 6 mmHg increased GVL height (14 ± 4 vs. 21 ± 7 µm, p < 0.0001) and endothelial hydraulic conductivity (1.15 ± 0.04 vs. 2.11 ± 0.49 µL min−1 mmHg−1 cm−2; p < 0.001), but there was significant variability in the GVL response to pressure between cell lines isolated from different donors. During perfusion, GVLs were observed “migrating” and agglomerating about the cell layer and often collapsed despite maintaining the same pressure drop. GVL formation was also observed in human umbilical vein and porcine aortic endothelial cells, suggesting that giant vacuole formation is not a unique property of Schlemm’s canal cells. However, in these other cell types, GVLs were rarely observed “migrating” or contracting during perfusion, suggesting that Schlemm’s canal endothelial cells may be better adapted to withstand basal-to-apical directed pressure gradients. In conclusion, we have established an in vitro

  14. Differential susceptibility of primary cultured human skin cells to hypericin PDT in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Popovic, A; Wiggins, T; Davids, L M

    2015-08-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer worldwide, and its incidence rate in South Africa is increasing. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective treatment modality, through topical administration, for treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers. Our group investigates hypericin-induced PDT (HYP-PDT) for the treatment of both non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. However, a prerequisite for effective cancer treatments is efficient and selective targeting of the tumoral cells with minimal collateral damage to the surrounding normal cells, as it is well established that cancer therapies have bystander effects on normal cells in the body, often causing undesirable side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular and molecular effects of HYP-PDT on normal primary human keratinocytes (Kc), melanocytes (Mc) and fibroblasts (Fb) in an in vitro tissue culture model which represented both the epidermal and dermal cellular compartments of human skin. Cell viability analysis revealed a differential cytotoxic response to a range of HYP-PDT doses in all the human skin cell types, showing that Fb (LD50=1.75μM) were the most susceptible to HYP-PDT, followed by Mc (LD50=3.5μM) and Kc (LD50>4μM HYP-PDT) These results correlated with the morphological analysis which displayed distinct morphological changes in Fb and Mc, 24h post treatment with non-lethal (1μM) and lethal (3μM) doses of HYP-PDT, but the highest HYP-PDT doses had no effect on Kc morphology. Fluorescent microscopy displayed cytoplasmic localization of HYP in all the 3 skin cell types and additionally, HYP was excluded from the nuclei in all the cell types. Intracellular ROS levels measured in Fb at 3μM HYP-PDT, displayed a significant 3.8 fold (p<0.05) increase in ROS, but no significant difference in ROS levels occurred in Mc or Kc. Furthermore, 64% (p<0.005) early apoptotic Fb and 20% (p<0.05) early apoptotic Mc were evident; using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), 24

  15. Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) as Gene Carrier System for Rat Model of Human Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S.; Janic, Branislava; Iskander, A. S. M.; Shankar, Adarsh; Bhuiyan, Mohammed P. I.; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Jiang, Quan; Barton, Kenneth; Ali, Meser M.; Arbab, Ali S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to their unique property to migrate to pathological lesions, stem cells are used as a delivery vehicle for therapeutic genes to tumors, especially for glioma. It is critically important to track the movement, localization, engraftment efficiency and functional capability or expression of transgenes of selected cell populations following transplantation. The purposes of this study were to investigate whether 1) intravenously administered, genetically transformed cord blood derived EPCs can carry human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) to the sites of tumors in rat orthotopic model of human glioma and express transgene products, and 2) whether accumulation of these administered EPCs can be tracked by different in vivo imaging modalities. Methods and Results Collected EPCs were cultured and transduced to carry hNIS. Cellular viability, differential capacity and Tc-99m uptake were determined. Five to ten million EPCs were intravenously administered and Tc-99-SPECT images were acquired on day 8, to determine the accumulation of EPCs and expression of transgenes (increase activity of Tc-99m) in the tumors. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine endothelial cell markers and hNIS positive cells in the tumors. Transduced EPCs were also magnetically labeled and accumulation of cells was confirmed by MRI and histochemistry. SPECT analysis showed increased activity of Tc-99m in the tumors that received transduced EPCs, indicative of the expression of transgene (hNIS). Activity of Tc-99m in the tumors was also dependent on the number of administered transduced EPCs. MRI showed the accumulation of magnetically labeled EPCs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed iron and hNIS positive and, human CD31 and vWF positive cells in the tumors. Conclusion EPC was able to carry and express hNIS in glioma following IV administration. SPECT detected migration of EPCs and expression of the hNIS gene. EPCs can be used as gene carrier/delivery system for glioma therapy as

  16. Neuroprotective effect of a cell-free extract derived from human adipose stem cells in experimental stroke models.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Daejong; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Ban, Jae-Jun; Park, Dong-Kyu; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Jung, Seungmoon; Yang, Hyunwoo; Kim, Byung Sun; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, So Hee; Kim, Jeong-Min; Won, Chong-Hyun; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2013-06-01

    A recent study suggested that a cell-free extract of human adipose stem cells (hASCs-E) has beneficial effects on neurological diseases by modulating the host environment. Here, we investigated the effects of hASCs-E in several experimental models of stroke in vitro (oxygen and glucose deprivation, OGD) and in vivo (transient or permanent focal cerebral ischemia and intracerebral hemorrhage, ICH). Ischemia was induced in vitro in Neuro2A cells, and the hASCs-E was applied 24h before the OGD or concurrently. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by unilateral intraluminal thread occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in rats for 90min or permanently, or by unilateral MCA microsurgical direct electrocoagulation in mice. The ICH model was induced with an intracerebral injection of collagenase in rats. The hASCs-E was intraperitoneally administered 1h after the stroke insults. Treatment of the hASCs-E led to a substantially high viability in the lactate dehydrogenase and WST-1 assays in the in vitro ischemic model. The cerebral ischemic and ICH model treated with hASCs-E showed decreased ischemic volume and reduced brain water content and hemorrhage volume. The ICH model treated with hASCs-E exhibited better performance on the modified limb placing test. The expression of many genes related to inflammation, immune response, and cell-death was changed substantially in the ischemic rats or neuronal cells treated with the hASCs-E. These results reveal a neuroprotective role of hASCs-E in animal models of stroke, and suggest the feasible application of stem cell-based, noninvasive therapy for treating stroke.

  17. Complete suppression of in vivo growth of human leukemia cells by specific immunotoxins: nude mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, H.; Seon, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    In this study, immunotoxins containing monoclonal anti-human T-cell leukemia antibodies are shown to be capable of completely suppressing the tumor growth of human T-cell leukemia cells in vivo without any overt undersirable toxicity. These immunotoxins were prepared by conjugating ricin A chain (RA) with our monoclonal antibodies, SN1 and SN2, directed specifically to the human T-cell leukemia cell surface antigens TALLA and GP37, respectively. The authors have shown that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for human T-cell leukemia cells and do not react with various normal cells including normal T and B cells, thymocytes, and bone marrow cells. Ascitic and solid human T-cell leukemia cell tumors were generated in nude mice. The ascitic tumor was generated by transplanting Ichikawa cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell) i.p. into nude mice, whereas the solid tumor was generated by transplanting s.c. MOLT-4 cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell line) and x-irradiated human fibrosarcoma cells into x-irradiated nude mice. To investigate the efficacy of specific immunotoxins in suppression the in vivo growth of the ascitic tumor, they divided 40 nude mice that were injected with Ichikawa cells into four groups. None of the mice in group 4 that were treated with SN1-RA and SN2-RA showed any signs of a tumor or undesirable toxic effects for the 20 weeks that they were followed after the transplantation. Treatment with SN1-RA plus SN2-RA completely suppressed solid tumor growth in 4 of 10 nude mice carrying solid tumors and partially suppressed the tumor growth in the remaining 6 nude mice. These results strongly suggest that SN1-RA and SN2-RA may be useful for clinical treatment.

  18. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived acinar/ductal organoids generate human pancreas upon orthotopic transplantation and allow disease modelling.

    PubMed

    Hohwieler, Meike; Illing, Anett; Hermann, Patrick C; Mayer, Tobias; Stockmann, Marianne; Perkhofer, Lukas; Eiseler, Tim; Antony, Justin S; Müller, Martin; Renz, Susanne; Kuo, Chao-Chung; Lin, Qiong; Sendler, Matthias; Breunig, Markus; Kleiderman, Susanne M; Lechel, André; Zenker, Martin; Leichsenring, Michael; Rosendahl, Jonas; Zenke, Martin; Sainz, Bruno; Mayerle, Julia; Costa, Ivan G; Seufferlein, Thomas; Kormann, Michael; Wagner, Martin; Liebau, Stefan; Kleger, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    The generation of acinar and ductal cells from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is a poorly studied process, although various diseases arise from this compartment. We designed a straightforward approach to direct human PSCs towards pancreatic organoids resembling acinar and ductal progeny. Extensive phenotyping of the organoids not only shows the appropriate marker profile but also ultrastructural, global gene expression and functional hallmarks of the human pancreas in the dish. Upon orthotopic transplantation into immunodeficient mice, these organoids form normal pancreatic ducts and acinar tissue resembling fetal human pancreas without evidence of tumour formation or transformation. Finally, we implemented this unique phenotyping tool as a model to study the pancreatic facets of cystic fibrosis (CF). For the first time, we provide evidence that in vitro, but also in our xenograft transplantation assay, pancreatic commitment occurs generally unhindered in CF. Importantly, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) activation in mutated pancreatic organoids not only mirrors the CF phenotype in functional assays but also at a global expression level. We also conducted a scalable proof-of-concept screen in CF pancreatic organoids using a set of CFTR correctors and activators, and established an mRNA-mediated gene therapy approach in CF organoids. Taken together, our platform provides novel opportunities to model pancreatic disease and development, screen for disease-rescuing agents and to test therapeutic procedures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Modelling epigenetic regulation of gene expression in 12 human cell types reveals combinatorial patterns of cell-type-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yiming; Qu, Wubin; Min, Bo; Liu, Zheyan; Chen, Changsheng; Zhang, Chenggang

    2014-06-01

    The maintenance of the diverse cell types in a multicellular organism is one of the fundamental mysteries of biology. Modelling the dynamic regulatory relationships between the histone modifications and the gene expression across the diverse cell types is essential for the authors to understand the mechanisms of the epigenetic regulation. Here, the authors thoroughly assessed the histone modification enrichment profiles at the promoters and constructed quantitative models between the histone modification abundances and the gene expression in 12 human cell types. The author's results showed that the histone modifications at the promoters exhibited remarkably cell-type-dependent variability in the cell-type-specific (CTS) genes. They demonstrated that the variable profiles of the modifications are highly predictive for the dynamic changes of the gene expression across all the cell types. Their findings revealed the close relationship between the combinatorial patterns of the histone modifications and the CTS gene expression. They anticipate that the findings and the methods they used in this study could provide useful information for the future studies of the regulatory roles of the histone modifications in the CTS genes.

  20. Alternating electric fields arrest cell proliferation in animal tumor models and human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kirson, Eilon D.; Dbalý, Vladimír; Tovaryš, František; Vymazal, Josef; Soustiel, Jean F.; Itzhaki, Aviran; Mordechovich, Daniel; Steinberg-Shapira, Shirley; Gurvich, Zoya; Schneiderman, Rosa; Wasserman, Yoram; Salzberg, Marc; Ryffel, Bernhard; Goldsher, Dorit; Dekel, Erez; Palti, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    We have recently shown that low intensity, intermediate frequency, electric fields inhibit by an anti-microtubule mechanism of action, cancerous cell growth in vitro. Using implanted electrodes, these fields were also shown to inhibit the growth of dermal tumors in mice. The present study extends these findings to additional cell lines [human breast carcinoma; MDA-MB-231, and human non-small-cell lung carcinoma (H1299)] and to animal tumor models (intradermal B16F1 melanoma and intracranial F-98 glioma) using external insulated electrodes. These findings led to the initiation of a pilot clinical trial of the effects of TTFields in 10 patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). Median time to disease progression in these patients was 26.1 weeks and median overall survival was 62.2 weeks. These time to disease progression and OS values are more than double the reported medians of historical control patients. No device-related serious adverse events were seen after >70 months of cumulative treatment in all of the patients. The only device-related side effect seen was a mild to moderate contact dermatitis beneath the field delivering electrodes. We conclude that TTFields are a safe and effective new treatment modality which effectively slows down tumor growth in vitro, in vivo and, as demonstrated here, in human cancer patients. PMID:17551011

  1. Flotillin-2 Expression in the Human Gut: from a Cell Model to Human Tissue in Health and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, Annika; Buchholz, Inga; Zahn, Alexandra; Schmitz, Gerd; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Fuellekrug, Joachim; Ehehalt, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: The etiopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) remains largely unexplained. Flotillins (flotillin-1 and flotillin-2) are ubiquitous proteins which have been linked to inflammation and regeneration. We hypothesized that alterations in the expression of flotillin-2 in enterocytes may be related to the pathogenesis of IBD as a classical example of an inflammatory disorder of mostly unknown origin. Methods: Cell and tissue localization of flotillin-2 (and -1) were investigated by immunofluorescent staining in 1. polarized and unpolarized CaCo-2w cells as a model of human enterocytes (native and after TNFα stimulation) and 2. intestinal biopsies from controls, patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and patients with Crohn's disease (CD). For quantification of flotillin-2, we analyzed its expression in ileal and colonic biopsies from controls, UC patients and CD patients using real-time RT-PCR, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence. Results: In polarized CaCo-2w cells and human enterocytes in biopsies, flotillins were localized at the basolateral membrane and on subapical vesicles, but not in the apical membrane. Flotillin-2 expression did not differ between UC patients, CD patients and controls. However, it was significantly higher in colonic biopsies compared to ileal biopsies in all groups. Conclusions: By virtue of its abundant expression in enterocytes, flotillin-2 must have an essential function in intestinal physiology, especially in the colon. Yet our data could not link flotillin-2 to the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:23983584

  2. Preconditioned mesenchymal stem cells treat myasthenia gravis in a humanized preclinical model

    PubMed Central

    Sudres, Muriel; Maurer, Marie; Robinet, Marieke; Bismuth, Jacky; Truffault, Frédérique; Girard, Diane; Dragin, Nadine; Attia, Mohamed; Fadel, Elie; Santelmo, Nicola; Sicsic, Camille; Brenner, Talma

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with anti–acetylcholine receptor (AChR) Abs is an autoimmune disease characterized by severe defects in immune regulation and thymic inflammation. Because mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) display immunomodulatory features, we investigated whether and how in vitro–preconditioned human MSCs (cMSCs) could treat MG disease. We developed a new humanized preclinical model by subcutaneously grafting thymic MG fragments into immunodeficient NSG mice (NSG-MG model). Ninety percent of the animals displayed human anti-AChR Abs in the serum, and 50% of the animals displayed MG-like symptoms that correlated with the loss of AChR at the muscle endplates. Interestingly, each mouse experiment recapitulated the MG features of each patient. We next demonstrated that cMSCs markedly improved MG, reducing the level of anti-AChR Abs in the serum and restoring AChR expression at the muscle endplate. Resting MSCs had a smaller effect. Finally, we showed that the underlying mechanisms involved (a) the inhibition of cell proliferation, (b) the inhibition of B cell–related and costimulatory molecules, and (c) the activation of the complement regulator DAF/CD55. In conclusion, this study shows that a preconditioning step promotes the therapeutic effects of MSCs via combined mechanisms, making cMSCs a promising strategy for treating MG and potentially other autoimmune diseases. PMID:28405609

  3. Bioluminescent Orthotopic Mouse Models of Human Localized Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Feasibility and Identification of Circulating Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lahon, Benoit; Castier, Yves; Lesèche, Guy; Soria, Jean-Charles; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Decraene, Charles; Deutsch, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Background Preclinical models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) require better clinical relevance to study disease mechanisms and innovative therapeutics. We sought to compare and refine bioluminescent orthotopic mouse models of human localized NSCLC. Methods Athymic nude mice underwent subcutaneous injection (group 1-SC, n = 15, control), percutaneous orthotopic injection (group 2-POI, n = 30), surgical orthotopic implantation of subcutaneously grown tumours (group 3-SOI, n = 25), or transpleural orthotopic injection (group 4-TOI, n = 30) of A549-luciferase cells. Bioluminescent in vivo imaging was then performed weekly. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) were searched using Cellsearch® system in SC and TOI models. Results Group 2-POI was associated with unexpected direct pleural spreading of the cellular solution in 53% of the cases, forbidding further evaluation of any localized lung tumour. Group 3-SOI was characterized by high perioperative mortality, initially localized lung tumours, and local evolution. Group 4-TOI was associated with low perioperative mortality, initially localized lung tumours, loco regional extension, and distant metastasis. CTCs were detected in 83% of nude mice bearing subcutaneous or orthotopic NSCLC tumours. Conclusions Transpleural orthotopic injection of A549-luc cells in nude mouse lung induces localized tumour, followed by lymphatic extension and specific mortality, and allowed the first time identification of CTCs in a NSCLC mice model. PMID:22022511

  4. Human macrophage and dendritic cell-specific silencing of high-mobility group protein B1 ameliorates sepsis in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang-Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Wu, Haoquan; Diaz, Dolores; Terreros, Daniel; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2012-12-18

    Hypersecretion of cytokines by innate immune cells is thought to initiate multiple organ failure in murine models of sepsis. Whether human cytokine storm also plays a similar role is not clear. Here, we show that human hematopoietic cells are required to induce sepsis-induced mortality following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in the severely immunodeficient nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) mice, and siRNA treatment to inhibit HMGB1 release by human macrophages and dendritic cells dramatically reduces sepsis-induced mortality. Following CLP, compared with immunocompetent WT mice, NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) mice did not show high levels of serum HMGB1 or murine proinflammatory cytokines and were relatively resistant to sepsis-induced mortality. In contrast, NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) mice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells [humanized bone marrow liver thymic mice (BLT) mice] showed high serum levels of HMGB1, as well as multiple human but not murine proinflammatory cytokines, and died uniformly, suggesting human cytokines are sufficient to induce organ failure in this model. Moreover, targeted delivery of HMGB1 siRNA to human macrophages and dendritic cells using a short acetylcholine receptor (AchR)-binding peptide [rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG)-9R] effectively suppressed secretion of HMGB1, reduced the human cytokine storm, human lymphocyte apoptosis, and rescued humanized mice from CLP-induced mortality. siRNA treatment was also effective when started after the appearance of sepsis symptoms. These results show that CLP in humanized mice provides a model to study human sepsis, HMGB1 siRNA might provide a treatment strategy for human sepsis, and RVG-9R provides a tool to deliver siRNA to human macrophages and dendritic cells that could potentially be used to suppress a variety of human inflammatory diseases.

  5. Human Neural Precursor Cells Promote Neurologic Recovery in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Coleman, Ronald; Leang, Ronika; Tran, Ha; Kopf, Alexandra; Walsh, Craig M.; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Steward, Oswald; Macklin, Wendy B.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Using a viral model of the demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS), we show that intraspinal transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells (hNPCs) results in sustained clinical recovery, although hNPCs were not detectable beyond day 8 posttransplantation. Improved motor skills were associated with a reduction in neuroinflammation, decreased demyelination, and enhanced remyelination. Evidence indicates that the reduced neuroinflammation is correlated with an increased number of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) within the spinal cords. Coculture of hNPCs with activated T cells resulted in reduced T cell proliferation and increased Treg numbers. The hNPCs acted, in part, through secretion of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. These findings indicate that the transient presence of hNPCs transplanted in an animal model of MS has powerful immunomodulatory effects and mediates recovery. Further investigation of the restorative effects of hNPC transplantation may aid in the development of clinically relevant MS treatments. PMID:24936469

  6. Monitoring Serial Changes in Circulating Human Breast Cancer Cells in Mruine Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Eliane, Jean-Pierre; Repollet, Madeline; Luker, Kathryn E.; Brown, Martha; Rae, James M.; Dontu, Gabriela; Schott, Anne F.; Wicha, Max; Doyle, Gerald V.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Luker, Gary D.

    2009-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are emerging as a powerful prognostic and predictive biomarker in several types of cancer, including breast, colon, and prostate. Studies of CTC in metastasis and further development of CTC as a biomarker in cancer have been limited by the inability to repetitively monitor CTC in mouse models of cancer. We have validated a method to enumerate CTC in blood samples obtained from living mice using a modified version of an in vitro diagnostic system for quantifying CTC in patients. Different routes of blood collection were tested to identify a method to reproducibly recover CTC from tumor-bearing mice without interference from contaminating normal murine epithelial cells. CTC are present in blood samples from mice bearing orthotopic xenografts of several different breast cancer cell lines and primary breast cancer cells from patient biopsies. We also show that this technology can be used for serial monitoring of CTC in mouse xenograft models of human breast cancer. These results establish a new method for studying CTC in mouse models of epithelial cancer, providing the foundation for studies of molecular regulation of CTC in cancer and CTC as biomarker for therapeutic efficacy. PMID:18632603

  7. Gastrospheres of human gastric mucosa cells: an in vitro model of stromal and epithelial stem cell niche reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carlos A N; Andrade, Leonardo R; Costa, Márcia H M; Souza, Heitor S P; Granjeiro, José M; Takiya, Christina M; Borojevic, Radovan; Nasciutti, Luiz E

    2016-08-01

    The molecular characterization of mechanisms involved in the gastrointestinal tract disorders needs an in vitro 3D culture model able to mimic the in vivo gastric microenvironment. Herein, we propose a 3D coculture system where gastric epithelial and stromal cells are grown together building spherical and solid structures using the NASA bioreactor - cell culture system (RCCS), a bioreactor. Epithelial and stromal cells from human antral gastric mucosa were isolated from endoscopic gastric biopsies. Thereafter, these cells were mechanically and enzymatically dispersed by treatment with dispase and collagenase, respectively. Using specific culture procedures, these cells formed 3D structures by using a RCCS, named "gastrospheres". Briefly, gastrospheres were obtained by initial seeding of 2.5x10⁴ cells/well in 96 well culture plates. At 24 h after their formation, they were transferred into RCCS, and maintained for 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. The gastrospheres were morphologically characterized by immunocytochemisty to evaluate extracellular matrix (ECM), and by electron microscopy. These analysis of gastrospheres revealed that the epithelial cells were cytokeratin (CK) and lectin reactive and were arranged in the outer layer; stromal cells presented long cytoplasmic processes and were localized inside the gastrosphere. They were vimentin (VIM) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) positive and expressed ECM components such as laminin (LN), fibronectin (FN), and type IV collagen (CIV). Electron microscopy revealed groups of cohesive gastric cells surrounded by complex stromal structures, with multiple microvilli, and tight cellular junctions interspersed with extracellular matrix fibrils and fibers. The presence of some nestin-positive cells was observed in the inner region of the gastrospheres, suggesting an intermediary localization between epithelial and stromal cells. Altogether, our data suggest that in vitro gastrospheres recapitulate the in vivo gastric niche

  8. Modeling Electrophysiological Coupling and Fusion between Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mayourian, Joshua; Savizky, Ruben M.; Sobie, Eric A.; Costa, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery has demonstrated promise in preclinical and clinical trials for myocardial infarction therapy; however, broad acceptance is hindered by limited understanding of hMSC-human cardiomyocyte (hCM) interactions. To better understand the electrophysiological consequences of direct heterocellular connections between hMSCs and hCMs, three original mathematical models were developed, representing an experimentally verified triad of hMSC families with distinct functional ion channel currents. The arrhythmogenic risk of such direct electrical interactions in the setting of healthy adult myocardium was predicted by coupling and fusing these hMSC models to the published ten Tusscher midcardial hCM model. Substantial variations in action potential waveform—such as decreased action potential duration (APD) and plateau height—were found when hCMs were coupled to the two hMSC models expressing functional delayed rectifier-like human ether à-go-go K+ channel 1 (hEAG1); the effects were exacerbated for fused hMSC-hCM hybrid cells. The third family of hMSCs (Type C), absent of hEAG1 activity, led to smaller single-cell action potential alterations during coupling and fusion, translating to longer tissue-level mean action potential wavelength. In a simulated 2-D monolayer of cardiac tissue, re-entry vulnerability with low (5%) hMSC insertion was approximately eight-fold lower with Type C hMSCs compared to hEAG1-functional hMSCs. A 20% decrease in APD dispersion by Type C hMSCs compared to hEAG1-active hMSCs supports the claim of reduced arrhythmogenic potential of this cell type with low hMSC insertion. However, at moderate (15%) and high (25%) hMSC insertion, the vulnerable window increased independent of hMSC type. In summary, this study provides novel electrophysiological models of hMSCs, predicts possible arrhythmogenic effects of hMSCs when directly coupled to healthy hCMs, and proposes that isolating a subset of hMSCs absent of h

  9. Genome engineering of isogenic human ES cells to model autism disorders

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Refugio A.; Stein, Jason L.; Krostag, Anne-Rachel F.; Nelson, Angelique M.; Marken, John S.; Menon, Vilas; May, Ryan C.; Yao, Zizhen; Kaykas, Ajamete; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Grimley, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic pluripotent stem cells are critical tools for studying human neurological diseases by allowing one to study the effects of a mutation in a fixed genetic background. Of particular interest are the spectrum of autism disorders, some of which are monogenic such as Timothy syndrome (TS); others are multigenic such as the microdeletion and microduplication syndromes of the 16p11.2 chromosomal locus. Here, we report engineered human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines for modeling these two disorders using locus-specific endonucleases to increase the efficiency of homology-directed repair (HDR). We developed a system to: (1) computationally identify unique transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) binding sites in the genome using a new software program, TALENSeek, (2) assemble the TALEN genes by combining golden gate cloning with modified constructs from the FLASH protocol, and (3) test the TALEN pairs in an amplification-based HDR assay that is more sensitive than the typical non-homologous end joining assay. We applied these methods to identify, construct, and test TALENs that were used with HDR donors in hESCs to generate an isogenic TS cell line in a scarless manner and to model the 16p11.2 copy number disorder without modifying genomic loci with high sequence similarity. PMID:25765640

  10. A zebrafish xenograft model for studying human cancer stem cells in distant metastasis and therapy response.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Groenewoud, A; Tulotta, C; Zoni, E; Kruithof-de Julio, M; van der Horst, G; van der Pluijm, G; Ewa Snaar-Jagalska, B

    2017-01-01

    Lethal and incurable bone metastasis is one of the main causes of death in multiple types of cancer. A small subpopulation of cancer stem/progenitor-like cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells from heterogenetic cancer is considered to mediate bone metastasis. Although over the past decades numerous studies have been performed in different types of cancer, it is still difficult to track small numbers of CSCs during the onset of metastasis. With use of noninvasive high-resolution imaging, transparent zebrafish embryos can be employed to dynamically visualize cancer progression and reciprocal interaction with stroma in a living organism. Recently we established a zebrafish CSC-xenograft model to visually and functionally analyze the role of CSCs and their interactions with the microenvironment at the onset of metastasis. Given the highly conserved human and zebrafish genome, transplanted human cancer cells are able to respond to zebrafish cytokines, modulate the zebrafish microenvironment, and take advantage of the zebrafish stroma during cancer progression. This chapter delineates the zebrafish CSC-xenograft model as a useful tool for both CSC biological study and anticancer drug screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sequence-dependent abnormal aggregation of human Tau fragment in an inducible cell model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ling; Hu, Ji-Ying; Hu, Meng-Yun; Zhang, Yi; Hong, Zheng-Yuan; Cheng, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Jie; Pang, Dai-Wen; Liang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    A pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of misfolded hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein Tau within neurons, forming neurofibrillary tangles and leading to synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death. Here we study sequence-dependent abnormal aggregation of human fragment Tau244-372 in an inducible cell model. As evidenced by confocal laser scanning microscopy, Western blot, and immunogold electron microscopy, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for abnormal aggregation of Tau244-372 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells induced by Congo red: when its two fibril-forming segments PHF6 and PHF6* are deleted, Tau244-372 does lose its ability to form fibrils in SH-SY5Y cells, and the replacement of PHF6 and PHF6* with an unrelated amyloidogenic sequence IFQINS from human lysozyme does rescue the fibril-forming ability of Tau244-372 in SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, insertion of a non-fibril forming peptide GGGGGG does not drive the disabled Tau244-372 to misfold in SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, as revealed by quantum dots based probes combined with annexin V staining, annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection assay, and immunofluorescence, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for early apoptosis of living SH-SY5Y cells induced by abnormal aggregation of Tau244-372. Our results suggest that fibril-forming motifs could be the determinants of Tau protein tending to misfold in living cells, thereby inducing neuronal apoptosis and causing the initiation and development of AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Cell Lines as a Three-Dimensional Model for the Study of Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chung; Vosburgh, Evan; Levine, Arnold J.; Cong, Lei; Xu, Eugenia Y.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare tumors, with an incidence of two per 100, 000 individuals per year, and they account for 0.5% of all human malignancies.1 Other than surgery for the minority of patients who present with localized disease, there is little or no survival benefit of systemic therapy. Therefore, there is a great need to better understand the biology of NETs, and in particular define new therapeutic targets for patients with nonresectable or metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. 3D cell culture is becoming a popular method for drug screening due to its relevance in modeling the in vivo tumor tissue organization and microenvironment.2,3 The 3D multicellular spheroids could provide valuable information in a more timely and less expensive manner than directly proceeding from 2D cell culture experiments to animal (murine) models. To facilitate the discovery of new therapeutics for NET patients, we have developed an in vitro 3D multicellular spheroids model using the human NET cell lines. The NET cells are plated in a non-adhesive agarose-coated 24-well plate and incubated under physiological conditions (5% CO2, 37 °C) with a very slow agitation for 16-24 hr after plating. The cells form multicellular spheroids starting on the 3rd or 4th day. The spheroids become more spherical by the 6th day, at which point the drug treatments are initiated. The efficacy of the drug treatments on the NET spheroids is monitored based on the morphology, shape and size of the spheroids with a phase-contrast light microscope. The size of the spheroids is estimated automatically using a custom-developed MATLAB program based on an active contour algorithm. Further, we demonstrate a simple method to process the HistoGel embedding on these 3D spheroids, allowing the use of standard histological and immunohistochemical techniques. This is the first report on generating 3D spheroids using NET cell lines to examine the effect of therapeutic drugs. We have also performed histology

  13. Isolation and purification of self-renewable human neural stem cells for cell therapy in experimental model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, Ricardo L; Daadi, Marcel M

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent with a strong self-renewable ability making them a virtually unlimited source of neural cells for structural repair in neurological disorders. Currently, hESCs are one of the most promising cell sources amenable for commercialization of off-shelf cell therapy products. However, along with this strong proliferative capacity of hESCs comes the tumorigenic potential of these cells after transplantation. Thus, the isolation and purification of a homogeneous, population of neural stem cells (hNSCs) are of paramount importance to avoid tumor formation in the host brain. This chapter describes the isolation, neuralization, and long-term perpetuation of hNSCs derived from hESCs through use of specific mitogenic growth factors and the preparation of hNSCs for transplantation in an experimental model of stroke. Additionally, we describe methods to analyze the stroke and size of grafts using magnetic resonance imaging and Osirix software, and neuroanatomical tracing procedures to study axonal remodeling after stroke and cell transplantation.

  14. Absence of WASp Enhances Hematopoietic and Megakaryocytic Differentiation in a Human Embryonic Stem Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, Miguel G; Muñoz, Pilar; Sánchez-Gilabert, Almudena; Cobo, Marién; Benabdellah, Karim; Anderson, Per; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Neth, Olaf; Molinos-Quintana, Agueda; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Martin, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the WAS gene and characterized by severe thrombocytopenia. Although the role of WASp in terminally differentiated lymphocytes and myeloid cells is well characterized, its role in early hematopoietic differentiation and in platelets (Plts) biology is poorly understood. In the present manuscript, we have used zinc finger nucleases targeted to the WAS locus for the development of two isogenic WAS knockout (WASKO) human embryonic stem cell lines (hESCs). Upon hematopoietic differentiation, hESCs-WASKO generated increased ratios of CD34+CD45+ progenitors with altered responses to stem cell factor compared to hESCs-WT. When differentiated toward the megakaryocytic linage, hESCs-WASKO produced increased numbers of CD34+CD41+ progenitors, megakaryocytes (MKs), and Plts. hESCs-WASKO-derived MKs and Plts showed altered phenotype as well as defective responses to agonist, mimicking WAS patients MKs and Plts defects. Interestingly, the defects were more evident in WASp-deficient MKs than in WASp-deficient Plts. Importantly, ectopic WAS expression using lentiviral vectors restored normal Plts development and MKs responses. These data validate the AND-1_WASKO cell lines as a human cellular model for basic research and for preclinical studies for WAS. PMID:26502776

  15. Absence of WASp Enhances Hematopoietic and Megakaryocytic Differentiation in a Human Embryonic Stem Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Miguel G; Muñoz, Pilar; Sánchez-Gilabert, Almudena; Cobo, Marién; Benabdellah, Karim; Anderson, Per; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Neth, Olaf; Molinos-Quintana, Agueda; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Martin, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the WAS gene and characterized by severe thrombocytopenia. Although the role of WASp in terminally differentiated lymphocytes and myeloid cells is well characterized, its role in early hematopoietic differentiation and in platelets (Plts) biology is poorly understood. In the present manuscript, we have used zinc finger nucleases targeted to the WAS locus for the development of two isogenic WAS knockout (WASKO) human embryonic stem cell lines (hESCs). Upon hematopoietic differentiation, hESCs-WASKO generated increased ratios of CD34(+)CD45(+) progenitors with altered responses to stem cell factor compared to hESCs-WT. When differentiated toward the megakaryocytic linage, hESCs-WASKO produced increased numbers of CD34(+)CD41(+) progenitors, megakaryocytes (MKs), and Plts. hESCs-WASKO-derived MKs and Plts showed altered phenotype as well as defective responses to agonist, mimicking WAS patients MKs and Plts defects. Interestingly, the defects were more evident in WASp-deficient MKs than in WASp-deficient Plts. Importantly, ectopic WAS expression using lentiviral vectors restored normal Plts development and MKs responses. These data validate the AND-1_WASKO cell lines as a human cellular model for basic research and for preclinical studies for WAS.

  16. Multiple Cooperating Oncogenes Drive Recurrent Breast Cancer-Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Josh Lauring , M.D., Ph.D...Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0285 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Josh Lauring ...on work described in this award: 1R21CA191262-01 (P.I. Lauring ) 12/1/14-11/30/16 20% (2.4 cal) National Cancer Institute Engineering

  17. Model systems for studying trophoblast differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ezashi, Toshihiko; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Roberts, R Michael

    2012-09-01

    This review focuses on a now well-established model for generating cells of the trophoblast (TB) lineage by treating human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) with the growth factor BMP4. We first discuss the opposing roles of FGF2 and BMP4 in directing TB formation and the need to exclude the former from the growth medium to minimize the co-induction of mesoderm and endoderm. Under these conditions, there is up-regulation of several transcription factors implicated in TB lineage emergence within 3 h of BMP4 exposure and, over a period of days and especially under a high O(2) gas atmosphere, gradual appearance of cell types carrying markers for more differentiated TB cell types, including extravillous TB and syncytioTB. We describe the potential value of including low molecular weight pharmaceutical agents that block activin A (INHBA) and FGF2 signaling to support BMP4-directed differentiation. We contend that the weight of available evidence supports the contention that BMP4 converts human ESC and iPSC of the so-called epiblast type unidirectionally to TB. We also consider the argument that BMP4 treatment of human ESC in the absence of exogenous FGF2 leads only to the emergence of mesoderm derivatives to be seriously flawed. Instead, we propose that, when signaling networks supporting pluripotency ESC or iPSC become unsustainable and when specification towards extra-embryonic mesoderm and endoderm are rendered inoperative, TB emerges as a major default state to pluripotency.

  18. Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells benefits an animal model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B.

    PubMed

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Willing, Alison E; Desjarlais, Tammy; Davis Sanberg, Cyndy; Sanberg, Paul R

    2005-08-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B is caused by alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu) enzyme deficiency leading to an accumulation of undegraded heparan sulfate, a glycosaminoglycan (GAG). Cell therapy is a promising new treatment and human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cell transplantation may be preferred for delivery of the missing enzyme. We investigated the ability of mononuclear hUCB cells administered into the lateral cerebral ventricle to ameliorate/prevent histopathological changes in mice modeling Sanfilippo syndrome type B. These are the first results supporting enzyme replacement by administered hUCB cells. In vivo, transplanted hUCB cells survived long-term (7 months), migrated into the parenchyma of the brain and peripheral organs, expressed neural antigens, and exhibited neuron and astrocyte-like morphology. Transplant benefits were also demonstrated by stable cytoarchitecture in the hippocampus and cerebellum, and by reduced GAGs in the livers of treated mutant mice. A hUCB cell transplant may be an effective therapeutic strategy for enzyme delivery in Sanfilippo syndrome type B.

  19. Model Systems for Examining Effects of Leukemia-Associated Oncogenes in Primary Human CD34+ Cells via Retroviral Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Mark; Mulloy, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The use of primary human cells to model cancer initiation and progression is now within the grasp of investigators. It has been nearly a decade since the first defined genetic elements were introduced into primary human epithelial and fibroblast cells to model oncogenesis. This approach has now been extended to the hematopoietic system, with the first described experimental transformation of primary human hematopoietic cells. Human cell model systems will lead to a better understanding of the species and cell type specific signals necessary for oncogenic initiation and progression, and will allow investigators to interrogate the cancer stem cell hypothesis using a well-defined hierarchical system that has been studied for decades. The molecular and biochemical link between self-renewal and differentiation can now be experimentally approached using primary human cells. In addition, the models that result from these experiments are likely to generate highly relevant systems for use in identification and validation of potential therapeutic targets as well as testing of small molecule therapeutics. We describe here the methodologies and reagents that are used to examine the effects of leukemia fusion protein expression on primary human hematopoietic cells, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19277588

  20. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yong; Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema; Zhang, Yongkang; Jain, Sumit; Skidgel, Randal A.; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Mazzone, Theodore; Holterman, Mark J.

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  1. Toxicity of natural tear substitutes in a fully defined culture model of human corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Geerling, G; Daniels, J T; Dart, J K; Cree, I A; Khaw, P T

    2001-04-01

    Serum and saliva have recently been advocated as natural tear substitutes for intractable aqueous-deficient dry eyes, but the effects of these fluids on corneal epithelium have not been well characterized. A laboratory study was performed in a defined test model to compare the toxicity of natural and pharmaceutical tear substitutes and to identify potentially toxic factors in natural tear substitutes, such as amylase, hypotonicity, and variations in preparation. Primary human corneal epithelial cells were cultured with defined keratinocyte serum-free medium. The cells were incubated with hypromellose (hydroxypropylmethylcellulose 0.3%) with and without benzalkonium chloride 0.01%, saliva with differing osmolalities, 100% serum, and 50% serum (1:1 vol/vol with chloramphenicol 0.5%) for varying times and concentrations. Toxicity was examined in four ways. Microvillous density was assessed with scanning electron microscopy. Cell membrane permeability and intracellular esterase activity were analyzed after staining with fluorescent calcein-AM/ethidium homodimer and cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was quantified using a luciferin-luciferase-based assay. The toxicity ranking of the tear substitutes correlated in all assays. The ATP assay was the most sensitive, followed by ethidium cell permeability, and finally the esterase activity. Preserved hypromellose was more toxic than the unpreserved preparation. Among natural tear substitutes, natural saliva was most toxic. Isotonic saliva and 50% serum were of similar toxicity, and 100% serum was least toxic. Natural tear substitutes were-except for natural saliva-less toxic than unpreserved hypromellose. Hypotonicity, but not amylase, was the major toxic effect associated with saliva. The dilution of serum with chloramphenicol induced toxicity. This is the first toxicity study using human primary corneal epithelial cells cultured under fully defined conditions as an in vitro model. Cellular ATP is a sensitive parameter

  2. Stem cell-derived models to improve mechanistic understanding and prediction of human drug induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, Christopher; Antoine, Daniel J.; Bonner, Frank; Crozier, Jonathan; Denning, Chris; Fontana, Robert J.; Hanley, Neil A.; Hay, David C.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Juhila, Satu; Kitteringham, Neil; Silva-Lima, Beatriz; Norris, Alan; Pridgeon, Chris; Ross, James A.; Sison Young, Rowena; Tagle, Danilo; Tornesi, Belen; van de Water, Bob; Weaver, Richard J.; Zhang, Fang; Park, B. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Current preclinical drug testing does not predict some forms of adverse drug reactions in humans. Efforts at improving predictability of drug-induced tissue injury in humans include using stem cell technology to generate human cells for screening for adverse effects of drugs in humans. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells means that it may ultimately be possible to develop personalised toxicology to determine inter-individual susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. However, the complexity of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) means that no current single cell model, whether of primary liver tissue origin, from liver cell lines, or derived from stem cells, adequately emulates what is believed to occur during human DILI. Nevertheless, a single cell model of a human hepatocyte which emulates key features of a hepatocyte is likely to be valuable in assessing potential chemical risk; furthermore understanding how to generate a relevant hepatocyte will also be critical to efforts to build complex multicellular models of the liver. Currently, hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from stem cells still fall short of recapitulating the full mature hepatocellular phenotype. Therefore, we convened a number of experts from the areas of preclinical and clinical hepatotoxicity and safety assessment, from industry, academia and regulatory bodies, to specifically explore the application of stem cells in hepatotoxicity safety assessment, and to make recommendations for the way forward. In this short review, we particularly discuss the importance of benchmarking stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells to their terminally-differentiated human counterparts using defined phenotyping, to make sure the cells are relevant and comparable between labs, and outline why this process is essential before the cells are introduced into chemical safety assessment. PMID:27775817

  3. Stem cell-derived models to improve mechanistic understanding and prediction of human drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Goldring, Christopher; Antoine, Daniel J; Bonner, Frank; Crozier, Jonathan; Denning, Chris; Fontana, Robert J; Hanley, Neil A; Hay, David C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Juhila, Satu; Kitteringham, Neil; Silva-Lima, Beatriz; Norris, Alan; Pridgeon, Chris; Ross, James A; Young, Rowena Sison; Tagle, Danilo; Tornesi, Belen; van de Water, Bob; Weaver, Richard J; Zhang, Fang; Park, B Kevin

    2017-02-01

    Current preclinical drug testing does not predict some forms of adverse drug reactions in humans. Efforts at improving predictability of drug-induced tissue injury in humans include using stem cell technology to generate human cells for screening for adverse effects of drugs in humans. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells means that it may ultimately be possible to develop personalized toxicology to determine interindividual susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. However, the complexity of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury means that no current single-cell model, whether of primary liver tissue origin, from liver cell lines, or derived from stem cells, adequately emulates what is believed to occur during human drug-induced liver injury. Nevertheless, a single-cell model of a human hepatocyte which emulates key features of a hepatocyte is likely to be valuable in assessing potential chemical risk; furthermore, understanding how to generate a relevant hepatocyte will also be critical to efforts to build complex multicellular models of the liver. Currently, hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from stem cells still fall short of recapitulating the full mature hepatocellular phenotype. Therefore, we convened a number of experts from the areas of preclinical and clinical hepatotoxicity and safety assessment, from industry, academia, and regulatory bodies, to specifically explore the application of stem cells in hepatotoxicity safety assessment and to make recommendations for the way forward. In this short review, we particularly discuss the importance of benchmarking stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells to their terminally differentiated human counterparts using defined phenotyping, to make sure the cells are relevant and comparable between labs, and outline why this process is essential before the cells are introduced into chemical safety assessment. (Hepatology 2017;65:710-721).

  4. In vitro Modeling of Ryanodine Receptor 2 Dysfunction Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Azra; Xu, Guoxing; Shao, Kaifeng; Papadopoulos, Symeon; Lehmann, Martin; Arnáiz-Cot, Juan J.; Rosa, Angelo O.; Nguemo, Filomain; Matzkies, Matthias; Dittmann, Sven; Stone, Susannah L.; Linke, Matthias; Zechner, Ulrich; Beyer, Vera; Hennies, Hans Christian; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Klauke, Baerbel; Parwani, Abdul S.; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Farr, Martin; Cleemann, Lars; Morad, Martin; Milting, Hendrik; Hescheler, Juergen; Šaric, Tomo

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated from accessible adult cells of patients with genetic diseases open unprecedented opportunities for exploring the pathophysiology of human diseases in vitro. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia type 1 (CPVT1) is an inherited cardiac disorder that is caused by mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor type 2 gene (RYR2) and is characterized by stress-induced ventricular arrhythmia that can lead to sudden cardiac death in young individuals. The aim of this study was to generate iPS cells from a patient with CPVT1 and determine whether iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes carrying patient specific RYR2 mutation recapitulate the disease phenotype in vitro. Methods: iPS cells were derived from dermal fibroblasts of healthy donors and a patient with CPVT1 carrying the novel heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation p.F2483I in the RYR2. Functional properties of iPS cell derived-cardiomyocytes were analyzed by using whole-cell current and voltage clamp and calcium imaging techniques. Results: Patch-clamp recordings revealed arrhythmias and delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) after catecholaminergic stimulation of CPVT1-iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Calcium imaging studies showed that, compared to healthy cardiomyocytes, CPVT1-cardiomyocytes exhibit higher amplitudes and longer durations of spontaneous Ca2+ release events at basal state. In addition, in CPVT1-cardiomyocytes the Ca2+-induced Ca2+-release events continued after repolarization and were abolished by increasing the cytosolic cAMP levels with forskolin. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the suitability of iPS cells in modeling RYR2-related cardiac disorders in vitro and opens new opportunities for investigating the disease mechanism in vitro, developing new drugs, predicting their toxicity, and optimizing current treatment strategies. PMID:22178870

  5. Endothelial progenitor cells from human fetal aorta cure diabetic foot in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wan-Ni; Xu, Shi-Qing; Liang, Jian-Feng; Peng, Liang; Liu, Hong-Lin; Wang, Zai; Fang, Qing; Wang, Meng; Yin, Wei-Qin; Zhang, Wen-Jian; Lou, Jin-Ning

    2016-12-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can repair the arterial endothelium during vascular injury. However, a reliable source of human EPCs is needed for therapeutic applications. In this study, we isolated human fetal aorta (HFA)-derived EPCs and analyzed the capacity of EPCs to differentiate into endothelial cells. In addition, because microvascular dysfunction is considered to be the major cause of diabetic foot (DF), we investigated whether transplantation of HFA-derived EPCs could treat DF in a rat model. EPCs were isolated from clinically aborted fetal aorta. RT-PCR, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, immunofluorescence, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to examine the expressions of CD133, CD34, CD31, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 (VEGFR2), von Willebrand Factor (vWF), and Endothelial Leukocyte Adhesion Molecule-1 (ELAM-1). Morphology and Dil-uptake were used to assess function of the EPCs. We then established a DF model by injecting microcarriers into the hind-limb arteries of Goto-Kakizaki rats and then transplanting the cultured EPCs into the ischemic hind limbs. Thermal infrared imaging, oxygen saturation apparatus, and laser Doppler perfusion imaging were used to monitor the progression of the disease. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the microvascular tissue formed by HFA-derived EPCs. We found that CD133, CD34, and VEGFR2 were expressed by HFA-derived EPCs. After VEGF induction, CD133 expression was significantly decreased, but expression levels of vWF and ELAM-1 were markedly increased. Furthermore, tube formation and Dil-uptake were improved after VEGF induction. These observations suggest that EPCs could differentiate into endothelial cells. In the DF model, temperature, blood flow, and oxygen saturation were reduced but recovered to a nearly normal level following injection of the EPCs in the hind limb. Ischemic symptoms also improved. Injected EPCs were

  6. Inhibitory effects of ganoderma lucidum on tumorigenesis and metastasis of human hepatoma cells in cells and animal models.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chia-Jui; Chau, Chi-Fai; Yen, Gow-Chin; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chen, Deng-Hai; Chen, Kuang-Dee

    2009-06-10

    Metastasis is considered to be the major cause of death in patients with cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly metastatic cancer. Ganoderma lucidum , a well-known mushroom with various biological effects, is a functional food known to contain lucidenic acid. The objectives of this study were to investigate the anti-invasion effect of a lucidenic acid-rich G. lucidum extract (GLE) on human hepatoma HepG2 cells as well as the antiproliferative and antimetastatic effects of GLE in human hepatoma cells implanted into ICR-nu/nu mice. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-induced invasion and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expression levels of HepG2 cells were reduced by GLE treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of GLE on MMP-9 expression proceeded by inhibiting the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B in the cytosol as well as reducing activator protein-1 and nuclear factor-kappa B levels in the nucleus of HepG2 cells. In a human tumor xenograft model, a dose-response inhibition was observed in the average size, volume, and weight of tumors upon oral administration of GLE. The number of metastatic tumor-bearing mice, the number of affected organs, and the number of tumor foci as well as the MMP-2 and -9 activities in serum of mice were also significantly suppressed by oral administration of GLE. These results suggest that the lucidenic acid-rich GLE could serve as a chemopreventive agent for the tumorigenesis and metastasis of highly invasive hepatoma cells.

  7. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2005-07-01

    Lack of accurate data for epidemiological studies of low dose radiation effects necessitates development of dosimetric models allowing prediction of cancer risks for different organs. The objective of this work is to develop a model of the radiation response of human bronchiolar tissue with single cell resolution. The computer model describes epithelial tissue as an ensemble of individual cells, with the geometry of a human bronchiole and the properties of different cell types are taken into account. The model simulates the tissue kinetics and radiation exposure in four dimensions: three spatial dimensions and a temporal dimension. The bronchiole is modeled as a regular hollow cylinder with the epithelial cells of three different types (basal, secretory, and ciliated) lining its interior. For the purposes of assessment of radiation damage to the cells only the nuclei of the cells have been modeled. Subroutines describing cellular kinetics have been developed to simulate cell turnover in a normal epithelial tissue. Monte Carlo subroutines have been developed to simulate exposure to alpha particles; the GEANT4 toolkit has been used to simulate exposure to low LET radiation. Each hit cell is provided with a record of energy deposition, and this record is passed to the progeny if the cell survives. The model output provides data on the number of basal progenitor cells in different phases of a cell life-cycle and secretory to ciliated cell ratio after several generations of cell proliferation. The model calculates labeling and mitotic indices and estimates the average cell turnover time for the bronchiolar tissue. Microdosimetric calculations are performed for cells traversed by ionizing particles. The model will be used to assess the accumulation of damage in cells due to protracted low level radiation exposure. The model output may provide directions for the future experimental design.

  8. Transplantation of Human Neuroblastoma Cells, Catecholaminergic and Non-Catecholaminergic: Effects on Rotational Behavoir in Parkinson's Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Manaster, Jacob S.; Feuerman, Tony; Reynolds, C. Patrick; Markham, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    Cultured human catecholaminergic and noncatecholaminergic donor cells were used in neural transplantation experiments in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Using two different human catecholaminergic neuroblastoma cell lines, one control non-catecholaminergic neuroblastoma cell line, and one sham control (tissue culture medium), transplants were made into the striatum using a modified Ungerstedt hemiparkinsonian rat model. Significant decreases in apomorphine-induced rotational behavior were produced by two of three catecholaminergic cell lines. Grafted cells staining positively for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and catecholamine fluorescence indicated viable catecholamine activity in the two cell lines which produced reductions in rotational behavior. Catecholamine fluorescence was not detected in either of the two controls. These data suggest a link between catecholamine secretion by transplanted cells and motor improvement using a rat rotational behavior model. PMID:1355366

  9. Bioluminescence imaging of human embryonic stem cells transplanted in vivo in murine and chick models.

    PubMed

    Priddle, Helen; Grabowska, Anna; Morris, Teresa; Clarke, Philip A; McKenzie, Andrew J; Sottile, Virginie; Denning, Chris; Young, Lorraine; Watson, Sue

    2009-06-01

    Research into the behavior, efficacy, and biosafety of stem cells with a view to clinical transplantation requires the development of noninvasive methods for in vivo imaging of cells transplanted into animal models. This is particularly relevant for human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), because transplantation of undifferentiated hESCs leads to tumor formation. The present study aimed to monitor hESCs in real time when injected in vivo. hESCs were stably transfected to express luciferase, and luciferase expression was clearly detected in the undifferentiated and differentiated state. When transfected hESCs were injected into chick embryos, bioluminescence could be detected both ex and in ovo. In the SCID mouse model, undifferentiated hESCs were detectable after injection either into the muscle layer of the peritoneum or the kidney capsule. Tumors became detectable between days 10-30, with approximately a 3 log increase in the luminescence signal by day 75. The growth phase occurred earlier in the kidney capsule and then reached a plateau, whilst tumors in the peritoneal wall grew steadily throughout the period analysed. These results show the widespread utility of bioluminescent for in vivo imaging of hESCs in a variety of model systems for preclinical research into regenerative medicine and cancer biology.

  10. Therapeutic potentials of human adipose-derived stem cells on the mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Soon; Kim, Hee Jin; Oh, Jin-Hwan; Park, Hyeong-Geun; Ra, Jeong Chan; Chang, Keun-A; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) using stem cells has long been the focus of many researchers, but the ideal therapeutic strategy has not yet been developed. The consistency and high reliability of the experimental results confirmed by animal models are considered to be a critical factor in the stability of stem cell transplantation for PD. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the preventive and therapeutic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) for PD and was to identify the related factors to this therapeutic effect. The hASC were intravenously injected into the tail vein of a PD mouse model induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. Consequently, the behavioral performances were significantly improved at 3 weeks after the injection of hASC. Additionally, dopaminergic neurons were rescued, the number of structure-modified mitochondria was decreased, and mitochondrial complex I activity was restored in the brains of the hASC-injected PD mouse model. Overall, this study underscores that intravenously transplanted hASC may have therapeutic potential for PD by recovering mitochondrial functions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Combined Effects of Lipophilic Phycotoxins (Okadaic Acid, Azapsiracid-1 and Yessotoxin) on Human Intestinal Cells Models

    PubMed Central

    Ferron, Pierre-Jean; Dumazeau, Kevin; Beaulieu, Jean-François; Le Hégarat, Ludovic; Fessard, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Phycotoxins are monitored in seafood because they can cause food poisonings in humans. Phycotoxins do not only occur singly but also as mixtures in shellfish. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro toxic interactions of binary combinations of three lipophilic phycotoxins commonly found in Europe (okadaic acid (OA), yessotoxin (YTX) and azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1)) using the neutral red uptake assay on two human intestinal cell models, Caco-2 and the human intestinal epithelial crypt-like cells (HIEC). Based on the cytotoxicity of individual toxins, we studied the interactions between toxins in binary mixtures using the combination index-isobologram equation, a method widely used in pharmacology to study drug interactions. This method quantitatively classifies interactions between toxins in mixtures as synergistic, additive or antagonistic. AZA-1/OA, and YTX/OA mixtures showed increasing antagonism with increasing toxin concentrations. In contrast, the AZA-1/YTX mixture showed increasing synergism with increasing concentrations, especially for mixtures with high YTX concentrations. These results highlight the hazard potency of AZA-1/YTX mixtures with regard to seafood intoxication. PMID:26907345

  12. Cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of G1/S cell cycle molecules and adult human β-cell replication: a revised model of human β-cell G1/S control.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W; Salim, Fatimah G; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E; Takane, Karen K; Srinivas, Harish; Scott, Donald K; Stewart, Andrew F

    2013-07-01

    Harnessing control of human β-cell proliferation has proven frustratingly difficult. Most G1/S control molecules, generally presumed to be nuclear proteins in the human β-cell, are in fact constrained to the cytoplasm. Here, we asked whether G1/S molecules might traffic into and out of the cytoplasmic compartment in association with activation of cell cycle progression. Cdk6 and cyclin D3 were used to drive human β-cell proliferation and promptly translocated into the nucleus in association with proliferation. In contrast, the cell cycle inhibitors p15, p18, and p19 did not alter their location, remaining cytoplasmic. Conversely, p16, p21, and p27 increased their nuclear frequency. In contrast once again, p57 decreased its nuclear frequency. Whereas proliferating β-cells contained nuclear cyclin D3 and cdk6, proliferation generally did not occur in β-cells that contained nuclear cell cycle inhibitors, except p21. Dynamic cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of cdk6 was confirmed using green fluorescent protein-tagged cdk6 and live cell imaging. Thus, we provide novel working models describing the control of cell cycle progression in the human β-cell. In addition to known obstacles to β-cell proliferation, cytoplasmic-to-nuclear trafficking of G1/S molecules may represent an obstacle as well as a therapeutic opportunity for human β-cell expansion.

  13. In vivo imaging of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease animal model.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sungji; Ahn, Sangzin; Kim, Saeromi; Joo, Yuyoung; Chong, Young Hae; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Chang, Keun-A

    2014-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of diverse conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). To understand transplanted stem cell biology, in vivo imaging is necessary. Nanomaterial has great potential for in vivo imaging and several noninvasive methods are used, such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, fluorescence imaging (FI) and near-infrared FI. However, each method has limitations for in vivo imaging. To overcome these limitations, multimodal nanoprobes have been developed. In the present study, we intravenously injected human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) that were labeled with a multimodal nanoparticle, LEO-LIVE™-Magnoxide 675 or 797 (BITERIALS, Seoul, Korea), into Tg2576 mice, an AD mouse model. After sequential in vivo tracking using Maestro Imaging System, we found fluorescence signals up to 10 days after injection. We also found strong signals in the brains extracted from hASC-transplanted Tg2576 mice up to 12 days after injection. With these results, we suggest that in vivo imaging with this multimodal nanoparticle may provide a useful tool for stem cell tracking and understanding stem cell biology in other neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. In vivo imaging of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sungji; Ahn, Sangzin; Kim, Saeromi; Joo, Yuyoung; Chong, Young Hae; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Chang, Keun-A.

    2014-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of diverse conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). To understand transplanted stem cell biology, in vivo imaging is necessary. Nanomaterial has great potential for in vivo imaging and several noninvasive methods are used, such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, fluorescence imaging (FI) and near-infrared FI. However, each method has limitations for in vivo imaging. To overcome these limitations, multimodal nanoprobes have been developed. In the present study, we intravenously injected human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) that were labeled with a multimodal nanoparticle, LEO-LIVE™-Magnoxide 675 or 797 (BITERIALS, Seoul, Korea), into Tg2576 mice, an AD mouse model. After sequential in vivo tracking using Maestro Imaging System, we found fluorescence signals up to 10 days after injection. We also found strong signals in the brains extracted from hASC-transplanted Tg2576 mice up to 12 days after injection. With these results, we suggest that in vivo imaging with this multimodal nanoparticle may provide a useful tool for stem cell tracking and understanding stem cell biology in other neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. The human meibomian gland epithelial cell line as a model to study meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Ulrike; Garreis, Fabian

    2017-10-01

    The meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is the leading cause of dry eye disease (DED) throughout the world. The investigation of MGD lacks suitable in vivo and in vitro models. In 2010 a human meibomian gland epithelial cell line (HMGEC) was established, so far the only available meibomian gland cell line. The characterization of HMGEC is of major importance to clarify its suitability for studying the meibomian gland (patho)physiology in vitro. The current culture protocol and new concepts of HMGEC culture will be compared. Hormones are believed to be a key factor in meibomian gland dysfunction thus HMGEC responsiveness to hormone stimulation is crucial to elucidate the hormonal influence on the meibomian gland. This review will summarize current findings about HMGEC and discuss its role in the meibomian gland dysfunction research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A retinoic acid-enhanced, multicellular human blood-brain barrier model derived from stem cell sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2014-02-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) models are often used to investigate BBB function and screen brain-penetrating therapeutics, but it has been difficult to construct a human model that possesses an optimal BBB phenotype and is readily scalable. To address this challenge, we developed a human in vitro BBB model comprising brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), pericytes, astrocytes and neurons derived from renewable cell sources. First, retinoic acid (RA) was used to substantially enhance BBB phenotypes in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived BMECs, particularly through adherens junction, tight junction, and multidrug resistance protein regulation. RA-treated hPSC-derived BMECs were subsequently co-cultured with primary human brain pericytes and human astrocytes and neurons derived from human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to yield a fully human BBB model that possessed significant tightness as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (~5,000 Ωxcm2). Overall, this scalable human BBB model may enable a wide range of neuroscience studies.

  17. A retinoic acid-enhanced, multicellular human blood-brain barrier model derived from stem cell sources

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2014-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) models are often used to investigate BBB function and screen brain-penetrating therapeutics, but it has been difficult to construct a human model that possesses an optimal BBB phenotype and is readily scalable. To address this challenge, we developed a human in vitro BBB model comprising brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), pericytes, astrocytes and neurons derived from renewable cell sources. First, retinoic acid (RA) was used to substantially enhance BBB phenotypes in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived BMECs, particularly through adherens junction, tight junction, and multidrug resistance protein regulation. RA-treated hPSC-derived BMECs were subsequently co-cultured with primary human brain pericytes and human astrocytes and neurons derived from human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to yield a fully human BBB model that possessed significant tightness as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (~5,000 Ωxcm2). Overall, this scalable human BBB model may enable a wide range of neuroscience studies. PMID:24561821

  18. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Ameliorate Motor Deficits in Rabbits in a Cerebral Palsy Model.

    PubMed

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander; Cotten, C Michael; Shi, Zhongjie; Luo, Kehuan; Jiang, Rugang; Derrick, Matthew; Tracy, Elizabeth T; Gentry, Tracy; Goldberg, Ronald N; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Tan, Sidhartha

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) has a significant impact on both patients and society, but therapy is limited. Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBC), containing various stem and progenitor cells, have been used to treat various brain genetic conditions. In small animal experiments, HUCBC have improved outcomes after hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury. Clinical trials using HUCBC are underway, testing feasibility, safety and efficacy for neonatal injury as well as CP. We tested HUCBC therapy in a validated rabbit model of CP after acute changes secondary to HI injury had subsided. Following uterine ischemia at 70% gestation, we infused HUCBC into newborn rabbit kits with either mild or severe neurobehavioral changes. Infusion of high-dose HUCBC (5 × 10(6) cells) dramatically altered the natural history of the injury, alleviating the abnormal phenotype including posture, righting reflex, locomotion, tone, and dystonia. Half the high dose showed lesser but still significant improvement. The swimming test, however, showed that joint function did not restore to naïve control function in either group. Tracing HUCBC with either MRI biomarkers or PCR for human DNA found little penetration of HUCBC in the newborn brain in the immediate newborn period, suggesting that the beneficial effects were not due to cellular integration or direct proliferative effects but rather to paracrine signaling. This is the first study to show that HUCBC improve motor performance in a dose-dependent manner, perhaps by improving compensatory repair processes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Modeling Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived-Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Agnes; Tan, Kim; Chai, Xiaoran; Sadananda, Singh N.; Mehta, Ashish; Ooi, Jolene; Hayden, Michael R.; Pouladi, Mahmoud A.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Shim, Winston; Brunham, Liam R.

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a highly efficacious anti-cancer drug but causes cardiotoxicity in many patients. The mechanisms of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity (DIC) remain incompletely understood. We investigated the characteristics and molecular mechanisms of DIC in human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs). We found that doxorubicin causes dose-dependent increases in apoptotic and necrotic cell death, reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased intracellular calcium concentration. We characterized genome-wide changes in gene expression caused by doxorubicin using RNA-seq, as well as electrophysiological abnormalities caused by doxorubicin with multi-electrode array technology. Finally, we show that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated disruption of TOP2B, a gene implicated in DIC in mouse studies, significantly reduces the sensitivity of hPSC-CMs to doxorubicin-induced double stranded DNA breaks and cell death. These data establish a human cellular model of DIC that recapitulates many of the cardinal features of this adverse drug reaction and could enable screening for protective agents against DIC as well as assessment of genetic variants involved in doxorubicin response. PMID:27142468

  20. Treatment of perianal fistulas with human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells: a canine model of human fistulizing Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Lluís; Kimbrel, Erin A; Lam, Andrea; Falk, Elizabeth B; Zewe, Christine; Juopperi, Tarja; Lanza, Robert; Hoffman, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intralesional injection of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) in canine anal furunculosis dogs. Dogs naturally develop an immune-mediated disease called canine anal furunculosis, which shares many features with human fistulizing Crohn's disease. The hESC-MSCs were well tolerated and 1 month postinjection, accompanied by reduced serum levels of IL-2 and IL-6, two inflammatory cytokines associated with Crohn's disease. All six dogs were found to be completely free of fistulas at 3 months postinjection. However, at 6 months, two dogs had some fistula relapse. Results of this study provide the first evidence of the safety and therapeutic potential of hESC-MSCs in a large animal model.

  1. Using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model cerebellar disease: hope and hype.

    PubMed

    Wiethoff, Sarah; Arber, Charles; Li, Abi; Wray, Selina; Houlden, Henry; Patani, Rickie

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum forms a highly ordered and indispensible component of motor function within the adult neuraxis, consisting of several distinct cellular subtypes. Cerebellar disease, through a variety of genetic and acquired causes, results in the loss of function of defined subclasses of neurons, and remains a significant and untreatable health care burden. The scarcity of therapies in this arena can partially be explained by unresolved disease mechanisms due to inaccessibility of human cerebellar neurons in a relevant experimental context where initiating disease mechanisms could be functionally elucidated, or drug screens conducted. In this review we discuss the potential promise of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for regenerative neurology, with a particular emphasis on in vitro modelling of cerebellar degeneration. We discuss progress made thus far using hiPSC-based models of neurodegeneration, noting the relatively slower pace of discovery made in modelling cerebellar dysfunction. We conclude by speculating how strategies attempting cerebellar differentiation from hiPSCs can be refined to allow the generation of accurate disease models. This in turn will permit a greater understanding of cerebellar pathophysiology to inform mechanistically rationalised therapies, which are desperately needed in this field.

  2. Human dental pulp cells: a new source of cell therapy in a mouse model of compressive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Fernanda Martins; Marques, Suelen Adriani; Ramalho, Bruna dos Santos; Rodrigues, Rafaela Fintelman; Cadilhe, Daniel Veloso; Furtado, Daniel; Kerkis, Irina; Pereira, Lygia Veiga; Rehen, Stevens Kastrup; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco

    2011-09-01

    Strategies aimed at improving spinal cord regeneration after trauma are still challenging neurologists and neuroscientists throughout the world. Many cell-based therapies have been tested, with limited success in terms of functional outcome. In this study, we investigated the effects of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) in a mouse model of compressive spinal cord injury (SCI). These cells present some advantages, such as the ease of the extraction process, and expression of trophic factors and embryonic markers from both ecto-mesenchymal and mesenchymal components. Young adult female C57/BL6 mice were subjected to laminectomy at T9 and compression of the spinal cord with a vascular clip for 1 min. The cells were transplanted 7 days or 28 days after the lesion, in order to compare the recovery when treatment is applied in a subacute or chronic phase. We performed quantitative analyses of white-matter preservation, trophic-factor expression and quantification, and ultrastructural and functional analysis. Our results for the HDPC-transplanted animals showed better white-matter preservation than the DMEM groups, higher levels of trophic-factor expression in the tissue, better tissue organization, and the presence of many axons being myelinated by either Schwann cells or oligodendrocytes, in addition to the presence of some healthy-appearing intact neurons with synapse contacts on their cell bodies. We also demonstrated that HDPCs were able to express some glial markers such as GFAP and S-100. The functional analysis also showed locomotor improvement in these animals. Based on these findings, we propose that HDPCs may be feasible candidates for therapeutic intervention after SCI and central nervous system disorders in humans.

  3. Effects of Modeled Microgravity on Expression Profiles of Micro RNA in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Emami, Kamal; Story, Michael; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    Among space radiation and other environmental factors, microgravity or an altered gravity is undoubtedly the most significant stress experienced by living organisms during flight. In comparison to the static 1g, microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells or animals. Micro RNA (miRNA) has recently emerged as an important regulator of gene expression, possibly regulating as many as one-third of all human genes. miRNA represents a class of single-stranded noncoding regulatory RNA molecules ( 22 nt) that control gene expressions by inhibiting the translation of mRNA to proteins. However, very little is known on the effect of altered gravity on miRNA expression. We hypothesized that the miRNA expression profile will be altered in zero gravity resulting in regulation of the gene expression and functional changes of the cells. To test this hypothesis, we cultured TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells in Synthecon s Rotary cell culture system (bioreactors) for 72 h either in the rotating (10 rpm) to model the microgravity in space or in the static condition. The cell viability was determined before and after culturing the cells in the bioreactor using both trypan blue and guava via count. Expressions of a panel of 352 human miRNA were analyzed using the miRNA PCRarray. Out of 352 miRNAs, expressions of 75 were significantly altered by a change of greater than 1.5 folds and seven miRNAs were altered by a fold change greater than 2 under the rotating culture condition. Among these seven, miR-545 and miR-517a were down regulated by 2 folds, whereas miR-150, miR-302a, miR-139-3p, miR-515-3p and miR-564 were up regulated by 2 to 8 folds. To confirm whether this altered miRNA expression correlates with gene expression and functional changes of the cells, we performed DNA Illumina Microarray Analysis and validated the related genes using q-RT PCR.

  4. Interactive 3D computer model of the human corneolimbal region: crypts, projections and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Molvaer, Rikke K; Andreasen, Arne; Heegaard, Steffen; Thomsen, Jesper S; Hjortdal, Jesper; Urbak, Steen F; Nielsen, Kim

    2013-08-01

    This study aims to clarify the existence of and to map the localization of different proposed stem cell niches in the corneal limbal region. One human eye was cut into 2200 consecutive sections. Every other section was stained with haematoxylin and eosin, digitized at low and high magnification, aligned, 3D reconstructed and visualized using interactive 3D visualization software. The visualization software has interactive tools that make free rotations in all directions possible and makes it possible to create virtual sections independent of the original cutting plan. In all, one low-magnification and 24 high-magnification interactive 3D models were created. Immunohistochemistry against stem cell markers p63 and ΔNp63α was performed as a supplement to the 3D models. Using the interactive 3D models, we identified three types of stem cell niches in the limbal region: limbal epithelial crypts (LECs), limbal crypts (LCs) and focal stromal projections (FSPs). In all, eight LECs, 25 LCs and 105 FSPs were identified in the limbal region. The LECs, LCs and FSPs were predominantly located in the superior limbal region with seven LECs, 19 LCs and 93 FSPs in the superior limbal region and one LEC, six LCs and 12 FSPs in the inferior limbal region. Only few LECs, LCs and FSPs were localized nasally and temporally. Interactive 3D models are a powerful tool that may help to shed more light on the existence and spatial localization of the different stem cell niches (LECs, LCs and FSPs) in the corneal limbal region. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  5. A rapid and quantitative method to detect human circulating tumor cells in a preclinical animal model.

    PubMed

    Tu, Shih-Hsin; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Huang, Li-Chi; Lin, Chun-Yu; Hsu, Kai-Wen; Hsieh, Wen-Shyang; Chi, Wei-Ming; Lee, Chia-Hwa

    2017-06-23

    As cancer metastasis is the deadliest aspect of cancer, causing 90% of human deaths, evaluating the molecular mechanisms underlying this process is the major interest to those in the drug development field. Both therapeutic target identification and proof-of-concept experimentation in anti-cancer drug development require appropriate animal models, such as xenograft tumor transplantation in transgenic and knockout mice. In the progression of cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the most critical factor in determining the prognosis of cancer patients. Several studies have demonstrated that measuring CTC-specific markers in a clinical setting (e.g., flow cytometry) can provide a current status of cancer development in patients. However, this useful technique has rarely been applied in the real-time monitoring of CTCs in preclinical animal models. In this study, we designed a rapid and reliable detection method by combining a bioluminescent in vivo imaging system (IVIS) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR)-based analysis to measure CTCs in animal blood. Using the IVIS Spectrum CT System with 3D-imaging on orthotropic-developed breast-tumor-bearing mice. In this manuscript, we established a quick and reliable method for measuring CTCs in a preclinical animal mode. The key to this technique is the use of specific human and mouse GUS primers on DNA/RNA of mouse peripheral blood under an absolute qPCR system. First, the high sensitivity of cancer cell detection on IVIS was presented by measuring the luciferase carried MDA-MB-231 cells from 5 to 5x10(11) cell numbers with great correlation (R(2) = 0.999). Next, the MDA-MB-231 cell numbers injected by tail vein and their IVIS radiance signals were strongly corrected with qPCR-calculated copy numbers (R(2) > 0.99). Furthermore, by applying an orthotropic implantation animal model, we successfully distinguished xenograft tumor-bearing mice and control mice with a significant difference (p < 0

  6. Human middle-ear model with compound eardrum and airway branching in mastoid air cells

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustical/mechanical model of normal adult human middle-ear function is described for forward and reverse transmission. The eardrum model included one component bound along the manubrium and another bound by the tympanic cleft. Eardrum components were coupled by a time-delayed impedance. The acoustics of the middle-ear cleft was represented by an acoustical transmission-line model for the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and mastoid air cell system with variable amounts of excess viscothermal loss. Model parameters were fitted to published measurements of energy reflectance (0.25–13 kHz), equivalent input impedance at the eardrum (0.25–11 kHz), temporal-bone pressure in scala vestibuli and scala tympani (0.1–11 kHz), and reverse middle-ear impedance (0.25–8 kHz). Inner-ear fluid motion included cochlear and physiological third-window pathways. The two-component eardrum with time delay helped fit intracochlear pressure responses. A multi-modal representation of the eardrum and high-frequency modeling of the middle-ear cleft helped fit ear-canal responses. Input reactance at the eardrum was small at high frequencies due to multiple modal resonances. The model predicted the middle-ear efficiency between ear canal and cochlea, and the cochlear pressures at threshold. PMID:25994701

  7. Human middle-ear model with compound eardrum and airway branching in mastoid air cells.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Douglas H

    2015-05-01

    An acoustical/mechanical model of normal adult human middle-ear function is described for forward and reverse transmission. The eardrum model included one component bound along the manubrium and another bound by the tympanic cleft. Eardrum components were coupled by a time-delayed impedance. The acoustics of the middle-ear cleft was represented by an acoustical transmission-line model for the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and mastoid air cell system with variable amounts of excess viscothermal loss. Model parameters were fitted to published measurements of energy reflectance (0.25-13 kHz), equivalent input impedance at the eardrum (0.25-11 kHz), temporal-bone pressure in scala vestibuli and scala tympani (0.1-11 kHz), and reverse middle-ear impedance (0.25-8 kHz). Inner-ear fluid motion included cochlear and physiological third-window pathways. The two-component eardrum with time delay helped fit intracochlear pressure responses. A multi-modal representation of the eardrum and high-frequency modeling of the middle-ear cleft helped fit ear-canal responses. Input reactance at the eardrum was small at high frequencies due to multiple modal resonances. The model predicted the middle-ear efficiency between ear canal and cochlea, and the cochlear pressures at threshold.

  8. Bioavailability of iron from spinach using an in vitro/human Caco-2 cell bioassay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutzke, Corinne J.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Rutzke, Michael A.; Welch, Ross M.; Langhans, Robert W.; Albright, Louis D.; Combs, Gerald F Jr; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cv Whitney was tested for iron bioavailabilty using an in vitro human intestinal cell culture ferritin bioassay technique previously developed. Spinach was cultured in a growth chamber for 33 days, harvested, and freeze-dried. Total iron in the samples was an average of 71 micrograms/g dry weight. Spinach was digested in vitro (pepsin and 0.1 M HCl followed by pancreatin and 0.1 M NaHCO3) with and without the addition of supplemental ascorbic acid. Caco-2 cell cultures were used to determine iron bioavailability from the spinach mixtures. Production of the iron-binding protein ferritin in the Caco-2 cells showed the supplemental ascorbic acid doubled bioavailability of iron from spinach. The data show fresh spinach is a poor source of iron, and emphasize the importance of evaluation of whole meals rather than single food items. The data support the usefulness of the in vitro/Caco-2 cell ferritin bioassay model for prescreening of space flight diets for bioavailable iron.

  9. Bioavailability of iron from spinach using an in vitro/human Caco-2 cell bioassay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutzke, Corinne J.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Rutzke, Michael A.; Welch, Ross M.; Langhans, Robert W.; Albright, Louis D.; Combs, Gerald F Jr; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cv Whitney was tested for iron bioavailabilty using an in vitro human intestinal cell culture ferritin bioassay technique previously developed. Spinach was cultured in a growth chamber for 33 days, harvested, and freeze-dried. Total iron in the samples was an average of 71 micrograms/g dry weight. Spinach was digested in vitro (pepsin and 0.1 M HCl followed by pancreatin and 0.1 M NaHCO3) with and without the addition of supplemental ascorbic acid. Caco-2 cell cultures were used to determine iron bioavailability from the spinach mixtures. Production of the iron-binding protein ferritin in the Caco-2 cells showed the supplemental ascorbic acid doubled bioavailability of iron from spinach. The data show fresh spinach is a poor source of iron, and emphasize the importance of evaluation of whole meals rather than single food items. The data support the usefulness of the in vitro/Caco-2 cell ferritin bioassay model for prescreening of space flight diets for bioavailable iron.

  10. Neuroprotective effect of secreted factors from human adipose stem cells in a rat stroke model.

    PubMed

    Seo, Han Gil; Yi, Youbin; Oh, Byung-Mo; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2017-09-26

    Objectives Recent evidence shows that stem cells exert neuroprotective effect through the secretion of immune modulatory, neurotrophic factors. We aimed to assess the neuroprotective effect of selected recombinant factors (RFs) detected in human adipose stem cell (hASC)-conditioned medium (CM), in a rat ischemic stroke model. Methods Ischemic stroke was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats using 2 h transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). One hour after reperfusion, the vehicle (Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium; DMEM), concentrated CM, and selected RFs mixed with DMEM were administered intracerebroventricularly to each group (N = 14, 15, and 16, respectively). Rats were sacrificed 24 h after MCAO. Results IL-6, VEGF, HGF, and BDNF were detected in hASC-CM. At 24 h post-MCAO, the CM and RF groups both showed significantly better sensorimotor neurological test scores than the control group. The infarct volume was significantly lower in both the CM and RF groups than in the control group. The number of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells was reduced, whereas HSP70 expression was enhanced in the peri-infarct area in both the CM and RF groups. Moreover, hASC-CM and RFs reduced IκB phosphorylation and influenced bcl-2 and bax protein expression. Conclusions Our results suggest that RFs, selected from hASC-CM, may exert a neuroprotective effect in an ischemic stroke rat model that is comparable to the neuroprotective effect of full hASC-CM. The therapeutic effects of the RFs may be mediated by an anti-inflammatory mechanism and cell apoptosis inhibition. Hence, treatment with RFs can be considered a feasible substitute for stem cell therapy after stroke.

  11. Modeling Monogenic Human Nephrotic Syndrome in the Drosophila Garland Cell Nephrocyte.

    PubMed

    Hermle, Tobias; Braun, Daniela A; Helmstädter, Martin; Huber, Tobias B; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2017-05-01

    Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome is characterized by podocyte dysfunction. Drosophila garland cell nephrocytes are podocyte-like cells and thus provide a potential in vivo model in which to study the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome. However, relevant pathomechanisms of nephrotic syndrome have not been studied in nephrocytes. Here, we discovered that two Drosophila slit diaphragm proteins, orthologs of the human genes encoding nephrin and nephrin-like protein 1, colocalize within a fingerprint-like staining pattern that correlates with ultrastructural morphology. Using RNAi and conditional CRISPR/Cas9 in nephrocytes, we found this pattern depends on the expression of both orthologs. Tracer endocytosis by nephrocytes required Cubilin and reflected size selectivity analogous to that of glomerular function. Using RNAi and tracer endocytosis as a functional read-out, we screened Drosophila orthologs of human monogenic causes of nephrotic syndrome and observed conservation of the central pathogenetic alterations. We focused on the coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis gene Coq2, the silencing of which disrupted slit diaphragm morphology. Restoration of CoQ10 synthesis by vanillic acid partially rescued the phenotypic and functional alterations induced by Coq2-RNAi. Notably, Coq2 colocalized with mitochondria, and Coq2 silencing increased the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Silencing of ND75, a subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain that controls ROS formation independently of CoQ10, phenocopied the effect of Coq2-RNAi. Moreover, the ROS scavenger glutathione partially rescued the effects of Coq2-RNAi. In conclusion, Drosophila garland cell nephrocytes provide a model with which to study the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome, and ROS formation may be a pathomechanism of COQ2-nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Does shape matter? Bioeffects of gold nanomaterials in a human skin cell model.

    PubMed

    Schaeublin, Nicole M; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K; Maurer, Elizabeth I; Park, Kyoungweon; MacCuspie, Robert I; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Vaia, Richard A; Saleh, Navid B; Hussain, Saber M

    2012-02-14

    Gold nanomaterials (AuNMs) have distinctive electronic and optical properties, making them ideal candidates for biological, medical, and defense applications. Therefore, it is imperative to evaluate the potential biological impact of AuNMs before employing them in any application. This study investigates two AuNMs with different aspect ratios (AR) on mediation of biological responses in the human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) to model potential skin exposure to these AuNMs. The cellular responses were evaluated by cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, alteration in gene and protein expression, and inflammatory response. Gold nanospheres, nominally 20 nm in diameter and coated with mercaptopropane sulfonate (AuNS-MPS), formed agglomerates when dispersed in cell culture media, had a large fractal dimension (D(f) = 2.57 ± 0.4) (i.e., tightly bound and densely packed) and were found to be nontoxic even at the highest dose of 100 μg/mL. Highly uniform, 16.7 nm diameter, and 43.8 nm long polyethylene glycol-capped gold nanorods (AuNR-PEG) also formed agglomerates when dispersed into the cell culture media. However, the agglomerates had a smaller fractal dimension (D(f) = 1.28 ± 0.08) (i.e., loosely bound) and were found to be cytotoxic to the HaCaT cells, with a significant decrease in cell viability occurring at 25 μg/mL and higher. Moreover, AuNR-PEG caused significant ROS production and up-regulated several genes involved in cellular stress and toxicity. These results, combined with increased levels of inflammatory and apoptotic proteins, demonstrated that the AuNR-PEG induced apoptosis. Exposure to AuNS-MPS, however, did not show any of the detrimental effects observed from the AuNR-PEG. Therefore, we conclude that shape appears to play a key role in mediating the cellular response to AuNMs.

  13. Modeling Viral Infectious Diseases and Development of Antiviral Therapies Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Systems

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Marta; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Desole, Giovanna; Berto, Alessandro; Pacenti, Monia; Palù, Giorgio; Barzon, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    The recent biotechnology breakthrough of cell reprogramming and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which has revolutionized the approaches to study the mechanisms of human diseases and to test new drugs, can be exploited to generate patient-specific models for the investigation of host–pathogen interactions and to develop new antimicrobial and antiviral therapies. Applications of iPSC technology to the study of viral infections in humans have included in vitro modeling of viral infections of neural, liver, and cardiac cells; modeling of human genetic susceptibility to severe viral infectious diseases, such as encephalitis and severe influenza; genetic engineering and genome editing of patient-specific iPSC-derived cells to confer antiviral resistance. PMID:26184286

  14. Modeled Microgravity Disrupts Collagen I/Integrin Signaling During Osteoblastic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; Zayzafoon, Majd; Gonda, Steven R.; Gathings, William E.; McDonald, Jay M.

    2004-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to reduced bone mineral density in weight bearing bones that is primarily attributed to a reduction in bone formation. We have previously demonstrated severely reduced osteoblastogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) following seven days culture in modeled microgravity. One potential mechanism for reduced osteoblastic differentiation is disruption of type I collagen-integrin interactions and reduced integrin signaling. Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors that bind extracellular matrix proteins and produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival, and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of modeled microgravity on integrin expression and function in hMSC. We demonstrate that seven days of culture in modeled microgravity leads to reduced expression of the extracellular matrix protein, type I collagen (Col I). Conversely, modeled microgravity consistently increases Col I-specific alpha2 and beta1 integrin protein expression. Despite this increase in integrin sub-unit expression, autophosphorylation of adhesion-dependent kinases, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), is significantly reduced. Activation of Akt is unaffected by the reduction in FAK activation. However, reduced downstream signaling via the Ras-MAPK pathway is evidenced by a reduction in Ras and ERK activation. Taken together, our findings indicate that modeled microgravity decreases integrin/MAPK signaling, which likely contributes to the observed reduction in osteoblastogenesis.

  15. Establishment of a large panel of patient-derived preclinical models of human renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hervé; Béraud, Claire; Bethry, Audrey; Danilin, Sabrina; Lindner, Véronique; Coquard, Catherine; Rothhut, Sylvie; Massfelder, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to establish a large panel of preclinical models of human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) directly from patients, faithfully reproducing the biological features of the original tumor. RCC tissues (all stages/subtypes) were collected for 8 years from 336 patients undergoing surgery, xenografted subcutaneously in nude mice, and serially passaged into new mice up to 13 passages. Tissue samples from the primary tumor and tumors grown in mice through passages were analyzed for biological tissue stability by histopathology, mRNA profiling, von Hippel-Lindau gene sequencing, STR fingerprinting, growth characteristics and response to current therapies. Metastatic models were also established by orthotopic implantation and analyzed by imagery. We established a large panel of 30 RCC models (passage > 3, 8.9% success rate). High tumor take rate was associated with high stage and grade. Histopathologic, molecular and genetic characteristics were preserved between original tumors and case-matched xenografts. The models reproduced the sensitivity to targeted therapies observed in the clinic. Overall, these models constitute an invaluable tool for the clinical design of efficient therapies, the identification of predictive biomarkers and translational research. PMID:27449081

  16. In silico model-driven assessment of the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on human red blood cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Neema; Wiback, Sharon J; Palsson B, Bernhard Ø

    2002-11-01

    The completion of the human genome project and the construction of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) maps have lead to significant efforts to find SNPs that can be linked to pathophysiology. In silico models of complete biochemical reaction networks relate a cell's individual reactions to the function of the entire network. Sequence variations can in turn be related to kinetic properties of individual enzymes, thus allowing an in silico model-driven assessment of the effects of defined SNPs on overall cellular functions. This process is applied to defined SNPs in two key enzymes of human red blood cell metabolism: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase. The results demonstrate the utility of in silico models in providing insight into differences between red cell function in patients with chronic and nonchronic anemia. In silico models of complex cellular processes are thus likely to aid in defining and understanding key SNPs in human pathophysiology.

  17. Modeled microgravity inhibits osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and increases adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zayzafoon, Majd; Gathings, William E; McDonald, Jay M

    2004-05-01

    Space flight-induced bone loss has been attributed to a decrease in osteoblast function, without a significant change in bone resorption. To determine the effect of microgravity (MG) on bone, we used the Rotary Cell Culture System [developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)] to model MG. Cultured mouse calvariae demonstrated a 3-fold decrease in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and failed to mineralize after 7 d of MG. ALP and osteocalcin gene expression were also decreased. To determine the effects of MG on osteoblastogenesis, we cultured human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) on plastic microcarriers, and osteogenic differentiation was induced immediately before the initiation of modeled MG. A marked suppression of hMSC differentiation into osteoblasts was observed because the cells failed to express ALP, collagen 1, and osteonectin. The expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 was also inhibited. Interestingly, we found that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma2), which is known to be important for adipocyte differentiation, adipsin, leptin, and glucose transporter-4 are highly expressed in response to MG. These changes were not corrected after 35 d of readaptation to normal gravity. In addition, MG decreased ERK- and increased p38-phosphorylation. These pathways are known to regulate the activity of runt-related transcription factor 2 and PPARgamma2, respectively. Taken together, our findings indicate that modeled MG inhibits the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSC and induces the development of an adipocytic lineage phenotype. This work will increase understanding and aid in the prevention of bone loss, not only in MG but also potentially in age-and disuse-related osteoporosis.

  18. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Neural Stem Cell Line as a Screening Model for Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Rajashree; Padhy, Rabindra Nath

    2017-04-01

    The aim was to investigate whether a human neural stem cell (NSC) line derived from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) can be used for toxicity study. Toxicity of both neurotoxic environmental xenobiotics, methyl mercury chloride (CH3HgCl), lead acetate (CH3COOPb), and chlorpyrifos (CP), and non-neurotoxic insecticide, dichlorvos, as well as non-neurotoxic drugs, theophylline and acetaminophen were assessed. Additionally, differentiation of neuronal and glial cell lines derived from hUCB was elucidated. It was observed that CH3HgCl was more toxic to human NSCs in comparison to CH3COOPb and CP. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value against NSCs was 3, 10, and 300 mg/L, in each staining process, acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and Hoechst staining, for CH3HgCl, CP, and CH3COOPb, respectively. CH3HgCl had the LC25 value as 10.0, 14.4, and 12.7 mg/L, by staining method mentioned in succession. CP had the LC25 value as 21.9, 23.7, and 18.4 mg/L; similarly, CH3COOPb had LC25 values, successively as 616.9, 719.2, and 890.3 mg/L. LC50 values ranged from 18.2 to 21.7 mg/L for CH3HgCl, 56.4 to 60.2 mg/L for CP, and 1000 to 1460.1 for CH3COOPb. Theophylline, acetaminophen, and dichlorvos had no impact on the viability of NSCs. This work justified that hUCB-NSC model can be used for toxicity study.

  19. Gene transfer properties and structural modeling of human stem cell-derived AAV.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura J; Ul-Hasan, Taihra; Carvaines, Sarah K; Van Vliet, Kim; Yang, Ethel; Wong, Kamehameha K; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Chatterjee, Saswati

    2014-09-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are proving to be remarkably successful for in vivo gene delivery. Based upon reports of abundant AAV in the human marrow, we tested CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells for the presence of natural AAV. Here, we report for the first time, the presence of novel AAV variants in healthy CD34(+) human peripheral blood stem cells. The majority of healthy peripheral blood stem cell donors were found to harbor AAV in their CD34(+) cells. Every AAV isolated from CD34(+) cells mapped to AAV Clade F. Gene transfer vectors derived from these novel AAVs efficiently underwent entry and postentry processing in human cord blood stem cells and supported stable gene transfer into long-term, in vivo engrafting human HSCs significantly better than other serotypes. AAVHSC-transduced human CD34(+) cells engrafted in vivo and gave rise to differentiated transgene-expressing progeny. Importantly, gene-marked CD34(+) stem cells persisted long term in xenograft recipients, indicating transduction of primitive progenitors. Notably, correlation of structure with function permitted identification of potential capsid components important for HSC transduction. Thus, AAVHSCs represent a new class of genetic vectors for the manipulation of HSC genomes.

  20. Human islet amyloid polypeptide expression in COS-1 cells. A model of intracellular amyloidogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, T. D.; Butler, P. C.; Kreutter, D. K.; Kane, L. A.; Eberhardt, N. L.

    1995-01-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is characterized by concurrent loss of beta-cells and deposition of islet amyloid derived from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). We have previously demonstrated that IAPP-derived amyloid forms intracellularly in humans with chronic excess insulin expression (eg, insulinoma and insulin receptor antibody-induced insulin resistance). To determine whether overexpression of IAPP results in intracellular amyloid in mammalian cells, we transfected COS cells with vectors expressing amyloidogenic human IAPP or non-amyloidogenic rat IAPP. Transfected COS-1 cells secreted comparable amounts of human IAPP and rat IAPP (2.1 to 2.8 nmol/L/48 hours). After 96 hours, 90% of cells expressing human IAPP contained amyloid fibrils and were degenerating or dead, whereas cells transfected with rat IAPP lacked amyloid and were viable. Thus, overexpression of human IAPP can result in intracellular amyloid formation that is associated with cell death, suggesting that intracellular amyloid may play a role in beta-cell loss in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7677175

  1. Development of Functional Human NK Cells in an Immunodeficient Mouse Model with the Ability to Provide Protection against Tumor Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kwant-Mitchell, Amanda; Pek, Elishka A.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of human NK cells and their role in tumor suppression have largely been restricted to in vitro experiments which lack the complexity of whole organisms, or mouse models which differ significantly from humans. In this study we showed that, in contrast to C57BL/6 Rag2−/−/γc−/− and NOD/Scid mice, newborn BALB/c Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice can support the development of human NK cells and CD56+ T cells after intrahepatic injection with hematopoietic stem cells. The human CD56+ cells in BALB/c Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice were able to produce IFN-γ in response to human IL-15 and polyI:C. NK cells from reconstituted Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice were also able to kill and inhibit the growth of K562 cells in vitro and were able to produce IFN-γ in response to stimulation with K562 cells. In vivo, reconstituted Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice had higher survival rates after K562 challenge compared to non-reconstituted Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice and were able to control tumor burden in various organs. Reconstituted Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice represent a model in which functional human NK and CD56+ T cells can develop from stem cells and can thus be used to study human disease in a more clinically relevant environment. PMID:20027308

  2. Cellular automata model for human articular chondrocytes migration, proliferation and cell death: An in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Vaca-González, J J; Gutiérrez, M L; Guevara, J M; Garzón-Alvarado, D A

    2016-01-07

    Articular cartilage is characterized by low cell density of only one cell type, chondrocytes, and has limited self-healing properties. When articular cartilage is affected by traumatic injuries, a therapeutic strategy such as autologous chondrocyte implantation is usually proposed for its treatment. This approach requires in vitro chondrocyte expansion to yield high cell number for cell transplantation. To improve the efficiency of this procedure, it is necessary to assess cell dynamics such as migration, proliferation and cell death during culture. Computational models such as cellular automata can be used to simulate cell dynamics in order to enhance the result of cell culture procedures. This methodology has been implemented for several cell types; however, an experimental validation is required for each one. For this reason, in this research a cellular automata model, based on random-walk theory, was devised in order to predict articular chondrocyte behavior in monolayer culture during cell expansion. Results demonstrated that the cellular automata model corresponded to cell dynamics and computed-accurate quantitative results. Moreover, it was possible to observe that cell dynamics depend on weighted probabilities derived from experimental data and cell behavior varies according to the cell culture period. Thus, depending on whether cells were just seeded or proliferated exponentially, culture time probabilities differed in percentages in the CA model. Furthermore, in the experimental assessment a decreased chondrocyte proliferation was observed along with increased passage number. This approach is expected to having other uses as in enhancing articular cartilage therapies based on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  3. Toad skin extract cinobufatini inhibits migration of human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells into a model stromal tissue.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Munehiro; Mori, Shuya; Kamoshida, Yo; Kawaguchi, Shota; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko; Gao, Bo; Tang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Toad skin extract cinobufatini study has been focused on anticancer activity, especially apoptosis-inducing activity by bufosteroids. The present study examined effect of the toad skin extract on cancer cell migration into model stromal tissues. Human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 was incubated in the presence or absence of toad skin extract on a surface of reconstituted type I collagen gel as a model stromal tissue allowing the cells to migrate into the gel. Frozen sections were microscopically observed after azan staining. Data showed a decrease of cell number in a microscopic field and shortening of cell migration into the model stromal tissue in a dose dependent manner. This suggests that toad skin extract may possess migration-preventing activity in addition to cell toxicity such as apoptosis-inducing activity. The multifaceted effects including apoptosis-inducing and cancer cell migration-preventing activities would improve usefulness of toad skin extract cinobufatini as an anticancer medicine.

  4. Characterization of Nipah virus infection in a model of human airway epithelial cells cultured at an air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Vergara, Leoncio A; Wen, Julie W; Long, Dan; Rockx, Barry

    2016-05-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is an emerging paramyxovirus that can cause lethal respiratory illness in humans. No vaccine/therapeutic is currently licensed for humans. Human-to-human transmission was previously reported during outbreaks and NiV could be isolated from respiratory secretions, but the proportion of cases in Malaysia exhibiting respiratory symptoms was significantly lower than that in Bangladesh. Previously, we showed that primary human basal respiratory epithelial cells are susceptible to both NiV-Malaysia (M) and -Bangladesh (B) strains causing robust pro-inflammatory responses. However, the cells of the human respiratory epithelium that NiV targets are unknown and their role in NiV transmission and NiV-related lung pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here, we characterized NiV infection of the human respiratory epithelium using a model of the human tracheal/bronchial (B-ALI) and small airway (S-ALI) epithelium cultured at an air-liquid interface. We show that NiV-M and NiV-B infect ciliated and secretory cells in B/S-ALI, and that infection of S-ALI, but not B-ALI, results in disruption of the epithelium integrity and host responses recruiting human immune cells. Interestingly, NiV-B replicated more efficiently in B-ALI than did NiV-M. These results suggest that the human tracheal/bronchial epithelium is favourable to NiV replication and shedding, while inducing a limited host response. Our data suggest that the small airways epithelium is prone to inflammation and lesions as well as constituting a point of virus entry into the pulmonary vasculature. The use of relevant models of the human respiratory tract, such as B/S-ALI, is critical for understanding NiV-related lung pathogenesis and identifying the underlying mechanisms allowing human-to-human transmission.

  5. Initiation of an inflammatory response in resident intestinal lamina propria cells -use of a human organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Schröder-Braunstein, Jutta; Gras, Judith; Brors, Benedikt; Schwarz, Sonja; Szikszai, Timea; Lasitschka, Felix; Wabnitz, Guido; Heidtmann, Antje; Lee, Young-Seon; Schiessling, Serin; Leowardi, Christine; Al-Saeedi, Mohammed; Ulrich, Alexis; Engelke, Antonia; Winter, Johannes; Samstag, Yvonne; Giese, Thomas; Meuer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Resident human lamina propria immune cells serve as powerful effectors in host defense. Molecular events associated with the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells are largely unknown. Here, we aimed to characterize phenotypic and functional changes induced in these cells at the onset of intestinal inflammation using a human intestinal organ culture model. In this model, healthy human colonic mucosa was depleted of epithelial cells by EDTA treatment. Following loss of the epithelial layer, expression of the inflammatory mediators IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL23A, TNFA, CXCL2, and the surface receptors CD14, TLR2, CD86, CD54 was rapidly induced in resident lamina propria cells in situ as determined by qRT-PCR and immunohistology. Gene microarray analysis of lamina propria cells obtained by laser-capture microdissection provided an overview of global changes in gene expression occurring during the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells. Bioinformatic analysis gave insight into signalling pathways mediating this inflammatory response. Furthermore, comparison with published microarray datasets of inflamed mucosa in vivo (ulcerative colitis) revealed a significant overlap of differentially regulated genes underlining the in vivo relevance of the organ culture model. Furthermore, genes never been previously associated with intestinal inflammation were identified using this model. The organ culture model characterized may be useful to study molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in normal mucosa as well as potential alterations of this response in inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. Malva sylvestris Inhibits Inflammatory Response in Oral Human Cells. An In Vitro Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Benso, Bruna; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Alencar, Severino Matias; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of Malva sylvestris extract (MSE) and fractions in a co-culture model of cells infected by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, we evaluated the phytochemical content in the extract and fractions of M. sylvestris and demonstrated that polyphenols were the most frequent group in all samples studied. An in vitro dual-chamber model to mimic the periodontal structure was developed using a monolayer of epithelial keratinocytes (OBA-9) and a subepithelial layer of fibroblasts (HGF-1). The invasive periodontopathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans (D7S-1) was applied to migrate through the cell layers and induce the synthesis of immune factors and cytokines in the host cells. In an attempt to analyze the antimicrobial properties of MSE and fractions, a susceptibility test was carried out. The extract (MIC 175 μg/mL, MBC 500μg/mL) and chloroform fraction (MIC 150 μg/mL, MBC 250 μg/mL) were found to have inhibitory activity. The extract and all fractions were assessed using a cytotoxicity test and results showed that concentrations under 100 μg/mL did not significantly reduce cell viability compared to the control group (p > 0.05, viability > 90%). In order to analyze the inflammatory response, transcriptional factors and cytokines were quantified in the supernatant released from the cells. The chloroform fraction was the most effective in reducing the bacterial colonization (p< 0.05) and controlling inflammatory mediators, and promoted the down-regulation of genes including IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, CD14, PTGS, MMP-1 and FOS as well as the reduction of the IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF protein levels (p< 0.05). Malva sylvestris and its chloroform fraction minimized the A. actinomycetemcomitans infection and inflammation processes in oral human cells by a putative pathway that involves important cytokines and receptors. Therefore, this natural product may be considered as a

  7. Malva sylvestris Inhibits Inflammatory Response in Oral Human Cells. An In Vitro Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Benso, Bruna; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Alencar, Severino Matias; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of Malva sylvestris extract (MSE) and fractions in a co-culture model of cells infected by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, we evaluated the phytochemical content in the extract and fractions of M. sylvestris and demonstrated that polyphenols were the most frequent group in all samples studied. An in vitro dual-chamber model to mimic the periodontal structure was developed using a monolayer of epithelial keratinocytes (OBA-9) and a subepithelial layer of fibroblasts (HGF-1). The invasive periodontopathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans (D7S-1) was applied to migrate through the cell layers and induce the synthesis of immune factors and cytokines in the host cells. In an attempt to analyze the antimicrobial properties of MSE and fractions, a susceptibility test was carried out. The extract (MIC 175 μg/mL, MBC 500μg/mL) and chloroform fraction (MIC 150 μg/mL, MBC 250 μg/mL) were found to have inhibitory activity. The extract and all fractions were assessed using a cytotoxicity test and results showed that concentrations under 100 μg/mL did not significantly reduce cell viability compared to the control group (p > 0.05, viability > 90%). In order to analyze the inflammatory response, transcriptional factors and cytokines were quantified in the supernatant released from the cells. The chloroform fraction was the most effective in reducing the bacterial colonization (p< 0.05) and controlling inflammatory mediators, and promoted the down-regulation of genes including IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, CD14, PTGS, MMP-1 and FOS as well as the reduction of the IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF protein levels (p< 0.05). Malva sylvestris and its chloroform fraction minimized the A. actinomycetemcomitans infection and inflammation processes in oral human cells by a putative pathway that involves important cytokines and receptors. Therefore, this natural product may be considered as a

  8. Generation of an ICF syndrome model by efficient genome editing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using the CRISPR system.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takuro; Tamura, Daiki; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Hatada, Izuho

    2013-09-30

    Genome manipulation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is essential to achieve their full potential as tools for regenerative medicine. To date, however, gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has proven to be extremely difficult. Recently, an efficient genome manipulation technology using the RNA-guided DNase Cas9, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, has been developed. Here we report the efficient generation of an iPS cell model for immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) syndrome using the CRISPR system. We obtained iPS cells with mutations in both alleles of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) in 63% of transfected clones. Our data suggest that the CRISPR system is highly efficient and useful for genome engineering of human iPS cells.

  9. Transgenic Expression of Human CD47 Markedly Increases Engraftment in a Murine Model of Pig-to-Human Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tena, Aseda; Kurtz, Josef; Leonard, David A.; Dobrinsky, John R.; Terlouw, Steven L.; Mtango, Namdori; Verstegen, John; Germana, Sharon; Mallard, Christopher; Arn, J. Scott; Sachs, David H.; Hawley, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Mixed chimerism approaches for induction of tolerance of solid organ transplants have been applied successfully in animal models and in the clinic. However, in xenogeneic models (pig-to-primate), host macrophages participate in the rapid clearance of porcine hematopoietic progenitor cells, hindering the ability to achieve mixed chimerism. CD47 is a cell-surface molecule that interacts in a species-specific manner with SIRPα receptors on macrophages to inhibit phagocytosis and expression of human CD47 on porcine cells has been shown to inhibit phagocytosis by primate macrophages. We report here the generation of human CD47 (hCD47) transgenic GalT-KO miniature swine that express hCD47 in all blood cell lineages. The effect of hCD47 expression on xenogeneic hematopoietic engraftment was tested in an in vivo mouse model of human hematopoietic cell engraftment. High-level porcine chimerism was observed in the bone marrow of hCD47 progenitor cell recipients and smaller but readily measurable chimerism levels were observed in the peripheral blood of these recipients. In contrast, transplantation of WT progenitor cells resulted in little or no bone marrow engraftment and no detectable peripheral chimerism. These results demonstrate a substantial protective effect of hCD47 expression on engraftment and persistence of porcine cells in this model, presumably by modulation of macrophage phagocytosis. PMID:25278264

  10. Cardiac disease modeling using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Dell'Era, Patrizia; Benzoni, Patrizia; Crescini, Elisabetta; Valle, Matteo; Xia, Er; Consiglio, Antonella; Memo, Maurizio

    2015-03-26

    Causative mutations and variants associated with cardiac diseases have been found in genes encoding cardiac ion channels, accessory proteins, cytoskeletal components, junctional proteins, and signaling molecules. In most cases the functional evaluation of the genetic alteration has been carried out by expressing the mutated proteins in in-vitro heterologous systems. While these studies have provided a wealth of functional details that have greatly enhanced the understanding of the pathological mechanisms, it has always been clear that heterologous expression of the mutant protein bears the intrinsic limitation of the lack of a proper intracellular environment and the lack of pathological remodeling. The results obtained from the application of the next generation sequencing technique to patients suffering from cardiac diseases have identified several loci, mostly in non-coding DNA regions, which still await functional analysis. The isolation and culture of human embryonic stem cells has initially provided a constant source of cells from which cardiomyocytes (CMs) can be obtained by differentiation. Furthermore, the possibility to reprogram cellular fate to a pluripotent state, has opened this process to the study of genetic diseases. Thus induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a completely new cellular model that overcomes the limitations of heterologous studies. Importantly, due to the possibility to keep spontaneously beating CMs in culture for several months, during which they show a certain degree of maturation/aging, this approach will also provide a system in which to address the effect of long-term expression of the mutated proteins or any other DNA mutation, in terms of electrophysiological remodeling. Moreover, since iPSC preserve the entire patients' genetic context, the system will help the physicians in identifying the most appropriate pharmacological intervention to correct the functional alteration. This article summarizes the current

  11. Generation of CD34+ cells from human embryonic stem cells using a clinically applicable methodology and engraftment in the fetal sheep model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehyup; Zanjani, Esmail D.; Jeanblanc, Christine M.; Goodrich, A. Daisy; Hematti, Peiman

    2013-01-01

    Until now, ex vivo generation of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) mostly involved use of feeder cells of non-human origin. While they provided invaluable models to study hematopoiesis, in vivo engraftment of hESC-derived HSCs remains a challenging task. In this study, we used a novel coculture system comprised of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) and peripheral blood CD14+ monocyte-derived macrophages to generate CD34+ cells from hESCs in vitro. Human ESC-derived CD34+ cells generated using this method expressed surface makers associated with adult human HSCs and up-regulated hematopoietic stem cell genes compared to human bone marrow-derived CD34+ cells. Finally, transplantation of purified hESC-derived CD34+ cells into the pre-immune fetal sheep, primed with transplantation of MSCs derived from the same hESC line, demonstrated multi-lineage hematopoietic activity with graft presence up to 16 weeks post-transplantation. This in vivo demonstration of engraftment and robust multi-lineage hematopoietic activity by hESC-derived CD34+ cells lends credence to the translational value and potential clinical utility of this novel differentiation and transplantation protocol. PMID:23612043

  12. Differentiation of Neonatal Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Prostate Epithelial Cells: A Model to Study Prostate Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    expression by RT-PCR showed that while human dermal fibroblasts have higher constitutive expression of Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 compared to IMP90 cells...REPORT U b . ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 12 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS: Item...mechanistic insights into prostate epithelial cell development can be gained. 8 a. DPYS DAY!O b . c. Fig. 1. Differentiation of human iPSC to

  13. Human cell structure-driven model construction for predicting protein subcellular location from biological images.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Mingxia; Zhang, Daoqiang

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of subcellular location pattern is very important for fully characterizing the human proteome. Nowadays, with the great advances in automated microscopic imaging, accurate bioimage-based classification methods to predict protein subcellular locations are highly desired. All existing models were constructed on the independent parallel hypothesis, where the cellular component classes are positioned independently in a multi-class classification engine. The important structural information of cellular compartments is missed. To deal with this problem for developing more accurate models, we proposed a novel cell structure-driven classifier construction approach (SC-PSorter) by employing the prior biological structural information in the learning model. Specifically, the structural relationship among the cellular components is reflected by a new codeword matrix under the error correcting output coding framework. Then, we construct multiple SC-PSorter-based classifiers corresponding to the columns of the error correcting output coding codeword matrix using a multi-kernel support vector machine classification approach. Finally, we perform the classifier ensemble by combining those multiple SC-PSorter-based classifiers via majority voting. We evaluate our method on a collection of 1636 immunohistochemistry images from the Human Protein Atlas database. The experimental results show that our method achieves an overall accuracy of 89.0%, which is 6.4% higher than the state-of-the-art method. The dataset and code can be downloaded from https://github.com/shaoweinuaa/. dqzhang@nuaa.edu.cn Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Transplantation of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in an animal model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury: survival and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Leyan; Ryu, Jiwon; Hiel, Hakim; Menon, Adarsh; Aggarwal, Ayushi; Rha, Elizabeth; Mahairaki, Vasiliki; Cummings, Brian J; Koliatsos, Vassilis E

    2015-05-14

    Diffuse axonal injury is an extremely common type of traumatic brain injury encountered in motor vehicle crashes, sports injuries, and in combat. Although many cases of diffuse axonal injury result in chronic disability, there are no current treatments for this condition. Its basic lesion, traumatic axonal injury, has been aggressively modeled in primate and rodent animal models. The inexorable axonal and perikaryal degeneration and dysmyelination often encountered in traumatic axonal injury calls for regenerative therapies, including therapies based on stem cells and precursors. Here we explore the proof of concept that treatments based on transplants of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells can replace or remodel myelin and, eventually, contribute to axonal regeneration in traumatic axonal injury. We derived human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from the human embryonic stem cell line H9, purified and characterized them. We then transplanted these human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells into the deep sensorimotor cortex next to the corpus callosum of nude rats subjected to traumatic axonal injury based on the impact acceleration model of Marmarou. We explored the time course and spatial distribution of differentiation and structural integration of these cells in rat forebrain. At the time of transplantation, over 90 % of human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells expressed A2B5, PDGFR, NG2, O4, Olig2 and Sox10, a profile consistent with their progenitor or early oligodendrocyte status. After transplantation, these cells survived well and migrated massively via the corpus callosum in both injured and uninjured brains. Human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells displayed a striking preference for white matter tracts and were contained almost exclusively in the corpus callosum and external capsule, the striatopallidal striae, and cortical layer 6. Over 3 months, human oligodendrocyte progenitor cells progressively matured into myelin basic protein(+) and adenomatous

  15. Chick embryo xenograft model reveals a novel perineural niche for human adipose-derived stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, Ingrid R.; Lopes, Daiana V.; Abreu, José G.; Carneiro, Katia; Rossi, Maria I. D.; Brito, José M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSC) are a heterogeneous cell population that contains adult multipotent stem cells. Although it is well established that hADSC have skeletal potential in vivo in adult organisms, in vitro assays suggest further differentiation capacity, such as into glia. Thus, we propose that grafting hADSC into the embryo can provide them with a much more instructive microenvironment, allowing the human cells to adopt diverse fates or niches. Here, hADSC spheroids were grafted into either the presumptive presomitic mesoderm or the first branchial arch (BA1) regions of chick embryos. Cells were identified without previous manipulations via human-specific Alu probes, which allows efficient long-term tracing of heterogeneous primary cultures. When grafted into the trunk, in contrast to previous studies, hADSC were not found in chondrogenic or osteogenic territories up to E8. Surprisingly, 82.5% of the hADSC were associated with HNK1+ tissues, such as peripheral nerves. Human skin fibroblasts showed a smaller tropism for nerves. In line with other studies, hADSC also adopted perivascular locations. When grafted into the presumptive BA1, 74.6% of the cells were in the outflow tract, the final goal of cardiac neural crest cells, and were also associated with peripheral nerves. This is the first study showing that hADSC could adopt a perineural niche in vivo and were able to recognize cues for neural crest cell migration of the host. Therefore, we propose that xenografts of human cells into chick embryos can reveal novel behaviors of heterogeneous cell populations, such as response to migration cues. PMID:26319582

  16. Comparative Analysis of Pain Behaviours in Humanized Mouse Models of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jianxun; Benson, Barbara; Tran, Huy; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a hallmark feature of sickle cell anemia (SCA) but management of chronic as well as acute pain remains a major challenge. Mouse models of SCA are essential to examine the mechanisms of pain and develop novel therapeutics. To facilitate this effort, we compared humanized homozygous BERK and Townes sickle mice for the effect of gender and age on pain behaviors. Similar to previously characterized BERK sickle mice, Townes sickle mice show more mechanical, thermal, and deep tissue hyperalgesia with increasing age. Female Townes sickle mice demonstrate more hyperalgesia compared to males similar to that reported for BERK mice and patients with SCA. Mechanical, thermal and deep tissue hyperalgesia increased further after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) treatment in Townes sickle mice. Together, these data show BERK sickle mice exhibit a significantly greater degree of hyperalgesia for all behavioral measures as compared to gender- and age-matched Townes sickle mice. However, the genetically distinct “knock-in” strategy of human α and β transgene insertion in Townes mice as compared to BERK mice, may provide relative advantage for further genetic manipulations to examine specific mechanisms of pain. PMID:27494522

  17. Human airway epithelial cell culture to identify new respiratory viruses: coronavirus NL63 as a model.

    PubMed

    S Banach, Bridget; Orenstein, Jan M; Fox, Linda M; Randell, Scott H; Rowley, Anne H; Baker, Susan C

    2009-03-01

    Propagation of new human respiratory virus pathogens in established cell lines is hampered by a lack of predictability regarding cell line permissivity and by availability of suitable antibody reagents to detect infection in cell lines that do not exhibit significant cytopathic effect. Recently, molecular methods have been used to amplify and identify novel nucleic acid sequences directly from clinical samples, but these methods may be hampered by the quantity of virus present in respiratory secretions at different time points following the onset of infection. Human airway epithelial (HAE) cultures, which effectively mimic the human bronchial environment, allow for cultivation of a wide variety of human respiratory viral pathogens. The goal of the experiments described here was to determine if propagation and identification of a human respiratory virus may be achieved through inoculation of HAE cultures followed by whole transcriptome amplification (WTA) and sequence analysis. To establish proof-of-principle human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) was evaluated, and the first visualization of HCoV-NL63 virus by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is reported. Initial propagation of human respiratory secretions onto HAE cultures followed by TEM and WTA of culture supernatant may be a useful approach for visualization and detection of new human respiratory pathogens that have eluded identification by traditional approaches.

  18. Transformation of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells with DEK-NUP214 induces AML in an immunocompromised mouse model.

    PubMed

    Qin, H; Malek, S; Cowell, J K; Ren, M

    2016-10-27

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease comprising a large number of subtypes defined by specific chromosome abnormalities. One such subtype carries the t(6;9)(p22;q34) chromosome rearrangement, which leads to expression of the DEK-NUP214 chimeric gene, and has a particularly poor outcome. To provide a better understanding of the molecular etiology of these relatively rare individual AML variants, it is necessary to generate in vivo models, which can also serve as a means to evaluate targeted therapies based on their specific genetic abnormalities. Here, we describe the development of a human cell AML, generated in CD34+ human hematopoietic progenitor cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice that express human myeloid cell growth factors. Within 6 months, these mice develop a human cell AML with phenotypic characteristics of the primary t(6;9) disease and a CD45+CD13+CD34+CD38+ immunophenotype. Gene expression studies show that members of the HOX family of genes (HOXA9, 10, B3, B4 and PBX3) are highly upregulated in the AML from this mouse model as well as from primary human t(6;9) AML. Gene expression analysis also identified several other significantly disregulated pathways involving KRAS, BRCA1 and ALK, for example. This is the first report of a humanized model of the DEK-NUP214 disease and provides a means to study the development and treatment of this particular subtype of AML.

  19. Human pulmonary artery endothelial cells in the model of mucopolysaccharidosis VI present a prohypertensive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Golda, Adam; Jurecka, Agnieszka; Gajda, Karolina; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna; Lalik, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder caused by a deficient activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase (ARSB). Pulmonary hypertension (PH) occurs in MPS VI patients and is a marker of bad prognosis. Malfunction of endothelium, which regulates vascular tonus and stimulates angiogenesis, can contribute to the occurrence of PH in MPS VI. Aim The aim of the study was to establish a human MPS VI cellular model of pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) and evaluate how it affects factors that may trigger PH such as proliferation, apoptosis, expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), natriuretic peptide type C (NPPC), and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). Results Increasing concentrations of dermatan sulfate (DS) reduce the viability of the cells in both ARSB deficiency and controls, but hardly influence apoptosis. The expression of eNOS in HPAECs is reduced up to two thirds in the presence of DS. NPPC shows a biphasic expression reaction with an increase at 50 μg/mL DS and reduction at 0 and 100 μg/mL DS. The expression of VEGFA decreases with increasing DS concentrations and absence of elastin, and increases with increasing DS in the presence of elastin. Conclusion Our data suggest that MPS VI endothelium presents a prohypertensive phenotype due to the reduction of endothelium's proliferation ability and expression of vasorelaxing factors. PMID:26937388

  20. A Recently Established Murine Model of Nasal Polyps Demonstrates Activation of B Cells, as Occurs in Human Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Sun Hye; Carter, Roderick G; Kato, Atsushi; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2016-08-01

    Animal model systems are invaluable for examining human diseases. Our laboratory recently established a mouse model of nasal polyps (NPs) and investigated similarities and differences between this mouse model and human NPs. We especially focus on the hypothesis that B cell activation occurs during NP generation in the murine model. After induction of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinosinusitis, 6% ovalbumin and Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (10 ng) were instilled into the nasal cavity of mice three times per week for 8 weeks. The development of structures that somewhat resemble NPs (which we will refer to as NPs) was confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The mRNA and protein levels of various inflammatory cell markers and mediators were measured by real-time PCR in nasal tissue and by ELISA in nasal lavage fluid (NLF), respectively. Total Ig isotype levels in NLF were also quantitated using the Mouse Ig Isotyping Multiplex kit (EMD Millipore, Billerica, MA) on a Luminex 200 instrument (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY). Similar to human NPs, there were significant increases in gene expression of inflammatory cell markers, such as CD19, CD138, CD11c, and mast cell protease-6 in nasal tissue samples of the NP group compared with those of the control group. In further investigations of B cell activation, mRNA expressions of B cell activating factor and a proliferation-inducing ligand were found to be significantly increased in mouse NP tissue. B cell-activating factor protein concentration and IgA and IgG1 levels in NLF were significantly higher in the NP group compared with the control group. In this study, the NP mouse model demonstrated enhanced B cell responses, which are reminiscent of B cell responses in human NPs.

  1. Neural Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Nontherapeutic Applications: Toxicology, Pharmacology, and In Vitro Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Yap, May Shin; Nathan, Kavitha R.; Yeo, Yin; Poh, Chit Laa; Richards, Mark; Lim, Wei Ling; Othman, Iekhsan; Heng, Boon Chin

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) derived from either blastocyst stage embryos (hESCs) or reprogrammed somatic cells (iPSCs) can provide an abundant source of human neuronal lineages that were previously sourced from human cadavers, abortuses, and discarded surgical waste. In addition to the well-known potential therapeutic application of these cells in regenerative medicine, these are also various promising nontherapeutic applications in toxicological and pharmacological screening of neuroactive compounds, as well as for in vitro modeling of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders. Compared to alternative research models based on laboratory animals and immortalized cancer-derived human neural cell lines, neuronal cells differentiated from hPSCs possess the advantages of species specificity together with genetic and physiological normality, which could more closely recapitulate in vivo conditions within the human central nervous system. This review critically examines the various potential nontherapeutic applications of hPSC-derived neuronal lineages and gives a brief overview of differentiation protocols utilized to generate these cells from hESCs and iPSCs. PMID:26089911

  2. Radio-sensitivity of the cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model mice transfected with human mutant SOD1.

    PubMed

    Wate, Reika; Takahashi, Sentaro; Ito, Hidefumi; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Suetomi, Katsutoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2005-03-01

    In order to clarify the possible involvement of oxidative damage induced by ionizing radiation in the onset and/or progression of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we studied radio-sensitivity in primary cells derived from ALS model mice expressing human mutant SOD1. The primary mouse cells expressed both mouse and the mutant human SOD1. The cell survival of the transgenic mice (with mutant SOD1), determined by counting cell numbers at a scheduled time after X-irradiation, is very similar to that of cells from wild type animals. The induction and repair of DNA damage in the transgenic cells, measured by single cell gel electrophoresis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis, are also similar to those of wild type cells. These results indicate that the human mutant SOD1 gene does not seem to contribute to the alteration of radio-sensitivity, at least in the fibroblastic cells used here. Although it is necessary to consider the difference in cell types between fibroblastic and neuronal cells, the present results may suggest that ionizing radiation is not primarily responsible for the onset of familial ALS with the SOD1 mutation, and that the excess risks are probably not a concern for radiation diagnosis and therapy in familial ALS patients.

  3. Oral Monomethyl Fumarate Therapy Ameliorates Retinopathy in a Humanized Mouse Model of Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Promsote, Wanwisa; Powell, Folami Lamoke; Veean, Satyam; Thounaojam, Menaka; Markand, Shanu; Saul, Alan; Gutsaeva, Diana; Bartoli, Manuela; Smith, Sylvia B; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Martin, Pamela M

    2016-12-10

    Sickle retinopathy (SR) is a major cause of blindness in sickle cell disease (SCD). The genetic mutation responsible for SCD is known, however; oxidative stress and inflammation also figure prominently in the development and progression of pathology. Development of therapies for SR is hampered by the lack of (a) animal models that accurately recapitulate human SR and (b) strategies for noninvasive yet effective retinal drug delivery. This study addressed both issues by validating the Townes humanized SCD mouse as a model of SR and demonstrating the efficacy of oral administration of the antioxidant fumaric acid ester monomethyl fumarate (MMF) in the disease. In vivo ophthalmic imaging, electroretinography, and postmortem histological RNA and protein analyses were used to monitor retinal health and function in normal (HbAA) and sickle (HbSS) hemoglobin-producing mice over a one-year period and in additional HbAA and HbSS mice treated with MMF (15 mg/ml) for 5 months. Functional and morphological abnormalities and molecular hallmarks of oxidative stress/inflammation were evident early in HbSS retinas and increased in number and severity with age. Treatment with MMF, a known inducer of Nrf2, induced γ-globin expression and fetal hemoglobin production, improved hematological profiles, and ameliorated SR-related pathology. Innovation and Conclusion: United States Food and Drug Administration-approved formulations in which MMF is the primary bioactive ingredient are currently available to treat multiple sclerosis; such drugs may be effective for treatment of ocular and systemic complications of SCD, and given the pleiotropic effects, other nonsickle-related diseases in which oxidative stress, inflammation, and retinal vascular pathology figure prominently. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 921-935.

  4. Generation of CD34+ cells from human embryonic stem cells using a clinically applicable methodology and engraftment in the fetal sheep model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehyup; Zanjani, Esmail D; Jeanblanc, Christine M; Goodrich, A Daisy; Hematti, Peiman

    2013-08-01

    Until now, ex vivo generation of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) mostly involved use of feeder cells of nonhuman origin. Although they provided invaluable models to study hematopoiesis, in vivo engraftment of hESC-derived HSCs remains a challenging task. In this study, we used a novel coculture system composed of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) and peripheral blood CD14(+) monocyte-derived macrophages to generate CD34(+) cells from hESCs in vitro. Human ESC-derived CD34(+) cells generated using this method expressed surface makers associated with adult human HSCs and upregulated hematopoietic stem cell genes comparable to human bone marrow-derived CD34(+) cells. Finally, transplantation of purified hESC-derived CD34(+) cells into the preimmune fetal sheep, primed with transplantation of MSCs derived from the same hESC line, demonstrated multilineage hematopoietic activity with graft presence up to 16 weeks after transplantation. This in vivo demonstration of engraftment and robust multilineage hematopoietic activity by hESC-derived CD34(+) cells lends credence to the translational value and potential clinical utility of this novel differentiation and transplantation protocol.

  5. Human renal tubular cells contain CD24/CD133 progenitor cell populations: Implications for tubular regeneration after toxicant induced damage using cadmium as a model.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Swojani; Somji, Seema; Sens, Donald A; Slusser-Nore, Andrea; Patel, Divyen H; Savage, Evan; Garrett, Scott H

    2017-09-15

    The proximal tubules of the kidney are target sites of injury by various toxicants. Cadmium (Cd(+2)), an environmental nephrotoxicant can cause adverse effects and overt renal damage. To decipher the mechanisms involved in nephrotoxicity, an in vitro model system is required. Mortal cultures of human proximal tubule (HPT) cells have served, as models but are difficult to acquire and do not lend themselves to stable transfection. The immortalized human proximal tubule cell line HK-2, has served as a model but it lacks vectorial active transport and shows signs of lost epithelial features. Recently a new proximal tubule cell line was developed, the RPTEC/TERT1, and the goal of this study was to determine if this cell line could serve as a model to study nephrotoxicity. Global gene expression analysis of this cell line in comparison to the HK-2 and HPT cells showed that the RPTEC/TERT1 cells had gene expression patterns similar to HPT cells when compared to the HK-2 cells. The HPT and the RPTEC/TERT1 cell line had an increased population of stem/progenitor cells co-expressing CD24 and CD133 when compared to the HK-2 cells. The level of expression of cadherins, claudins and occludin molecules was also similar between the RPTEC/TERT1 and the HPT cells. Acute exposure to Cd(+2) resulted in necrosis of the RPTEC/TERT1 cells when compared to the HK-2 cells which died by apoptosis. Thus, the RPTEC/TERT1 cells are similar to HPT cells and can serve as a good model system to study mechanisms involved in toxicant induced renal damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of the multi-drug resistant human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Bel-7402/ADM model established by three methods

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To compare the biological characteristics of three types of human hepatocellular carcinoma multi-drug resistant cell sub-lines Bel-7402/ADM models established by three methods. Methods Established human hepatocellular carcinoma adriamycin (ADM) multi-drug resistant cell sub-lines models Bel-7402/ADMV, Bel-7402/ADML and Bel-7402/ADMS by three methods of in vitro concentration gradient increased induction, nude mice liver-implanted induction and subcutaneous-implanted induction respectively. Phase contrast microscopy was used to observe the cells and the MTT (methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium) method was used to detect drug resistance of the three different sub-lines of cells. Results The three groups of drug resistant cells, Bel-7402/ADMV, Bel-7402/ADML and Bel-7402/ADMS generated cross-resistance to ADM and CDDP (cis-Diaminedichloroplatinum), but showed a significant difference in resistance to Bel-7402 IC50 value (P < 0.01). The doubling times were significantly extended compared to the parent cell line (39 h) and were 65 h (Bel-7402/ADMV), 46 h (Bel-7402/ADML), and 45 h (Bel-7402/ADMS). The excretion rates of ADM were significantly increased compared with the parent cell (34.14%) line and were 81.06% (Bel-7402/ADMV), 66.56% (Bel-7402/ADML) and 61.56% (Bel-7402/ADMS). Expression of P-gp and MRP in the three groups of resistant cells was significantly enhanced (P < 0.01). There was no significant variation in the expression of GSH/GST (P > 0.05). Conclusions Stable resistance was involved in the resistant cell line model established by the above three methods. Liver implantation was a good simulation of human hepatocellular and proved to be an ideal model with characteristics similar to human hepatocellular biology and the pharmacokinetics of anticancer drugs. PMID:20727186

  7. Comparison of the multi-drug resistant human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Bel-7402/ADM model established by three methods.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xingguo; Xiong, Maoming; Meng, Xiangling; Gong, Renhua

    2010-08-20

    To compare the biological characteristics of three types of human hepatocellular carcinoma multi-drug resistant cell sub-lines Bel-7402/ADM models established by three methods. Established human hepatocellular carcinoma adriamycin (ADM) multi-drug resistant cell sub-lines models Bel-7402/ADMV, Bel-7402/ADML and Bel-7402/ADMS by three methods of in vitro concentration gradient increased induction, nude mice liver-implanted induction and subcutaneous-implanted induction respectively. Phase contrast microscopy was used to observe the cells and the MTT (methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium) method was used to detect drug resistance of the three different sub-lines of cells. The three groups of drug resistant cells, Bel-7402/ADMV, Bel-7402/ADML and Bel-7402/ADMS generated cross-resistance to ADM and CDDP (cis-Diaminedichloroplatinum), but showed a significant difference in resistance to Bel-7402 IC50 value (P < 0.01). The doubling times were significantly extended compared to the parent cell line (39 h) and were 65 h (Bel-7402/ADMV), 46 h (Bel-7402/ADML), and 45 h (Bel-7402/ADMS). The excretion rates of ADM were significantly increased compared with the parent cell (34.14%) line and were 81.06% (Bel-7402/ADMV), 66.56% (Bel-7402/ADML) and 61.56% (Bel-7402/ADMS). Expression of P-gp and MRP in the three groups of resistant cells was significantly enhanced (P < 0.01). There was no significant variation in the expression of GSH/GST (P > 0.05). Stable resistance was involved in the resistant cell line model established by the above three methods. Liver implantation was a good simulation of human hepatocellular and proved to be an ideal model with characteristics similar to human hepatocellular biology and the pharmacokinetics of anticancer drugs.

  8. Development of a direct contact astrocyte-human cerebral microvessel endothelial cells blood-brain barrier coculture model.

    PubMed

    Kulczar, Chris; Lubin, Kelsey E; Lefebvre, Sylvia; Miller, Donald W; Knipp, Gregory T

    2017-09-05

    In conventional in-vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models, primary and immortalized brain microvessel endothelial cell (BMEC) lines are often cultured in a monolayer or indirect coculture or triculture configurations with astrocytes or pericytes, for screening permeation of therapeutic or potentially neurotoxic compounds. In each of these cases, the physiological relevancy associated with the direct contact between the BMECs, pericytes and astrocytes that form the BBB and resulting synergistic interactions are lost. We look to overcome this limitation with a direct contact coculture model. We established and optimized a direct interaction coculture system where primary human astrocytes are cultured on the apical surface of a Transwell® filter support and then human cerebral microvessel endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) seeded directly on the astrocyte lawn. The studies suggest the direct coculture model may provide a more restrictive and physiologically relevant model through a significant reduction in paracellular transport of model compounds in comparison with monoculture and indirect coculture. In comparison with existing methods, the indirect coculture and monoculture models utilized may limit cell-cell signaling between human astrocytes and BMECs that are possible with direct configurations. Paracellular permeability reductions with the direct coculture system may enhance therapeutic agent and potential neurotoxicant screening for BBB permeability better than the currently available monoculture and indirect coculture in-vitro models. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Natural Killer Cells Improve Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment by Increasing Stem Cell Clonogenicity In Vitro and in a Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Laza-Briviesca, Raquel; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Luevano, Martha; Derniame, Sophie; Querol, Sergio; Blundell, Michael; Thrasher, Adrian; Soria, Bernat; Cooper, Nichola; Bonnet, Dominique; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is increasingly used as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for transplantation. Low incidence and severity of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and a robust graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect are observed following CB transplantation (CBT). However, its main disadvantages are a limited number of HSC per unit, delayed immune reconstitution and a higher incidence of infection. Unmanipulated grafts contain accessory cells that may facilitate HSC engraftment. Therefore, the effects of accessory cells, particularly natural killer (NK) cells, on human CB HSC (CBSC) functions were assessed in vitro and in vivo. CBSC cultured with autologous CB NK cells showed higher levels of CXCR4 expression, a higher migration index and a higher number of colony forming units (CFU) after short-term and long-term cultures. We found that CBSC secreted CXCL9 following interaction with CB NK cells. In addition, recombinant CXCL9 increased CBSC clonogenicity, recapitulating the effect observed of CB NK cells on CBSC. Moreover, the co-infusion of CBSC with CB NK cells led to a higher level of CBSC engraftment in NSG mouse model. The results presented in this work offer the basis for an alternative approach to enhance HSC engraftment that could improve the outcome of CBT. PMID:26465138

  10. Sulforhodamine 101 selectively labels human astrocytoma cells in an animal model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Georges, Joseph F; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Tissot, Maya; Preul, Mark C; Feuerstein, Burt; Anderson, Trent; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a useful tool for immediate staining of astrocytes. We hypothesized that if the selectivity of SR101was maintained in astrocytoma cells, it could prove useful for glioma research. Cultured astrocytoma cells and acute slices from orthotopic human glioma (n=9) and lymphoma (n=6) xenografts were incubated with SR101 and imaged with confocal microscopy. A subset of slices (n=18) were counter-immunostained with glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD20 for stereological assessment of SR101 co-localization. SR101 differentiated astrocytic tumor cells from lymphoma cells. In acute slices, SR101 labeled 86.50% (±1.86; p<0.0001) of astrocytoma cells and 2.19% (±0.47; p<0.0001) of lymphoma cells. SR101-labeled astrocytoma cells had a distinct morphology when compared with in vivo astrocytes. Immediate imaging of human astrocytoma cells in vitro and in ex vivo rodent xenograft tissue labeled with SR101 can identify astrocytic tumor cells and help visualize the tumor margin. These features are useful in studying astrocytoma in the laboratory and may have clinical applications. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Gel based in vitro 3D model exploring the osteocytic potentiality of human CD34(+) stem cells.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Lokanathan; Sunitha, Manne Mudhu; Kumar, Pasupuleti Santhosh; Chandrasekhar, Chodimella; Vengamma, Bhuma; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2016-11-01

    Osteocytic potentiality of human CD34(+) stem cells explored in the present study by generating in vitro agarose gel 3D model to understand the bone ossification process. The G-CSF and IL-3 mobilized human CD34(+) stem cells isolated apheretically from donor peripheral blood and purity of the cells was assessed by FACS and immunocytochemical (ICC) studies. The CD34(+) stem cells were cultured in gel based 3D model with osteogenic stimulating medium for 21 days. The transition stages from undifferentiated to differentiated osteocytes through osteoblasts were studied with expression markers Differentiated cells at Day 7 showed positive reactivity with monoclonal anti-Runx2, an early osteoblastic marker. qPCR expression analysis showed early and mature osteoblastic markers like RUNX2, Osterix, RANKL, along with osteocyte markers SPARC, Sclerostin. While poor expression of OSCAR genes was observed apart from conspicuous expression of alkaline phosphatase. The expression of sclerostin and SPARC suggests that these differentiated cells are behaving like true osteocytes, sclerostin expression causes transformation of osteoblast into osteocytes and negligible expression of OSCAR, RANK, NFATc and cathepsin K genes explains there are no osteoclasts in the differentiated culture. These cells showed positive reaction with Alizarin red stain indicating expression of calcium bound bone morphogenic proteins like osteonectin. All these results clearly confirm the human CD34(+) stem cells possess unique osteogenic differentiation potential and can be used in the early regeneration of injured bone.

  12. Modeling Human Neurological and Neurodegenerative Diseases: From Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Neuronal Differentiation and Its Applications in Neurotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Bahmad, Hisham; Hadadeh, Ola; Chamaa, Farah; Cheaito, Katia; Darwish, Batoul; Makkawi, Ahmad-Kareem; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2017-01-01

    With the help of several inducing factors, somatic cells can be reprogrammed to become induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) lines. The success is in obtaining iPSCs almost identical to embryonic stem cells (ESCs), therefore various approaches have been tested and ultimately several ones have succeeded. The importance of these cells is in how they serve as models to unveil the molecular pathways and mechanisms underlying several human diseases, and also in its potential roles in the development of regenerative medicine. They further aid in the development of regenerative medicine, autologous cell therapy and drug or toxicity screening. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the recent development in the field of iPSCs research, specifically for modeling human neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, and its applications in neurotrauma. These are mainly characterized by progressive functional or structural neuronal loss rendering them extremely challenging to manage. Many of these diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been explored in vitro. The main purpose is to generate patient-specific iPS cell lines from the somatic cells that carry mutations or genetic instabilities for the aim of studying their differentiation potential and behavior. This new technology will pave the way for future development in the field of stem cell research anticipating its use in clinical settings and in regenerative medicine in order to treat various human diseases, including neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28293168

  13. Refining human T-cell immunotherapy of cytomegalovirus disease: a mouse model with 'humanized' antigen presentation as a new preclinical study tool.

    PubMed

    Lemmermann, Niels A W; Reddehase, Matthias J

    2016-12-01

    With the cover headline 'T cells on the attack,' the journal Science celebrated individualized cancer immunotherapy by adoptive transfer of T cells as the 'Breakthrough of the Year' 2013 (J. Couzin-Frankel in Science 342:1432-1433, 2013). It is less well recognized and appreciated that individualized T cell immunotherapy of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is approaching clinical application for preventing CMV organ manifestations, interstitial CMV pneumonia in particular. This coincident medical development is particularly interesting as reactivated CMV infection is a major viral complication in the state of transient immunodeficiency after the therapy of hematopoietic malignancies by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). It may thus be attractive to combine T cell immunotherapy of 'minimal residual disease/leukemia (MRD)' and CMV-specific T cell immunotherapy to combat both risks in HCT recipients simultaneously, and ideally with T cells derived from the respective HLA-matched HCT donor. Although clinical trials of human CMV-specific T cell immunotherapy were promising in that the incidence of virus reactivation and disease was found to be reduced with statistical significance, animal models are still instrumental for providing 'proof of concept' by directly documenting the prevention of viral multiple-organ histopathology and organ failure under controlled conditions of the absence versus presence of the therapy, which obviously is not feasible in an individual human patient. Further, animal models can make predictions regarding parameters that determine the efficacy of T cell immunotherapy for improved study design in clinical investigations, and they allow for manipulating host and virus genetics. The latter is of particular value as it opens the possibility for epitope specificity controls that are inherently missing in clinical trials. Here, we review a recently developed new mouse model that is more approximated to human CMV-specific T cell immunotherapy

  14. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) as a chronic experimental model for investigation of retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Andrew; Hopes, Marina; Wright, Phillip; Broadway, David C; Sanderson, Julie

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing need for models of human diseases that utilise native, donated human tissue in order to model disease processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies. In this paper we assessed the suitability of adult human retinal explants as a potential model of chronic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. Our results confirmed that RGC markers commonly used in rodent studies (NeuN, βIII Tubulin and Thy-1) were appropriate for labelling human RGCs and followed the expected differential expression patterns across, as well as throughout, the macular and para-macular regions of the retina. Furthermore, we showed that neither donor age nor post-mortem time (within 24 h) significantly affected the initial expression levels of RGC markers. In addition, the feasibility of using human post mortem donor tissue as a long-term model of RGC degeneration was determined with RGC protein being detectable up to 4 weeks in culture with an associated decline in RGC mRNA and significant, progressive, apoptotic labelling of NeuN(+) cells. Differences in RGC apoptosis might have been influenced by medium compositions indicating that media constituents could play a role in supporting axotomised RGCs. We propose that using ex vivo human explants may prove to be a useful model for testing the effectiveness of neuroprotective strategies.

  15. Investigation of dermal toxicity of ionic liquids in monolayer-cultured skin cells and 3D reconstructed human skin models.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jee-Hyun; Park, Hyeonji; Choi, Dal Woong; Nam, Ki Taek; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2017-09-25

    Ionic liquids have gained increasing attention in the chemical industry as potential green substitutes for traditional solvents. However, little is known about toxicity of ionic liquids on the skin, a major exposure portal to toxic substances. Here, we evaluated dermal toxicity of ionic liquids using human keratinocyte and fibroblast cell line, 3D reconstructed human epidermis, and full-thickness model to investigate underlying mechanisms. Cytotoxicity of ionic liquids was evaluated for representative anions, [TFSI], [PF6], [BF4], and [DCA], as well as for cations, [EMIM], [BMPY], [TBA] and [Zn], in human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, and human dermal fibroblasts. In our results, significant cytotoxicity was induced by ionic liquids with [TFSI] in both cell lines. Notably, cytotoxicity of [TFSI] containing ionic liquids was comparable to xylene, a toxic conventional organic solvent. Fluorescent and flow cytometric analysis revealed that [TFSI]-exposed cells underwent necrotic cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was increased while the amount of glutathione was decreased by [TFSI] in dose-dependent manner, which was reversed by antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine. In 3D reconstructed human epidermis and full-thickness model, a single application of [TFSI] induced toxicity although it was minimal and largely limited to epidermal layer. Collectively, these results demonstrated potential dermal toxicity of ionic liquids. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Raman and infrared spectroscopy differentiate senescent from proliferating cells in a human dermal fibroblast 3D skin model.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Katharina; Matthäus, Christian; Winter, Doreen; Wiegand, Cornelia; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Diekmann, Stephan; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-08-15

    Senescent cells contribute to tissue aging and dysfunction. Therefore, detecting senescent cells in skin is of interest for skin tumor diagnostics and therapy. Here, we studied the transition into senescence of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) in a three-dimensional (3D) human fibroblast-derived matrix (FDM). Senescent and proliferating cells were imaged by Raman spectroscopy (RS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The obtained averaged spectra were analyzed using PLS-LDA. For these 3D cultured cells, RS and FTIR could clearly distinguish senescent from proliferating cells. For both techniques, we detected senescence-associated alterations in almost all cellular macromolecules. Furthermore, we identified different biochemical properties of 3D compared to two-dimensional (2D) cultured cells, indicating that cells in their natural, skin-like 3D environment act differently than in (2D) cell cultivations in vitro. Compared to 2D cultured cells, cells grown in 3D models displayed a sharper contrast between the proliferating and senescent state, also affecting the abundance of biomolecules including nucleic acids. The training accuracies of both vibrational spectroscopic techniques were >96%, demonstrating the suitability of these label-free measurements for detecting these cellular states in 3D skin models.

  17. Interaction of human trophoblast cells with gland-like endometrial spheroids: a model system for trophoblast invasion.

    PubMed

    Buck, V U; Gellersen, B; Leube, R E; Classen-Linke, I

    2015-04-01

    Do maternal endometrial epithelial cell (EEC) differentiation and polarity impact the invasive capacity of extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells during early human implantation? In a three dimensional (3D) confrontation co-culture the invasiveness of the human trophoblast cell line AC-1M88 was inversely correlated with the degree of differentiation and polarization of human endometrial adenocarcinoma cell spheroids. In a previous study desmosomal and adherens junction proteins were shown to spread from a subapically restricted lateral position to the entire lateral membrane in human glandular EECs during the implantation window of the menstrual cycle. Whether this change in EEC junction localization has an impact on the interaction of EVT cells with glandular EECs during early human implantation is not known. A new 3D cell culture system was developed in order to mimic early implantation events in humans. As a model for the invasion of endometrial glands by EVT cells, spheroids of three differently differentiated and polarized endometrial adenocarcinoma cell lines were confronted with an EVT cell line in co-culture experiments. Three human adenocarcinoma EEC lines were chosen for this study because of their differences in differentiation and polarization: HEC-1-A, which is well differentiated and highly polarized, Ishikawa, which is well differentiated and moderately polarized, and RL95-2, which is moderately differentiated and poorly polarized. When the cell lines were grown in reconstituted basement membrane, they formed gland-like, multicellular spheroids. The degree of polarization within the different EEC spheroids was assessed by 3D confocal immunofluorescence microscopy detecting the basal membrane protein integrin α6, the apical tight junction-associated protein ZO-1 and the desmosomal plaque protein desmoplakin 1/2 (Dsp). Cells of the human EVT cell line AC-1M88, which is a fusion cell line of primary EVT cells and choriocarcinoma-derived JEG-3 cells, were

  18. Unique features of the transcriptional response to model aneuploidy in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneuploidy, a karyotype deviating from multiples of a haploid chromosome set, affects the physiology of eukaryotes. In humans, aneuploidy is linked to pathological defects such as developmental abnormalities, mental retardation or cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. There are many different types and origins of aneuploidy, but whether there is a uniform cellular response to aneuploidy in human cells has not been addressed so far. Results Here we evaluate the transcription profiles of eleven trisomic and tetrasomic cell lines and two cell lines with complex aneuploid karyotypes. We identify a characteristic aneuploidy response pattern defined by upregulation of genes linked to endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and lysosomes, and downregulation of DNA replication, transcription as well as ribosomes. Strikingly, complex aneuploidy elicits the same transcriptional changes as trisomy. To uncover the triggers of the response, we compared the profiles with transcription changes in human cells subjected to stress conditions. Interestingly, we found an overlap only with the response to treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1. Finally, we identified 23 genes whose expression is significantly altered in all aneuploids and which may thus serve as aneuploidy markers. Conclusions Our analysis shows that despite the variability in chromosome content, aneuploidy triggers uniform transcriptional response in human cells. A common response independent of the type of aneuploidy might be exploited as a novel target for cancer therapy. Moreover, the potential aneuploidy markers identified in our analysis might represent novel biomarkers to assess the malignant potential of a tumor. PMID:24548329

  19. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Atienzar, Franck A.; Novik, Eric I.; Gerets, Helga H.; Parekh, Amit; Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro; MacDonald, James; Yarmush, Martin L.; Dhalluin, Stéphane

    2014-02-15

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes.

  20. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4+ T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model

    PubMed Central

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-01-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann–Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4+CD45RO+ and CD4+CD45RO+CXCR5+ cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans. PMID:21488866

  1. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4(+) T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model.

    PubMed

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-06-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann-Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CXCR5(+) cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans.

  2. Human Embryonic Stem Cells: A Model for the Study of Neural Development and Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Prajumwongs, Piya; Weeranantanapan, Oratai; Jaroonwitchawan, Thiranut; Noisa, Parinya

    2016-01-01

    Although the mechanism of neurogenesis has been well documented in other organisms, there might be fundamental differences between human and those species referring to species-specific context. Based on principles learned from other systems, it is found that the signaling pathways required for neural induction and specification of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) recapitulated those in the early embryo development in vivo at certain degree. This underscores the usefulness of hESCs in understanding early human neural development and reinforces the need to integrate the principles of developmental biology and hESC biology for an efficient neural differentiation. PMID:27239201

  3. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells secreting anti-PD-L1 antibodies more effectively regress renal cell carcinoma in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Chang, De-Kuan; Sun, Jiusong; Sui, Jianhua; Freeman, Gordon J.; Signoretti, Sabina; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) have led to improved progression-free survival of many patients; however the therapies are toxic, rarely achieve durable long-term complete responses and are not curative. Herein we used a single bicistronic lentiviral vector to develop a new combination immunotherapy that consists of human anti-carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX)-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells engineered to secrete human anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibodies at the tumor site. The local antibody delivery led to marked immune checkpoint blockade. Tumor growth diminished 5 times and tumor weight reduced 50–80% when compared with the anti-CAIX CAR T cells alone in a humanized mice model of ccRCC. The expression of PD-L1 and Ki67 in the tumors decreased and an increase in granzyme B levels was found in CAR T cells. The anti-PD-L1 IgG1 isotype, which is capable of mediating ADCC, was also able to recruit human NK cells to the tumor site in vivo. These armed second-generation CAR T cells empowered to secrete human anti-PD-L1 antibodies in the ccRCC milieu to combat T cell exhaustion is an innovation in this field that should provide renewed potential for CAR T cell immunotherapy of solid tumors where limited efficacy is currently seen. PMID:27145284

  4. Computational Model of Ca2+ Wave Propagation in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vainio, Iina; Abu Khamidakh, Amna; Paci, Michelangelo; Skottman, Heli; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Hyttinen, Jari; Nymark, Soile

    2015-01-01

    Objective Computational models of calcium (Ca2+) signaling have been constructed for several cell types. There are, however, no such models for retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Our aim was to construct a Ca2+ signaling model for RPE based on our experimental data of mechanically induced Ca2+ wave in the in vitro model of RPE, the ARPE-19 monolayer. Methods We combined six essential Ca2+ signaling components into a model: stretch-sensitive Ca2+ channels (SSCCs), P2Y2 receptors, IP3 receptors, ryanodine receptors, Ca2+ pumps, and gap junctions. The cells in our epithelial model are connected to each other to enable transport of signaling molecules. Parameterization was done by tuning the above model components so that the simulated Ca2+ waves reproduced our control experimental data and data where gap junctions were blocked. Results Our model was able to explain Ca2+ signaling in ARPE-19 cells, and the basic mechanism was found to be as follows: 1) Cells near the stimulus site are likely to conduct Ca2+ through plasma membrane SSCCs and gap junctions conduct the Ca2+ and IP3 between cells further away. 2) Most likely the stimulated cell secretes ligand to the extracellular space where the ligand diffusion mediates the Ca2+ signal so that the ligand concentration decreases with distance. 3) The phosphorylation of the IP3 receptor defines the cell’s sensitivity to the extracellular ligand attenuating the Ca2+ signal in the distance. Conclusions The developed model was able to simulate an array of experimental data including drug effects. Furthermore, our simulations predict that suramin may interfere ligand binding on P2Y2 receptors or accelerate P2Y2 receptor phosphorylation, which may partially be the reason for Ca2+ wave attenuation by suramin. Being the first RPE Ca2+ signaling model created based on experimental data on ARPE-19 cell line, the model offers a platform for further modeling of native RPE functions. PMID:26070134

  5. Neural Stem Cell or Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived GABA-ergic Progenitor Cell Grafting in an Animal Model of Chronic Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Upadhya, Dinesh; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Geetha A.; Zanirati, Gabriele; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2016-01-01

    Grafting of neural stem cells (NSCs) or GABA-ergic progenitor cells (GPCs) into the hippocampus could offer an alternative therapy to hippocampal resection in patients with drug-resistant chronic epilepsy, which afflicts >30% of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) cases. Multipotent, self-renewing NSCs could be expanded from multiple regions of the developing and adult brain, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). On the other hand, GPCs could be generated from the medial and lateral ganglionic eminences of the embryonic brain and from hESCs and hiPSCs. To provide comprehensive methodologies involved in testing the efficacy of transplantation of NSCs and GPCs in a rat model of chronic TLE, NSCs derived from the rat medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and MGE-like GPCs derived from hiPSCs are taken as examples in this unit. The topics comprise description of the required materials, reagents and equipment, methods for obtaining rat MGE-NSCs and hiPSC-derived MGE-like GPCs in culture, generation of chronically epileptic rats, intrahippocampal grafting procedure, post-grafting evaluation of the effects of grafts on spontaneous recurrent seizures and cognitive and mood impairments, analyses of the yield and the fate of graft-derived cells, and the effects of grafts on the host hippocampus. PMID:27532817

  6. Neural Stem Cell or Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived GABA-ergic Progenitor Cell Grafting in an Animal Model of Chronic Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Dinesh; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Geetha A; Zanirati, Gabriele; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shetty, Ashok K

    2016-08-17

    Grafting of neural stem cells (NSCs) or GABA-ergic progenitor cells (GPCs) into the hippocampus could offer an alternative therapy to hippocampal resection in patients with drug-resistant chronic epilepsy, which afflicts >30% of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) cases. Multipotent, self-renewing NSCs could be expanded from multiple regions of the developing and adult brain, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). On the other hand, GPCs could be generated from the medial and lateral ganglionic eminences of the embryonic brain and from hESCs and hiPSCs. To provide comprehensive methodologies involved in testing the efficacy of transplantation of NSCs and GPCs in a rat model of chronic TLE, NSCs derived from the rat medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and MGE-like GPCs derived from hiPSCs are taken as examples in this unit. The topics comprise description of the required materials, reagents and equipment, methods for obtaining rat MGE-NSCs and hiPSC-derived MGE-like GPCs in culture, generation of chronically epileptic rats, intrahippocampal grafting procedure, post-grafting evaluation of the effects of grafts on spontaneous recurrent seizures and cognitive and mood impairments, analyses of the yield and the fate of graft-derived cells, and the effects of grafts on the host hippocampus. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Androgen regulation of the human FERM domain encoding gene EHM2 in a cell model of steroid-induced differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay; Pandey, Ritu; Way, Jeffrey F.; Sroka, Thomas C.; Demetriou, Manolis C.; Kunz, Susan; Cress, Anne E.; Mount, David W.; Miesfeld, Roger L.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a cell model to investigate steroid control of differentiation using a subline of HT1080 cells (HT-AR1) that have been engineered to express the human androgen receptor. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment of HT-AR1 cells induced growth arrest and cytoskeletal reorganization that was associated with the expression of fibronectin and the neuroendocrine markers chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase. Expression profiling analysis identified the human FERM domain-encoding gene EHM2 as uniquely induced in HT-AR1 cells as compared to 16 other FERM domain containing genes. Since FERM domain proteins control cytoskeletal functions in differentiating cells, and the human EHM2 gene has not been characterized, we investigated EHM2 steroid-regulation, genomic organization, and sequence conservation. We found that DHT, but not dexamethasone, induced the expression of a 3.8 kb transcript in HT-AR1 cells encoding a 504 amino acid protein, and moreover, that human brain tissue contains a 5.8 kb transcript encoding a 913 amino acid isoform. Construction of an unrooted phylogenetic tree using 98 FERM domain proteins revealed that the human EHM2 gene is a member of a distinct subfamily consisting of nine members, all of which contain a highly conserved 325 amino acid FERM domain. PMID:14521927

  8. Development and characterization of a human embryonic stem cell-derived 3D neural tissue model for neurotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Sandström, J; Eggermann, E; Charvet, I; Roux, A; Toni, N; Greggio, C; Broyer, A; Monnet-Tschudi, F; Stoppini, L

    2017-02-01

    Alternative models for more rapid compound safety testing are of increasing demand. With emerging techniques using human pluripotent stem cells, the possibility of generating human in vitro models has gained interest, as factors related to species differences could be potentially eliminated. When studying potential neurotoxic effects of a compound it is of crucial importance to have both neurons and glial cells. We have successfully developed a protocol for generating in vitro 3D human neural tissues, using neural progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. These 3D neural tissues can be maintained for two months and undergo progressive differentiation. We showed a gradual decreased expression of early neural lineage markers, paralleled by an increase in markers specific for mature neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. At the end of the two-month culture period the neural tissues not only displayed synapses and immature myelin sheaths around axons, but electrophysiological measurements also showed spontaneous activity. Neurotoxicity testing - comparing non-neurotoxic to known neurotoxic model compounds - showed an expected increase in the marker of astroglial reactivity after exposure to known neurotoxicants methylmercury and trimethyltin. Although further characterization and refinement of the model is required, these results indicate its potential usefulness for in vitro neurotoxicity testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiple Cooperating Oncogenes Drive Recurrent Breast Cancer-Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Josh Lauring , M.D., Ph.D...5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0285 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Josh Lauring , M.D., Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuron as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity Ingrid L. Druwe1, Timothy J. Shafer2, Kathleen Wallace2, Pablo Valdivia3 ,and William R. Mundy2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology...

  11. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuron as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity Ingrid L. Druwe1, Timothy J. Shafer2, Kathleen Wallace2, Pablo Valdivia3 ,and William R. Mundy2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology...

  12. Maternal transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells provides prenatal therapy in Sanfilippo type B mouse model.

    PubMed

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Gografe, Sylvia J; Sanberg, Cyndy Davis; Willing, Alison E; Saporta, Samuel; Cameron, Don F; Desjarlais, Tammy; Daily, Jennifer; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Klasko, Stephen K; Sanberg, Paul R

    2006-03-01

    Numerous data support passage of maternal cells into the fetus during pregnancy in both human and animal models. However, functional benefits of maternal microchimerism in utero are unknown. The current study attempted to take advantage of this route for prenatal delivery of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu) enzyme into the enzyme-deficient mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS III B). Enzymatically sufficient mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood (MNC hUCB) were intravenously administered into heterozygote females modeling MPS III B on the 5th day of pregnancy during blastocyst implantation. The major findings were 1) administered MNC hUCB cells transmigrated and diffused into the embryos (E12.5); 2) some transmigrated cells expressed CD34 and CD117 antigens; 3) transmigrated cells were found in both the maternal and embryonic parts of placentas; 4) transmigrated cells corrected Naglu enzyme activity in all embryos; 5) administered MNC hUCB cells were extensively distributed in the organs and the blood of heterozygote mothers at one week after transplantation. Results indicate that prenatal delivery of Naglu enzyme by MNC hUCB cell administration into mothers of enzyme-deficient embryos is possible and may present a significant opportunity for new biotechnologies to treat many inherited disorders.

  13. Multiple Intravenous Administrations of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Benefit in a Mouse Model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Rodrigues, Maria C. O.; Mirtyl, Santhia; Turner, Shanna; Mitha, Shazia; Sodhi, Jasmine; Suthakaran, Subatha; Eve, David J.; Sanberg, Cyndy D.; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Background A promising therapeutic strategy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the use of cell-based therapies that can protect motor neurons and thereby retard disease progression. We recently showed that a single large dose (25×106 cells) of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood (MNC hUCB) administered intravenously to pre-symptomatic G93A SOD1 mice is optimal in delaying disease progression and increasing lifespan. However, this single high cell dose is impractical for clinical use. The aim of the present pre-clinical translation study was therefore to evaluate the effects of multiple low dose systemic injections of MNC hUCB cell into G93A SOD1 mice at different disease stages. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice received weekly intravenous injections of MNC hUCB or media. Symptomatic mice received 106 or 2.5×106 cells from 13 weeks of age. A third, pre-symptomatic, group received 106 cells from 9 weeks of age. Control groups were media-injected G93A and mice carrying the normal hSOD1 gene. Motor function tests and various assays determined cell effects. Administered cell distribution, motor neuron counts, and glial cell densities were analyzed in mouse spinal cords. Results showed that mice receiving 106 cells pre-symptomatically or 2.5×106 cells symptomatically significantly delayed functional deterioration, increased lifespan and had higher motor neuron counts than media mice. Astrocytes and microglia were significantly reduced in all cell-treated groups. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that multiple injections of MNC hUCB cells, even beginning at the symptomatic disease stage, could benefit disease outcomes by protecting motor neurons from inflammatory effectors. This multiple cell infusion approach may promote future clinical studies. PMID:22319620

  14. Naltrindole Inhibits Human Multiple Myeloma Cell Proliferation In Vitro and in a Murine Xenograft Model In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Terskiy, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that immune cell activation and proliferation were sensitive to the effects of naltrindole, a nonpeptidic δ-opioid receptor-selective antagonist; therefore, we hypothesized that human multiple myeloma (MM) would be a valuable model for studying potential antineoplastic properties of naltrindole. [3H]naltrindole exhibited saturable, low-affinity binding to intact human MM cells; however, the pharmacological profile of the binding site differed considerably from the properties of δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptors, and opioid receptor mRNA was not detected in MM cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Naltrindole inhibited the proliferation of cultured human U266 MM cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 16 μM. The naltrindole-induced inhibition of U266 cell proliferation was not blocked by a 10-fold molar excess of naltrexone, a nonselective opioid antagonist. Additive inhibition of MM cell proliferation was observed when using a combination of naltrindole with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, the glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone, and the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin. Treatment of U266 cells with naltrindole significantly decreased the level of the active, phosphorylated form of the kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt, which may be related to its antiproliferative activity. The antiproliferative activity of naltrindole toward MM cells was maintained in cocultures of MM and bone marrow-derived stromal cells, mimicking the bone marrow microenvironment. In vivo, naltrindole significantly decreased tumor cell volumes in human MM cell xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We hypothesize that naltrindole inhibits the proliferation of MM cells through a nonopioid receptor-dependent mechanism. PMID:22537770

  15. Human memory B cells.

    PubMed

    Seifert, M; Küppers, R

    2016-12-01

    A key feature of the adaptive immune system is the generation of memory B and T cells and long-lived plasma cells, providing protective immunity against recurring infectious agents. Memory B cells are generated in germinal center (GC) reactions in the course of T cell-dependent immune responses and are distinguished from naive B cells by an increased lifespan, faster and stronger response to stimulation and expression of somatically mutated and affinity matured immunoglobulin (Ig) genes. Approximately 40% of human B cells in adults are memory B cells, and several subsets were identified. Besides IgG(+) and IgA(+) memory B cells, ∼50% of peripheral blood memory B cells express IgM with or without IgD. Further smaller subpopulations have additionally been described. These various subsets share typical memory B cell features, but likely also fulfill distinct functions. IgM memory B cells appear to have the propensity for refined adaptation upon restimulation in additional GC reactions, whereas reactivated IgG B cells rather differentiate directly into plasma cells. The human memory B-cell pool is characterized by (sometimes amazingly large) clonal expansions, often showing extensive intraclonal IgV gene diversity. Moreover, memory B-cell clones are frequently composed of members of various subsets, showing that from a single GC B-cell clone a variety of memory B cells with distinct functions is generated. Thus, the human memory B-cell compartment is highly diverse and flexible. Several B-cell malignancies display features suggesting a derivation from memory B cells. This includes a subset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, hairy cell leukemia and marginal zone lymphomas. The exposure of memory B cells to oncogenic events during their generation in the GC, the longevity of these B cells and the ease to activate them may be key determinants for their malignant transformation.

  16. Modeling of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia with patient-specific human-induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Itzhaki, Ilanit; Maizels, Leonid; Huber, Irit; Gepstein, Amira; Arbel, Gil; Caspi, Oren; Miller, Liron; Belhassen, Bernard; Nof, Eyal; Glikson, Michael; Gepstein, Lior

    2012-09-11

    The goal of this study was to establish a patient-specific human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) model of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). CPVT is a familial arrhythmogenic syndrome characterized by abnormal calcium (Ca(2+)) handling, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained from a CPVT patient due to the M4109R heterozygous point RYR2 mutation and reprogrammed to generate the CPVT-hiPSCs. The patient-specific hiPSCs were coaxed to differentiate into the cardiac lineage and compared with healthy control hiPSCs-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSCs-CMs). Intracellular electrophysiological recordings demonstrated the development of delayed afterdepolarizations in 69% of the CPVT-hiPSCs-CMs compared with 11% in healthy control cardiomyocytes. Adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol (1 μM) or forskolin (5 μM) increased the frequency and magnitude of afterdepolarizations and also led to development of triggered activity in the CPVT-hiPSCs-CMs. In contrast, flecainide (10 μM) and thapsigargin (10 μM) eliminated all afterdepolarizations in these cells. The latter finding suggests an important role for internal Ca(2+) stores in the pathogenesis of delayed afterdepolarizations. Laser-confocal Ca(2+) imaging revealed significant whole-cell [Ca(2+)] transient irregularities (frequent local and large-storage Ca(2+)-release events, broad and double-humped transients, and triggered activity) in the CPVT cardiomyocytes that worsened with adrenergic stimulation and Ca(2+) overload and improved with beta-blockers. Store-overload-induced Ca(2+) release was also identified in the hiPSCs-CMs and the threshold for such events was significantly reduced in the CPVT cells. This study highlights the potential of hiPSCs for studying inherited arrhythmogenic syndromes, in general, and CPVT specifically. As such, it represents a promising paradigm to study disease mechanisms, optimize patient care, and aid in the

  17. A Systems Model for Immune Cell Interactions Unravels the Mechanism of Inflammation in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Umezawa, Yoshinori; Kotov, Nikolay V.; Williams, Gareth; Clop, Alex; Ainali, Crysanthi; Ouzounis, Christos; Tsoka, Sophia; Nestle, Frank O.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation is characterized by altered cytokine levels produced by cell populations in a highly interdependent manner. To elucidate the mechanism of an inflammatory reaction, we have developed a mathematical model for immune cell interactions via the specific, dose-dependent cytokine production rates of cell populations. The model describes the criteria required for normal and pathological immune system responses and suggests that alterations in the cytokine production rates can lead to various stable levels which manifest themselves in different disease phenotypes. The model predicts that pairs of interacting immune cell populations can maintain homeostatic and elevated extracellular cytokine concentration levels, enabling them to operate as an immune system switch. The concept described here is developed in the context of psoriasis, an immune-mediated disease, but it can also offer mechanistic insights into other inflammatory pathologies as it explains how interactions between immune cell populations can lead to disease phenotypes. PMID:21152006

  18. Bone metastasis model with multiorgan dissemination of human small-cell lung cancer (SBC-5) cells in natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Miki, T; Yano, S; Hanibuchi, M; Sone, S

    2000-01-01

    Lung cancer is commonly associated with multiorgan metastasis, and bone is a frequent metastatic site for lung cancer. Nevertheless, no bone metastasis model of lung cancer with multiorgan dissemination is available, which could provide opportunity to study the molecular pathogenesis. We examined the abilities of eight human lung cancer cell lines injected intravenously into natural killer (NK) cell-depleted SCID mice to generate metastatic nodules in bone and multiple organs, and explored the correlation of the parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) with the bone metastasis. Although all the small-cell carcinoma cell lines (SBC-5, SBC-3, SBC-3/ADM, H69, H69/VP) formed metastatic nodules in multiple organs (liver, kidney, and lymph nodes), only SBC-5 cells reproducibly developed bone metastases. Squamous cell carcinoma (RERF-LC-AI) cells metastasized mainly into the liver and kidneys, whereas adenocarcinoma (PC-14, A549) mainly produced colonies in the lungs. As assessed by X-ray photography, the osteolytic bone metastases produced by SBC-5 cells were detected as early as on day 28, and all recipient mice developed bone metastasis by day 35. The expression of PTHrP in eight cell lines was directly correlated with the formation of bone metastasis. No correlation was observed between the formation of bone metastasis and the expression of other metastasis-related cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-11, TNF-alpha, VEGF, M-CSF). Consistent with the formation of bone metastasis by SBC-5 cells, the levels of PTHrP and calcium in the mouse serum were increased in a time-dependent manner, suggesting that PTHrP produced by human lung cancer may play a crucial role in the formation of bone metastasis and hypercalcemia. These findings indicate that a bone metastasis model of SBC-5 cells may be useful for clarifying the molecular aspects of the metastatic processes in different organ microenvironments and the development of therapeutic modalities for lung cancer

  19. Model of human immunodeficiency virus budding and self-assembly: Role of the cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan T.

    2008-11-01

    Budding from the plasma membrane of the host cell is an indispensable step in the life cycle of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which belongs to a large family of enveloped RNA viruses, retroviruses. Unlike regular enveloped viruses, retrovirus budding happens concurrently with the self-assembly of the main retrovirus protein subunits (called Gag protein after the name of the genetic material that codes for this protein: Group-specific AntiGen) into spherical virus capsids on the cell membrane. Led by this unique budding and assembly mechanism, we study the free energy profile of retrovirus budding, taking into account the Gag-Gag attraction energy and the membrane elastic energy. We find that if the Gag-Gag attraction is strong, budding always proceeds to completion. During early stage of budding, the zenith angle of partial budded capsids, α , increases with time as α∝t1/2 . However, if the Gag-Gag attraction is weak, a metastable state of partial budding appears. The zenith angle of these partially spherical capsids is given by α0≃(τ2/κσ)1/4 in a linear approximation, where κ and σ are the bending modulus and the surface tension of the membrane, and τ is a line tension of the capsid proportional to the strength of Gag-Gag attraction. Numerically, we find α0<0.3π without any approximations. Using experimental parameters, we show that HIV budding and assembly always proceed to completion in normal biological conditions. On the other hand, by changing Gag-Gag interaction strength or membrane rigidity, it is relatively easy to tune it back and forth between complete budding and partial budding. Our model agrees reasonably well with experiments observing partial budding of retroviruses including HIV.

  20. Modeled microgravity disrupts collagen I/integrin signaling during osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Valerie E; Zayzafoon, Maid; Gonda, Steve R; Gathings, William E; McDonald, Jay M

    2004-11-01

    Spaceflight leads to reduced bone mineral density in weight bearing bones that is primarily attributed to a reduction in bone formation. We have previously demonstrated severely reduced osteoblastogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) following 7 days culture in modeled microgravity (MMG). One potential mechanism for reduced osteoblastic differentiation is disruption of type I collagen (Col I)-integrin interactions and reduced integrin signaling. Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors that bind extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival, and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of MMG on integrin expression and function in hMSC. We demonstrate that 7 days of culture in MMG leads to reduced expression of the ECM protein, Col I. Conversely, MMG consistently increases Col I-specific alpha2 and beta1 integrin protein expression. Despite this increase in integrin subunit expression, autophosphorylation of adhesion-dependent kinases, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), is significantly reduced. Activation of Akt protein kinase (Akt) is unaffected by the reduction in FAK activation. However, reduced downstream signaling via the Ras-mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is evidenced by a reduction in Ras and extracellular signal-related protein kinase (ERK) activation. Taken together, our findings indicate that MMG decreases integrin/MAPK signaling, which likely contributes to the observed reduction in osteoblastogenesis.

  1. Eradication of tumor colonization and invasion by a B cell-specific immunotoxin in a murine model for human primary intraocular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuqing; Mahesh, Sankaranarayana P; Shen, De Fen; Liu, Baoying; Siu, Willie O; Hwang, Frank S; Wang, Qing-Chen; Chan, Chi-Chao; Pastan, Ira; Nussenblatt, Robert B

    2006-11-01

    Human primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL) is predominantly a B cell-originated malignant disease with no appropriate animal models and effective therapies available. This study aimed to establish a mouse model to closely mimic human B-cell PIOL and to test the therapeutic potential of a recently developed immunotoxin targeting human B-cell lymphomas. Human B-cell lymphoma cells were intravitreally injected into severe combined immunodeficient mice. The resemblance of this tumor model to human PIOL was examined by fundoscopy, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and evaluated for molecular markers. The therapeutic effectiveness of immunotoxin HA22 was tested by injecting the drug intravitreally. Results showed that the murine model resembles human PIOL closely. Pathologic examination revealed that the tumor cells initially colonized on the retinal surface, followed by infiltrating through the retinal layers, expanding preferentially in the subretinal space, and eventually penetrating through the retinal pigment epithelium into the choroid. Several putative molecular markers for human PIOL were expressed in vivo in this model. Tumor metastasis into the central nervous system was also observed. A single intravitreal injection of immunotoxin HA22 after the establishment of the PIOL resulted in complete regression of the tumor. This is the first report of a murine model that closely mimics human B-cell PIOL. This model may be a valuable tool in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of human PIOL and for the evaluation of new therapeutic approaches. The results of B cell-specific immunotoxin therapy may have clinical implications in treating human PIOL.

  2. A novel human gamma-globin gene vector for genetic correction of sickle cell anemia in a humanized sickle mouse model: critical determinants for successful correction.

    PubMed

    Perumbeti, Ajay; Higashimoto, Tomoyasu; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Franco, Robert; Meiselman, Herbert J; Witte, David; Malik, Punam

    2009-08-06

    We show that lentiviral delivery of human gamma-globin gene under beta-globin regulatory control elements in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) results in sufficient postnatal fetal hemoglobin (HbF) expression to correct sickle cell anemia (SCA) in the Berkeley "humanized" sickle mouse. Upon de-escalating the amount of transduced HSCs in transplant recipients, using reduced-intensity conditioning and varying gene transfer efficiency and vector copy number, we assessed critical parameters needed for correction. A systematic quantification of functional and hematologic red blood cell (RBC) indices, organ pathology, and life span was used to determine the minimal amount of HbF, F cells, HbF/F-cell, and gene-modified HSCs required for correcting the sickle phenotype. We show that long-term amelioration of disease occurred (1) when HbF exceeded 10%, F cells constituted two-thirds of the circulating RBCs, and HbF/F cell was one-third of the total hemoglobin in sickle RBCs; and (2) when approximately 20% gene-modified HSCs repopulated the marrow. Moreover, we show a novel model using reduced-intensity conditioning to determine genetically corrected HSC threshold that corrects a hematopoietic disease. These studies provide a strong preclinical model for what it would take to genetically correct SCA and are a foundation for the use of this vector in a human clinical trial.

  3. STAT3 signaling is activated preferentially in tumor-initiating cells in claudin-low models of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Tweardy, David J; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Landua, John; Petrovic, Ivana; Bu, Wen; Roarty, Kevin; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    In breast cancer, a subset of tumor-initiating cells (TIC) or "cancer stem cells" are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance, treatment resistance, and disease recurrence. While current breast cancer stem cell markers (e.g., CD44(high) /CD24(low/neg) , ALDH positive) have allowed enrichment for such cells, they are not universally expressed and may actually identify distinct TIC subpopulations in the same tumor. Thus, additional markers of functional stem cells are needed. The STAT3 pathway is a critical regulator of the function of normal stem cells, and evidence is accumulating for its important role in breast cancer stem cells. However, due to the lack of a method for separating live cells based on their level of STAT3 activity, it remains unknown whether STAT3 functions in the cancer stem cells themselves, or in surrounding niche cells, or in both. To approach this question, we constructed a series of lentiviral fluorescent (enhanced green fluorescent protein, EGFP) reporters that enabled flow cytometric enrichment of cells differing in STAT3-mediated transcriptional activity, as well as in vivo/in situ localization of STAT3 responsive cells. Using in vivo claudin-low cell line xenograft models of human breast cancer, we found that STAT3 signaling reporter activity (EGFP(+) ) is associated with a subpopulation of cancer cells enriched for mammosphere-forming efficiency, as well as TIC function in limiting dilution transplantation assays compared to negative or unsorted populations. Our results support STAT3 signaling activity as another functional marker for human breast cancer stem cells thus making it an attractive therapeutic target for stem-cell-directed therapy in some breast cancer subtypes. © AlphaMed Press.

  4. Gold nanoparticle labeling of cells is a sensitive method to investigate cell distribution and migration in animal models of human disease.

    PubMed

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Schültke, Elisabeth; Hall, Christopher; Arfelli, Fulvia; Astolfo, Alberto; Rigon, Luigi; Round, Adam; Ataelmannan, Khalid; MacDonald, Sarah Rigley; Juurlink, Bernhard H J

    2011-10-01

    The ability to track cells in small-animal models of human disease is important because it gives the potential to improve our understanding of the processes of disease progression as well as our understanding of the therapeutic effects of interventions. In this study gold nanoparticles have been used as a permanent marker of implanted normal and malignant cell grafts in combination with a suitable x-ray apparatus. Using x-ray computed tomography the micrometric three-dimensional distribution of these marked cells could be displayed with penetration depth, high cell sensitivity and high spatial resolution in rodent models of human diseases. In principle the method allows quantification of cell numbers at any anatomical location over time in small animals.

  5. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  6. Rhinovirus Delays Cell Repolarization in a Model of Injured/Regenerating Human Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Andrea N.; Ganesan, Shyamala; Chattoraj, Asamanja; Chattoraj, Sangbrita S.; Comstock, Adam T.; Unger, Benjamin L.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2016-01-01

    Rhinovirus (RV), which causes exacerbation in patients with chronic airway diseases, readily infects injured airway epithelium and has been reported to delay wound closure. In this study, we examined the effects of RV on cell repolarization and differentiation in a model of injured/regenerating airway epithelium (polarized, undifferentiated cells). RV causes only a transient barrier disruption in a model of normal (mucociliary-differentiated) airway epithelium. However, in the injury/regeneration model, RV prolongs barrier dysfunction and alters the differentiation of cells. The prolonged barrier dysfunction caused by RV was not a result of excessive cell death but was instead associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like features, such as reduced expression of the apicolateral junction and polarity complex proteins, E-cadherin, occludin, ZO-1, claudins 1 and 4, and Crumbs3 and increased expression of vimentin, a mesenchymal cell marker. The expression of Snail, a transcriptional repressor of tight and adherence junctions, was also up-regulated in RV-infected injured/regenerating airway epithelium, and inhibition of Snail reversed RV-induced EMT-like features. In addition, compared with sham-infected cells, the RV-infected injured/regenerating airway epithelium showed more goblet cells and fewer ciliated cells. Inhibition of epithelial growth factor receptor promoted repolarization of cells by inhibiting Snail and enhancing expression of E-cadherin, occludin, and Crumbs3 proteins, reduced the number of goblet cells, and increased the number of ciliated cells. Together, these results suggest that RV not only disrupts barrier function, but also interferes with normal renewal of injured/regenerating airway epithelium by inducing EMT-like features and subsequent goblet cell hyperplasia. PMID:27119973

  7. Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Toxicity Testing Models: Future Applications in New Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Vaibhav; Sureshkumar, Poornima; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Hescheler, Jurgen; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2016-01-01

    New drug discovery (NDD) is a fascinating discipline encompassing different facets of medicine, pharmacology, biotechnology and chemistry. NDD is very often restricted by efficacy or safety problems of the new clinical candidate in human patients. Drug regulatory authorities have provided various guidelines for advancement of safe new chemical entities (NCEs) in clinical trials which must be strictly followed. In spite of this, various drugs have failed in clinical trials or withdrawn from market because of human safety issues related to cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, neurotoxicity and teratogenicity. The failure of safety prediction was pointed to species specificity issues, lack of mechanistic toxicity data and inadequate clinical trials. These drugs not only affect human health but also cause loss of resources and time. The species specificity issues are partially addressed by use of primary human cells but their availability is very limited. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offer sources for generation of an unlimited number of human somatic cells. The emergence of mechanistic models for toxicity testing with transcriptomics, proteomics along with toxicokinetics readouts based on hESCs and hiPSCs is paving the way to design new human relevant testing strategies. Introduction of these models at the timeframe of lead selection and optimization in parallel with in vitro pharmacokinetic studies will significantly reduce compound attrition rate by selection of safer lead molecules. We focused on upcoming hESCs and hiPSCs based toxicity testing models and their future role to address safety gaps of present drug discovery and development.

  8. Current state and perspectives in modeling and control of human pluripotent stem cell expansion processes in stirred-tank bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Galvanauskas, Vytautas; Grincas, Vykantas; Simutis, Rimvydas; Kagawa, Yuki; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2016-12-26

    Implementation of model-based practices for process development, control, automation, standardization, and validation are important factors for therapeutic and industrial applications of human pluripotent stem cells. As robust cultivation strategies for pluripotent stem cell expansion and differentiation have yet to be determined, process development could be enhanced by application of mathematical models and advanced control systems to optimize growth conditions. Therefore, it is important to understand both the potential of possible applications and the apparent limitations of existing mathematical models to improve pluripotent stem cell cultivation technologies. In the present review, the authors focus on these issues as they apply to stem cell expansion processes. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2017.

  9. Human Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Model X Chromosome Dampening and X Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Anna; Kim, Rachel; Chronis, Constantinos; Sabri, Shan; Bonora, Giancarlo; Theunissen, Thorold W; Kuoy, Edward; Langerman, Justin; Clark, Amander T; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Plath, Kathrin

    2017-01-05

    Naive human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be derived from primed hESCs or directly from blastocysts, but their X chromosome state has remained unresolved. Here, we show that the inactive X chromosome (Xi) of primed hESCs was reactivated in naive culture conditions. Like cells of the blastocyst, the resulting naive cells contained two active X chromosomes with XIST expression and chromosome-wide transcriptional dampening and initiated XIST-mediated X inactivation upon differentiation. Both establishment of and exit from the naive state (differentiation) happened via an XIST-negative XaXa intermediate. Together, these findings identify a cell culture system for functionally exploring the two X chromosome dosage compensation processes in early human development: X dampening and X inactivation. However, remaining differences between naive hESCs and embryonic cells related to mono-allelic XIST expression and non-random X inactivation highlight the need for further culture improvement. As the naive state resets Xi abnormalities seen in primed hESCs, it may provide cells better suited for downstream applications.

  10. Nanotubes impregnated human olfactory bulb neural stem cells promote neuronal differentiation in Trimethyltin-induced neurodegeneration rat model.

    PubMed

    Marei, Hany E; Elnegiry, Ahmed A; Zaghloul, Adel; Althani, Asma; Afifi, Nahla; Abd-Elmaksoud, Ahmed; Farag, Amany; Lashen, Samah; Rezk, Shymaa; Shouman, Zeinab; Cenciarelli, Carlo; Hasan, Anwarul

    2017-12-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that could be used in cellular-based therapy for a wide variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's diseases (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and multiple sclerosis (MS). Being multipotent in nature, they are practically capable of giving rise to major cell types of the nervous tissue including neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. This is in marked contrast to neural progenitor cells which are committed to a specific lineage fate. In previous studies, we have demonstrated the ability of NSCs isolated from human olfactory bulb (OB) to survive, proliferate, differentiate, and restore cognitive and motor deficits associated with AD, and PD rat models, respectively. The use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance the survivability and differentiation potential of NSCs following their in vivo engraftment have been recently suggested. Here, in order to assess the ability of CNTs to enhance the therapeutic potential of human OBNSCs for restoring cognitive deficits and neurodegenerative lesions, we co-engrafted CNTs and human OBNSCs in TMT-neurodegeneration rat model. The present study revealed that engrafted human OBNSCS-CNTs restored cognitive deficits, and neurodegenerative changes associated with TMT-induced rat neurodegeneration model. Moreover, the CNTs seemed to provide a support for engrafted OBNSCs, with increasing their tendency to differentiate into neurons rather than into glia cells. The present study indicate the marked ability of CNTs to enhance the therapeutic potential of human OBNSCs which qualify this novel therapeutic paradigm as a promising candidate for cell-based therapy of different neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Gut bacteria from multiple sclerosis patients modulate human T cells and exacerbate symptoms in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Cekanaviciute, Egle; Yoo, Bryan B; Runia, Tessel F; Debelius, Justine W; Singh, Sneha; Nelson, Charlotte A; Kanner, Rachel; Bencosme, Yadira; Lee, Yun Kyung; Hauser, Stephen L; Crabtree-Hartman, Elizabeth; Katz Sand, Ilana; Gacias, Mar; Zhu, Yungjiao; Casaccia, Patrizia; Cree, Bruce A C; Knight, Rob; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Baranzini, Sergio E

    2017-09-11

    The gut microbiota regulates T cell functions throughout the body. We hypothesized that intestinal bacteria impact the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disorder of the CNS and thus analyzed the microbiomes of 71 MS patients not undergoing treatment and 71 healthy controls. Although no major shifts in microbial community structure were found, we identified specific bacterial taxa that were significantly associated with MS. Akkermansia muciniphila and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, both increased in MS patients, induced proinflammatory responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and in monocolonized mice. In contrast, Parabacteroides distasonis, which was reduced in MS patients, stimulated antiinflammatory IL-10-expressing human CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells and IL-10(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in mice. Finally, microbiota transplants from MS patients into germ-free mice resulted in more severe symptoms of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and reduced proportions of IL-10(+) Tregs compared with mice "humanized" with microbiota from healthy controls. This study identifies specific human gut bacteria that regulate adaptive autoimmune responses, suggesting therapeutic targeting of the microbiota as a treatment for MS.

  12. NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a model to test therapeutics targeting human signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal models of human inflammatory diseases have limited predictive quality for human clinical trials for various reasons including species specific activation mechanisms and the immunological background of the animals which markedly differs from the genetically heterogeneous and often aged patient population. Objective Development of an animal model allowing for testing therapeutics targeting pathways involved in the development of Atopic Dermatitis (AD) with better translatability to the patient. Methods NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from AD and healthy volunteers were treated with IL-4 and the antagonistic IL-4 variant R121/Y124D (Pitrakinra). Levels of human (h)IgE, amount of B-, T- and plasma- cells and ratio of CD4 : CD8 positive cells served as read out for induction and inhibition of cell proliferation and hIgE secretion. Results were compared to in vitro analysis. Results hIgE secretion was induced by IL-4 and inhibited by the IL-4 antagonist Pitrakinra in vivo when formulated with methylcellulose. B-cells proliferated in response to IL-4 in vivo; the effect was abrogated by Pitrakinra. IL-4 shifted CD4 : CD8 ratios in vitro and in vivo when hPBMC derived from healthy volunteers were used. Pitrakinra reversed the effect. Human PBMC derived from patients with AD remained inert and engrafted mice reflected the individual responses observed in vitro. Conclusion NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human PBMC reflect the immunological history of the donors and provide a complementary tool to in vitro studies. Thus, studies in this model might provide data with better translatability from bench to bedside. PMID:23294516

  13. Recapitulation of spinal motor neuron-specific disease phenotypes in a human cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Bo; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Xue-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Establishing human cell models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) to mimic motor neuron-specific phenotypes holds the key to understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating disease. Here, we developed a closely representative cell model of SMA by knocking down the disease-determining gene, survival motor neuron (SMN), in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Our study with this cell model demonstrated that knocking down of SMN does not interfere with neural induction or the initial specification of spinal motor neurons. Notably, the axonal outgrowth of spinal motor neurons was significantly impaired and these disease-mimicking neurons subsequently degenerated. Furthermore, these disease phenotypes were caused by SMN-full length (SMN-FL) but not SMN-Δ7 (lacking exon 7) knockdown, and were specific to spinal motor neurons. Restoring the expression of SMN-FL completely ameliorated all of the disease phenotypes, including specific axonal defects and motor neuron loss. Finally, knockdown of SMN-FL led to excessive mitochondrial oxidative stress in human motor neuron progenitors. The involvement of oxidative stress in the degeneration of spinal motor neurons in the SMA cell model was further confirmed by the administration of N-acetylcysteine, a potent antioxidant, which prevented disease-related apoptosis and subsequent motor neuron death. Thus, we report here the successful establishment of an hESC-based SMA model, which exhibits disease gene isoform specificity, cell type specificity, and phenotype reversibility. Our model provides a unique paradigm for studying how motor neurons specifically degenerate and highlights the potential importance of antioxidants for the treatment of SMA. PMID:23208423

  14. Recapitulation of spinal motor neuron-specific disease phenotypes in a human cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Bo; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Xue-Jun

    2013-03-01

    Establishing human cell models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) to mimic motor neuron-specific phenotypes holds the key to understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating disease. Here, we developed a closely representative cell model of SMA by knocking down the disease-determining gene, survival motor neuron (SMN), in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Our study with this cell model demonstrated that knocking down of SMN does not interfere with neural induction or the initial specification of spinal motor neurons. Notably, the axonal outgrowth of spinal motor neurons was significantly impaired and these disease-mimicking neurons subsequently degenerated. Furthermore, these disease phenotypes were caused by SMN-full length (SMN-FL) but not SMN-Δ7 (lacking exon 7) knockdown, and were specific to spinal motor neurons. Restoring the expression of SMN-FL completely ameliorated all of the disease phenotypes, including specific axonal defects and motor neuron loss. Finally, knockdown of SMN-FL led to excessive mitochondrial oxidative stress in human motor neuron progenitors. The involvement of oxidative stress in the degeneration of spinal motor neurons in the SMA cell model was further confirmed by the administration of N-acetylcysteine, a potent antioxidant, which prevented disease-related apoptosis and subsequent motor neuron death. Thus, we report here the successful establishment of an hESC-based SMA model, which exhibits disease gene isoform specificity, cell type specificity, and phenotype reversibility. Our model provides a unique paradigm for studying how motor neurons specifically degenerate and highlights the potential importance of antioxidants for the treatment of SMA.

  15. Survivin as a potential mediator to support autoreactive cell survival in myasthenia gravis: a human and animal model study.

    PubMed

    Kusner, Linda L; Ciesielski, Michael J; Marx, Alexander; Kaminski, Henry J; Fenstermaker, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the development and maintenance of autoimmunity in myasthenia gravis are poorly understood. In this investigation, we evaluate the role of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, in humans and in two animal models. We identified survivin expression in cells with B lymphocyte and plasma cells markers, and in the thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis. A portion of survivin-expressing cells specifically bound a peptide derived from the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptor indicating that they recognize the peptide. Thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis had large numbers of survivin-positive cells with fewer cells in the thymuses of corticosteroid-treated patients. Application of a survivin vaccination strategy in mouse and rat models of myasthenia gravis demonstrated improved motor assessment, a reduction in acetylcholine receptor specific autoantibodies, and a retention of acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction, associated with marked reduction of survivin-expressing circulating CD20+ cells. These data strongly suggest that survivin expression in cells with lymphocyte and plasma cell markers occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis and in two animal models of myasthenia gravis. Survivin expression may be part of a mechanism that inhibits the apoptosis of autoreactive B cells in myasthenia gravis and other autoimmune disorders.

  16. Labelling and tracking of human mesenchymal stromal cells in preclinical studies and large animal models of degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Vaegler, Martin; Maerz, Jan K; Amend, Bastian; da Silva, Luis Arenas; Mannheim, Julia G; Fuchs, Kerstin; Will, Susanne; Sievert, Karl D; Stenzl, Arnulf; Hart, Melanie L; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2014-01-01

    Success of stem cell therapies were reported in different medical disciplines, including haematology, rheumatology, orthopaedic surgery, traumatology, and others. Currently, more than 4000 clinical trials using stem cells have been completed or are underway, among which 378 investigated or are at present investigating mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). The majority of clinical trials using stem- or progenitor- cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and MSCs, target the immune system. However, therapies based on MSCs are increasingly implemented to treat symptoms in which failure of the resident stem cells in situ, or malfunction of tissues or structures are not associated with immune cells or inflammation, but instead are associated with mechanical or metabolic stress, ageing, developmental or acquired malformations, and other causes. To proceed further in the development of stem cell therapies as a safe and effective treatment for surgical and other medical specialities, the behaviour of MSCs implanted in preclinical models and their impact on the site of application need to be explored in detail. Depending on the pre-clinical model employed, tracking of labelled stem cells in live animals makes an enormous difference for exploration of the mechanisms and kinetics involved in MSC-mediated tissue regeneration. Here we review (pre-)clinically applicable key methods to label human MSCs for short and long-term observations in small and large animal models.

  17. Human pluripotent stem cells: Prospects and challenges as a source of cardiomyocytes for in vitro modeling and cell-based cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Matthew E; Dai, Dao-Fu; Laflamme, Michael A

    2016-01-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an attractive source of cardiomyocytes with potential applications including disease modeling, drug discovery and safety screening, and novel cell-based cardiac therapies. Insights from embryology have contributed to the development of efficient, reliable methods capable of generating large quantities of human PSC-cardiomyocytes with cardiac purities ranging up to 90%. However, for human PSCs to meet their full potential, the field must identify methods to generate cardiomyocyte populations that are uniform in subtype (e.g. homogeneous ventricular cardiomyocytes) and have more mature structural and functional properties. For in vivo applications, cardiomyocyte production must be highly scalable and clinical grade, and we will need to overcome challenges including graft cell death, immune rejection, arrhythmogenesis, and tumorigenic potential. Here we discuss the types of human PSCs, commonly used methods to guide their differentiation into cardiomyocytes, the phenotype of the resultant cardiomyocytes, and the remaining obstacles to their successful translation.

  18. Characterisation of human tubular cell monolayers as a model of proximal tubular xenobiotic handling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Colin D.A. Sayer, Rachel; Windass, Amy S.; Haslam, Iain S.; Broe, Marc E. de; D'Haese, Patrick C.; Verhulst, Anja

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether primary human tubular cell monolayers could provide a powerful tool with which to investigate the renal proximal tubular handling of xenobiotics. Human proximal and distal tubule/collecting duct cells were grown as monolayers on permeable filter supports. After 10 days in culture, proximal tubule cells remained differentiated and expressed a wide palette of transporters at the mRNA level including NaPi-IIa, SGLT1, SGLT2, OCT2, OCTN2, OAT1, OAT3, OAT4, MDR1, MRP2 and BCRP. At the protein level, the expression of a subset of transporters including NaPi-IIa, OAT1 and OAT3 was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry. Analysis of the expression of the ATP binding cassette efflux pumps MDR1, MRP2 and BCRP confirmed their apical membrane localisation. At the functional level, tubule cell monolayers retain the necessary machinery to mediate the net secretion of the prototypic substrates; PAH and creatinine. PAH secretion across the monolayer consisted of the uptake of PAH across the basolateral membrane by OAT1 and OAT3 and the apical exit of PAH by a probenecid and MK571-sensitive route consistent with actions of MRP2 or MRP4. Creatinine secretion was by OCT2-mediated uptake at the basolateral membrane and via MDR1 at the apical membrane. Functional expression of MDR1 and BCRP at the apical membrane was also demonstrated using a Hoechst 33342 dye. Similarly, measurement of calcein efflux demonstrated the functional expression of MRP2 at the apical membrane of cell monolayers. In conclusion, human tubular cell monolayers provide a powerful tool to investigate renal xenobiotic handling.

  19. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Brownjohn, Philip W; Smith, James; Portelius, Erik; Serneels, Lutgarde; Kvartsberg, Hlin; De Strooper, Bart; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J

    2017-03-06

    Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation.

  20. Autoreactive T cells in a partially humanized murine model of T1D.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Falk, Ben; Unrath, Kellee; Nepom, Gerald T

    2007-04-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and insulin are implicated as target antigens in the pathogenesis of human diabetes through correlative measurements of humoral and cellular reactivity to them in diabetics and at-risk diabetic individuals. Recently, an age-dependent loss of tolerance to one of several naturally processed epitopes of GAD65 (555-567) has been observed to precede diabetes in diabetes-prone mice transgenic for diabetes-correlated human class II genes. Extended studies in these mice (RIP-B7/DR0404) now show that tolerance is maintained to another DR4-restricted naturally processed region within GAD65. While tolerance is lost to GAD65 (555-567) in B7/DR0404 mice prior to diabetes, these mice remain T cell-tolerant to GAD65 (273-286). Prediabetes loss of tolerance to GAD65 (555-567) has now been shown to correlate with an impaired response to exogenous glucose in an intraperitoneal (i.p.) glucose tolerance test. In addition, these mice exhibit a T cell response to insulin A(6-21) at the hyperglycemic state. Investigating a possible cause-and-effect relationship between T cell reactivity to GAD65 and diabetes pathogenesis, GAD65 (555-567) T cell receptor (TcR) transgenic mice have been generated and future work is aimed at understanding the importance of T cell GAD65 reactivity and its role in diabetes progression.

  1. Is this a brain which I see before me? Modeling human neural development with pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikuo K; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre

    2015-09-15

    The human brain is arguably the most complex structure among living organisms. However, the specific mechanisms leading to this complexity remain incompletely understood, primarily because of the poor experimental accessibility of the human embryonic brain. Over recent years, technologies based on pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have been developed to generate neural cells of various types. While the translational potential of PSC technologies for disease modeling and/or cell replacement therapies is usually put forward as a rationale for their utility, they are also opening novel windows for direct observation and experimentation of the basic mechanisms of human brain development. PSC-based studies have revealed that a number of cardinal features of neural ontogenesis are remarkably conserved in human models, which can be studied in a reductionist fashion. They have also revealed species-specific features, which constitute attractive lines of investigation to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the human brain, and its link with evolution. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Use of a SCID mouse/human lymphoma model to evaluate cytokine-induced killer cells with potent antitumor cell activity

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    C.B-17 severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice, which lack functional B and T lymphocytes, allow xenografts and, therefore, can be used to study the biology of human malignancies. Two different human B cell lymphoma cell lines, SU-DHL-4 and OCI-Ly8, which both harbor the t(14;18) chromosomal translocation, were injected into C.B-17 SCID mice. Mice injected intravenously or intraperitoneally developed tumors and died in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of tumor cells in various murine tissues could be demonstrated by a clonogenic tumor assay, staining of frozen sections with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against a human B cell antigen (CD19), and with the polymerase chain reaction technique. A protocol using cytotoxic effector cells was developed and used to selectively deplete the tumor cells from bone marrow. These cells were developed by growing peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), anti- CD3 mAb, and interleukin 2 (IL-2). The timing of IFN-gamma treatment was critical and optimal if IFN-gamma was added before IL-2 treatment. The cells that were stimulated by IFN-gamma, followed by IL-2, could be expanded by treatment with a mAb directed against CD3. These cells could be further activated by IL-1, but not by tumor necrosis factor alpha. With this protocol, a tumor cell kill of 3 logs was obtained as measured by a clonogenic assay. Interestingly, despite their high cytotoxic activity against lymphoma cells, these cells had little toxicity against a subset of normal human hematopoietic precursor cells (granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming units). These cells were further tested by treating murine bone marrow contaminated with the human lymphoma cell line SU-DHL-4, and injecting these cells into SCID mice to assay for tumor growth in vivo. The animals injected with bone marrow contaminated with SU-DHL-4 cells had enhanced survival if the bone marrow was treated with the cytokine-induced killer cells before

  3. Differentiation of Neonatal Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Prostate Epithelial Cells: A Model to Study Prostate Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    VM either in vitro or in an in vivo mouse model, include: isoxanthohumol, endostar, zoledronic acid, curcumin , and a group of cell- permeable...mimicry by curcumin through down-regulation of the EphA2/PI3K/ MMP pathway in a murine choroidal melano- ma model. Cancer Biol Ther 2011; 11: 229- 235. [79

  4. Potential Large Animal Models for Gene Therapy of Human Genetic Diseases of Immune and Blood Cell Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas R.; Adler, Rima L.; Hickstein, Dennis D.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic mutations involving the cellular components of the hematopoietic system—red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets—manifest clinically as anemia, infection, and bleeding. Although gene targeting has recapitulated many of these diseases in mice, these murine homologues are limited as translational models by their small size and brief life span as well as the fact that mutations induced by gene targeting do not always faithfully reflect the clinical manifestations of such mutations in humans. Many of these limitations can be overcome by identifying large animals with genetic diseases of the hematopoietic system corresponding to their human disease counterparts. In this article, we describe human diseases of the cellular components of the hematopoietic system that have counterparts in large animal species, in most cases carrying mutations in the same gene (CD18 in leukocyte adhesion deficiency) or genes in interacting proteins (DNA cross-link repair 1C protein and protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide in radiation-sensitive severe combined immunodeficiency). Furthermore, we describe the potential of these animal models to serve as disease-specific, preclinical models for testing the efficacy and safety of clinical interventions such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy approaches before their use in humans with the corresponding disease. PMID:19293460

  5. Potential large animal models for gene therapy of human genetic diseases of immune and blood cell systems.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Thomas R; Adler, Rima L; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2009-01-01

    Genetic mutations involving the cellular components of the hematopoietic system--red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets--manifest clinically as anemia, infection, and bleeding. Although gene targeting has recapitulated many of these diseases in mice, these murine homologues are limited as translational models by their small size and brief life span as well as the fact that mutations induced by gene targeting do not always faithfully reflect the clinical manifestations of such mutations in humans. Many of these limitations can be overcome by identifying large animals with genetic diseases of the hematopoietic system corresponding to their human disease counterparts. In this article, we describe human diseases of the cellular components of the hematopoietic system that have counterparts in large animal species, in most cases carrying mutations in the same gene (CD18 in leukocyte adhesion deficiency) or genes in interacting proteins (DNA cross-link repair 1C protein and protein kinase, DNA-activated catalytic polypeptide in radiation-sensitive severe combined immunodeficiency). Furthermore, we describe the potential of these animal models to serve as disease-specific preclinical models for testing the efficacy and safety of clinical interventions such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy before their use in humans with the corresponding disease.

  6. Sodium orthovanadate inhibits growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaohua; Ma, Yong; Xu, Zhilin; Wang, Dawei; Zhao, Baolei; Pan, Huayang; Wang, Jizhou; Xu, Dongsheng; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Pan, Shangha; Liu, Lianxin; Dai, Wenjie; Jiang, Hongchi

    2014-08-28

    The transition metal vanadium is widely distributed in the environment and exhibits various biological and physiological effects in the human body. As a well known vanadium compound, sodium orthovanadate (SOV) has shown promising antineoplastic activity in several human cancers. However, the effects of SOV on liver cancer are still unknown. In this study, for the first time, we showed that SOV could effectively suppress proliferation, induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and diminish the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) of HCC cells in vitro. In addition, our in vitro results were recapitulated in vivo, showing that SOV exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of growth of human HCC in an orthotopic model, evidenced by the reduction in tumor size, proliferation index and microvessel density, and increase in cell apoptosis. Most important, we found that SOV could inhibit autophagy in HCC cells in vitro and in vivo, which plays a prodeath role. Thus, our findings suggest that SOV could effectively suppress the growth of human HCC through the regulations of proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and autophagy, and thus may act as a potential therapeutic agent in HCC treatment.

  7. Three-dimensional model of angiogenesis: coculture of human retinal cells with bovine aortic endothelial cells in the NASA bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Kamla; Sanford, Gary; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Brako, Lawrence; Kumar, Ravindra; Sroufe, Angela; Melhado, Caroline

    2003-10-01

    Ocular angiogenesis is the leading cause of blindness and is associated with diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. We describe, in this report, our preliminary studies using a horizontally rotating bioreactor (HRB), developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), to explore growth and differentiation-associated events in the early phase of ocular angiogenesis. Human retinal (HRet) cells and bovine endothelial cells (ECs) were cocultured on laminin-coated Cytodex-3 microcarrier beads in an HRB for 1-36 days. Endothelial cells grown alone in the HRB remained cuboidal and were well differentiated. However, when HRet cells were cocultured with ECs, cordlike structures formed as early as 18-36 h and were positive for von Willebrand factor. In addition to the formation of cords and capillary-like structures, ECs showed the beginning of sprouts. The HRB seems not only to promote accelerated capillary formation, but also to enhance differentiation of retinal precursor cells. This leads to the formation of rosette-like structures (which may be aggregates of photoreceptors that were positive for rhodopsin). Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor was seen in retinal cells grown in the HRB as compared with monolayers and could be one of the factors responsible for accelerated capillary formation. Hence, the HRB promotes three-dimensional assembly and differentiation, possibly through promoting cell-to-cell interaction and/or secretion of growth and differentiation factors.

  8. Efficient derivation of cortical glutamatergic neurons from human pluripotent stem cells: a model system to study neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vazin, Tandis; Ball, K Aurelia; Lu, Hui; Park, Hyungju; Ataeijannati, Yasaman; Head-Gordon, Teresa; Poo, Mu-ming; Schaffer, David V

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is among the most prevalent forms of dementia affecting the aging population, and pharmacological therapies to date have not been successful in preventing disease progression. Future therapeutic efforts may benefit from the development of models that enable basic investigation of early disease pathology. In particular, disease-relevant models based on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) may be promising approaches to assess the impact of neurotoxic agents in AD on specific neuronal populations and thereby facilitate the development of novel interventions to avert early disease mechanisms. We implemented an efficient paradigm to convert hPSCs into enriched populations of cortical glutamatergic neurons emerging from dorsal forebrain neural progenitors, aided by modulating Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. Since AD is generally known to be toxic to glutamatergic circuits, we exposed glutamatergic neurons derived from hESCs to an oligomeric pre-fibrillar forms of Aβ known as "globulomers", which have shown strong correlation with the level of cognitive deficits in AD. Administration of such Aβ oligomers yielded signs of the disease, including cell culture age-dependent binding of Aβ and cell death in the glutamatergic populations. Furthermore, consistent with previous findings in postmortem human AD brain, Aβ-induced toxicity was selective for glutamatergic rather than GABAeric neurons present in our cultures. This in vitro model of cortical glutamatergic neurons thus offers a system for future mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development for AD pathology using human cell types specifically affected by this disease. © 2013.

  9. RNASET2 silencing affects miRNAs and target gene expression pattern in a human ovarian cancer cell model.

    PubMed

    Turconi, Giovanna; Scaldaferri, Debora; Fabbri, Marco; Monti, Laura; Lualdi, Marta; Pedrini, Edoardo; Gribaldo, Laura; Taramelli, Roberto; Acquati, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) are hydrolytic enzymes endowed with the ability to either process or degrade ribonucleic acids. Among the many biological functions assigned to RNases, a growing attention has been recently devoted to the control of cancer growth, in the attempt to bring novel therapeutic approaches to clinical oncology. Indeed, several enzymes belonging to different ribonuclease families have been reported in the last decade to display a marked oncosuppressive activity in a wide range of experimental models. The human RNASET2 gene, the only member of the highly conserved T2/Rh/S family of endoribonucleolytic enzymes described in our species, has been shown to display oncosuppressive roles in both in vitro and in vivo models representing several human malignancies. In the present study, we extend previous findings obtained in ovarian cancer models to shed further light on the cell-autonomous roles played by this gene in the context of its oncosuppresive role and to show that RNASET2 silencing can significantly affect the transcriptional output in one of the most thoroughly investigated human ovarian cancer cell lines. Moreover, we report for the first time that RNASET2-mediated changes in the cell transcriptome are in part mediated by its apparent ability to affect the cell's microRNA expression pattern.

  10. Human glomerular mesangial IP15 cell line as a suitable model for in vitro cadmium cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    L'Azou, B; Dubus, I; Ohayon-Courtès, C; Cambar, J

    2007-07-01

    Cadmium represents a major environmental pollutant that may induce severe damage, especially in the kidney where cadmium accumulates. While cadmium is known to severely impair renal tubular functions, glomerular structures are also potential targets. Owing to their contractile properties, glomerular mesangial cells play a major role in the control of glomerular hemodynamics and influence the ultrafiltration coefficient. Cell cultures provide alternative and fruitful models for study of in vitro toxicology. However, the use of primary human mesangial cell cultures is hampered by their limited survival span and their rapid dedifferentiation during passages. This study presents a human stable immortalized mesangial cell line, designated IP15. Cell characteristics were investigated by the detection of known mesangial markers, as well as their ability to contract in response to angiotensin II. IP15 cells were used to investigate cadmium uptake and morphological changes such as cell contraction and cytoskeleton protein expression. The IC(50) cytotoxicity index was obtained with 3.55 micromol/L using neutral red assay for 24 h. After cadmium exposure (1 micromol/L, determined as nonlethal concentration), 0.38 microg Cd/mg protein was internalized by the cells as evaluated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES). Cadmium induced a significant cell surface reduction that correlated with smooth-muscle alpha-actin disorganization. Thus, the IP15 cell line is a suitable model for study of in vitro cadmium cytotoxicity in mesangial cells and allows sufficient material to be obtained for future studies of the intracellular effects of cadmium exposure.

  11. Ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model using human normal vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yaqi; Yang, Yan; Guo, Juanjuan; Dai, Ying; Ye, Lina; Qiu, Jianbin; Zeng, Zhihong; Wu, Xiaoting; Xing, Yanmei; Long, Xiang; Wu, Xufeng; Ye, Lin; Wang, Shubin; Li, Hui

    2017-02-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infects human genital mucosa and establishes life-long latent infection. It is unmet need to establish a human cell-based microphysiological system for virus biology and anti-viral drug discovery. One of barriers is lacking of culture system of normal epithelial cells in vitro over decades. In this study, we established human normal vaginal epithelial cell (HNVEC) culture using co-culture system. HNVEC cells were then propagated rapidly and stably in a defined culture condition. HNVEC cells exhibited a normal diploid karyotype and formed the well-defined and polarized spheres in matrigel three-dimension (3D) culture, while malignant cells (HeLa) formed disorganized and nonpolar solid spheres. HNVEC cells had a normal cellular response to DNA damage and had no transforming property using soft agar assays. HNVEC expressed epithelial marker cytokeratin 14 (CK14) and p63, but not cytokeratin 18 (CK18). Next, we reconstructed HNVEC-derived 3D vaginal epithelium using air-liquid interface (ALI) culture. This 3D vaginal epithelium has the basal and apical layers with expression of epithelial markers as its originated human vaginal tissue. Finally, we established an HSV-2 infection model based on the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium. After inoculation of HSV-2 (G strain) at apical layer of the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium, we observed obvious pathological effects gradually spreading from the apical layer to basal layer with expression of a viral protein. Thus, we established an ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model that can be used for HSV-2 virology and anti-viral drug discovery.

  12. PO-12 - The key role of talin-1 in cancer cell extravasation dissected through human vascularized 3D microfluidic model.

    PubMed

    Gilardi, M; Bersini, S; Calleja, A Boussomier; Kamm, R D; Vanoni, M; Moretti, M

    2016-04-01

    Metastases are responsible for more than 90% of cancer related mortality. The hematogenous metastatic invasion is a complex process in which the endothelium plays a key role. Extravasation is a dynamic process involving remodeling and change in cell shape and in cytoskeleton whereby a series of strongly dependent interactions between CTCs and endothelium occurs [1]. Talins are proteins regulating focal adhesions and cytoskeleton remodeling. Talin-1 seems to be involved in the aggressiveness, motility, survival and invadopodia formation of cancer cells throughout the entire metastatic cascade [2], being up-regulated in breast cancer cells and mutated in sarcomas. Understand the implication of talin-1 in extravasation could facilitate the design of new therapies and finally fight cancer. We hypothesized that Talin-1 could be specifically involved in extravasation driving each of its steps. We developed a human 3D microfluidic model that enables the study of human cancer cell extravasation within a perfusable human microvascularized organ specific environment[3]. For the study of extravasation we applied microfluidic approach through the development of a microfluidic device in which endothelial cells and fibroblasts generated a 3D human functional vascular networks. Microvessel characterization was performed with immunofluorescence and permeability assays. We knocked-down talin-1 in triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231 and metastatic fibro-sarcoma cell line HT1080 with SiRNA and verified by Western-blot. Cancer cells were then perfused in the vessels and extravasation monitored through confocal imaging. We developed a human vascularized 3D microfluidic device with human perfusable capillary-like structures embedded in fibrin matrix, characterized by mature endothelium markers and physiological permeability (1.5±0.76)×10(-6) cm/s. We focused on the role of Talin-1 in adhesion to endothelium, trans-endothelial migration (TEM) and early invasion. Adhesion

  13. Human natural killer cell development.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2006-12-01

    Our understanding of human natural killer (NK) cell development lags far behind that of human B- or T-cell development. Much of our recent knowledge of this incomplete picture comes from experimental animal models that have aided in identifying fundamental in vivo processes, including those controlling NK cell homeostasis, self-tolerance, and the generation of a diverse NK cell repertoire. However, it has been difficult to fully understand the mechanistic details of NK cell development in humans, primarily because the in vivo cellular intermediates and microenvironments of this developmental pathway have remained elusive. Although there is general consensus that NK cell development occurs primarily within the bone marrow (BM), recent data implicate secondary lymphoid tissues as principal sites of NK cell development in humans. The strongest evidence stems from the observation that the newly described stages of human NK cell development are naturally and selectively enriched within lymph nodes and tonsils compared with blood and BM. In the current review, we provide an overview of these recent findings and discuss these in the context of existing tenets in the field of lymphocyte development.

  14. Monitoring dynamic interactions between breast cancer cells and human bone tissue in a co-culture model.

    PubMed

    Contag, Christopher H; Lie, Wen-Rong; Bammer, Marie C; Hardy, Jonathan W; Schmidt, Tobi L; Maloney, William J; King, Bonnie L

    2014-04-01

    Bone is a preferential site of breast cancer metastasis, and models are needed to study this process at the level of the microenvironment. We have used bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and multiplex biomarker immunoassays to monitor dynamic breast cancer cell behaviors in co-culture with human bone tissue. Femur tissue fragments harvested from hip replacement surgeries were co-cultured with luciferase-positive MDA-MB-231-fLuc cells. BLI was performed to quantify breast cell proliferation and track migration relative to bone tissue. Breast cell colonization of bone tissues was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Biomarkers in co-culture supernatants were profiled with MILLIPLEX(®) immunoassays. BLI demonstrated increased MDA-MB-231-fLuc cell proliferation (p < 0.001) in the presence vs. absence of bones and revealed breast cell migration toward bone. Immunohistochemistry illustrated MDA-MB-231-fLuc cell colonization of bone, and MILLIPLEX(®) profiles of culture supernatants suggested breast/bone crosstalk. Breast cell behaviors that facilitate metastasis occur reproducibly in human bone tissue co-cultures and can be monitored and quantified using BLI and multiplex immunoassays.

  15. Genomic analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and human tumors: a rational approach to preclinical model selection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Wawrose, John S.; Gooding, William E.; Garraway, Levi A.; Lui, Vivian Wai Yan; Peyser, Noah D.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common type of cancer worldwide. The increasing amount of genomic information on human tumors and cell lines provides more biological data to design preclinical studies. We and others previously reported whole exome sequencing data of 106 HNSCC primary tumors. In 2012, high throughput genomic data and pharmacological profiling of anticancer drugs of hundreds of cancer cell lines were reported. Here we compared the genomic data of 39 HNSCC cell lines with the genomic findings in 106 HNSCC tumors. Amplification of eight genes (PIK3CA, EGFR, CCND2, KDM5A, ERBB2, PMS1, FGFR1 and WHSCIL1) and deletion of five genes (CDKN2A, SMAD4, NOTCH2, NRAS and TRIM33) were found in both HNSCC cell lines and tumors. Seventeen genes were only mutated in HNSCC cell lines (>10%) suggesting that these mutations may arise through immortalization in tissue culture. Conversely, 11 genes were only mutated in >10% of human HNSCC tumors. Several mutant genes in the EGFR pathway are shared both in cell lines and in tumors. Pharmacological profiling of eight anticancer agents in six HNSCC cell lines suggested that PIK3CA mutation may serve as a predictive biomarker for the drugs targeting the EGFR/PI3K pathway. These findings suggest that a correlation of gene mutations between HNSCC cell lines and human tumors may be used to guide the selection of preclinical models for translational research. PMID:24425785

  16. Global Transcriptomic Analysis of Model Human Cell Lines Exposed to Surface-Modified Gold Nanoparticles: The Effect of Surface Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Grzincic, E. M.; Yang, J. A.; Drnevich, J.; Falagan-Lotsch, P.; Murphy, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are attractive for biomedical applications not only for their remarkable physical properties, but also for the ease of which their surface chemistry can be manipulated. Many applications involve functionalization of the Au NP surface in order to improve biocompatibility, attach targeting ligands or carry drugs. However, changes in cells exposed to Au NPs of different surface chemistries have been observed, and little is known about how Au NPs and their surface coatings may impact cellular gene expression. The gene expression of two model human cell lines, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and prostate cancer cells (PC3) was interrogated by microarray analysis of over 14,000 human genes. The cell lines were exposed to four differently functionalized Au NPs: citrate, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), and lipid coatings combined with alkanethiols or PAH. Gene functional annotation categories and weighted gene correlation network analysis were used in order to connect gene expression changes to common cellular functions and to elucidate expression patterns between Au NP samples. Coated Au NPs affect genes implicated in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metabolism in HDF cells, and inflammation, angiogenesis, proliferation apoptosis regulation, survival and invasion in PC3 cells. Subtle changes in surface chemistry, such as the initial net charge, lability of the ligand, and underlying layers greatly influence the degree of expression change and the type of cellular pathway affected. PMID:25491924

  17. Reliable and versatile immortal muscle cell models from healthy and myotonic dystrophy type 1 primary human myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Boris; Borgia, Doriana; Giunco, Silvia; Malena, Adriana; Kiyono, Tohru; Salvatori, Sergio; De Rossi, Anita; Giardina, Emiliano; Sangiuolo, Federica; Pegoraro, Elena; Vergani, Lodovica; Botta, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    Primary human skeletal muscle cells (hSkMCs) are invaluable tools for deciphering the basic molecular mechanisms of muscle-related biological processes and pathological alterations. Nevertheless, their use is quite restricted due to poor availability, short life span and variable purity of the cells during in vitro culture. Here, we evaluate a recently published method of hSkMCs immortalization, relying on ectopic expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and telomerase (TERT) in myoblasts from healthy donors (n=3) and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients (n=2). The efficacy to maintain the myogenic and non-transformed phenotype, as well as the main pathogenetic hallmarks of DM1, has been assessed. Combined expression of the three genes i) maintained the CD56(NCAM)-positive myoblast population and differentiation potential; ii) preserved the non-transformed phenotype and iii) maintained the CTG repeat length, amount of nuclear foci and aberrant alternative splicing in immortal muscle cells. Moreover, immortal hSkMCs displayed attractive additional features such as structural maturation of sarcomeres, persistence of Pax7-positive cells during differentiation and complete disappearance of nuclear foci following (CAG)7 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) treatment. Overall, the CCND1, CDK4 and TERT immortalization yields versatile, reliable and extremely useful human muscle cell models to investigate the basic molecular features of human muscle cell biology, to elucidate the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms and to test new therapeutic approaches for DM1 in vitro.

  18. Survival and Functionality of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Oligodendrocytes in a Nonhuman Primate Model for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Thiruvalluvan, Arun; Czepiel, Marcin; Kap, Yolanda A; Mantingh-Otter, Ietje; Vainchtein, Ilia; Kuipers, Jeroen; Bijlard, Marjolein; Baron, Wia; Giepmans, Ben; Brück, Wolfgang; 't Hart, Bert A; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2016-11-01

    : Fast remyelination by endogenous oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) is essential to prevent axonal and subsequent retrograde neuronal degeneration in demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). In chronic lesions, however, the remyelination capacity of OPCs becomes insufficient. Cell therapy with exogenous remyelinating cells may be a strategy to replace the failing endogenous OPCs. Here, we differentiated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into OPCs and validated their proper functionality in vitro as well as in vivo in mouse models for MS. Next, we intracerebrally injected hiPSC-derived OPCs in a nonhuman primate (marmoset) model for progressive MS; the grafted OPCs specifically migrated toward the MS-like lesions in the corpus callosum where they myelinated denuded axons. hiPSC-derived OPCs may become the first therapeutic tool to address demyelination and neurodegeneration in the progressive forms of MS. This study demonstrates for the first time that human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), after intracortical implantation in a nonhuman primate model for progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), migrate to the lesions and remyelinate denuded axons. These findings imply that human iPSC-OPCs can be a therapeutic tool for MS. The results of this feasibility study on the potential use of hiPSC-derived OPCs are of great importance for all MS researchers focusing on the stimulation of remyelination in MS patients. Further optimization and research on practical issues related to the safe production and administration of iPSC-derived cell grafts will likely lead to a first clinical trial in a small group of secondary progressive MS patients. This would be the first specific therapeutic approach aimed at restoring myelination and rescuing axons in MS patients, since there is no treatment available for this most debilitating aspect of MS. ©AlphaMed Press.

  19. Intracutaneously injected human adipose tissue-derived stem cells in a mouse model stay at the site of injection.

    PubMed

    Koellensperger, E; Lampe, K; Beierfuss, A; Gramley, F; Germann, G; Leimer, U

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the local behavior of intracutaneously injected human mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue and to determine the safety of a cell-based cutaneous therapy in an animal model.Human mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue were labeled with red fluorochrome and were injected intradermally in the paravertebral area in immunodeficient BalbC/nude mice (n = 21). As a control, cell culturemedium was injected in the same fashion on the contralateral paravertebral side. Four weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after the injection, seven mice were examined. In addition to the injected areas, the lungs, kidneys,spleens, and brains were excised and processed for histological evaluation. Serial sections of all the tissues excised were evaluated for adipose tissue-derived stem cells by means of emerging red fluorescent signals.The injected stem cells could be detected throughout the follow-up period of 1-year at the injection site within the dermal and subcutaneous layers. Bar these areas, adipose tissue-derived stem cells were not found in any otherexamined tissue at any point in time. The adipose tissue-derived stem cells showed a slow transition to deeper subcutaneous adipose tissue layers and, in part, a differentiation into adipocytes. No ulceration, inflammation, ortumor induction could be detected.The present study shows that intracutaneously injected human mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue stay at the site of injection, survive in vivo for up to 1-year, and partly differentiate into adipocytes. This is a new andvery important finding needed to safely apply therapies based on such stem cells in fat transplants in regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling the dose-response relationship for cytotoxicity of human cells exposed to chemical carcinogens. [N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Heflich, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    Compounds like N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (N-AcO-AAF) result from the in vivo reduction of nitrate derivatives of benzo(..cap alpha..)pyrene. The dose-response relationship for survival of cloning ability in human fibroblasts exposed to N-AcO-AAF is being investigated to obtain a better understanding of the carcinogenic potential of coal-related air pollutants. A model is presented which correlates the survival of normal human fibroblasts after exposure to N-AcO-AAF with the rate of excision of carcinogen residues bound to DNA. The model predicts that the survival of normal cells, S/sub N/, is related to the survival of repair deficient cells, S/sub XPA/, by the equation 1n(S/sub N/) = 1n(S/sub XPA/) (1-f) where f is the fraction of potentially lethal damage repaired in the normal cell at a given dose of carcinogen. The rate of excision of AAF residues from the DNA of confluent human fibroblasts was measured over the same dose range as the survival studies. This information together with the dose-response relationship for survival of normal and repair deficient cells permits a determination of the mean number of adducts required to produce a potentially lethal lesion and the effective time available for repair. The model can be used to predict the mean lifetime of carcinogen residues on the DNA of partially repair deficient cells and the effect of recovery on the survival of normal cells. Extensions of the model to account for shoulders on the dose-response relationship curves are also discussed.

  1. IFPA Meeting 2012 Workshop Report I: comparative placentation and animal models, advanced techniques in placental histopathology, human pluripotent stem cells as a model for trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, W E; Carter, A M; De Mestre, A M; Golos, T G; Jeschke, U; Kusakabe, K; Laurent, L C; Parast, M M; Roberts, R M; Robinson, J M; Rutherford, J; Soma, H; Takizawa, T; Ui-Tei, K; Lash, G E

    2013-03-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2012 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of models and technical issues involved in placenta research: 1) comparative placentation and animal models; 2) advanced techniques in placental histopathology; 3) human pluripotent stem cells as a model for trophoblast differentiation.

  2. Zika virus infects human Sertoli cells and modulates the integrity of the in vitro blood-testis barrier model.

    PubMed

    Siemann, David N; Strange, Daniel P; Maharaj, Payal N; Shi, Pei-Yong; Verma, Saguna

    2017-09-06

    Confirmed reports of ZIKV in human seminal fluid for months after the clearance of viremia suggest the ability of ZIKV to establish persistent infection in the seminiferous tubules, an immune privileged site in the testis protected by the blood-testis barrier, also called the Sertoli cell barrier (SCB). However, cellular targets of ZIKV in human testis and mechanisms by which the virus enters seminiferous tubules remain unclear. We demonstrate that primary human SCs were highly susceptible to ZIKV as compared to the closely related dengue virus and induced expression of IFN-α, key cytokines and cell-adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and ICAM-1). Further, using an in vitro SCB model, we show ZIKV was released on the adluminal side of the SCB model with higher efficiency than the blood-brain barrier. ZIKV-infected SCs exhibited enhanced adhesion of leukocytes that correlated with decrease in the SCB integrity. ZIKV infection did not affect the expression of tight and adherens junction proteins such as ZO-1, claudin and JAM-A, however exposure of SCs with inflammatory mediators derived from ZIKV-infected macrophages led to the degradation of ZO-1 protein that correlated with increased SCB permeability. Taken together, our data suggest that infection of SCs may be one of the crucial steps by which ZIKV gains access to the site of spermatozoa development and identify SCs as a therapeutic target to clear testicular infections. The SCB model opens up opportunities to assess interactions of SCs with other testicular cells and test the ability of anti-ZIKV drugs to cross the barrier.IMPORTANCE Recent outbreaks of ZIKV, a neglected mosquito-borne flavivirus, have identified sexual transmission as a new route of disease spread, not reported for other flaviviruses. To be able to sexually transmit for months after clearance of the viremia, ZIKV must establish infection in the seminiferous tubules, a site for spermatozoa development. However, little is known about the cell types that

  3. Synaptic dysregulation in a human iPS cell model of mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhexing; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Guo, Ziyuan; Lalli, Matthew A.; Wang, Xinyuan; Su, Yijing; Kim, Nam-Shik; Yoon, Ki-Jun; Shin, Jaehoon; Zhang, Ce; Makri, Georgia; Nauen, David; Yu, Huimei; Guzman, Elmer; Chiang, Cheng-Hsuan; Yoritomo, Nadine; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Zou, Jizhong; Christian, Kimberly M.; Cheng, Linzhao; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russell L.; Chen, Gong; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated neurodevelopment with altered structural and functional connectivity is believed to underlie many neuropsychiatric disorders1, and ‘a disease of synapses’ is the major hypothesis for the biological basis of schizophrenia2. Although this hypothesis has gained indirect support from human post-mortem brain analyses2–4 and genetic studies5–10, little is known about the pathophysiology of synapses in patient neurons and how susceptibility genes for mental disorders could lead to synaptic deficits in humans. Genetics of most psychiatric disorders are extremely complex due to multiple susceptibility variants with low penetrance and variable phenotypes11. Rare, multiply affected, large families in which a single genetic locus is probably responsible for conferring susceptibility have proven invaluable for the study of complex disorders. Here we generated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from four members of a family in which a frameshift mutation of disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) co-segregated with major psychiatric disorders12 and we further produced different isogenic iPS cell lines via gene editing. We showed that mutant DISC1 causes synaptic vesicle release deficits in iPS-cell-derived forebrain neurons. Mutant DISC1 depletes wild-type DISC1 protein and, furthermore, dysregulates expression of many genes related to synapses and psychiatric disorders in human forebrain neurons. Our study reveals that a psychiatric disorder relevant mutation causes synapse deficits and transcriptional dysregulation in human neurons and our findings provide new insight into the molecular and synaptic etiopathology of psychiatric disorders. PMID:25132547

  4. Setup and characterization of a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft model in nude rats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ande; Phillips, William T; Goins, Beth; McGuff, Howard S; Zheng, Xiangpeng; Woolley, F Ross; Natarajan, Mohan; Santoyo, Cristina; Miller, Frank R; Otto, Randal A

    2006-12-01

    To develop and characterize a new head and neck cancer animal model. A human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft model in nude rats was established via subcutaneous inoculation of a human-origin HNSCC cell line, SCC-4. The tumor was evaluated for growth characteristics, pathologic features by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, and immunohistochemistry of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging characteristics were studied too. A new HNSCC animal model was successfully established. Tumor sizes reached about 1 cm3 on day 15 after tumor cell inoculation. HE staining pathology has confirmed that this tumor is a typical SCC. EGFR immunohistochemistry demonstrated this tumor model to be strongly EGFR positive. 18F-FDG PET study has shown that 18F-FDG accumulated in tumors. This study has demonstrated that this tumor model is an appropriate HNSCC tumor model for animal studies on HNSCC.

  5. KRAS-mutation status dependent effect of zoledronic acid in human non-small cell cancer preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Kenessey, István; Kói, Krisztina; Horváth, Orsolya; Cserepes, Mihály; Molnár, Dávid; Izsák, Vera; Dobos, Judit; Hegedűs, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    Background In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) KRAS-mutant status is a negative prognostic and predictive factor. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates inhibit prenylation of small G-proteins (e.g. Ras, Rac, Rho) and thus may affect proliferation and migration. In our preclinical work, we investigated the effect of an aminobisphosphonate compound (zoledronic acid) on mutant and wild type KRAS-expressing human NSCLC cell lines. Results We confirmed that zoledronic acid was unable to inhibit the prenylation of mutant K-Ras unlike in the case of wild type K-Ras. In case of in vitro proliferation, the KRAS-mutant human NSCLC cell lines showed resistance to zoledronic acid wild-type KRAS-cells proved to be sensitive. Combinatory application of zoledronic acid enhanced the cytostatic effect of cisplatin. Zoledronic acid did not induce significant apoptosis. In xenograft model, zoledronic acid significantly reduced the weight of wild type KRAS-EGFR-expressing xenograft tumor by decreasing the proliferative capacity. Futhermore, zoledronic acid induced VEGF expression and improved in vivo tumor vascularization. Materials and methods Membrane association of K-Ras was examined by Western-blot. In vitro cell viability, apoptotic cell death and migration were measured in NSCLC lines with different molecular background. The in vivo effect of zoledronic acid was investigated in a SCID mouse subcutaneous xenograft model. Conclusions The in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effect of zoledronic acid was based on the blockade of cell cycle in wild type KRAS-expressing human NSCLC cells. The zoledronic acid induced vascularization supported in vivo cytostatic effect. Our preclinical investigation suggests that patients with wild type KRAS-expressing NSCLC could potentially benefit from aminobisphosphonate therapy. PMID:27780929

  6. Hepatic differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells and in vivo therapeutic effect on animal model of cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jaymie Siqi; Zhou, Lei; Sagayaraj, Antony; Jumat, Nur Halisah Bte; Choolani, Mahesh; Chan, Jerry Kok Yen; Biswas, Arijit; Wong, Peng Cheang; Lim, Seng Gee; Dan, Yock Young

    2015-11-01

    Human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) have been touted as an ideal stem cell candidate, being ethically neutral, immunologically naïve, plentiful in origin, and retaining plasticity in its fetal stage. We hypothesized that by applying natural physiological signals of the developing liver, hAECs can be coaxed into becoming functional immunopermissive hepatocyte-like cells. These cells would have tremendous potential for allogenic cellular transplantation in the treatment of chronic liver insufficiency. hAECs were obtained from term placentas and subjected to hepatic trans-differentiation. Hepatic differentiated cells were analyzed with immunophenotyping, electron microscopy, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction as well as characterized for hepatic metabolic function. In vivo efficacy was tested using intrasplenic transplantation into non-obese diabetic (NOD) Scid Gamma mice with thioacetamide-induced chronic liver failure and analyzed for engraftment and improvement in liver indices. With hepatic differentiation, hAECs assumed a hepatocytic polygonal morphology with upregulation of transcription factors responsible for liver specification. These hepatic differentiated-hAECs (HD-AECs) demonstrated bile canaliculi formation, secreted albumin, eliminated indo-cyanine green, uptook low-density lipoprotein, and inducible CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 enzymatic activities. Transplantation of HD-AECs and de novo hAECs in mice model of cirrhosis showed successful in vivo engraftment and differentiation into functional hepatocytes positive for human-specific albumin. HD-AEC cells that had undergone hepatic differentiation showed the greatest improvement in albumin function while preserving human leukocyte antigen-G expression postdifferentiation. hAECs were able to differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells both in vivo and in vitro. They showed therapeutic efficacy after transplantation in mice model of cirrhosis, offering an exciting source of cells for

  7. Ex-Vivo Tissues Engineering Modeling for Reconstructive Surgery Using Human Adult Adipose Stem Cells and Polymeric Nanostructured Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Morena, Francesco; Argentati, Chiara; Calzoni, Eleonora; Cordellini, Marino; Emiliani, Carla; D’Angelo, Francesco; Martino, Sabata

    2016-01-01

    The major challenge for stem cell translation regenerative medicine is the regeneration of damaged tissues by creating biological substitutes capable of recapitulating the missing function in the recipient host. Therefore, the current paradigm of tissue engineering strategies is the combination of a selected stem cell type, based on their capability to differentiate toward committed cell lineages, and a biomaterial, that, due to own characteristics (e.g., chemical, electric, mechanical property, nano-topography, and nanostructured molecular components), could serve as active scaffold to generate a bio-hybrid tissue/organ. Thus, effort has been made on the generation of in vitro tissue engineering modeling. Here, we present an in vitro model where human adipose stem cells isolated from lipoaspirate adipose tissue and breast adipose tissue, cultured on polymeric INTEGRA® Meshed Bilayer Wound Matrix (selected based on conventional clinical applications) are evaluated for their potential application for reconstructive surgery toward bone and adipose tissue. We demonstrated that human adipose stem cells isolated from lipoaspirate and breast tissue have similar stemness properties and are suitable for tissue engineering applications. Finally, the overall results highlighted lipoaspirate adipose tissue as a good source for the generation of adult adipose stem cells.

  8. Human olfactory bulb neural stem cells mitigate movement disorders in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Marei, Hany E S; Lashen, Samah; Farag, Amany; Althani, Asmaa; Afifi, Nahla; A, Abd-Elmaksoud; Rezk, Shaymaa; Pallini, Roberto; Casalbore, Patrizia; Cenciarelli, Carlo

    2015-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurological disorder characterized by the loss of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent stem cells that are capable of differentiating into different neuronal and glial elements. The production of DA neurons from NSCs could potentially alleviate behavioral deficits in Parkinsonian patients; timely intervention with NSCs might provide a therapeutic strategy for PD. We have isolated and generated highly enriched cultures of neural stem/progenitor cells from the human olfactory bulb (OB). If NSCs can be obtained from OB, it would alleviate ethical concerns associated with the use of embryonic tissue, and provide an easily accessible cell source that would preclude the need for invasive brain surgery. Following isolation and culture, olfactory bulb neural stem cells (OBNSCs) were genetically engineered to express hNGF and GFP. The hNFG-GFP-OBNSCs were transplanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamin (6-OHDA) Parkinsonian rats. The grafted cells survived in the lesion environment for more than eight weeks after implantation with no tumor formation. The grafted cells differentiated in vivo into oligodendrocyte-like (25 ± 2.88%), neuron-like (52.63 ± 4.16%), and astrocyte -like (22.36 ± 1.56%) lineages, which we differentiated based on morphological and immunohistochemical criteria. Transplanted rats exhibited a significant partial correction in stepping and placing in non-pharmacological behavioral tests, pole and rotarod tests. Taken together, our data encourage further investigations of the possible use of OBNSCs as a promising cell-based therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mouse Models of Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type-1–Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, B.; Niewiesk, S.; Lairmore, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a number of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory conditions including HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Development of animal models to study the pathogenesis of HTLV-1–associated diseases has been problematic. Mechanisms of early infection and cell-to-cell transmission can be studied in rabbits and nonhuman primates, but lesion development and reagents are limited in these species. The mouse provides a cost-effective, highly reproducible model in which to study factors related to lymphoma development and the preclinical efficacy of potential therapies against ATL. The ability to manipulate transgenic mice has provided important insight into viral genes responsible for lymphocyte transformation. Expansion of various strains of immunodeficient mice has accelerated the testing of drugs and targeted therapy against ATL. This review compares various mouse models to illustrate recent advances in the understanding of HTLV-1–associated ATL development and how improvements in these models are critical to the future development of targeted therapies against this aggressive T-cell lymphoma. PMID:20442421

  10. An additional human chromosome 21 causes suppression of neural fate of pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells in a teratoma model.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Afua; Mulligan, Claire; Linehan, Jackie; Ruf, Sandra; O'Doherty, Aideen; Grygalewicz, Beata; Shipley, Janet; Groet, Juergen; Tybulewicz, Victor; Fisher, Elizabeth; Brandner, Sebastian; Nizetic, Dean

    2007-11-29

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21), is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation in humans. Among complex phenotypes, it displays a number of neural pathologies including smaller brain size, reduced numbers of neurons, reduced dendritic spine density and plasticity, and early Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration. Mouse models for DS show behavioural and cognitive defects, synaptic plasticity defects, and reduced hippocampal and cerebellar neuron numbers. Early postnatal development of both human and mouse-model DS shows the reduced capability of neuronal precursor cells to generate neurons. The exact molecular cause of this reduction, and the role played by increased dosage of individual HSA21 genes, remain unknown. We have subcutaneously injected mouse pluripotent ES cells containing a single freely segregating supernumerary human chromosome 21 (HSA21) into syngeneic mice, to generate transchromosomic teratomas. Transchromosomic cells and parental control cells were injected into opposite flanks of thirty mice in three independent experiments. Tumours were grown for 30 days, a time-span equivalent to combined intra-uterine, and early post-natal mouse development. When paired teratomas from the same animals were compared, transchromosomic tumours showed a three-fold lower percentage of neuroectodermal tissue, as well as significantly reduced mRNA levels for neuron specific (Tubb3) and glia specific (Gfap) genes, relative to euploid controls. Two thirds of transchromosomic tumours also showed a lack of PCR amplification with multiple primers specific for HSA21, which were present in the ES cells at the point of injection, thus restricting a commonly retained trisomy to less than a third of HSA21 genes. We demonstrate that a supernumerary chromosome 21 causes Inhibition of Neuroectodermal DIfferentiation (INDI) of pluripotent ES cells. The data suggest that trisomy of less than a third of HSA21 genes, in two chromosomal regions

  11. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models.

    PubMed

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire; Buob, David; Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien; Flamand, Vincent; Hennino, Marie-Flore; Perrais, Michaël; Lo-Guidice, Jean-Marc; Broly, Franck; Cauffiez, Christelle; Glowacki, François

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies.

  12. Surface-induced modulation of human mesenchymal progenitor cells. An in vitro model for early implant integration.

    PubMed

    Baschong, Werner; Jaquiery, Claude; Martin, Ivan; Lambrecht, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    Clinical experience indicates that the surface architecture of dental implants has an important impact on their integration. This has been related to the finding that differentially treated substrates can modulate the expression of osteogenic markers in various bone-related cell lines and primary cells. Here, we investigated the influence of surface architecture on the differentiation of human mesenchymal progenitor cells (HMPC) from adult bone marrow, i. e. the cells likely involved in initial bone synthesis at the bone-implant interface. Cells were seeded on machine surfaced (MS) or sandblasted/acid etched (SE) titanium discs in agarose-coated dishes, and on polystyrene (PS) controls. On all substrates cell densities did not change between days 7 and 14. Cell numbers were higher on SE, likely due to increased attachment to the rougher material. Alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) was similar on all substrates, whereas mRNA expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) at day 14 was about tenfold higher on SE (p < 0.05%). The SE-related increase of BSP in progenitor cells indicates an earlier differentiation of immigrated cells and could thus explain earlier implant integration and shorter time to functional loading observed in the clinic. The in vitro model and BSP quantification could be used to screen for changes in osteogenic cell differentiation induced by specific implant surfaces, with potential relevance on the prediction of bone-implant integration.

  13. Neuro-regeneration therapy using human Muse cells is highly effective in a mouse intracerebral hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Norihito; Kakuta, Kiyohide; Wang, Liang; Naraoka, Masato; Uchida, Hiroki; Wakao, Shohei; Dezawa, Mari; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2017-02-01

    A novel type of non-tumorigenic pluripotent stem cell, the Muse cell (multi-lineage, differentiating stress enduring cell), resides in the connective tissue and in cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and is reported to differentiate into multiple cell types according to the microenvironment to repair tissue damage. We examined the efficiency of Muse cells in a mouse intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) model. Seventy μl of cardiac blood was stereotactically injected into the left putamen of immunodeficient mice. Five days later, 2 × 10(5) of human bone marrow MSC-derived Muse cells (n = 6) or cells other than Muse cells in MSCs (non-Muse, n = 6) or the same volume of PBS (n = 11) was injected into the ICH cavity. Water maze and motor function tests were implemented for 68 days, and immunohistochemistry for NeuN, MAP2 and GFAP was done. The Muse group showed impressive recovery: Recovery was seen in the water maze after day 19, and motor functions after 5 days was compared with the other two groups, with a significant statistical difference (p < 0.05). The survival rate of the engrafted cells in the Muse group was significantly higher than in the non-Muse group (p < 0.05) at day 69, and those cells showed positivity for NeuN (~57%) and MAP-2 (~41.6%). Muse cells could remain in the ICH brain, differentiate into neural-lineage cells and restore functions without inducing them into neuronal cells by gene introduction and cytokine treatment prior to transplantation. A simple collection of Muse cells and their supply to the brain in naïve state facilitates regenerative therapy in ICH.

  14. Transplantation of human neural stem cells restores cognition in an immunodeficient rodent model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Haus, Daniel L; López-Velázquez, Luci; Gold, Eric M; Cunningham, Kelly M; Perez, Harvey; Anderson, Aileen J; Cummings, Brian J

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans can result in permanent tissue damage and has been linked to cognitive impairment that lasts years beyond the initial insult. Clinically effective treatment strategies have yet to be developed. Transplantation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) has the potential to restore cognition lost due to injury, however, the vast majority of rodent TBI/hNSC studies to date have evaluated cognition only at early time points, typically <1month post-injury and cell transplantation. Additionally, human cell engraftment and long-term survival in rodent models of TBI has been difficult to achieve due to host immunorejection of the transplanted human cells, which confounds conclusions pertaining to transplant-mediated behavioral improvement. To overcome these shortfalls, we have developed a novel TBI xenotransplantation model that utilizes immunodeficient athymic nude (ATN) rats as the host recipient for the post-TBI transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived NSCs and have evaluated cognition in these animals at long-term (≥2months) time points post-injury. We report that immunodeficient ATN rats demonstrate hippocampal-dependent spatial memory deficits (Novel Place, Morris Water Maze), but not non-spatial (Novel Object) or emotional/anxiety-related (Elevated Plus Maze, Conditioned Taste Aversion) deficits, at 2-3months post-TBI, confirming that ATN rats recapitulate some of the cognitive deficits found in immunosufficient animal strains. Approximately 9-25% of transplanted hNSCs survived for at least 5months post-transplantation and differentiated into mature neurons (NeuN, 18-38%), astrocytes (GFAP, 13-16%), and oligodendrocytes (Olig2, 11-13%). Furthermore, while this model of TBI (cortical impact) targets primarily cortex and the underlying hippocampus and generates a large lesion cavity, hNSC transplantation facilitated cognitive recovery without affecting either lesion volume or total spared cortical or hippocampal

  15. Establishment of human iPSC-based models for the study and targeting of glioma initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Nivet, Emmanuel; Xia, Yun; Hishida, Tomoaki; Aguirre, Aitor; Ocampo, Alejandro; Ma, Li; Morey, Robert; Krause, Marie N.; Zembrzycki, Andreas; Ansorge, Olaf; Vazquez-Ferrer, Eric; Dubova, Ilir; Reddy, Pradeep; Lam, David; Hishida, Yuriko; Wu, Min-Zu; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; O'Leary, Dennis; Wahl, Geoffrey M.; Verma, Inder M.; Laurent, Louise C.; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Glioma tumour-initiating cells (GTICs) can originate upon the transformation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Studies on GTICs have focused on primary tumours from which GTICs could be isolated and the use of human embryonic material. Recently, the somatic genomic landscape of human gliomas has been reported. RTK (receptor tyrosine kinase) and p53 signalling were found dysregulated in ∼90% and 86% of all primary tumours analysed, respectively. Here we report on the use of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for modelling gliomagenesis. Dysregulation of RTK and p53 signalling in hiPSC-derived NPCs (iNPCs) recapitulates GTIC properties in vitro. In vivo transplantation of transformed iNPCs leads to highly aggressive tumours containing undifferentiated stem cells and their differentiated derivatives. Metabolic modulation compromises GTIC viability. Last, screening of 101 anti-cancer compounds identifies three molecules specifically targeting transformed iNPCs and primary GTICs. Together, our results highlight the potential of hiPSCs for studying human tumourigenesis. PMID:26899176

  16. Intrinsic neurophysiological properties of hilar ectopic and normotopic dentate granule cells in human temporal lobe epilepsy and a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Althaus, A. L.; Sagher, O.; Parent, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Hilar ectopic dentate granule cells (DGCs) are a salient feature of aberrant plasticity in human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and most rodent models of the disease. Recent evidence from rodent TLE models suggests that hilar ectopic DGCs contribute to hyperexcitability within the epileptic hippocampal network. Here we investigate the intrinsic excitability of DGCs from humans with TLE and the rat pilocarpine TLE model with the objective of comparing the neurophysiology of hilar ectopic DGCs to their normotopic counterparts in the granule cell layer (GCL). We recorded from 36 GCL and 7 hilar DGCs from human TLE tissue. Compared with GCL DGCs, hilar DGCs in patient tissue exhibited lower action potential (AP) firing rates, more depolarized AP threshold, and differed in single AP wa