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Sample records for human cell models

  1. Human embryonic stem cell lines model experimental human cytomegalovirus latency.

    PubMed

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2013-05-28

    Herpesviruses are highly successful pathogens that persist for the lifetime of their hosts primarily because of their ability to establish and maintain latent infections from which the virus is capable of productively reactivating. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, establishes latency in CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells during natural infections in the body. Experimental infection of CD34(+) cells ex vivo has demonstrated that expression of the viral gene products that drive productive infection is silenced by an intrinsic immune defense mediated by Daxx and histone deacetylases through heterochromatinization of the viral genome during the establishment of latency. Additional mechanistic details about the establishment, let alone maintenance and reactivation, of HCMV latency remain scarce. This is partly due to the technical challenges of CD34(+) cell culture, most notably, the difficulty in preventing spontaneous differentiation that drives reactivation and renders them permissive for productive infection. Here we demonstrate that HCMV can establish, maintain, and reactivate in vitro from experimental latency in cultures of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), for which spurious differentiation can be prevented or controlled. Furthermore, we show that known molecular aspects of HCMV latency are faithfully recapitulated in these cells. In total, we present ESCs as a novel, tractable model for studies of HCMV latency.

  2. Generative models: Human embryonic stem cells and multiple modeling relations.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Melinda Bonnie

    2016-04-01

    Model organisms are at once scientific models and concrete living things. It is widely assumed by philosophers of science that (1) model organisms function much like other kinds of models, and (2) that insofar as their scientific role is distinctive, it is in virtue of representing a wide range of biological species and providing a basis for generalizations about those targets. This paper uses the case of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to challenge both assumptions. I first argue that hESC can be considered model organisms, analogous to classic examples such as Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster. I then discuss four contrasts between the epistemic role of hESC in practice, and the assumptions about model organisms noted above. These contrasts motivate an alternative view of model organisms as a network of systems related constructively and developmentally to one another. I conclude by relating this result to other accounts of model organisms in recent philosophy of science.

  3. Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0176 TITLE: Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 July 2015 Annual 01-July 2014 -- 30 Jun 2015 Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem...induced pluripotent stem cells by Atoh1 induction can be efficiently transformed by MYC oncogene to form aggressive brain tumors that recapitulate human

  4. Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Model Skeletal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Barruet, Emilie; Hsiao, Edward C

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders affecting the bones and joints are major health problems among children and adults. Major challenges such as the genetic origins or poor diagnostics of severe skeletal disease hinder our understanding of human skeletal diseases. The recent advent of human induced pluripotent stem cells (human iPS cells) provides an unparalleled opportunity to create human-specific models of human skeletal diseases. iPS cells have the ability to self-renew, allowing us to obtain large amounts of starting material, and have the potential to differentiate into any cell types in the body. In addition, they can carry one or more mutations responsible for the disease of interest or be genetically corrected to create isogenic controls. Our work has focused on modeling rare musculoskeletal disorders including fibrodysplasia ossificans progressive (FOP), a congenital disease of increased heterotopic ossification. In this review, we will discuss our experiences and protocols differentiating human iPS cells toward the osteogenic lineage and their application to model skeletal diseases. A number of critical challenges and exciting new approaches are also discussed, which will allow the skeletal biology field to harness the potential of human iPS cells as a critical model system for understanding diseases of abnormal skeletal formation and bone regeneration.

  5. Modeling human neurological disorders with induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Yoichi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2014-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells obtained by reprogramming technology are a source of great hope, not only in terms of applications in regenerative medicine, such as cell transplantation therapy, but also for modeling human diseases and new drug development. In particular, the production of iPS cells from the somatic cells of patients with intractable diseases and their subsequent differentiation into cells at affected sites (e.g., neurons, cardiomyocytes, hepatocytes, and myocytes) has permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. For example, disease-specific iPS cells have been established from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and autism, as well as from those with neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. A multi-omics analysis of neural cells originating from patient-derived iPS cells may thus enable investigators to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms of neurological diseases that have heretofore been unknown. In addition, large-scale screening of chemical libraries with disease-specific iPS cells is currently underway and is expected to lead to new drug discovery. Accordingly, this review outlines the progress made via the use of patient-derived iPS cells toward the modeling of neurological disorders, the testing of existing drugs, and the discovery of new drugs. The production of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from the patients' somatic cells and their subsequent differentiation into specific cells have permitted the in vitro construction of disease models that contain patient-specific genetic information. Furthermore, innovations of gene-editing technologies on iPS cells are enabling new approaches for illuminating the pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases. In this review article, we outlined the current status of neurological diseases-specific iPS cell research and described recently obtained

  6. [Development of human embryonic stem cell model for toxicity evaluation].

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-yan; Cao, Tong; Ouyang, Hong-wei; Peng, Shuang-qing; Deng, Xu-liang; Li, Sheng-lin; Liu, He; Zou, Xiao-hui; Fu, Xin; Peng, Hui; Wang, Xiao-ying; Zhan, Yuan

    2013-02-18

    The current international standard for toxicity screening of biomedical devices and materials recommend the use of immortalized cell lines because of their homogeneous morphologies and infinite proliferation which provide good reproducibility for in vitro cytotoxicity screening. However, most of the widely used immortalized cell lines are derived from animals and may not be representative of normal human cell behavior in vivo, in particular in terms of the cytotoxic and genotoxic response. Therefore, It is vital to develop a model for toxicity evaluation. In our studies, two Chinese human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines as toxicity model were established. hESC derived tissue/organ cell model for tissue/organ specific toxicity evaluation were developed. The efficiency and accuracy of using hESC model for cytoxicity, embryotoxicity and genotoxicity evaluation were confirmed. The results indicated that hESCs might be good tools for toxicity testing and biosafety evaluation in vitro.

  7. Human pluripotent stem cells: an emerging model in developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengrong; Huangfu, Danwei

    2013-02-01

    Developmental biology has long benefited from studies of classic model organisms. Recently, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, have emerged as a new model system that offers unique advantages for developmental studies. Here, we discuss how studies of hPSCs can complement classic approaches using model organisms, and how hPSCs can be used to recapitulate aspects of human embryonic development 'in a dish'. We also summarize some of the recently developed genetic tools that greatly facilitate the interrogation of gene function during hPSC differentiation. With the development of high-throughput screening technologies, hPSCs have the potential to revolutionize gene discovery in mammalian development.

  8. Modeling anesthetic developmental neurotoxicity using human stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiaowen; Twaroski, Danielle; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.

    2013-01-01

    Mounting pre-clinical evidence in rodents and non-human primates has demonstrated that prolonged exposure of developing animals to general anesthetics can induce widespread neuronal cell death followed by long-term memory and learning disabilities. In vitro experimental evidence from cultured neonatal animal neurons confirmed the in vivo findings. However, there is no direct clinical evidence of the detrimental effects of anesthetics in human fetuses, infants, or children. Development of an in vitro neurogenesis system using human stem cells has opened up avenues of research for advancing our understanding of human brain development and the issues relevant to anesthetic-induced developmental toxicity in human neuronal lineages. Recent studies from our group, as well as other groups, showed that isoflurane influences human neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis, while ketamine induces neuroapoptosis. Application of this high throughput in vitro stem cell neurogenesis approach is a major stride toward assuring the safety of anesthetic agents in young children. This in vitro human model allows us to (1) screen the toxic effects of various anesthetics under controlled conditions during intense neuronal growth, (2) find the trigger for the anesthetic-induced catastrophic chain of toxic events, and (3) develop prevention strategies to avoid this toxic effect. In this paper, we reviewed the current findings in anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity studies, specifically focusing on the in vitro human stem cell model. PMID:23859832

  9. Three-dimensional cell culture models for investigating human viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Bing; Chen, Guomin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture models are physiologically relevant, as they provide reproducible results, experimental flexibility and can be adapted for high-throughput experiments. Moreover, these models bridge the gap between traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures and animal models. 3D culture systems have significantly advanced basic cell science and tissue engineering, especially in the fields of cell biology and physiology, stem cell research, regenerative medicine, cancer research, drug discovery, and gene and protein expression studies. In addition, 3D models can provide unique insight into bacteriology, virology, parasitology and host-pathogen interactions. This review summarizes and analyzes recent progress in human virological research with 3D cell culture models. We discuss viral growth, replication, proliferation, infection, virus-host interactions and antiviral drugs in 3D culture models.

  10. Exocytotic dynamics in human chromaffin cells: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Albillos, Almudena; Gil, Amparo; González-Vélez, Virginia; Pérez-Álvarez, Alberto; Segura, Javier; Hernández-Vivanco, Alicia; Caba-González, José Carlos

    2013-02-01

    Chromaffin cells have been widely used to study neurosecretion since they exhibit similar calcium dependence of several exocytotic steps as synaptic terminals do, but having the enormous advantage of being neither as small or fast as neurons, nor as slow as endocrine cells. In the present study, secretion associated to experimental measurements of the exocytotic dynamics in human chromaffin cells of the adrenal gland was simulated by using a model that combines stochastic and deterministic approaches for short and longer depolarizing pulses, respectively. Experimental data were recorded from human chromaffin cells, obtained from healthy organ donors, using the perforated patch configuration of the patch-clamp technique. We have found that in human chromaffin cells, secretion would be mainly managed by small pools of non-equally fusion competent vesicles, slowly refilled over time. Fast secretion evoked by brief pulses can be predicted only when 75% of one of these pools (the "ready releasable pool" of vesicles, abbreviated as RRP) are co-localized to Ca²⁺ channels, indicating an immediately releasable pool in the range reported for isolated cells of bovine and rat (Álvarez and Marengo, J Neurochem 116:155-163, 2011). The need for spatial correlation and close proximity of vesicles to Ca²⁺ channels suggests that in human chromaffin cells there is a tight control of those releasable vesicles available for fast secretion.

  11. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described.

  12. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro. Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described. PMID:27385595

  13. Differentiation and Genomic Instability in a Human Mammary Cell Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, R.; Kale, R.; Pettengill, O.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Harvest of prophylactic mastectomy specimens from an obligate heterozygote for ataxia-telangiectasia provided autologous fibroblasts as well epithelial cells (HMEC). The routine availability of these autologous cells has provided an opportunity to study cell-cell interactions in coculture and monoculture, and in 3-dimensional cultures grown in the NASA rotating bioreactor. HMEC and stromal fibroblasts grown in 2-dimensional monoculture were both observed to produce extracellular matrix. Similar matrix was encountered in 3-dimensional cultures containing HMEC. Metaphases were analyzed. For stromal fibroblasts, genomic aberrations were found in 18% of metaphase spreads. For HMEC, aberrations were greater such that a majority were found to be abnormal. The level of genomic instability determined for these noncancerous cells in 2-dimensional monoculture should be useful for generating a human cell model that can correlate the effects of differentiation in 3-dimensional coculture on the level of genomic instability.

  14. Culture models of human mammary epithelial cell transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Yaswen, Paul

    2000-11-10

    Human pre-malignant breast diseases, particularly ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)3 already display several of the aberrant phenotypes found in primary breast cancers, including chromosomal abnormalities, telomerase activity, inactivation of the p53 gene and overexpression of some oncogenes. Efforts to model early breast carcinogenesis in human cell cultures have largely involved studies in vitro transformation of normal finite lifespan human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to immortality and malignancy. We present a model of HMEC immortal transformation consistent with the know in vivo data. This model includes a recently described, presumably epigenetic process, termed conversion, which occurs in cells that have overcome stringent replicative senescence and are thus able to maintain proliferation with critically short telomeres. The conversion process involves reactivation of telomerase activity, and acquisition of good uniform growth in the absence and presence of TFGB. We propose th at overcoming the proliferative constraints set by senescence, and undergoing conversion, represent key rate-limiting steps in human breast carcinogenesis, and occur during early stage breast cancer progression.

  15. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Nigel P.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10−8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10−8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  16. Human Normal Bronchial Epithelial Cells: A Novel In Vitro Cell Model for Toxicity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery. PMID:25861018

  17. Being human: The role of pluripotent stem cells in regenerative medicine and humanizing Alzheimer's disease models.

    PubMed

    Sproul, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the capacity to revolutionize medicine by allowing the generation of functional cell types such as neurons for cell replacement therapy. However, the more immediate impact of PSCs on treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) will be through improved human AD model systems for mechanistic studies and therapeutic screening. This review will first briefly discuss different types of PSCs and genome-editing techniques that can be used to modify PSCs for disease modeling or for personalized medicine. This will be followed by a more in depth analysis of current AD iPSC models and a discussion of the need for more complex multicellular models, including cell types such as microglia. It will finish with a discussion on current clinical trials using PSC-derived cells and the long-term potential of such strategies for treating AD.

  18. Effects of mesenchymal stromal cells on human myeloid dendritic cell differentiation and maturation in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huang, Yanfei; Womer, Karl L

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have shown promise as cellular therapy in allogeneic transplantation, although the precise mechanisms underlying their benefit in clinical trials are difficult to study. We previously demonstrated that MSCs exert immunoregulatory effects in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (DC) culture. Since mouse studies do not reliably reproduce human events, we used a humanized mouse model to study the immunomodulatory effects of human MSCs on human DC immunobiology. Humanized mice were established by injection of cord blood CD34(+) cells into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl/SzJ) (NOD scid gamma, NSG) mice. Human cells were detected in the mouse bone marrow, blood, and spleen 12weeks after transplantation. Human DCs were differentiated from humanized mouse bone marrow cells during human MSC co-culture. MSCs inhibited DC differentiation and kept DCs in an immature state as demonstrated by phenotype and function. In conclusion, humanized mouse models represent a useful method to study the function of human MSCs on human DC immunobiology.

  19. Genome editing of human pluripotent stem cells to generate human cellular disease models.

    PubMed

    Musunuru, Kiran

    2013-07-01

    Disease modeling with human pluripotent stem cells has come into the public spotlight with the awarding of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2012 to Drs John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. This discovery has opened the door for the generation of pluripotent stem cells from individuals with disease and the differentiation of these cells into somatic cell types for the study of disease pathophysiology. The emergence of genome-editing technology over the past few years has made it feasible to generate and investigate human cellular disease models with even greater speed and efficiency. Here, recent technological advances in genome editing, and its utility in human biology and disease studies, are reviewed.

  20. Voltage-Gated ion currents of schwann cells in cell culture models of human neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Lynne A

    2003-11-01

    K(+) (K) channels play a role in the proliferation of many cell types in normal cells and certain disease states. Several laboratories have studied K currents in cultured Schwann cells from models of the human diseases, neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2). These diseases are characterized by the growth of Schwann cell tumors. In all cell culture NF models the K current properties differ in tumor-derived and normal Schwann cells. Depending on the model however, the type of K channel abnormality differs. K channels appear to play a role in the proliferation of Schwann cell cultures of these disease models, because a link has been established between K current blockade and the inhibition of Schwann cell proliferation in NF1 and NF2. Differences in the proliferation response of normal Schwann cells to K channel blockers suggest that in vitro regulation of proliferation in neoplastic and normal Schwann cells is complex.

  1. Human vascular tissue models formed from human induced pluripotent stem cell derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Belair, David G.; Whisler, Jordan A.; Valdez, Jorge; Velazquez, Jeremy; Molenda, James A.; Vickerman, Vernella; Lewis, Rachel; Daigh, Christine; Hansen, Tyler D.; Mann, David A.; Thomson, James A.; Griffith, Linda G.; Kamm, Roger D.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Murphy, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a strategy to model blood vessel development using a well-defined iPSC-derived endothelial cell type (iPSC-EC) cultured within engineered platforms that mimic the 3D microenvironment. The iPSC-ECs used here were first characterized by expression of endothelial markers and functional properties that included VEGF responsiveness, TNF-α-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules (MCAM/CD146; ICAM1/CD54), thrombin-dependent barrier function, shear stress-induced alignment, and 2D and 3D capillary-like network formation in Matrigel. The iPSC-ECs also formed 3D vascular networks in a variety of engineering contexts, yielded perfusable, interconnected lumen when co-cultured with primary human fibroblasts, and aligned with flow in microfluidics devices. iPSC-EC function during tubule network formation, barrier formation, and sprouting was consistent with that of primary ECs, and the results suggest a VEGF-independent mechanism for sprouting, which is relevant to therapeutic anti-angiogenesis strategies. Our combined results demonstrate the feasibility of using a well-defined, stable source of iPSC-ECs to model blood vessel formation within a variety of contexts using standard in vitro formats. PMID:25190668

  2. Modeling Fragile X Syndrome Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mor-Shaked, Hagar; Eiges, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common heritable form of cognitive impairment. It results from a loss-of-function mutation by a CGG repeat expansion at the 5′ untranslated region of the X-linked fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Expansion of the CGG repeats beyond 200 copies results in protein deficiency by leading to aberrant methylation of the FMR1 promoter and the switch from active to repressive histone modifications. Additionally, the CGGs become increasingly unstable, resulting in high degree of variation in expansion size between and within tissues of affected individuals. It is still unclear how the FMR1 protein (FMRP) deficiency leads to disease pathology in neurons. Nor do we know the mechanisms by which the CGG expansion results in aberrant DNA methylation, or becomes unstable in somatic cells of patients, at least in part due to the lack of appropriate animal or cellular models. This review summarizes the current contribution of pluripotent stem cells, mutant human embryonic stem cells, and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells to disease modeling of FXS for basic and applied research, including the development of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27690107

  3. Modeling Human Natural Killer Cell Development in the Era of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scoville, Steven D.; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Decades after the discovery of natural killer (NK) cells, their developmental pathways in mice and humans have not yet been completely deciphered. Accumulating evidence indicates that NK cells can develop in multiple tissues throughout the body. Moreover, detailed and comprehensive models of NK cell development were proposed soon after the turn of the century. However, with the recent identification and characterization of other subtypes of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), which show some overlapping functional and phenotypic features with NK cell developmental intermediates, the distinct stages through which human NK cells develop from early hematopoietic progenitor cells remain unclear. Thus, there is a need to reassess and refine older models of NK cell development in the context of new data and in the era of ILCs. Our group has focused on elucidating the developmental pathway of human NK cells in secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs), including tonsils and lymph nodes. Here, we provide an update of recent progress that has been made with regard to human NK cell development in SLTs, and we discuss these new findings in the context of contemporary models of ILC development.

  4. Modeling Rett Syndrome Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Inouye, Michiko O; Miyake, Kunio; Kubota, Takeo; Okano, Hideyuki; Akamatsu, Wado

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is one of a group of neurodevelopmental disorders typically characterized by deficits in the X-linked gene MECP2 (methyl-CpG binding protein 2). The MECP2 gene encodes a multifunctional protein involved in transcriptional repression, transcriptional activation, chromatin remodeling, and RNA splicing. Genetic deletion of Mecp2 in mice revealed neuronal disabilities including RTT-like phenotypes and provided an excellent platform for understanding the pathogenesis of RTT. So far, there are no effective pharmacological treatments for RTT because the role of MECP2 in RTT is incompletely understood. Recently, human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) technologies have improved our knowledge of neurological and neurodevelopmental diseases including RTT because neurons derived from RTT-hiPSCs can be used for disease modeling to understand RTT phenotypes and to perform high throughput pharmaceutical drug screening. In this review, we provide an overview of RTT, including MeCP2 function and mouse models of RTT. In addition, we introduce recent advances in disease modeling of RTT using hiPSC-derived neural cells.

  5. A Human Corneal Epithelial Cell Line Model for Limbal Stem Cell Biology and Limbal Immunobiology.

    PubMed

    Shaharuddin, Bakiah; Ahmad, Sajjad; Md Latar, Nani; Ali, Simi; Meeson, Annette

    2016-10-14

    : Limbal stem cell (LSC) deficiency is a visually debilitating condition caused by abnormal maintenance of LSCs. It is treated by transplantation of donor-derived limbal epithelial cells (LECs), the success of which depends on the presence and quality of LSCs within the transplant. Understanding the immunobiological responses of these cells within the transplants could improve cell engraftment and survival. However, human corneal rings used as a source of LSCs are not always readily available for research purposes. As an alternative, we hypothesized that a human telomerase-immortalized corneal epithelial cell (HTCEC) line could be used as a model for studying LSC immunobiology. HTCEC constitutively expressed human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I but not class II molecules. However, when stimulated by interferon-γ, HTCECs then expressed HLA class II antigens. Some HTCECs were also migratory in response to CXCL12 and expressed stem cell markers, Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2. In addition because both HTCECs and LECs contain side population (SP) cells, which are an enriched LSC population, we used these SP cells to show that some HTCEC SP cells coexpressed ABCG2 and ABCB5. HTCEC SP and non-side population (NSP) cells also expressed CXCR4, but the SP cells expressed higher levels. Both were capable of colony formation, but the NSP colonies were smaller and contained fewer cells. In addition, HTCECs expressed ΔNp63α. These results suggest the HTCEC line is a useful model for further understanding LSC biology by using an in vitro approach without reliance on a supply of human tissue.

  6. Modeling complex neuropsychiatric disorders with human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Brian T D; Snyder, Evan Y; Nye, Jeffrey S

    2011-10-01

    Identifying the molecular and cellular basis of complex neuropsychiatric disorders (cNPDs) has been limited by the inaccessibility of central neurons, variability within broad diagnostic classifications, and the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Recent work utilizing neuronally differentiated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from Mendelian and polygenic cNPDs is beginning to illuminate neuritic, synaptic or cell body variations accompanied by specific gene or protein expression alterations largely mimicking known pathology. In some cases, phenotypes have only emerged after application of cellular stress or long duration of differentiation. Pathological and cellular expression features are fully or partially responsive to pharmacological treatment highlighting the potential utility of differentiated hiPSCs for discovery of personalized therapeutics and for identifying pathogenetically relevant targets in subgroups of patients within a broad syndromic classification. Because of the inherent variability in developing and differentiating hiPSC lines and the multiple comparisons implicit in 'omics' technologies, rigorous algorithms for assuring statistical significance and independent confirmation of results, will be required for robust modeling of cNPDs.

  7. Stem cells on the brain: modeling neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases using human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Priya; Young-Pearse, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Seven years have passed since the initial report of the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from adult human somatic cells, and in the intervening time the field of neuroscience has developed numerous disease models using this technology. Here, we review progress in the field and describe both the advantages and potential pitfalls of modeling neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases using this technology. We include tables with information on neural differentiation protocols and studies that developed human iPSC lines to model neurological diseases. We also discuss how one can: investigate effects of genetic mutations with iPSCs, examine cell fate-specific phenotypes, best determine the specificity of a phenotype, and bring in vivo relevance to this in vitro technique.

  8. QGP-1 cells release 5-HT via TRPA1 activation; a model of human enterochromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Doihara, Hitoshi; Nozawa, Katsura; Kojima, Ryosuke; Kawabata-Shoda, Eri; Yokoyama, Toshihide; Ito, Hiroyuki

    2009-11-01

    Recently, we discovered that transient receptor potential ankyrin1 channel (TRPA1) is highly expressed in human and rat enterochromaffin (EC) cells, and those TRPA1 agonists such as allyl isothiocyanates (AITC) and cinnamaldehyde (CA) enhance the release of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) from EC cells in vitro. In this study, QGP-1 cells, a human pancreatic endocrine cell line, were found to highly express TRPA1 and EC cell marker genes, such as tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), chromogranin A (CgA), synaptophysin, ATP-dependent vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1), metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGluR4), beta1-adrenergic receptor (ADB1), muscarinic 4 acetylcholine receptor (ACM4), substance P, serotonin transporter (SERT), and guanylin. Furthermore, the TRPA1 agonists AITC, CA, and acrolein concentration dependently evoked an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) influx and the release of 5-HT in QGP-1 cells. The effects of these TRPA1 agonists were inhibited by ruthenium red, a TRPA1 antagonist, and TRPA1-specific siRNA. These results indicate that the Ca(2+) influx increase and 5-HT release induced by AITC, CA and acrolein in QGP-1 cells were mediated by TRPA1, and that the QGP-1 cell line could be a new model for the investigation of TRPA1 function in the human EC cell.

  9. Human mast cells decrease SLPI levels in type II – like alveolar cell model, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Camilla; Nyström, Max; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Westin, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    Background Mast cells are known to accumulate at sites of inflammation and upon activation to release their granule content, e.g. histamine, cytokines and proteases. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is produced in the respiratory mucous and plays a role in regulating the activity of the proteases. Result We have used the HMC-1 cell line as a model for human mast cells to investigate their effect on SLPI expression and its levels in cell co-culture experiments, in vitro. In comparison with controls, we found a significant reduction in SLPI levels (by 2.35-fold, p < 0.01) in a SLPI-producing, type II-like alveolar cell line, (A549) when co-cultured with HMC-1 cells, but not in an HMC-1-conditioned medium, for 96 hours. By contrast, increased SLPI mRNA expression (by 1.58-fold, p < 0.05) was found under the same experimental conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed mast cell transmigration in co-culture with SLPI-producing A549 cells for 72 and 96 hours. Conclusion These results indicate that SLPI-producing cells may assist mast cell migration and that the regulation of SLPI release and/or consumption by mast cells requires interaction between these cell types. Therefore, a "local relationship" between mast cells and airway epithelial cells might be an important step in the inflammatory response. PMID:12952550

  10. Human natural regulatory T cell development, suppressive function and post-thymic maturation in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Onoe, Takashi; Kalscheuer, Hannes; Danzl, Nichole; Chittenden, Meredith; Zhao, Guiling; Yang, Yong-Guang; Sykes, Megan

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells control adaptive immune responses and promote self-tolerance. Various humanized mouse models have been developed in efforts to reproduce and study a human immune system. However, in models that require T cell differentiation in the recipient murine thymus, only low numbers of T cells populate the peripheral immune systems. T cells are positively selected by mouse MHC and therefore do not function well in an HLA-restricted manner. In contrast, cotransplantation of human fetal thymus/liver and i.v. injection of CD34+ cells from the same donor achieves multilineage human lymphohematopoietic reconstitution, including dendritic cells (DCs) and formation of secondary lymphoid organs, in NOD/SCID mice. Strong antigen-specific immune responses and homeostatic expansion of human T cells that is dependent on peripheral human APCs occurs. We now demonstrate that FoxP3+ Helios+ “natural” Tregs develop normally in human fetal thymic grafts and are present in peripheral blood, spleen and lymph nodes of these humanized mice. Humanized mice exhibit normal reversal of CD45 isoform expression in association with thymic egress, post-thymic “naïve” to “activated” phenotypic conversion, and suppressive function. These studies demonstrate the utility of this humanized mouse model for the study of human Treg ontogeny, immunobiology and therapy. PMID:21876039

  11. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  12. A novel model for evaluating therapies targeting human tumor vasculature and human cancer stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Ojeda, Daniela; McLean, Karen; Bai, Shoumei; Pulaski, Heather; Gong, Yusong; Silva, Ines; Skorecki, Karl; Tzukerman, Maty; Buckanovich, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Human tumor vessels express tumor vascular markers (TVMs), proteins that are not expressed in normal blood vessels. Antibodies targeting TVMs could act as potent therapeutics. Unfortunately, preclinical in vivo studies testing anti-human TVM therapies have been difficult to perform due to a lack of in vivo models with confirmed expression of human TVMs. We therefore evaluated TVM expression in a human embryonic stem cell derived teratoma (hESCT) tumor model previously shown to have human vessels. We now report that, in the presence of tumor cells, hESCT tumor vessels express human TVMs. The addition of mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human tumor endothelial cells significantly increases the number of human tumor vessels. TVM induction is mostly tumor type specific with ovarian cancer cells inducing primarily ovarian TVMs while breast cancer cells induce breast cancer specific TVMs. We demonstrate the utility of this model to test an anti-human specific TVM immunotherapeutics; anti-human Thy-1 TVM immunotherapy results in central tumor necrosis and a three-fold reduction in human tumor vascular density. Finally, we tested the ability of the hESCT model, with human tumor vascular niche, to enhance the engraftment rate of primary human ovarian cancer stem-like cells (CSC). ALDH+ CSC from patients (n=6) engrafted in hESCT within 4–12 weeks whereas none engrafted in the flank. ALDH- ovarian cancer cells showed no engraftment in the hESCT or flank (n=3). Thus this model represents a useful tool to test anti-human TVM therapy and evaluate in vivo human CSC tumor biology. PMID:23576551

  13. Modeling Hippocampal Neurogenesis Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Diana Xuan; Di Giorgio, Francesco Paolo; Yao, Jun; Marchetto, Maria Carolina; Brennand, Kristen; Wright, Rebecca; Mei, Arianna; Mchenry, Lauren; Lisuk, David; Grasmick, Jaeson Michael; Silberman, Pedro; Silberman, Giovanna; Jappelli, Roberto; Gage, Fred H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The availability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offers the opportunity to generate lineage-specific cells to investigate mechanisms of human diseases specific to brain regions. Here, we report a differentiation paradigm for hPSCs that enriches for hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) granule neurons. This differentiation paradigm recapitulates the expression patterns of key developmental genes during hippocampal neurogenesis, exhibits characteristics of neuronal network maturation, and produces PROX1+ neurons that functionally integrate into the DG. Because hippocampal neurogenesis has been implicated in schizophrenia (SCZD), we applied our protocol to SCZD patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We found deficits in the generation of DG granule neurons from SCZD hiPSC-derived hippocampal NPCs with lowered levels of NEUROD1, PROX1, and TBR1, reduced neuronal activity, and reduced levels of spontaneous neurotransmitter release. Our approach offers important insights into the neurodevelopmental aspects of SCZD and may be a promising tool for drug screening and personalized medicine. PMID:24672753

  14. Modeling hippocampal neurogenesis using human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Diana Xuan; Di Giorgio, Francesco Paolo; Yao, Jun; Marchetto, Maria Carolina; Brennand, Kristen; Wright, Rebecca; Mei, Arianna; McHenry, Lauren; Lisuk, David; Grasmick, Jaeson Michael; Silberman, Pedro; Silberman, Giovanna; Jappelli, Roberto; Gage, Fred H

    2014-03-11

    The availability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offers the opportunity to generate lineage-specific cells to investigate mechanisms of human diseases specific to brain regions. Here, we report a differentiation paradigm for hPSCs that enriches for hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) granule neurons. This differentiation paradigm recapitulates the expression patterns of key developmental genes during hippocampal neurogenesis, exhibits characteristics of neuronal network maturation, and produces PROX1+ neurons that functionally integrate into the DG. Because hippocampal neurogenesis has been implicated in schizophrenia (SCZD), we applied our protocol to SCZD patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We found deficits in the generation of DG granule neurons from SCZD hiPSC-derived hippocampal NPCs with lowered levels of NEUROD1, PROX1, and TBR1, reduced neuronal activity, and reduced levels of spontaneous neurotransmitter release. Our approach offers important insights into the neurodevelopmental aspects of SCZD and may be a promising tool for drug screening and personalized medicine.

  15. Epithelial Cell Culture from Human Adenoids: A Functional Study Model for Ciliated and Secretory Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, Claudia; Espinosa, Marisol; Sánchez, María Trinidad; Droguett, Karla; Ríos, Mariana; Fonseca, Ximena; Villalón, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Mucociliary transport (MCT) is a defense mechanism of the airway. To study the underlying mechanisms of MCT, we have both developed an experimental model of cultures, from human adenoid tissue of ciliated and secretory cells, and characterized the response to local chemical signals that control ciliary activity and the secretion of respiratory mucins in vitro. Materials and Methods. In ciliated cell cultures, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and intracellular Ca2+ levels were measured in response to ATP, UTP, and adenosine. In secretory cultures, mucin synthesis and secretion were identified by using immunodetection. Mucin content was taken from conditioned medium and analyzed in the presence or absence of UTP. Results. Enriched ciliated cell monolayers and secretory cells were obtained. Ciliated cells showed a basal CBF of 10.7 Hz that increased significantly after exposure to ATP, UTP, or adenosine. Mature secretory cells showed active secretion of granules containing different glycoproteins, including MUC5AC. Conclusion. Culture of ciliated and secretory cells grown from adenoid epithelium is a reproducible and feasible experimental model, in which it is possible to observe ciliary and secretory activities, with a potential use as a model to understand mucociliary transport control mechanisms. PMID:23484122

  16. Notch Signaling and Schwann Cell Transformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    TITLE: Notch Signaling and Schwann Cell Transformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Schwann cell transformation: Development of a model system and 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER application to human MPNSTs . 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0209...of neurofibromas to MPNSTs in patients with NF1. Our previous work has shown that constitutive expression of Notch can transform rat Schwann cells

  17. Mucosal-associated invariant T cells from induced pluripotent stem cells: A novel approach for modeling human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Chie; Fujita, Hiroyoshi; Wakao, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Mice have frequently been used to model human diseases involving immune dysregulation such as autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. These models help elucidate the mechanisms underlying the disease and in the development of novel therapies. However, if mice are deficient in certain cells and/or effectors associated with human diseases, how can their functions be investigated in this species? Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, a novel innate-like T cell family member, are a good example. MAIT cells are abundant in humans but scarce in laboratory mice. MAIT cells harbor an invariant T cell receptor and recognize nonpeptidic antigens vitamin B2 metabolites from bacteria and yeasts. Recent studies have shown that MAIT cells play a pivotal role in human diseases such as bacterial infections and autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. MAIT cells possess granulysin, a human-specific effector molecule, but granulysin and its homologue are absent in mice. Furthermore, MAIT cells show poor proliferation in vitro. To overcome these problems and further our knowledge of MAIT cells, we have established a method to expand MAIT cells via induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this review, we describe recent advances in the field of MAIT cell research and our approach for human disease modeling with iPSC-derived MAIT cells. PMID:27114747

  18. Impact of Mixed Xenogeneic Porcine Hematopoietic Chimerism on Human NK Cell Recognition in a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Li, H W; Vishwasrao, P; Hölzl, M A; Chen, S; Choi, G; Zhao, G; Sykes, M

    2017-02-01

    Mixed chimerism is a promising approach to inducing allograft and xenograft tolerance. Mixed allogeneic and xenogeneic chimerism in mouse models induced specific tolerance and global hyporesponsiveness, respectively, of host mouse natural killer (NK) cells. In this study, we investigated whether pig/human mixed chimerism could tolerize human NK cells in a humanized mouse model. Our results showed no impact of induced human NK cell reconstitution on porcine chimerism. NK cells from most pig/human mixed chimeric mice showed either specifically decreased cytotoxicity to pig cells or global hyporesponsiveness in an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Mixed xenogeneic chimerism did not hamper the maturation of human NK cells but was associated with an alteration in NK cell subset distribution and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in the bone marrow. In summary, we demonstrate that mixed xenogeneic chimerism induces human NK cell hyporesponsiveness to pig cells. Our results support the use of this approach to inducing xenogeneic tolerance in the clinical setting. However, additional approaches are required to improve the efficacy of tolerance induction while ensuring adequate NK cell functions.

  19. Visualizing Human Hematopoietic Stem Cell Trafficking In Vivo Using a Zebrafish Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Staal, Frank J T; Spaink, Herman P; Fibbe, Willem E

    2016-02-15

    Zebrafish is gaining increased popularity as a model organism to study stem cell biology. It also is widely used as model system to visualize human leukemic stem cells. However, xenotransplantation of primary human stem/progenitor cells has not been described. Here, we use casper pigmentation mutant fish that are transparent crossed to fli-GFP transgenic fish as recipients of red labeled human CD34(+) cells. We have investigated various conditions and protocols with the aim to monitor and visualize the fate of transplanted human CD34(+) cells. We here report successful use of casper mutant zebrafish embryos for the direct monitoring of human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, differentiation, and trafficking in vivo.

  20. Highly Differentiated Human Airway Epithelial Cells: a Model to Study Host cell-parasite Interactions in Pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Claudia; Zhang, Chengxian; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Iqbal, Junaid; Guerra, Julio; Greenberg, David P.; Decker, Michael D.; Carbonetti, Nicholas; Starner, Timothy D.; McCray, Paul B.; Mooi, Frits R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bordetella pertussis colonizes the human respiratory mucosa. Most studies on B. pertussis adherence have relied on cultured mammalian cells that lack key features present in differentiated human airway cells or on animal models that are not natural hosts of B. pertussis. The objectives of this work are to evaluate B. pertussis infection on highly differentiated human airway cells in vitro and to show the role of B. pertussis fimbriae in cell adherence. Methods Primary human airway epithelial (PHAE) cells from human bronchi and a human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cell line were grown in vitro under air-liquid interface conditions. Results PHAE and HBE cells infected with B. pertussis wild type strain revealed bacterial adherence to cell’s apical surface and bacterial induced cytoskeleton changes and cell detachment. Mutations in the major fimbrial subunits Fim2/3 or in the minor fimbrial adhesin subunit FimD affected B. pertussis adherence to predominantly HBE cells. This cell model recapitulates the morphologic features of the human airway infected by B. pertussis and confirms the role of fimbriae in B. pertussis adherence. Furthemore, HBE cells show that fimbrial subunits, and specifically FimD adhesin, are critical in B. pertussis adherence to airway cells. Conclusions The relevance of this model to study host-parasite interaction in pertussis lies in the striking physiologic and morphologic similarity between the PHAE and HBE cells and the human airway ciliated and goblet cells in vivo. These cells can proliferate in vitro, differentiate, and express the same genetic profile as human respiratory cells in vivo. PMID:26492208

  1. Regulatory B cells in human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases: from mouse models to clinical research.

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Fujimoto, Manabu; Sato, Shinichi

    2015-10-01

    B cells have been generally considered to be positive regulators of immune responses because of their ability to produce antigen-specific antibodies and to activate T cells through antigen presentation. Impairment of B cell development and function may cause inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Recently, specific B cell subsets that can negatively regulate immune responses have been described in mouse models of a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The concept of those B cells, termed regulatory B cells, is now recognized as important in the murine immune system. Among several regulatory B cell subsets, IL-10-producing regulatory B cells are the most widely investigated. On the basis of discoveries from studies of such mice, human regulatory B cells that produce IL-10 in most cases are becoming an active area of research. There have been emerging data suggesting the importance of human regulatory B cells in various diseases. Revealing the immune regulation mechanisms of human regulatory B cells in human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases could lead to the development of novel B cell targeted therapies. This review highlights the current knowledge on regulatory B cells, mainly IL-10-producing regulatory B cells, in animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and in clinical research using human samples.

  2. Alzheimer's disease in a dish: promises and challenges of human stem cell models.

    PubMed

    Young, Jessica E; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2012-10-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into disease-relevant cell types, which capture the unique genome of an individual patient and provide insight into pathological mechanisms of human disease. Recently, human stem cell models for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative dementia, have been described. Stem cell-derived neurons from patients with familial and sporadic AD and Down's syndrome recapitulate human disease phenotypes such as amyloid β peptide production, hyperphosphorylation of tau protein and endosomal abnormalities. Treatment of human neurons with small molecules can modulate these phenotypes, demonstrating the utility of this system for drug development and screening. This review will highlight the current AD stem cell models and discuss the remaining challenges and potential future directions of this field.

  3. An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Carey L; Mahe, Maxime M; Múnera, Jorge; Howell, Jonathan C; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Poling, Holly M; Schweitzer, Jamie I; Vallance, Jefferson E; Mayhew, Christopher N; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Spence, Jason R; Shroyer, Noah F; Wells, James M; Helmrath, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into organ-specific subtypes offers an exciting avenue for the study of embryonic development and disease processes, for pharmacologic studies and as a potential resource for therapeutic transplant. To date, limited in vivo models exist for human intestine, all of which are dependent upon primary epithelial cultures or digested tissue from surgical biopsies that include mesenchymal cells transplanted on biodegradable scaffolds. Here, we generated human intestinal organoids (HIOs) produced in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that can engraft in vivo. These HIOs form mature human intestinal epithelium with intestinal stem cells contributing to the crypt-villus architecture and a laminated human mesenchyme, both supported by mouse vasculature ingrowth. In vivo transplantation resulted in marked expansion and maturation of the epithelium and mesenchyme, as demonstrated by differentiated intestinal cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, tuft cells and enteroendocrine cells), presence of functional brush-border enzymes (lactase, sucrase-isomaltase and dipeptidyl peptidase 4) and visible subepithelial and smooth muscle layers when compared with HIOs in vitro. Transplanted intestinal tissues demonstrated digestive functions as shown by permeability and peptide uptake studies. Furthermore, transplanted HIO-derived tissue was responsive to systemic signals from the host mouse following ileocecal resection, suggesting a role for circulating factors in the intestinal adaptive response. This model of the human small intestine may pave the way for studies of intestinal physiology, disease and translational studies.

  4. Lung endothelial cells strengthen, but brain endothelial cells weaken barrier properties of a human alveolar epithelium cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Winfried; Samwer, Fabian; Kunzmann, Steffen; Muellenbach, Ralf M; Wirth, Michael; Speer, Christian P; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola Y

    2012-11-01

    The blood-air barrier in the lung consists of the alveolar epithelium, the underlying capillary endothelium, their basement membranes and the interstitial space between the cell layers. Little is known about the interactions between the alveolar and the blood compartment. The aim of the present study was to gain first insights into the possible interplay between these two neighbored cell layers. We established an in vitro Transwell model of the alveolar epithelium based on human cell line H441 and investigated the influence of conditioned medium obtained from human lung endothelial cell line HPMEC-ST1.6R on the barrier properties of the H441 layers. As control for tissue specificity H441 layers were exposed to conditioned medium from human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Addition of dexamethasone was necessary to obtain stable H441 cell layers. Moreover, dexamethasone increased expression of cell type I markers (caveolin-1, RAGE) and cell type II marker SP-B, whereas decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in a concentration dependent manner. Soluble factors obtained from the lung endothelial cell line increased the barrier significantly proven by TEER values and fluorescein permeability on the functional level and by the differential expression of tight junctional proteins on the molecular level. In contrast to this, soluble factors derived from brain endothelial cells weakened the barrier significantly. In conclusion, soluble factors from lung endothelial cells can strengthen the alveolar epithelium barrier in vitro, which suggests communication between endothelial and epithelial cells regulating the integrity of the blood-air barrier.

  5. Cultured Human Airway Epithelial Cells (Calu-3): A Model of Human Respiratory Function, Structure, and Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Chidekel, Aaron; Shaffer, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the application of the human airway Calu-3 cell line as a respiratory model for studying the effects of gas concentrations, exposure time, biophysical stress, and biological agents on human airway epithelial cells. Calu-3 cells are grown to confluence at an air-liquid interface on permeable supports. To model human respiratory conditions and treatment modalities, monolayers are placed in an environmental chamber, and exposed to specific levels of oxygen or other therapeutic modalities such as positive pressure and medications to assess the effect of interventions on inflammatory mediators, immunologic proteins, and antibacterial outcomes. Monolayer integrity and permeability and cell histology and viability also measure cellular response to therapeutic interventions. Calu-3 cells exposed to graded oxygen concentrations demonstrate cell dysfunction and inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Modeling positive airway pressure reveals that pressure may exert a greater injurious effect and cytokine response than oxygen. In experiments with pharmacological agents, Lucinactant is protective of Calu-3 cells compared with Beractant and control, and perfluorocarbons also protect against hyperoxia-induced airway epithelial cell injury. The Calu-3 cell preparation is a sensitive and efficient preclinical model to study human respiratory processes and diseases related to oxygen- and ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:20948883

  6. Disease modeling using human induced pluripotent stem cells: Lessons from the liver☆

    PubMed Central

    Gieseck, Richard L.; Colquhoun, Jennifer; Hannan, Nicholas R.F.

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into any of the hundreds of distinct cell types that comprise the human body. This unique characteristic has resulted in considerable interest in the field of regenerative medicine, given the potential for these cells to be used to protect, repair, or replace diseased, injured, and aged cells within the human body. In addition to their potential in therapeutics, hPSCs can be used to study the earliest stages of human development and to provide a platform for both drug screening and disease modeling using human cells. Recently, the description of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPSCs) has allowed the field of disease modeling to become far more accessible and physiologically relevant, as pluripotent cells can be generated from patients of any genetic background. Disease models derived from hIPSCs that manifest cellular disease phenotypes have been established to study several monogenic diseases; furthermore, hIPSCs can be used for phenotype-based drug screens to investigate complex diseases for which the underlying genetic mechanism is unknown. As a result, the use of stem cells as research tools has seen an unprecedented growth within the last decade as researchers look for in vitro disease models which closely mimic in vivo responses in humans. Here, we discuss the beginnings of hPSCs, starting with isolation of human embryonic stem cells, moving into the development and optimization of hIPSC technology, and ending with the application of hIPSCs towards disease modeling and drug screening applications, with specific examples highlighting the modeling of inherited metabolic disorders of the liver. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics. PMID:24943800

  7. Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells to model monogenic metabolic disorders of the liver.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Maria Paulina; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2012-11-01

    A crucial problem in liver disease biology and a major obstacle to the development of new therapies is the inability to conduct mechanistic studies of live human hepatocytes. Liver tissue from patients is difficult to obtain and only reveals the disease aftermath, while animal models lack the significant genetic diversity of humans. Monogenic metabolic disorders of the liver are an ideal platform to explore the complex gene-environment interactions and the role of genetic variation in the onset and progression of liver disease. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC) technology provides an unprecedented opportunity to generate live cellular models of disease for therapeutic candidate discovery and cell replacement therapy. In this review, we discuss the potential of hIPSC to increase our understanding of human disease with a focus on the current efforts to model metabolic diseases of the liver and to generate suitable populations of human hepatocytes for cell transplantation.

  8. Mathematical modeling of gap junction coupling and electrical activity in human β-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loppini, Alessandro; Braun, Matthias; Filippi, Simonetta; Gram Pedersen, Morten

    2015-12-01

    Coordinated insulin secretion is controlled by electrical coupling of pancreatic β-cells due to connexin-36 gap junctions. Gap junction coupling not only synchronizes the heterogeneous β-cell population, but can also modify the electrical behavior of the cells. These phenomena have been widely studied with mathematical models based on data from mouse β-cells. However, it is now known that human β-cell electrophysiology shows important differences to its rodent counterpart, and although human pancreatic islets express connexin-36 and show evidence of β-cell coupling, these aspects have been little investigated in human β-cells. Here we investigate theoretically, the gap junction coupling strength required for synchronizing electrical activity in a small cluster of cells simulated with a recent mathematical model of human β-cell electrophysiology. We find a lower limit for the coupling strength of approximately 20 pS (i.e., normalized to cell size, ˜2 pS pF-1) below which spiking electrical activity is asynchronous. To confront this theoretical lower bound with data, we use our model to estimate from an experimental patch clamp recording that the coupling strength is approximately 100-200 pS (10-20 pS pF-1), similar to previous estimates in mouse β-cells. We then investigate the role of gap junction coupling in synchronizing and modifying other forms of electrical activity in human β-cell clusters. We find that electrical coupling can prolong the period of rapid bursting electrical activity, and synchronize metabolically driven slow bursting, in particular when the metabolic oscillators are in phase. Our results show that realistic coupling conductances are sufficient to promote synchrony in small clusters of human β-cells as observed experimentally, and provide motivation for further detailed studies of electrical coupling in human pancreatic islets.

  9. An animal model of adult T-cell leukemia: humanized mice with HTLV-1-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Kenta; Xun, Runze; Tei, Mami; Ueno, Takaharu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-16

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy with a poor prognosis. To elucidate ATL pathogenesis in vivo, a variety of animal models have been established; however, the mechanisms driving this disorder remain poorly understood due to deficiencies in each of these animal models. Here, we report a novel HTLV-1-infected humanized mouse model generated by intra-bone marrow injection of human CD133(+) stem cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc null (NOG) mice (IBMI-huNOG mice). Upon infection, the number of CD4(+) human T cells in the periphery increased rapidly, and atypical lymphocytes with lobulated nuclei resembling ATL-specific flower cells were observed 4 to 5 months after infection. Proliferation was seen in both CD25(-) and CD25(+) CD4 T cells with identical proviral integration sites; however, a limited number of CD25(+)-infected T-cell clones eventually dominated, indicating an association between clonal selection of infected T cells and expression of CD25. Additionally, HTLV-1-specific adaptive immune responses were induced in infected mice and might be involved in the control of HTLV-1-infected cells. Thus, the HTLV-1-infected IBMI-huNOG mouse model successfully recapitulated the development of ATL and may serve as an important tool for investigating in vivo mechanisms of ATL leukemogenesis and evaluating anti-ATL drug and vaccine candidates.

  10. Modeling human risk: Cell & molecular biology in context

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    It is anticipated that early in the next century manned missions into outer space will occur, with a mission to Mars scheduled between 2015 and 2020. However, before such missions can be undertaken, a realistic estimation of the potential risks to the flight crews is required. One of the uncertainties remaining in this risk estimation is that posed by the effects of exposure to the radiation environment of outer space. Although the composition of this environment is fairly well understood, the biological effects arising from exposure to it are not. The reasons for this are three-fold: (1) A small but highly significant component of the radiation spectrum in outer space consists of highly charged, high energy (HZE) particles which are not routinely experienced on earth, and for which there are insufficient data on biological effects; (2) Most studies on the biological effects of radiation to date have been high-dose, high dose-rate, whereas in space, with the exception of solar particle events, radiation exposures will be low-dose, low dose-rate; (3) Although it has been established that the virtual absence of gravity in space has a profound effect on human physiology, it is not clear whether these effects will act synergistically with those of radiation exposure. A select panel will evaluate the utilizing experiments and models to accurately predict the risks associated with exposure to HZE particles. Topics of research include cellular and tissue response, health effects associated with radiation damage, model animal systems, and critical markers of Radiation response.

  11. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells: A Novel Source for Modeling of Human Genetic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Ivana; Provenzano, Martina; Rodrigues, Melissa; Pantalone, Andrea; Salini, Vincenzo; Ballerini, Patrizia; Borlongan, Cesar V; Stuppia, Liborio

    2016-04-22

    In recent years, great interest has been devoted to the use of Induced Pluripotent Stem cells (iPS) for modeling of human genetic diseases, due to the possibility of reprogramming somatic cells of affected patients into pluripotent cells, enabling differentiation into several cell types, and allowing investigations into the molecular mechanisms of the disease. However, the protocol of iPS generation still suffers from technical limitations, showing low efficiency, being expensive and time consuming. Amniotic Fluid Stem cells (AFS) represent a potential alternative novel source of stem cells for modeling of human genetic diseases. In fact, by means of prenatal diagnosis, a number of fetuses affected by chromosomal or Mendelian diseases can be identified, and the amniotic fluid collected for genetic testing can be used, after diagnosis, for the isolation, culture and differentiation of AFS cells. This can provide a useful stem cell model for the investigation of the molecular basis of the diagnosed disease without the necessity of producing iPS, since AFS cells show some features of pluripotency and are able to differentiate in cells derived from all three germ layers "in vitro". In this article, we describe the potential benefits provided by using AFS cells in the modeling of human genetic diseases.

  12. Amniotic Fluid Stem Cells: A Novel Source for Modeling of Human Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Ivana; Provenzano, Martina; Rodrigues, Melissa; Pantalone, Andrea; Salini, Vincenzo; Ballerini, Patrizia; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Stuppia, Liborio

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been devoted to the use of Induced Pluripotent Stem cells (iPS) for modeling of human genetic diseases, due to the possibility of reprogramming somatic cells of affected patients into pluripotent cells, enabling differentiation into several cell types, and allowing investigations into the molecular mechanisms of the disease. However, the protocol of iPS generation still suffers from technical limitations, showing low efficiency, being expensive and time consuming. Amniotic Fluid Stem cells (AFS) represent a potential alternative novel source of stem cells for modeling of human genetic diseases. In fact, by means of prenatal diagnosis, a number of fetuses affected by chromosomal or Mendelian diseases can be identified, and the amniotic fluid collected for genetic testing can be used, after diagnosis, for the isolation, culture and differentiation of AFS cells. This can provide a useful stem cell model for the investigation of the molecular basis of the diagnosed disease without the necessity of producing iPS, since AFS cells show some features of pluripotency and are able to differentiate in cells derived from all three germ layers “in vitro”. In this article, we describe the potential benefits provided by using AFS cells in the modeling of human genetic diseases. PMID:27110774

  13. Large-scale in silico modeling of metabolic interactions between cell types in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nathan E; Schramm, Gunnar; Bordbar, Aarash; Schellenberger, Jan; Andersen, Michael P; Cheng, Jeffrey K; Patel, Nilam; Yee, Alex; Lewis, Randall A; Eils, Roland; König, Rainer; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2010-12-01

    Metabolic interactions between multiple cell types are difficult to model using existing approaches. Here we present a workflow that integrates gene expression data, proteomics data and literature-based manual curation to model human metabolism within and between different types of cells. Transport reactions are used to account for the transfer of metabolites between models of different cell types via the interstitial fluid. We apply the method to create models of brain energy metabolism that recapitulate metabolic interactions between astrocytes and various neuron types relevant to Alzheimer's disease. Analysis of the models identifies genes and pathways that may explain observed experimental phenomena, including the differential effects of the disease on cell types and regions of the brain. Constraint-based modeling can thus contribute to the study and analysis of multicellular metabolic processes in the human tissue microenvironment and provide detailed mechanistic insight into high-throughput data analysis.

  14. Validation of Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells as a Model for Influenza A Infections in Human Distal Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A. Sally; Chertow, Daniel S.; Moyer, Jenna E.; Suzich, Jon; Sandouk, Aline; Dorward, David W.; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Primary normal human bronchial/tracheal epithelial (NHBE) cells, derived from the distal-most aspect of the trachea at the bifurcation, have been used for a number of studies in respiratory disease research. Differences between the source tissue and the differentiated primary cells may impact infection studies based on this model. Therefore, we examined how well-differentiated NHBE cells compared with their source tissue, the human distal trachea, as well as the ramifications of these differences on influenza A viral pathogenesis research using this model. We employed a histological analysis including morphological measurements, electron microscopy, multi-label immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, lectin histochemistry, and microarray expression analysis to compare differentiated NHBEs to human distal tracheal epithelium. Pseudostratified epithelial height, cell type variety and distribution varied significantly. Electron microscopy confirmed differences in cellular attachment and paracellular junctions. Influenza receptor lectin histochemistry revealed that α2,3 sialic acids were rarely present on the apical aspect of the differentiated NHBE cells, but were present in low numbers in the distal trachea. We bound fluorochrome bioconjugated virus to respiratory tissue and NHBE cells and infected NHBE cells with human influenza A viruses. Both indicated that the pattern of infection progression in these cells correlated with autopsy studies of fatal cases from the 2009 pandemic. PMID:25604814

  15. Characterization of human follicular thyroid cancer cell lines in preclinical mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Reeb, Ashley N; Ziegler, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) is the second most common type of thyroid cancers. In order to develop more effective personalized therapies, it is necessary to thoroughly evaluate patient-derived cell lines in in vivo preclinical models before using them to test new, targeted therapies. This study evaluates the tumorigenic and metastatic potential of a panel of three human FTC cell lines (WRO, FTC-238, and TT1609-CO2) with defined genetic mutations in two in vivo murine models: an orthotopic thyroid cancer model to study tumor progression and a tail vein injection model to study metastasis. All cell lines developed tumors in the orthotopic model, with take rates of 100%. Notably, WRO-derived tumors grew two to four times faster than tumors arising from the FTC-238 and TT2609-CO2 cell lines. These results mirrored those of a tail vein injection model for lung metastasis: one hundred percent of mice injected with WRO cells in the tail vein exhibited aggressive growth of bilateral lung metastases within 35 days. In contrast, tail vein injection of FTC-238 or TT2609-CO2 cells did not result in lung metastasis. Together, our work demonstrates that these human FTC cell lines display highly varied tumorigenic and metastatic potential in vivo with WRO being the most aggressive cell line in both orthotopic and lung metastasis models. This information will be valuable when selecting cell lines for preclinical drug testing. PMID:26830329

  16. Restorative effect of hair follicular dermal cells on injured human hair follicles in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yamao, Mikaru; Inamatsu, Mutsumi; Okada, Taro; Ogawa, Yuko; Ishida, Yuji; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2015-03-01

    No model is available for examining whether in vivo-damaged human hair follicles (hu-HFs) are rescued by transplanting cultured hu-HF dermal cells (dermal papilla and dermal sheath cells). Such a model might be valuable for examining whether in vivo-damaged hu-HFs such as miniaturized hu-HFs in androgenic alopecia are improvable by auto-transplanting hu-HF dermal cells. In this study, we first developed mice with humanized skin composed of hu-keratinocytes and hu-dermal fibroblasts. Then, a 'humanized scalp model mouse' was generated by transplanting hu-scalp HFs into the humanized skin. To demonstrate the usability of the model, the lower halves of the hu-HFs in the model were amputated in situ, and cultured hu-HF dermal cells were injected around the amputated area. The results demonstrated that the transplanted cells contributed to the restoration of the damaged HFs. This model could be used to explore clinically effective technologies for hair restoration therapy by autologous cell transplantation.

  17. Establishment of a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Su, G; Cai, S J; Gong, X; Wang, L L; Li, H H; Wang, L M

    2016-06-24

    To establish a blue-light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fourth-generation human RPE cells were randomly divided into two groups. In group A, cells were exposed to blue light (2000 ± 500 lux) for 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h, and cell culture was stopped after 12 h. In group B, cells were exposed to blue light at the same intensity and time periods, but cell culture was stopped after 24 h. TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to determine the most suitable illuminating time with apoptotic index. Flow cytometry was used to determine apoptotic ratio of RPEs. In group A, the apoptotic index of cells that received 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light was higher than that of control. The apoptotic index of cells receiving 9 and 12 h was higher than that of 6 h (P = 0.000). In group B, the apoptotic index and RPE cell apoptosis ratio of cells exposed to 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light were higher than that of 3 h (P = 0.000); and cells receiving 9 and 12 h had higher values than that of 6 h. This study demonstrated that the best conditions to establish a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro are 2000 ± 500 lux light intensity for 6 h, with 24 h of cell culture post-exposure.

  18. Large animal induced pluripotent stem cells as pre-clinical models for studying human disease.

    PubMed

    Plews, Jordan R; Gu, Mingxia; Longaker, Michael T; Wu, Joseph C

    2012-06-01

    The path to induced pluripotency Discovery of a pan-species pluripotency network Animal iPSCs and disease modelling Issues with large animal iPSCs Conclusions The derivation of human embryonic stem cells and subsequently human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has energized regenerative medicine research and enabled seemingly limitless applications. Although small animal models, such as mouse models, have played an important role in the progression of the field, typically, they are poor representations of the human disease phenotype. As an alternative, large animal models should be explored as a potentially better approach for clinical translation of cellular therapies. However, only fragmented information regarding the derivation, characterization and clinical usefulness of pluripotent large animal cells is currently available. Here, we briefly review the latest advances regarding the derivation and use of large animal iPSCs.

  19. An in vivo model of human small intestine using pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Carey L; Mahe, Maxime M; Múnera, Jorge; Howell, Jonathan C; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Poling, Holly M; Schweitzer, Jamie I; Vallance, Jefferson E; Mayhew, Christopher N; Sun, Ying; Grabowski, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Spence, Jason R; Shroyer, Noah F; Wells, James M; Helmrath, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into organ-specific subtypes offers an exciting avenue for the study of embryonic development and disease processes, for pharmacologic studies and as a potential resource for therapeutic transplant1,2. To date, limited in vivo models exist for human intestine, all of which are dependent upon primary epithelial cultures or digested tissue from surgical biopsies that include mesenchymal cells transplanted on biodegradable scaffolds3,4. Here, we generated human intestinal organoids (HIOs) produced in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)5,6 that can engraft in vivo. These HIOs form mature human intestinal epithelium with intestinal stem cells contributing to the cryptvillus architecture and a laminated human mesenchyme, both supported by mouse vasculature ingrowth. In vivo transplantation resulted in marked expansion and maturation of the epithelium and mesenchyme, as demonstrated by differentiated intestinal cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, tuft cells and enteroendocrine cells), presence of functional brush-border enzymes (lactase, sucrase-isomaltase and dipeptidyl peptidase 4) and visible subepithelial and smooth muscle layers when compared with HIOs in vitro. Transplanted intestinal tissues demonstrated digestive functions as shown by permeability and peptide uptake studies. Furthermore, transplanted HIO-derived tissue was responsive to systemic signals from the host mouse following ileocecal resection, suggesting a role for circulating factors in the intestinal adaptive response7–9. This model of the human small intestine may pave the way for studies of intestinal physiology, disease and translational studies. PMID:25326803

  20. Stem cells on the brain: modeling neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases using human iPSCs

    PubMed Central

    Srikanth, Priya; Young-Pearse, Tracy L.

    2014-01-01

    Seven years have passed since the initial report of the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from adult humans, and in the intervening time the field of neuroscience has developed numerous disease models using this technology. Here, we review the progress in the field, and describe both the advantages and potential pitfalls of modeling neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases using this technology. PMID:24628482

  1. Human amniotic fluid stem cells as a model for functional studies of genes involved in human genetic diseases or oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Margit; Dolznig, Helmut; Schipany, Katharina; Mikula, Mario; Brandau, Oliver; Hengstschläger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    functions in AFS cells was established. Since AFS cells are not tumorigenic, gene modulations not only allow to investigate the role of endogenous genes involved in human genetic diseases but also may help to reveal putative oncogenic gene functions in different biological models, both in vitro and in vivo. This concept is discussed and a "proof of principle", already obtained via modulating genes involved in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in AFS cells, is presented.

  2. A Stable and Reproducible Human Blood-Brain Barrier Model Derived from Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sevin, Emmanuel; Almeida, Catarina; Culot, Maxime; Dehouck, Lucie; Coisne, Caroline; Engelhardt, Britta; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Ferreira, Lino

    2014-01-01

    The human blood brain barrier (BBB) is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs), which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS) from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs) express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes. PMID:24936790

  3. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna; Shoaie, Saeed; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted 85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25640694

  4. Evaluation of cloned cells, animal model, and ATRA sensitivity of human testicular yolk sac tumor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The testicular yolk sac tumor (TYST) is the most common neoplasm originated from germ cells differentiated abnormally, a major part of pediatric malignant testicular tumors. The present study aimed at developing and validating the in vitro and vivo models of TYST and evaluating the sensitivity of TYST to treatments, by cloning human TYST cells and investigating the histology, ultra-structure, growth kinetics and expression of specific proteins of cloned cells. We found biological characteristics of cloned TYST cells were similar to the yolk sac tumor and differentiated from the columnar to glandular-like or goblet cells-like cells. Chromosomes for tumor identification in each passage met nature of the primary tumor. TYST cells were more sensitive to all-trans-retinoic acid which had significantly inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Cisplatin induced apoptosis of TYST cells through the activation of p53 expression and down-regulation of Bcl- expression. Thus, we believe that cloned TYST cells and the animal model developed here are useful to understand the molecular mechanism of TYST cells and develop potential therapies for human TYST. PMID:22410253

  5. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, Sandra; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Dollinger, Matthias; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Christ, Bruno

    2014-08-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver. - Highlights: • First time to show NASH in an immune-deficient mouse model. • Human MSC attenuate NASH and improve lipid homeostasis. • MSC act anti-fibrotic and augment liver regeneration by stimulation of proliferation. • Pre-clinical assessment of human MSC for stem cell-based therapy of NASH.

  6. Evaluation of two endometriosis models by transplantation of human endometrial tissue fragments and human endometrial mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarabadi, Mina; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Sadafi, Rana

    2017-01-01

    Background: The animal models of endometriosis could be a valuable alternative tool for clarifying the etiology of endometriosis. Objective: In this study two endometriosis models at the morphological and molecular levels was evaluated and compared. Materials and Methods: The human endometrial tissues were cut into small fragments then they were randomly considered for transplantation into γ irradiated mice as model A; or they were isolated and cultured up to fourth passages. 2×106 cultured stromal cells were transplanted into γ irradiated mice subcutaneously as model B. twenty days later the ectopic tissues in both models were studied morphologically by Periodic acid-Schiff and hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of osteopontin (OPN) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) genes were also assessed using real time RT-PCR. 17-β estradiol levels of mice sera were compared before and after transplantation. Results: The endometrial like glands and stromal cells were formed in the implanted subcutaneous tissue of both endometriosis models. The gland sections per cubic millimeter, the expression of OPN and MMP2 genes and the level of 17-β estradiol were higher in model B than model A (p=0.03). Conclusion: Our observation demonstrated that endometrial mesenchymal stromal cells showed more efficiency to establish endometriosis model than human endometrial tissue fragments. PMID:28280797

  7. A differentiated porcine bronchial epithelial cell culture model for studying human adenovirus tropism and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lam, E; Ramke, M; Groos, S; Warnecke, G; Heim, A

    2011-12-01

    The species specificity of human adenoviruses (HAdV) almost precludes studying virulence and tropism in animal models, e.g. rodent models, or derived tissue and cell culture models. However, replication of HAdV type 5 (HAdV-C5) has been shown after intravenous injection in swine. In order to study adenovirus replication in airway tissue propagation of bronchial epithelial cells from porcine lungs was established. These primary cells proved to be fully permissive for HAdV-C5 infection in submerged culture, demonstrating efficient HAdV genome replication, infectious viral particle release (1.07×10(8) TCID(50)/ml±6.63×10(7)) and development of cytopathic effect (CPE). Differentiation of porcine bronchial epithelial cells was achieved at the air-liquid interface on collagen I coated 0.4μm polyester membranes. Morphology, expression of tubulin and occludin, the development of tight-junctions and cilia were similar to human bronchial epithelial cells. Infection with HAdV-C5 from the basolateral side resulted in release of infectious virus progeny (2.05×10(7) TCID(50)/ml±2.39×10(7)) to the apical surface as described recently in human bronchial epithelial cells, although complete CPE was not observed. Differentiated porcine bronchial epithelial cells hold promise as a novel method for studying the virulence and pathophysiology of pneumonia associated HAdV types.

  8. Longitudinal Tracking of Human Dendritic Cells in Murine Models Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Briley-Saebo, Karen C.; Leboeuf, Marylene; Dickson, Stephen; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A.; Palucka, A. Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Merad, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Ex vivo generated dendritic cells are currently used to induce therapeutic immunity in solid tumors. Effective immune response requires dendritic cells to home and remain in lymphoid organs to allow for adequate interaction with T lymphocytes. The aim of the current study was to detect and track Feridex labeled human dendritic cells in murine models using magnetic resonance imaging. Human dendritic cells were incubated with Feridex and the effect of labeling on dendritic cells immune function was evaluated. Ex vivo dendritic cell phantoms were used to estimate sensitivity of the magnetic resonance methods and in vivo homing was evaluated after intravenous or subcutaneous injection. R2*-maps of liver, spleen, and draining lymph nodes were obtained and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or relaxometry methods were used to quantify the Feridex tissue concentrations. Correlations between in vivo R2* values and iron content were then determined. Feridex labeling did not affect dendritic cell maturation or function. Phantom results indicated that it was possible to detect 125 dendritic cells within a given slice. Strong correlation between in vivo R2* values and iron deposition was observed. Importantly, Feridex-labeled dendritic cells were detected in the spleen for up to 2 weeks postintravenous injection. This study suggests that magnetic resonance imaging may be used to longitudinally track Feridex-labeled human dendritic cells for up to 2 weeks after injection. PMID:20593373

  9. Novel metastasis model of human lung cancer in SCID mice depleted of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Nishioka, Y; Izumi, K; Tsuruo, T; Tanaka, T; Miyasaka, M; Sone, S

    1996-07-17

    Metastasis is a critical problem in the treatment of human lung cancer. Thus, a suitable animal model of metastasis of human lung cancer is required for in vivo biological and preclinical studies. In this study, we tried to establish a suitable model for this, using SCID mice. Neither human SCLC H69/VP cells (5 x 10(6)) nor squamous-cell carcinoma RERF-LC-AI cells (1 x 10(6)), injected through a tail vein, formed metastases in untreated SCID mice. Pre-treatment of SCID mice with anti-asialo GM1 serum resulted in only a few metastases of H69/VP cells, but pre-treatment with anti-mouse IL-2 receptor beta chain Ab (TM-beta 1) resulted in numerous lymph-node metastases 56 days after tumor inoculation. H69/VP-M cells, an in vivo-selected variant line, formed significant numbers of lymph-node metastases even in SCID mice pre-treated with anti-asialo GM1 serum. SCID mice depleted of NK cells by treatment with TM-beta 1 showed different patterns of metastasis when inoculated intravenously with the 2 different human lung cancer cell lines (H69/VP and RERF-LC-AI cells): H69/VP cells formed metastases mainly in systemic lymph nodes and the liver, whereas RERF-LC-AI cells formed metastases mainly in the liver and kidneys, with only a few in lymph nodes. A histopathological study showed that the metastatic colonies consisted of cancer cells. The numbers of metastatic colonies formed by the 2 cell lines increased with the number of cells inoculated. TM-beta 1 treatment of SCID mice efficiently removed NK cells from peripheral blood for at least 6 weeks, whereas, after treatment of the mice with anti-asialo GM1 serum, NK cells were recovered within 9 days. These findings suggest that NK-cell-depleted SCID mice may be useful as a model in biological and pre-clinical studies on metastasis of human lung cancer.

  10. Pathway Analysis and Modeling of the Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells into Hepatocyte-like Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalaki, Andriani; Jozefczuk, Justyna; Lehrach, Hans; Adjaye, James; Wierling, Christoph

    2011-06-01

    A more detailed understanding of the differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells can help to improve therapies for liver diseases, like steatohepatitis. In this work we used microarray-based expression data to analyze the in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into hepatocytes. Pathway analysis has been carried out on gene expression data of different stages of the differentiation process from embryonic stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells via definitive endoderm and hepatic endoderm. Based on pathway analysis we identified signaling pathways, like the GPCR signaling pathway as well as FOXA2 regulatory networks. Based on these highly enriched pathways we constructed a model prototype to better understand and study the differentiation of stem cells into hepatocytes.

  11. Cortical Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Cells for In Vitro Modeling of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Saurat, Nathalie G; Livesey, Frederick J; Moore, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell models of Alzheimer's disease provide an opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying disease pathology at a resolution that is not possible in animal models. Furthermore, the ability to reprogram patient somatic cells to a pluripotent state ensures that the disease can be investigated in the correct genetic context. Here, we describe the directed differentiation of human pluripotent cells to cortical progenitors by recapitulating key developmental signaling events in vitro. Over a timeframe that mirrors human development, these progenitors give rise to functional lower and upper layer neurons. We also describe biochemical and imaging based methods to analyse key APP and Tau phenotypes in neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells from individuals with either monogenic familial Alzheimer's disease or Down's syndrome.

  12. Characterization of Human Neural Progenitor Cell Models for Developmental Neurotoxicity Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current testing methods for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) make evaluation of the effects of large numbers of chemicals impractical and prohibitively expensive. As such, we are evaluating two different human neural progenitor cell (hNPC) models for their utility in screens for...

  13. Notch Signaling and Schwann Cell Transformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    MPNSTs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Tom R. Kadesch, Ph.D...Signaling and Schwann Cell Tranformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs 6. AUTHOR(S) Tom R. Kadesch, Ph.D. W81XWH-04-1...the malignant transformation of neurofibromas to MPNSTs in patients with NF1. Our previous work has shown that constitutive expression of Notch can

  14. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sandra; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Dollinger, Matthias; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Christ, Bruno

    2014-08-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver.

  15. Modeling human development and disease in pluripotent stem cell-derived gastric organoids

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Kyle W.; Catá, Emily M.; Crawford, Calyn M.; Sinagoga, Katie L.; Schumacher, Michael; Rockich, Briana E.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Mayhew, Christopher N.; Spence, Jason R.; Zavros, Yana; Wells, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric diseases, including peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, affect 10% of the world’s population and are largely due to chronic H. pylori infection1–3. Species differences in embryonic development and architecture of the adult stomach make animal models suboptimal for studying human stomach organogenesis and pathogenesis4, and there is no experimental model of normal human gastric mucosa. Here we report the de novo generation of three-dimensional human gastric tissue in vitro through the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We identified that temporal manipulation of the FGF, WNT, BMP, retinoic acid and EGF signaling pathways and three-dimensional growth are sufficient to generate human gastric organoids (hGOs). Developing hGOs progressed through molecular and morphogenetic stages that were nearly identical to the developing antrum of the mouse stomach. Organoids formed primitive gastric gland- and pit-like domains, proliferative zones containing LGR5-expressing cells, surface and antral mucous cells, and a diversity of gastric endocrine cells. We used hGO cultures to identify novel signaling mechanisms that regulate early endoderm patterning and gastric endocrine cell differentiation upstream of the transcription factor NEUROG3. Using hGOs to model pathogenesis of human disease, we found that H. pylori infection resulted in rapid association of the virulence factor CagA with the c-Met receptor, activation of signaling and induction of epithelial proliferation. Together, these studies describe a novel and robust in vitro system for elucidating the mechanisms underlying human stomach development and disease. PMID:25363776

  16. Cell-free transmission of human adenovirus by passive mass transfer in cell culture simulated in a computer model.

    PubMed

    Yakimovich, Artur; Gumpert, Heidi; Burckhardt, Christoph J; Lütschg, Verena A; Jurgeit, Andreas; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Greber, Urs F

    2012-09-01

    Viruses spread between cells, tissues, and organisms by cell-free and cell-cell transmissions. Both mechanisms enhance disease development, but it is difficult to distinguish between them. Here, we analyzed the transmission mode of human adenovirus (HAdV) in monolayers of epithelial cells by wet laboratory experimentation and a computer simulation. Using live-cell fluorescence microscopy and replication-competent HAdV2 expressing green fluorescent protein, we found that the spread of infection invariably occurred after cell lysis. It was affected by convection and blocked by neutralizing antibodies but was independent of second-round infections. If cells were overlaid with agarose, convection was blocked and round plaques developed around lytic infected cells. Infected cells that did not lyse did not give rise to plaques, highlighting the importance of cell-free transmission. Key parameters for cell-free virus transmission were the time from infection to lysis, the dose of free viruses determining infection probability, and the diffusion of single HAdV particles in aqueous medium. With these parameters, we developed an in silico model using multiscale hybrid dynamics, cellular automata, and particle strength exchange. This so-called white box model is based on experimentally determined parameters and reproduces viral infection spreading as a function of the local concentration of free viruses. These analyses imply that the extent of lytic infections can be determined by either direct plaque assays or can be predicted by calculations of virus diffusion constants and modeling.

  17. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34+ human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary. PMID:27034390

  18. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary.

  19. Alzheimer's disease modeling: ups, downs, and perspectives for human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wojda, Urszula; Kuznicki, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Major breakthroughs are required to win the war against the increasing threat of Alzheimer's disease. Until now, however, despite enormous efforts and funds, effective therapies are lacking, and adequate models for drug validation are still unavailable. In this article, we review the available animal and cellular models of different features of human Alzheimer's disease and critically evaluate their usefulness for understanding the mechanisms of the disease. The majority of the presently used models are based on the amyloid-β and hyperphosphorylated tau hypothesis, which resembles features of familial Alzheimer's disease. Unfortunately, these models offer limited help for understanding the pathomechanisms of the early stages of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Thus, new models are needed to discover ways to treat or delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease, and we discuss the prospects for such desperately needed models, including human induced pluripotent stem cells and in silico brain models.

  20. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes Afford New Opportunities in Inherited Cardiovascular Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Bayzigitov, Daniel R.; Medvedev, Sergey P.; Dementyeva, Elena V.; Bayramova, Sevda A.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Karaskov, Alexander M.; Zakian, Suren M.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis are required to create more effective and safer methods of their therapy. The studies can be carried out only when model systems that fully recapitulate pathological phenotype seen in patients are used. Application of laboratory animals for cardiovascular disease modeling is limited because of physiological differences with humans. Since discovery of induced pluripotency generating induced pluripotent stem cells has become a breakthrough technology in human disease modeling. In this review, we discuss a progress that has been made in modeling inherited arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies, studying molecular mechanisms of the diseases, and searching for and testing drug compounds using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. PMID:27110425

  1. Human induced pluripotent stem cells for monogenic disease modelling and therapy.

    PubMed

    Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Valentina Rosa; Murdocca, Michela; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-04-26

    Recent and advanced protocols are now available to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from patients affected by genetic diseases. No curative treatments are available for many of these diseases; thus, hiPSCs represent a major impact on patient' health. hiPSCs represent a valid model for the in vitro study of monogenic diseases, together with a better comprehension of the pathogenic mechanisms of the pathology, for both cell and gene therapy protocol applications. Moreover, these pluripotent cells represent a good opportunity to test innovative pharmacological treatments focused on evaluating the efficacy and toxicity of novel drugs. Today, innovative gene therapy protocols, especially gene editing-based, are being developed, allowing the use of these cells not only as in vitro disease models but also as an unlimited source of cells useful for tissue regeneration and regenerative medicine, eluding ethical and immune rejection problems. In this review, we will provide an up-to-date of modelling monogenic disease by using hiPSCs and the ultimate applications of these in vitro models for cell therapy. We consider and summarize some peculiar aspects such as the type of parental cells used for reprogramming, the methods currently used to induce the transcription of the reprogramming factors, and the type of iPSC-derived differentiated cells, relating them to the genetic basis of diseases and to their inheritance model.

  2. Human induced pluripotent stem cells for monogenic disease modelling and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Valentina Rosa; Murdocca, Michela; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Recent and advanced protocols are now available to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from patients affected by genetic diseases. No curative treatments are available for many of these diseases; thus, hiPSCs represent a major impact on patient’ health. hiPSCs represent a valid model for the in vitro study of monogenic diseases, together with a better comprehension of the pathogenic mechanisms of the pathology, for both cell and gene therapy protocol applications. Moreover, these pluripotent cells represent a good opportunity to test innovative pharmacological treatments focused on evaluating the efficacy and toxicity of novel drugs. Today, innovative gene therapy protocols, especially gene editing-based, are being developed, allowing the use of these cells not only as in vitro disease models but also as an unlimited source of cells useful for tissue regeneration and regenerative medicine, eluding ethical and immune rejection problems. In this review, we will provide an up-to-date of modelling monogenic disease by using hiPSCs and the ultimate applications of these in vitro models for cell therapy. We consider and summarize some peculiar aspects such as the type of parental cells used for reprogramming, the methods currently used to induce the transcription of the reprogramming factors, and the type of iPSC-derived differentiated cells, relating them to the genetic basis of diseases and to their inheritance model. PMID:27114745

  3. Use of human stem cells in Huntington disease modeling and translational research.

    PubMed

    Golas, Monika M; Sander, Bjoern

    2016-04-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by an extended CAG repeat in exon 1 of the gene that encodes the huntingtin (HTT) protein. HD pathology involves a loss of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and progressive neurodegeneration affects the striatum and other brain regions. Because HTT is involved in multiple cellular processes, the molecular mechanisms of HD pathogenesis should be investigated on multiple levels. On the cellular level, in vitro stem cell models, such as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from HD patients and HD embryonic stem cells (ESCs), have yielded progress. Approaches to differentiate functional MSNs from ESCs, iPSCs, and neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) have been established, enabling MSN differentiation to be studied and disease phenotypes to be recapitulated. Isolation of target stem cells and precursor cells may also provide a resource for grafting. In animal models, transplantation of striatal precursors differentiated in vitro to the striatum has been reported to improve disease phenotype. Initial clinical trials examining intrastriatal transplantation of fetal neural tissue suggest a more favorable clinical course in a subset of HD patients, though shortcomings persist. Here, we review recent advances in the development of cellular HD models and approaches aimed at cell regeneration with human stem cells. We also describe how genome editing tools could be used to correct the HTT mutation in patient-specific stem cells. Finally, we discuss the potential and the remaining challenges of stem cell-based approaches in HD research and therapy development.

  4. Recreating the Cardiac Microenvironment in Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Human Physiology and Disease.

    PubMed

    Atmanli, Ayhan; Domian, Ibrahim John

    2016-12-19

    The advent of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) biology has opened unprecedented opportunities for the use of tissue engineering to generate human cardiac tissue for in vitro study. Engineering cardiac constructs that recapitulate human development and disease requires faithful recreation of the cardiac niche in vitro. Here we discuss recent progress in translating the in vivo cardiac microenvironment into PSC models of the human heart. We review three key physiologic features required to recreate the cardiac niche and facilitate normal cardiac differentiation and maturation: the biochemical, biophysical, and bioelectrical signaling cues. Finally, we discuss key barriers that must be overcome to fulfill the promise of stem cell biology in preclinical applications and ultimately in clinical practice.

  5. Follicular Helper CD4+ T Cells in Human Neuroautoimmune Diseases and Their Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xueli; Lin, Chenhong; Han, Jinming; Jiang, Xinmei; Zhu, Jie; Jin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Follicular helper CD4(+) T (TFH) cells play a fundamental role in humoral immunity deriving from their ability to provide help for germinal center (GC) formation, B cell differentiation into plasma cells and memory cells, and antibody production in secondary lymphoid tissues. TFH cells can be identified by a combination of markers, including the chemokine receptor CXCR5, costimulatory molecules ICOS and PD-1, transcription repressor Bcl-6, and cytokine IL-21. It is difficult and impossible to get access to secondary lymphoid tissues in humans, so studies are usually performed with human peripheral blood samples as circulating counterparts of tissue TFH cells. A balance of TFH cell generation and function is critical for protective antibody response, whereas overactivation of TFH cells or overexpression of TFH-associated molecules may result in autoimmune diseases. Emerging data have shown that TFH cells and TFH-associated molecules may be involved in the pathogenesis of neuroautoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS), neuromyelitis optica (NMO)/neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD), and myasthenia gravis (MG). This review summarizes the features of TFH cells, including their development, function, and roles as well as TFH-associated molecules in neuroautoimmune diseases and their animal models.

  6. Effect of human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on cerebral ischemic volume‐controlled photothrombotic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun‐Kyong; Urnukhsaikhan, Enerelt; Yoon, Hee‐Hoon; Seo, Young‐Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Various animal models of stroke have been developed to simulate the human stroke with the development of the ischemic method facilitates preclinical stroke research. The photothrombotic ischemia model, based on the intravascular photochemical reaction, is widely used for in vivo studies. However, this study has limitations, which generated a relatively small‐sized infarction model on superficial cortex compared to that of the MCAO stroke model. In this study, the photothorombosis mouse model is adapted and the optimum conditions for generation of cell death and deficits with high reproducibility is determined. The extent of damage within the cortex was assessed by infarct volume and cellular/behavioral analyses. In this model, the neural cell death and inflammatory responses is detected; moreover, the degree of behavioral impairment is correlated with the brain infarct volume. Further, to enhance the understanding of neural repair, the effect of neural differentiation by transplantation of human bone marrow‐derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM‐MSCs) is analyzed. The authors demonstrated that transplantation of BM‐MSCs promoted the neural differentiation and behavioral performance in their photothrombosis model. Therefore, this research was meaningful to provide a stable animal model of stroke with low variability. Moreover, this model will facilitate development of novel MSC‐based therapeutics for stroke. PMID:27440447

  7. Neuro-immune interactions of neural stem cell transplants: From animal disease models to human trials

    PubMed Central

    Cossetti, Chiara; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell technology is a promising branch of regenerative medicine that is aimed at developing new approaches for the treatment of severely debilitating human diseases, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Despite the increasing understanding of the mechanisms governing their biology, the application of stem cell therapeutics remains challenging. The initial idea that stem cell transplants work in vivo via the replacement of endogenous cells lost or damaged owing to disease has been challenged by accumulating evidence of their therapeutic plasticity. This new concept covers the remarkable immune regulatory and tissue trophic effects that transplanted stem cells exert at the level of the neural microenvironment to promote tissue healing via combination of immune modulatory and tissue protective actions, while retaining predominantly undifferentiated features. Among a number of promising candidate stem cell sources, neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are under extensive investigation with regard to their therapeutic plasticity after transplantation. The significant impact in vivo of experimental NPC therapies in animal models of inflammatory CNS diseases has raised great expectations that these stem cells, or the manipulation of the mechanisms behind their therapeutic impact, could soon be translated to human studies. This review aims to provide an update on the most recent evidence of therapeutically-relevant neuroimmune interactions following NPC transplants in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral stroke and traumas of the spinal cord, and consideration of the forthcoming challenges related to the early translation of some of these exciting experimental outcomes into clinical medicines. PMID:23507035

  8. Neuro-immune interactions of neural stem cell transplants: from animal disease models to human trials.

    PubMed

    Giusto, Elena; Donegà, Matteo; Cossetti, Chiara; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    Stem cell technology is a promising branch of regenerative medicine that is aimed at developing new approaches for the treatment of severely debilitating human diseases, including those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Despite the increasing understanding of the mechanisms governing their biology, the application of stem cell therapeutics remains challenging. The initial idea that stem cell transplants work in vivo via the replacement of endogenous cells lost or damaged owing to disease has been challenged by accumulating evidence of their therapeutic plasticity. This new concept covers the remarkable immune regulatory and tissue trophic effects that transplanted stem cells exert at the level of the neural microenvironment to promote tissue healing via combination of immune modulatory and tissue protective actions, while retaining predominantly undifferentiated features. Among a number of promising candidate stem cell sources, neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are under extensive investigation with regard to their therapeutic plasticity after transplantation. The significant impact in vivo of experimental NPC therapies in animal models of inflammatory CNS diseases has raised great expectations that these stem cells, or the manipulation of the mechanisms behind their therapeutic impact, could soon be translated to human studies. This review aims to provide an update on the most recent evidence of therapeutically-relevant neuro-immune interactions following NPC transplants in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral stroke and traumas of the spinal cord, and consideration of the forthcoming challenges related to the early translation of some of these exciting experimental outcomes into clinical medicines.

  9. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Restore Function in a Human Cell Loss Model of Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Hassan, Diala W; Li, Xinbo; Ryan, Eileen I; Acott, Ted S; Kelley, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Normally, trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelial cells within the aqueous humor outflow pathway maintain intraocular pressure within a narrow safe range. Elevation in intraocular pressure, because of the loss of homeostatic regulation by these outflow pathway cells, is the primary risk factor for vision loss due to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. A notable feature associated with glaucoma is outflow pathway cell loss. Using controlled cell loss in ex vivo perfused human outflow pathway organ culture, we developed compelling experimental evidence that this level of cell loss compromises intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This function was restored by repopulation of the model with fresh TM cells. We then differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and used them to repopulate this cell depletion model. These differentiated cells (TM-like iPSCs) became similar to TM cells in both morphology and expression patterns. When transplanted, they were able to fully restore intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This successful transplantation of TM-like iPSCs establishes the conceptual feasibility of using autologous stem cells to restore intraocular pressure regulatory function in open-angle glaucoma patients, providing a novel alternative treatment option. Stem Cells 2015;33:751–761 PMID:25377070

  10. A human breast cell model of pre-invasive to invasive transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Lee, Sun-Young; Rozenberg, Gabriela I.; Chin, Koei; Myers, Connie A.; Bascom, Jamie L.; Mott, Joni D.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Grate, Leslie R.; Mian, I. Saira; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Jensen, Roy A.; Idowu, Michael O.; Chen, Fanqing; Chen, David J.; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-03-10

    A crucial step in human breast cancer progression is the acquisition of invasiveness. There is a distinct lack of human cell culture models to study the transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype as it may occur 'spontaneously' in vivo. To delineate molecular alterations important for this transition, we isolated human breast epithelial cell lines that showed partial loss of tissue polarity in three-dimensional reconstituted-basement membrane cultures. These cells remained non-invasive; however, unlike their non-malignant counterparts, they exhibited a high propensity to acquire invasiveness through basement membrane in culture. The genomic aberrations and gene expression profiles of the cells in this model showed a high degree of similarity to primary breast tumor profiles. The xenograft tumors formed by the cell lines in three different microenvironments in nude mice displayed metaplastic phenotypes, including squamous and basal characteristics, with invasive cells exhibiting features of higher grade tumors. To find functionally significant changes in transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype, we performed attribute profile clustering analysis on the list of genes differentially expressed between pre-invasive and invasive cells. We found integral membrane proteins, transcription factors, kinases, transport molecules, and chemokines to be highly represented. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9,-13,-15,-17 was up regulated in the invasive cells. Using siRNA based approaches, we found these MMPs to be required for the invasive phenotype. This model provides a new tool for dissection of mechanisms by which pre-invasive breast cells could acquire invasiveness in a metaplastic context.

  11. Lentiviral-Transduced Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Persistently Express Therapeutic Levels of Enzyme in a Xenotransplantation Model of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Meyerrose, Todd E.; Roberts, Marie; Ohlemiller, Kevin K.; Vogler, Carole A.; Wirthlin, Louisa; Nolta, Jan A.; Sands, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising platform for cell- and gene-based treatment of inherited and acquired disorders. We recently showed that human MSCs distribute widely in a murine xenotransplantation model. In the current study, we have determined the distribution, persistence, and ability of lentivirally transduced human MSCs to express therapeutic levels of enzyme in a xenotransplantation model of human disease (nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mucopolysaccharidosis type VII [NOD-SCID MPSVII]). Primary human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral vector expressing either enhanced green fluorescent protein or the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (MSCs-GUSB). Lentiviral transduction did not affect any in vitro parameters of MSC function or potency. One million cells from each population were transplanted intraperitoneally into separate groups of neonatal NOD-SCID MPSVII mice. Transduced MSCs persisted in the animals that underwent transplantation, and comparable numbers of donor MSCs were detected at 2 and 4 months after transplantation in multiple organs. MSCs-GUSB expressed therapeutic levels of protein in the recipients, raising circulating serum levels of GUSB to nearly 40% of normal. This level of circulating enzyme was sufficient to normalize the secondary elevation of other lysosomal enzymes and reduce lysosomal distention in several tissues. In addition, at least one physiologic marker of disease, retinal function, was normalized following transplantation of MSCs-GUSB. These data provide evidence that transduced human MSCs retain their normal trafficking ability in vivo and persist for at least 4 months, delivering therapeutic levels of protein in an authentic xenotransplantation model of human disease. PMID:18436861

  12. Human mesenchymal stromal cells exert HGF dependent cytoprotective effects in a human relevant pre-clinical model of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Kennelly, Helen; Mahon, Bernard P.; English, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have potent immunomodulatory and tissue reparative properties, which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as COPD. This study examined the mechanisms by which human MSCs protect against elastase induced emphysema. Using a novel human relevant pre-clinical model of emphysema the efficacy of human MSC therapy and optimal cell dose were investigated. Protective effects were examined in the lung through histological examination. Further in vivo experiments examined the reparative abilities of MSCs after tissue damage was established and the role played by soluble factors secreted by MSCs. The mechanism of MSC action was determined in using shRNA gene knockdown. Human MSC therapy and MSC conditioned media exerted significant cytoprotective effects when administered early at the onset of the disease. These protective effects were due to significant anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic mechanisms, mediated in part through MSC production of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). When MSC administration was delayed, significant protection of the lung architecture was observed but this was less extensive. MSC cell therapy was more effective than MSC conditioned medium in this emphysema model. PMID:27922052

  13. Challenges of culturing human norovirus in three-dimensional organoid intestinal cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Papafragkou, Efstathia; Hewitt, Joanne; Park, Geun Woo; Greening, Gail; Vinjé, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Human noroviruses are the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Recently, cell culture systems have been described using either human embryonic intestinal epithelial cells (Int-407) or human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2) growing on collagen-I porous micro carrier beads in a rotating bioreactor under conditions of physiological fluid shear. Here, we describe the efforts from two independent laboratories to implement this three dimensional (3D) cell culture system for the replication of norovirus. Int-407 and Caco-2 were grown in a rotating bioreactor for up to 28 days. Prior to infection, cells were screened for the presence of microvilli by electron microscopy and stained for junction proteins (zonula occludens-1, claudin-1, and β-catenin). Differentiated 3D cells were transferred to 24-well plates and infected with bacteria-free filtrates of various norovirus genotypes (GI.1, GI.3, GI.8, GII.2, GII.4, GII.7, and GII.8). At 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h post inoculation, viral RNA from both cells and supernatants were collected and analyzed for norovirus RNA by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Despite observations of high expression of junction proteins and microvilli development in stained thin sections, our data suggest no significant increase in viral titer based on norovirus RNA copy number during the first 48 h after inoculation for the different samples and virus culture conditions tested. Our combined efforts demonstrate that 3D cell culture models using Int-407 or Caco-2 cells do not support norovirus replication and highlight the complexity and difficulty of developing a reproducible in vitro cell culture system for human norovirus.

  14. Generation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells to model spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xia, Guangbin; Santostefano, Katherine; Hamazaki, Takashi; Liu, Jilin; Subramony, S H; Terada, Naohiro; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2013-10-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is caused by triple nucleotide repeat (CAG) expansion in the coding region of the ATAXN2 gene on chromosome 12, which produces an elongated, toxic polyglutamine tract, leading to Purkinje cell loss. There is currently no effective therapy. One of the main obstacles that hampers therapeutic development is lack of an ideal disease model. In this study, we have generated and characterized SCA2-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines as an in vitro cell model. Dermal fibroblasts (FBs) were harvested from primary cultures of skin explants obtained from a SCA2 subject and a healthy subject. For reprogramming, hOct4, hSox2, hKlf4, and hc-Myc were transduced to passage-3 FBs by retroviral infection. Both SCA2 iPS and control iPS cells were successfully generated and showed typical stem cell growth patterns with normal karyotype. All iPS cell lines expressed stem cell markers and differentiated in vitro into cells from three embryonic germ layers. Upon in vitro neural differentiation, SCA2 iPS cells showed abnormality in neural rosette formation but successfully differentiated into neural stem cells (NSCs) and subsequent neural cells. SCA2 and normal FBs showed a comparable level of ataxin-2 expression; whereas SCA2 NSCs showed less ataxin-2 expression than normal NSCs and SCA2 FBs. Within the neural lineage, neurons had the most abundant expression of ataxin-2. Time-lapsed neural growth assay indicated terminally differentiated SCA2 neural cells were short-lived compared with control neural cells. The expanded CAG repeats of SCA2 were stable throughout reprogramming and neural differentiation. In conclusion, we have established the first disease-specific human SCA2 iPS cell line. These mutant iPS cells have the potential for neural differentiation. These differentiated neural cells harboring mutations are invaluable for the study of SCA2 pathogenesis and therapeutic drug development.

  15. Modelling human embryoid body cell adhesion to a combinatorial library of polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Epa, V Chandana; Yang, Jing; Mei, Ying; Hook, Andrew L; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Winkler, David A

    2012-09-18

    Designing materials to control biology is an intense focus of biomaterials and regenerative medicine research. Discovering and designing materials with appropriate biological compatibility or active control of cells and tissues is being increasingly undertaken using high throughput synthesis and assessment methods. We report a relatively simple but powerful machine-learning method of generating models that link microscopic or molecular properties of polymers or other materials to their biological effects. We illustrate the potential of these methods by developing the first robust, predictive, quantitative, and purely computational models of adhesion of human embryonic stem cell embryoid bodies (hEB) to the surfaces of a 496-member polymer micro array library.

  16. Modelling human embryoid body cell adhesion to a combinatorial library of polymer surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Epa, V. Chandana; Yang, Jing; Mei, Ying; Hook, Andrew L.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Davies, Martyn C.; Alexander, Morgan R.; Winkler, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Designing materials to control biology is an intense focus of biomaterials and regenerative medicine research. Discovering and designing materials with appropriate biological compatibility or active control of cells and tissues is being increasingly undertaken using high throughput synthesis and assessment methods. We report a relatively simple but powerful machine-learning method of generating models that link microscopic or molecular properties of polymers or other materials to their biological effects. We illustrate the potential of these methods by developing the first robust, predictive, quantitative, and purely computational models of adhesion of human embryonic stem cell embryoid bodies (hEB) to the surfaces of a 496-member polymer micro array library. PMID:24092955

  17. Molecular analyses of neurogenic defects in a human pluripotent stem cell model of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Michael J; Nazor, Kristopher L; Tran, Ha T; Szücs, Attila; Lynch, Candace L; Paredes, Ryder; Tassone, Flora; Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Hagerman, Randi J; Loring, Jeanne F

    2017-03-01

    New research suggests that common pathways are altered in many neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder; however, little is known about early molecular events that contribute to the pathology of these diseases. The study of monogenic, neurodevelopmental disorders with a high incidence of autistic behaviours, such as fragile X syndrome, has the potential to identify genes and pathways that are dysregulated in autism spectrum disorder as well as fragile X syndrome. In vitro generation of human disease-relevant cell types provides the ability to investigate aspects of disease that are impossible to study in patients or animal models. Differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells recapitulates development of the neocortex, an area affected in both fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. We have generated induced human pluripotent stem cells from several individuals clinically diagnosed with fragile X syndrome and autism spectrum disorder. When differentiated to dorsal forebrain cell fates, our fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cell lines exhibited reproducible aberrant neurogenic phenotypes. Using global gene expression and DNA methylation profiling, we have analysed the early stages of neurogenesis in fragile X syndrome human pluripotent stem cells. We discovered aberrant DNA methylation patterns at specific genomic regions in fragile X syndrome cells, and identified dysregulated gene- and network-level correlates of fragile X syndrome that are associated with developmental signalling, cell migration, and neuronal maturation. Integration of our gene expression and epigenetic analysis identified altered epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation of a distinct set of genes in fragile X syndrome. These fragile X syndrome-aberrant networks are significantly enriched for genes associated with autism spectrum disorder, giving support to the idea that underlying similarities exist among these neurodevelopmental diseases.

  18. Visualizing tropoelastin in a long-term human elastic fibre cell culture model

    PubMed Central

    Halm, M.; Schenke-Layland, K.; Jaspers, S.; Wenck, H.; Fischer, F.

    2016-01-01

    Elastin is an essential protein found in a variety of tissues where resilience and flexibility are needed, such as the skin and the heart. When aiming to engineer suitable implants, elastic fibres are needed to allow adequate tissue renewal. However, the visualization of human elastogenesis remains in the dark. To date, the visualization of human tropoelastin (TE) production in a human cell context and its fibre assembly under live cell conditions has not been achieved. Here, we present a long-term cell culture model of human dermal fibroblasts expressing fluorescence-labelled human TE. We employed a lentiviral system to stably overexpress Citrine-labelled TE to build a fluorescent fibre network. Using immunofluorescence, we confirmed the functionality of the Citrine-tagged TE. Furthermore, we visualized the fibre assembly over the course of several days using confocal microscopy. Applying super resolution microscopy, we were able to investigate the inner structure of the elastin–fibrillin-1 fibre network. Future investigations will allow the tracking of TE produced under various conditions. In tissue engineering applications the fluorescent fibre network can be visualized under various conditions or it serves as a tool for investigating fibre degradation processes in disease-in-a-dish-models. PMID:26842906

  19. Generation of fluorescently labeled cell lines, C3A hepatoma cells, and human adult skin fibroblasts to study coculture models.

    PubMed

    Samluk, Anna; Zakrzewska, Karolina Ewa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2013-07-01

    Hepatic/nonhepatic cell cocultures are widely used in studies on the role of homo- and heterotypic interactions in liver physiology and pathophysiology. In this article, for the first time, establishment of the coculture model employing hepatoma C3A cells and human skin fibroblasts, stably expressing fluorescent markers, is described. Suitability of the model in studying coculture conditions using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry was examined. C3A cells spontaneously formed island-like growth patterns surrounded by fibroblasts. The "islands" size and resulting intensity of the homo- and heterotypic interactions can easily be tuned by applying various plated cells ratios. We examined the capability of the hepatoma cells to produce albumin in hepatic/nonhepatic cell cocultures. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests showed that greater number of fibroblasts in coculture, resulting in smaller sizes of hepatoma "islands," and thus, a larger heterotypic interface, promoted higher albumin synthesis. The use of fluorescently labeled cells in flow cytometry measurements enabled us to separately gate two cell populations and to evaluate protein expression only in/on cells of interest. Flow cytometry confirmed ELISA results indicating the highest albumin production in hepatoma cells cocultured with the greatest number of fibroblasts and the inhibited protein synthesis in coculture with osteosarcoma cells.

  20. Induced pluripotent stem cells restore function in a human cell loss model of open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Abu-Hassan, Diala W; Li, Xinbo; Ryan, Eileen I; Acott, Ted S; Kelley, Mary J

    2015-03-01

    Normally, trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelial cells within the aqueous humor outflow pathway maintain intraocular pressure within a narrow safe range. Elevation in intraocular pressure, because of the loss of homeostatic regulation by these outflow pathway cells, is the primary risk factor for vision loss due to glaucomatous optic neuropathy. A notable feature associated with glaucoma is outflow pathway cell loss. Using controlled cell loss in ex vivo perfused human outflow pathway organ culture, we developed compelling experimental evidence that this level of cell loss compromises intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This function was restored by repopulation of the model with fresh TM cells. We then differentiated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and used them to repopulate this cell depletion model. These differentiated cells (TM-like iPSCs) became similar to TM cells in both morphology and expression patterns. When transplanted, they were able to fully restore intraocular pressure homeostatic function. This successful transplantation of TM-like iPSCs establishes the conceptual feasibility of using autologous stem cells to restore intraocular pressure regulatory function in open-angle glaucoma patients, providing a novel alternative treatment option.

  1. Cancer stem cells from human breast tumors are involved in spontaneous metastases in orthotopic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiping; Patel, Manishkumar R.; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Patsialou, Antonia; Qian, Dalong; Lin, Jiahui; Wen, Susanna; Chang, Ya-Fang; Bachmann, Michael H.; Shimono, Yohei; Dalerba, Piero; Adorno, Maddalena; Lobo, Neethan; Bueno, Janet; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Goswami, Sumanta; Somlo, George; Condeelis, John; Contag, Christopher H.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Clarke, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    To examine the role of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in metastasis, we generated human-in-mouse breast cancer orthotopic models using patient tumor specimens, labeled with optical reporter fusion genes. These models recapitulate human cancer features not captured with previous models, including spontaneous metastasis in particular, and provide a useful platform for studies of breast tumor initiation and progression. With noninvasive imaging approaches, as few as 10 cells of stably labeled BCSCs could be tracked in vivo, enabling studies of early tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis. These advances in BCSC imaging revealed that CD44+ cells from both primary tumors and lung metastases are highly enriched for tumor-initiating cells. Our metastatic cancer models, combined with noninvasive imaging techniques, constitute an integrated approach that could be applied to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the dissemination of metastatic CSCs (MCSCs) and to explore therapeutic strategies targeting MCSCs in general or to evaluate individual patient tumor cells and predict response to therapy. PMID:20921380

  2. Human kidney cell reprogramming: applications for disease modeling and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Adam C; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-09-01

    The ability to reprogram fully differentiated cells into a pluripotent embryonic state, termed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), has been met with great excitement. iPSC technology has advanced the fundamental study of disease modeling with the potential for cell-replacement therapy, especially in the neuronal and cardiac fields. However, renal medicine as of yet has not benefited from similar advancements. This review summarizes the unique characteristics of iPSCs and their potential applications for modeling kidney disease. Pioneering such endeavors could yield constructs that recapitulate disease phenotypes, open avenues for more targeted drug development, and potentially serve as replenishable sources for replacement of kidney cells in the setting of human disease.

  3. Modeling the effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 on human cell growth.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Gemma M A; Shorten, Paul R; Wake, Graeme C; Guan, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) plays a key role in human growth and development. The interactions of IGF-1 with IGF-1 receptors and IGF-1 binding proteins (IGFBPs) regulate IGF-1 function. Recent research suggests that a metabolite of IGF-1, cyclo-glycyl-proline (cGP), has a role in regulating IGF-1 homeostasis. A component of this interaction is believed to be the competitive binding of IGF-1 and cGP to IGFBPs. In this paper we describe a mathematical model of the interaction between IGF-1 and cGP on human cell growth. The model can be used to understand the interaction between IGF-1, IGFBPs, cGP and IGF-1 receptors along with the kinetics of cell growth. An explicit model of the known interactions between IGF-1, cGP, IGFBPs, IGF-1 receptors explained a large portion of the variance in cell growth (R(2) = 0.83). An implicit model of the interactions between IGF-1, cGP, IGFBPs, IGF-1 receptors that included a hypothesized feedback of cGP on IGF-1 receptors explained nonlinear features of interaction between IGF-1 and cGP not described by the explicit model (R(2) = 0.84). The model also explained the effect of IGFBP antibody on the interaction between cGP and IGF-1 (R(2) = 0.78). This demonstrates that the competitive binding of IGF-1 and cGP to IGFBPs plays a large role in the interaction between IGF-1 and cGP, but that other factors potentially play a role in the interaction between cGP and IGF-1. These models can be used to predict the complex interaction between IGF-1 and cGP on human cell growth and form a basis for further research in this field.

  4. Urine-derived induced pluripotent stem cells as a modeling tool to study rare human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Summary Rare diseases with a low prevalence are a key public health issue because the causes of those diseases are difficult to determine and those diseases lack a clearly established or curative treatment. Thus, investigating the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathology of rare diseases and facilitating the development of novel therapies using disease models is crucial. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are well suited to modeling rare diseases since they have the capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency. In addition, iPSC technology provides a valuable tool to generate patient-specific iPSCs. These cells can be differentiated into cell types that have been affected by a disease. These cells would circumvent ethical concerns and avoid immunological rejection, so they could be used in cell replacement therapy or regenerative medicine. To date, human iPSCs could have been generated from multiple donor sources, such as skin, adipose tissue, and peripheral blood. However, these cells are obtained via invasive procedures. In contrast, several groups of researchers have found that urine may be a better source for producing iPSCs from normal individuals or patients. This review discusses urinary iPSC (UiPSC) as a candidate for modeling rare diseases. Cells obtained from urine have overwhelming advantages compared to other donor sources since they are safely, affordably, and frequently obtained and they are readily obtained from patients. The use of iPSC-based models is also discussed. UiPSCs may prove to be a key means of modeling rare diseases and they may facilitate the treatment of those diseases in the future. PMID:27672542

  5. Urine-derived induced pluripotent stem cells as a modeling tool to study rare human diseases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Han, Jinxiang

    2016-08-01

    Rare diseases with a low prevalence are a key public health issue because the causes of those diseases are difficult to determine and those diseases lack a clearly established or curative treatment. Thus, investigating the molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathology of rare diseases and facilitating the development of novel therapies using disease models is crucial. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are well suited to modeling rare diseases since they have the capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency. In addition, iPSC technology provides a valuable tool to generate patient-specific iPSCs. These cells can be differentiated into cell types that have been affected by a disease. These cells would circumvent ethical concerns and avoid immunological rejection, so they could be used in cell replacement therapy or regenerative medicine. To date, human iPSCs could have been generated from multiple donor sources, such as skin, adipose tissue, and peripheral blood. However, these cells are obtained via invasive procedures. In contrast, several groups of researchers have found that urine may be a better source for producing iPSCs from normal individuals or patients. This review discusses urinary iPSC (UiPSC) as a candidate for modeling rare diseases. Cells obtained from urine have overwhelming advantages compared to other donor sources since they are safely, affordably, and frequently obtained and they are readily obtained from patients. The use of iPSC-based models is also discussed. UiPSCs may prove to be a key means of modeling rare diseases and they may facilitate the treatment of those diseases in the future.

  6. A model of metabolic changes in respiration-deficient human cells.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, F Mathias

    2007-09-01

    Cells lacking aerobic metabolism because of damaged mtDNA accumulate in many postmitotic tissues in the course aging. Although being only a small fraction of cells, they might play a major role in oxidative stress affecting the whole body. However, it remains unclear how such cells, which are under normal circumstances dependent on aerobic metabolism, are able to survive for decades in vivo. Here a new model is presented that proposes a coexistence of anaerobic glycolysis and a partly reversed TCA cycle. Succinate plays a key role in the changed metabolic pathways because it has to be exported by the cell. This hypothesis supports the view that some respiration-deficient cells are able to survive permanently within the body and contribute to human aging.

  7. The therapeutic effects of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    PubMed

    Chang, Keun-A; Kim, Hee Jin; Joo, Yuyoung; Ha, Sungji; Suh, Yoo-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease, still lacking proper clinical treatment. Therefore, many researchers have focused on the possibility of therapeutic use of stem cells for AD. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from adipose tissue, are well known for their pluripotency and their ability to differentiate into multiple tissue types and have immune modulatory properties similar to those of MSCs from other origins. Because of their biological properties, ASCs can be considered for cell therapy and neuroregeneration. Our recent results clearly showed the therapeutic potential of these cells after transplantation into Tg2576 mice (an AD mouse model). Intravenously or intracerebrally transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) greatly improved the memory impairment and the neuropathology, suggesting that hASCs have a high therapeutic potential for AD.

  8. Standardized 3D Bioprinting of Soft Tissue Models with Human Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Rimann, Markus; Bono, Epifania; Annaheim, Helene; Bleisch, Matthias; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    Cells grown in 3D are more physiologically relevant than cells cultured in 2D. To use 3D models in substance testing and regenerative medicine, reproducibility and standardization are important. Bioprinting offers not only automated standardizable processes but also the production of complex tissue-like structures in an additive manner. We developed an all-in-one bioprinting solution to produce soft tissue models. The holistic approach included (1) a bioprinter in a sterile environment, (2) a light-induced bioink polymerization unit, (3) a user-friendly software, (4) the capability to print in standard labware for high-throughput screening, (5) cell-compatible inkjet-based printheads, (6) a cell-compatible ready-to-use BioInk, and (7) standard operating procedures. In a proof-of-concept study, skin as a reference soft tissue model was printed. To produce dermal equivalents, primary human dermal fibroblasts were printed in alternating layers with BioInk and cultured for up to 7 weeks. During long-term cultures, the models were remodeled and fully populated with viable and spreaded fibroblasts. Primary human dermal keratinocytes were seeded on top of dermal equivalents, and epidermis-like structures were formed as verified with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunostaining. However, a fully stratified epidermis was not achieved. Nevertheless, this is one of the first reports of an integrative bioprinting strategy for industrial routine application.

  9. A 3D human neural cell culture system for modeling Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; D’Avanzo, Carla; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Bylykbashi, Enjana; Washicosky, Kevin J.; Klee, Justin B.; Brüstle, Oliver; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell technologies have facilitated the development of human cellular disease models that can be used to study pathogenesis and test therapeutic candidates. These models hold promise for complex neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because existing animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate all aspects of pathology. We recently reported the characterization of a novel three-dimensional (3D) culture system that exhibits key events in AD pathogenesis, including extracellular aggregation of β-amyloid and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we provide instructions for the generation and analysis of 3D human neural cell cultures, including the production of genetically modified human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) with familial AD mutations, the differentiation of the hNPCs in a 3D matrix, and the analysis of AD pathogenesis. The 3D culture generation takes 1–2 days. The aggregation of β-amyloid is observed after 6-weeks of differentiation followed by robust tau pathology after 10–14 weeks. PMID:26068894

  10. A 3D human neural cell culture system for modeling Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; D'Avanzo, Carla; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Bylykbashi, Enjana; Washicosky, Kevin J; Klee, Justin B; Brüstle, Oliver; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-07-01

    Stem cell technologies have facilitated the development of human cellular disease models that can be used to study pathogenesis and test therapeutic candidates. These models hold promise for complex neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), because existing animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate all aspects of pathology. We recently reported the characterization of a novel 3D culture system that exhibits key events in AD pathogenesis, including extracellular aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we provide instructions for the generation and analysis of 3D human neural cell cultures, including the production of genetically modified human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) with familial AD mutations, the differentiation of the hNPCs in a 3D matrix and the analysis of AD pathogenesis. The 3D culture generation takes 1-2 d. The aggregation of Aβ is observed after 6 weeks of differentiation, followed by robust tau pathology after 10-14 weeks.

  11. Enhancement of zidovudine transfer to molt-4 cells, a human t-cell model, by dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Jun; Tomi, Masatoshi; Seki, Yoshiaki; Kose, Noriko; Sai, Yoshimichi; Nakashima, Emi

    2011-09-01

    A possible approach to improve antiretroviral therapy with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors is to enhance inhibitor delivery to CD4-positive T cells. We previously showed that dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) enhances zidovudine (AZT) transfer into syncytiotrophoblast. Here, we investigated whether DHEAS also enhances AZT transfer into a cellular model of human T lymphocytes, and whether AZT is taken up by a specific transport system. The effects of DHEAS and related compounds on the uptake of [(3) H]AZT and other nucleosides by Molt-4 cells (a model of human CD4-positive T cells) were measured. [(3) H]AZT uptake by Molt-4 cells was nitrobenzylthioinosine insensitive and pH dependent, and the uptake was significantly inhibited by 1 mM ethylisopropylamiloride. [(3) H]AZT uptake by Molt-4 cells was increased in the presence of DHEAS, whereas uptake of other nucleosides was reduced. Kinetic study revealed that the maximum uptake velocity (up to 30 min) was increased in the presence of DHEAS. The structural requirements for AZT uptake-enhancing activity were studied using structural analogues of DHEAS. Estrone-3-sulfate and 16α-hydroxy DHEAS also enhanced AZT uptake into Molt-4 cells. The use of uptake enhancers may be a good strategy to improve the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy.

  12. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake and transport in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability. In the present study, we measured the uptake and transport of various Se compounds in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. We found that two sources...

  13. In Vitro Modeling of RSV Infection and Cytopathogenesis in Well-Differentiated Human Primary Airway Epithelial Cells (WD-PAECs).

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Lindsay; Villenave, Remi; Guo-Parke, Hong; Douglas, Isobel; Shields, Michael D; Power, Ultan F

    2016-01-01

    The choice of model used to study human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is extremely important. RSV is a human pathogen that is exquisitely adapted to infection of human hosts. Rodent models, such as mice and cotton rats, are semi-permissive to RSV infection and do not faithfully reproduce hallmarks of RSV disease in humans. Furthermore, immortalized airway-derived cell lines, such as HEp-2, BEAS-2B, and A549 cells, are poorly representative of the complexity of the respiratory epithelium. The development of a well-differentiated primary pediatric airway epithelial cell models (WD-PAECs) allows us to simulate several hallmarks of RSV infection of infant airways. They therefore represent important additions to RSV pathogenesis modeling in human-relevant tissues. The following protocols describe how to culture and differentiate both bronchial and nasal primary pediatric airway epithelial cells and how to use these cultures to study RSV cytopathogenesis.

  14. Population based model of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation during endoderm induction.

    PubMed

    Task, Keith; Jaramillo, Maria; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which human embryonic stem cells (hESC) differentiate to endodermal lineage have not been extensively studied. Mathematical models can aid in the identification of mechanistic information. In this work we use a population-based modeling approach to understand the mechanism of endoderm induction in hESC, performed experimentally with exposure to Activin A and Activin A supplemented with growth factors (basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4)). The differentiating cell population is analyzed daily for cellular growth, cell death, and expression of the endoderm proteins Sox17 and CXCR4. The stochastic model starts with a population of undifferentiated cells, wherefrom it evolves in time by assigning each cell a propensity to proliferate, die and differentiate using certain user defined rules. Twelve alternate mechanisms which might describe the observed dynamics were simulated, and an ensemble parameter estimation was performed on each mechanism. A comparison of the quality of agreement of experimental data with simulations for several competing mechanisms led to the identification of one which adequately describes the observed dynamics under both induction conditions. The results indicate that hESC commitment to endoderm occurs through an intermediate mesendoderm germ layer which further differentiates into mesoderm and endoderm, and that during induction proliferation of the endoderm germ layer is promoted. Furthermore, our model suggests that CXCR4 is expressed in mesendoderm and endoderm, but is not expressed in mesoderm. Comparison between the two induction conditions indicates that supplementing FGF2 and BMP4 to Activin A enhances the kinetics of differentiation than Activin A alone. This mechanistic information can aid in the derivation of functional, mature cells from their progenitors. While applied to initial endoderm commitment of hESC, the model is general enough to be applicable either to a system of

  15. Cutaneous manifestations of human T cell leukemia virus type I infection in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M; Leno, M; Hubbard, B S; Kindt, T J

    1996-03-01

    Skin diseases ranging from infective dermatitis to cutaneous lymphoma have been associated with human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV) type I. A generalized exfoliative papillated dermatopathy occurred in a rabbit 20 months into a course of chronic HTLV-I infection. Biopsies revealed epidermotropic T cell infiltrates, including Sezary-like cells, that resulted in a pattern mimicking cutaneous T cell lymphoma. HTLV-I was isolated from affected skin, and virus expression was detected in cutaneous cultures. Sezary-like cells also occurred in circulation. Interleukin-2-independent lymphocyte cultures, established from blood exhibiting elevated CD8 T cell levels and CD25 expression, had polyclonal integration of provirus. The findings are similar to those in evolving adult T cell leukemia lymphoma and may represent a prelymphomatous change. The cutaneous lymphoproliferative lesion resulted from HTLV-I infection and further establishes the New Zealand White rabbit inoculated with the RH/K34 cell line as a suitable model for investigation of HTLV-I pathogenesis.

  16. Cardiomyopathy in a dish: using human inducible pluripotent stem cells to model inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Forum; Klaassen Kamdar, Andre; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Mary G; Garry, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathies, arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and other inherited forms of heart failure, represent a unique set of genetically defined cardiovascular disease processes. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms of these deadly forms of human heart disease has been challenging, but recent groundbreaking scientific advances in stem cell technology have allowed for the generation of patient-specific human inducible stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs). hiPSC-derived CMs retain the genetic blueprint of the patient, they can be maintained in culture, and they recapitulate the phenotypic characteristics of the disease in vitro, thus serving as a disease in a dish. This review provides an overview of in vitro modeling of inherited cardiomyopathies with the use of patient-specific hiPSC-derived CMs.

  17. Human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells as an in vitro model of human hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Mitani, Seiji; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Takayama, Kazuo; Tachibana, Masashi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Iijima, Sayuki; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    In order to understand the life cycle of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and to develop efficient anti-HBV drugs, a useful in vitro cell culture system which allows HBV infection and recapitulates virus-host interactions is essential; however, pre-existing in vitro HBV infection models are often problematic. Here, we examined the potential of human induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-HLCs) as an in vitro HBV infection model. Expression levels of several genes involved in HBV infection, including the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) gene, were gradually elevated as the differentiation status of human iPS cells proceeded to iPS-HLCs. The mRNA levels of these genes were comparable between primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and iPS-HLCs. Following inoculation with HBV, we found significant production of HBV proteins and viral RNAs in iPS-HLCs. The three major forms of the HBV genome were detected in iPS-HLCs by Southern blotting analysis. Anti-HBV agents entecavir and Myrcludex-B, which are a nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a synthetic pre-S1 peptide, respectively, significantly inhibited HBV infection in iPS-HLCs. These data demonstrate that iPS-HLCs can be used as a promising in vitro HBV infection model. PMID:28374759

  18. Effects of an antimalarial quinazoline derivative on human erythrocytes and on cell membrane molecular models.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Aguirre, Yareli; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Mendoza-Martínez, César; Sotomayor, Carlos Patricio; Aguilar, Luis Felipe; Villena, Fernando; Castillo, Ivan; Hernández, David J; Suwalsky, Mario

    2012-03-01

    Plasmodium, the parasite which causes malaria in humans multiplies in the liver and then infects circulating erythrocytes. Thus, the role of the erythrocyte cell membrane in antimalarial drug activity and resistance has key importance. The effects of the antiplasmodial N(6)-(4-methoxybenzyl)quinazoline-2,4,6-triamine (M4), and its inclusion complex (M4/HPβCD) with 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) on human erythrocytes and on cell membrane molecular models are herein reported. This work evidences that M4/HPβCD interacts with red cells as follows: a) in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies on human erythrocytes induced shape changes at a 10μM concentration; b) in isolated unsealed human erythrocyte membranes (IUM) a concentration as low as 1μM induced sharp DPH fluorescence anisotropy decrease whereas increasing concentrations produced a monotonically decrease of DPH fluorescence lifetime at 37°C; c) X-ray diffraction studies showed that 200μM induced a complete structural perturbation of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers whereas no significant effects were detected in dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) bilayers, classes of lipids present in the outer and inner monolayers of the human erythrocyte membrane, respectively; d) fluorescence spectroscopy data showed that increasing concentrations of the complex interacted with the deep hydrophobic core of DMPC large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) at 18°C. All these experiments are consistent with the insertion of M4/HPβCD in the outer monolayer of the human erythrocyte membrane; thus, it can be considered a promising and novel antimalarial agent.

  19. Antioxidant and Cytoprotective Activities of Fucus spiralis Seaweed on a Human Cell in Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Pinteus, Susete; Silva, Joana; Alves, Celso; Horta, André; Thomas, Olivier P.; Pedrosa, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Antioxidants play an important role as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) chelating agents and, therefore, the screening for potent antioxidants from natural sources as potential protective agents is of great relevance. The main aim of this study was to obtain antioxidant-enriched fractions from the common seaweed Fucus spiralis and evaluate their activity and efficiency in protecting human cells (MCF-7 cells) on an oxidative stress condition induced by H2O2. Five fractions, F1–F5, were obtained by reversed-phase vacuum liquid chromatography. F3, F4 and F5 revealed the highest phlorotannin content, also showing the strongest antioxidant effects. The cell death induced by H2O2 was reduced by all fractions following the potency order F4 > F2 > F3 > F5 > F1. Only fraction F4 completely inhibited the H2O2 effect. To understand the possible mechanisms of action of these fractions, the cellular production of H2O2, the mitochondrial membrane potential and the caspase 9 activity were studied. Fractions F3 and F4 presented the highest reduction on H2O2 cell production. All fractions decreased both caspase-9 activity and cell membrane depolarization (except F1). Taken all together, the edible F. spiralis reveal that they provide protection against oxidative stress induced by H2O2 on the human MCF-7 cellular model, probably acting as upstream blockers of apoptosis. PMID:28146076

  20. Antioxidant and Cytoprotective Activities of Fucus spiralis Seaweed on a Human Cell in Vitro Model.

    PubMed

    Pinteus, Susete; Silva, Joana; Alves, Celso; Horta, André; Thomas, Olivier P; Pedrosa, Rui

    2017-01-29

    Antioxidants play an important role as Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) chelating agents and, therefore, the screening for potent antioxidants from natural sources as potential protective agents is of great relevance. The main aim of this study was to obtain antioxidant-enriched fractions from the common seaweed Fucus spiralis and evaluate their activity and efficiency in protecting human cells (MCF-7 cells) on an oxidative stress condition induced by H₂O₂. Five fractions, F1-F5, were obtained by reversed-phase vacuum liquid chromatography. F3, F4 and F5 revealed the highest phlorotannin content, also showing the strongest antioxidant effects. The cell death induced by H₂O₂ was reduced by all fractions following the potency order F4 > F2 > F3 > F5 > F1. Only fraction F4 completely inhibited the H₂O₂ effect. To understand the possible mechanisms of action of these fractions, the cellular production of H₂O₂, the mitochondrial membrane potential and the caspase 9 activity were studied. Fractions F3 and F4 presented the highest reduction on H₂O₂ cell production. All fractions decreased both caspase-9 activity and cell membrane depolarization (except F1). Taken all together, the edible F. spiralis reveal that they provide protection against oxidative stress induced by H₂O₂ on the human MCF-7 cellular model, probably acting as upstream blockers of apoptosis.

  1. A model for neural development and treatment of Rett syndrome using human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Marchetto, Maria C N; Carromeu, Cassiano; Acab, Allan; Yu, Diana; Yeo, Gene W; Mu, Yangling; Chen, Gong; Gage, Fred H; Muotri, Alysson R

    2010-11-12

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental diseases in which different combinations of genetic mutations may contribute to the phenotype. Using Rett syndrome (RTT) as an ASD genetic model, we developed a culture system using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from RTT patients' fibroblasts. RTT patients' iPSCs are able to undergo X-inactivation and generate functional neurons. Neurons derived from RTT-iPSCs had fewer synapses, reduced spine density, smaller soma size, altered calcium signaling and electrophysiological defects when compared to controls. Our data uncovered early alterations in developing human RTT neurons. Finally, we used RTT neurons to test the effects of drugs in rescuing synaptic defects. Our data provide evidence of an unexplored developmental window, before disease onset, in RTT syndrome where potential therapies could be successfully employed. Our model recapitulates early stages of a human neurodevelopmental disease and represents a promising cellular tool for drug screening, diagnosis and personalized treatment.

  2. A model for neural development and treatment of Rett Syndrome using human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Marchetto, Maria C. N.; Carromeu, Cassiano; Acab, Allan; Yu, Diana; Yeo, Gene; Mu, Yangling; Chen, Gong; Gage, Fred H.; Muotri, Alysson R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are complex neurodevelopmental diseases in which different combinations of genetic mutations may contribute to the phenotype. Using Rett syndrome (RTT) as an ASD genetic model, we developed a culture system using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from RTT patients’ fibroblasts. RTT patients’ iPSCs are able to undergo X-inactivation and generate functional neurons. Neurons derived from RTT-iPSCs had fewer synapses, reduced spine density, smaller soma size, altered calcium signaling and electrophysiological defects when compared to controls. Our data uncovered early alterations in developing human RTT neurons. Finally, we used RTT neurons to test the effects of drugs in rescuing synaptic defects. Our data provide evidence of an unexplored developmental window, before disease onset, in RTT syndrome where potential therapies could be successfully employed. Our model recapitulates early stages of a human neurodevelopmental disease and represents a promising cellular tool for drug screening, diagnosis and personalized treatment. PMID:21074045

  3. A Model of Giant Vacuole Dynamics in Human Schlemm’s Canal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Simon, David; Reed, Ashley; Stamer, W. Daniel; Overby, Darryl R.

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous humour transport across the inner wall endothelium of Schlemm’s canal likely involves flow through giant vacuoles and pores, but the mechanics of how these structures form and how they influence the regulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) are not well understood. In this study, we developed an in vitro model of giant vacuole formation in human Schlemm’s canal endothelial cells (HSCECs) perfused in the basal-to-apical direction (i.e., the direction that flow crosses the inner wall in vivo) under controlled pressure drops (2 or 6 mmHg). The system was mounted on a confocal microscope for time-lapse en face imaging, and cells were stained with calcein, a fluorescent vital dye. At the onset of perfusion, elliptical void regions appeared within an otherwise uniformly stained cytoplasm, and 3-dimensional reconstructions revealed that these voids were dome-like outpouchings of the cell to form giant vacuole-like structures or GVLs that reproduced the classic “signet ring” appearance of true giant vacuoles. Increasing pressure drop from 2 to 6 mmHg increased GVL height (14 ± 4 vs. 21 ± 7 µm, p < 0.0001) and endothelial hydraulic conductivity (1.15 ± 0.04 vs. 2.11 ± 0.49 µL min−1 mmHg−1 cm−2; p < 0.001), but there was significant variability in the GVL response to pressure between cell lines isolated from different donors. During perfusion, GVLs were observed “migrating” and agglomerating about the cell layer and often collapsed despite maintaining the same pressure drop. GVL formation was also observed in human umbilical vein and porcine aortic endothelial cells, suggesting that giant vacuole formation is not a unique property of Schlemm’s canal cells. However, in these other cell types, GVLs were rarely observed “migrating” or contracting during perfusion, suggesting that Schlemm’s canal endothelial cells may be better adapted to withstand basal-to-apical directed pressure gradients. In conclusion, we have established an in vitro

  4. Complete suppression of in vivo growth of human leukemia cells by specific immunotoxins: nude mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, H.; Seon, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    In this study, immunotoxins containing monoclonal anti-human T-cell leukemia antibodies are shown to be capable of completely suppressing the tumor growth of human T-cell leukemia cells in vivo without any overt undersirable toxicity. These immunotoxins were prepared by conjugating ricin A chain (RA) with our monoclonal antibodies, SN1 and SN2, directed specifically to the human T-cell leukemia cell surface antigens TALLA and GP37, respectively. The authors have shown that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for human T-cell leukemia cells and do not react with various normal cells including normal T and B cells, thymocytes, and bone marrow cells. Ascitic and solid human T-cell leukemia cell tumors were generated in nude mice. The ascitic tumor was generated by transplanting Ichikawa cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell) i.p. into nude mice, whereas the solid tumor was generated by transplanting s.c. MOLT-4 cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell line) and x-irradiated human fibrosarcoma cells into x-irradiated nude mice. To investigate the efficacy of specific immunotoxins in suppression the in vivo growth of the ascitic tumor, they divided 40 nude mice that were injected with Ichikawa cells into four groups. None of the mice in group 4 that were treated with SN1-RA and SN2-RA showed any signs of a tumor or undesirable toxic effects for the 20 weeks that they were followed after the transplantation. Treatment with SN1-RA plus SN2-RA completely suppressed solid tumor growth in 4 of 10 nude mice carrying solid tumors and partially suppressed the tumor growth in the remaining 6 nude mice. These results strongly suggest that SN1-RA and SN2-RA may be useful for clinical treatment.

  5. Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) as Gene Carrier System for Rat Model of Human Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S.; Janic, Branislava; Iskander, A. S. M.; Shankar, Adarsh; Bhuiyan, Mohammed P. I.; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Jiang, Quan; Barton, Kenneth; Ali, Meser M.; Arbab, Ali S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to their unique property to migrate to pathological lesions, stem cells are used as a delivery vehicle for therapeutic genes to tumors, especially for glioma. It is critically important to track the movement, localization, engraftment efficiency and functional capability or expression of transgenes of selected cell populations following transplantation. The purposes of this study were to investigate whether 1) intravenously administered, genetically transformed cord blood derived EPCs can carry human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) to the sites of tumors in rat orthotopic model of human glioma and express transgene products, and 2) whether accumulation of these administered EPCs can be tracked by different in vivo imaging modalities. Methods and Results Collected EPCs were cultured and transduced to carry hNIS. Cellular viability, differential capacity and Tc-99m uptake were determined. Five to ten million EPCs were intravenously administered and Tc-99-SPECT images were acquired on day 8, to determine the accumulation of EPCs and expression of transgenes (increase activity of Tc-99m) in the tumors. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine endothelial cell markers and hNIS positive cells in the tumors. Transduced EPCs were also magnetically labeled and accumulation of cells was confirmed by MRI and histochemistry. SPECT analysis showed increased activity of Tc-99m in the tumors that received transduced EPCs, indicative of the expression of transgene (hNIS). Activity of Tc-99m in the tumors was also dependent on the number of administered transduced EPCs. MRI showed the accumulation of magnetically labeled EPCs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed iron and hNIS positive and, human CD31 and vWF positive cells in the tumors. Conclusion EPC was able to carry and express hNIS in glioma following IV administration. SPECT detected migration of EPCs and expression of the hNIS gene. EPCs can be used as gene carrier/delivery system for glioma therapy as

  6. Neuroprotective effect of a cell-free extract derived from human adipose stem cells in experimental stroke models.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Daejong; Chu, Kon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Ban, Jae-Jun; Park, Dong-Kyu; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Jung, Seungmoon; Yang, Hyunwoo; Kim, Byung Sun; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, So Hee; Kim, Jeong-Min; Won, Chong-Hyun; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2013-06-01

    A recent study suggested that a cell-free extract of human adipose stem cells (hASCs-E) has beneficial effects on neurological diseases by modulating the host environment. Here, we investigated the effects of hASCs-E in several experimental models of stroke in vitro (oxygen and glucose deprivation, OGD) and in vivo (transient or permanent focal cerebral ischemia and intracerebral hemorrhage, ICH). Ischemia was induced in vitro in Neuro2A cells, and the hASCs-E was applied 24h before the OGD or concurrently. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by unilateral intraluminal thread occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) in rats for 90min or permanently, or by unilateral MCA microsurgical direct electrocoagulation in mice. The ICH model was induced with an intracerebral injection of collagenase in rats. The hASCs-E was intraperitoneally administered 1h after the stroke insults. Treatment of the hASCs-E led to a substantially high viability in the lactate dehydrogenase and WST-1 assays in the in vitro ischemic model. The cerebral ischemic and ICH model treated with hASCs-E showed decreased ischemic volume and reduced brain water content and hemorrhage volume. The ICH model treated with hASCs-E exhibited better performance on the modified limb placing test. The expression of many genes related to inflammation, immune response, and cell-death was changed substantially in the ischemic rats or neuronal cells treated with the hASCs-E. These results reveal a neuroprotective role of hASCs-E in animal models of stroke, and suggest the feasible application of stem cell-based, noninvasive therapy for treating stroke.

  7. Human macrophage and dendritic cell-specific silencing of high-mobility group protein B1 ameliorates sepsis in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunting; Choi, Jang-Gi; Abraham, Sojan; Wu, Haoquan; Diaz, Dolores; Terreros, Daniel; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2012-12-18

    Hypersecretion of cytokines by innate immune cells is thought to initiate multiple organ failure in murine models of sepsis. Whether human cytokine storm also plays a similar role is not clear. Here, we show that human hematopoietic cells are required to induce sepsis-induced mortality following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in the severely immunodeficient nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) mice, and siRNA treatment to inhibit HMGB1 release by human macrophages and dendritic cells dramatically reduces sepsis-induced mortality. Following CLP, compared with immunocompetent WT mice, NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) mice did not show high levels of serum HMGB1 or murine proinflammatory cytokines and were relatively resistant to sepsis-induced mortality. In contrast, NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ(-/-) mice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells [humanized bone marrow liver thymic mice (BLT) mice] showed high serum levels of HMGB1, as well as multiple human but not murine proinflammatory cytokines, and died uniformly, suggesting human cytokines are sufficient to induce organ failure in this model. Moreover, targeted delivery of HMGB1 siRNA to human macrophages and dendritic cells using a short acetylcholine receptor (AchR)-binding peptide [rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG)-9R] effectively suppressed secretion of HMGB1, reduced the human cytokine storm, human lymphocyte apoptosis, and rescued humanized mice from CLP-induced mortality. siRNA treatment was also effective when started after the appearance of sepsis symptoms. These results show that CLP in humanized mice provides a model to study human sepsis, HMGB1 siRNA might provide a treatment strategy for human sepsis, and RVG-9R provides a tool to deliver siRNA to human macrophages and dendritic cells that could potentially be used to suppress a variety of human inflammatory diseases.

  8. Modelling epigenetic regulation of gene expression in 12 human cell types reveals combinatorial patterns of cell-type-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yiming; Qu, Wubin; Min, Bo; Liu, Zheyan; Chen, Changsheng; Zhang, Chenggang

    2014-06-01

    The maintenance of the diverse cell types in a multicellular organism is one of the fundamental mysteries of biology. Modelling the dynamic regulatory relationships between the histone modifications and the gene expression across the diverse cell types is essential for the authors to understand the mechanisms of the epigenetic regulation. Here, the authors thoroughly assessed the histone modification enrichment profiles at the promoters and constructed quantitative models between the histone modification abundances and the gene expression in 12 human cell types. The author's results showed that the histone modifications at the promoters exhibited remarkably cell-type-dependent variability in the cell-type-specific (CTS) genes. They demonstrated that the variable profiles of the modifications are highly predictive for the dynamic changes of the gene expression across all the cell types. Their findings revealed the close relationship between the combinatorial patterns of the histone modifications and the CTS gene expression. They anticipate that the findings and the methods they used in this study could provide useful information for the future studies of the regulatory roles of the histone modifications in the CTS genes.

  9. Alternating electric fields arrest cell proliferation in animal tumor models and human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kirson, Eilon D.; Dbalý, Vladimír; Tovaryš, František; Vymazal, Josef; Soustiel, Jean F.; Itzhaki, Aviran; Mordechovich, Daniel; Steinberg-Shapira, Shirley; Gurvich, Zoya; Schneiderman, Rosa; Wasserman, Yoram; Salzberg, Marc; Ryffel, Bernhard; Goldsher, Dorit; Dekel, Erez; Palti, Yoram

    2007-01-01

    We have recently shown that low intensity, intermediate frequency, electric fields inhibit by an anti-microtubule mechanism of action, cancerous cell growth in vitro. Using implanted electrodes, these fields were also shown to inhibit the growth of dermal tumors in mice. The present study extends these findings to additional cell lines [human breast carcinoma; MDA-MB-231, and human non-small-cell lung carcinoma (H1299)] and to animal tumor models (intradermal B16F1 melanoma and intracranial F-98 glioma) using external insulated electrodes. These findings led to the initiation of a pilot clinical trial of the effects of TTFields in 10 patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). Median time to disease progression in these patients was 26.1 weeks and median overall survival was 62.2 weeks. These time to disease progression and OS values are more than double the reported medians of historical control patients. No device-related serious adverse events were seen after >70 months of cumulative treatment in all of the patients. The only device-related side effect seen was a mild to moderate contact dermatitis beneath the field delivering electrodes. We conclude that TTFields are a safe and effective new treatment modality which effectively slows down tumor growth in vitro, in vivo and, as demonstrated here, in human cancer patients. PMID:17551011

  10. Preconditioned mesenchymal stem cells treat myasthenia gravis in a humanized preclinical model

    PubMed Central

    Sudres, Muriel; Maurer, Marie; Robinet, Marieke; Bismuth, Jacky; Truffault, Frédérique; Girard, Diane; Dragin, Nadine; Attia, Mohamed; Fadel, Elie; Santelmo, Nicola; Sicsic, Camille; Brenner, Talma

    2017-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with anti–acetylcholine receptor (AChR) Abs is an autoimmune disease characterized by severe defects in immune regulation and thymic inflammation. Because mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) display immunomodulatory features, we investigated whether and how in vitro–preconditioned human MSCs (cMSCs) could treat MG disease. We developed a new humanized preclinical model by subcutaneously grafting thymic MG fragments into immunodeficient NSG mice (NSG-MG model). Ninety percent of the animals displayed human anti-AChR Abs in the serum, and 50% of the animals displayed MG-like symptoms that correlated with the loss of AChR at the muscle endplates. Interestingly, each mouse experiment recapitulated the MG features of each patient. We next demonstrated that cMSCs markedly improved MG, reducing the level of anti-AChR Abs in the serum and restoring AChR expression at the muscle endplate. Resting MSCs had a smaller effect. Finally, we showed that the underlying mechanisms involved (a) the inhibition of cell proliferation, (b) the inhibition of B cell–related and costimulatory molecules, and (c) the activation of the complement regulator DAF/CD55. In conclusion, this study shows that a preconditioning step promotes the therapeutic effects of MSCs via combined mechanisms, making cMSCs a promising strategy for treating MG and potentially other autoimmune diseases.

  11. Human Neural Precursor Cells Promote Neurologic Recovery in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lu; Coleman, Ronald; Leang, Ronika; Tran, Ha; Kopf, Alexandra; Walsh, Craig M.; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Steward, Oswald; Macklin, Wendy B.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Using a viral model of the demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS), we show that intraspinal transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells (hNPCs) results in sustained clinical recovery, although hNPCs were not detectable beyond day 8 posttransplantation. Improved motor skills were associated with a reduction in neuroinflammation, decreased demyelination, and enhanced remyelination. Evidence indicates that the reduced neuroinflammation is correlated with an increased number of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) within the spinal cords. Coculture of hNPCs with activated T cells resulted in reduced T cell proliferation and increased Treg numbers. The hNPCs acted, in part, through secretion of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. These findings indicate that the transient presence of hNPCs transplanted in an animal model of MS has powerful immunomodulatory effects and mediates recovery. Further investigation of the restorative effects of hNPC transplantation may aid in the development of clinically relevant MS treatments. PMID:24936469

  12. Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Cell Lines as a Three-Dimensional Model for the Study of Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chung; Vosburgh, Evan; Levine, Arnold J.; Cong, Lei; Xu, Eugenia Y.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare tumors, with an incidence of two per 100, 000 individuals per year, and they account for 0.5% of all human malignancies.1 Other than surgery for the minority of patients who present with localized disease, there is little or no survival benefit of systemic therapy. Therefore, there is a great need to better understand the biology of NETs, and in particular define new therapeutic targets for patients with nonresectable or metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. 3D cell culture is becoming a popular method for drug screening due to its relevance in modeling the in vivo tumor tissue organization and microenvironment.2,3 The 3D multicellular spheroids could provide valuable information in a more timely and less expensive manner than directly proceeding from 2D cell culture experiments to animal (murine) models. To facilitate the discovery of new therapeutics for NET patients, we have developed an in vitro 3D multicellular spheroids model using the human NET cell lines. The NET cells are plated in a non-adhesive agarose-coated 24-well plate and incubated under physiological conditions (5% CO2, 37 °C) with a very slow agitation for 16-24 hr after plating. The cells form multicellular spheroids starting on the 3rd or 4th day. The spheroids become more spherical by the 6th day, at which point the drug treatments are initiated. The efficacy of the drug treatments on the NET spheroids is monitored based on the morphology, shape and size of the spheroids with a phase-contrast light microscope. The size of the spheroids is estimated automatically using a custom-developed MATLAB program based on an active contour algorithm. Further, we demonstrate a simple method to process the HistoGel embedding on these 3D spheroids, allowing the use of standard histological and immunohistochemical techniques. This is the first report on generating 3D spheroids using NET cell lines to examine the effect of therapeutic drugs. We have also performed histology

  13. Genome engineering of isogenic human ES cells to model autism disorders

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Refugio A.; Stein, Jason L.; Krostag, Anne-Rachel F.; Nelson, Angelique M.; Marken, John S.; Menon, Vilas; May, Ryan C.; Yao, Zizhen; Kaykas, Ajamete; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Grimley, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Isogenic pluripotent stem cells are critical tools for studying human neurological diseases by allowing one to study the effects of a mutation in a fixed genetic background. Of particular interest are the spectrum of autism disorders, some of which are monogenic such as Timothy syndrome (TS); others are multigenic such as the microdeletion and microduplication syndromes of the 16p11.2 chromosomal locus. Here, we report engineered human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines for modeling these two disorders using locus-specific endonucleases to increase the efficiency of homology-directed repair (HDR). We developed a system to: (1) computationally identify unique transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) binding sites in the genome using a new software program, TALENSeek, (2) assemble the TALEN genes by combining golden gate cloning with modified constructs from the FLASH protocol, and (3) test the TALEN pairs in an amplification-based HDR assay that is more sensitive than the typical non-homologous end joining assay. We applied these methods to identify, construct, and test TALENs that were used with HDR donors in hESCs to generate an isogenic TS cell line in a scarless manner and to model the 16p11.2 copy number disorder without modifying genomic loci with high sequence similarity. PMID:25765640

  14. Modeling Electrophysiological Coupling and Fusion between Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mayourian, Joshua; Savizky, Ruben M.; Sobie, Eric A.; Costa, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) delivery has demonstrated promise in preclinical and clinical trials for myocardial infarction therapy; however, broad acceptance is hindered by limited understanding of hMSC-human cardiomyocyte (hCM) interactions. To better understand the electrophysiological consequences of direct heterocellular connections between hMSCs and hCMs, three original mathematical models were developed, representing an experimentally verified triad of hMSC families with distinct functional ion channel currents. The arrhythmogenic risk of such direct electrical interactions in the setting of healthy adult myocardium was predicted by coupling and fusing these hMSC models to the published ten Tusscher midcardial hCM model. Substantial variations in action potential waveform—such as decreased action potential duration (APD) and plateau height—were found when hCMs were coupled to the two hMSC models expressing functional delayed rectifier-like human ether à-go-go K+ channel 1 (hEAG1); the effects were exacerbated for fused hMSC-hCM hybrid cells. The third family of hMSCs (Type C), absent of hEAG1 activity, led to smaller single-cell action potential alterations during coupling and fusion, translating to longer tissue-level mean action potential wavelength. In a simulated 2-D monolayer of cardiac tissue, re-entry vulnerability with low (5%) hMSC insertion was approximately eight-fold lower with Type C hMSCs compared to hEAG1-functional hMSCs. A 20% decrease in APD dispersion by Type C hMSCs compared to hEAG1-active hMSCs supports the claim of reduced arrhythmogenic potential of this cell type with low hMSC insertion. However, at moderate (15%) and high (25%) hMSC insertion, the vulnerable window increased independent of hMSC type. In summary, this study provides novel electrophysiological models of hMSCs, predicts possible arrhythmogenic effects of hMSCs when directly coupled to healthy hCMs, and proposes that isolating a subset of hMSCs absent of h

  15. Absence of WASp Enhances Hematopoietic and Megakaryocytic Differentiation in a Human Embryonic Stem Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, Miguel G; Muñoz, Pilar; Sánchez-Gilabert, Almudena; Cobo, Marién; Benabdellah, Karim; Anderson, Per; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Neth, Olaf; Molinos-Quintana, Agueda; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Martin, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the WAS gene and characterized by severe thrombocytopenia. Although the role of WASp in terminally differentiated lymphocytes and myeloid cells is well characterized, its role in early hematopoietic differentiation and in platelets (Plts) biology is poorly understood. In the present manuscript, we have used zinc finger nucleases targeted to the WAS locus for the development of two isogenic WAS knockout (WASKO) human embryonic stem cell lines (hESCs). Upon hematopoietic differentiation, hESCs-WASKO generated increased ratios of CD34+CD45+ progenitors with altered responses to stem cell factor compared to hESCs-WT. When differentiated toward the megakaryocytic linage, hESCs-WASKO produced increased numbers of CD34+CD41+ progenitors, megakaryocytes (MKs), and Plts. hESCs-WASKO-derived MKs and Plts showed altered phenotype as well as defective responses to agonist, mimicking WAS patients MKs and Plts defects. Interestingly, the defects were more evident in WASp-deficient MKs than in WASp-deficient Plts. Importantly, ectopic WAS expression using lentiviral vectors restored normal Plts development and MKs responses. These data validate the AND-1_WASKO cell lines as a human cellular model for basic research and for preclinical studies for WAS. PMID:26502776

  16. Absence of WASp Enhances Hematopoietic and Megakaryocytic Differentiation in a Human Embryonic Stem Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Miguel G; Muñoz, Pilar; Sánchez-Gilabert, Almudena; Cobo, Marién; Benabdellah, Karim; Anderson, Per; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Neth, Olaf; Molinos-Quintana, Agueda; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Martin, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the WAS gene and characterized by severe thrombocytopenia. Although the role of WASp in terminally differentiated lymphocytes and myeloid cells is well characterized, its role in early hematopoietic differentiation and in platelets (Plts) biology is poorly understood. In the present manuscript, we have used zinc finger nucleases targeted to the WAS locus for the development of two isogenic WAS knockout (WASKO) human embryonic stem cell lines (hESCs). Upon hematopoietic differentiation, hESCs-WASKO generated increased ratios of CD34(+)CD45(+) progenitors with altered responses to stem cell factor compared to hESCs-WT. When differentiated toward the megakaryocytic linage, hESCs-WASKO produced increased numbers of CD34(+)CD41(+) progenitors, megakaryocytes (MKs), and Plts. hESCs-WASKO-derived MKs and Plts showed altered phenotype as well as defective responses to agonist, mimicking WAS patients MKs and Plts defects. Interestingly, the defects were more evident in WASp-deficient MKs than in WASp-deficient Plts. Importantly, ectopic WAS expression using lentiviral vectors restored normal Plts development and MKs responses. These data validate the AND-1_WASKO cell lines as a human cellular model for basic research and for preclinical studies for WAS.

  17. Isolation and purification of self-renewable human neural stem cells for cell therapy in experimental model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, Ricardo L; Daadi, Marcel M

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are pluripotent with a strong self-renewable ability making them a virtually unlimited source of neural cells for structural repair in neurological disorders. Currently, hESCs are one of the most promising cell sources amenable for commercialization of off-shelf cell therapy products. However, along with this strong proliferative capacity of hESCs comes the tumorigenic potential of these cells after transplantation. Thus, the isolation and purification of a homogeneous, population of neural stem cells (hNSCs) are of paramount importance to avoid tumor formation in the host brain. This chapter describes the isolation, neuralization, and long-term perpetuation of hNSCs derived from hESCs through use of specific mitogenic growth factors and the preparation of hNSCs for transplantation in an experimental model of stroke. Additionally, we describe methods to analyze the stroke and size of grafts using magnetic resonance imaging and Osirix software, and neuroanatomical tracing procedures to study axonal remodeling after stroke and cell transplantation.

  18. Multiple Cooperating Oncogenes Drive Recurrent Breast Cancer-Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Josh Lauring , M.D., Ph.D...Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0285 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Josh Lauring ...on work described in this award: 1R21CA191262-01 (P.I. Lauring ) 12/1/14-11/30/16 20% (2.4 cal) National Cancer Institute Engineering

  19. Model systems for studying trophoblast differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ezashi, Toshihiko; Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Roberts, R Michael

    2012-09-01

    This review focuses on a now well-established model for generating cells of the trophoblast (TB) lineage by treating human embryonic stem cells (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) with the growth factor BMP4. We first discuss the opposing roles of FGF2 and BMP4 in directing TB formation and the need to exclude the former from the growth medium to minimize the co-induction of mesoderm and endoderm. Under these conditions, there is up-regulation of several transcription factors implicated in TB lineage emergence within 3 h of BMP4 exposure and, over a period of days and especially under a high O(2) gas atmosphere, gradual appearance of cell types carrying markers for more differentiated TB cell types, including extravillous TB and syncytioTB. We describe the potential value of including low molecular weight pharmaceutical agents that block activin A (INHBA) and FGF2 signaling to support BMP4-directed differentiation. We contend that the weight of available evidence supports the contention that BMP4 converts human ESC and iPSC of the so-called epiblast type unidirectionally to TB. We also consider the argument that BMP4 treatment of human ESC in the absence of exogenous FGF2 leads only to the emergence of mesoderm derivatives to be seriously flawed. Instead, we propose that, when signaling networks supporting pluripotency ESC or iPSC become unsustainable and when specification towards extra-embryonic mesoderm and endoderm are rendered inoperative, TB emerges as a major default state to pluripotency.

  20. Model Systems for Examining Effects of Leukemia-Associated Oncogenes in Primary Human CD34+ Cells via Retroviral Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Mark; Mulloy, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The use of primary human cells to model cancer initiation and progression is now within the grasp of investigators. It has been nearly a decade since the first defined genetic elements were introduced into primary human epithelial and fibroblast cells to model oncogenesis. This approach has now been extended to the hematopoietic system, with the first described experimental transformation of primary human hematopoietic cells. Human cell model systems will lead to a better understanding of the species and cell type specific signals necessary for oncogenic initiation and progression, and will allow investigators to interrogate the cancer stem cell hypothesis using a well-defined hierarchical system that has been studied for decades. The molecular and biochemical link between self-renewal and differentiation can now be experimentally approached using primary human cells. In addition, the models that result from these experiments are likely to generate highly relevant systems for use in identification and validation of potential therapeutic targets as well as testing of small molecule therapeutics. We describe here the methodologies and reagents that are used to examine the effects of leukemia fusion protein expression on primary human hematopoietic cells, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19277588

  1. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yong; Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema; Zhang, Yongkang; Jain, Sumit; Skidgel, Randal A.; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Mazzone, Theodore; Holterman, Mark J.

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  2. Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells benefits an animal model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B.

    PubMed

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Willing, Alison E; Desjarlais, Tammy; Davis Sanberg, Cyndy; Sanberg, Paul R

    2005-08-01

    Sanfilippo syndrome type B is caused by alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu) enzyme deficiency leading to an accumulation of undegraded heparan sulfate, a glycosaminoglycan (GAG). Cell therapy is a promising new treatment and human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cell transplantation may be preferred for delivery of the missing enzyme. We investigated the ability of mononuclear hUCB cells administered into the lateral cerebral ventricle to ameliorate/prevent histopathological changes in mice modeling Sanfilippo syndrome type B. These are the first results supporting enzyme replacement by administered hUCB cells. In vivo, transplanted hUCB cells survived long-term (7 months), migrated into the parenchyma of the brain and peripheral organs, expressed neural antigens, and exhibited neuron and astrocyte-like morphology. Transplant benefits were also demonstrated by stable cytoarchitecture in the hippocampus and cerebellum, and by reduced GAGs in the livers of treated mutant mice. A hUCB cell transplant may be an effective therapeutic strategy for enzyme delivery in Sanfilippo syndrome type B.

  3. Stem cell-derived models to improve mechanistic understanding and prediction of human drug induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, Christopher; Antoine, Daniel J.; Bonner, Frank; Crozier, Jonathan; Denning, Chris; Fontana, Robert J.; Hanley, Neil A.; Hay, David C.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Juhila, Satu; Kitteringham, Neil; Silva-Lima, Beatriz; Norris, Alan; Pridgeon, Chris; Ross, James A.; Sison Young, Rowena; Tagle, Danilo; Tornesi, Belen; van de Water, Bob; Weaver, Richard J.; Zhang, Fang; Park, B. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Current preclinical drug testing does not predict some forms of adverse drug reactions in humans. Efforts at improving predictability of drug-induced tissue injury in humans include using stem cell technology to generate human cells for screening for adverse effects of drugs in humans. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells means that it may ultimately be possible to develop personalised toxicology to determine inter-individual susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. However, the complexity of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) means that no current single cell model, whether of primary liver tissue origin, from liver cell lines, or derived from stem cells, adequately emulates what is believed to occur during human DILI. Nevertheless, a single cell model of a human hepatocyte which emulates key features of a hepatocyte is likely to be valuable in assessing potential chemical risk; furthermore understanding how to generate a relevant hepatocyte will also be critical to efforts to build complex multicellular models of the liver. Currently, hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from stem cells still fall short of recapitulating the full mature hepatocellular phenotype. Therefore, we convened a number of experts from the areas of preclinical and clinical hepatotoxicity and safety assessment, from industry, academia and regulatory bodies, to specifically explore the application of stem cells in hepatotoxicity safety assessment, and to make recommendations for the way forward. In this short review, we particularly discuss the importance of benchmarking stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells to their terminally-differentiated human counterparts using defined phenotyping, to make sure the cells are relevant and comparable between labs, and outline why this process is essential before the cells are introduced into chemical safety assessment. PMID:27775817

  4. Stem cell-derived models to improve mechanistic understanding and prediction of human drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Goldring, Christopher; Antoine, Daniel J; Bonner, Frank; Crozier, Jonathan; Denning, Chris; Fontana, Robert J; Hanley, Neil A; Hay, David C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Juhila, Satu; Kitteringham, Neil; Silva-Lima, Beatriz; Norris, Alan; Pridgeon, Chris; Ross, James A; Young, Rowena Sison; Tagle, Danilo; Tornesi, Belen; van de Water, Bob; Weaver, Richard J; Zhang, Fang; Park, B Kevin

    2017-02-01

    Current preclinical drug testing does not predict some forms of adverse drug reactions in humans. Efforts at improving predictability of drug-induced tissue injury in humans include using stem cell technology to generate human cells for screening for adverse effects of drugs in humans. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells means that it may ultimately be possible to develop personalized toxicology to determine interindividual susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. However, the complexity of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury means that no current single-cell model, whether of primary liver tissue origin, from liver cell lines, or derived from stem cells, adequately emulates what is believed to occur during human drug-induced liver injury. Nevertheless, a single-cell model of a human hepatocyte which emulates key features of a hepatocyte is likely to be valuable in assessing potential chemical risk; furthermore, understanding how to generate a relevant hepatocyte will also be critical to efforts to build complex multicellular models of the liver. Currently, hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from stem cells still fall short of recapitulating the full mature hepatocellular phenotype. Therefore, we convened a number of experts from the areas of preclinical and clinical hepatotoxicity and safety assessment, from industry, academia, and regulatory bodies, to specifically explore the application of stem cells in hepatotoxicity safety assessment and to make recommendations for the way forward. In this short review, we particularly discuss the importance of benchmarking stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells to their terminally differentiated human counterparts using defined phenotyping, to make sure the cells are relevant and comparable between labs, and outline why this process is essential before the cells are introduced into chemical safety assessment. (Hepatology 2017;65:710-721).

  5. In vitro Modeling of Ryanodine Receptor 2 Dysfunction Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Azra; Xu, Guoxing; Shao, Kaifeng; Papadopoulos, Symeon; Lehmann, Martin; Arnáiz-Cot, Juan J.; Rosa, Angelo O.; Nguemo, Filomain; Matzkies, Matthias; Dittmann, Sven; Stone, Susannah L.; Linke, Matthias; Zechner, Ulrich; Beyer, Vera; Hennies, Hans Christian; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Klauke, Baerbel; Parwani, Abdul S.; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Farr, Martin; Cleemann, Lars; Morad, Martin; Milting, Hendrik; Hescheler, Juergen; Šaric, Tomo

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated from accessible adult cells of patients with genetic diseases open unprecedented opportunities for exploring the pathophysiology of human diseases in vitro. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia type 1 (CPVT1) is an inherited cardiac disorder that is caused by mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor type 2 gene (RYR2) and is characterized by stress-induced ventricular arrhythmia that can lead to sudden cardiac death in young individuals. The aim of this study was to generate iPS cells from a patient with CPVT1 and determine whether iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes carrying patient specific RYR2 mutation recapitulate the disease phenotype in vitro. Methods: iPS cells were derived from dermal fibroblasts of healthy donors and a patient with CPVT1 carrying the novel heterozygous autosomal dominant mutation p.F2483I in the RYR2. Functional properties of iPS cell derived-cardiomyocytes were analyzed by using whole-cell current and voltage clamp and calcium imaging techniques. Results: Patch-clamp recordings revealed arrhythmias and delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) after catecholaminergic stimulation of CPVT1-iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Calcium imaging studies showed that, compared to healthy cardiomyocytes, CPVT1-cardiomyocytes exhibit higher amplitudes and longer durations of spontaneous Ca2+ release events at basal state. In addition, in CPVT1-cardiomyocytes the Ca2+-induced Ca2+-release events continued after repolarization and were abolished by increasing the cytosolic cAMP levels with forskolin. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the suitability of iPS cells in modeling RYR2-related cardiac disorders in vitro and opens new opportunities for investigating the disease mechanism in vitro, developing new drugs, predicting their toxicity, and optimizing current treatment strategies. PMID:22178870

  6. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2005-07-01

    Lack of accurate data for epidemiological studies of low dose radiation effects necessitates development of dosimetric models allowing prediction of cancer risks for different organs. The objective of this work is to develop a model of the radiation response of human bronchiolar tissue with single cell resolution. The computer model describes epithelial tissue as an ensemble of individual cells, with the geometry of a human bronchiole and the properties of different cell types are taken into account. The model simulates the tissue kinetics and radiation exposure in four dimensions: three spatial dimensions and a temporal dimension. The bronchiole is modeled as a regular hollow cylinder with the epithelial cells of three different types (basal, secretory, and ciliated) lining its interior. For the purposes of assessment of radiation damage to the cells only the nuclei of the cells have been modeled. Subroutines describing cellular kinetics have been developed to simulate cell turnover in a normal epithelial tissue. Monte Carlo subroutines have been developed to simulate exposure to alpha particles; the GEANT4 toolkit has been used to simulate exposure to low LET radiation. Each hit cell is provided with a record of energy deposition, and this record is passed to the progeny if the cell survives. The model output provides data on the number of basal progenitor cells in different phases of a cell life-cycle and secretory to ciliated cell ratio after several generations of cell proliferation. The model calculates labeling and mitotic indices and estimates the average cell turnover time for the bronchiolar tissue. Microdosimetric calculations are performed for cells traversed by ionizing particles. The model will be used to assess the accumulation of damage in cells due to protracted low level radiation exposure. The model output may provide directions for the future experimental design.

  7. Cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of G1/S cell cycle molecules and adult human β-cell replication: a revised model of human β-cell G1/S control.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie M; Kleinberger, Jeffrey W; Salim, Fatimah G; Troxell, Ronnie; Wills, Rachel; Tanwir, Mansoor; Casinelli, Gabriella; Cox, Amy E; Takane, Karen K; Srinivas, Harish; Scott, Donald K; Stewart, Andrew F

    2013-07-01

    Harnessing control of human β-cell proliferation has proven frustratingly difficult. Most G1/S control molecules, generally presumed to be nuclear proteins in the human β-cell, are in fact constrained to the cytoplasm. Here, we asked whether G1/S molecules might traffic into and out of the cytoplasmic compartment in association with activation of cell cycle progression. Cdk6 and cyclin D3 were used to drive human β-cell proliferation and promptly translocated into the nucleus in association with proliferation. In contrast, the cell cycle inhibitors p15, p18, and p19 did not alter their location, remaining cytoplasmic. Conversely, p16, p21, and p27 increased their nuclear frequency. In contrast once again, p57 decreased its nuclear frequency. Whereas proliferating β-cells contained nuclear cyclin D3 and cdk6, proliferation generally did not occur in β-cells that contained nuclear cell cycle inhibitors, except p21. Dynamic cytoplasmic-nuclear trafficking of cdk6 was confirmed using green fluorescent protein-tagged cdk6 and live cell imaging. Thus, we provide novel working models describing the control of cell cycle progression in the human β-cell. In addition to known obstacles to β-cell proliferation, cytoplasmic-to-nuclear trafficking of G1/S molecules may represent an obstacle as well as a therapeutic opportunity for human β-cell expansion.

  8. Transplantation of Human Neuroblastoma Cells, Catecholaminergic and Non-Catecholaminergic: Effects on Rotational Behavoir in Parkinson's Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Manaster, Jacob S.; Feuerman, Tony; Reynolds, C. Patrick; Markham, Charles H.

    1992-01-01

    Cultured human catecholaminergic and noncatecholaminergic donor cells were used in neural transplantation experiments in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Using two different human catecholaminergic neuroblastoma cell lines, one control non-catecholaminergic neuroblastoma cell line, and one sham control (tissue culture medium), transplants were made into the striatum using a modified Ungerstedt hemiparkinsonian rat model. Significant decreases in apomorphine-induced rotational behavior were produced by two of three catecholaminergic cell lines. Grafted cells staining positively for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and catecholamine fluorescence indicated viable catecholamine activity in the two cell lines which produced reductions in rotational behavior. Catecholamine fluorescence was not detected in either of the two controls. These data suggest a link between catecholamine secretion by transplanted cells and motor improvement using a rat rotational behavior model. PMID:1355366

  9. Combined Effects of Lipophilic Phycotoxins (Okadaic Acid, Azapsiracid-1 and Yessotoxin) on Human Intestinal Cells Models

    PubMed Central

    Ferron, Pierre-Jean; Dumazeau, Kevin; Beaulieu, Jean-François; Le Hégarat, Ludovic; Fessard, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Phycotoxins are monitored in seafood because they can cause food poisonings in humans. Phycotoxins do not only occur singly but also as mixtures in shellfish. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro toxic interactions of binary combinations of three lipophilic phycotoxins commonly found in Europe (okadaic acid (OA), yessotoxin (YTX) and azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1)) using the neutral red uptake assay on two human intestinal cell models, Caco-2 and the human intestinal epithelial crypt-like cells (HIEC). Based on the cytotoxicity of individual toxins, we studied the interactions between toxins in binary mixtures using the combination index-isobologram equation, a method widely used in pharmacology to study drug interactions. This method quantitatively classifies interactions between toxins in mixtures as synergistic, additive or antagonistic. AZA-1/OA, and YTX/OA mixtures showed increasing antagonism with increasing toxin concentrations. In contrast, the AZA-1/YTX mixture showed increasing synergism with increasing concentrations, especially for mixtures with high YTX concentrations. These results highlight the hazard potency of AZA-1/YTX mixtures with regard to seafood intoxication. PMID:26907345

  10. In vivo imaging of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease animal model.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sungji; Ahn, Sangzin; Kim, Saeromi; Joo, Yuyoung; Chong, Young Hae; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Chang, Keun-A

    2014-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of diverse conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). To understand transplanted stem cell biology, in vivo imaging is necessary. Nanomaterial has great potential for in vivo imaging and several noninvasive methods are used, such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, fluorescence imaging (FI) and near-infrared FI. However, each method has limitations for in vivo imaging. To overcome these limitations, multimodal nanoprobes have been developed. In the present study, we intravenously injected human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) that were labeled with a multimodal nanoparticle, LEO-LIVE™-Magnoxide 675 or 797 (BITERIALS, Seoul, Korea), into Tg2576 mice, an AD mouse model. After sequential in vivo tracking using Maestro Imaging System, we found fluorescence signals up to 10 days after injection. We also found strong signals in the brains extracted from hASC-transplanted Tg2576 mice up to 12 days after injection. With these results, we suggest that in vivo imaging with this multimodal nanoparticle may provide a useful tool for stem cell tracking and understanding stem cell biology in other neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. In vivo imaging of human adipose-derived stem cells in Alzheimer's disease animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sungji; Ahn, Sangzin; Kim, Saeromi; Joo, Yuyoung; Chong, Young Hae; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Chang, Keun-A.

    2014-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of diverse conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). To understand transplanted stem cell biology, in vivo imaging is necessary. Nanomaterial has great potential for in vivo imaging and several noninvasive methods are used, such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, fluorescence imaging (FI) and near-infrared FI. However, each method has limitations for in vivo imaging. To overcome these limitations, multimodal nanoprobes have been developed. In the present study, we intravenously injected human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) that were labeled with a multimodal nanoparticle, LEO-LIVE™-Magnoxide 675 or 797 (BITERIALS, Seoul, Korea), into Tg2576 mice, an AD mouse model. After sequential in vivo tracking using Maestro Imaging System, we found fluorescence signals up to 10 days after injection. We also found strong signals in the brains extracted from hASC-transplanted Tg2576 mice up to 12 days after injection. With these results, we suggest that in vivo imaging with this multimodal nanoparticle may provide a useful tool for stem cell tracking and understanding stem cell biology in other neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. A retinoic acid-enhanced, multicellular human blood-brain barrier model derived from stem cell sources

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2014-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) models are often used to investigate BBB function and screen brain-penetrating therapeutics, but it has been difficult to construct a human model that possesses an optimal BBB phenotype and is readily scalable. To address this challenge, we developed a human in vitro BBB model comprising brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), pericytes, astrocytes and neurons derived from renewable cell sources. First, retinoic acid (RA) was used to substantially enhance BBB phenotypes in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived BMECs, particularly through adherens junction, tight junction, and multidrug resistance protein regulation. RA-treated hPSC-derived BMECs were subsequently co-cultured with primary human brain pericytes and human astrocytes and neurons derived from human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to yield a fully human BBB model that possessed significant tightness as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (~5,000 Ωxcm2). Overall, this scalable human BBB model may enable a wide range of neuroscience studies. PMID:24561821

  13. A retinoic acid-enhanced, multicellular human blood-brain barrier model derived from stem cell sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2014-02-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) models are often used to investigate BBB function and screen brain-penetrating therapeutics, but it has been difficult to construct a human model that possesses an optimal BBB phenotype and is readily scalable. To address this challenge, we developed a human in vitro BBB model comprising brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), pericytes, astrocytes and neurons derived from renewable cell sources. First, retinoic acid (RA) was used to substantially enhance BBB phenotypes in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived BMECs, particularly through adherens junction, tight junction, and multidrug resistance protein regulation. RA-treated hPSC-derived BMECs were subsequently co-cultured with primary human brain pericytes and human astrocytes and neurons derived from human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to yield a fully human BBB model that possessed significant tightness as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (~5,000 Ωxcm2). Overall, this scalable human BBB model may enable a wide range of neuroscience studies.

  14. Modeling Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived-Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Agnes; Tan, Kim; Chai, Xiaoran; Sadananda, Singh N.; Mehta, Ashish; Ooi, Jolene; Hayden, Michael R.; Pouladi, Mahmoud A.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Shim, Winston; Brunham, Liam R.

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a highly efficacious anti-cancer drug but causes cardiotoxicity in many patients. The mechanisms of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity (DIC) remain incompletely understood. We investigated the characteristics and molecular mechanisms of DIC in human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs). We found that doxorubicin causes dose-dependent increases in apoptotic and necrotic cell death, reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased intracellular calcium concentration. We characterized genome-wide changes in gene expression caused by doxorubicin using RNA-seq, as well as electrophysiological abnormalities caused by doxorubicin with multi-electrode array technology. Finally, we show that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated disruption of TOP2B, a gene implicated in DIC in mouse studies, significantly reduces the sensitivity of hPSC-CMs to doxorubicin-induced double stranded DNA breaks and cell death. These data establish a human cellular model of DIC that recapitulates many of the cardinal features of this adverse drug reaction and could enable screening for protective agents against DIC as well as assessment of genetic variants involved in doxorubicin response. PMID:27142468

  15. Using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model cerebellar disease: hope and hype.

    PubMed

    Wiethoff, Sarah; Arber, Charles; Li, Abi; Wray, Selina; Houlden, Henry; Patani, Rickie

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum forms a highly ordered and indispensible component of motor function within the adult neuraxis, consisting of several distinct cellular subtypes. Cerebellar disease, through a variety of genetic and acquired causes, results in the loss of function of defined subclasses of neurons, and remains a significant and untreatable health care burden. The scarcity of therapies in this arena can partially be explained by unresolved disease mechanisms due to inaccessibility of human cerebellar neurons in a relevant experimental context where initiating disease mechanisms could be functionally elucidated, or drug screens conducted. In this review we discuss the potential promise of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for regenerative neurology, with a particular emphasis on in vitro modelling of cerebellar degeneration. We discuss progress made thus far using hiPSC-based models of neurodegeneration, noting the relatively slower pace of discovery made in modelling cerebellar dysfunction. We conclude by speculating how strategies attempting cerebellar differentiation from hiPSCs can be refined to allow the generation of accurate disease models. This in turn will permit a greater understanding of cerebellar pathophysiology to inform mechanistically rationalised therapies, which are desperately needed in this field.

  16. Effects of Modeled Microgravity on Expression Profiles of Micro RNA in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Emami, Kamal; Story, Michael; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    Among space radiation and other environmental factors, microgravity or an altered gravity is undoubtedly the most significant stress experienced by living organisms during flight. In comparison to the static 1g, microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells or animals. Micro RNA (miRNA) has recently emerged as an important regulator of gene expression, possibly regulating as many as one-third of all human genes. miRNA represents a class of single-stranded noncoding regulatory RNA molecules ( 22 nt) that control gene expressions by inhibiting the translation of mRNA to proteins. However, very little is known on the effect of altered gravity on miRNA expression. We hypothesized that the miRNA expression profile will be altered in zero gravity resulting in regulation of the gene expression and functional changes of the cells. To test this hypothesis, we cultured TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells in Synthecon s Rotary cell culture system (bioreactors) for 72 h either in the rotating (10 rpm) to model the microgravity in space or in the static condition. The cell viability was determined before and after culturing the cells in the bioreactor using both trypan blue and guava via count. Expressions of a panel of 352 human miRNA were analyzed using the miRNA PCRarray. Out of 352 miRNAs, expressions of 75 were significantly altered by a change of greater than 1.5 folds and seven miRNAs were altered by a fold change greater than 2 under the rotating culture condition. Among these seven, miR-545 and miR-517a were down regulated by 2 folds, whereas miR-150, miR-302a, miR-139-3p, miR-515-3p and miR-564 were up regulated by 2 to 8 folds. To confirm whether this altered miRNA expression correlates with gene expression and functional changes of the cells, we performed DNA Illumina Microarray Analysis and validated the related genes using q-RT PCR.

  17. Is this a brain which I see before me? Modeling human neural development with pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ikuo K; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre

    2015-09-15

    The human brain is arguably the most complex structure among living organisms. However, the specific mechanisms leading to this complexity remain incompletely understood, primarily because of the poor experimental accessibility of the human embryonic brain. Over recent years, technologies based on pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have been developed to generate neural cells of various types. While the translational potential of PSC technologies for disease modeling and/or cell replacement therapies is usually put forward as a rationale for their utility, they are also opening novel windows for direct observation and experimentation of the basic mechanisms of human brain development. PSC-based studies have revealed that a number of cardinal features of neural ontogenesis are remarkably conserved in human models, which can be studied in a reductionist fashion. They have also revealed species-specific features, which constitute attractive lines of investigation to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the human brain, and its link with evolution.

  18. Human middle-ear model with compound eardrum and airway branching in mastoid air cells

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    An acoustical/mechanical model of normal adult human middle-ear function is described for forward and reverse transmission. The eardrum model included one component bound along the manubrium and another bound by the tympanic cleft. Eardrum components were coupled by a time-delayed impedance. The acoustics of the middle-ear cleft was represented by an acoustical transmission-line model for the tympanic cavity, aditus, antrum, and mastoid air cell system with variable amounts of excess viscothermal loss. Model parameters were fitted to published measurements of energy reflectance (0.25–13 kHz), equivalent input impedance at the eardrum (0.25–11 kHz), temporal-bone pressure in scala vestibuli and scala tympani (0.1–11 kHz), and reverse middle-ear impedance (0.25–8 kHz). Inner-ear fluid motion included cochlear and physiological third-window pathways. The two-component eardrum with time delay helped fit intracochlear pressure responses. A multi-modal representation of the eardrum and high-frequency modeling of the middle-ear cleft helped fit ear-canal responses. Input reactance at the eardrum was small at high frequencies due to multiple modal resonances. The model predicted the middle-ear efficiency between ear canal and cochlea, and the cochlear pressures at threshold. PMID:25994701

  19. Bioavailability of iron from spinach using an in vitro/human Caco-2 cell bioassay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutzke, Corinne J.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Rutzke, Michael A.; Welch, Ross M.; Langhans, Robert W.; Albright, Louis D.; Combs, Gerald F Jr; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cv Whitney was tested for iron bioavailabilty using an in vitro human intestinal cell culture ferritin bioassay technique previously developed. Spinach was cultured in a growth chamber for 33 days, harvested, and freeze-dried. Total iron in the samples was an average of 71 micrograms/g dry weight. Spinach was digested in vitro (pepsin and 0.1 M HCl followed by pancreatin and 0.1 M NaHCO3) with and without the addition of supplemental ascorbic acid. Caco-2 cell cultures were used to determine iron bioavailability from the spinach mixtures. Production of the iron-binding protein ferritin in the Caco-2 cells showed the supplemental ascorbic acid doubled bioavailability of iron from spinach. The data show fresh spinach is a poor source of iron, and emphasize the importance of evaluation of whole meals rather than single food items. The data support the usefulness of the in vitro/Caco-2 cell ferritin bioassay model for prescreening of space flight diets for bioavailable iron.

  20. Modeling Viral Infectious Diseases and Development of Antiviral Therapies Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Systems

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Marta; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Desole, Giovanna; Berto, Alessandro; Pacenti, Monia; Palù, Giorgio; Barzon, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    The recent biotechnology breakthrough of cell reprogramming and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which has revolutionized the approaches to study the mechanisms of human diseases and to test new drugs, can be exploited to generate patient-specific models for the investigation of host–pathogen interactions and to develop new antimicrobial and antiviral therapies. Applications of iPSC technology to the study of viral infections in humans have included in vitro modeling of viral infections of neural, liver, and cardiac cells; modeling of human genetic susceptibility to severe viral infectious diseases, such as encephalitis and severe influenza; genetic engineering and genome editing of patient-specific iPSC-derived cells to confer antiviral resistance. PMID:26184286

  1. Modeled Microgravity Disrupts Collagen I/Integrin Signaling During Osteoblastic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; Zayzafoon, Majd; Gonda, Steven R.; Gathings, William E.; McDonald, Jay M.

    2004-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to reduced bone mineral density in weight bearing bones that is primarily attributed to a reduction in bone formation. We have previously demonstrated severely reduced osteoblastogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) following seven days culture in modeled microgravity. One potential mechanism for reduced osteoblastic differentiation is disruption of type I collagen-integrin interactions and reduced integrin signaling. Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors that bind extracellular matrix proteins and produce signals essential for proper cellular function, survival, and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of modeled microgravity on integrin expression and function in hMSC. We demonstrate that seven days of culture in modeled microgravity leads to reduced expression of the extracellular matrix protein, type I collagen (Col I). Conversely, modeled microgravity consistently increases Col I-specific alpha2 and beta1 integrin protein expression. Despite this increase in integrin sub-unit expression, autophosphorylation of adhesion-dependent kinases, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), is significantly reduced. Activation of Akt is unaffected by the reduction in FAK activation. However, reduced downstream signaling via the Ras-MAPK pathway is evidenced by a reduction in Ras and ERK activation. Taken together, our findings indicate that modeled microgravity decreases integrin/MAPK signaling, which likely contributes to the observed reduction in osteoblastogenesis.

  2. Establishment of a large panel of patient-derived preclinical models of human renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hervé; Béraud, Claire; Bethry, Audrey; Danilin, Sabrina; Lindner, Véronique; Coquard, Catherine; Rothhut, Sylvie; Massfelder, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to establish a large panel of preclinical models of human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) directly from patients, faithfully reproducing the biological features of the original tumor. RCC tissues (all stages/subtypes) were collected for 8 years from 336 patients undergoing surgery, xenografted subcutaneously in nude mice, and serially passaged into new mice up to 13 passages. Tissue samples from the primary tumor and tumors grown in mice through passages were analyzed for biological tissue stability by histopathology, mRNA profiling, von Hippel-Lindau gene sequencing, STR fingerprinting, growth characteristics and response to current therapies. Metastatic models were also established by orthotopic implantation and analyzed by imagery. We established a large panel of 30 RCC models (passage > 3, 8.9% success rate). High tumor take rate was associated with high stage and grade. Histopathologic, molecular and genetic characteristics were preserved between original tumors and case-matched xenografts. The models reproduced the sensitivity to targeted therapies observed in the clinic. Overall, these models constitute an invaluable tool for the clinical design of efficient therapies, the identification of predictive biomarkers and translational research. PMID:27449081

  3. In silico model-driven assessment of the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on human red blood cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Neema; Wiback, Sharon J; Palsson B, Bernhard Ø

    2002-11-01

    The completion of the human genome project and the construction of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) maps have lead to significant efforts to find SNPs that can be linked to pathophysiology. In silico models of complete biochemical reaction networks relate a cell's individual reactions to the function of the entire network. Sequence variations can in turn be related to kinetic properties of individual enzymes, thus allowing an in silico model-driven assessment of the effects of defined SNPs on overall cellular functions. This process is applied to defined SNPs in two key enzymes of human red blood cell metabolism: glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase. The results demonstrate the utility of in silico models in providing insight into differences between red cell function in patients with chronic and nonchronic anemia. In silico models of complex cellular processes are thus likely to aid in defining and understanding key SNPs in human pathophysiology.

  4. Human islet amyloid polypeptide expression in COS-1 cells. A model of intracellular amyloidogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, T. D.; Butler, P. C.; Kreutter, D. K.; Kane, L. A.; Eberhardt, N. L.

    1995-01-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is characterized by concurrent loss of beta-cells and deposition of islet amyloid derived from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). We have previously demonstrated that IAPP-derived amyloid forms intracellularly in humans with chronic excess insulin expression (eg, insulinoma and insulin receptor antibody-induced insulin resistance). To determine whether overexpression of IAPP results in intracellular amyloid in mammalian cells, we transfected COS cells with vectors expressing amyloidogenic human IAPP or non-amyloidogenic rat IAPP. Transfected COS-1 cells secreted comparable amounts of human IAPP and rat IAPP (2.1 to 2.8 nmol/L/48 hours). After 96 hours, 90% of cells expressing human IAPP contained amyloid fibrils and were degenerating or dead, whereas cells transfected with rat IAPP lacked amyloid and were viable. Thus, overexpression of human IAPP can result in intracellular amyloid formation that is associated with cell death, suggesting that intracellular amyloid may play a role in beta-cell loss in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7677175

  5. Gene transfer properties and structural modeling of human stem cell-derived AAV.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laura J; Ul-Hasan, Taihra; Carvaines, Sarah K; Van Vliet, Kim; Yang, Ethel; Wong, Kamehameha K; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Chatterjee, Saswati

    2014-09-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are proving to be remarkably successful for in vivo gene delivery. Based upon reports of abundant AAV in the human marrow, we tested CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells for the presence of natural AAV. Here, we report for the first time, the presence of novel AAV variants in healthy CD34(+) human peripheral blood stem cells. The majority of healthy peripheral blood stem cell donors were found to harbor AAV in their CD34(+) cells. Every AAV isolated from CD34(+) cells mapped to AAV Clade F. Gene transfer vectors derived from these novel AAVs efficiently underwent entry and postentry processing in human cord blood stem cells and supported stable gene transfer into long-term, in vivo engrafting human HSCs significantly better than other serotypes. AAVHSC-transduced human CD34(+) cells engrafted in vivo and gave rise to differentiated transgene-expressing progeny. Importantly, gene-marked CD34(+) stem cells persisted long term in xenograft recipients, indicating transduction of primitive progenitors. Notably, correlation of structure with function permitted identification of potential capsid components important for HSC transduction. Thus, AAVHSCs represent a new class of genetic vectors for the manipulation of HSC genomes.

  6. Development of Functional Human NK Cells in an Immunodeficient Mouse Model with the Ability to Provide Protection against Tumor Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kwant-Mitchell, Amanda; Pek, Elishka A.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of human NK cells and their role in tumor suppression have largely been restricted to in vitro experiments which lack the complexity of whole organisms, or mouse models which differ significantly from humans. In this study we showed that, in contrast to C57BL/6 Rag2−/−/γc−/− and NOD/Scid mice, newborn BALB/c Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice can support the development of human NK cells and CD56+ T cells after intrahepatic injection with hematopoietic stem cells. The human CD56+ cells in BALB/c Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice were able to produce IFN-γ in response to human IL-15 and polyI:C. NK cells from reconstituted Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice were also able to kill and inhibit the growth of K562 cells in vitro and were able to produce IFN-γ in response to stimulation with K562 cells. In vivo, reconstituted Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice had higher survival rates after K562 challenge compared to non-reconstituted Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice and were able to control tumor burden in various organs. Reconstituted Rag2−/−/γc−/− mice represent a model in which functional human NK and CD56+ T cells can develop from stem cells and can thus be used to study human disease in a more clinically relevant environment. PMID:20027308

  7. Toad skin extract cinobufatini inhibits migration of human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells into a model stromal tissue.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Munehiro; Mori, Shuya; Kamoshida, Yo; Kawaguchi, Shota; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko; Gao, Bo; Tang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Toad skin extract cinobufatini study has been focused on anticancer activity, especially apoptosis-inducing activity by bufosteroids. The present study examined effect of the toad skin extract on cancer cell migration into model stromal tissues. Human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 was incubated in the presence or absence of toad skin extract on a surface of reconstituted type I collagen gel as a model stromal tissue allowing the cells to migrate into the gel. Frozen sections were microscopically observed after azan staining. Data showed a decrease of cell number in a microscopic field and shortening of cell migration into the model stromal tissue in a dose dependent manner. This suggests that toad skin extract may possess migration-preventing activity in addition to cell toxicity such as apoptosis-inducing activity. The multifaceted effects including apoptosis-inducing and cancer cell migration-preventing activities would improve usefulness of toad skin extract cinobufatini as an anticancer medicine.

  8. Cellular automata model for human articular chondrocytes migration, proliferation and cell death: An in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Vaca-González, J J; Gutiérrez, M L; Guevara, J M; Garzón-Alvarado, D A

    2016-01-07

    Articular cartilage is characterized by low cell density of only one cell type, chondrocytes, and has limited self-healing properties. When articular cartilage is affected by traumatic injuries, a therapeutic strategy such as autologous chondrocyte implantation is usually proposed for its treatment. This approach requires in vitro chondrocyte expansion to yield high cell number for cell transplantation. To improve the efficiency of this procedure, it is necessary to assess cell dynamics such as migration, proliferation and cell death during culture. Computational models such as cellular automata can be used to simulate cell dynamics in order to enhance the result of cell culture procedures. This methodology has been implemented for several cell types; however, an experimental validation is required for each one. For this reason, in this research a cellular automata model, based on random-walk theory, was devised in order to predict articular chondrocyte behavior in monolayer culture during cell expansion. Results demonstrated that the cellular automata model corresponded to cell dynamics and computed-accurate quantitative results. Moreover, it was possible to observe that cell dynamics depend on weighted probabilities derived from experimental data and cell behavior varies according to the cell culture period. Thus, depending on whether cells were just seeded or proliferated exponentially, culture time probabilities differed in percentages in the CA model. Furthermore, in the experimental assessment a decreased chondrocyte proliferation was observed along with increased passage number. This approach is expected to having other uses as in enhancing articular cartilage therapies based on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  9. Initiation of an inflammatory response in resident intestinal lamina propria cells -use of a human organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Schröder-Braunstein, Jutta; Gras, Judith; Brors, Benedikt; Schwarz, Sonja; Szikszai, Timea; Lasitschka, Felix; Wabnitz, Guido; Heidtmann, Antje; Lee, Young-Seon; Schiessling, Serin; Leowardi, Christine; Al-Saeedi, Mohammed; Ulrich, Alexis; Engelke, Antonia; Winter, Johannes; Samstag, Yvonne; Giese, Thomas; Meuer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Resident human lamina propria immune cells serve as powerful effectors in host defense. Molecular events associated with the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells are largely unknown. Here, we aimed to characterize phenotypic and functional changes induced in these cells at the onset of intestinal inflammation using a human intestinal organ culture model. In this model, healthy human colonic mucosa was depleted of epithelial cells by EDTA treatment. Following loss of the epithelial layer, expression of the inflammatory mediators IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL23A, TNFA, CXCL2, and the surface receptors CD14, TLR2, CD86, CD54 was rapidly induced in resident lamina propria cells in situ as determined by qRT-PCR and immunohistology. Gene microarray analysis of lamina propria cells obtained by laser-capture microdissection provided an overview of global changes in gene expression occurring during the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in these cells. Bioinformatic analysis gave insight into signalling pathways mediating this inflammatory response. Furthermore, comparison with published microarray datasets of inflamed mucosa in vivo (ulcerative colitis) revealed a significant overlap of differentially regulated genes underlining the in vivo relevance of the organ culture model. Furthermore, genes never been previously associated with intestinal inflammation were identified using this model. The organ culture model characterized may be useful to study molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of an intestinal inflammatory response in normal mucosa as well as potential alterations of this response in inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Malva sylvestris Inhibits Inflammatory Response in Oral Human Cells. An In Vitro Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Benso, Bruna; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Alencar, Severino Matias; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of Malva sylvestris extract (MSE) and fractions in a co-culture model of cells infected by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, we evaluated the phytochemical content in the extract and fractions of M. sylvestris and demonstrated that polyphenols were the most frequent group in all samples studied. An in vitro dual-chamber model to mimic the periodontal structure was developed using a monolayer of epithelial keratinocytes (OBA-9) and a subepithelial layer of fibroblasts (HGF-1). The invasive periodontopathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans (D7S-1) was applied to migrate through the cell layers and induce the synthesis of immune factors and cytokines in the host cells. In an attempt to analyze the antimicrobial properties of MSE and fractions, a susceptibility test was carried out. The extract (MIC 175 μg/mL, MBC 500μg/mL) and chloroform fraction (MIC 150 μg/mL, MBC 250 μg/mL) were found to have inhibitory activity. The extract and all fractions were assessed using a cytotoxicity test and results showed that concentrations under 100 μg/mL did not significantly reduce cell viability compared to the control group (p > 0.05, viability > 90%). In order to analyze the inflammatory response, transcriptional factors and cytokines were quantified in the supernatant released from the cells. The chloroform fraction was the most effective in reducing the bacterial colonization (p< 0.05) and controlling inflammatory mediators, and promoted the down-regulation of genes including IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, CD14, PTGS, MMP-1 and FOS as well as the reduction of the IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF protein levels (p< 0.05). Malva sylvestris and its chloroform fraction minimized the A. actinomycetemcomitans infection and inflammation processes in oral human cells by a putative pathway that involves important cytokines and receptors. Therefore, this natural product may be considered as a

  11. Malva sylvestris Inhibits Inflammatory Response in Oral Human Cells. An In Vitro Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Benso, Bruna; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Alencar, Severino Matias; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of Malva sylvestris extract (MSE) and fractions in a co-culture model of cells infected by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. In addition, we evaluated the phytochemical content in the extract and fractions of M. sylvestris and demonstrated that polyphenols were the most frequent group in all samples studied. An in vitro dual-chamber model to mimic the periodontal structure was developed using a monolayer of epithelial keratinocytes (OBA-9) and a subepithelial layer of fibroblasts (HGF-1). The invasive periodontopathogen A. actinomycetemcomitans (D7S-1) was applied to migrate through the cell layers and induce the synthesis of immune factors and cytokines in the host cells. In an attempt to analyze the antimicrobial properties of MSE and fractions, a susceptibility test was carried out. The extract (MIC 175 μg/mL, MBC 500μg/mL) and chloroform fraction (MIC 150 μg/mL, MBC 250 μg/mL) were found to have inhibitory activity. The extract and all fractions were assessed using a cytotoxicity test and results showed that concentrations under 100 μg/mL did not significantly reduce cell viability compared to the control group (p > 0.05, viability > 90%). In order to analyze the inflammatory response, transcriptional factors and cytokines were quantified in the supernatant released from the cells. The chloroform fraction was the most effective in reducing the bacterial colonization (p< 0.05) and controlling inflammatory mediators, and promoted the down-regulation of genes including IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, CD14, PTGS, MMP-1 and FOS as well as the reduction of the IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF protein levels (p< 0.05). Malva sylvestris and its chloroform fraction minimized the A. actinomycetemcomitans infection and inflammation processes in oral human cells by a putative pathway that involves important cytokines and receptors. Therefore, this natural product may be considered as a

  12. Generation of an ICF syndrome model by efficient genome editing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using the CRISPR system.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takuro; Tamura, Daiki; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Hatada, Izuho

    2013-09-30

    Genome manipulation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is essential to achieve their full potential as tools for regenerative medicine. To date, however, gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has proven to be extremely difficult. Recently, an efficient genome manipulation technology using the RNA-guided DNase Cas9, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, has been developed. Here we report the efficient generation of an iPS cell model for immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) syndrome using the CRISPR system. We obtained iPS cells with mutations in both alleles of DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) in 63% of transfected clones. Our data suggest that the CRISPR system is highly efficient and useful for genome engineering of human iPS cells.

  13. Cardiac disease modeling using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived human cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Dell'Era, Patrizia; Benzoni, Patrizia; Crescini, Elisabetta; Valle, Matteo; Xia, Er; Consiglio, Antonella; Memo, Maurizio

    2015-03-26

    Causative mutations and variants associated with cardiac diseases have been found in genes encoding cardiac ion channels, accessory proteins, cytoskeletal components, junctional proteins, and signaling molecules. In most cases the functional evaluation of the genetic alteration has been carried out by expressing the mutated proteins in in-vitro heterologous systems. While these studies have provided a wealth of functional details that have greatly enhanced the understanding of the pathological mechanisms, it has always been clear that heterologous expression of the mutant protein bears the intrinsic limitation of the lack of a proper intracellular environment and the lack of pathological remodeling. The results obtained from the application of the next generation sequencing technique to patients suffering from cardiac diseases have identified several loci, mostly in non-coding DNA regions, which still await functional analysis. The isolation and culture of human embryonic stem cells has initially provided a constant source of cells from which cardiomyocytes (CMs) can be obtained by differentiation. Furthermore, the possibility to reprogram cellular fate to a pluripotent state, has opened this process to the study of genetic diseases. Thus induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a completely new cellular model that overcomes the limitations of heterologous studies. Importantly, due to the possibility to keep spontaneously beating CMs in culture for several months, during which they show a certain degree of maturation/aging, this approach will also provide a system in which to address the effect of long-term expression of the mutated proteins or any other DNA mutation, in terms of electrophysiological remodeling. Moreover, since iPSC preserve the entire patients' genetic context, the system will help the physicians in identifying the most appropriate pharmacological intervention to correct the functional alteration. This article summarizes the current

  14. Comparative Analysis of Pain Behaviours in Humanized Mouse Models of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jianxun; Benson, Barbara; Tran, Huy; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a hallmark feature of sickle cell anemia (SCA) but management of chronic as well as acute pain remains a major challenge. Mouse models of SCA are essential to examine the mechanisms of pain and develop novel therapeutics. To facilitate this effort, we compared humanized homozygous BERK and Townes sickle mice for the effect of gender and age on pain behaviors. Similar to previously characterized BERK sickle mice, Townes sickle mice show more mechanical, thermal, and deep tissue hyperalgesia with increasing age. Female Townes sickle mice demonstrate more hyperalgesia compared to males similar to that reported for BERK mice and patients with SCA. Mechanical, thermal and deep tissue hyperalgesia increased further after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) treatment in Townes sickle mice. Together, these data show BERK sickle mice exhibit a significantly greater degree of hyperalgesia for all behavioral measures as compared to gender- and age-matched Townes sickle mice. However, the genetically distinct “knock-in” strategy of human α and β transgene insertion in Townes mice as compared to BERK mice, may provide relative advantage for further genetic manipulations to examine specific mechanisms of pain. PMID:27494522

  15. Human airway epithelial cell culture to identify new respiratory viruses: coronavirus NL63 as a model.

    PubMed

    S Banach, Bridget; Orenstein, Jan M; Fox, Linda M; Randell, Scott H; Rowley, Anne H; Baker, Susan C

    2009-03-01

    Propagation of new human respiratory virus pathogens in established cell lines is hampered by a lack of predictability regarding cell line permissivity and by availability of suitable antibody reagents to detect infection in cell lines that do not exhibit significant cytopathic effect. Recently, molecular methods have been used to amplify and identify novel nucleic acid sequences directly from clinical samples, but these methods may be hampered by the quantity of virus present in respiratory secretions at different time points following the onset of infection. Human airway epithelial (HAE) cultures, which effectively mimic the human bronchial environment, allow for cultivation of a wide variety of human respiratory viral pathogens. The goal of the experiments described here was to determine if propagation and identification of a human respiratory virus may be achieved through inoculation of HAE cultures followed by whole transcriptome amplification (WTA) and sequence analysis. To establish proof-of-principle human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) was evaluated, and the first visualization of HCoV-NL63 virus by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is reported. Initial propagation of human respiratory secretions onto HAE cultures followed by TEM and WTA of culture supernatant may be a useful approach for visualization and detection of new human respiratory pathogens that have eluded identification by traditional approaches.

  16. Transformation of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells with DEK-NUP214 induces AML in an immunocompromised mouse model.

    PubMed

    Qin, H; Malek, S; Cowell, J K; Ren, M

    2016-10-27

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease comprising a large number of subtypes defined by specific chromosome abnormalities. One such subtype carries the t(6;9)(p22;q34) chromosome rearrangement, which leads to expression of the DEK-NUP214 chimeric gene, and has a particularly poor outcome. To provide a better understanding of the molecular etiology of these relatively rare individual AML variants, it is necessary to generate in vivo models, which can also serve as a means to evaluate targeted therapies based on their specific genetic abnormalities. Here, we describe the development of a human cell AML, generated in CD34+ human hematopoietic progenitor cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice that express human myeloid cell growth factors. Within 6 months, these mice develop a human cell AML with phenotypic characteristics of the primary t(6;9) disease and a CD45+CD13+CD34+CD38+ immunophenotype. Gene expression studies show that members of the HOX family of genes (HOXA9, 10, B3, B4 and PBX3) are highly upregulated in the AML from this mouse model as well as from primary human t(6;9) AML. Gene expression analysis also identified several other significantly disregulated pathways involving KRAS, BRCA1 and ALK, for example. This is the first report of a humanized model of the DEK-NUP214 disease and provides a means to study the development and treatment of this particular subtype of AML.

  17. A Recently Established Murine Model of Nasal Polyps Demonstrates Activation of B Cells, as Occurs in Human Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Sun Hye; Carter, Roderick G; Kato, Atsushi; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2016-08-01

    Animal model systems are invaluable for examining human diseases. Our laboratory recently established a mouse model of nasal polyps (NPs) and investigated similarities and differences between this mouse model and human NPs. We especially focus on the hypothesis that B cell activation occurs during NP generation in the murine model. After induction of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinosinusitis, 6% ovalbumin and Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (10 ng) were instilled into the nasal cavity of mice three times per week for 8 weeks. The development of structures that somewhat resemble NPs (which we will refer to as NPs) was confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The mRNA and protein levels of various inflammatory cell markers and mediators were measured by real-time PCR in nasal tissue and by ELISA in nasal lavage fluid (NLF), respectively. Total Ig isotype levels in NLF were also quantitated using the Mouse Ig Isotyping Multiplex kit (EMD Millipore, Billerica, MA) on a Luminex 200 instrument (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY). Similar to human NPs, there were significant increases in gene expression of inflammatory cell markers, such as CD19, CD138, CD11c, and mast cell protease-6 in nasal tissue samples of the NP group compared with those of the control group. In further investigations of B cell activation, mRNA expressions of B cell activating factor and a proliferation-inducing ligand were found to be significantly increased in mouse NP tissue. B cell-activating factor protein concentration and IgA and IgG1 levels in NLF were significantly higher in the NP group compared with the control group. In this study, the NP mouse model demonstrated enhanced B cell responses, which are reminiscent of B cell responses in human NPs.

  18. Neural Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Nontherapeutic Applications: Toxicology, Pharmacology, and In Vitro Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Yap, May Shin; Nathan, Kavitha R.; Yeo, Yin; Poh, Chit Laa; Richards, Mark; Lim, Wei Ling; Othman, Iekhsan; Heng, Boon Chin

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) derived from either blastocyst stage embryos (hESCs) or reprogrammed somatic cells (iPSCs) can provide an abundant source of human neuronal lineages that were previously sourced from human cadavers, abortuses, and discarded surgical waste. In addition to the well-known potential therapeutic application of these cells in regenerative medicine, these are also various promising nontherapeutic applications in toxicological and pharmacological screening of neuroactive compounds, as well as for in vitro modeling of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders. Compared to alternative research models based on laboratory animals and immortalized cancer-derived human neural cell lines, neuronal cells differentiated from hPSCs possess the advantages of species specificity together with genetic and physiological normality, which could more closely recapitulate in vivo conditions within the human central nervous system. This review critically examines the various potential nontherapeutic applications of hPSC-derived neuronal lineages and gives a brief overview of differentiation protocols utilized to generate these cells from hESCs and iPSCs. PMID:26089911

  19. Human pulmonary artery endothelial cells in the model of mucopolysaccharidosis VI present a prohypertensive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Golda, Adam; Jurecka, Agnieszka; Gajda, Karolina; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna; Lalik, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal disorder caused by a deficient activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase (ARSB). Pulmonary hypertension (PH) occurs in MPS VI patients and is a marker of bad prognosis. Malfunction of endothelium, which regulates vascular tonus and stimulates angiogenesis, can contribute to the occurrence of PH in MPS VI. Aim The aim of the study was to establish a human MPS VI cellular model of pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) and evaluate how it affects factors that may trigger PH such as proliferation, apoptosis, expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), natriuretic peptide type C (NPPC), and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). Results Increasing concentrations of dermatan sulfate (DS) reduce the viability of the cells in both ARSB deficiency and controls, but hardly influence apoptosis. The expression of eNOS in HPAECs is reduced up to two thirds in the presence of DS. NPPC shows a biphasic expression reaction with an increase at 50 μg/mL DS and reduction at 0 and 100 μg/mL DS. The expression of VEGFA decreases with increasing DS concentrations and absence of elastin, and increases with increasing DS in the presence of elastin. Conclusion Our data suggest that MPS VI endothelium presents a prohypertensive phenotype due to the reduction of endothelium's proliferation ability and expression of vasorelaxing factors. PMID:26937388

  20. Generation of CD34+ cells from human embryonic stem cells using a clinically applicable methodology and engraftment in the fetal sheep model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehyup; Zanjani, Esmail D; Jeanblanc, Christine M; Goodrich, A Daisy; Hematti, Peiman

    2013-08-01

    Until now, ex vivo generation of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) mostly involved use of feeder cells of nonhuman origin. Although they provided invaluable models to study hematopoiesis, in vivo engraftment of hESC-derived HSCs remains a challenging task. In this study, we used a novel coculture system composed of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) and peripheral blood CD14(+) monocyte-derived macrophages to generate CD34(+) cells from hESCs in vitro. Human ESC-derived CD34(+) cells generated using this method expressed surface makers associated with adult human HSCs and upregulated hematopoietic stem cell genes comparable to human bone marrow-derived CD34(+) cells. Finally, transplantation of purified hESC-derived CD34(+) cells into the preimmune fetal sheep, primed with transplantation of MSCs derived from the same hESC line, demonstrated multilineage hematopoietic activity with graft presence up to 16 weeks after transplantation. This in vivo demonstration of engraftment and robust multilineage hematopoietic activity by hESC-derived CD34(+) cells lends credence to the translational value and potential clinical utility of this novel differentiation and transplantation protocol.

  1. Natural Killer Cells Improve Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment by Increasing Stem Cell Clonogenicity In Vitro and in a Humanized Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Laza-Briviesca, Raquel; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Luevano, Martha; Derniame, Sophie; Querol, Sergio; Blundell, Michael; Thrasher, Adrian; Soria, Bernat; Cooper, Nichola; Bonnet, Dominique; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is increasingly used as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for transplantation. Low incidence and severity of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and a robust graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect are observed following CB transplantation (CBT). However, its main disadvantages are a limited number of HSC per unit, delayed immune reconstitution and a higher incidence of infection. Unmanipulated grafts contain accessory cells that may facilitate HSC engraftment. Therefore, the effects of accessory cells, particularly natural killer (NK) cells, on human CB HSC (CBSC) functions were assessed in vitro and in vivo. CBSC cultured with autologous CB NK cells showed higher levels of CXCR4 expression, a higher migration index and a higher number of colony forming units (CFU) after short-term and long-term cultures. We found that CBSC secreted CXCL9 following interaction with CB NK cells. In addition, recombinant CXCL9 increased CBSC clonogenicity, recapitulating the effect observed of CB NK cells on CBSC. Moreover, the co-infusion of CBSC with CB NK cells led to a higher level of CBSC engraftment in NSG mouse model. The results presented in this work offer the basis for an alternative approach to enhance HSC engraftment that could improve the outcome of CBT. PMID:26465138

  2. Refining human T-cell immunotherapy of cytomegalovirus disease: a mouse model with 'humanized' antigen presentation as a new preclinical study tool.

    PubMed

    Lemmermann, Niels A W; Reddehase, Matthias J

    2016-12-01

    With the cover headline 'T cells on the attack,' the journal Science celebrated individualized cancer immunotherapy by adoptive transfer of T cells as the 'Breakthrough of the Year' 2013 (J. Couzin-Frankel in Science 342:1432-1433, 2013). It is less well recognized and appreciated that individualized T cell immunotherapy of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is approaching clinical application for preventing CMV organ manifestations, interstitial CMV pneumonia in particular. This coincident medical development is particularly interesting as reactivated CMV infection is a major viral complication in the state of transient immunodeficiency after the therapy of hematopoietic malignancies by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). It may thus be attractive to combine T cell immunotherapy of 'minimal residual disease/leukemia (MRD)' and CMV-specific T cell immunotherapy to combat both risks in HCT recipients simultaneously, and ideally with T cells derived from the respective HLA-matched HCT donor. Although clinical trials of human CMV-specific T cell immunotherapy were promising in that the incidence of virus reactivation and disease was found to be reduced with statistical significance, animal models are still instrumental for providing 'proof of concept' by directly documenting the prevention of viral multiple-organ histopathology and organ failure under controlled conditions of the absence versus presence of the therapy, which obviously is not feasible in an individual human patient. Further, animal models can make predictions regarding parameters that determine the efficacy of T cell immunotherapy for improved study design in clinical investigations, and they allow for manipulating host and virus genetics. The latter is of particular value as it opens the possibility for epitope specificity controls that are inherently missing in clinical trials. Here, we review a recently developed new mouse model that is more approximated to human CMV-specific T cell immunotherapy

  3. Sulforhodamine 101 selectively labels human astrocytoma cells in an animal model of glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Georges, Joseph F; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Nichols, Joshua; Tissot, Maya; Preul, Mark C; Feuerstein, Burt; Anderson, Trent; Spetzler, Robert F; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a useful tool for immediate staining of astrocytes. We hypothesized that if the selectivity of SR101was maintained in astrocytoma cells, it could prove useful for glioma research. Cultured astrocytoma cells and acute slices from orthotopic human glioma (n=9) and lymphoma (n=6) xenografts were incubated with SR101 and imaged with confocal microscopy. A subset of slices (n=18) were counter-immunostained with glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD20 for stereological assessment of SR101 co-localization. SR101 differentiated astrocytic tumor cells from lymphoma cells. In acute slices, SR101 labeled 86.50% (±1.86; p<0.0001) of astrocytoma cells and 2.19% (±0.47; p<0.0001) of lymphoma cells. SR101-labeled astrocytoma cells had a distinct morphology when compared with in vivo astrocytes. Immediate imaging of human astrocytoma cells in vitro and in ex vivo rodent xenograft tissue labeled with SR101 can identify astrocytic tumor cells and help visualize the tumor margin. These features are useful in studying astrocytoma in the laboratory and may have clinical applications.

  4. Modeling Human Neurological and Neurodegenerative Diseases: From Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Neuronal Differentiation and Its Applications in Neurotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Bahmad, Hisham; Hadadeh, Ola; Chamaa, Farah; Cheaito, Katia; Darwish, Batoul; Makkawi, Ahmad-Kareem; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2017-01-01

    With the help of several inducing factors, somatic cells can be reprogrammed to become induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) lines. The success is in obtaining iPSCs almost identical to embryonic stem cells (ESCs), therefore various approaches have been tested and ultimately several ones have succeeded. The importance of these cells is in how they serve as models to unveil the molecular pathways and mechanisms underlying several human diseases, and also in its potential roles in the development of regenerative medicine. They further aid in the development of regenerative medicine, autologous cell therapy and drug or toxicity screening. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the recent development in the field of iPSCs research, specifically for modeling human neurological and neurodegenerative diseases, and its applications in neurotrauma. These are mainly characterized by progressive functional or structural neuronal loss rendering them extremely challenging to manage. Many of these diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been explored in vitro. The main purpose is to generate patient-specific iPS cell lines from the somatic cells that carry mutations or genetic instabilities for the aim of studying their differentiation potential and behavior. This new technology will pave the way for future development in the field of stem cell research anticipating its use in clinical settings and in regenerative medicine in order to treat various human diseases, including neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28293168

  5. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) as a chronic experimental model for investigation of retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Andrew; Hopes, Marina; Wright, Phillip; Broadway, David C; Sanderson, Julie

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing need for models of human diseases that utilise native, donated human tissue in order to model disease processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies. In this paper we assessed the suitability of adult human retinal explants as a potential model of chronic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. Our results confirmed that RGC markers commonly used in rodent studies (NeuN, βIII Tubulin and Thy-1) were appropriate for labelling human RGCs and followed the expected differential expression patterns across, as well as throughout, the macular and para-macular regions of the retina. Furthermore, we showed that neither donor age nor post-mortem time (within 24 h) significantly affected the initial expression levels of RGC markers. In addition, the feasibility of using human post mortem donor tissue as a long-term model of RGC degeneration was determined with RGC protein being detectable up to 4 weeks in culture with an associated decline in RGC mRNA and significant, progressive, apoptotic labelling of NeuN(+) cells. Differences in RGC apoptosis might have been influenced by medium compositions indicating that media constituents could play a role in supporting axotomised RGCs. We propose that using ex vivo human explants may prove to be a useful model for testing the effectiveness of neuroprotective strategies.

  6. Predictivity of dog co-culture model, primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells for the detection of hepatotoxic drugs in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Atienzar, Franck A.; Novik, Eric I.; Gerets, Helga H.; Parekh, Amit; Delatour, Claude; Cardenas, Alvaro; MacDonald, James; Yarmush, Martin L.; Dhalluin, Stéphane

    2014-02-15

    Drug Induced Liver Injury (DILI) is a major cause of attrition during early and late stage drug development. Consequently, there is a need to develop better in vitro primary hepatocyte models from different species for predicting hepatotoxicity in both animals and humans early in drug development. Dog is often chosen as the non-rodent species for toxicology studies. Unfortunately, dog in vitro models allowing long term cultures are not available. The objective of the present manuscript is to describe the development of a co-culture dog model for predicting hepatotoxic drugs in humans and to compare the predictivity of the canine model along with primary human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. After rigorous optimization, the dog co-culture model displayed metabolic capacities that were maintained up to 2 weeks which indicates that such model could be also used for long term metabolism studies. Most of the human hepatotoxic drugs were detected with a sensitivity of approximately 80% (n = 40) for the three cellular models. Nevertheless, the specificity was low approximately 40% for the HepG2 cells and hepatocytes compared to 72.7% for the canine model (n = 11). Furthermore, the dog co-culture model showed a higher superiority for the classification of 5 pairs of close structural analogs with different DILI concerns in comparison to both human cellular models. Finally, the reproducibility of the canine system was also satisfactory with a coefficient of correlation of 75.2% (n = 14). Overall, the present manuscript indicates that the dog co-culture model may represent a relevant tool to perform chronic hepatotoxicity and metabolism studies. - Highlights: • Importance of species differences in drug development. • Relevance of dog co-culture model for metabolism and toxicology studies. • Hepatotoxicity: higher predictivity of dog co-culture vs HepG2 and human hepatocytes.

  7. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4+ T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model

    PubMed Central

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-01-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann–Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4+CD45RO+ and CD4+CD45RO+CXCR5+ cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans. PMID:21488866

  8. Importance of B cell co-stimulation in CD4(+) T cell differentiation: X-linked agammaglobulinaemia, a human model.

    PubMed

    Martini, H; Enright, V; Perro, M; Workman, S; Birmelin, J; Giorda, E; Quinti, I; Lougaris, V; Baronio, M; Warnatz, K; Grimbacher, B

    2011-06-01

    We were interested in the question of whether the congenital lack of B cells actually had any influence on the development of the T cell compartment in patients with agammaglobulinaemia. Sixteen patients with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) due to mutations in Btk, nine patients affected by common variable immune deficiency (CVID) with <2% of peripheral B cells and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The T cell phenotype was determined with FACSCalibur and CellQuest Pro software. Mann-Whitney two-tailed analysis was used for statistical analysis. The CD4 T cell memory compartment was reduced in patients with XLA of all ages. This T cell subset encompasses both CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CXCR5(+) cells and both subsets were decreased significantly when compared to healthy controls: P = 0·001 and P < 0·0001, respectively. This observation was confirmed in patients with CVID who had <2% B cells, suggesting that not the lack of Bruton's tyrosine kinase but the lack of B cells is most probably the cause of the impaired CD4 T cell maturation. We postulate that this defect is a correlate of the observed paucity of germinal centres in XLA. Our results support the importance of the interplay between B and T cells in the germinal centre for the activation of CD4 T cells in humans.

  9. Human Embryonic Stem Cells: A Model for the Study of Neural Development and Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Prajumwongs, Piya; Weeranantanapan, Oratai; Jaroonwitchawan, Thiranut; Noisa, Parinya

    2016-01-01

    Although the mechanism of neurogenesis has been well documented in other organisms, there might be fundamental differences between human and those species referring to species-specific context. Based on principles learned from other systems, it is found that the signaling pathways required for neural induction and specification of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) recapitulated those in the early embryo development in vivo at certain degree. This underscores the usefulness of hESCs in understanding early human neural development and reinforces the need to integrate the principles of developmental biology and hESC biology for an efficient neural differentiation. PMID:27239201

  10. Computational Model of Ca2+ Wave Propagation in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vainio, Iina; Abu Khamidakh, Amna; Paci, Michelangelo; Skottman, Heli; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Hyttinen, Jari; Nymark, Soile

    2015-01-01

    Objective Computational models of calcium (Ca2+) signaling have been constructed for several cell types. There are, however, no such models for retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Our aim was to construct a Ca2+ signaling model for RPE based on our experimental data of mechanically induced Ca2+ wave in the in vitro model of RPE, the ARPE-19 monolayer. Methods We combined six essential Ca2+ signaling components into a model: stretch-sensitive Ca2+ channels (SSCCs), P2Y2 receptors, IP3 receptors, ryanodine receptors, Ca2+ pumps, and gap junctions. The cells in our epithelial model are connected to each other to enable transport of signaling molecules. Parameterization was done by tuning the above model components so that the simulated Ca2+ waves reproduced our control experimental data and data where gap junctions were blocked. Results Our model was able to explain Ca2+ signaling in ARPE-19 cells, and the basic mechanism was found to be as follows: 1) Cells near the stimulus site are likely to conduct Ca2+ through plasma membrane SSCCs and gap junctions conduct the Ca2+ and IP3 between cells further away. 2) Most likely the stimulated cell secretes ligand to the extracellular space where the ligand diffusion mediates the Ca2+ signal so that the ligand concentration decreases with distance. 3) The phosphorylation of the IP3 receptor defines the cell’s sensitivity to the extracellular ligand attenuating the Ca2+ signal in the distance. Conclusions The developed model was able to simulate an array of experimental data including drug effects. Furthermore, our simulations predict that suramin may interfere ligand binding on P2Y2 receptors or accelerate P2Y2 receptor phosphorylation, which may partially be the reason for Ca2+ wave attenuation by suramin. Being the first RPE Ca2+ signaling model created based on experimental data on ARPE-19 cell line, the model offers a platform for further modeling of native RPE functions. PMID:26070134

  11. Multiple Cooperating Oncogenes Drive Recurrent Breast Cancer-Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Associated Chromosomal Amplifications: Creation of Isogenic Human Cell Line Models PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Josh Lauring , M.D., Ph.D...5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0285 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Josh Lauring , M.D., Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER

  12. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuron as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity Ingrid L. Druwe1, Timothy J. Shafer2, Kathleen Wallace2, Pablo Valdivia3 ,and William R. Mundy2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology...

  13. Maternal transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells provides prenatal therapy in Sanfilippo type B mouse model.

    PubMed

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Gografe, Sylvia J; Sanberg, Cyndy Davis; Willing, Alison E; Saporta, Samuel; Cameron, Don F; Desjarlais, Tammy; Daily, Jennifer; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Chamizo, Wilfredo; Klasko, Stephen K; Sanberg, Paul R

    2006-03-01

    Numerous data support passage of maternal cells into the fetus during pregnancy in both human and animal models. However, functional benefits of maternal microchimerism in utero are unknown. The current study attempted to take advantage of this route for prenatal delivery of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Naglu) enzyme into the enzyme-deficient mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS III B). Enzymatically sufficient mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood (MNC hUCB) were intravenously administered into heterozygote females modeling MPS III B on the 5th day of pregnancy during blastocyst implantation. The major findings were 1) administered MNC hUCB cells transmigrated and diffused into the embryos (E12.5); 2) some transmigrated cells expressed CD34 and CD117 antigens; 3) transmigrated cells were found in both the maternal and embryonic parts of placentas; 4) transmigrated cells corrected Naglu enzyme activity in all embryos; 5) administered MNC hUCB cells were extensively distributed in the organs and the blood of heterozygote mothers at one week after transplantation. Results indicate that prenatal delivery of Naglu enzyme by MNC hUCB cell administration into mothers of enzyme-deficient embryos is possible and may present a significant opportunity for new biotechnologies to treat many inherited disorders.

  14. Multiple Intravenous Administrations of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Benefit in a Mouse Model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Rodrigues, Maria C. O.; Mirtyl, Santhia; Turner, Shanna; Mitha, Shazia; Sodhi, Jasmine; Suthakaran, Subatha; Eve, David J.; Sanberg, Cyndy D.; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Background A promising therapeutic strategy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the use of cell-based therapies that can protect motor neurons and thereby retard disease progression. We recently showed that a single large dose (25×106 cells) of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood (MNC hUCB) administered intravenously to pre-symptomatic G93A SOD1 mice is optimal in delaying disease progression and increasing lifespan. However, this single high cell dose is impractical for clinical use. The aim of the present pre-clinical translation study was therefore to evaluate the effects of multiple low dose systemic injections of MNC hUCB cell into G93A SOD1 mice at different disease stages. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice received weekly intravenous injections of MNC hUCB or media. Symptomatic mice received 106 or 2.5×106 cells from 13 weeks of age. A third, pre-symptomatic, group received 106 cells from 9 weeks of age. Control groups were media-injected G93A and mice carrying the normal hSOD1 gene. Motor function tests and various assays determined cell effects. Administered cell distribution, motor neuron counts, and glial cell densities were analyzed in mouse spinal cords. Results showed that mice receiving 106 cells pre-symptomatically or 2.5×106 cells symptomatically significantly delayed functional deterioration, increased lifespan and had higher motor neuron counts than media mice. Astrocytes and microglia were significantly reduced in all cell-treated groups. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that multiple injections of MNC hUCB cells, even beginning at the symptomatic disease stage, could benefit disease outcomes by protecting motor neurons from inflammatory effectors. This multiple cell infusion approach may promote future clinical studies. PMID:22319620

  15. Naltrindole Inhibits Human Multiple Myeloma Cell Proliferation In Vitro and in a Murine Xenograft Model In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mundra, Jyoti Joshi; Terskiy, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that immune cell activation and proliferation were sensitive to the effects of naltrindole, a nonpeptidic δ-opioid receptor-selective antagonist; therefore, we hypothesized that human multiple myeloma (MM) would be a valuable model for studying potential antineoplastic properties of naltrindole. [3H]naltrindole exhibited saturable, low-affinity binding to intact human MM cells; however, the pharmacological profile of the binding site differed considerably from the properties of δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptors, and opioid receptor mRNA was not detected in MM cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Naltrindole inhibited the proliferation of cultured human U266 MM cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 16 μM. The naltrindole-induced inhibition of U266 cell proliferation was not blocked by a 10-fold molar excess of naltrexone, a nonselective opioid antagonist. Additive inhibition of MM cell proliferation was observed when using a combination of naltrindole with the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium valproate, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, the glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone, and the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor simvastatin. Treatment of U266 cells with naltrindole significantly decreased the level of the active, phosphorylated form of the kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt, which may be related to its antiproliferative activity. The antiproliferative activity of naltrindole toward MM cells was maintained in cocultures of MM and bone marrow-derived stromal cells, mimicking the bone marrow microenvironment. In vivo, naltrindole significantly decreased tumor cell volumes in human MM cell xenografts in severe combined immunodeficient mice. We hypothesize that naltrindole inhibits the proliferation of MM cells through a nonopioid receptor-dependent mechanism. PMID:22537770

  16. Bone metastasis model with multiorgan dissemination of human small-cell lung cancer (SBC-5) cells in natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Miki, T; Yano, S; Hanibuchi, M; Sone, S

    2000-01-01

    Lung cancer is commonly associated with multiorgan metastasis, and bone is a frequent metastatic site for lung cancer. Nevertheless, no bone metastasis model of lung cancer with multiorgan dissemination is available, which could provide opportunity to study the molecular pathogenesis. We examined the abilities of eight human lung cancer cell lines injected intravenously into natural killer (NK) cell-depleted SCID mice to generate metastatic nodules in bone and multiple organs, and explored the correlation of the parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) with the bone metastasis. Although all the small-cell carcinoma cell lines (SBC-5, SBC-3, SBC-3/ADM, H69, H69/VP) formed metastatic nodules in multiple organs (liver, kidney, and lymph nodes), only SBC-5 cells reproducibly developed bone metastases. Squamous cell carcinoma (RERF-LC-AI) cells metastasized mainly into the liver and kidneys, whereas adenocarcinoma (PC-14, A549) mainly produced colonies in the lungs. As assessed by X-ray photography, the osteolytic bone metastases produced by SBC-5 cells were detected as early as on day 28, and all recipient mice developed bone metastasis by day 35. The expression of PTHrP in eight cell lines was directly correlated with the formation of bone metastasis. No correlation was observed between the formation of bone metastasis and the expression of other metastasis-related cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-11, TNF-alpha, VEGF, M-CSF). Consistent with the formation of bone metastasis by SBC-5 cells, the levels of PTHrP and calcium in the mouse serum were increased in a time-dependent manner, suggesting that PTHrP produced by human lung cancer may play a crucial role in the formation of bone metastasis and hypercalcemia. These findings indicate that a bone metastasis model of SBC-5 cells may be useful for clarifying the molecular aspects of the metastatic processes in different organ microenvironments and the development of therapeutic modalities for lung cancer

  17. Eradication of tumor colonization and invasion by a B cell-specific immunotoxin in a murine model for human primary intraocular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuqing; Mahesh, Sankaranarayana P; Shen, De Fen; Liu, Baoying; Siu, Willie O; Hwang, Frank S; Wang, Qing-Chen; Chan, Chi-Chao; Pastan, Ira; Nussenblatt, Robert B

    2006-11-01

    Human primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL) is predominantly a B cell-originated malignant disease with no appropriate animal models and effective therapies available. This study aimed to establish a mouse model to closely mimic human B-cell PIOL and to test the therapeutic potential of a recently developed immunotoxin targeting human B-cell lymphomas. Human B-cell lymphoma cells were intravitreally injected into severe combined immunodeficient mice. The resemblance of this tumor model to human PIOL was examined by fundoscopy, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, and evaluated for molecular markers. The therapeutic effectiveness of immunotoxin HA22 was tested by injecting the drug intravitreally. Results showed that the murine model resembles human PIOL closely. Pathologic examination revealed that the tumor cells initially colonized on the retinal surface, followed by infiltrating through the retinal layers, expanding preferentially in the subretinal space, and eventually penetrating through the retinal pigment epithelium into the choroid. Several putative molecular markers for human PIOL were expressed in vivo in this model. Tumor metastasis into the central nervous system was also observed. A single intravitreal injection of immunotoxin HA22 after the establishment of the PIOL resulted in complete regression of the tumor. This is the first report of a murine model that closely mimics human B-cell PIOL. This model may be a valuable tool in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of human PIOL and for the evaluation of new therapeutic approaches. The results of B cell-specific immunotoxin therapy may have clinical implications in treating human PIOL.

  18. A novel human gamma-globin gene vector for genetic correction of sickle cell anemia in a humanized sickle mouse model: critical determinants for successful correction.

    PubMed

    Perumbeti, Ajay; Higashimoto, Tomoyasu; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Franco, Robert; Meiselman, Herbert J; Witte, David; Malik, Punam

    2009-08-06

    We show that lentiviral delivery of human gamma-globin gene under beta-globin regulatory control elements in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) results in sufficient postnatal fetal hemoglobin (HbF) expression to correct sickle cell anemia (SCA) in the Berkeley "humanized" sickle mouse. Upon de-escalating the amount of transduced HSCs in transplant recipients, using reduced-intensity conditioning and varying gene transfer efficiency and vector copy number, we assessed critical parameters needed for correction. A systematic quantification of functional and hematologic red blood cell (RBC) indices, organ pathology, and life span was used to determine the minimal amount of HbF, F cells, HbF/F-cell, and gene-modified HSCs required for correcting the sickle phenotype. We show that long-term amelioration of disease occurred (1) when HbF exceeded 10%, F cells constituted two-thirds of the circulating RBCs, and HbF/F cell was one-third of the total hemoglobin in sickle RBCs; and (2) when approximately 20% gene-modified HSCs repopulated the marrow. Moreover, we show a novel model using reduced-intensity conditioning to determine genetically corrected HSC threshold that corrects a hematopoietic disease. These studies provide a strong preclinical model for what it would take to genetically correct SCA and are a foundation for the use of this vector in a human clinical trial.

  19. Differentiation of Neonatal Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Prostate Epithelial Cells: A Model to Study Prostate Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a . REPORT U b . ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 20 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code...mitomycin treated mouse urogenital mesenchyme and cultured in PrEGM (Lonza). Pictured left to right a ) cells imaged in bright field, b ) stained for p63 (red...J, Minden M, Paterson B , Caligiuri MA, Dick JE. A cell initiating human acute myeloid leukaemia after transplantation into SCID mice. Nature 1994

  20. Gold nanoparticle labeling of cells is a sensitive method to investigate cell distribution and migration in animal models of human disease.

    PubMed

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Schültke, Elisabeth; Hall, Christopher; Arfelli, Fulvia; Astolfo, Alberto; Rigon, Luigi; Round, Adam; Ataelmannan, Khalid; MacDonald, Sarah Rigley; Juurlink, Bernhard H J

    2011-10-01

    The ability to track cells in small-animal models of human disease is important because it gives the potential to improve our understanding of the processes of disease progression as well as our understanding of the therapeutic effects of interventions. In this study gold nanoparticles have been used as a permanent marker of implanted normal and malignant cell grafts in combination with a suitable x-ray apparatus. Using x-ray computed tomography the micrometric three-dimensional distribution of these marked cells could be displayed with penetration depth, high cell sensitivity and high spatial resolution in rodent models of human diseases. In principle the method allows quantification of cell numbers at any anatomical location over time in small animals.

  1. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  2. Human Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Toxicity Testing Models: Future Applications in New Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Vaibhav; Sureshkumar, Poornima; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Hescheler, Jurgen; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2016-01-01

    New drug discovery (NDD) is a fascinating discipline encompassing different facets of medicine, pharmacology, biotechnology and chemistry. NDD is very often restricted by efficacy or safety problems of the new clinical candidate in human patients. Drug regulatory authorities have provided various guidelines for advancement of safe new chemical entities (NCEs) in clinical trials which must be strictly followed. In spite of this, various drugs have failed in clinical trials or withdrawn from market because of human safety issues related to cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, neurotoxicity and teratogenicity. The failure of safety prediction was pointed to species specificity issues, lack of mechanistic toxicity data and inadequate clinical trials. These drugs not only affect human health but also cause loss of resources and time. The species specificity issues are partially addressed by use of primary human cells but their availability is very limited. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offer sources for generation of an unlimited number of human somatic cells. The emergence of mechanistic models for toxicity testing with transcriptomics, proteomics along with toxicokinetics readouts based on hESCs and hiPSCs is paving the way to design new human relevant testing strategies. Introduction of these models at the timeframe of lead selection and optimization in parallel with in vitro pharmacokinetic studies will significantly reduce compound attrition rate by selection of safer lead molecules. We focused on upcoming hESCs and hiPSCs based toxicity testing models and their future role to address safety gaps of present drug discovery and development.

  3. Current state and perspectives in modeling and control of human pluripotent stem cell expansion processes in stirred-tank bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Galvanauskas, Vytautas; Grincas, Vykantas; Simutis, Rimvydas; Kagawa, Yuki; Kino-Oka, Masahiro

    2016-12-26

    Implementation of model-based practices for process development, control, automation, standardization, and validation are important factors for therapeutic and industrial applications of human pluripotent stem cells. As robust cultivation strategies for pluripotent stem cell expansion and differentiation have yet to be determined, process development could be enhanced by application of mathematical models and advanced control systems to optimize growth conditions. Therefore, it is important to understand both the potential of possible applications and the apparent limitations of existing mathematical models to improve pluripotent stem cell cultivation technologies. In the present review, the authors focus on these issues as they apply to stem cell expansion processes. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2017.

  4. Notch Signaling and Schwann Cell Transformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Transformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Tom Kadesch, Ph.D...and Application to Human MPNSTs 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0209 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Tom Kadesch, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT...grant addresses the potential role of Notch signaling in the malignant transformation of neurofibromas to MPNSTs in patients with NF1. Our previous

  5. Human Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Model X Chromosome Dampening and X Inactivation.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Anna; Kim, Rachel; Chronis, Constantinos; Sabri, Shan; Bonora, Giancarlo; Theunissen, Thorold W; Kuoy, Edward; Langerman, Justin; Clark, Amander T; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Plath, Kathrin

    2017-01-05

    Naive human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be derived from primed hESCs or directly from blastocysts, but their X chromosome state has remained unresolved. Here, we show that the inactive X chromosome (Xi) of primed hESCs was reactivated in naive culture conditions. Like cells of the blastocyst, the resulting naive cells contained two active X chromosomes with XIST expression and chromosome-wide transcriptional dampening and initiated XIST-mediated X inactivation upon differentiation. Both establishment of and exit from the naive state (differentiation) happened via an XIST-negative XaXa intermediate. Together, these findings identify a cell culture system for functionally exploring the two X chromosome dosage compensation processes in early human development: X dampening and X inactivation. However, remaining differences between naive hESCs and embryonic cells related to mono-allelic XIST expression and non-random X inactivation highlight the need for further culture improvement. As the naive state resets Xi abnormalities seen in primed hESCs, it may provide cells better suited for downstream applications.

  6. Modeling and Therapy of Human Liver Diseases Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: How Far Have We Come?

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Tafaleng, Edgar; Kelly, Victoria; Roy-Chowdhury, Jayanta; Fox, Ira J.

    2011-01-01

    Rashid ST, Corbineau S, Hannan N, Marciniak SJ, Miranda E, Alexander G, Huang-Doran I, Griffin J, Ahrlund-Richter L, Skepper J, Semple R, Weber A, Lomas DA, Vallier L. Modeling inherited metabolic disorders of the liver using human induced pluripotent stem cells. J Clin Invest. 2010 Sep 1;120(9):3127–36. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells hold great promise for advancements in developmental biology, cell-based therapy, and modeling of human disease. Here, we examined the use of human iPS cells for modeling inherited metabolic disorders of the liver. Dermal fibroblasts from patients with various inherited metabolic diseases of the liver were used to generate a library of patient-specific human iPS cell lines. Each line was differentiated into hepatocytes using what we believe to be a novel 3-step differentiation protocol in chemically defined conditions. The resulting cells exhibited properties of mature hepatocytes, such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 metabolism. Moreover, cells generated from patients with 3 of the inherited metabolic conditions studied in further detail (alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial hypercholesterolemia, and glycogen storage disease type 1a) were found to recapitulate key pathological features of the diseases affecting the patients from which they were derived, such as aggregation of misfolded alpha1-antitrypsin in the endoplasmic reticulum, deficient LDL receptor-mediated cholesterol uptake, and elevated lipid and glycogen accumulation. Therefore, we report a simple and effective platform for hepatocyte generation from patient-specific human iPS cells. These patient-derived hepatocytes demonstrate that it is possible to model diseases whose phenotypes are caused by pathological dysregulation of key processes within adult cells. Espejel S, Roll GR, McLaughlin KJ, Lee AY, Zhang JY, Laird DJ, Okita K, Yamanaka S, Willenbring H. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes have the functional and proliferative

  7. NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a model to test therapeutics targeting human signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal models of human inflammatory diseases have limited predictive quality for human clinical trials for various reasons including species specific activation mechanisms and the immunological background of the animals which markedly differs from the genetically heterogeneous and often aged patient population. Objective Development of an animal model allowing for testing therapeutics targeting pathways involved in the development of Atopic Dermatitis (AD) with better translatability to the patient. Methods NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from AD and healthy volunteers were treated with IL-4 and the antagonistic IL-4 variant R121/Y124D (Pitrakinra). Levels of human (h)IgE, amount of B-, T- and plasma- cells and ratio of CD4 : CD8 positive cells served as read out for induction and inhibition of cell proliferation and hIgE secretion. Results were compared to in vitro analysis. Results hIgE secretion was induced by IL-4 and inhibited by the IL-4 antagonist Pitrakinra in vivo when formulated with methylcellulose. B-cells proliferated in response to IL-4 in vivo; the effect was abrogated by Pitrakinra. IL-4 shifted CD4 : CD8 ratios in vitro and in vivo when hPBMC derived from healthy volunteers were used. Pitrakinra reversed the effect. Human PBMC derived from patients with AD remained inert and engrafted mice reflected the individual responses observed in vitro. Conclusion NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human PBMC reflect the immunological history of the donors and provide a complementary tool to in vitro studies. Thus, studies in this model might provide data with better translatability from bench to bedside. PMID:23294516

  8. Recapitulation of spinal motor neuron-specific disease phenotypes in a human cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Bo; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Xue-Jun

    2013-03-01

    Establishing human cell models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) to mimic motor neuron-specific phenotypes holds the key to understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating disease. Here, we developed a closely representative cell model of SMA by knocking down the disease-determining gene, survival motor neuron (SMN), in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Our study with this cell model demonstrated that knocking down of SMN does not interfere with neural induction or the initial specification of spinal motor neurons. Notably, the axonal outgrowth of spinal motor neurons was significantly impaired and these disease-mimicking neurons subsequently degenerated. Furthermore, these disease phenotypes were caused by SMN-full length (SMN-FL) but not SMN-Δ7 (lacking exon 7) knockdown, and were specific to spinal motor neurons. Restoring the expression of SMN-FL completely ameliorated all of the disease phenotypes, including specific axonal defects and motor neuron loss. Finally, knockdown of SMN-FL led to excessive mitochondrial oxidative stress in human motor neuron progenitors. The involvement of oxidative stress in the degeneration of spinal motor neurons in the SMA cell model was further confirmed by the administration of N-acetylcysteine, a potent antioxidant, which prevented disease-related apoptosis and subsequent motor neuron death. Thus, we report here the successful establishment of an hESC-based SMA model, which exhibits disease gene isoform specificity, cell type specificity, and phenotype reversibility. Our model provides a unique paradigm for studying how motor neurons specifically degenerate and highlights the potential importance of antioxidants for the treatment of SMA.

  9. Human pluripotent stem cells: Prospects and challenges as a source of cardiomyocytes for in vitro modeling and cell-based cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Matthew E; Dai, Dao-Fu; Laflamme, Michael A

    2016-01-15

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an attractive source of cardiomyocytes with potential applications including disease modeling, drug discovery and safety screening, and novel cell-based cardiac therapies. Insights from embryology have contributed to the development of efficient, reliable methods capable of generating large quantities of human PSC-cardiomyocytes with cardiac purities ranging up to 90%. However, for human PSCs to meet their full potential, the field must identify methods to generate cardiomyocyte populations that are uniform in subtype (e.g. homogeneous ventricular cardiomyocytes) and have more mature structural and functional properties. For in vivo applications, cardiomyocyte production must be highly scalable and clinical grade, and we will need to overcome challenges including graft cell death, immune rejection, arrhythmogenesis, and tumorigenic potential. Here we discuss the types of human PSCs, commonly used methods to guide their differentiation into cardiomyocytes, the phenotype of the resultant cardiomyocytes, and the remaining obstacles to their successful translation.

  10. Survivin as a potential mediator to support autoreactive cell survival in myasthenia gravis: a human and animal model study.

    PubMed

    Kusner, Linda L; Ciesielski, Michael J; Marx, Alexander; Kaminski, Henry J; Fenstermaker, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the development and maintenance of autoimmunity in myasthenia gravis are poorly understood. In this investigation, we evaluate the role of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, in humans and in two animal models. We identified survivin expression in cells with B lymphocyte and plasma cells markers, and in the thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis. A portion of survivin-expressing cells specifically bound a peptide derived from the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptor indicating that they recognize the peptide. Thymuses of patients with myasthenia gravis had large numbers of survivin-positive cells with fewer cells in the thymuses of corticosteroid-treated patients. Application of a survivin vaccination strategy in mouse and rat models of myasthenia gravis demonstrated improved motor assessment, a reduction in acetylcholine receptor specific autoantibodies, and a retention of acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction, associated with marked reduction of survivin-expressing circulating CD20+ cells. These data strongly suggest that survivin expression in cells with lymphocyte and plasma cell markers occurs in patients with myasthenia gravis and in two animal models of myasthenia gravis. Survivin expression may be part of a mechanism that inhibits the apoptosis of autoreactive B cells in myasthenia gravis and other autoimmune disorders.

  11. Labelling and tracking of human mesenchymal stromal cells in preclinical studies and large animal models of degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Vaegler, Martin; Maerz, Jan K; Amend, Bastian; da Silva, Luis Arenas; Mannheim, Julia G; Fuchs, Kerstin; Will, Susanne; Sievert, Karl D; Stenzl, Arnulf; Hart, Melanie L; Aicher, Wilhelm K

    2014-01-01

    Success of stem cell therapies were reported in different medical disciplines, including haematology, rheumatology, orthopaedic surgery, traumatology, and others. Currently, more than 4000 clinical trials using stem cells have been completed or are underway, among which 378 investigated or are at present investigating mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). The majority of clinical trials using stem- or progenitor- cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and MSCs, target the immune system. However, therapies based on MSCs are increasingly implemented to treat symptoms in which failure of the resident stem cells in situ, or malfunction of tissues or structures are not associated with immune cells or inflammation, but instead are associated with mechanical or metabolic stress, ageing, developmental or acquired malformations, and other causes. To proceed further in the development of stem cell therapies as a safe and effective treatment for surgical and other medical specialities, the behaviour of MSCs implanted in preclinical models and their impact on the site of application need to be explored in detail. Depending on the pre-clinical model employed, tracking of labelled stem cells in live animals makes an enormous difference for exploration of the mechanisms and kinetics involved in MSC-mediated tissue regeneration. Here we review (pre-)clinically applicable key methods to label human MSCs for short and long-term observations in small and large animal models.

  12. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Brownjohn, Philip W; Smith, James; Portelius, Erik; Serneels, Lutgarde; Kvartsberg, Hlin; De Strooper, Bart; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J

    2017-03-06

    Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation.

  13. Characterisation of human tubular cell monolayers as a model of proximal tubular xenobiotic handling

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Colin D.A. Sayer, Rachel; Windass, Amy S.; Haslam, Iain S.; Broe, Marc E. de; D'Haese, Patrick C.; Verhulst, Anja

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine whether primary human tubular cell monolayers could provide a powerful tool with which to investigate the renal proximal tubular handling of xenobiotics. Human proximal and distal tubule/collecting duct cells were grown as monolayers on permeable filter supports. After 10 days in culture, proximal tubule cells remained differentiated and expressed a wide palette of transporters at the mRNA level including NaPi-IIa, SGLT1, SGLT2, OCT2, OCTN2, OAT1, OAT3, OAT4, MDR1, MRP2 and BCRP. At the protein level, the expression of a subset of transporters including NaPi-IIa, OAT1 and OAT3 was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry. Analysis of the expression of the ATP binding cassette efflux pumps MDR1, MRP2 and BCRP confirmed their apical membrane localisation. At the functional level, tubule cell monolayers retain the necessary machinery to mediate the net secretion of the prototypic substrates; PAH and creatinine. PAH secretion across the monolayer consisted of the uptake of PAH across the basolateral membrane by OAT1 and OAT3 and the apical exit of PAH by a probenecid and MK571-sensitive route consistent with actions of MRP2 or MRP4. Creatinine secretion was by OCT2-mediated uptake at the basolateral membrane and via MDR1 at the apical membrane. Functional expression of MDR1 and BCRP at the apical membrane was also demonstrated using a Hoechst 33342 dye. Similarly, measurement of calcein efflux demonstrated the functional expression of MRP2 at the apical membrane of cell monolayers. In conclusion, human tubular cell monolayers provide a powerful tool to investigate renal xenobiotic handling.

  14. Autoreactive T cells in a partially humanized murine model of T1D.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Falk, Ben; Unrath, Kellee; Nepom, Gerald T

    2007-04-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and insulin are implicated as target antigens in the pathogenesis of human diabetes through correlative measurements of humoral and cellular reactivity to them in diabetics and at-risk diabetic individuals. Recently, an age-dependent loss of tolerance to one of several naturally processed epitopes of GAD65 (555-567) has been observed to precede diabetes in diabetes-prone mice transgenic for diabetes-correlated human class II genes. Extended studies in these mice (RIP-B7/DR0404) now show that tolerance is maintained to another DR4-restricted naturally processed region within GAD65. While tolerance is lost to GAD65 (555-567) in B7/DR0404 mice prior to diabetes, these mice remain T cell-tolerant to GAD65 (273-286). Prediabetes loss of tolerance to GAD65 (555-567) has now been shown to correlate with an impaired response to exogenous glucose in an intraperitoneal (i.p.) glucose tolerance test. In addition, these mice exhibit a T cell response to insulin A(6-21) at the hyperglycemic state. Investigating a possible cause-and-effect relationship between T cell reactivity to GAD65 and diabetes pathogenesis, GAD65 (555-567) T cell receptor (TcR) transgenic mice have been generated and future work is aimed at understanding the importance of T cell GAD65 reactivity and its role in diabetes progression.

  15. Use of a SCID mouse/human lymphoma model to evaluate cytokine-induced killer cells with potent antitumor cell activity

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    C.B-17 severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice, which lack functional B and T lymphocytes, allow xenografts and, therefore, can be used to study the biology of human malignancies. Two different human B cell lymphoma cell lines, SU-DHL-4 and OCI-Ly8, which both harbor the t(14;18) chromosomal translocation, were injected into C.B-17 SCID mice. Mice injected intravenously or intraperitoneally developed tumors and died in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of tumor cells in various murine tissues could be demonstrated by a clonogenic tumor assay, staining of frozen sections with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against a human B cell antigen (CD19), and with the polymerase chain reaction technique. A protocol using cytotoxic effector cells was developed and used to selectively deplete the tumor cells from bone marrow. These cells were developed by growing peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), anti- CD3 mAb, and interleukin 2 (IL-2). The timing of IFN-gamma treatment was critical and optimal if IFN-gamma was added before IL-2 treatment. The cells that were stimulated by IFN-gamma, followed by IL-2, could be expanded by treatment with a mAb directed against CD3. These cells could be further activated by IL-1, but not by tumor necrosis factor alpha. With this protocol, a tumor cell kill of 3 logs was obtained as measured by a clonogenic assay. Interestingly, despite their high cytotoxic activity against lymphoma cells, these cells had little toxicity against a subset of normal human hematopoietic precursor cells (granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming units). These cells were further tested by treating murine bone marrow contaminated with the human lymphoma cell line SU-DHL-4, and injecting these cells into SCID mice to assay for tumor growth in vivo. The animals injected with bone marrow contaminated with SU-DHL-4 cells had enhanced survival if the bone marrow was treated with the cytokine-induced killer cells before

  16. Potential Large Animal Models for Gene Therapy of Human Genetic Diseases of Immune and Blood Cell Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Thomas R.; Adler, Rima L.; Hickstein, Dennis D.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic mutations involving the cellular components of the hematopoietic system—red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets—manifest clinically as anemia, infection, and bleeding. Although gene targeting has recapitulated many of these diseases in mice, these murine homologues are limited as translational models by their small size and brief life span as well as the fact that mutations induced by gene targeting do not always faithfully reflect the clinical manifestations of such mutations in humans. Many of these limitations can be overcome by identifying large animals with genetic diseases of the hematopoietic system corresponding to their human disease counterparts. In this article, we describe human diseases of the cellular components of the hematopoietic system that have counterparts in large animal species, in most cases carrying mutations in the same gene (CD18 in leukocyte adhesion deficiency) or genes in interacting proteins (DNA cross-link repair 1C protein and protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide in radiation-sensitive severe combined immunodeficiency). Furthermore, we describe the potential of these animal models to serve as disease-specific, preclinical models for testing the efficacy and safety of clinical interventions such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy approaches before their use in humans with the corresponding disease. PMID:19293460

  17. Potential large animal models for gene therapy of human genetic diseases of immune and blood cell systems.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Thomas R; Adler, Rima L; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2009-01-01

    Genetic mutations involving the cellular components of the hematopoietic system--red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets--manifest clinically as anemia, infection, and bleeding. Although gene targeting has recapitulated many of these diseases in mice, these murine homologues are limited as translational models by their small size and brief life span as well as the fact that mutations induced by gene targeting do not always faithfully reflect the clinical manifestations of such mutations in humans. Many of these limitations can be overcome by identifying large animals with genetic diseases of the hematopoietic system corresponding to their human disease counterparts. In this article, we describe human diseases of the cellular components of the hematopoietic system that have counterparts in large animal species, in most cases carrying mutations in the same gene (CD18 in leukocyte adhesion deficiency) or genes in interacting proteins (DNA cross-link repair 1C protein and protein kinase, DNA-activated catalytic polypeptide in radiation-sensitive severe combined immunodeficiency). Furthermore, we describe the potential of these animal models to serve as disease-specific preclinical models for testing the efficacy and safety of clinical interventions such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy before their use in humans with the corresponding disease.

  18. Human natural killer cell development.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2006-12-01

    Our understanding of human natural killer (NK) cell development lags far behind that of human B- or T-cell development. Much of our recent knowledge of this incomplete picture comes from experimental animal models that have aided in identifying fundamental in vivo processes, including those controlling NK cell homeostasis, self-tolerance, and the generation of a diverse NK cell repertoire. However, it has been difficult to fully understand the mechanistic details of NK cell development in humans, primarily because the in vivo cellular intermediates and microenvironments of this developmental pathway have remained elusive. Although there is general consensus that NK cell development occurs primarily within the bone marrow (BM), recent data implicate secondary lymphoid tissues as principal sites of NK cell development in humans. The strongest evidence stems from the observation that the newly described stages of human NK cell development are naturally and selectively enriched within lymph nodes and tonsils compared with blood and BM. In the current review, we provide an overview of these recent findings and discuss these in the context of existing tenets in the field of lymphocyte development.

  19. Sodium orthovanadate inhibits growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaohua; Ma, Yong; Xu, Zhilin; Wang, Dawei; Zhao, Baolei; Pan, Huayang; Wang, Jizhou; Xu, Dongsheng; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Pan, Shangha; Liu, Lianxin; Dai, Wenjie; Jiang, Hongchi

    2014-08-28

    The transition metal vanadium is widely distributed in the environment and exhibits various biological and physiological effects in the human body. As a well known vanadium compound, sodium orthovanadate (SOV) has shown promising antineoplastic activity in several human cancers. However, the effects of SOV on liver cancer are still unknown. In this study, for the first time, we showed that SOV could effectively suppress proliferation, induce G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and diminish the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) of HCC cells in vitro. In addition, our in vitro results were recapitulated in vivo, showing that SOV exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of growth of human HCC in an orthotopic model, evidenced by the reduction in tumor size, proliferation index and microvessel density, and increase in cell apoptosis. Most important, we found that SOV could inhibit autophagy in HCC cells in vitro and in vivo, which plays a prodeath role. Thus, our findings suggest that SOV could effectively suppress the growth of human HCC through the regulations of proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and autophagy, and thus may act as a potential therapeutic agent in HCC treatment.

  20. RNASET2 silencing affects miRNAs and target gene expression pattern in a human ovarian cancer cell model.

    PubMed

    Turconi, Giovanna; Scaldaferri, Debora; Fabbri, Marco; Monti, Laura; Lualdi, Marta; Pedrini, Edoardo; Gribaldo, Laura; Taramelli, Roberto; Acquati, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    Ribonucleases (RNases) are hydrolytic enzymes endowed with the ability to either process or degrade ribonucleic acids. Among the many biological functions assigned to RNases, a growing attention has been recently devoted to the control of cancer growth, in the attempt to bring novel therapeutic approaches to clinical oncology. Indeed, several enzymes belonging to different ribonuclease families have been reported in the last decade to display a marked oncosuppressive activity in a wide range of experimental models. The human RNASET2 gene, the only member of the highly conserved T2/Rh/S family of endoribonucleolytic enzymes described in our species, has been shown to display oncosuppressive roles in both in vitro and in vivo models representing several human malignancies. In the present study, we extend previous findings obtained in ovarian cancer models to shed further light on the cell-autonomous roles played by this gene in the context of its oncosuppresive role and to show that RNASET2 silencing can significantly affect the transcriptional output in one of the most thoroughly investigated human ovarian cancer cell lines. Moreover, we report for the first time that RNASET2-mediated changes in the cell transcriptome are in part mediated by its apparent ability to affect the cell's microRNA expression pattern.

  1. Ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model using human normal vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yaqi; Yang, Yan; Guo, Juanjuan; Dai, Ying; Ye, Lina; Qiu, Jianbin; Zeng, Zhihong; Wu, Xiaoting; Xing, Yanmei; Long, Xiang; Wu, Xufeng; Ye, Lin; Wang, Shubin; Li, Hui

    2017-01-27

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infects human genital mucosa and establishes life-long latent infection. It is unmet need to establish a human cell-based microphysiological system for virus biology and anti-viral drug discovery. One of barriers is lacking of culture system of normal epithelial cells in vitro over decades. In this study, we established human normal vaginal epithelial cell (HNVEC) culture using co-culture system. HNVEC cells were then propagated rapidly and stably in a defined culture condition. HNVEC cells exhibited a normal diploid karyotype and formed the well-defined and polarized spheres in matrigel three-dimension (3D) culture, while malignant cells (HeLa) formed disorganized and nonpolar solid spheres. HNVEC cells had a normal cellular response to DNA damage and had no transforming property using soft agar assays. HNVEC expressed epithelial marker cytokeratin 14 (CK14) and p63, but not cytokeratin 18 (CK18). Next, we reconstructed HNVEC-derived 3D vaginal epithelium using air-liquid interface (ALI) culture. This 3D vaginal epithelium has the basal and apical layers with expression of epithelial markers as its originated human vaginal tissue. Finally, we established an HSV-2 infection model based on the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium. After inoculation of HSV-2 (G strain) at apical layer of the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium, we observed obvious pathological effects gradually spreading from the apical layer to basal layer with expression of a viral protein. Thus, we established an ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model that can be used for HSV-2 virology and anti-viral drug discovery.

  2. Human glomerular mesangial IP15 cell line as a suitable model for in vitro cadmium cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    L'Azou, B; Dubus, I; Ohayon-Courtès, C; Cambar, J

    2007-07-01

    Cadmium represents a major environmental pollutant that may induce severe damage, especially in the kidney where cadmium accumulates. While cadmium is known to severely impair renal tubular functions, glomerular structures are also potential targets. Owing to their contractile properties, glomerular mesangial cells play a major role in the control of glomerular hemodynamics and influence the ultrafiltration coefficient. Cell cultures provide alternative and fruitful models for study of in vitro toxicology. However, the use of primary human mesangial cell cultures is hampered by their limited survival span and their rapid dedifferentiation during passages. This study presents a human stable immortalized mesangial cell line, designated IP15. Cell characteristics were investigated by the detection of known mesangial markers, as well as their ability to contract in response to angiotensin II. IP15 cells were used to investigate cadmium uptake and morphological changes such as cell contraction and cytoskeleton protein expression. The IC(50) cytotoxicity index was obtained with 3.55 micromol/L using neutral red assay for 24 h. After cadmium exposure (1 micromol/L, determined as nonlethal concentration), 0.38 microg Cd/mg protein was internalized by the cells as evaluated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES). Cadmium induced a significant cell surface reduction that correlated with smooth-muscle alpha-actin disorganization. Thus, the IP15 cell line is a suitable model for study of in vitro cadmium cytotoxicity in mesangial cells and allows sufficient material to be obtained for future studies of the intracellular effects of cadmium exposure.

  3. Global Transcriptomic Analysis of Model Human Cell Lines Exposed to Surface-Modified Gold Nanoparticles: The Effect of Surface Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Grzincic, E. M.; Yang, J. A.; Drnevich, J.; Falagan-Lotsch, P.; Murphy, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are attractive for biomedical applications not only for their remarkable physical properties, but also for the ease of which their surface chemistry can be manipulated. Many applications involve functionalization of the Au NP surface in order to improve biocompatibility, attach targeting ligands or carry drugs. However, changes in cells exposed to Au NPs of different surface chemistries have been observed, and little is known about how Au NPs and their surface coatings may impact cellular gene expression. The gene expression of two model human cell lines, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and prostate cancer cells (PC3) was interrogated by microarray analysis of over 14,000 human genes. The cell lines were exposed to four differently functionalized Au NPs: citrate, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), and lipid coatings combined with alkanethiols or PAH. Gene functional annotation categories and weighted gene correlation network analysis were used in order to connect gene expression changes to common cellular functions and to elucidate expression patterns between Au NP samples. Coated Au NPs affect genes implicated in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metabolism in HDF cells, and inflammation, angiogenesis, proliferation apoptosis regulation, survival and invasion in PC3 cells. Subtle changes in surface chemistry, such as the initial net charge, lability of the ligand, and underlying layers greatly influence the degree of expression change and the type of cellular pathway affected. PMID:25491924

  4. Reliable and versatile immortal muscle cell models from healthy and myotonic dystrophy type 1 primary human myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Boris; Borgia, Doriana; Giunco, Silvia; Malena, Adriana; Kiyono, Tohru; Salvatori, Sergio; De Rossi, Anita; Giardina, Emiliano; Sangiuolo, Federica; Pegoraro, Elena; Vergani, Lodovica; Botta, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    Primary human skeletal muscle cells (hSkMCs) are invaluable tools for deciphering the basic molecular mechanisms of muscle-related biological processes and pathological alterations. Nevertheless, their use is quite restricted due to poor availability, short life span and variable purity of the cells during in vitro culture. Here, we evaluate a recently published method of hSkMCs immortalization, relying on ectopic expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and telomerase (TERT) in myoblasts from healthy donors (n=3) and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients (n=2). The efficacy to maintain the myogenic and non-transformed phenotype, as well as the main pathogenetic hallmarks of DM1, has been assessed. Combined expression of the three genes i) maintained the CD56(NCAM)-positive myoblast population and differentiation potential; ii) preserved the non-transformed phenotype and iii) maintained the CTG repeat length, amount of nuclear foci and aberrant alternative splicing in immortal muscle cells. Moreover, immortal hSkMCs displayed attractive additional features such as structural maturation of sarcomeres, persistence of Pax7-positive cells during differentiation and complete disappearance of nuclear foci following (CAG)7 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) treatment. Overall, the CCND1, CDK4 and TERT immortalization yields versatile, reliable and extremely useful human muscle cell models to investigate the basic molecular features of human muscle cell biology, to elucidate the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms and to test new therapeutic approaches for DM1 in vitro.

  5. Modeling the dose-response relationship for cytotoxicity of human cells exposed to chemical carcinogens. [N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Heflich, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    Compounds like N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (N-AcO-AAF) result from the in vivo reduction of nitrate derivatives of benzo(..cap alpha..)pyrene. The dose-response relationship for survival of cloning ability in human fibroblasts exposed to N-AcO-AAF is being investigated to obtain a better understanding of the carcinogenic potential of coal-related air pollutants. A model is presented which correlates the survival of normal human fibroblasts after exposure to N-AcO-AAF with the rate of excision of carcinogen residues bound to DNA. The model predicts that the survival of normal cells, S/sub N/, is related to the survival of repair deficient cells, S/sub XPA/, by the equation 1n(S/sub N/) = 1n(S/sub XPA/) (1-f) where f is the fraction of potentially lethal damage repaired in the normal cell at a given dose of carcinogen. The rate of excision of AAF residues from the DNA of confluent human fibroblasts was measured over the same dose range as the survival studies. This information together with the dose-response relationship for survival of normal and repair deficient cells permits a determination of the mean number of adducts required to produce a potentially lethal lesion and the effective time available for repair. The model can be used to predict the mean lifetime of carcinogen residues on the DNA of partially repair deficient cells and the effect of recovery on the survival of normal cells. Extensions of the model to account for shoulders on the dose-response relationship curves are also discussed.

  6. IFPA Meeting 2012 Workshop Report I: comparative placentation and animal models, advanced techniques in placental histopathology, human pluripotent stem cells as a model for trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, W E; Carter, A M; De Mestre, A M; Golos, T G; Jeschke, U; Kusakabe, K; Laurent, L C; Parast, M M; Roberts, R M; Robinson, J M; Rutherford, J; Soma, H; Takizawa, T; Ui-Tei, K; Lash, G E

    2013-03-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2012 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops related to various aspects of placental biology but collectively covered areas of models and technical issues involved in placenta research: 1) comparative placentation and animal models; 2) advanced techniques in placental histopathology; 3) human pluripotent stem cells as a model for trophoblast differentiation.

  7. KRAS-mutation status dependent effect of zoledronic acid in human non-small cell cancer preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Kenessey, István; Kói, Krisztina; Horváth, Orsolya; Cserepes, Mihály; Molnár, Dávid; Izsák, Vera; Dobos, Judit; Hegedűs, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    Background In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) KRAS-mutant status is a negative prognostic and predictive factor. Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates inhibit prenylation of small G-proteins (e.g. Ras, Rac, Rho) and thus may affect proliferation and migration. In our preclinical work, we investigated the effect of an aminobisphosphonate compound (zoledronic acid) on mutant and wild type KRAS-expressing human NSCLC cell lines. Results We confirmed that zoledronic acid was unable to inhibit the prenylation of mutant K-Ras unlike in the case of wild type K-Ras. In case of in vitro proliferation, the KRAS-mutant human NSCLC cell lines showed resistance to zoledronic acid wild-type KRAS-cells proved to be sensitive. Combinatory application of zoledronic acid enhanced the cytostatic effect of cisplatin. Zoledronic acid did not induce significant apoptosis. In xenograft model, zoledronic acid significantly reduced the weight of wild type KRAS-EGFR-expressing xenograft tumor by decreasing the proliferative capacity. Futhermore, zoledronic acid induced VEGF expression and improved in vivo tumor vascularization. Materials and methods Membrane association of K-Ras was examined by Western-blot. In vitro cell viability, apoptotic cell death and migration were measured in NSCLC lines with different molecular background. The in vivo effect of zoledronic acid was investigated in a SCID mouse subcutaneous xenograft model. Conclusions The in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effect of zoledronic acid was based on the blockade of cell cycle in wild type KRAS-expressing human NSCLC cells. The zoledronic acid induced vascularization supported in vivo cytostatic effect. Our preclinical investigation suggests that patients with wild type KRAS-expressing NSCLC could potentially benefit from aminobisphosphonate therapy. PMID:27780929

  8. Synaptic dysregulation in a human iPS cell model of mental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhexing; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Guo, Ziyuan; Lalli, Matthew A.; Wang, Xinyuan; Su, Yijing; Kim, Nam-Shik; Yoon, Ki-Jun; Shin, Jaehoon; Zhang, Ce; Makri, Georgia; Nauen, David; Yu, Huimei; Guzman, Elmer; Chiang, Cheng-Hsuan; Yoritomo, Nadine; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Zou, Jizhong; Christian, Kimberly M.; Cheng, Linzhao; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russell L.; Chen, Gong; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated neurodevelopment with altered structural and functional connectivity is believed to underlie many neuropsychiatric disorders1, and ‘a disease of synapses’ is the major hypothesis for the biological basis of schizophrenia2. Although this hypothesis has gained indirect support from human post-mortem brain analyses2–4 and genetic studies5–10, little is known about the pathophysiology of synapses in patient neurons and how susceptibility genes for mental disorders could lead to synaptic deficits in humans. Genetics of most psychiatric disorders are extremely complex due to multiple susceptibility variants with low penetrance and variable phenotypes11. Rare, multiply affected, large families in which a single genetic locus is probably responsible for conferring susceptibility have proven invaluable for the study of complex disorders. Here we generated induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from four members of a family in which a frameshift mutation of disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) co-segregated with major psychiatric disorders12 and we further produced different isogenic iPS cell lines via gene editing. We showed that mutant DISC1 causes synaptic vesicle release deficits in iPS-cell-derived forebrain neurons. Mutant DISC1 depletes wild-type DISC1 protein and, furthermore, dysregulates expression of many genes related to synapses and psychiatric disorders in human forebrain neurons. Our study reveals that a psychiatric disorder relevant mutation causes synapse deficits and transcriptional dysregulation in human neurons and our findings provide new insight into the molecular and synaptic etiopathology of psychiatric disorders. PMID:25132547

  9. Ex-Vivo Tissues Engineering Modeling for Reconstructive Surgery Using Human Adult Adipose Stem Cells and Polymeric Nanostructured Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Morena, Francesco; Argentati, Chiara; Calzoni, Eleonora; Cordellini, Marino; Emiliani, Carla; D’Angelo, Francesco; Martino, Sabata

    2016-01-01

    The major challenge for stem cell translation regenerative medicine is the regeneration of damaged tissues by creating biological substitutes capable of recapitulating the missing function in the recipient host. Therefore, the current paradigm of tissue engineering strategies is the combination of a selected stem cell type, based on their capability to differentiate toward committed cell lineages, and a biomaterial, that, due to own characteristics (e.g., chemical, electric, mechanical property, nano-topography, and nanostructured molecular components), could serve as active scaffold to generate a bio-hybrid tissue/organ. Thus, effort has been made on the generation of in vitro tissue engineering modeling. Here, we present an in vitro model where human adipose stem cells isolated from lipoaspirate adipose tissue and breast adipose tissue, cultured on polymeric INTEGRA® Meshed Bilayer Wound Matrix (selected based on conventional clinical applications) are evaluated for their potential application for reconstructive surgery toward bone and adipose tissue. We demonstrated that human adipose stem cells isolated from lipoaspirate and breast tissue have similar stemness properties and are suitable for tissue engineering applications. Finally, the overall results highlighted lipoaspirate adipose tissue as a good source for the generation of adult adipose stem cells.

  10. Mouse Models of Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type-1–Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, B.; Niewiesk, S.; Lairmore, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a number of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory conditions including HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Development of animal models to study the pathogenesis of HTLV-1–associated diseases has been problematic. Mechanisms of early infection and cell-to-cell transmission can be studied in rabbits and nonhuman primates, but lesion development and reagents are limited in these species. The mouse provides a cost-effective, highly reproducible model in which to study factors related to lymphoma development and the preclinical efficacy of potential therapies against ATL. The ability to manipulate transgenic mice has provided important insight into viral genes responsible for lymphocyte transformation. Expansion of various strains of immunodeficient mice has accelerated the testing of drugs and targeted therapy against ATL. This review compares various mouse models to illustrate recent advances in the understanding of HTLV-1–associated ATL development and how improvements in these models are critical to the future development of targeted therapies against this aggressive T-cell lymphoma. PMID:20442421

  11. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models.

    PubMed

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire; Buob, David; Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien; Flamand, Vincent; Hennino, Marie-Flore; Perrais, Michaël; Lo-Guidice, Jean-Marc; Broly, Franck; Cauffiez, Christelle; Glowacki, François

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies.

  12. Surface-induced modulation of human mesenchymal progenitor cells. An in vitro model for early implant integration.

    PubMed

    Baschong, Werner; Jaquiery, Claude; Martin, Ivan; Lambrecht, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    Clinical experience indicates that the surface architecture of dental implants has an important impact on their integration. This has been related to the finding that differentially treated substrates can modulate the expression of osteogenic markers in various bone-related cell lines and primary cells. Here, we investigated the influence of surface architecture on the differentiation of human mesenchymal progenitor cells (HMPC) from adult bone marrow, i. e. the cells likely involved in initial bone synthesis at the bone-implant interface. Cells were seeded on machine surfaced (MS) or sandblasted/acid etched (SE) titanium discs in agarose-coated dishes, and on polystyrene (PS) controls. On all substrates cell densities did not change between days 7 and 14. Cell numbers were higher on SE, likely due to increased attachment to the rougher material. Alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) was similar on all substrates, whereas mRNA expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) at day 14 was about tenfold higher on SE (p < 0.05%). The SE-related increase of BSP in progenitor cells indicates an earlier differentiation of immigrated cells and could thus explain earlier implant integration and shorter time to functional loading observed in the clinic. The in vitro model and BSP quantification could be used to screen for changes in osteogenic cell differentiation induced by specific implant surfaces, with potential relevance on the prediction of bone-implant integration.

  13. Neuro-regeneration therapy using human Muse cells is highly effective in a mouse intracerebral hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Norihito; Kakuta, Kiyohide; Wang, Liang; Naraoka, Masato; Uchida, Hiroki; Wakao, Shohei; Dezawa, Mari; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2017-02-01

    A novel type of non-tumorigenic pluripotent stem cell, the Muse cell (multi-lineage, differentiating stress enduring cell), resides in the connective tissue and in cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and is reported to differentiate into multiple cell types according to the microenvironment to repair tissue damage. We examined the efficiency of Muse cells in a mouse intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) model. Seventy μl of cardiac blood was stereotactically injected into the left putamen of immunodeficient mice. Five days later, 2 × 10(5) of human bone marrow MSC-derived Muse cells (n = 6) or cells other than Muse cells in MSCs (non-Muse, n = 6) or the same volume of PBS (n = 11) was injected into the ICH cavity. Water maze and motor function tests were implemented for 68 days, and immunohistochemistry for NeuN, MAP2 and GFAP was done. The Muse group showed impressive recovery: Recovery was seen in the water maze after day 19, and motor functions after 5 days was compared with the other two groups, with a significant statistical difference (p < 0.05). The survival rate of the engrafted cells in the Muse group was significantly higher than in the non-Muse group (p < 0.05) at day 69, and those cells showed positivity for NeuN (~57%) and MAP-2 (~41.6%). Muse cells could remain in the ICH brain, differentiate into neural-lineage cells and restore functions without inducing them into neuronal cells by gene introduction and cytokine treatment prior to transplantation. A simple collection of Muse cells and their supply to the brain in naïve state facilitates regenerative therapy in ICH.

  14. Transplantation of human neural stem cells restores cognition in an immunodeficient rodent model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Haus, Daniel L; López-Velázquez, Luci; Gold, Eric M; Cunningham, Kelly M; Perez, Harvey; Anderson, Aileen J; Cummings, Brian J

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans can result in permanent tissue damage and has been linked to cognitive impairment that lasts years beyond the initial insult. Clinically effective treatment strategies have yet to be developed. Transplantation of human neural stem cells (hNSCs) has the potential to restore cognition lost due to injury, however, the vast majority of rodent TBI/hNSC studies to date have evaluated cognition only at early time points, typically <1month post-injury and cell transplantation. Additionally, human cell engraftment and long-term survival in rodent models of TBI has been difficult to achieve due to host immunorejection of the transplanted human cells, which confounds conclusions pertaining to transplant-mediated behavioral improvement. To overcome these shortfalls, we have developed a novel TBI xenotransplantation model that utilizes immunodeficient athymic nude (ATN) rats as the host recipient for the post-TBI transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived NSCs and have evaluated cognition in these animals at long-term (≥2months) time points post-injury. We report that immunodeficient ATN rats demonstrate hippocampal-dependent spatial memory deficits (Novel Place, Morris Water Maze), but not non-spatial (Novel Object) or emotional/anxiety-related (Elevated Plus Maze, Conditioned Taste Aversion) deficits, at 2-3months post-TBI, confirming that ATN rats recapitulate some of the cognitive deficits found in immunosufficient animal strains. Approximately 9-25% of transplanted hNSCs survived for at least 5months post-transplantation and differentiated into mature neurons (NeuN, 18-38%), astrocytes (GFAP, 13-16%), and oligodendrocytes (Olig2, 11-13%). Furthermore, while this model of TBI (cortical impact) targets primarily cortex and the underlying hippocampus and generates a large lesion cavity, hNSC transplantation facilitated cognitive recovery without affecting either lesion volume or total spared cortical or hippocampal

  15. Establishment of human iPSC-based models for the study and targeting of glioma initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Nivet, Emmanuel; Xia, Yun; Hishida, Tomoaki; Aguirre, Aitor; Ocampo, Alejandro; Ma, Li; Morey, Robert; Krause, Marie N.; Zembrzycki, Andreas; Ansorge, Olaf; Vazquez-Ferrer, Eric; Dubova, Ilir; Reddy, Pradeep; Lam, David; Hishida, Yuriko; Wu, Min-Zu; Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez; O'Leary, Dennis; Wahl, Geoffrey M.; Verma, Inder M.; Laurent, Louise C.; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Glioma tumour-initiating cells (GTICs) can originate upon the transformation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Studies on GTICs have focused on primary tumours from which GTICs could be isolated and the use of human embryonic material. Recently, the somatic genomic landscape of human gliomas has been reported. RTK (receptor tyrosine kinase) and p53 signalling were found dysregulated in ∼90% and 86% of all primary tumours analysed, respectively. Here we report on the use of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for modelling gliomagenesis. Dysregulation of RTK and p53 signalling in hiPSC-derived NPCs (iNPCs) recapitulates GTIC properties in vitro. In vivo transplantation of transformed iNPCs leads to highly aggressive tumours containing undifferentiated stem cells and their differentiated derivatives. Metabolic modulation compromises GTIC viability. Last, screening of 101 anti-cancer compounds identifies three molecules specifically targeting transformed iNPCs and primary GTICs. Together, our results highlight the potential of hiPSCs for studying human tumourigenesis. PMID:26899176

  16. Intrinsic neurophysiological properties of hilar ectopic and normotopic dentate granule cells in human temporal lobe epilepsy and a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Althaus, A. L.; Sagher, O.; Parent, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Hilar ectopic dentate granule cells (DGCs) are a salient feature of aberrant plasticity in human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and most rodent models of the disease. Recent evidence from rodent TLE models suggests that hilar ectopic DGCs contribute to hyperexcitability within the epileptic hippocampal network. Here we investigate the intrinsic excitability of DGCs from humans with TLE and the rat pilocarpine TLE model with the objective of comparing the neurophysiology of hilar ectopic DGCs to their normotopic counterparts in the granule cell layer (GCL). We recorded from 36 GCL and 7 hilar DGCs from human TLE tissue. Compared with GCL DGCs, hilar DGCs in patient tissue exhibited lower action potential (AP) firing rates, more depolarized AP threshold, and differed in single AP waveform, consistent with an overall decrease in excitability. To evaluate the intrinsic neurophysiology of hilar ectopic DGCs, we made recordings from retrovirus-birthdated, adult-born DGCs 2–4 mo after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus or sham treatment in rats. Hilar DGCs from epileptic rats exhibited higher AP firing rates than normotopic DGCs from epileptic or control animals. They also displayed more depolarized resting membrane potential and wider AP waveforms, indicating an overall increase in excitability. The contrasting findings between disease and disease model may reflect differences between the late-stage disease tissue available from human surgical specimens and the earlier disease stage examined in the rat TLE model. These data represent the first neurophysiological characterization of ectopic DGCs from human hippocampus and prospectively birthdated ectopic DGCs in a rodent TLE model. PMID:25429123

  17. Three Dimensional Human Neuro-Spheroid Model of Alzheimer’s Disease Based on Differentiated Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Kyu; Velazquez Sanchez, Clara; Chen, Mei; Morin, Peter J.; Wells, John M.; Hanlon, Eugene B.

    2016-01-01

    The testing of candidate drugs to slow progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) requires clinical trials that are lengthy and expensive. Efforts to model the biochemical milieu of the AD brain may be greatly facilitated by combining two cutting edge technologies to generate three-dimensional (3D) human neuro-spheroid from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from AD subjects. We created iPSC from blood cells of five AD patients and differentiated them into 3D human neuronal culture. We characterized neuronal markers of our 3D neurons by immunocytochemical staining to validate the differentiation status. To block the generation of pathologic amyloid β peptides (Aβ), the 3D-differentiated AD neurons were treated with inhibitors targeting β-secretase (BACE1) and γ-secretases. As predicted, both BACE1 and γ-secretase inhibitors dramatically decreased Aβ generation in iPSC-derived neural cells derived from all five AD patients, under standard two-dimensional (2D) differentiation conditions. However, BACE1 and γ-secretase inhibitors showed less potency in decreasing Aβ levels in neural cells differentiated under 3D culture conditions. Interestingly, in a single subject AD1, we found that BACE1 inhibitor treatment was not able to significantly reduce Aβ42 levels. To investigate underlying molecular mechanisms, we performed proteomic analysis of 3D AD human neuronal cultures including AD1. Proteomic analysis revealed specific reduction of several proteins that might contribute to a poor inhibition of BACE1 in subject AD1. To our knowledge, this is the first iPSC-differentiated 3D neuro-spheroid model derived from AD patients’ blood. Our results demonstrate that our 3D human neuro-spheroid model can be a physiologically relevant and valid model for testing efficacy of AD drug. PMID:27684569

  18. A Synthetic Model of Human Beta-Thalassemia Erythropoiesis Using CD34+ Cells from Healthy Adult Donors

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Colleen; de Vasconcellos, Jaira F.; Noh, Seung-Jae; Rabel, Antoinette; Meier, Emily R.; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Based upon the lack of clinical samples available for research in many laboratories worldwide, a significant gap exists between basic and clinical studies of beta-thalassemia major. To bridge this gap, we developed an artificially engineered model for human beta thalassemia by knocking down beta-globin gene and protein expression in cultured CD34+ cells obtained from healthy adults. Lentiviral-mediated transduction of beta-globin shRNA (beta-KD) caused imbalanced globin chain production. Beta-globin mRNA was reduced by 90% compared to controls, while alpha-globin mRNA levels were maintained. HPLC analyses revealed a 96% reduction in HbA with only a minor increase in HbF. During the terminal phases of differentiation (culture days 14–21), beta-KD cells demonstrated increased levels of insoluble alpha-globin, as well as activated caspase-3. The majority of the beta-KD cells underwent apoptosis around the polychromatophilic stage of maturation. GDF15, a marker of ineffective erythropoiesis in humans with thalassemia, was significantly increased in the culture supernatants from the beta-KD cells. Knockdown of beta-globin expression in cultured primary human erythroblasts provides a robust ex vivo model for beta-thalassemia. PMID:23861885

  19. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion.

  20. Monocyte-expressed urokinase regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell migration in a coculture model.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Angelika; Tkachuk, Sergey; Lutter, Steffen; Haller, Hermann; Dietz, Rainer; Lipp, Martin; Dumler, Inna

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with monocytes recruited to the arterial wall at a site of injury, with resultant modulation of VSMC growth and migration, are central to the development of vascular intimal thickening. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expressed by monocytes is a potent chemotactic factor for VSMC and might serve for the acceleration of vascular remodeling. In this report, we demonstrate that coculture of human VSMC with freshly isolated peripheral blood-derived human monocytes results in significant VSMC migration that increases during the coculture period. Accordingly, VSMC adhesion was inhibited with similar kinetics. VSMC proliferation, however, was not affected and remained at the same basal level during the whole period of coculture. The increase of VSMC migration in coculture was equivalent to the uPA-induced migration of monocultured VSMC and was blocked by addition into coculture of soluble uPAR (suPAR). Analysis of uPA and uPAR expression in cocultured cells demonstrated that monocytes are a major source of uPA, whose expression increases in coculture five-fold, whereas VSMC display an increased expression of cell surface-associated uPAR. These findings indicate that upregulated uPA production by monocytes following vascular injury acts most likely as an endogenous activator of VSMC migration contributing to the remodeling of vessel walls.

  1. Progenitor cell therapy for sacral pressure sore: a pilot study with a novel human chronic wound model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic wounds are a major health-care issue, but research is limited by the complexity and heterogeneity in terms of wound etiology as well as patient-related factors. A suitable animal model that replicates the situation in humans is not available. Therefore, the aim of the present work is to present a standardized human wound model and the data of a pilot study of topically applied progenitor cells in a sacral pressure sore. Methods Three patients underwent cell harvest from the iliac crest at the time of the initial debridement. Forty-eight hours after bone marrow harvest and debridement, the CD34+ selected cell suspension was injected into the wound. With the aid of a laser scanner, three-dimensional analyses of wound morphometry were performed until the defect was reconstructed with a local flap 3 weeks after debridement. Results Decreases in volume to 60% ± 6% of baseline on the sham side and to 52% ± 3% of baseline on the cell side were measured. Histologic work-up revealed no signs of metaplastic, dysplastic, or neoplastic proliferation/differentiation after progenitor cell treatment. CD34+ cells were detected in the biopsies of day 0. Conclusions The pressure sore wound model allows investigation of the initial 3 weeks after cell-based therapy. Objective outcome analysis in terms of wound volume and histology can be performed without, or with, minimal additional morbidity, and the anatomy of the sacral area allows a control and study side in the same patient. Therefore, this model can serve as a standard for wound-healing studies. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00535548. PMID:24476740

  2. Encapsulated human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by alginate gel beads as an in vitro metastasis model

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiao-xi; Liu, Chang; Liu, Yang; Li, Nan; Guo, Xin; Wang, Shu-jun; Sun, Guang-wei; Wang, Wei; Ma, Xiao-jun

    2013-08-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer and often forms metastases, which are the most important prognostic factors. For further elucidation of the mechanism underlying the progression and metastasis of HCC, a culture system mimicking the in vivo tumor microenvironment is needed. In this study, we investigated the metastatic ability of HCC cells cultured within alginate gel (ALG) beads. In the culture system, HCC cells formed spheroids by proliferation and maintained in nuclear abnormalities. The gene and protein expression of metastasis-related molecules was increased in ALG beads, compared with the traditional adhesion culture. Furthermore, several gene expression levels in ALG bead culture system were even closer to liver cancer tissues. More importantly, in vitro invasion assay showed that the invasion cells derived from ALG beads was 7.8-fold higher than adhesion cells. Our results indicated that the in vitro three-dimensional (3D) model based on ALG beads increased metastatic ability compared with adhesion culture, even partly mimicked the in vivo tumor tissues. Moreover, due to the controllable preparation conditions, steady characteristics and production at large-scale, the 3D ALG bead model would become an important tool used in the high-throughput screening of anti-metastasis drugs and the metastatic mechanism research. -- Highlights: •We established a 3D metastasis model mimicking the metastatic ability in vivo. •The invasion ability of cells derived from our model was increased significantly. •The model is easy to reproduce, convenient to handle, and amenable for large-scale.

  3. Electrophysiological properties under heart failure conditions in a human ventricular cell: a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Elshrif, Mohamed M; Pengcheng Shi; Cherry, Elizabeth M

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the major diseases across the world. During HF the electrophysiology of the failing heart is remodeled, which renders the heart more susceptible to ventricular arrhythmias. In this study, we quantitatively analyze the effects of electrophysiological remodeling of the major currents of human ventricular myocytes on the dynamics of the failing heart. We develop a HF model using a modified version of a recently published model of the human ventricular action potential, the O'Hara-Virag-Varro-Rudy (OVVR) model. The proposed HF model incorporates recently available HF clinical data. It can reproduce most of the action potential (AP) properties of failing myocytes, including action potential duration (APD), amplitude (APA), notch (APN), plateau (APP), resting membrane potential (RMP), and maximum upstroke velocity (dV/dtmax). In addition, the model reproduces the behavior of the [Na+], concentration and [Ca(2)+]i dynamics. Moreover, the HF model exhibits alternans with a fast pacing frequency and can induce early afterdepolarizations (EADs). Additionally, blocking the late sodium current shortens the APD and suppresses EADs, in agreement with experimental findings. The dynamics of the proposed model are assessed through investigating the rate dependence of the AP and the dynamics of the major currents. The steady-state (S-S) and S1-S2 restitution curves along with accommodation to an abrupt change in cycle length were evaluated. Our study should help to elucidate the roles of alterations in electrophysiological properties during HF. Also, this HF cellular model could be used to study HF in a realistic geometry and could be embedded into a model of HF electromechanics to investigate electrical and mechanical properties simultaneously during HF.

  4. Mössbauer Study and Modeling of Iron Import and Trafficking in Human Jurkat Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jhurry, Nema D.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; McCormick, Sean P.; Gohil, Vishal M.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The Fe content of Jurkat cells grown on transferrin-bound iron (TBI) and FeIII citrate (FC) was characterized using Mössbauer, EPR, and UV-vis spectroscopies, electron microscopy, and ICP-MS. Isolated mitochondria were similarly characterized. Fe-limited cells contained ∼ 100 μM of essential Fe, mainly as mitochondrial Fe and non-mitochondrial nonheme high-spin (NHHS) FeII. Fe-replete cells also contained ferritin-bound Fe and FeIII oxyhydroxide nanoparticles. Only 400 ± 100 Fe ions were loaded per ferritin complex, regardless of the growth medium Fe concentration. Ferritin regulation thus appears more complex than is commonly assumed. The magnetic/structural properties of Jurkat nanoparticles differed from those in yeast mitochondria. They were smaller and may be located in the cytosol. The extent of nanoparticle formation scaled nonlinearly with the concentration of Fe in the medium. Nanoparticle formation was not strongly correlated with ROS damage. Cells could utilize nanoparticle Fe, converting such aggregates into essential Fe forms. Cells grown on galactose rather than glucose respired faster, grew slower, exhibited more ROS damage and generally contained more nanoparticles. Cells grown with TBI rather than FC contained lower Fe concentrations, more ferritin and fewer nanoparticles. Cells in which transferrin receptor expression was increased contained more ferritin Fe. Frataxin-deficient cells contained more nanoparticles than comparable WT cells. Data were analyzed by a chemically-based mathematical model. Although simple, it captured essential features of Fe import, trafficking and regulation. TBI import was highly regulated but FC import was not. Nanoparticle formation was not regulated but the rate was third-order in cytosolic Fe. PMID:24180611

  5. Notch Signaling and Schwann Cell Transformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Transformation: Development of a Model System and Application to Human MPNSTs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Tom Kadesch, Ph.D... MPNSTs 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0209 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Tom Kadesch, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...potential role of Notch signaling in the malignant transformation of neurofibromas to MPNSTs in patients with NF1. Our previous work has shown that

  6. Highly efficient IL-21 and feeder cell-driven ex vivo expansion of human NK cells with therapeutic activity in a xenograft mouse model of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Granzin, Markus; Stojanovic, Ana; Miller, Matthias; Childs, Richard; Huppert, Volker; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are promising antitumor effector cells, but the generation of sufficient NK cell numbers for adoptive immunotherapy remains challenging. Therefore, we developed a method for highly efficient ex vivo expansion of human NK cells. Ex vivo expansion of NK cells in medium containing IL-2 and irradiated clinical-grade feeder cells (EBV-LCL) induced a 22-fold NK cell expansion after one week that was significantly increased to 53-fold by IL-21. Repeated stimulation with irradiated EBV-LCL and IL-2 and addition of IL-21 at the initiation of the culture allowed sustained NK cell proliferation with 10(11)-fold NK cell expansion after 6 weeks. Compared to naive NK cells, expanded NK cells upregulated TRAIL, NKG2D, and DNAM-1, had superior cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines in vitro and produced more IFNγ and TNF-α upon PMA/Iono stimulation. Most importantly, adoptive transfer of NK cells expanded using feeder cells, IL-2 and IL-21 led to significant inhibition of tumor growth in a melanoma xenograft mouse model, which was greater than with NK cells activated with IL-2 alone. Intriguingly, adoptively transferred NK cells maintained their enhanced production of IFNγ and TNF-α upon ex vivo restimulation, although they rapidly lost their capacity to degranulate and mediate tumor cytotoxicity after the in vivo transfer. In conclusion, we developed a protocol for ex vivo NK cell expansion that results in outstanding cell yields. The expanded NK cells possess potent antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and could be utilized at high numbers for adoptive immunotherapy in the clinic.

  7. A Cell Kinetic Model of Granulocytopoiesis Under Radiation Exposure: Extension from Murines to Canines and Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Space radiation poses significant challenges to space travel, and it is essential to understand the possible adverse effects from space radiation exposure to the radiosensitive organ systems that are important for immediate survival of human, e.g., the hematopoietic system. In this presentation a biomathematical model of granulocytopoiesis is described and used to analyze the blood granulocyte changes seen in the blood of mammalians under continuous and acute radiation exposure. This is one of a set of hematopoietic models that have been successfully utilized to simulate and interpret the experimental data of acute and chronic radiation on rodents. We discuss the underlying implicit regulation mechanism and the biological relevance of the kinetic parameters estimation method. Extension of the model to predictions in dogs and humans systems indicates that the modeling results are consistent with the cumulative experimental and empirical data from various sources. This implies the potential to integrate the models into one united system for monitoring the hematopoietic response of various species under irradiation. Based on the evidence of threshold responses of dogs to extended periods of low daily dose exposures, we discuss the potential health risks of the space traveler under chronic stress of low-dose irradiation and the possibly encountered Solar Particle Events.

  8. An in vitro 3D bone metastasis model by using a human bone tissue culture and human sex-related cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Salamanna, Francesca; Borsari, Veronica; Brogini, Silvia; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Parrilli, Annapaola; Cepollaro, Simona; Cadossi, Matteo; Martini, Lucia; Mazzotti, Antonio; Fini, Milena

    2016-01-01

    One of the main limitations, when studying cancer-bone metastasis, is the complex nature of the native bone environment and the lack of reliable, simple, inexpensive models that closely mimic the biological processes occurring in patients and allowing the correct translation of results. To enhance the understanding of the mechanisms underlying human bone metastases and in order to find new therapies, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) cancer-bone metastasis model by culturing human breast or prostate cancer cells with human bone tissue isolated from female and male patients, respectively. Bone tissue discarded from total hip replacement surgery was cultured in a rolling apparatus system in a normoxic or hypoxic environment. Gene expression profile, protein levels, histological, immunohistochemical and four-dimensional (4D) micro-CT analyses showed a noticeable specificity of breast and prostate cancer cells for bone colonization and ingrowth, thus highlighting the species-specific and sex-specific osteotropism and the need to widen the current knowledge on cancer-bone metastasis spread in human bone tissues. The results of this study support the application of this model in preclinical studies on bone metastases and also follow the 3R principles, the guiding principles, aimed at replacing/reducing/refining (3R) animal use and their suffering for scientific purposes. PMID:27765913

  9. Agent-Based Model of Human Alveoli Predicts Chemotactic Signaling by Epithelial Cells during Early Aspergillus fumigatus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pollmächer, Johannes; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is one of the most important human fungal pathogens, causing life-threatening diseases. Since humans inhale hundreds to thousands of fungal conidia every day, the lower respiratory tract is the primary site of infection. Current interaction networks of the innate immune response attribute fungal recognition and detection to alveolar macrophages, which are thought to be the first cells to get in contact with the fungus. At present, these networks are derived from in vitro or in situ assays, as the peculiar physiology of the human lung makes in vivo experiments, including imaging on the cell-level, hard to realize. We implemented a spatio-temporal agent-based model of a human alveolus in order to perform in silico experiments of a virtual infection scenario, for an alveolus infected with A. fumigatus under physiological conditions. The virtual analog captures the three-dimensional alveolar morphology consisting of the two major alveolar epithelial cell types and the pores of Kohn as well as the dynamic process of respiration. To the best of our knowledge this is the first agent-based model of a dynamic human alveolus in the presence of respiration. A key readout of our simulations is the first-passage-time of alveolar macrophages, which is the period of time that elapses until the first physical macrophage-conidium contact is established. We tested for random and chemotactic migration modes of alveolar macrophages and varied their corresponding parameter sets. The resulting first-passage-time distributions imply that randomly migrating macrophages fail to find the conidium before the start of germination, whereas guidance by chemotactic signals derived from the alveolar epithelial cell associated with the fungus enables a secure and successful discovery of the pathogen in time. PMID:25360787

  10. Differentiating effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue exendin-4 in a human neuronal cell model.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Paola; Deledda, Cristiana; Benvenuti, Susanna; Cellai, Ilaria; Squecco, Roberta; Monici, Monica; Cialdai, Francesca; Luciani, Giorgia; Danza, Giovanna; Di Stefano, Chiara; Francini, Fabio; Peri, Alessandro

    2010-11-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an insulinotropic peptide with neurotrophic properties, as assessed in animal cell models. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 analogue, has been recently approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to morphologically, structurally, and functionally characterize the differentiating actions of exendin-4 using a human neuronal cell model (i.e., SH-SY5Y cells). We found that exendin-4 increased the number of neurites paralleled by dramatic changes in intracellular actin and tubulin distribution. Electrophysiological analyses showed an increase in cell membrane surface and in stretch-activated-channels sensitivity, an increased conductance of Na(+) channels and amplitude of Ca(++) currents (T- and L-type), typical of a more mature neuronal phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that exendin-4 promotes neuronal differentiation in human cells. Noteworthy, our data support the claimed favorable role of exendin-4 against diabetic neuropathy as well as against different neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces TLR2-Mediated Migration of Activated Dendritic Cells in an Ex Vivo Human Skin Model

    PubMed Central

    Wagemakers, Alex; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Oei, Anneke; van der Pot, Wouter J.; Ahmed, Kalam; van der Poll, Tom; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is transmitted into the skin of the host where it encounters and interacts with two dendritic cell (DC) subsets; Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal DCs (DDCs). These cells recognize pathogens via pattern recognition receptors, mature and migrate out of the skin into draining lymph nodes, where they orchestrate adaptive immune responses. In order to investigate the response of skin DCs during the early immunopathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis, we injected B. burgdorferi intradermally into full-thickness human skin and studied the migration of DCs out of the skin, the activation profile and phenotype of migrated cells. We found a significant increase in the migration of LCs and DDCs in response to B. burgdorferi. Notably, migration was prevented by blocking TLR2. DCs migrated from skin inoculated with higher numbers of spirochetes expressed significantly higher levels of CD83 and produced pro-inflammatory cytokines. No difference was observed in the expression of HLA-DR, CD86, CD38, or CCR7. To conclude, we have established an ex vivo human skin model to study DC-B. burgdorferi interactions. Using this model, we have demonstrated that B. burgdorferi-induced DC migration is mediated by TLR2. Our findings underscore the utility of this model as a valuable tool to study immunity to spirochetal infections. PMID:27695100

  12. Human neuroblastoma cell lines as models for the in vitro study of neoplastic and neuronal cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Abemayor, E; Sidell, N

    1989-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood solid tumor composed of primitive cells derived from precursors of the autonomic nervous system. This neoplasm has the highest rate of spontaneous regression of all cancer types and has been noted to undergo spontaneous and chemically induced differentiation into elements resembling mature nervous tissue. As such, neuroblastoma has been a prime model system for the study of neuronal differentiation and the process of cancer cell maturation. In this paper we review those agents that have been described to induce the differentiation of neuroblastoma, with an emphasis on the effects and possible mechanisms of action of a group of related compounds, the retinoids. With this model system and the availability of subclones that are both responsive and resistant to chemically induced differentiation, fundamental questions regarding the mechanisms and processes underlying cell maturation have become more amenable to in vitro study. Images FIGURE 1. A FIGURE 1. B FIGURE 1. C FIGURE 2. A FIGURE 2. B PMID:2538324

  13. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  14. Anti-Leukemia Activity of In Vitro-Expanded Human Gamma Delta T Cells in a Xenogeneic Ph+ Leukemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Siegers, Gabrielle M.; Felizardo, Tania C.; Mathieson, A. Mark; Kosaka, Yoko; Wang, Xing-Hua; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Keating, Armand

    2011-01-01

    Gamma delta T cells (GDTc) lyse a variety of hematological and solid tumour cells in vitro and in vivo, and are thus promising candidates for cellular immunotherapy. We have developed a protocol to expand human GDTc in vitro, yielding highly cytotoxic Vgamma9/Vdelta2 CD27/CD45RA double negative effector memory cells. These cells express CD16, CD45RO, CD56, CD95 and NKG2D. Flow cytometric, clonogenic, and chromium release assays confirmed their specific cytotoxicity against Ph+ cell lines in vitro. We have generated a fluorescent and bioluminescent Ph+ cell line, EM-2eGFPluc, and established a novel xenogeneic leukemia model. Intravenous injection of EM-2eGFPluc into NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG) mice resulted in significant dose-dependent bone marrow engraftment; lower levels engrafted in blood, lung, liver and spleen. In vitro-expanded human GDTc injected intraperitoneally were found at higher levels in blood and organs compared to those injected intravenously; GDTc survived at least 33 days post-injection. In therapy experiments, we documented decreased bone marrow leukemia burden in mice treated with GDTc. Live GDTc were found in spleen and bone marrow at endpoint, suggesting the potential usefulness of this therapy. PMID:21304898

  15. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, an appropriate in vitro model to study heavy metals induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Hee; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-09-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to arsenic (III) and chromium VI (Cr(VI)) have been confirmed to cause lung cancer. Mechanisms of these metals carcinogenesis are still under investigation. Selection of cell lines to be used is essential for the studies. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells are the cells to be utilized by most of scientists. However, due to p53 missense mutation (CCG→TCG) at codon 47 and the codon 72 polymorphism (CGC→CCC) in BEAS-2B cells, its usage has frequently been questioned. The present study has examined activity and expression of 53 and its downstream target protein p21 upon acute or chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic and Cr(VI). The results show that short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) was able to activate both p53 and p21. Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to these two metals caused malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis. In arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells reductions in p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 were observed, while the total p53 protein level remained the same compared to those in passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Cr(VI)-transformed cells exhibit elevated p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation at Ser15, but reduced phosphorylation at Ser392 and total p53 protein level compared to passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were elevated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells. These results demonstrate that p53 is able to respond to exposure of arsenic or Cr(VI), suggesting that BEAS-2B cells are an appropriate in vitro model to investigate arsenic or Cr(VI) induced lung cancer.

  16. BMS-708163 and Nilotinib restore synaptic dysfunction in human embryonic stem cell-derived Alzheimer’s disease models

    PubMed Central

    Nishioka, Hisae; Tooi, Norie; Isobe, Takehisa; Nakatsuji, Norio; Aiba, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Cellular AD models derived from human pluripotent stem cells are promising tools in AD research. We recently developed human embryonic stem cell-derived AD models which overexpress mutant Presenilin1 genes, and which exhibit AD phenotypes, including synaptic dysfunction. In this study, we found that our AD models showed reduced levels of RAB3A and SV2B proteins in the pre-synapses, which is a possible cause of electrophysiological abnormalities. Through the screening of chemical compounds using our AD models, we have identified Aβ peptide inhibitors which decrease the concentration of Aβ in culture supernatant. Among these, BMS-708163 and Nilotinib were found to improve the expression levels of RAB3A and SV2B proteins and to recover the electrophysiological function in our AD models. These results suggest that the AD models we developed are promising materials for the discovery of AD drugs that target the expression of pre-synaptic proteins and synaptic function. PMID:27641902

  17. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes as a Model for Heart Development and Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Michelle J; Lohr, Jamie L; Chapman, Christopher S; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Mary G; Garry, Daniel J

    2015-10-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) remains a significant health problem, with a growing population of survivors with chronic disease. Despite intense efforts to understand the genetic basis of CHD in humans, the etiology of most CHD is unknown. Furthermore, new models of CHD are required to better understand the development of CHD and to explore novel therapies for this patient population. In this review, we highlight the role that human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes can serve to enhance our understanding of the development, pathophysiology and potential therapeutic targets for CHD. We highlight the use of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes to model gene regulatory interactions, cell-cell interactions and tissue interactions contributing to CHD. We further emphasize the importance of using hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes as personalized research models. The use of hiPSCs presents an unprecedented opportunity to generate disease-specific cellular models, investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of disease and uncover new therapeutic targets for CHD.

  18. Importance of Salmonella Typhi-Responsive CD8+ T Cell Immunity in a Human Typhoid Fever Challenge Model.

    PubMed

    Fresnay, Stephanie; McArthur, Monica A; Magder, Laurence S; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2017-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the human-restricted organism Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), constitutes a major global health problem. The development of improved attenuated vaccines is pressing, but delayed by the lack of appropriate preclinical models. Herein, we report that high levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T cells at baseline significantly correlate with an increased risk of disease in humans challenged with a high dose (~10(4) CFU) wild-type S. Typhi. Typhoid fever development was associated with higher multifunctional S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T effector memory cells at baseline. Early decreases of these cells in circulation following challenge were observed in both S. Typhi-responsive integrin α4β7- and integrin α4β7+ CD8+ T effector memory (TEM) cells, suggesting their potential to home to both mucosal and extra-intestinal sites. Participants with higher baseline levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T memory cells had a higher risk of acquiring disease, but among those who acquired disease, those with a higher baseline responses took longer to develop disease. In contrast, protection against disease was associated with low or absent S. Typhi-responsive T cells at baseline and no changes in circulation following challenge. These data highlight the importance of pre-existing S. Typhi-responsive immunity in predicting clinical outcome following infection with wild-type S. Typhi and provide novel insights into the complex mechanisms involved in protective immunity to natural infection in a stringent human model with a high challenge dose. They also contribute important information on the immunological responses to be assessed in the appraisal and selection of new generation typhoid vaccines.

  19. Importance of Salmonella Typhi-Responsive CD8+ T Cell Immunity in a Human Typhoid Fever Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Fresnay, Stephanie; McArthur, Monica A.; Magder, Laurence S.; Darton, Thomas C.; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S.; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M.; Pollard, Andrew J.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2017-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the human-restricted organism Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), constitutes a major global health problem. The development of improved attenuated vaccines is pressing, but delayed by the lack of appropriate preclinical models. Herein, we report that high levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T cells at baseline significantly correlate with an increased risk of disease in humans challenged with a high dose (~104 CFU) wild-type S. Typhi. Typhoid fever development was associated with higher multifunctional S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T effector memory cells at baseline. Early decreases of these cells in circulation following challenge were observed in both S. Typhi-responsive integrin α4β7− and integrin α4β7+ CD8+ T effector memory (TEM) cells, suggesting their potential to home to both mucosal and extra-intestinal sites. Participants with higher baseline levels of S. Typhi-responsive CD8+ T memory cells had a higher risk of acquiring disease, but among those who acquired disease, those with a higher baseline responses took longer to develop disease. In contrast, protection against disease was associated with low or absent S. Typhi-responsive T cells at baseline and no changes in circulation following challenge. These data highlight the importance of pre-existing S. Typhi-responsive immunity in predicting clinical outcome following infection with wild-type S. Typhi and provide novel insights into the complex mechanisms involved in protective immunity to natural infection in a stringent human model with a high challenge dose. They also contribute important information on the immunological responses to be assessed in the appraisal and selection of new generation typhoid vaccines. PMID:28303138

  20. Modeling ALS with motor neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sances, Samuel; Bruijn, Lucie I; Chandran, Siddharthan; Eggan, Kevin; Ho, Ritchie; Klim, Joseph R; Livesey, Matt R; Lowry, Emily; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Rushton, David; Sadegh, Cameron; Sareen, Dhruv; Wichterle, Hynek; Zhang, Su-Chun; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-04-01

    Directing the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into motor neurons has allowed investigators to develop new models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, techniques vary between laboratories and the cells do not appear to mature into fully functional adult motor neurons. Here we discuss common developmental principles of both lower and upper motor neuron development that have led to specific derivation techniques. We then suggest how these motor neurons may be matured further either through direct expression or administration of specific factors or coculture approaches with other tissues. Ultimately, through a greater understanding of motor neuron biology, it will be possible to establish more reliable models of ALS. These in turn will have a greater chance of validating new drugs that may be effective for the disease.

  1. Modeling ALS using motor neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sances, S; Bruijn, LI; Chandran, S; Eggan, K; Ho, R; Klim, J; Livesey, MR; Lowry, E; Macklis, JD; Rushton, D; Sadegh, C; Sareen, D; Wichterle, H; Zhang, SC; Svendsen, CN

    2016-01-01

    Directing the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into motor neurons has allowed investigators to develop novel models of ALS. However, techniques vary between laboratories and the cells do not appear to mature into fully functional adult motor neurons. Here we discuss common developmental principles of both lower and upper motor neuron development that have led to specific derivation techniques. We then suggest how these motor neurons may be matured further either through direct expression or administration of specific factors or co-culture approaches with other tissues. Ultimately, through a greater understanding of motor neuron biology, it will be possible to establish more reliable models of ALS. These in turn will have a greater chance of validating new drugs that may be effective for the disease. PMID:27021939

  2. Modeling Human Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes Using Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jung, Moonjung; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Winkler, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The combination of epigenetic reprogramming with advanced genome editing technologies opened a new avenue to study disease mechanisms, particularly of disorders with depleted target tissue. Bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) typically present with a marked reduction of peripheral blood cells due to a destroyed or dysfunctional bone marrow compartment. Somatic and germline mutations have been etiologically linked to many cases of BMFS. However, without the ability to study primary patient material, the exact pathogenesis for many entities remained fragmentary. Capturing the pathological genotype in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows studying potential developmental defects leading to a particular phenotype. The lack of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in these patients can also be overcome by differentiating patient-derived iPSCs into hematopoietic lineages. With fast growing genome editing techniques, such as CRISPR/Cas9, correction of disease-causing mutations in iPSCs or introduction of mutations in cells from healthy individuals enable comparative studies that may identify other genetic or epigenetic events contributing to a specific disease phenotype. In this review, we present recent progresses in disease modeling of inherited and acquired BMFS using reprogramming and genome editing techniques. We also discuss the challenges and potential shortcomings of iPSC-based models for hematological diseases.

  3. Human olfactory bulb neural stem cells expressing hNGF restore cognitive deficit in Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Marei, Hany E S; Farag, Amany; Althani, Asma; Afifi, Nahla; Abd-Elmaksoud, Ahmed; Lashen, Samah; Rezk, Shaymaa; Pallini, Roberto; Casalbore, Patrizia; Cenciarelli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to demonstrate the fate of allogenic adult human olfactory bulb neural stem/progenitor cells (OBNSC/NPCs) transplanted into the rat hippocampus treated with ibotenic acid (IBO), a neurotoxicant specific to hippocampal cholinergic neurons that are lost in Alzheimer's disease. We assessed their possible ability to survive, integrate, proliferate, and differentiate into different neuronal and glial elements: we also evaluate their possible therapeutic potential, and the mechanism(s) relevant to neuroprotection following their engraftment into the CNS milieu. OBNSC/NPCs were isolated from adult human olfactory bulb patients, genetically engineered to express GFP and human nerve growth factor (hNGF) by lentivirus-mediated infection, and stereotaxically transplanted into the hippocampus of IBO-treated animals and controls. Stereological analysis of engrafted OBNSCs eight weeks post transplantation revealed a 1.89 fold increase with respect to the initial cell population, indicating a marked ability for survival and proliferation. In addition, 54.71 ± 11.38%, 30.18 ± 6.00%, and 15.09 ± 5.38% of engrafted OBNSCs were identified by morphological criteria suggestive of mature neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes respectively. Taken together, this work demonstrated that human OBNSCs expressing NGF ameliorate the cognitive deficiencies associated with IBO-induced lesions in AD model rats, and the improvement can probably be attributed primarily to neuronal and glial cell replacement as well as the trophic influence exerted by the secreted NGF.

  4. Modeling Ca(2+) currents and buffered diffusion of Ca(2+) in human β-cells during voltage clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Félix-Martínez, Gerardo J; Godínez-Fernández, J Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Macroscopic Ca(2+) currents of the human β-cells were characterized using the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism. Expressions describing the Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation process of the L-type Ca(2+) channels in terms of the concentration of Ca(2+) were obtained. By coupling the modeled Ca(2+) currents to a three-dimensional model of buffered diffusion of Ca(2+), we simulated the Ca(2+) transients formed in the immediate vicinity of the cell membrane during voltage clamp experiments performed in high buffering conditions. Our modeling approach allowed us to consider the distribution of the Ca(2+) sources over the cell membrane. The effect of exogenous (EGTA) and endogenous Ca(2+) buffers on the temporal course of the Ca(2+) transients was evaluated. We show that despite the high Ca(2+) buffering capacity, nanodomains are formed in the submembrane space, where a peak Ca(2+) concentration between ∼76 and 143 µM was estimated from our simulations. In addition, the contribution of each Ca(2+) current to the formation of the Ca(2+) nanodomains was also addressed. Here we provide a general framework to incorporate the spatial aspects to the models of the pancreatic β-cell, such as a more detailed and realistic description of Ca(2+) dynamics in response to electrical activity in physiological conditions can be provided by future models.

  5. Global transcriptomic analysis of model human cell lines exposed to surface-modified gold nanoparticles: the effect of surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzincic, E. M.; Yang, J. A.; Drnevich, J.; Falagan-Lotsch, P.; Murphy, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are attractive for biomedical applications not only for their remarkable physical properties, but also for the ease of which their surface chemistry can be manipulated. Many applications involve functionalization of the Au NP surface in order to improve biocompatibility, attach targeting ligands or carry drugs. However, changes in cells exposed to Au NPs of different surface chemistries have been observed, and little is known about how Au NPs and their surface coatings may impact cellular gene expression. The gene expression of two model human cell lines, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and prostate cancer cells (PC3) was interrogated by microarray analysis of over 14 000 human genes. The cell lines were exposed to four differently functionalized Au NPs: citrate, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), and lipid coatings combined with alkanethiols or PAH. Gene functional annotation categories and weighted gene correlation network analysis were used in order to connect gene expression changes to common cellular functions and to elucidate expression patterns between Au NP samples. Coated Au NPs affect genes implicated in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metabolism in HDF cells, and inflammation, angiogenesis, proliferation apoptosis regulation, survival and invasion in PC3 cells. Subtle changes in surface chemistry, such as the initial net charge, lability of the ligand, and underlying layers greatly influence the degree of expression change and the type of cellular pathway affected.Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are attractive for biomedical applications not only for their remarkable physical properties, but also for the ease of which their surface chemistry can be manipulated. Many applications involve functionalization of the Au NP surface in order to improve biocompatibility, attach targeting ligands or carry drugs. However, changes in cells exposed to Au NPs of different surface chemistries have been observed, and little is known about how

  6. Animal models relevant to human prostate carcinogenesis underlining the critical implication of prostatic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent development of animal models relevant to human prostate cancer (PC) etiopathogenesis has provided important information on the specific functions provided by key gene products altered during disease initiation and progression to locally invasive, metastatic and hormone-refractory stages. Especially, the characterization of transgenic mouse models has indicated that the inactivation of distinct tumor suppressor proteins such as phosphatase tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), Nkx3.1, p27KIP1 and p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb) may cooperate for the malignant transformation of prostatic stem/progenitor cells into PC stem/progenitor cells and tumor development and metastases. Moreover, the sustained activation of diverse oncogenic signaling elements, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), sonic hedgehog, Wnt/β-catenin, c-Myc, Akt and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) also may contribute to the acquisition of more aggressive and hormone-refractory phenotypes by PC stem/progenitor cells and their progenies during disease progression. Importantly, it has also been shown that an enrichment of PC stem/progenitor cells expressing stem cell-like markers may occur after androgen deprivation therapy and docetaxel treatment in the transgenic mouse models of PC suggesting the critical implication of these immature PC cells in treatment resistance, tumor re-growth and disease recurrence. Of clinical interest, the molecular targeting of distinct gene products altered in PC cells by using different dietary compounds has also been shown to counteract PC initiation and progression in animal models supporting their potential use as chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents for eradicating the total tumor cell mass, improving current anti-hormonal and chemotherapies and preventing disease relapse. PMID:21396984

  7. Activation of Type 1 CRH receptor isoforms induces serotonin release from human carcinoid BON-1N cells: an enterochromaffin cell model.

    PubMed

    Wu, S Vincent; Yuan, Pu-Qing; Lai, Jim; Wong, Kelvin; Chen, Monica C; Ohning, Gordon V; Taché, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    CRH and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) are expressed in human colonic enterochromaffin (EC) cells, but their interactions at the cellular level remain largely unknown. The mechanistic and functional relationship between CRH and 5-HT systems in EC cells was investigated in a human carcinoid cloned BON cell line (BON-1N), widely used as an in vitro model of EC cell function. First, we identified multiple CRH(1) splice variants, including CRH(1a), CRH(1c), CRH(1f), and a novel form lacking exon 4, designated here as CRH(1i), in the BON-1N cells. The expression of CRH(1i) was also confirmed in human brain cortex, pituitary gland, and ileum. Immunocytochemistry and immunoblot analysis confirmed that BON-1N cells were CRH(1) and 5-HT positive. CRH, urocortin (Ucn)-1, and cortagine, a selective CRH(1) agonist, all increased intracellular cAMP, and this concentration-dependent response was inhibited by CRH(1)-selective antagonist NBI-35965. CRH and Ucn-1, but not Ucn-2, stimulated significant ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In transfected human embryonic kidney-293 cells, CRH(1i) isoforms produced a significant increase in pERK1/2 in response to CRH(1) agonists that was sensitive to NBI-35965. CRH and Ucn-1 stimulated 5-HT release that reached a maximal increase of 3.3- and 4-fold at 10(-8) m over the basal level, respectively. In addition, exposure to CRH for 24-h up-regulated tryptophan hydroxylase-1 mRNA levels in the BON-1N cells. These findings define the expression of EC cell-specific CRH(1) isoforms and activation of CRH(1)-dependent pathways leading to 5-HT release and synthesis; thus, providing functional evidence of a link exists between CRH and 5-HT systems, which have implications in stress-induced CRH(1) and 5-HT-mediated stimulation of lower intestinal function.

  8. Effect of Citrus bergamia juice on human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in metastatic xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Navarra, M; Ursino, M R; Ferlazzo, N; Russo, M; Schumacher, U; Valentiner, U

    2014-06-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor with poor prognosis in children with disseminated stage of disease. A number of studies show that molecules largely distributed in commonly consumed fruits and vegetables may have anti-tumor activity. In this study we evaluate the effect of Citrus bergamia (bergamot) juice (BJ) in vitro and in a spontaneous metastatic neuroblastoma SCID mouse model. Qualitative and quantitative characterizations of BJ flavonoid fractions were performed by RP-HPLC/PDA/MS. We show that BJ significantly affects SK-N-SH and LAN-1 cell proliferation in vitro, but fails to reduce primary tumor weight in vivo. Moreover, BJ reduced cell adhesiveness and invasion of LAN-1 and SK-N-SH cells in vitro and the number of pulmonary metastases under consideration of the number of tumor cells in the blood in mice inoculated with LAN-1 cells in vivo. These effects without any apparent sign of systemic toxicity confirm the potential clinical interest of BJ and lay the basis for further investigation in cancer.

  9. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire; Buob, David; Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien; Flamand, Vincent; Hennino, Marie-Flore; Perrais, Michaël; and others

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue.

  10. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-based microphysiological tissue models of myocardium and liver for drug development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Drug discovery and development to date has relied on animal models, which are useful but are often expensive, slow, and fail to mimic human physiology. The discovery of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has led to the emergence of a new paradigm of drug screening using human and disease-specific organ-like cultures in a dish. Although classical static culture systems are useful for initial screening and toxicity testing, they lack the organization of differentiated iPS cells into microphysiological, organ-like structures deemed necessary for high-content analysis of candidate drugs. One promising approach to produce these organ-like structures is the use of advanced microfluidic systems, which can simulate tissue structure and function at a micron level, and can provide high-throughput testing of different compounds for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Here, we provide a brief outline on the different approaches, which have been used to engineer in vitro tissue constructs of iPS cell-based myocardium and liver functions on chip. Combining these techniques with iPS cell biology has the potential of reducing the dependence on animal studies for drug toxicity and efficacy screening. PMID:24565415

  11. Proinsulin multi-peptide immunotherapy induces antigen-specific regulatory T cells and limits autoimmunity in a humanized model

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, V B; Nikolic, T; Pearce, V Q; Demengeot, J; Roep, B O; Peakman, M

    2015-01-01

    Peptide immunotherapy (PIT) is a targeted therapeutic approach, involving administration of disease-associated peptides, with the aim of restoring antigen-specific immunological tolerance without generalized immunosuppression. In type 1 diabetes, proinsulin is a primary antigen targeted by the autoimmune response, and is therefore a strong candidate for exploitation via PIT in this setting. To elucidate the optimal conditions for proinsulin-based PIT and explore mechanisms of action, we developed a preclinical model of proinsulin autoimmunity in a humanized HLA-DRB1*0401 transgenic HLA-DR4 Tg mouse. Once proinsulin-specific tolerance is broken, HLA-DR4 Tg mice develop autoinflammatory responses, including proinsulin-specific T cell proliferation, interferon (IFN)-γ and autoantibody production. These are preventable and quenchable by pre- and post-induction treatment, respectively, using intradermal proinsulin-PIT injections. Intradermal proinsulin-PIT enhances proliferation of regulatory [forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+)CD25high] CD4 T cells, including those capable of proinsulin-specific regulation, suggesting this as its main mode of action. In contrast, peptide delivered intradermally on the surface of vitamin D3-modulated (tolerogenic) dendritic cells, controls autoimmunity in association with proinsulin-specific IL-10 production, but no change in regulatory CD4 T cells. These studies define a humanized, translational model for in vivo optimization of PIT to control autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes and indicate that dominant mechanisms of action differ according to mode of peptide delivery. PMID:26206289

  12. Modulation of body composition and immune cell functions by conjugated linoleic acid in humans and animal models: benefits vs. risks.

    PubMed

    Kelley, D S; Erickson, K L

    2003-04-01

    We have reviewed the published literature regarding the effects of CLA on body composition and immune cell functions in humans and in animal models. Results from studies in mice, hamsters, rats, and pigs generally support the notion that CLA reduced depot fat in the normal or lean strains. However, in obese rats, it increased body fat or decreased it less than in the corresponding lean controls. These studies also indicate that t10,c12-CLA was the isomer that reduced adipose fat; however, it also increased the fat content of several other tissues and increased circulating insulin and the saturated FA content of adipose tissue and muscle. Four of the eight published human studies found small but significant reductions in body fat with CLA supplementation; however, the reductions were smaller than the prediction errors for the methods used. The other four human studies found no change in body fat with CLA supplementation. These studies also report that CLA supplementation increased the risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease including increased blood glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, VLDL, C-reactive protein, lipid peroxidation, and decreased HDL. Most studies regarding the effects of CLA on immune cell functions have been conducted with a mixture of isomers, and the results have been variable. One study conducted in mice with the purified c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA isomers indicated that the two isomers have similar effects on immune cell functions. Some of the reasons for the discrepancies between the effects of CLA in published reports are discussed. Although significant benefit to humans from CLA supplementation is questionable, it may create several health risks in both humans and animals. On the basis of the published data, CLA supplementation of adult human diets to improve body composition or enhance immune functions cannot be recommended at this time.

  13. Enhanced Efficacy of Human Brain-Derived Neural Stem Cells by Transplantation of Cell Aggregates in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Sil; Hwang, Onyou; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Chun, Young Il

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neural tissue transplantation has been a promising strategy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, transplantation has the disadvantages of low-cell survival and/or development of dyskinesia. Transplantation of cell aggregates has the potential to overcome these problems, because the cells can extend their axons into the host brain and establish synaptic connections with host neurons. In this present study, aggregates of human brain-derived neural stem cells (HB-NSC) were transplanted into a PD animal model and compared to previous report on transplantation of single-cell suspensions. Methods Rats received an injection of 6-OHDA into the right medial forebrain bundle to generate the PD model and followed by injections of PBS only, or HB-NSC aggregates in PBS into the ipsilateral striatum. Behavioral tests, multitracer (2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) and [18F]-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-2-carbomethoxy-3-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane ([18F]-FP-CIT) microPET scans, as well as immunohistochemical (IHC) and immunofluorescent (IF) staining were conducted to evaluate the results. Results The stepping test showed significant improvement of contralateral forelimb control in the HB-NSC group from 6-10 weeks compared to the control group (p<0.05). [18F]-FP-CIT microPET at 10 weeks posttransplantation demonstrated a significant increase in uptake in the HB-NSC group compared to pretransplantation (p<0.05). In IHC and IF staining, tyrosine hydroxylase and human β2 microglobulin (a human cell marker) positive cells were visualized at the transplant site. Conclusion These results suggest that the HB-NSC aggregates can survive in the striatum and exert therapeutic effects in a PD model by secreting dopamine. PMID:25535514

  14. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, an appropriate in vitro model to study heavy metals induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Youn-hee; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-09-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to arsenic (III) and chromium VI (Cr(VI)) have been confirmed to cause lung cancer. Mechanisms of these metals carcinogenesis are still under investigation. Selection of cell lines to be used is essential for the studies. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells are the cells to be utilized by most of scientists. However, due to p53 missense mutation (CCG → TCG) at codon 47 and the codon 72 polymorphism (CGC → CCC) in BEAS-2B cells, its usage has frequently been questioned. The present study has examined activity and expression of 53 and its downstream target protein p21 upon acute or chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic and Cr(VI). The results show that short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) was able to activate both p53 and p21. Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to these two metals caused malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis. In arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells reductions in p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 were observed, while the total p53 protein level remained the same compared to those in passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Cr(VI)-transformed cells exhibit elevated p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation at Ser15, but reduced phosphorylation at Ser392 and total p53 protein level compared to passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were elevated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells. These results demonstrate that p53 is able to respond to exposure of arsenic or Cr(VI), suggesting that BEAS-2B cells are an appropriate in vitro model to investigate arsenic or Cr(VI) induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) activates p53 and p21. • Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) causes cell transformation and tumorigenesis. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit

  15. Transepithelial transport efficiency of bovine collagen hydrolysates in a human Caco-2 cell line model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mengmeng; Betti, Mirko

    2017-06-01

    Collagen was extracted from raw bovine hide and hydrolyzed by one of three enzymes - Alcalase, Flavourzyme, or trypsin - or by using a combination of two or three of these enzymes. The Alcalase-containing enzymatic hydrolysis treatments generated a greater proportion of hydrolysates with molecular weight (MW) <2kDa (79.8-82.7%). Flavourzyme-containing hydrolysis treatments exhibited the greatest proportion of free amino acids (686-740nmol/mg). The hydrolysates were then subjected to a simulated gastrointestinal (GI) digestion, and transport studies were conducted using a Caco-2 cell model. Due to the lower MW profile, the hydrolyzed collagen showed greater resistance to GI digestion and greater transport efficiency than the unhydrolyzed collagen control. Hydrolysates from a dual enzyme mixture - the Alcalase/Flavourzyme combination - generated the greatest transport efficiency across Caco-2 cell monolayers (21.4%), two-fold more than that of the collagen control.

  16. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future.

  17. Using Zebrafish Models of Human Influenza A Virus Infections to Screen Antiviral Drugs and Characterize Host Immune Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Con; Jurcyzszak, Denise; Goody, Michelle F; Gabor, Kristin A; Longfellow, Jacob R; Millard, Paul J; Kim, Carol H

    2017-01-20

    Each year, seasonal influenza outbreaks profoundly affect societies worldwide. In spite of global efforts, influenza remains an intractable healthcare burden. The principle strategy to curtail infections is yearly vaccination. In individuals who have contracted influenza, antiviral drugs can mitigate symptoms. There is a clear and unmet need to develop alternative strategies to combat influenza. Several animal models have been created to model host-influenza interactions. Here, protocols for generating zebrafish models for systemic and localized human influenza A virus (IAV) infection are described. Using a systemic IAV infection model, small molecules with potential antiviral activity can be screened. As a proof-of-principle, a protocol that demonstrates the efficacy of the antiviral drug Zanamivir in IAV-infected zebrafish is described. It shows how disease phenotypes can be quantified to score the relative efficacy of potential antivirals in IAV-infected zebrafish. In recent years, there has been increased appreciation for the critical role neutrophils play in the human host response to influenza infection. The zebrafish has proven to be an indispensable model for the study of neutrophil biology, with direct impacts on human medicine. A protocol to generate a localized IAV infection in the Tg(mpx:mCherry) zebrafish line to study neutrophil biology in the context of a localized viral infection is described. Neutrophil recruitment to localized infection sites provides an additional quantifiable phenotype for assessing experimental manipulations that may have therapeutic applications. Both zebrafish protocols described faithfully recapitulate aspects of human IAV infection. The zebrafish model possesses numerous inherent advantages, including high fecundity, optical clarity, amenability to drug screening, and availability of transgenic lines, including those in which immune cells such as neutrophils are labeled with fluorescent proteins. The protocols detailed here

  18. Feasibility of Human Amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells in Alleviation of Neuropathic Pain in Chronic Constrictive Injury Nerve Model

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Yi; Liu, Shih-An; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chen, Fu-Chou; Chen, Chun-Jung; Su, Hong-Lin; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The neurobehavior of neuropathic pain by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is very similar to that in humans, and it is accompanied by a profound local inflammation response. In this study, we assess the potentiality of human amniotic fluid derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAFMSCs) for alleviating the neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction nerve injury model. Methods and Methods This neuropathic pain animal model was conducted by four 3–0 chromic gut ligatures loosely ligated around the left sciatic nerve in Sprague—Dawley rats. The intravenous administration of hAFMSCs with 5x105 cells was conducted for three consecutive days. Results The expression IL-1β, TNF-α and synaptophysin in dorsal root ganglion cell culture was remarkably attenuated when co-cultured with hAFMSCs. The significant decrease of PGP 9.5 in the skin after CCI was restored by administration of hAFMSCs. Remarkably increased expression of CD 68 and TNF-α and decreased S-100 and neurofilament expression in injured nerve were rescued by hAFMSCs administration. Increases in synaptophysin and TNF-α over the dorsal root ganglion were attenuated by hAFMSCs. Significant expression of TNF-α and OX-42 over the dorsal spinal cord was substantially attenuated by hAFMSCs. The increased amplitude of sensory evoked potential as well as expression of synaptophysin and TNF-α expression was alleviated by hAFMSCs. Human AFMSCs significantly improved the threshold of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia as well as various parameters of CatWalk XT gait analysis. Conclusion Human AFMSCs administration could alleviate the neuropathic pain demonstrated in histomorphological alteration and neurobehavior possibly through the modulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:27441756

  19. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; McKay, Bryon R; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models.

  20. A human T-cell line with inducible production of interleukins 5 and 4. A model for studies of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mordvinov, V A; Peroni, S E; De Boer, M L; Kees, U R; Sanderson, C J

    1999-08-31

    The production of interleukin-5 (IL5) and interleukin-4 (IL4) by activated T-cells is important in the pathogenesis of helminth infections and allergy. Human Jurkat cells express IL4 but one of the main factors restricting studies of human IL5 expression has been the lack of human T-cell lines which express significant levels of IL5 in an inducible fashion. We report that the human T-cell leukemia cell line (PER-117), previously shown to produce IL2, also produces IL5 and IL4, and is a useful model for the study of the regulation of IL5 and IL4 gene expression. We show that expression of IL5 and IL4 mRNAs in PER-117 cells is stimulation dependent. IL5 and IL4 reporter constructs are also transiently expressed in these cells in an inducible fashion. IL5 production in the PER-117 cell line can be activated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate alone and further enhanced by calcium ionophore A23187, cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate or anti-CD28 antibodies. The conditions used to stimulate the PER-117 cells determined whether IL5 production was inhibited by cyclosporin A or dexamethasone. These data indicate that the PER-117 cell line is a model to study signal transduction and transcriptional activation of the human IL5 gene in human T-cells.

  1. Neoplastic transformation of human cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rhim, J S

    1993-01-01

    Efforts to investigate the progression of events that lead normal human cells in culture to become neoplastic in response to carcinogenic agents have been aided by the development of the suitable in vitro model systems. For initial human cell transformation studies, a flat, nontumorigenic clonal line, originally derived from a human osteosarcoma (HOS), was used. When treated with chemical carcinogens such as N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and 3-methyl-cholanthrene (3MC), the HOS cells underwent morphological alterations and acquired tumorigenic properties. These cell lines were very useful inasmuch as a non-ras cellular transforming gene, met, and an activated H-ras oncogene have been isolated from MNNG-transformed and 3MC-transformed HOS lines, respectively, by DNA transfection procedure. Alteration of p53 gene in chemically transformed HOS cell lines has recently been shown. Although carcinogens cause human cancer, normal human cells in culture have proven difficult to achieve. Neoplastic transformation of human cells in culture has recently been achieved by a stepwise fashion-immortalization and conversion of the immortalized cells to tumorigenic cells. One of the critical initial events in the progression of normal human cells to tumor cells is the escape from cellular senescence. With few exceptions, normal human cells require immortalization to provide a practical system for transformation studies. Thus, the role of carcinogenic agents in the development of human cancers is now being defined using a variety of human cells. The neoplastic transformation in human cell cultures is reviewed. In doing so, this author attempts to put into perspective the history of human cell transformation by carcinogenic agents, and to discuss the current state of the art in transformation of human cells in culture; thus providing insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the conversion of normal cells to a neoplastic state of growth.

  2. I.V. infusion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene-modified human mesenchymal stem cells protects against injury in a cerebral ischemia model in adult rat.

    PubMed

    Nomura, T; Honmou, O; Harada, K; Houkin, K; Hamada, H; Kocsis, J D

    2005-01-01

    I.V. delivery of mesenchymal stem cells prepared from adult bone marrow reduces infarction size and ameliorates functional deficits in rat cerebral ischemia models. Administration of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor to the infarction site has also been demonstrated to be neuroprotective. To test the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor contributes to the therapeutic benefits of mesenchymal stem cell delivery, we compared the efficacy of systemic delivery of human mesenchymal stem cells and human mesenchymal stem cells transfected with a fiber-mutant F/RGD adenovirus vector with a brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (brain-derived neurotrophic factor-human mesenchymal stem cells). A permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced by intraluminal vascular occlusion with a microfilament. Human mesenchymal stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-human mesenchymal stem cells were i.v. injected into the rats 6 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Lesion size was assessed at 6 h, 1, 3 and 7 days using MR imaging, and histological methods. Functional outcome was assessed using the treadmill stress test. Both human mesenchymal stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-human mesenchymal stem cells reduced lesion volume and elicited functional improvement compared with the control sham group, but the effect was greater in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor-human mesenchymal stem cell group. ELISA analysis of the infarcted hemisphere revealed an increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the human mesenchymal stem cell groups, but a greater increase in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor-human mesenchymal stem cell group. These data support the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor contributes to neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia and cellular delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor can be achieved by i.v. delivery of human mesenchymal stem cells.

  3. Identification and gene expression profiling of tumor-initiating cells isolated from human osteosarcoma cell lines in an orthotopic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rainusso, Nino; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Lau, Ching C; Hicks, John; Shen, Jianhe J; Yu, Alexander; Wang, Lisa L

    2011-01-01

    In the cancer stem cell model a cell hierarchy has been suggested as an explanation for intratumoral heterogeneity and tumor formation is thought to be driven by this tumor cell subpopulation. The identification of cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma (OS) and the biological processes dysregulated in this cell subpopulation, also known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs), may provide new therapeutic targets. The goal of this study, therefore, was to identify and characterize the gene expression profiles of TICs isolated from human OS cell lines. We analyzed the self-renewal capacity of OS cell lines and primary OS tumors based upon their ability to form sphere-like structures (sarcospheres) under serum-starving conditions. TICs were identify from OS cell lines using the long-term label retention dye PKH26. OS TICs and the bulk of tumor cells were isolated and used to assess their ability to initiate tumors in NOD/SCID mice. Gene expression profiles of OS TICs were obtained from fresh orthotopic tumor samples. We observed that increased sarcosphere efficiency correlated with an enhanced tumorigenic potential in OS. PKH26Hi cells were shown to constitute OS TICs based upon their capacity to form more sarcospheres, as well as to generate both primary bone tumors and lung metastases efficiently in NOD/SCID mice. Genomic profiling of OS TICs revealed that both bone development and cell migration processes were dysregulated in this tumor cell subpopulation. PKH26 labeling represents a valuable tool to identify OS TICs and gene expression analysis of this tumor cell compartment may identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:21617384

  4. Doxycycline protects human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury: Implications from an in-vitro hypoxia model.

    PubMed

    Hummitzsch, Lars; Zitta, Karina; Berndt, Rouven; Kott, Matthias; Schildhauer, Christin; Parczany, Kerstin; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2017-04-15

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a grave clinical emergency and associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Based on the complex underlying mechanisms, a multimodal pharmacological approach seems necessary to prevent intestinal I/R injury. The antibiotic drug doxycycline, which exhibits a wide range of pleiotropic therapeutic properties, might be a promising candidate for also reducing I/R injury in the intestine. To investigate possible protective effects of doxycycline on intestinal I/R injury, human intestinal CaCo-2 cells were exposed to doxycycline at clinically relevant concentrations. In order to mimic I/R injury, CaCo-2 were thereafter subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation by using our recently described two-enzyme in-vitro hypoxia model. Investigations of cell morphology, cell damage, apoptosis and hydrogen peroxide formation were performed 24h after the hypoxic insult. Hypoxia/reoxygenation injury resulted in morphological signs of cell damage, elevated LDH concentrations in the respective culture media (P<0.001) and increased protein expression of proapoptotic caspase-3 (P<0.05) in the intestinal cultures. These events were associated with increased levels hydrogen peroxide (P<0.001). Preincubation of CaCo-2 cells with different concentrations of doxycycline (5µM, 10µM, 50µM) reduced the hypoxia induced signs of cell damage and LDH release (P<0.001 for all concentrations). The reduction of cellular damage was associated with a reduced expression of caspase-3 (5µM, P<0.01; 10µM, P<0.01; 50µM, P<0.05), while hydrogen peroxide levels remained unchanged. In summary, doxycycline protects human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in-vitro. Further animal and clinical studies are required to prove the protective potential of doxycycline on intestinal I/R injury under in-vivo conditions.

  5. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Injection of Genetically Engineered Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells Expressing the Human Proenkephalin Gene in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuke; Li, Haifeng; Zhang, Dengwen; Sun, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to investigate the use of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) genetically engineered with the human proenkephalin (hPPE) gene to treat bone cancer pain (BCP) in a rat model. Methods. Primary cultured hBMSCs were passaged and modified with hPPE, and the cell suspensions (6 × 106) were then intrathecally injected into a rat model of BCP. Paw mechanical withdrawal threshold (PMWT) was measured before and after BCP. The effects of hPPE gene transfer on hBMSC bioactivity were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results. No changes were observed in the surface phenotypes and differentiation of hBMSCs after gene transfer. The hPPE-hBMSC group showed improved PMWT values on the ipsilateral side of rats with BCP from day 12 postoperatively, and the analgesic effect was reversed by naloxone. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6 were ameliorated, and leucine-enkephalin (L-EK) secretion was augmented, in the hPPE-engineered hBMSC group. Conclusion. The intrathecal administration of BMSCs modified with the hPPE gene can effectively relieve pain caused by bone cancer in rats and might be a potentially therapeutic tool for cancer-related pain in humans. PMID:28286408

  6. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Genetically Engineered to Overexpress Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Improve Outcomes in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Nelson, Haley; Fink, Kyle D; Cary, Whitney; Hendrix, Kyle; Annett, Geralyn; Torrest, Audrey; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Joshua; Nacey, Catherine; Pepper, Karen; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; D Anderson, Johnathon; McGee, Jeannine; Gruenloh, William; Fury, Brian; Bauer, Gerhard; Duffy, Alexandria; Tempkin, Theresa; Wheelock, Vicki; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal degenerative autosomal dominant neuropsychiatric disease that causes neuronal death and is characterized by progressive striatal and then widespread brain atrophy. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a lead candidate for the treatment of HD, as it has been shown to prevent cell death and to stimulate the growth and migration of new neurons in the brain in transgenic mouse models. BDNF levels are reduced in HD postmortem human brain. Previous studies have shown efficacy of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC)/BDNF using murine MSCs, and the present study used human MSCs to advance the therapeutic potential of the MSC/BDNF platform for clinical application. Double-blinded studies were performed to examine the effects of intrastriatally transplanted human MSC/BDNF on disease progression in two strains of immune-suppressed HD transgenic mice: YAC128 and R6/2. MSC/BDNF treatment decreased striatal atrophy in YAC128 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also significantly reduced anxiety as measured in the open-field assay. Both MSC and MSC/BDNF treatments induced a significant increase in neurogenesis-like activity in R6/2 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also increased the mean lifespan of the R6/2 mice. Our genetically modified MSC/BDNF cells set a precedent for stem cell-based neurotherapeutics and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. These cells provide a platform delivery system for future studies involving corrective gene-editing strategies. PMID:26765769

  7. Remyelination Is Correlated with Regulatory T Cell Induction Following Human Embryoid Body-Derived Neural Precursor Cell Transplantation in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Plaisted, Warren C.; Zavala, Angel; Hingco, Edna; Tran, Ha; Coleman, Ronald; Lane, Thomas E.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Walsh, Craig M.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described sustained clinical recovery associated with dampened neuroinflammation and remyelination following transplantation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in a viral model of the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. The hNPCs used in that study were derived by a novel direct differentiation method (direct differentiation, DD-NPCs) that resulted in a unique gene expression pattern when compared to hNPCs derived by conventional methods. Since the therapeutic potential of human NPCs may differ greatly depending on the method of derivation and culture, we wanted to determine whether NPCs differentiated using conventional methods would be similarly effective in improving clinical outcome under neuroinflammatory demyelinating conditions. For the current study, we utilized hNPCs differentiated from a human induced pluripotent cell line via an embryoid body intermediate stage (EB-NPCs). Intraspinal transplantation of EB-NPCs into mice infected with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) resulted in decreased accumulation of CD4+ T cells in the central nervous system that was concomitant with reduced demyelination at the site of injection. Dampened neuroinflammation and remyelination was correlated with a transient increase in CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) concentrated within the peripheral lymphatics. However, compared to our earlier study, pathological improvements were modest and did not result in significant clinical recovery. We conclude that the genetic signature of NPCs is critical to their effectiveness in this model of viral-induced neurologic disease. These comparisons will be useful for understanding what factors are critical for the sustained clinical improvement. PMID:27310015

  8. A 3-dimensional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived model to detect developmental neurotoxicity of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hoelting, Lisa; Scheinhardt, Benjamin; Bondarenko, Olesja; Schildknecht, Stefan; Kapitza, Marion; Tanavde, Vivek; Tan, Betty; Lee, Qian Yi; Mecking, Stefan; Leist, Marcel; Kadereit, Suzanne

    2013-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been shown to accumulate in organs, cross the blood-brain barrier and placenta, and have the potential to elicit developmental neurotoxicity (DNT). Here, we developed a human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived 3-dimensional (3-D) in vitro model that allows for testing of potential developmental neurotoxicants. Early central nervous system PAX6(+) precursor cells were generated from hESCs and differentiated further within 3-D structures. The 3-D model was characterized for neural marker expression revealing robust differentiation toward neuronal precursor cells, and gene expression profiling suggested a predominantly forebrain-like development. Altered neural gene expression due to exposure to non-cytotoxic concentrations of the known developmental neurotoxicant, methylmercury, indicated that the 3-D model could detect DNT. To test for specific toxicity of NPs, chemically inert polyethylene NPs (PE-NPs) were chosen. They penetrated deep into the 3-D structures and impacted gene expression at non-cytotoxic concentrations. NOTCH pathway genes such as HES5 and NOTCH1 were reduced in expression, as well as downstream neuronal precursor genes such as NEUROD1 and ASCL1. FOXG1, a patterning marker, was also reduced. As loss of function of these genes results in severe nervous system impairments in mice, our data suggest that the 3-D hESC-derived model could be used to test for Nano-DNT.

  9. Identification of oscillatory genes in somitogenesis from functional genomic analysis of a human mesenchymal stem cell model.

    PubMed

    William, Dilusha A; Saitta, Biagio; Gibson, Joshua D; Traas, Jeremy; Markov, Vladimir; Gonzalez, Dorian M; Sewell, William; Anderson, Douglas M; Pratt, Stephen C; Rappaport, Eric F; Kusumi, Kenro

    2007-05-01

    During somitogenesis, oscillatory expression of genes in the notch and wnt signaling pathways plays a key role in regulating segmentation. These oscillations in expression levels are elements of a species-specific developmental mechanism. To date, the periodicity and components of the human clock remain unstudied. Here we show that a human mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) model can be induced to display oscillatory gene expression. We observed that the known cycling gene HES1 oscillated with a 5 h period consistent with available data on the rate of somitogenesis in humans. We also observed cycling of Hes1 expression in mouse C2C12 myoblasts with a period of 2 h, consistent with previous in vitro and embryonic studies. Furthermore, we used microarray and quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) analysis to identify additional genes that display oscillatory expression both in vitro and in mouse embryos. We confirmed oscillatory expression of the notch pathway gene Maml3 and the wnt pathway gene Nkd2 by whole mount in situ hybridization analysis and Q-PCR. Expression patterns of these genes were disrupted in Wnt3a(tm1Amc) mutants but not in Dll3(pu) mutants. Our results demonstrate that human and mouse in vitro models can recapitulate oscillatory expression observed in embryo and that a number of genes in multiple developmental pathways display dynamic expression in vitro.

  10. Physiological characterization of human ovarian cancer cells in a rat model of intraperitoneal antineoplastic therapy.

    PubMed

    Flessner, Michael F; Choi, Jaehwa; He, Zhi; Credit, Kimberly

    2004-10-01

    Destruction of cancer cells by therapies directed against new molecular targets requires their effective delivery to the tumor. To study diffusion and convection of intraperitoneal (ip) therapy to ip tumors, we established a new athymic rat (RNU) model with ovarian tumor cells (SKOV3 and OVCAR3) implanted in the abdominal wall. The model simulates metastatic tumor and facilitates the measurement of physiological parameters that govern transport forces. CD31 immunohistochemistry revealed unique patterns of angiogenesis, with a tissue-averaged vascular volume of approximately 0.01 ml/g for each tumor. The extracellular volume (SKOV3: 0.54 +/- 0.11 ml/g, n=5; OVCAR3: 0.61 +/- 0.03, n=5) was over twice that of the adjacent normal muscle (0.22 +/- 0.06 ml/g, n=5). Intravenous-injected antibody tumor clearance was two to three times that of muscle. Interstitial pressures were higher than normal tissue with a median of 10-15 mmHg. Quantitative autoradiography of frozen tissue slices from rats exposed to ip solutions containing [14C]mannitol or 125I-immunoglobulin G (trastuzumab) was performed to determine transport of small and large molecules. With ip pressure of 0-6 mmHg, both mannitol and immunoglobulin G displayed steep concentration profiles close to the tumor surface with limited penetration deeper within the tumor tissue; antibody penetration was significantly affected by ip pressure. These results demonstrated effects of molecular size, ip pressure, the limited but highly permeable tumor vasculature, and the expanded interstitium on drug penetration from the peritoneal cavity. In conclusion, we have characterized physical and chemical parameters that determine transport of therapeutic agents in our unique tumor-bearing rat model.

  11. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  12. Humanized Mouse Model of Skin Inflammation Is Characterized by Disturbed Keratinocyte Differentiation and Influx of IL-17A Producing T Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Vivian L.; Keijsers, Romy R. M. C.; van de Kerkhof, Peter C. M.; Seyger, Marieke M. B.; Fasse, Esther; Svensson, Lars; Latta, Markus; Norsgaard, Hanne; Labuda, Tord; Hupkens, Pieter; van Erp, Piet E. J.; Joosten, Irma; Koenen, Hans J. P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Humanized mouse models offer a challenging possibility to study human cell function in vivo. In the huPBL-SCID-huSkin allograft model human skin is transplanted onto immunodeficient mice and allowed to heal. Thereafter allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells are infused intra peritoneally to induce T cell mediated inflammation and microvessel destruction of the human skin. This model has great potential for in vivo study of human immune cells in (skin) inflammatory processes and for preclinical screening of systemically administered immunomodulating agents. Here we studied the inflammatory skin response of human keratinocytes and human T cells and the concomitant systemic human T cell response. As new findings in the inflamed human skin of the huPBL-SCID-huSkin model we here identified: 1. Parameters of dermal pathology that enable precise quantification of the local skin inflammatory response exemplified by acanthosis, increased expression of human β-defensin-2, Elafin, K16, Ki67 and reduced expression of K10 by microscopy and immunohistochemistry. 2. Induction of human cytokines and chemokines using quantitative real-time PCR. 3. Influx of inflammation associated IL-17A-producing human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as immunoregulatory CD4+Foxp3+ cells using immunohistochemistry and -fluorescence, suggesting that active immune regulation is taking place locally in the inflamed skin. 4. Systemic responses that revealed activated and proliferating human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that acquired homing marker expression of CD62L and CLA. Finally, we demonstrated the value of the newly identified parameters by showing significant changes upon systemic treatment with the T cell inhibitory agents cyclosporine-A and rapamycin. In summary, here we equipped the huPBL-SCID-huSkin humanized mouse model with relevant tools not only to quantify the inflammatory dermal response, but also to monitor the peripheral immune status. This combined approach will gain our

  13. A fully human antibody to gp41 selectively eliminates HIV-infected cells that transmigrated across a model human blood brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    McFARREN, Alicia; LOPEZ, Lillie; WILLIAMS, Dionna W.; VEENSTRA, Mike; BRYAN, Ruth A.; GOLDSMITH, Aliza; MORGENSTERN, Alfred; BRUCHERTSEIFER, Frank; ZOLLA-PAZNER, Susan; GORNY, Miroslaw K.; EUGENIN, Eliseo A.; BERMAN, Joan W.; DADACHOVA, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many HIV patients on cART exhibit HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders because the brain becomes a viral reservoir. There is a need for therapeutics that can enter the CNS and eradicate the virus. Design Radiolabeled human mAb 2556 to HIV gp41 selectively kills HIV-infected cells in vivo and in vitro. Here we tested the ability of 213Bi-2556 to cross a tissue culture model of the human BBB and kill HIV-infected PBMCs and monocytes on the CNS side of the barrier. Methods 2556 mAb isoelectric point (pI) was determined with IEF. The ability of radiolabeled 2556 to penetrate through the barrier was studied by adding it to the upper chamber of the barriers and its penetration into the CNS side was followed for 5 hrs. To assess the ability of 213Bi-2556 to kill the HIV-infected cells on the CNS side of barrier, the HIV-infected and uninfected PBMCs and monocytes were allowed to transmigrate across the barriers overnight followed by application of 213Bi-2556 or control mAb 213Bi-1418 to the top of the barrier. Killing of cells was measured by TUNEL and Trypan blue assays. The barriers were examined by confocal microscopy for overt damage. Results The pI of 213Bi-2556 was 9.6 enabling its penetration through the barrier by transcytosis. 213Bi-2556 killed significantly more transmigrated HIV-infected cells in comparison to 213Bi-1418 and uninfected cells. No overt damage to barriers was observed. Conclusions We demonstrated that 213Bi-2556 mAb crossed an in vitro human BBB and specifically killed transmigrated HIV-infected PBMCs and monocytes without overt damage to the barrier. PMID:26595540

  14. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a new model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dossena, Marta; Bedini, Gloria; Rusmini, Paola; Giorgetti, Elisa; Canazza, Alessandra; Tosetti, Valentina; Salsano, Ettore; Sagnelli, Anna; Mariotti, Caterina; Gellera, Cinzia; Navone, Stefania Elena; Marfia, Giovanni; Alessandri, Giulio; Corsi, Fabio; Parati, Eugenio Agostino; Pareyson, Davide; Poletti, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) or Kennedy's disease is an X-linked CAG/polyglutamine expansion motoneuron disease, in which an elongated polyglutamine tract (polyQ) in the N-terminal androgen receptor (ARpolyQ) confers toxicity to this protein. Typical markers of SBMA disease are ARpolyQ intranuclear inclusions. These are generated after the ARpolyQ binds to its endogenous ligands, which promotes AR release from chaperones, activation and nuclear translocation, but also cell toxicity. The SBMA mouse models developed so far, and used in preclinical studies, all contain an expanded CAG repeat significantly longer than that of SBMA patients. Here, we propose the use of SBMA patients adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a new human in vitro model to study ARpolyQ toxicity. These cells have the advantage to express only ARpolyQ, and not the wild type AR allele. Therefore, we isolated and characterized adipose-derived MSCs from three SBMA patients (ADSC from Kennedy's patients, ADSCK) and three control volunteers (ADSCs). We found that both ADSCs and ADSCKs express mesenchymal antigens, even if only ADSCs can differentiate into the three typical cell lineages (adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteocytes), whereas ADSCKs, from SBMA patients, showed a lower growth potential and differentiated only into adipocyte. Moreover, analysing AR expression on our mesenchymal cultures we found lower levels in all ADSCKs than ADSCs, possibly related to negative pressures exerted by toxic ARpolyQ in ADSCKs. In addition, with proteasome inhibition the ARpolyQ levels increased specifically in ADSCKs, inducing the formation of HSP70 and ubiquitin positive nuclear ARpolyQ inclusions. Considering all of this evidence, SBMA patients adipose-derived MSCs cultures should be considered an innovative in vitro human model to understand the molecular mechanisms of ARpolyQ toxicity and to test novel therapeutic approaches in SBMA.

  15. Long-term expression of human adenosine deaminase in vascular smooth muscle cells of rats: A model for gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.M.; Miller, A.D. ); Clowes, M.M.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Clowes, A.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  16. A Comprehensive, Multi-Scale Dynamical Model of ErbB Receptor Signal Transduction in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Helikar, Tomáš; Kochi, Naomi; Kowal, Bryan; Dimri, Manjari; Naramura, Mayumi; Raja, Srikumar M.; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid; Rogers, Jim A.

    2013-01-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src and receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB1) have been established as collaborators in cellular signaling and their combined dysregulation plays key roles in human cancers, including breast cancer. In part due to the complexity of the biochemical network associated with the regulation of these proteins as well as their cellular functions, the role of Src in EGFR regulation remains unclear. Herein we present a new comprehensive, multi-scale dynamical model of ErbB receptor signal transduction in human mammary epithelial cells. This model, constructed manually from published biochemical literature, consists of 245 nodes representing proteins and their post-translational modifications sites, and over 1,000 biochemical interactions. Using computer simulations of the model, we find it is able to reproduce a number of cellular phenomena. Furthermore, the model predicts that overexpression of Src results in increased endocytosis of EGFR in the absence/low amount of the epidermal growth factor (EGF). Our subsequent laboratory experiments also suggest increased internalization of EGFR upon Src overexpression under EGF-deprived conditions, further supporting this model-generated hypothesis. PMID:23637902

  17. A Comparative Study of Early Afterdepolarization-Mediated Fibrillation in Two Mathematical Models for Human Ventricular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zimik, Soling; Vandersickel, Nele; Nayak, Alok Ranjan; Panfilov, Alexander V.; Pandit, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Early afterdepolarizations (EADs), which are abnormal oscillations of the membrane potential at the plateau phase of an action potential, are implicated in the development of cardiac arrhythmias like Torsade de Pointes. We carry out extensive numerical simulations of the TP06 and ORd mathematical models for human ventricular cells with EADs. We investigate the different regimes in both these models, namely, the parameter regimes where they exhibit (1) a normal action potential (AP) with no EADs, (2) an AP with EADs, and (3) an AP with EADs that does not go back to the resting potential. We also study the dependence of EADs on the rate of at which we pace a cell, with the specific goal of elucidating EADs that are induced by slow or fast rate pacing. In our simulations in two- and three-dimensional domains, in the presence of EADs, we find the following wave types: (A) waves driven by the fast sodium current and the L-type calcium current (Na-Ca-mediated waves); (B) waves driven only by the L-type calcium current (Ca-mediated waves); (C) phase waves, which are pseudo-travelling waves. Furthermore, we compare the wave patterns of the various wave-types (Na-Ca-mediated, Ca-mediated, and phase waves) in both these models. We find that the two models produce qualitatively similar results in terms of exhibiting Na-Ca-mediated wave patterns that are more chaotic than those for the Ca-mediated and phase waves. However, there are quantitative differences in the wave patterns of each wave type. The Na-Ca-mediated waves in the ORd model show short-lived spirals but the TP06 model does not. The TP06 model supports more Ca-mediated spirals than those in the ORd model, and the TP06 model exhibits more phase-wave patterns than does the ORd model. PMID:26125185

  18. A Comparative Study of Early Afterdepolarization-Mediated Fibrillation in Two Mathematical Models for Human Ventricular Cells.

    PubMed

    Zimik, Soling; Vandersickel, Nele; Nayak, Alok Ranjan; Panfilov, Alexander V; Pandit, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Early afterdepolarizations (EADs), which are abnormal oscillations of the membrane potential at the plateau phase of an action potential, are implicated in the development of cardiac arrhythmias like Torsade de Pointes. We carry out extensive numerical simulations of the TP06 and ORd mathematical models for human ventricular cells with EADs. We investigate the different regimes in both these models, namely, the parameter regimes where they exhibit (1) a normal action potential (AP) with no EADs, (2) an AP with EADs, and (3) an AP with EADs that does not go back to the resting potential. We also study the dependence of EADs on the rate of at which we pace a cell, with the specific goal of elucidating EADs that are induced by slow or fast rate pacing. In our simulations in two- and three-dimensional domains, in the presence of EADs, we find the following wave types: (A) waves driven by the fast sodium current and the L-type calcium current (Na-Ca-mediated waves); (B) waves driven only by the L-type calcium current (Ca-mediated waves); (C) phase waves, which are pseudo-travelling waves. Furthermore, we compare the wave patterns of the various wave-types (Na-Ca-mediated, Ca-mediated, and phase waves) in both these models. We find that the two models produce qualitatively similar results in terms of exhibiting Na-Ca-mediated wave patterns that are more chaotic than those for the Ca-mediated and phase waves. However, there are quantitative differences in the wave patterns of each wave type. The Na-Ca-mediated waves in the ORd model show short-lived spirals but the TP06 model does not. The TP06 model supports more Ca-mediated spirals than those in the ORd model, and the TP06 model exhibits more phase-wave patterns than does the ORd model.

  19. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells and inhibits prostate cancer growth in a xenograft mouse model of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qiong; Li, Zhuoneng; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Fan; Xu, Ruo-Jun; Cai, Yi-Zhong

    2009-08-01

    Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBPs) are important functional constituents in red-colored fruits of L. barbarum (Guo Qi Zi, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal plant commonly known as Goji berry or wolfberry). The influence of LBP on human prostate cancer cells was systematically investigated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro effects of LBP on two cell lines (PC-3 and DU-145) were examined by using trypan blue exclusion staining, single-cell gel electrophoresis, flow cytometry, terminal dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and immunohistochemical assay (assessment of Bcl-2 and Bax expression). The in vivo effect of LBP on PC-3 cells was assessed in the nude mouse xenograft tumor model. The in vitro results showed that LBP can dose- and time-dependently inhibit the growth of both PC-3 and DU-145 cells. LBP caused the breakage of DNA strands of PC-3 and DU-145 cells; the tail frequency and tail length were significantly higher than that of control cells. LBP also markedly induced PC-3 and DU-145 cell apoptosis, with the highest apoptosis rates at 41.5% and 35.5%, respectively. The ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression following LBP treatments decreased significantly with a dose-effect relationship, which suggested that LBP can regulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax to induce apoptosis of PC-3 and DU-145 cells. The in vivo experimental results indicate that LBP might significantly inhibit PC-3 tumor growth in nude mice. Both the tumor volume and weight of the LBP treatment group were significantly lower than those of the control group.

  20. Intracoronary Delivery of Human Mesenchymal/Stromal Stem Cells: Insights from Coronary Microcirculation Invasive Assessment in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Fiarresga, António; Mata, Márcia F.; Cavaco-Gonçalves, Sandra; Selas, Mafalda; Simões, Irina N.; Oliveira, Eunice; Carrapiço, Belmira; Cardim, Nuno; Cabral, Joaquim M. S.; Ferreira, Rui Cruz; da Silva, Cláudia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells have unique properties favorable to their use in clinical practice and have been studied for cardiac repair. However, these cells are larger than coronary microvessels and there is controversy about the risk of embolization and microinfarctions, which could jeopardize the safety and efficacy of intracoronary route for their delivery. The index of microcirculatory resistance (IMR) is an invasive method for quantitatively assessing the coronary microcirculation status. Objectives To examine heart microcirculation after intracoronary injection of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells with the index of microcirculatory resistance. Methods Healthy swine were randomized to receive by intracoronary route either 30x106 MSC or the same solution with no cells (1% human albumin/PBS) (placebo). Blinded operators took coronary pressure and flow measurements, prior to intracoronary infusion and at 5 and 30 minutes post-delivery. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) and the IMR were compared between groups. Results CFR and IMR were done with a variance within the 3 transit time measurements of 6% at rest and 11% at maximal hyperemia. After intracoronary infusion there were no significant differences in CFR. The IMR was significantly higher in MSC-injected animals (at 30 minutes, 14.2U vs. 8.8U, p = 0.02) and intragroup analysis showed a significant increase of 112% from baseline to 30 minutes after cell infusion, although no electrocardiographic changes or clinical deterioration were noted. Conclusion Overall, this study provides definitive evidence of microcirculatory disruption upon intracoronary administration of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, in a large animal model closely resembling human cardiac physiology, function and anatomy. PMID:26479722

  1. A Human Espophageal Epithelial Cell Model for Study of Radiation Induced Cancer and DNA Damage Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma, a type of cancer found to have a significant enhancement in incidence in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Here we present the results of our preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of - H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron).

  2. Lipid metabolism in myelinating glial cells: lessons from human inherited disorders and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Chrast, Roman; Saher, Gesine; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Verheijen, Mark H. G.

    2011-01-01

    The integrity of central and peripheral nervous system myelin is affected in numerous lipid metabolism disorders. This vulnerability was so far mostly attributed to the extraordinarily high level of lipid synthesis that is required for the formation of myelin, and to the relative autonomy in lipid synthesis of myelinating glial cells because of blood barriers shielding the nervous system from circulating lipids. Recent insights from analysis of inherited lipid disorders, especially those with prevailing lipid depletion and from mouse models with glia-specific disruption of lipid metabolism, shed new light on this issue. The particular lipid composition of myelin, the transport of lipid-associated myelin proteins, and the necessity for timely assembly of the myelin sheath all contribute to the observed vulnerability of myelin to perturbed lipid metabolism. Furthermore, the uptake of external lipids may also play a role in the formation of myelin membranes. In addition to an improved understanding of basic myelin biology, these data provide a foundation for future therapeutic interventions aiming at preserving glial cell integrity in metabolic disorders. PMID:21062955

  3. A human esophageal epithelial cell model for study of radiation induced cancer and DNA repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    For cancer risk assessment in astronauts and for countermeasure development, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and how these mechanisms are influenced by exposure to the types of radiation found in space. We are developing an in vitro model system for the study of radiation-induced initiation and progression of esophageal carcinoma. Development of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is associated with radiation exposure, as revealed by the significant enhanced in incidence rates for this type of cancer in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also associated with poor nutritional status and micronutrient deficiencies, which are also important issues for long duration spaceflight. The possible synergies between nutritional issues and radiation exposure are unknown. Here we present the results of preliminary characterization of both normal and hTERT-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells grown in 2-dimensional culture. We analyzed DNA repair capacity by measuring the kinetics of formation and loss of gamma-H2AX foci following radiation exposure. Additionally, we analyzed induction of chromosomal aberrations using 3-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Data were generated using both low LET (gamma rays) and high LET ions (1000 MeV/nucleon iron.

  4. Measuring and modeling of binary mixture effects of pharmaceuticals and nickel on cell viability/cytotoxicity in the human hepatoma derived cell line HepG2

    SciTech Connect

    Rudzok, S.; Schlink, U.; Herbarth, O.; Bauer, M.

    2010-05-01

    The interaction of drugs and non-therapeutic xenobiotics constitutes a central role in human health risk assessment. Still, available data are rare. Two different models have been established to predict mixture toxicity from single dose data, namely, the concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) model. However, chemicals can also act synergistic or antagonistic or in dose level deviation, or in a dose ratio dependent deviation. In the present study we used the MIXTOX model (EU project ENV4-CT97-0507), which incorporates these algorithms, to assess effects of the binary mixtures in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. These cells possess a liver-like enzyme pattern and a variety of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (phases I and II). We tested binary mixtures of the metal nickel, the anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac, and the antibiotic agent irgasan and compared the experimental data to the mathematical models. Cell viability was determined by three different methods the MTT-, AlamarBlue (registered) and NRU assay. The compounds were tested separately and in combinations. We could show that the metal nickel is the dominant component in the mixture, affecting an antagonism at low-dose levels and a synergism at high-dose levels in combination with diclofenac or irgasan, when using the NRU and the AlamarBlue assay. The dose-response surface of irgasan and diclofenac indicated a concentration addition. The experimental data could be described by the algorithms with a regression of up to 90%, revealing the HepG2 cell line and the MIXTOX model as valuable tool for risk assessment of binary mixtures for cytotoxic endpoints. However the model failed to predict a specific mode of action, the CYP1A1 enzyme activity.

  5. Human TDP-43 and FUS selectively affect motor neuron maturation and survival in a murine cell model of ALS by non-cell-autonomous mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wächter, Nicole; Storch, Alexander; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) and fused in sarcoma (FUS) were recently found to cause familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The mechanisms by which mutations within these genes cause ALS are not understood. We established murine embryonic stem cell (ESC)-based cell models that stably express the human wild-type (WT) and various ALS causing mutations of TDP-43 (A315T) and FUS (R514S, R521C and P525L). We investigated their effect on pan-neuron as well as motor neuron degeneration. Finally, non-cell-autonomous mediated neurodegeneration by muscle cells was investigated. Expression of mutant hTDP-43, but not wild-type TDP-43, as well as wild-type and mutant hFUS proteins induced neuronal degeneration with partial selectivity for motor neurons. Motor neuron loss was accompanied by abnormal neurite morphology and length. In chimeric coculture experiments with control motor neurons and mutant muscle cells (as their major target cells), we detected that mutant hTDP-43 A315T as well as wild-type and hFUS P525L expression only in muscle cells is sufficient to exert degenerative effects on control motor neurons. In conclusion, our data indicate that a selective vulnerability of motor neurons expressing the pathogenic ALS-causing genes TDP-43 and FUS, is, at least in part, mediated through non-cell-autonomous mechanisms.

  6. Human induced pluripotent stem cells can reach complete terminal maturation: in vivo and in vitro evidence in the erythropoietic differentiation model

    PubMed Central

    Kobari, Ladan; Yates, Frank; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Francina, Alain; Kiger, Laurent; Mazurier, Christelle; Rouzbeh, Shaghayegh; El-Nemer, Wassim; Hebert, Nicolas; Giarratana, Marie-Catherine; François, Sabine; Chapel, Alain; Lapillonne, Hélène; Luton, Dominique; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Douay, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Background Human induced pluripotent stem cells offer perspectives for cell therapy and research models for diseases. We applied this approach to the normal and pathological erythroid differentiation model by establishing induced pluripotent stem cells from normal and homozygous sickle cell disease donors. Design and Methods We addressed the question as to whether these cells can reach complete erythroid terminal maturation notably with a complete switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin. Sickle cell disease induced pluripotent stem cells were differentiated in vitro into red blood cells and characterized for their terminal maturation in terms of hemoglobin content, oxygen transport capacity, deformability, sickling and adherence. Nucleated erythroblast populations generated from normal and pathological induced pluripotent stem cells were then injected into non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency mice to follow the in vivo hemoglobin maturation. Results We observed that in vitro erythroid differentiation results in predominance of fetal hemoglobin which rescues the functionality of red blood cells in the pathological model of sickle cell disease. We observed, in vivo, the switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin after infusion of nucleated erythroid precursors derived from either normal or pathological induced pluripotent stem cells into mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that human induced pluripotent stem cells: i) can achieve complete terminal erythroid maturation, in vitro in terms of nucleus expulsion and in vivo in terms of hemoglobin maturation; and ii) open the way to generation of functionally corrected red blood cells from sickle cell disease induced pluripotent stem cells, without any genetic modification or drug treatment. PMID:22733021

  7. Effect of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation on Nerve Fibers of A Rat Model of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Li, Dong; Zhang, Zhe; Takushige, Natsuko; Kong, Bei-Hua; Wang, Guo-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Background Endometriosis is a common, benign, oestrogen-dependent, chronic gynaecological disorder associated with pelvic pain and infertility. Some researchers have identified nerve fibers in endometriotic lesions in women with endometriosis. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted interest for their possible use for both cell and gene therapies because of their capacity for self-renewal and multipotentiality of differentiation. We investigated how human umbilical cord-MSCs (hUC-MSCs) could affect nerve fibers density in endometriosis. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, hUC-MSCs were isolated from fresh human umbilical cord, characterized by flow cytometry, and then transplanted into surgically induced endometriosis in a rat model. Ectopic endometrial implants were collected four weeks later. The specimens were sectioned and stained immunohistochemically with antibodies against neurofilament (NF), nerve growth factor (NGF), NGF receptor p75 (NGFRp75), tyrosine kinase receptor-A (Trk-A), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) to compare the presence of different types of nerve fibers between the treatment group with the transplantation of hUC-MSCs and the control group without the transplantation of hUC-MSCs. Results There were significantly less nerve fibers stained with specific markers we used in the treatment group than in the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion MSC from human umbilical cord reduced nerve fiber density in the treatment group with the transplantation of hUC-MSCs. PMID:25918595

  8. A human pluripotent carcinoma stem cell-based model for in vitro developmental neurotoxicity testing: effects of methylmercury, lead and aluminum evaluated by gene expression studies.

    PubMed

    Laurenza, Incoronata; Pallocca, Giorgia; Mennecozzi, Milena; Scelfo, Bibiana; Pamies, David; Bal-Price, Anna

    2013-11-01

    The major advantage of the neuronal cell culture models derived from human stem cells is their ability to replicate the crucial stages of neurodevelopment such as the commitment of human stem cells to the neuronal lineage and their subsequent stages of differentiation into neuronal and glial-like cell. In these studies we used mixed neuronal/glial culture derived from the NTERA-2 (NT-2) cell line, which has been established from human pluripotent testicular embryonal carcinoma cells. After characterization of the different stages of cell differentiation into neuronal- and glial-like phenotype toxicity studies were performed to evaluate whether this model would be suitable for developmental neurotoxicity studies. The cells were exposed during the differentiation process to non-cytotoxic concentrations of methylmercury chloride, lead chloride and aluminum nitrate for two weeks. The toxicity was then evaluated by measuring the mRNA levels of cell specific markers (neuronal and glial). The results obtained suggest that lead chloride and aluminum nitrate at low concentrations were toxic primarily to astrocytes and at the higher concentrations it also induced neurotoxicity. In contrast, MetHgCl was toxic for both cell types, neuronal and glial, as mRNA specific for astrocytes and neuronal markers were affected. The results obtained suggest that a neuronal mixed culture derived from human NT2 precursor cells is a suitable model for developmental neurotoxicity studies and gene expression could be used as a sensitive endpoint for initial screening of potential neurotoxic compounds.

  9. Astrocyte pathology in a human neural stem cell model of frontotemporal dementia caused by mutant TAU protein

    PubMed Central

    Hallmann, Anna-Lena; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Mavrommatis, Lampros; Ehrlich, Marc; Röpke, Albrecht; Brockhaus, Johannes; Missler, Markus; Sterneckert, Jared; Schöler, Hans R.; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Zaehres, Holm; Hargus, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    Astroglial pathology is seen in various neurodegenerative diseases including frontotemporal dementia (FTD), which can be caused by mutations in the gene encoding the microtubule-associated protein TAU (MAPT). Here, we applied a stem cell model of FTD to examine if FTD astrocytes carry an intrinsic propensity to degeneration and to determine if they can induce non-cell-autonomous effects in neighboring neurons. We utilized CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to repair the FTD-associated N279K MAPT mutation. While astrocytic differentiation was not impaired in FTD NPCs derived from one patient carrying the N279K MAPT mutation, FTD astrocytes appeared larger, expressed increased levels of 4R-TAU isoforms, demonstrated increased vulnerability to oxidative stress and elevated protein ubiquitination and exhibited disease-associated changes in transcriptome profiles when compared to astrocytes derived from one control individual and to the isogenic control. Interestingly, co-culture experiments with FTD astrocytes revealed increased oxidative stress and robust changes in whole genome expression in previously healthy neurons. Our study highlights the utility of iPS cell-derived NPCs to elucidate the role of astrocytes in the pathogenesis of FTD. PMID:28256506

  10. Transport of digoxin-loaded polymeric nanoparticles across BeWo cells, an in vitro model of human placental trophoblast

    PubMed Central

    Albekairi, Norah A; Al-Enazy, Sanaalarab; Ali, Shariq; Rytting, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fetal arrhythmias can lead to fetal congestive heart failure and hydrops fetalis. Digoxin (the first-line treatment) has low transplacental permeability and high risk of maternal side effects. Biodegradable digoxin-loaded PEGylated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles may increase digoxin transport across BeWo b30 cell monolayers (an in vitro model of trophoblast in human placenta) by reducing the drug's interaction with P-gp. Results/methodology: The nanoparticles showed high encapsulation efficiency and sustained release over 48 h. Transport studies revealed significantly increased permeability across BeWo cell layers of digoxin-loaded nanoparticles when compared with free digoxin. P-gp inhibition also increased the permeability of digoxin, but not digoxin-loaded nanoparticles. Conclusion: This represents a novel treatment strategy for fetal cardiovascular disease which may improve maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:26652279

  11. Effects of increasing numbers of phagocytic inclusions on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in culture: a model for aging.

    PubMed Central

    Boulton, M; Marshall, J

    1986-01-01

    Cultures of human retinal pigment epithelial cells have been challenged with a number of biological (lipofuscin, melanin, and rod outer segments) and non-biological (latex microspheres) particles at a variety of concentrations. The particles were chosen to include examples of both degradable and non-degradable systems. A range of morphological changes were observed by phase contrast microscopy, and these became more atypical with increasing concentration. At the highest concentration cells had ingested so many particles that many had died and others had ruptured. The time course of these changes indicated a relationship between cellular lytic activity and the capacity of the particle to degrade. The potential of this system as a model for studying senescence is discussed. Images PMID:3790481

  12. A human in vitro granuloma model using heat killed Candida albicans cells immobilized on plastic culture wells.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, D E; Peters, J H; Gahr, M

    1997-06-01

    A new model for studying the initial events of granuloma formation in vitro is presented using heat killed Candida albicans immobilized on the surface of plastic culture wells. Human monocytes were induced to accumulate and to proliferate, forming multinucleated giant cells (MGC) and epitheloid cells within 4 days of culture. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1 beta and IL-6 were detected in culture supernatants. These monokines, and additionally macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), were also detected immunocytochemically. The granuloma formation was inhibited by Dexamethasone (Dex), Pentoxifylline (POF), or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in a dose-dependent manner. Antibodies to M-CSF reduced the granuloma formation to a great extent with a striking reduction of monocyte proliferation. Using antibodies to TNF-alpha the authors found a complete inhibition of the granuloma including MGC formation and monocyte proliferation.

  13. Human mast cell transcriptome project.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Nakajima, T; Matsumoto, K

    2001-05-01

    After draft reading of the human genome sequence, systemic analysis of the transcriptome (the whole transcripts present in a cell) is progressing especially in commonly available cell types. Until recently, human mast cells were not commonly available. We have succeeded to generate a substantial number of human mast cells from umbilical cord blood and from adult peripheral blood progenitors. Then, we have examined messenger RNA selectively transcribed in these mast cells using high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays. Many unexpected but important transcripts were selectively expressed in human mast cells. We discuss the results obtained from transcriptome screening by introducing our data regarding mast-cell-specific genes.

  14. Human Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Xenografts Improve Cognitive Decline and Reduce the Amyloid Burden in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boutajangout, Allal; Noorwali, Abdulwahab; Atta, Hazem; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. The search for new treatments is made more urgent given its increasing prevalence resulting from the aging of the global population. Over the past 20 years, stem cell technologies have become an increasingly attractive option to both study and potentially treat neurodegenerative diseases. Several investigators reported a beneficial effect of different types of stem or progenitor cells on the pathology and cognitive function in AD models. Mouse models are one of the most important research tools for finding new treatment for AD. We aimed to explore the possible therapeutic potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell xenografts in a transgenic (Tg) mouse model of AD. Methods APP/PS1 Tg AD model mice received human umbilical cord stem cells, directly injected into the carotid artery. To test the efficacy of the umbilical cord stem cells in this AD model, behavioral tasks (sensorimotor and cognitive tests) and immunohistochemical quantitation of the pathology was performed. Results Treatment of the APP/PS1 AD model mice, with human umbilical cord stem cells, produced a reduction of the amyloid beta burden in the cortex and the hippocampus which correlated with a reduction of the cognitive loss. Conclusion Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells appear to reduce AD pathology in a transgenic mouse model as documented by a reduction of the amyloid plaque burden compared to controls. This amelioration of pathology correlates with improvements on cognitive and sensorimotor tasks. PMID:27719629

  15. Primary cultures of human colon cancer as a model to study cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koshkin, Sergey; Danilova, Anna; Raskin, Grigory; Petrov, Nikolai; Bajenova, Olga; O'Brien, Stephen J; Tomilin, Alexey; Tolkunova, Elena

    2016-09-01

    The principal cause of death in cancer involves tumor progression and metastasis. Since only a small proportion of the primary tumor cells, cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are the most aggressive, have the capacity to metastasize and display properties of stem cells, it is imperative to characterize the gene expression of diagnostic markers and to evaluate the drug sensitivity in the CSCs themselves. Here, we have examined the key genes that are involved in the progression of colorectal cancer and are expressed in cancer stem cells. Primary cultures of colorectal cancer cells from a patient's tumors were studied using the flow cytometry and cytological methods. We have evaluated the clinical and stem cell marker expression in these cells, their resistance to 5-fluorouracil and irinotecan, and the ability of cells to form tumors in mice. The data shows the role of stem cell marker Oct4 in the resistance of primary colorectal cancer tumor cells to 5-fluorouracil.

  16. Dose-biomarker-response modeling of the anticancer effect of ethaselen in a human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Suo-fu; Li, Jian; Ji, Shuang-min; Zeng, Hui-hui; Lu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is a component of several redox-sensitive signaling cascades that mediate important biological processes such as cell survival, maturation, growth, migration and inhibition of apoptosis. The expression levels of TrxR1 in some human carcinoma cell lines are nearly 10 times higher than those in normal cells. Ethaselen is a novel antitumor candidate that exerts potent inhibition on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by targeting TrxR. In this study we explored the relationship between the ethaselen dose and TrxR activity level and the relationship between TrxR degradation and tumor apoptosis in a human lung carcinoma A549 xenograft model. BALB/c nude mice implanted with human NSCLC cell line A54 were administered ethaselen (36, 72, 108 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or vehicle for 10 d. The tumor size and TrxR activity levels in tumor tissues were daily recorded and detected. Based on the experimental data, NONMEM 7.2 was used to develop an integrated dose-biomarker-response model for describing the quantitative relationship between ethaselen dose and tumor eradication effects. The time course of TrxR activity levels was modeled using an indirect response model (IDR model), in which the influence of the tumor growth rates on Kin with the linear correction factor γ1 (0.021 d/mm). The drug binding-inhibition effects on Kout was described using a sigmoidal Emax model with Smax (5.95), SC50 (136 mg/kg) and Hill's coefficient γ2 (2.29). The influence of TrxR activity inhibition on tumor eradication was characterized by an Emax model with an Emax (130 mm3/d) and EC50 (0.0676). This model was further validated using a visual predictive check (VPC) and was used to predict the efficacy of different doses. In conclusion, the properties and characteristics of ethaselen acting on TrxR degradation and subsequently resulting in tumor apoptosis are characterized by the IDR model and integrated dose-biomarker-response model with high goodness-of-fit and great

  17. In vitro model of cerebral ischemia by using brain microvascular endothelial cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kokubu, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji

    2017-04-29

    Brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), which play a central role in blood brain barrier (BBB), can be used for the evaluation of drug transport into the brain. Although human BMEC cell lines have already been reported, they lack original properties such as barrier integrity. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) can be used for various applications such as regenerative therapy, drug screening, and pathological study. In the recent study, an induction method of BMECs from PSCs has been established, making it possible to more precisely study the in vitro human BBB function. Here, using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived BMECs, we examined the effects of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and OGD/reoxygenation (OGD/R) on BBB permeability. OGD disrupted the barrier function, and the dysfunction was rapidly restored by re-supply of the oxygen and glucose. Interestingly, TNF-α, which is known to be secreted from astrocytes and microglia in the cerebral ischemia, prevented the restoration of OGD-induced barrier dysfunction in an apoptosis-independent manner. Thus, we could establish the in vitro BBB disease model that mimics the cerebral ischemia by using iPS cell-derived BMECs.

  18. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal tissue in two primate models of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Hiroshi; Mandai, Michiko; Matsushita, Keizo; Kuwahara, Atsushi; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Nakano, Tokushige; Assawachananont, Juthaporn; Kimura, Toru; Saito, Koichi; Terasaki, Hiroko; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Sasai, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    Retinal transplantation therapy for retinitis pigmentosa is increasingly of interest due to accumulating evidence of transplantation efficacy from animal studies and development of techniques for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells into retinal tissues or cells. In this study, we aimed to assess the potential clinical utility of hESC-derived retinal tissues (hESC-retina) using newly developed primate models of retinal degeneration to obtain preparatory information regarding the potential clinical utility of these hESC-retinas in transplantation therapy. hESC-retinas were first transplanted subretinally into nude rats with or without retinal degeneration to confirm their competency as a graft to mature to form highly specified outer segment structure and to integrate after transplantation. Two focal selective photoreceptor degeneration models were then developed in monkeys by subretinal injection of cobalt chloride or 577-nm optically pumped semiconductor laser photocoagulation. The utility of the developed models and a practicality of visual acuity test developed for monkeys were evaluated. Finally, feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation was assessed in the developed monkey models under practical surgical procedure and postoperational examinations. Grafted hESC-retina was observed differentiating into a range of retinal cell types, including rod and cone photoreceptors that developed structured outer nuclear layers after transplantation. Further, immunohistochemical analyses suggested the formation of host–graft synaptic connections. The findings of this study demonstrate the clinical feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation and provide the practical tools for the optimization of transplantation strategies for future clinical applications. PMID:26699487

  19. A Comprehensive TALEN-Based Knockout Library for Generating Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Models for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Karakikes, Ioannis; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Cepeda, Diana A; Lee, Jaecheol; Diecke, Sebastian; Hendel, Ayal; Itzhaki, Ilanit; Ameen, Mohamed; Shrestha, Rajani; Wu, Haodi; Ma, Ning; Shao, Ning-Yi; Seeger, Timon; Woo, Nicole A; Wilson, Kitchener D; Matsa, Elena; Porteus, Matthew H; Sebastiano, Vittorio; Wu, Joseph C

    2017-02-28

    Rationale: Targeted genetic engineering using programmable nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is a valuable tool for precise, site-specific genetic modification in the human genome. Objective: The emergence of novel technologies such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and nuclease-mediated genome editing represent a unique opportunity for studying cardiovascular diseases in vitro. Methods and Results: By incorporating extensive literature and database searches, we designed a collection of TALEN constructs to knockout (KO) eighty-eight human genes that are associated with cardiomyopathies and congenital heart diseases. The TALEN pairs were designed to induce double-strand DNA break near the starting codon of each gene that either disrupted the start codon or introduced a frameshift mutation in the early coding region, ensuring faithful gene KO. We observed that all the constructs were active and disrupted the target locus at high frequencies. To illustrate the general utility of the TALEN-mediated KO technique, six individual genes (TNNT2, LMNA/C, TBX5, MYH7, ANKRD1, and NKX2.5) were knocked out with high efficiency and specificity in human iPSCs. By selectively targeting a dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)-causing mutation (TNNT2 p.R173W) in patient-specific iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes (iPSC-CMs), we demonstrated that the KO strategy ameliorates the DCM phenotype in vitro. In addition, we modeled the Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS) in iPSC-CMs in vitro and uncovered novel pathways regulated by TBX5 in human cardiac myocyte development. Conclusions: Collectively, our study illustrates the powerful combination of iPSCs and genome editing technology for understanding the biological function of genes and the pathological significance of genetic variants in human cardiovascular diseases. The methods, strategies, constructs and iPSC lines developed in this study provide a validated, readily available resource for cardiovascular

  20. Therapeutic effect of transplanted human Wharton's jelly stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (hWJ-MSC-derived OPCs) in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mikaeili Agah, Elmira; Parivar, Kazem; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    2014-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). A potential new therapeutic approach for MS is cell transplantation which may promote remyelination. We transplanted human Wharton's jelly stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (hWJ-MSC-derived OPCs) into the brain ventricles of mice induced with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS. We studied the effect of the transplanted OPCs on the functional and pathological manifestations of the disease. Transplanted hWJ-MSC-derived OPCs significantly reduced the clinical signs of EAE. Histological examinations showed that remyelination was significantly increased after transplantation. These results suggest that hWJ-MSC-derived OPCs promote the regeneration of myelin sheaths in the brain.

  1. PHOSPHOLIPASE D (PLD) DRIVES CELL INVASION, TUMOR GROWTH AND METASTASIS IN A HUMAN BREAST CANCER XENOGRAPH MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Henkels, Karen M.; Boivin, Gregory P.; Dudley, Emily S.; Berberich, Steven J.; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in human females in the world. One protein that has elevated enzymatic lipase activity in breast cancers in vitro is phospholipase D (PLD), which is also involved in cell migration. We demonstrate that the PLD2 isoform, which was analyzed directly in the tumors, is crucial for cell invasion that contributes critically to the growth and development of breast tumors and lung metastases in vivo. We used three complementary strategies in a SCID mouse model and also addressed the underlying molecular mechanism. First, the PLD2 gene was silenced in highly metastatic, aggressive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) with lentivirus-based shRNA, which were xenotransplanted in SCID mice. The resulting mouse primary mammary tumors were reduced in size (65%, p<0.05) and their onset delayed when compared to control tumors. Second, we stably overexpressed PLD2 in low-invasive breast cancer cells (MCF-7) with a biscistronic MIEG retroviral vector and observed that these cells were converted into a highly aggressive phenotype, as primary tumors that formed following xenotransplantation were larger, grew faster and developed lung metastases more readily. Third, we implanted osmotic pumps into SCID xenotransplanted mice that delivered two different small-molecule inhibitors of PLD activity (FIPI and NOPT). These inhibitors led to significant (>70%, p<0.05) inhibition of primary tumor growth, metastatic axillary tumors and lung metastases. In order to define the underlying mechanism, we determined that the machinery of PLD-induced cell invasion is mediated by phosphatidic acid (PA), WASp, Grb2 and Rac2 signaling events that ultimately affect actin polymerization and cell invasion. In summary, this study shows that PLD has a central role in the development, metastasis and level of aggressiveness of breast cancer, raising the possibility that PLD2 could be used as a new therapeutic target. PMID:23752189

  2. Engineered three-dimensional multicellular culture model to recapitulate morphogenetic fusion using human cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tissue fusion during early mammalian development requires crosstalk between multiple cell types. For example, paracrine signaling between palatal epithelial cells and palatal mesenchyme mediates the fusion of opposing palatal shelves during embryonic development. Fusion events in...

  3. Activation of the erythroid K-Cl cotransporter Kcc1 enhances sickle cell disease pathology in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Brown, Fiona C; Conway, Ashlee J; Cerruti, Loretta; Collinge, Janelle E; McLean, Catriona; Wiley, James S; Kile, Ben T; Jane, Stephen M; Curtis, David J

    2015-12-24

    We used an N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea-based forward genetic screen in mice to identify new genes and alleles that regulate erythropoiesis. Here, we describe a mouse line expressing an activated form of the K-Cl cotransporter Slc12a4 (Kcc1), which results in a semi-dominant microcytosis of red cells. A missense mutation from methionine to lysine in the cytoplasmic tail of Kcc1 impairs phosphorylation of adjacent threonines required for inhibiting cotransporter activity. We bred Kcc1(M935K) mutant mice with a humanized mouse model of sickle cell disease to directly explore the relevance of the reported increase in KCC activity in disease pathogenesis. We show that a single mutant allele of Kcc1 induces widespread sickling and tissue damage, leading to premature death. This mouse model reveals important new insights into the regulation of K-Cl cotransporters and provides in vivo evidence that increased KCC activity worsened end-organ damage and diminished survival in sickle cell disease.

  4. A Novel Physiology-Based Mathematical Model to Estimate Red Blood Cell Lifespan in Different Human Age Groups.

    PubMed

    An, Guohua; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Direct measurement of red blood cell (RBC) survival in humans has improved from the original accurate but limited differential agglutination technique to the current reliable, safe, and accurate biotin method. Despite this, all of these methods are time consuming and require blood sampling over several months to determine the RBC lifespan. For situations in which RBC survival information must be obtained quickly, these methods are not suitable. With the exception of adults and infants, RBC survival has not been extensively investigated in other age groups. To address this need, we developed a novel, physiology-based mathematical model that quickly estimates RBC lifespan in healthy individuals at any age. The model is based on the assumption that the total number of RBC recirculations during the lifespan of each RBC (denoted by N max) is relatively constant for all age groups. The model was initially validated using the data from our prior infant and adult biotin-labeled red blood cell studies and then extended to the other age groups. The model generated the following estimated RBC lifespans in 2-year-old, 5-year-old, 8-year-old, and 10-year-old children: 62, 74, 82, and 86 days, respectively. We speculate that this model has useful clinical applications. For example, HbA1c testing is not reliable in identifying children with diabetes because HbA1c is directly affected by RBC lifespan. Because our model can estimate RBC lifespan in children at any age, corrections to HbA1c values based on the model-generated RBC lifespan could improve diabetes diagnosis as well as therapy in children.

  5. Establishment and Characterization of a Human Small Cell Osteosarcoma Cancer Stem Cell Line: A New Possible In Vitro Model for Discovering Small Cell Osteosarcoma Biology

    PubMed Central

    Zonefrati, Roberto; Mavilia, Carmelo; Franchi, Alessandro; Capanna, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most common primary malignant bone tumor, usually arising in the long bones of children and young adults. There are different subtypes of OSA, among which we find the conventional OS (also called medullary or central osteosarcoma) which has a high grade of malignancy and an incidence of 80%. There are different subtypes of high grade OS like chondroblastic, fibroblastic, osteoblastic, telangiectatic, and the small cell osteosarcoma (SCO). In this study, for the first time, we have isolated, established, and characterized a cell line of cancer stem cells (CSCs) from a human SCO. First of all, we have established a primary finite cell line of SCO, from which we have isolated the CSCs by the sphere formation assay. We have proved their in vitro mesenchymal and embryonic stem phenotype. Additionally, we have showed their neoplastic phenotype, since the original tumor bulk is a high grade osteosarcoma. This research demonstrates the existence of CSCs also in human primary SCO and highlights the establishment of this particular stabilized cancer stem cell line. This will represent a first step into the study of the biology of these cells to discover new molecular targets molecules for new incisive therapeutic strategies against this highly aggressive OSA. PMID:27651797

  6. Lycopene attenuates Aβ1-42 secretion and its toxicity in human cell and Caenorhabditis elegans models of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Mao, Liuqun; Xing, Huanhuan; Xu, Lei; Fu, Xiang; Huang, Liyingzi; Huang, Dongling; Pu, Zhijun; Li, Qinghua

    2015-11-03

    Growing evidence suggests concentration of lycopene was reduced in plasma of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Lycopene, a member of the carotenoid family, has been identified as an antioxidant to attenuate oxidative damage and has neuroprotective role in several AD models. However, whether lycopene is involved in the pathogenesis of AD and molecular underpinnings are elusive. In this study, we found that lycopene can significantly delay paralysis in the Aβ1-42-transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain GMC101. Lycopene treatment reduced Aβ1-42 secretion in SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing the Swedish mutant form of human β-amyloid precursor protein (APPsw). Next, we found lycopene can down-regulate expression level of β-amyloid precursor protein(APP) in APPsw cells. Moreover, lycopene treatment can not change endogenous reactive oxygen species level and apoptosis in APPsw cells. However, lycopene treatment protected against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and copper-induced damage in APPsw cells. Collectively, our data support that elevated lycopene contributes to the lower pathogenesis of AD. Our findings suggest that increasing lycopene in neurons may be a novel approach to attenuate onset and development of AD.

  7. Tumor tropism of intravenously injected human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells and their gene therapy application in a metastatic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Lam, Dang Hoang; Goh, Sally Sallee; Lee, Esther Xingwei; Zhao, Ying; Tay, Felix Chang; Chen, Can; Du, Shouhui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Tham, Chee Kian; Ng, Wai Hoe; Toh, Han Chong; Wang, Shu

    2012-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells can serve as an accessible and reliable source for the generation of functional human cells for medical therapies. In this study, we used a conventional lentiviral transduction method to derive human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from primary human fibroblasts and then generated neural stem cells (NSCs) from the iPS cells. Using a dual-color whole-body imaging technology, we demonstrated that after tail vein injection, these human NSCs displayed a robust migratory capacity outside the central nervous system in both immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice and homed in on established orthotopic 4T1 mouse mammary tumors. To investigate whether the iPS cell-derived NSCs can be used as a cellular delivery vehicle for cancer gene therapy, the cells were transduced with a baculoviral vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene and injected through tail vein into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. The transduced NSCs were effective in inhibiting the growth of the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor and the metastatic spread of the cancer cells in the presence of ganciclovir, leading to prolonged survival of the tumor-bearing mice. The use of iPS cell-derived NSCs for cancer gene therapy bypasses the sensitive ethical issue surrounding the use of cells derived from human fetal tissues or human embryonic stem cells. This approach may also help to overcome problems associated with allogeneic transplantation of other types of human NSCs.

  8. Antitumor effects of deguelin on H460 human lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo: Roles of apoptotic cell death and H460 tumor xenografts model.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Chieh; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Yu, Chun-Shu; Hsia, Te-Chun; Wu, Rick Sai-Chuen; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Yu, Fu-Shun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-01-01

    Deguelin, a naturally occurring rotenoid of the flavonoid family, is known to be an Akt inhibitor, to have chemopreventive activities and anti-tumor effect on several cancers. In this study, investigation to elucidate the effect of deguelin on apoptotic pathways in human lung cancer cells and on the anti-tumor effect in lung cancer xenograft nu/nu mice was performed. In vitro studies, found that deguelin induced cell morphological changes, and decreased the percentage of viability through the induction of apoptosis in H460 lung cancer cells. Deguelin triggered apoptosis in H460 cells was also confirmed by DAPI staining, DNA gel electrophoresis, and Annexin V-FITC staining and these effects are dose-dependent manners. It was also found that deguelin promoted the Ca(2+) production and activation of caspase-3 but decreased the level of ΔΨm in H460 cells. Western blots indicated that the protein levels of cytochrome c, AIF, and pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak protein were increased, but the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-x were decreased that may have led to apoptosis in H460 cells after exposure to deguelin. It was also confirmed by confocal laser microscope examination that deguelin promoted the release of AIF from mitochondria to cytosol. In vivo studies, found that in immunodeficient nu/nu mice bearing H460 tumor xenografts showed that the deguelin significantly suppressed tumor growth. Deguelin might be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of lung cancer in the future. This finding might fully support a critical event for deguelin via induction of apoptotic cell death and H460 tumor xenografts model against human lung cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 84-98, 2017.

  9. Passage of human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 during progression to cutaneous T-cell lymphoma results in myelopathic disease in an HTLV-1 infection model.

    PubMed

    Kindt, T J; Said, W A; Bowers, F S; Mahana, W; Zhao, T M; Simpson, R M

    2000-08-01

    Studies comparing functional differences in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) clones that mediate distinct outcomes in experimentally infected rabbits, resulted in a dermatopathic smoldering adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma following chronic infection with HTLV-1 strain RH/K34. During the 3.5 years' follow-up, HTLV-1 skin disease progressed to cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. When infection was passed to several naive rabbits, progressive paraparesis due to myelopathic neurodegeneration, analogous to HTLV-associated myelopathy, resulted in one of 4 transfusion recipients. Similar proviral loads were detected in the two diseases, regardless of stage of progression or tissue compartment of infection. Complete proviral sequences obtained from the donor and affected recipient aligned identically with each other and with the inoculated virus clone. Existence of disparate pathogenic outcomes following infectious transmission further extends the analogy of using rabbits to model human infection and disease. Although the experimental outcomes shown are limited by numbers of animals affected, they mimic the infrequency of HTLV-1 disease and authenticate epidemiological evidence of virus sequence stability regardless of disease phenotype. The findings suggest that further investigation of a possible role for HTLV-1 in some forms of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma is warranted.

  10. Nucleolin antagonist triggers autophagic cell death in human glioblastoma primary cells and decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model

    PubMed Central

    d'Angelo, Michele; Cristiano, Loredana; Galzio, Renato; Destouches, Damien; Florio, Tiziana Marilena; Dhez, Anne Chloé; Astarita, Carlo; Cinque, Benedetta; Fidoamore, Alessia; Rosati, Floriana; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Giordano, Antonio; Courty, José; Cimini, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Nucleolin (NCL) is highly expressed in several types of cancer and represents an interesting therapeutic target. It is expressed at the plasma membrane of tumor cells, a property which is being used as a marker for several human cancer including glioblastoma. In this study we investigated targeting NCL as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of this pathology. To explore this possibility, we studied the effect of an antagonist of NCL, the multivalent pseudopeptide N6L using primary culture of human glioblastoma cells. In this system, N6L inhibits cell growth with different sensitivity depending to NCL localization. Cell cycle analysis indicated that N6L-induced growth reduction was due to a block of the G1/S transition with down-regulation of the expression of cyclin D1 and B2. By monitoring autophagy markers such as p62 and LC3II, we demonstrate that autophagy is enhanced after N6L treatment. In addition, N6L-treatment of mice bearing tumor decreased in vivo tumor growth in orthotopic brain tumor model and increase mice survival. The results obtained indicated an anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effect of N6L and point towards its possible use as adjuvant agent to the standard therapeutic protocols presently utilized for glioblastoma. PMID:26540346

  11. Modeling human retinal development with patient-specific iPS cells reveals multiple roles for VSX2

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M. Joseph; Perez, Enio T.; Martin, Jessica M.; Reshel, Samantha T.; Wallace, Kyle A.; Capowski, Elizabeth E.; Singh, Ruchira; Wright, Lynda S.; Clark, Eric M.; Barney, Patrick M.; Stewart, Ron; Dickerson, Sarah J.; Miller, Michael J.; Percin, E. Ferda; Thomson, James A.; Gamm, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been shown to differentiate along the retinal lineage in a manner that mimics normal mammalian development. Under certain culture conditions hiPSCs form optic vesicle-like structures (OVs), which contain proliferating progenitors capable of yielding all neural retina (NR) cell types over time. Such observations imply conserved roles for regulators of retinogenesis in hiPSC-derived cultures and the developing embryo. However, whether and to what extent this assumption holds true has remained largely uninvestigated. We examined the role of a key NR transcription factor, Visual System Homeobox 2 (VSX2), using hiPSCs derived from a patient with microphthalmia caused by an R200Q mutation in the VSX2 homeodomain region. No differences were noted between (R200Q)VSX2 and sibling control hiPSCs prior to OV generation. Thereafter, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs displayed a significant growth deficit compared to control hiPSC-OVs, as well as increased production of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) at the expense of NR cell derivatives. Furthermore, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs failed to produce bipolar cells, a distinctive feature previously observed in Vsx2 mutant mice. (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs also demonstrated delayed photoreceptor maturation, which could be overcome via exogenous expression of wildtype VSX2 at early stages of retinal differentiation. Finally, RNAseq analysis on isolated hiPSC-OVs implicated key transcription factors and extracellular signaling pathways as potential downstream effectors of VSX2-mediated gene regulation. Our results establish hiPSC-OVs as versatile model systems to study retinal development at stages not previously accessible in humans, and support the bona fide nature of hiPSC-OV-derived retinal progeny. PMID:24532057

  12. Modeling human retinal development with patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells reveals multiple roles for visual system homeobox 2.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M Joseph; Perez, Enio T; Martin, Jessica M; Reshel, Samantha T; Wallace, Kyle A; Capowski, Elizabeth E; Singh, Ruchira; Wright, Lynda S; Clark, Eric M; Barney, Patrick M; Stewart, Ron; Dickerson, Sarah J; Miller, Michael J; Percin, E Ferda; Thomson, James A; Gamm, David M

    2014-06-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been shown to differentiate along the retinal lineage in a manner that mimics normal mammalian development. Under certain culture conditions, hiPSCs form optic vesicle-like structures (OVs), which contain proliferating progenitors capable of yielding all neural retina (NR) cell types over time. Such observations imply conserved roles for regulators of retinogenesis in hiPSC-derived cultures and the developing embryo. However, whether and to what extent this assumption holds true has remained largely uninvestigated. We examined the role of a key NR transcription factor, visual system homeobox 2 (VSX2), using hiPSCs derived from a patient with microphthalmia caused by an R200Q mutation in the VSX2 homeodomain region. No differences were noted between (R200Q)VSX2 and sibling control hiPSCs prior to OV generation. Thereafter, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs displayed a significant growth deficit compared to control hiPSC-OVs, as well as increased production of retinal pigmented epithelium at the expense of NR cell derivatives. Furthermore, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs failed to produce bipolar cells, a distinctive feature previously observed in Vsx2 mutant mice. (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs also demonstrated delayed photoreceptor maturation, which could be overcome via exogenous expression of wild-type VSX2 at early stages of retinal differentiation. Finally, RNAseq analysis on isolated hiPSC-OVs implicated key transcription factors and extracellular signaling pathways as potential downstream effectors of VSX2-mediated gene regulation. Our results establish hiPSC-OVs as versatile model systems to study retinal development at stages not previously accessible in humans and support the bona fide nature of hiPSC-OV-derived retinal progeny.

  13. Accelerated wound healing in a diabetic rat model using decellularized dermal matrix and human umbilical cord perivascular cells.

    PubMed

    Milan, P Brouki; Lotfibakhshaiesh, N; Joghataie, M T; Ai, J; Pazouki, A; Kaplan, D L; Kargozar, S; Amini, N; Hamblin, M R; Mozafari, M; Samadikuchaksaraei, A

    2016-11-01

    There is an unmet clinical need for novel wound healing strategies to treat full thickness skin defects, especially in diabetic patients. We hypothesized that a scaffold could perform dual roles of a biomechanical support and a favorable biochemical environment for stem cells. Human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) have been recently reported as a type of mesenchymal stem cell that can accelerate early wound healing in skin defects. However, there are only a limited number of studies that have incorporated these cells into natural scaffolds for dermal tissue engineering. The aim of the present study was to promote angiogenesis and accelerate wound healing by using HUCPVCs and decellularized dermal matrix (DDM) in a rat model of diabetic wounds. The DDM scaffolds were prepared from harvested human skin samples and histological, ultrastructural, molecular and mechanical assessments were carried out. In comparison with the control (without any treatment) and DDM alone group, full thickness excisional wounds treated with HUCPVCs-loaded DDM scaffolds demonstrated an accelerated wound closure rate, faster re-epithelization, more granulation tissue formation and decreased collagen deposition. Furthermore, immunofluorescence analysis showed that the VEGFR-2 expression and vascular density in the HUCPVCs-loaded DDM scaffold treated group were also significantly higher than the other groups at 7days post implantation. Since the rates of angiogenesis, re-epithelization and formation of granulation tissue are directly correlated with full thickness wound healing in patients, the proposed HUCPVCs-loaded DDM scaffolds may fulfil a role neglected by current treatment strategies. This pre-clinical proof-of-concept study warrants further clinical evaluation.

  14. In silico 3D structure modeling and inhibitor binding studies of human male germ cell-associated kinase.

    PubMed

    Tanneeru, Karunakar; Balla, Ashok Raja; Guruprasad, Lalitha

    2015-01-01

    Human male germ cell-associated kinase (hMAK) is an androgen-inducible gene in prostate epithelial cells, and it acts as a coactivator of androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer. The 3D structure of the hMAK kinase was modeled based on the crystal structure of CDK2 kinase using comparative modeling methods, and the ATP-binding site was characterized. We have collected five inhibitors of hMAK from the literature and docked into the ATP-binding site of the kinase domain. Solvated interaction energies (SIE) of inhibitor binding are calculated from the molecular dynamics simulations trajectories of protein-inhibitor complexes. The contribution from each active site residue in hMAK toward inhibitor binding revealed the nature and extent of interactions between inhibitors and individual residues. The main chain atoms of Met79 invariably form hydrogen bonds with all five inhibitors. The amino acids Leu7, Val15, and Leu129 stabilize the inhibitors via CH-pi interactions. The Asp140 in the active site and Glu77 in hinge region show characteristic hydrogen bonding interactions with inhibitors. From SIE, the residue-wise interactions revealed the nature of non-bonding contacts and modifications required to increase the inhibitor activity. Our work provides 3D model structure of hMAK and molecular basis for the mechanisms of hMAK inhibition at atomic level that aid in designing new potent inhibitors.

  15. The effect of mechanical loading on osteogenesis of human dental pulp stromal cells in a novel in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jun; Sun, Weibin; Wang, Wenmei; Munyombwe, Theresa; Yang, Xuebin B

    2014-10-01

    Tooth loss often results in alveolar bone resorption because of lack of mechanical stimulation. Thus, the mechanism of mechanical loading on stem cell osteogenesis is crucial for alveolar bone regeneration. We have investigated the effect of mechanical loading on osteogenesis in human dental pulp stromal cells (hDPSCs) in a novel in vitro model. Briefly, 1 × 10(7) hDPSCs were seeded into 1 ml 3% agarose gel in a 48-well-plate. A loading tube was then placed in the middle of the gel to mimic tooth-chewing movement (1 Hz, 3 × 30 min per day, n = 3). A non-loading group was used as a control. At various time points, the distribution of live/dead cells within the gel was confirmed by fluorescence markers and confocal microscopy. The correlation and interaction between the factors (e.g. force, time, depth and distance) were statistically analysed. The samples were processed for histology and immunohistochemistry. After 1-3 weeks of culture in the in-house-designed in vitro bioreactor, fluorescence imaging confirmed that additional mechanical loading increased the viable cell numbers over time as compared with the control. Cells of various phenotypes formed different patterns away from the reaction tube. The cells in the middle part of the gel showed enhanced alkaline phosphatase staining at week 1 but reduced staining at weeks 2 and 3. Additional loading enhanced Sirius Red and type I collagen staining compared with the control. We have thus successfully developed a novel in-house-designed in vitro bioreactor mimicking the biting force to enhance hDPSC osteogenesis in an agarose scaffold and to promote bone formation and/or prevent bone resorption.

  16. An In Vitro Model of Latency and Reactivation of Varicella Zoster Virus in Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Markus, Amos; Lebenthal-Loinger, Ilana; Yang, In Hong; Kinchington, Paul R.; Goldstein, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) latency in sensory and autonomic neurons has remained enigmatic and difficult to study, and experimental reactivation has not yet been achieved. We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neurons are permissive to a productive and spreading VZV infection. We now demonstrate that hESC-derived neurons can also host a persistent non-productive infection lasting for weeks which can subsequently be reactivated by multiple experimental stimuli. Quiescent infections were established by exposing neurons to low titer cell-free VZV either by using acyclovir or by infection of axons in compartmented microfluidic chambers without acyclovir. VZV DNA and low levels of viral transcription were detectable by qPCR for up to seven weeks. Quiescently-infected human neuronal cultures were induced to undergo renewed viral gene and protein expression by growth factor removal or by inhibition of PI3-Kinase activity. Strikingly, incubation of cultures induced to reactivate at a lower temperature (34°C) resulted in enhanced VZV reactivation, resulting in spreading, productive infections. Comparison of VZV genome transcription in quiescently-infected to productively-infected neurons using RNASeq revealed preferential transcription from specific genome regions, especially the duplicated regions. These experiments establish a powerful new system for modeling the VZV latent state, and reveal a potential role for temperature in VZV reactivation and disease. PMID:26042814

  17. Divergent Immunomodulating Effects of Probiotics on T Cell Responses to Oral Attenuated Human Rotavirus Vaccine and Virulent Human Rotavirus Infection in a Neonatal Gnotobiotic Piglet Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a leading cause of childhood diarrhea. Current oral vaccines are not effective in impoverished countries where the vaccine is needed most. Therefore, alternative affordable strategies are urgently needed. Probiotics can alleviate diarrhea in children and enhance specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses, but the T cell responses are undefined. In this study, we elucidated the T cell and cytokine responses to attenuated human RV (AttHRV) and virulent human RV (HRV) in gnotobiotic pigs colonized with probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG [LGG] and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 [Bb12]), mimicking gut commensals in breastfed infants. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs are the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea. Probiotic colonized and nonvaccinated (Probiotic) pigs had lower diarrhea and reduced virus shedding postchallenge compared with noncolonized and nonvaccinated pigs (Control). Higher protection in the Probiotic group coincided with higher ileal T regulatory cells (Tregs) before and after challenge, and higher serum TGF-β and lower serum and biliary proinflammatory cytokines postchallenge. Probiotic colonization in vaccinated pigs enhanced innate serum IFN-α, splenic and circulatory IFN-γ−producing T cells, and serum Th1 cytokines, but reduced serum Th2 cytokines compared with noncolonized vaccinated pigs (Vac). Thus, LGG+Bb12 induced systemic Th1 immunostimulatory effects on oral AttHRV vaccine that coincided with lower diarrhea severity and reduced virus shedding postchallenge in Vac+Pro compared with Vac pigs. Previously unreported intestinal CD8 Tregs were induced in vaccinated groups postchallenge. Thus, probiotics LGG+Bb12 exert divergent immunomodulating effects, with enhanced Th1 responses to oral AttHRV vaccine, whereas inducing Treg responses to virulent HRV. PMID:23918983

  18. Divergent immunomodulating effects of probiotics on T cell responses to oral attenuated human rotavirus vaccine and virulent human rotavirus infection in a neonatal gnotobiotic piglet disease model.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Kuldeep S; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Saif, Linda J

    2013-09-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a leading cause of childhood diarrhea. Current oral vaccines are not effective in impoverished countries where the vaccine is needed most. Therefore, alternative affordable strategies are urgently needed. Probiotics can alleviate diarrhea in children and enhance specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses, but the T cell responses are undefined. In this study, we elucidated the T cell and cytokine responses to attenuated human RV (AttHRV) and virulent human RV (HRV) in gnotobiotic pigs colonized with probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG [LGG] and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 [Bb12]), mimicking gut commensals in breastfed infants. Neonatal gnotobiotic pigs are the only animal model susceptible to HRV diarrhea. Probiotic colonized and nonvaccinated (Probiotic) pigs had lower diarrhea and reduced virus shedding postchallenge compared with noncolonized and nonvaccinated pigs (Control). Higher protection in the Probiotic group coincided with higher ileal T regulatory cells (Tregs) before and after challenge, and higher serum TGF-β and lower serum and biliary proinflammatory cytokines postchallenge. Probiotic colonization in vaccinated pigs enhanced innate serum IFN-α, splenic and circulatory IFN-γ-producing T cells, and serum Th1 cytokines, but reduced serum Th2 cytokines compared with noncolonized vaccinated pigs (Vac). Thus, LGG+Bb12 induced systemic Th1 immunostimulatory effects on oral AttHRV vaccine that coincided with lower diarrhea severity and reduced virus shedding postchallenge in Vac+Pro compared with Vac pigs. Previously unreported intestinal CD8 Tregs were induced in vaccinated groups postchallenge. Thus, probiotics LGG+Bb12 exert divergent immunomodulating effects, with enhanced Th1 responses to oral AttHRV vaccine, whereas inducing Treg responses to virulent HRV.

  19. The Bone Marrow Stem Cell Origin of Human Breast Cancer Using Transgenic Mouse Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Kurtis Yearsley Intraductal "foam cells" are the most commonly encountered cells in spontaneous nipple discharge, nipple aspirate fluid and ductal...female as well as male recipients. The numbers may actually have been higher than observed because some cancers of male origin spontaneously lost

  20. Selection of a Relevant In Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model to Investigate Pro-Metastatic Features of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Drolez, Aurore; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Julien, Sylvain; Gosselet, Fabien; Burchell, Joy; Cecchelli, Roméo; Delannoy, Philippe; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Mysiorek, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Around 7–17% of metastatic breast cancer patients will develop brain metastases, associated with a poor prognosis. To reach the brain parenchyma, cancer cells need to cross the highly restrictive endothelium of the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). As treatments for brain metastases are mostly inefficient, preventing cancer cells to reach the brain could provide a relevant and important strategy. For that purpose an in vitro approach is required to identify cellular and molecular interaction mechanisms between breast cancer cells and BBB endothelium, notably at the early steps of the interaction. However, while numerous studies are performed with in vitro models, the heterogeneity and the quality of BBB models used is a limitation to the extrapolation of the obtained results to in vivo context, showing that the choice of a model that fulfills the biological BBB characteristics is essential. Therefore, we compared pre-established and currently used in vitro models from different origins (bovine, mice, human) in order to define the most appropriate tool to study interactions between breast cancer cells and the BBB. On each model, the BBB properties and the adhesion capacities of breast cancer cell lines were evaluated. As endothelial cells represent the physical restriction site of the BBB, all the models consisted of endothelial cells from animal or human origins. Among these models, only the in vitro BBB model derived from human stem cells both displayed BBB properties and allowed measurement of meaningful different interaction capacities of the cancer cell lines. Importantly, the measured adhesion and transmigration were found to be in accordance with the cancer cell lines molecular subtypes. In addition, at a molecular level, the inhibition of ganglioside biosynthesis highlights the potential role of glycosylation in breast cancer cells adhesion capacities. PMID:26958843

  1. Selection of a Relevant In Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model to Investigate Pro-Metastatic Features of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Drolez, Aurore; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Julien, Sylvain; Gosselet, Fabien; Burchell, Joy; Cecchelli, Roméo; Delannoy, Philippe; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Mysiorek, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Around 7-17% of metastatic breast cancer patients will develop brain metastases, associated with a poor prognosis. To reach the brain parenchyma, cancer cells need to cross the highly restrictive endothelium of the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). As treatments for brain metastases are mostly inefficient, preventing cancer cells to reach the brain could provide a relevant and important strategy. For that purpose an in vitro approach is required to identify cellular and molecular interaction mechanisms between breast cancer cells and BBB endothelium, notably at the early steps of the interaction. However, while numerous studies are performed with in vitro models, the heterogeneity and the quality of BBB models used is a limitation to the extrapolation of the obtained results to in vivo context, showing that the choice of a model that fulfills the biological BBB characteristics is essential. Therefore, we compared pre-established and currently used in vitro models from different origins (bovine, mice, human) in order to define the most appropriate tool to study interactions between breast cancer cells and the BBB. On each model, the BBB properties and the adhesion capacities of breast cancer cell lines were evaluated. As endothelial cells represent the physical restriction site of the BBB, all the models consisted of endothelial cells from animal or human origins. Among these models, only the in vitro BBB model derived from human stem cells both displayed BBB properties and allowed measurement of meaningful different interaction capacities of the cancer cell lines. Importantly, the measured adhesion and transmigration were found to be in accordance with the cancer cell lines molecular subtypes. In addition, at a molecular level, the inhibition of ganglioside biosynthesis highlights the potential role of glycosylation in breast cancer cells adhesion capacities.

  2. Induction of Invasive Transitional Cell Bladder Carcinoma in Immune Intact Human MUC1 Transgenic Mice: A Model for Immunotherapy Development

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Daniel P.; Wurz, Gregory T.; Griffey, Stephen M.; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Gutierrez, Audrey M.; Hanson, Gregory K.; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    A preclinical model of invasive bladder cancer was developed in human mucin 1 (MUC1) transgenic (MUC1.Tg) mice for the purpose of evaluating immunotherapy and/or cytotoxic chemotherapy. To induce bladder cancer, C57BL/6 mice (MUC1.Tg and wild type) were treated orally with the carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (OH-BBN) at 3.0 mg/day, 5 days/week for 12 weeks. To assess the effects of OH-BBN on serum cytokine profile during tumor development, whole blood was collected via submandibular bleeds prior to treatment and every four weeks. In addition, a MUC1-targeted peptide vaccine and placebo were administered to groups of mice weekly for eight weeks. Multiplex fluorometric microbead immunoanalyses of serum cytokines during tumor development and following vaccination were performed. At termination, interferon gamma (IFN-γ)/interleukin-4 (IL-4) ELISpot analysis for MUC1 specific T-cell immune response and histopathological evaluations of tumor type and grade were performed. The results showed that: (1) the incidence of bladder cancer in both MUC1.Tg and wild type mice was 67%; (2) transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) developed at a 2:1 ratio compared to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC); (3) inflammatory cytokines increased with time during tumor development; and (4) administration of the peptide vaccine induces a Th1-polarized serum cytokine profile and a MUC1 specific T-cell response. All tumors in MUC1.Tg mice were positive for MUC1 expression, and half of all tumors in MUC1.Tg and wild type mice were invasive. In conclusion, using a team approach through the coordination of the efforts of pharmacologists, immunologists, pathologists and molecular biologists, we have developed an immune intact transgenic mouse model of bladder cancer that expresses hMUC1. PMID:24300078

  3. Protection against UVB-induced oxidative stress in human skin cells and skin models by methionine sulfoxide reductase A.

    PubMed

    Pelle, Edward; Maes, Daniel; Huang, Xi; Frenkel, Krystyna; Pernodet, Nadine; Yarosh, Daniel B; Zhang, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Environmental trauma to human skin can lead to oxidative damage of proteins and affect their activity and structure. When methionine becomes oxidized to its sulfoxide form, methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MSRA) reduces it back to methionine. We report here the increase in MSRA in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) after ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, as well as the reduction in hydrogen peroxide levels in NHEK pre-treated with MSRA after exposure. Further, when NHEK were pre-treated with a non-cytotoxic pentapeptide containing methionine sulfoxide (metSO), MSRA expression increased by 18.2%. Additionally, when the media of skin models were supplemented with the metSO pentapeptide and then exposed to UVB, a 31.1% reduction in sunburn cells was evident. We conclude that the presence of MSRA or an externally applied peptide reduces oxidative damage in NHEK and skin models and that MSRA contributes to the protection of proteins against UVB-induced damage in skin.

  4. Ductal pancreatic cancer modeling and drug screening using human pluripotent stem cell- and patient-derived tumor organoids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Holtzinger, Audrey; Jagan, Ishaan; BeGora, Michael; Lohse, Ines; Ngai, Nicholas; Nostro, Cristina; Wang, Rennian; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Crawford, Howard C; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Kalloger, Steve E; Renouf, Daniel J; Connor, Ashton A; Cleary, Sean; Schaeffer, David F; Roehrl, Michael; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Gallinger, Steven; Keller, Gordon; Muthuswamy, Senthil K

    2015-11-01

    There are few in vitro models of exocrine pancreas development and primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We establish three-dimensional culture conditions to induce the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into exocrine progenitor organoids that form ductal and acinar structures in culture and in vivo. Expression of mutant KRAS or TP53 in progenitor organoids induces mutation-specific phenotypes in culture and in vivo. Expression of TP53(R175H) induces cytosolic SOX9 localization. In patient tumors bearing TP53 mutations, SOX9 was cytoplasmic and associated with mortality. We also define culture conditions for clonal generation of tumor organoids from freshly resected PDAC. Tumor organoids maintain the differentiation status, histoarchitecture and phenotypic heterogeneity of the primary tumor and retain patient-specific physiological changes, including hypoxia, oxygen consumption, epigenetic marks and differences in sensitivity to inhibition of the histone methyltransferase EZH2. Thus, pancreatic progenitor organoids and tumor organoids can be used to model PDAC and for drug screening to identify precision therapy strategies.

  5. Ductal pancreatic cancer modeling and drug screening using human pluripotent stem cell and patient-derived tumor organoids

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ling; Holtzinger, Audrey; Jagan, Ishaan; BeGora, Michael; Lohse, Ines; Ngai, Nicholas; Nostro, Cristina; Wang, Rennian; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Crawford, Howard C.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Kalloger, Steve E.; Renouf, Daniel J.; Connor, Ashton A; Cleary, Sean; Schaeffer, David F.; Roehrl, Michael; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Gallinger, Steven; Keller, Gordon; Muthuswamy, Senthil K.

    2016-01-01

    There are few in vitro models of exocrine pancreas development and primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We establish three-dimensional culture conditions to induce the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) into exocrine progenitor organoids that form ductal and acinar structures in culture and in vivo. Expression of mutant KRAS or TP53 in progenitor organoids induces mutation-specific phenotypes in culture and in vivo. Expression of TP53R175H induced cytosolic SOX9 localization. In patient tumors bearing TP53 mutations, SOX9 was cytoplasmic and associated with mortality. Culture conditions are also defined for clonal generation of tumor organoids from freshly resected PDAC. Tumor organoids maintain the differentiation status, histoarchitecture, phenotypic heterogeneity of the primary tumor, and retain patient-specific physiologic changes including hypoxia, oxygen consumption, epigenetic marks, and differential sensitivity to EZH2 inhibition. Thus, pancreatic progenitor organoids and tumor organoids can be used to model PDAC and for drug screening to identify precision therapy strategies. PMID:26501191

  6. Urine-sample-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells as a model to study PCSK9-mediated autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Si-Tayeb, Karim; Idriss, Salam; Champon, Benoite; Caillaud, Amandine; Pichelin, Matthieu; Arnaud, Lucie; Lemarchand, Patricia; Le May, Cédric; Zibara, Kazem; Cariou, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a critical modulator of cholesterol homeostasis. Whereas PCSK9 gain-of-function (GOF) mutations are associated with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia (ADH) and premature atherosclerosis, PCSK9 loss-of-function (LOF) mutations have a cardio-protective effect and in some cases can lead to familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL). However, limitations of the currently available cellular models preclude deciphering the consequences of PCSK9 mutation further. We aimed to validate urine-sample-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (UhiPSCs) as an appropriate tool to model PCSK9-mediated ADH and FHBL. To achieve our goal, urine-sample-derived somatic cells were reprogrammed into hiPSCs by using episomal vectors. UhiPSC were efficiently differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Compared to control cells, cells originally derived from an individual with ADH (HLC-S127R) secreted less PCSK9 in the media (-38.5%; P=0.038) and had a 71% decrease (P<0.001) of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake, whereas cells originally derived from an individual with FHBL (HLC-R104C/V114A) displayed a strong decrease in PCSK9 secretion (-89.7%; P<0.001) and had a 106% increase (P=0.0104) of LDL uptake. Pravastatin treatment significantly enhanced LDL receptor (LDLR) and PCSK9 mRNA gene expression, as well as PCSK9 secretion and LDL uptake in both control and S127R HLCs. Pravastatin treatment of multiple clones led to an average increase of LDL uptake of 2.19 ± 0.77-fold in HLC-S127R compared to 1.38 ± 0.49 fold in control HLCs (P<0.01), in line with the good response to statin treatment of individuals carrying the S127R mutation (mean LDL cholesterol reduction=60.4%, n=5). In conclusion, urine samples provide an attractive and convenient source of somatic cells for reprogramming and hepatocyte differentiation, but also a powerful tool to further decipher PCSK9 mutations and function.

  7. Mechanisms of pathogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus as a model for human T-cell leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Yoko; Murakami, Hironobu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke

    2013-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) make up a unique retrovirus family. Both viruses induce chronic lymphoproliferative diseases with BLV affecting the B-cell lineage and HTLV-1 affecting the T-cell lineage. The pathologies of BLV- and HTLV-induced infections are notably similar, with an absence of chronic viraemia and a long latency period. These viruses encode at least two regulatory proteins, namely, Tax and Rex, in the pX region located between the env gene and the 3′ long terminal repeat. The Tax protein is a key contributor to the oncogenic potential of the virus, and is also the key protein involved in viral replication. However, BLV infection is not sufficient for leukemogenesis, and additional events such as gene mutations must take place. In this review, we first summarize the similarities between the two viruses in terms of genomic organization, virology, and pathology. We then describe the current knowledge of the BLV model, which may also be relevant for the understanding of leukemogenesis caused by HTLV-1. In addition, we address our improved understanding of Tax functions through the newly identified BLV Tax mutants, which have a substitution between amino acids 240 and 265. PMID:24265629

  8. Model of cell activation and desensitization by surface immunoglobin: the case of histamine release from human basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Dembo, M.; Goldstein, B.

    1980-11-01

    We present a model for the control of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated histamine release from human basophils. We suggest that there is a calcium gating factor which interacts with crosslinked IgE to form a short-lived open calcium channel. After formation of the channel the activated gating factor rapidly decays to an inactive form. It is the loss of the active gating factor which causes the basophil to desensitize nonspecifically. We propose that the crosslinked IgE molecules are deactivated by a mechanism, such as endocytosis or shedding, which is independent of the mechanism which inactivates the calcium gating factor. This loss of functional IgE leads to specific desensitization. The mathematical formulation of the model explains the relationship of specific and nonspecific desensitization to the amount of specific IgE on the basophil surface; explains why there are two types of antigen excess inhibition; explains the relationship between antigen excess inhibition and desensitization; explains why, for a fixed antigen concentration, increasing the concentration of cell surface IgE increases histamine release until an optimal concentration is reached, then decreases histamine release; predicts the effects that changing the external calcium will have on the dose response curve; and predicts that increasing the amount of specific IgE on the cell surface will cause the dose response curve to undergo a transition from a curve with a single maximum to a curve with two maxima.

  9. In vitro cardiotoxicity assessment of environmental chemicals using an organotypic human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived model.

    PubMed

    Sirenko, Oksana; Grimm, Fabian A; Ryan, Kristen R; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Parham, Frederick; Wignall, Jessica A; Anson, Blake; Cromwell, Evan F; Behl, Mamta; Rusyn, Ivan; Tice, Raymond R

    2017-03-01

    An important target area for addressing data gaps through in vitro screening is the detection of potential cardiotoxicants. Despite the fact that current conservative estimates relate at least 23% of all cardiovascular disease cases to environmental exposures, the identities of the causative agents remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we evaluate the feasibility of a combinatorial in vitro/in silico screening approach for functional and mechanistic cardiotoxicity profiling of environmental hazards using a library of 69 representative environmental chemicals and drugs. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were exposed in concentration-response for 30min or 24h and effects on cardiomyocyte beating and cellular and mitochondrial toxicity were assessed by kinetic measurements of intracellular Ca(2+) flux and high-content imaging using the nuclear dye Hoechst 33342, the cell viability marker Calcein AM, and the mitochondrial depolarization probe JC-10. More than half of the tested chemicals exhibited effects on cardiomyocyte beating after 30min of exposure. In contrast, after 24h, effects on cell beating without concomitant cytotoxicity were observed in about one third of the compounds. Concentration-response data for in vitro bioactivity phenotypes visualized using the Toxicological Prioritization Index (ToxPi) showed chemical class-specific clustering of environmental chemicals, including pesticides, flame retardants, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For environmental chemicals with human exposure predictions, the activity-to-exposure ratios between modeled blood concentrations and in vitro bioactivity were between one and five orders of magnitude. These findings not only demonstrate that some ubiquitous environmental pollutants might have the potential at high exposure levels to alter cardiomyocyte function, but also indicate similarities in the mechanism of these effects both within and among chemicals and classes.

  10. Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Keelin; Chan, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    Stem cells have been isolated at all stages of development from the early developing embryo to the post-reproductive adult organism. However, the fetal environment is unique as it is the only time in ontogeny that there is migration of stem cells in large numbers into different organ compartments. While fetal neural and haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been well characterised, only recently have mesenchymal stem cells from the human fetus been isolated and evaluated. Our group have characterised in human fetal blood, liver and bone marrow a population of non-haemopoietic, non-endothelial cells with an immunophenotype similar to adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). These cells, human fetal mesenchymal stem cells (hfMSC), are true multipotent stem cells with greater self-renewal and differentiation capacity than their adult counterparts. They circulate in first trimester fetal blood and have been found to traffic into the maternal circulation, engrafting in bone marrow, where they remain microchimeric for decades after pregnancy. Though fetal microchimerism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, the biological role of hfMSC microchimerism is unknown. Potential downstream applications of hfMSC include their use as a target cell for non-invasive pre-natal diagnosis from maternal blood, and for fetal cellular and gene therapy. Using hfMSC in fetal therapy offers the theoretical advantages of avoidance of immune rejection, increased engraftment, and treatment before disease pathology sets in. Aside from allogeneic hfMSC in utero transplantation, the use of autologous hfMSC has been brought a step forward with the development of early blood sampling techniques, efficient viral transduction and clonal expansion. Work is ongoing to determine hfMSC fate post-transplantation in murine models of genetic disease. In this review we will examine what is known about hfMSC biology, as well as discussing areas for future research. The

  11. A new in vitro model of Entamoeba histolytica adhesion, using the human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2: scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Rigothier, M C; Coconnier, M H; Servin, A L; Gayral, P

    1991-01-01

    The human colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, which is widely used to study the adhesion and cytotoxicity of enterobacteria, was used to investigate the adhesion of the trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica. We observed a high percentage of adhesion of amoebae to Caco-2 cells. Scanning electron microscopy showed that amoebial membrane structures were involved in adhesion and the cytolytic action. These differentiated cells should prove to be a useful model system for investigation of the pathogenic action of amoebae. Images PMID:1937772

  12. Human neural stem cells genetically modified to overexpress brain-derived neurotrophic factor promote functional recovery and neuroprotection in a mouse stroke model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong J; Lim, In J; Lee, Min C; Kim, Seung U

    2010-11-15

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a lethal stroke type; mortality approaches 50%, and current medical therapy against ICH shows only limited effectiveness, so an alternative approach is required, such as stem cell-based cell therapy. Previously we have shown that intravenously transplanted human neural stem cells (NSCs) selectively migrate to the brain and promote functional recovery in rat ICH model, and others have shown that intracerebral infusion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) results in improved structural and functional outcome from cerebral ischemia. We postulated that human NSCs overexpressing BDNF transplanted into cerebral cortex overlying ICH lesion could provide improved survival of grafted NSCs and increased angiogenesis and behavioral recovery in mouse ICH model. ICH was induced in adult mice by injection of bacterial collagenase into striatum. The HB1.F3.BDNF (F3.BDNF) human NSC line produces sixfold higher amounts of BDNFF over the parental F3 cell line in vitro, induces behavioral improvement, and produces a threefold increase in cell survival at 2 weeks and 8 weeks posttransplantation. Brain transplantation of human NSCs overexpressing BDNF provided differentiation and survival of grafted human NSCs and renewed angiogenesis of host brain and functional recovery of ICH animals. These results indicate that the F3.BDNF human NSCs should be of great value as a cellular source for experimental studies involving cellular therapy for human neurological disorders, including ICH.

  13. Cell culture models of the human cornea - a comparative evaluation of their usefulness to determine ocular drug absorption in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Reichl, Stephan

    2008-03-01

    Cell culture models of the cornea are continually developed to replace the isolated animal cornea for transcorneal drug absorption studies. The aim of this study was to determine and compare epithelial tightness and permeability of currently available corneal cell culture models to avoid interlaboratory variability and to assess their usefulness for in-vitro permeation studies. Pure epithelial cell culture models (CEPI, SIRC and HCE-T cell lines), primary cultures of human corneal epithelium (HCEpiC) and the two commercially available models (RHC and Epiocular), as well as organotypic human cornea constructs (HCC, HCC-HCE-T), were investigated and data were compared with those obtained from the excised bovine cornea. Barrier properties were assessed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and permeability of three passively absorbed substances (mannitol, testosterone and timolol maleate) with different physico-chemical properties. TEER experiments revealed weak barrier functions for all of the investigated epithelial models (cell line. Transport studies confirmed TEER results insofar that models showing low TEER values also had higher permeation rates in comparison with the excised bovine cornea. However, models based on HCE-T cells demonstrated similar barrier properties to isolated corneal tissue. The corneal models investigated in our laboratory show clear differences in epithelial barrier function. In-vitro systems comprising the HCE-T cell line seem to be most appropriate to replace excised animal cornea for assessing corneal permeability.

  14. Ancestral trees for modeling stem cell lineages genetically rather than functionally: understanding mutation accumulation and distinguishing the restrictive cancer stem cell propagation theory and the unrestricted cell propagation theory of human tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Darryl K; Kern, Scott E

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells either could be rare or common in tumors, constituting the major distinction between the two fundamentally opposed theoretical models of tumor progression: A newer and restrictive stem cell propagation model, in which the stem cells are a small and special minority of the tumor cells, and a standard older model, an unrestricted cell proliferation theory, in which many or most tumor cells are capable of indefinite generations of cell division. Stem cells of tumors are difficult to quantitate using functional assays, and the validity of the most common assays is seriously questioned. Nonetheless, stem cells are an essential component of any tumorigenesis model. Alternative approaches to studying tumor stem cells should be explored. Cell populations can be conceived of as having a genealogy, a relationship of cells to their ancestral lineage, from the zygote to the adult cells or neoplasms. Models using ancestral trees thus offer an anatomic and genetic means to "observe" stem cells independent of artificial conditions. Ancestral trees broaden our attention backward along a lineage, to the zygote stage, and thereby add insight into how the mutations of tumors accumulate. It is possible that a large fraction of mutations in a tumor originate from normal, endogenous, replication errors (nearly all being passenger mutations) occurring prior to the emergence of the first transformed cell. Trees can be constructed from experimental measurements - molecular clocks - of real human tissues and tumors. Detailed analysis of single-cell methylation patterns, heritable yet slightly plastic, now can provide this information in the necessary depth. Trees based on observations of molecular clocks may help us to distinguish between competing theories regarding the proliferative properties among cells of actual human tumors, to observe subtle and difficult phenomena such as the extinction of stem lineages, and to address the origins and rates of mutations in various

  15. Differentiation of Neonatal Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Prostate Epithelial Cells: A Model to Study Prostate Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    basis for studies on the differences in reprogramming of skin fibroblasts and their differentiation into prostate epithelial cells and susceptibility... transdifferentiation : implications for novel therapeutic strategies. American Journal of Stem Cells 2: 52-61. Funding applied for- Fiscal Year 2013

  16. Evidence for Human Lung Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kajstura, Jan; Rota, Marcello; Hall, Sean R.; Hosoda, Toru; D’Amario, Domenico; Sanada, Fumihiro; Zheng, Hanqiao; Ogórek, Barbara; Rondon-Clavo, Carlos; Ferreira-Martins, João; Matsuda, Alex; Arranto, Christian; Goichberg, Polina; Giordano, Giovanna; Haley, Kathleen J.; Bardelli, Silvana; Rayatzadeh, Hussein; Liu, Xiaoli; Quaini, Federico; Liao, Ronglih; Leri, Annarosa; Perrella, Mark A.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Anversa, Piero

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although progenitor cells have been described in distinct anatomical regions of the lung, description of resident stem cells has remained elusive. METHODS Surgical lung-tissue specimens were studied in situ to identify and characterize human lung stem cells. We defined their phenotype and functional properties in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS Human lungs contain undifferentiated human lung stem cells nested in niches in the distal airways. These cells are self-renewing, clonogenic, and multipotent in vitro. After injection into damaged mouse lung in vivo, human lung stem cells form human bronchioles, alveoli, and pulmonary vessels integrated structurally and functionally with the damaged organ. The formation of a chimeric lung was confirmed by detection of human transcripts for epithelial and vascular genes. In addition, the self-renewal and long-term proliferation of human lung stem cells was shown in serial-transplantation assays. CONCLUSIONS Human lungs contain identifiable stem cells. In animal models, these cells participate in tissue homeostasis and regeneration. They have the undemonstrated potential to promote tissue restoration in patients with lung disease. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.) PMID:21561345

  17. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  18. Comparison of liver progenitor cells in human atypical ductular reactions with those seen in experimental models of liver injury.

    PubMed

    Sell, S

    1998-02-01

    The ultrastructural characteristics of liver progenitor cell types of human atypical ductular reactions seen in chronic cholestasis, in regenerating human liver after submassive necrosis, in alcoholic liver disease, and in focal nodular hyperplasia are compared with liver progenitor cell types seen during experimental cholangiocarcinogenesis in hamsters; during hepatocarcinogenesis in rats; and in response to periportal liver injury induced by allyl alcohol in rats. Three types of progenitor cells have been identified in human atypical ductular reactions: type I: primitive, has an oval shape, marginal chromatin, few cellular organelles, rare tonofilaments, and forms desmosomal junctions with adjacent liver cells; type II: bile duct-like, is located within ducts, has few organelles, and forms lateral membrane interdigitations with other duct-like cells; and type III: hepatocyte-like, is located in hepatic cords, forms a bile canaliculus, has tight junctions with other hepatocyte-like cells, prominent mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum, and some have lysosomes and a poorly developed Golgi apparatus. Each type is seen during cholangiocarcinogenesis in hamsters, but the most prominent cell type is type II, duct-like. A more primitive cell type ("type 0 cell"), as well as type I cells, are seen in the intraportal zone of the liver within 1 to 2 days after carcinogen exposure or periportal injury in the rat, but both type II and type III are seen later as the progenitor cells expand into the liver lobule. After allyl alcohol injury, type 0 cells precede the appearance of type I and type III cells, but most of the cells that span the periportal necrotic zone are type III hepatocyte-like cells showing different degrees of hepatocytic differentiation. Some type II cells are also seen, but these are essentially limited to ducts. It is concluded that there is a primitive stem cell type in the liver (type 0) that may differentiate directly into type I and then into

  19. Glutathione metabolism in the HaCaT cell line as a model for the detoxification of the model sensitisers 2,4-dinitrohalobenzenes in human skin.

    PubMed

    Jacquoilleot, Sandrine; Sheffield, David; Olayanju, Adedamola; Sison-Young, Rowena; Kitteringham, Neil R; Naisbitt, Dean J; Aleksic, Maja

    2015-08-19

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most prominent antioxidant in cells and the co-factor of an important set of enzymes involved in the skin metabolic clearance system, glutathione S-transferases (GST). Here, we describe an LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy) method to measure GSH and its disulfide form (GSSG) in HaCaT cells and a 3D Reconstructed Human Epidermis (RHE) model. In our assay, the basal level of GSH in both systems was in the low nmol/mg soluble protein range, while the level of GSSG was systematically below our limit of quantification (0.1 μM). We found that 2,4-dinitrohalobenzenes deplete the GSH present in HaCaT cells within the first hour of exposure, in a dose dependent manner. The level of GSH in HaCaT cells treated with a single non-toxic dose of 10 μM of dinitrohalobenzene was also shown to increase after two hours. While cells treated with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNCB) and 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB) repleted GSH to levels similar to untreated control cells within 24h, 1-bromo-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNBB) seemed to prevent such a repletion and appeared to be the most toxic compound in all assays. A mathematical modelling of experimental results was performed to further rationalise the differences observed between test chemicals. For this purpose the biological phenomena observed were simplified into two sequential events: the initial depletion of the GSH stock after chemical treatment followed by the repletion of the GSH once the chemical was cleared. Activation of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway was observed with all compounds within two hours, and at concentrations less than 10 μM. These data show that GSH depletion and repletion occur rapidly in skin cells and emphasize the importance of conducting kinetic studies when performing in vitro experiments exploring skin sensitization.

  20. Ascorbate prevents cell death from prolonged exposure to glutamate in an in vitro model of human dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ballaz, Santiago; Morales, Ingrid; Rodríguez, Manuel; Obeso, José A

    2013-12-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is a nonenzymatic antioxidant highly concentrated in the brain. In addition to mediating redox balance, ascorbate is linked to glutamate neurotransmission in the striatum, where it renders neuroprotection against excessive glutamate stimulation. Oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity are key biochemical features accompanying the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that characterizes Parkinson's disease (PD). At present, it is not clear whether antiglutamate agents and ascorbate might be neuroprotective agents for PD. Thus, we tested whether ascorbate can prevent cell death from prolonged exposure to glutamate using dopaminergic neurons of human origin. To this purpose, dopamine-like neurons were obtained by differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells and then cultured for 4 days without antioxidant (antiaging) protection to evaluate glutamate toxicity and ascorbate protection as a model system of potential factors contributing to dopaminergic neuron death in PD. Glutamate dose dependently induced toxicity in dopaminergic cells largely by the stimulation of AMPA and metabotropic receptors and to a lesser extent by N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptors. At relatively physiological levels of extracellular concentration, ascorbate protected cells against glutamate excitotoxicity. This neuroprotection apparently relies on the inhibition of oxidative stress, because ascorbate prevented the pro-oxidant action of the scavenging molecule quercetin, which occurred over the course of prolonged exposure, as is also seen with glutamate. Our findings show the relevance of ascorbate as a neuroprotective agent and emphasize an often underappreciated role of oxidative stress in glutamate excitotoxicity. Occurrence of a glutamate-ascorbate link in dopaminergic neurons may explain previous contradictions regarding their putative role in PD.

  1. Changes in expression of genes involved in apoptosis in activated human T-cells in response to modeled microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Nancy E.; Pellis, Neal R.; Risin, Diana; Risin, Semyon A.; Liu, Wenbin

    2006-09-01

    Space flights result in remarkable effects on various physiological systems, including a decline in cellular immune functions. Previous studies have shown that exposure to microgravity, both true and modeled, can cause significant changes in numerous lymphocyte functions. The purpose of this study was to search for microgravity-sensitive genes, and specifically for apoptotic genes influenced by the microgravity environment and other genes related to immune response. The experiments were performed on anti-CD3 and IL-2 activated human T cells. To model microgravity conditions we have utilized the NASA rotating wall vessel bioreactor. Control lymphocytes were cultured in static 1g conditions. To assess gene expression we used DNA microarray chip technology. We had shown that multiple genes (approximately 3-8% of tested genes) respond to microgravity conditions by 1.5 and more fold change in expression. There is a significant variability in the response. However, a certain reproducible pattern in gene response could be identified. Among the genes showing reproducible changes in expression in modeled microgravity, several genes involved in apoptosis as well as in immune response were identified. These are IL-7 receptor, Granzyme B, Beta-3-endonexin, Apo2 ligand and STAT1. Possible functional consequences of these changes are discussed.

  2. Genome engineering in human cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Minjung; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing in human cells is of great value in research, medicine, and biotechnology. Programmable nucleases including zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases recognize a specific target sequence and make a double-strand break at that site, which can result in gene disruption, gene insertion, gene correction, or chromosomal rearrangements. The target sequence complexities of these programmable nucleases are higher than 3.2 mega base pairs, the size of the haploid human genome. Here, we briefly introduce the structure of the human genome and the characteristics of each programmable nuclease, and review their applications in human cells including pluripotent stem cells. In addition, we discuss various delivery methods for nucleases, programmable nickases, and enrichment of gene-edited human cells, all of which facilitate efficient and precise genome editing in human cells.

  3. A Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cell-based Model of the Human Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier to Study Bacterial Infection from the Basolateral Side.

    PubMed

    Dinner, Stefanie; Borkowski, Julia; Stump-Guthier, Carolin; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Schroten, Horst; Schwerk, Christian

    2016-05-06

    The epithelial cells of the choroid plexus (CP), located in the ventricular system of the brain, form the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). The BCSFB functions in separating the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the blood and restricting the molecular exchange to a minimum extent. An in vitro model of the BCSFB is based on cells derived from a human choroid plexus papilloma (HIBCPP). HIBCPP cells display typical barrier functions including formation of tight junctions (TJs), development of a transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), as well as minor permeabilities for macromolecules. There are several pathogens that can enter the central nervous system (CNS) via the BCSFB and subsequently cause severe disease like meningitis. One of these pathogens is Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), a human-specific bacterium. Employing the HIBCPP cells in an inverted cell culture filter insert system enables to study interactions of pathogens with cells of the BCSFB from the basolateral cell side, which is relevant in vivo. In this article, we describe seeding and culturing of HIBCPP cells on cell culture inserts. Further, infection of the cells with N. meningitidis along with analysis of invaded and adhered bacteria via double immunofluorescence is demonstrated. As the cells of the CP are also involved in other diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer`s disease and Multiple Sclerosis, as well as during the brain metastasis of tumor cells, the model system can also be applied in other fields of research. It provides the potential to decipher molecular mechanisms and to identify novel therapeutic targets.

  4. Combinatorial DNA damage pairing model based on X-ray-induced foci predicts the dose and LET dependence of cell death in human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Vadhavkar, Nikhil; Pham, Christopher; Georgescu, Walter; Deschamps, Thomas; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V

    2014-09-01

    In contrast to the classic view of static DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) being repaired at the site of damage, we hypothesize that DSBs move and merge with each other over large distances (μm). As X-ray dose increases, the probability of having DSB clusters increases as does the probability of misrepair and cell death. Experimental work characterizing the X-ray dose dependence of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) is used here to validate a DSB clustering model. We then use the principles of the local effect model (LEM) to predict the yield of DSBs at the submicron level. Two mechanisms for DSB clustering, namely random coalescence of DSBs versus active movement of DSBs into repair domains are compared and tested. Simulations that best predicted both RIF dose dependence and cell survival after X-ray irradiation favored the repair domain hypothesis, suggesting the nucleus is divided into an array of regularly spaced repair domains of ∼1.55 μm sides. Applying the same approach to high-linear energy transfer (LET) ion tracks, we are able to predict experimental RIF/μm along tracks with an overall relative error of 12%, for LET ranging between 30-350 keV/μm and for three different ions. Finally, cell death was predicted by assuming an exponential dependence on the total number of DSBs and of all possible combinations of paired DSBs within each simulated RIF. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) predictions for cell survival of MCF10A exposed to high-LET showed an LET dependence that matches previous experimental results for similar cell types. Overall, this work suggests that microdosimetric properties of ion tracks at the submicron level are sufficient to explain both RIF data and survival curves for any LET, similarly to the LEM assumption. Conversely, high-LET death mechanism does not have to infer linear-quadratic dose formalism as done in the LEM. In addition, the size of repair domains derived in our

  5. Combinatorial DNA Damage Pairing Model Based on X-Ray-Induced Foci Predicts the Dose and LET Dependence of Cell Death in Human Breast Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vadhavkar, Nikhil; Pham, Christopher; Georgescu, Walter; Deschamps, Thomas; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2014-09-01

    In contrast to the classic view of static DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) being repaired at the site of damage, we hypothesize that DSBs move and merge with each other over large distances (m). As X-ray dose increases, the probability of having DSB clusters increases as does the probability of misrepair and cell death. Experimental work characterizing the X-ray dose dependence of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) is used here to validate a DSB clustering model. We then use the principles of the local effect model (LEM) to predict the yield of DSBs at the submicron level. Two mechanisms for DSB clustering, namely random coalescence of DSBs versus active movement of DSBs into repair domains are compared and tested. Simulations that best predicted both RIF dose dependence and cell survival after X-ray irradiation favored the repair domain hypothesis, suggesting the nucleus is divided into an array of regularly spaced repair domains of ~;;1.55 m sides. Applying the same approach to high-linear energy transfer (LET) ion tracks, we are able to predict experimental RIF/m along tracks with an overall relative error of 12percent, for LET ranging between 30 350 keV/m and for three different ions. Finally, cell death was predicted by assuming an exponential dependence on the total number of DSBs and of all possible combinations of paired DSBs within each simulated RIF. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) predictions for cell survival of MCF10A exposed to high-LET showed an LET dependence that matches previous experimental results for similar cell types. Overall, this work suggests that microdosimetric properties of ion tracks at the submicron level are sufficient to explain both RIF data and survival curves for any LET, similarly to the LEM assumption. Conversely, high-LET death mechanism does not have to infer linear-quadratic dose formalism as done in the LEM. In addition, the size of repair domains derived in our model

  6. Anticancer activity of taraxerol acetate in human glioblastoma cells and a mouse xenograft model via induction of autophagy and apoptotic cell death, cell cycle arrest and inhibition of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jing-Fang; Song, Ying-Fang; Liu, Zheng; Zheng, Zhao-Cong; Chen, Hong-Jie; Wang, Shou-Sen

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer and apoptotic effects of taraxerol acetate in U87 human glioblastoma cells. The effects on cell cycle phase distribution, cell cycle-associated proteins, autophagy, DNA fragmentation and cell migration were assessed. Cell viability was determined using the MTT assay, and phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy was utilized to determine the viability and apoptotic morphological features of the U87 cells. Flow cytometry using propidium iodide and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate demonstrated the effect of taraxerol acetate on the cell cycle phase distribution and apoptosis induction. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate the effect of the taraxerol acetate on cell cycle‑associated proteins and autophagy‑linked LC3B‑II proteins. The results demonstrated that taraxerol acetate induced dose‑ and time‑dependent cytotoxic effects in the U87 cells. Apoptotic induction following taraxerol acetate treatment was observed and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased from 7.3% in the control cells, to 16.1, 44.1 and 76.7% in the 10, 50 and 150 µM taraxerol acetate‑treated cells, respectively. Furthermore, taraxerol acetate treatment led to sub‑G1 cell cycle arrest with a corresponding decrease in the number of S‑phase cells. DNA fragments were observed as a result of the gel electrophoresis experiment following taraxerol acetate treatment. To investigate the inhibitory effects of taraxerol acetate on the migration of U87 cell, a wound healing assay was conducted. The number of cells that migrated to the scratched area decreased significantly following treatment with taraxerol acetate. In addition, taraxerol acetate inhibited tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Administration of 0.25 and 0.75 µg/g taraxerol acetate reduced the tumor weight from 1.2 g in the phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS)‑treated group (control) to 0.81 and 0.42

  7. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Resolve Airway Inflammation, Hyperreactivity, and Histopathology in a Mouse Model of Occupational Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Itziar; Moreno, Rafael; Morell, Ferran; Muñoz, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is characterized by allergic airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, leading to progressive airway remodeling and a concomitant decline in lung function. The management of OA remains suboptimal in clinical practice. Thus, establishing effective therapies might overcome the natural history of the disease. We evaluated the ability of human adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs), either unmodified or engineered to secrete the IL-33 decoy receptor sST2, to attenuate the inflammatory and respiratory symptoms in a previously validated mouse model of OA to ammonium persulfate (AP). Twenty-four hours after a dermal AP sensitization and intranasal challenge regimen, the animals received intravenously 1×106 cells (either hASCs or hASCs overexpressing sST2) or saline and were analyzed at 1, 3, and 6 days after treatment. The infused hASCs induced an anti-inflammatory and restorative program upon reaching the AP-injured, asthmatic lungs, leading to early reduction of neutrophilic inflammation and total IgE production, preserved alveolar architecture with nearly absent lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, negligible smooth muscle hyperplasia/hypertrophy in the peribronchiolar areas, and baseline airway hyperreactivity (AHR) to methacholine. Local sST2 overexpression barely increased the substantial efficacy displayed by unmodified hASCs. Thus, hASCs may represent a viable multiaction therapeutic capable to adequately respond to the AP-injured lung environment by resolving inflammation, tissue remodeling, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness typical of OA. PMID:24798370

  8. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for heart regeneration, drug discovery and disease modeling: from the genetic, epigenetic, and tissue modeling perspectives.

    PubMed

    Chow, Maggie; Boheler, Kenneth R; Li, Ronald A

    2013-08-14

    Heart diseases remain a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, terminally differentiated human adult cardiomyocytes (CMs) possess a very limited innate ability to regenerate. Directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into CMs has enabled clinicians and researchers to pursue the novel therapeutic paradigm of cell-based cardiac regeneration. In addition to tissue engineering and transplantation studies, the need for functional CMs has also prompted researchers to explore molecular pathways and develop strategies to improve the quality, purity and quantity of hESC-derived and iPSC-derived CMs. In this review, we describe various approaches in directed CM differentiation and driven maturation, and discuss potential limitations associated with hESCs and iPSCs, with an emphasis on the role of epigenetic regulation and chromatin remodeling, in the context of the potential and challenges of using hESC-CMs and iPSC-CMs for drug discovery and toxicity screening, disease modeling, and clinical applications.

  9. A complex 3D human tissue culture system based on mammary stromal cells and silk scaffolds for modeling breast morphogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuli; Sun, Lin; Maffini, Maricel V; Soto, Ana; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Kaplan, David L

    2010-05-01

    Epithelial-stromal interactions play a crucial role in normal embryonic development and carcinogenesis of the human breast while the underlying mechanisms of these events remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we constructed a physiologically relevant, three-dimensional (3D) culture surrogate of complex human breast tissue that included a tri-culture system made up of human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A), human fibroblasts and adipocytes, i.e., the two dominant breast stromal cell types, in a Matrigel/collagen mixture on porous silk protein scaffolds. The presence of stromal cells inhibited MCF10A cell proliferation and induced both alveolar and ductal morphogenesis and enhanced casein expression. In contrast to the immature polarity exhibited by co-cultures with either fibroblasts or adipocytes, the alveolar structures formed by the tri-cultures exhibited proper polarity similar to that observed in breast tissue in vivo. Only alveolar structures with reverted polarity were observed in MCF10A monocultures. Consistent with their phenotypic appearance, more functional differentiation of epithelial cells was also observed in the tri-cultures, where casein alpha- and -beta mRNA expression was significantly increased. This in vitro tri-culture breast tissue system sustained on silk scaffold effectively represents a more physiologically relevant 3D microenvironment for mammary epithelial cells and stromal cells than either co-cultures or monocultures. This experimental model provides an important first step for bioengineering an informative human breast tissue system, with which to study normal breast morphogenesis and neoplastic transformation.

  10. Developing Animal Models for Optimizing the Musculoskeletal Repair Potential of Emerging Human Progenitor Cell Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    anterior bowing), posterior-anterior (for lateral displacement) and axial (knee to foot , for rotational displacement. Specific rules for measuring the...dependent on the degree for fixation. •Begin a program of impaired fracture healing caused by diabetes mellitus or cigarette smoking to determine which...The proposal will examine the model in murine backgrounds with impaired skeletal repair such as diabetes , glucocorticoid excess and smoking to

  11. Evaluation of three-dimensional cultured HepG2 cells in a nano culture plate system: an in vitro human model of acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Aritomi, Kohei; Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Tomishima, Yoshiro; Shimizu, Daisuke; Abe, Nazuki; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Irikura, Mitsuru; Kai, Hirofumi; Irie, Tetsumi

    2014-01-01

    Overdoses of acetaminophen (paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol; APAP) cause severe liver injury, yet there is no common or high throughput in vitro human APAP model. This study examined the characteristics and usefulness of HepG2 cells grown in a nano culture plate (NCP) system, a three-dimensional culture method, as an in vitro human model for APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. The NCP-cultured HepG2 cells showed higher expression of mRNA and protein levels of cytochrome P450 2E1, which metabolizes APAP to a toxic metabolite, APAP-cysteine adduct formation, and higher sensitivity against APAP-induced cell injury compared with conventionally cultured cells. We demonstrated that treatment of APAP in NCP-cultured HepG2 cells shows key mechanistic features of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, such as decreases in intracellular glutathione and mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of JNK, and cellular injury; and pharmacological agents, such as Cyclosporine A (a mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor) and SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor), prevented cell injury induced by APAP exposure. In addition, the antidote of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, N-acetylcysteine, could attenuate cellular injury induced by APAP in NCP-cultured HepG2 cells. We suggest that cellular injury induced by APAP treatment using an NCP-HepG2 system is a useful human model to study mechanisms and screen drug candidates of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity.

  12. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells in a Double-Hit Model of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mildau, Céline; Shen, Jie; Kasoha, Mariz; Laschke, Matthias W.; Roolfs, Torge; Schmiedl, Andreas; Tschernig, Thomas; Bieback, Karen; Gortner, Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) presents a major threat of very preterm birth and treatment options are still limited. Stem cells from different sources have been used successfully in experimental BPD, induced by postnatal hyperoxia. Objectives We investigated the effect of umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) in a new double-hit mouse model of BPD. Methods For the double-hit, date mated mice were subjected to hypoxia and thereafter the offspring was exposed to hyperoxia. Human umbilical cord blood MNCs were given intraperitoneally by day P7. As outcome variables were defined: physical development (auxology), lung structure (histomorphometry), expression of markers for lung maturation and inflammation on mRNA and protein level. Pre- and postnatal normoxic pups and sham treated double-hit pups served as control groups. Results Compared to normoxic controls, sham treated double-hit animals showed impaired physical and lung development with reduced alveolarization and increased thickness of septa. Electron microscopy revealed reduced volume density of lamellar bodies. Pulmonary expression of mRNA for surfactant proteins B and C, Mtor and Crabp1 was reduced. Expression of Igf1 was increased. Treatment with umbilical cord blood MNCs normalized thickness of septa and mRNA expression of Mtor to levels of normoxic controls. Tgfb3 mRNA expression and pro-inflammatory IL-1β protein concentration were decreased. Conclusion The results of our study demonstrate the therapeutic potential of umbilical cord blood MNCs in a new double-hit model of BPD in newborn mice. We found improved lung structure and effects on molecular level. Further studies are needed to address the role of systemic administration of MNCs in experimental BPD. PMID:24069341

  13. Modeling cell response to low doses of photon irradiation: Part 2--application to radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Micaela; Testa, Etienne; Komova, Olga V; Nasonova, Elena A; Mel'nikova, Larisa A; Shmakova, Nina L; Beuve, Michaël

    2016-03-01

    The biological phenomena observed at low doses of ionizing radiation (adaptive response, bystander effects, genomic instability, etc.) are still not well understood. While at high irradiation doses, cellular death may be directly linked to DNA damage, at low doses, other cellular structures may be involved in what are known as non-(DNA)-targeted effects. Mitochondria, in particular, may play a crucial role through their participation in a signaling network involving oxygen/nitrogen radical species. According to the size of the implicated organelles, the fluctuations in the energy deposited into these target structures may impact considerably the response of cells to low doses of ionizing irradiation. Based on a recent simulation of these fluctuations, a theoretical framework was established to have further insight into cell responses to low doses of photon irradiation, namely the triggering of radioresistance mechanisms by energy deposition into specific targets. Three versions of a model are considered depending on the target size and on the number of targets that need to be activated by energy deposition to trigger radioresistance mechanisms. These model versions are applied to the fraction of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations measured at low doses in human carcinoma cells (CAL51). For this cell line, it was found in the present study that the mechanisms of radioresistance could not be triggered by the activation of a single small target (nanometric size, 100 nm), but could instead be triggered by the activation of a large target (micrometric, 10 μm) or by the activation of a great number of small targets. The mitochondria network, viewed either as a large target or as a set of small units, might be concerned by these low-dose effects.

  14. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Adaptive B and T Cell Responses to a Prototype Monovalent Attenuated Human Rotavirus Vaccine and Virulent Human Rotavirus Challenge in a Gnotobiotic Piglet Model

    PubMed Central

    Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Kandasamy, Sukumar; Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Saif, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RV) are a major cause of gastroenteritis in children. Widespread vitamin A deficiency is associated with reduced efficacy of vaccines and higher incidence of diarrheal infections in children in developing countries. We established a vitamin A deficient (VAD) gnotobiotic piglet model that mimics subclinical vitamin A deficiency in children to study its effects on an oral human rotavirus (HRV) vaccine and virulent HRV challenge. Piglets derived from VAD and vitamin A sufficient (VAS) sows were orally vaccinated with attenuated HRV or mock, with/without supplemental vitamin A and challenged with virulent HRV. Unvaccinated VAD control piglets had significantly lower hepatic vitamin A, higher severity and duration of diarrhea and HRV fecal shedding post-challenge as compared to VAS control pigs. Reduced protection coincided with significantly higher innate (IFNα) cytokine and CD8 T cell frequencies in the blood and intestinal tissues, higher pro-inflammatory (IL12) and 2-3 fold lower anti-inflammatory (IL10) cytokines, in VAD compared to VAS control pigs. Vaccinated VAD pigs had higher diarrhea severity scores compared to vaccinated VAS pigs, which coincided with lower serum IgA HRV antibody titers and significantly lower intestinal IgA antibody secreting cells post-challenge in the former groups suggesting lower anamnestic responses. A trend for higher serum HRV IgG antibodies was observed in VAD vs VAS vaccinated groups post-challenge. The vaccinated VAD (non-vitamin A supplemented) pigs had significantly higher serum IL12 (PID2) and IFNγ (PID6) compared to vaccinated VAS groups suggesting higher Th1 responses in VAD conditions. Furthermore, regulatory T-cell responses were compromised in VAD pigs. Supplemental vitamin A in VAD pigs did not fully restore the dysregulated immune responses to AttHRV vaccine or moderate virulent HRV diarrhea. Our findings suggest that that VAD in children in developing countries may partially contribute to more severe

  15. Production of hepatocyte like cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Nicholas R.F; Segeritz, Charis-Patricia; Touboul, Thomas; Vallier, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    Large scale production of hepatocytes from a variety of genetic backgrounds would be beneficial for drug screening and to provide a source of cells to be used as a substitute for liver transplantation. However, fully functional primary hepatocytes remain difficult to expand in vitro and circumventing this problem by using an alternative source of cells is desirable. Here, we describe a 25 day protocol to direct the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into a near homogenous population of hepatocyte-like cells. As cells progress through this protocol they express genes in a chronological manner similar to that described during in-vivo hepatic development. The protocol relies on culture systems devoid of serum, feeders or complex extra-cellular matrices enabling molecular analyses without interference from unknown factors. This approach works efficiently with human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells and was recently used to model liver diseases in vitro. PMID:23424751

  16. Cell motility in models of wounded human skin is improved by Gap27 despite raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Catherine S.; Berends, Rebecca F.; Flint, David J.; Martin, Patricia E.M.

    2013-02-15

    Reducing Cx43 expression stimulates skin wound healing. This is mimicked in models when Cx43 function is blocked by the connexin mimetic peptide Gap27. IGF-I also stimulates wound healing with IGFBP-5 attenuating its actions. Further, the IGF-I to IGFBP-5 ratio is altered in diabetic skin, where wound closure is impaired. We investigated whether Gap27 remains effective in augmenting scrape-wound closure in human skin wound models simulating diabetes-induced changes, using culture conditions with raised glucose, insulin and IGFBP-5. Gap27 increased scrape-wound closure in normal glucose and insulin (NGI) and to a lesser extent in high glucose and insulin (HGI). IGF-I enhanced scrape-wound closure in keratinocytes whereas IGFBP-5 inhibited this response. Gap27 overcame the inhibitory effects of IGFBP-5 on IGF-I activity. Connexin-mediated communication (CMC) was reduced in HGI, despite raised Cx43, and Gap27 significantly decreased CMC in NGI and HGI. IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect CMC. IGF-I increased keratinocyte proliferation in NGI, and Gap27 increased proliferation in NGI to a greater extent than in HGI. We conclude that IGF-I and Gap27 stimulate scrape-wound closure by independent mechanisms with Gap27 inhibiting Cx43 function. Gap27 can enhance wound closure in diabetic conditions, irrespective of the IGF-I:IGFBP-5 balance. - Highlights: ► Human organotypic and keratinocyte ‘diabetic’ skin models were used to demonstrate the ability of Gap27 to improve scrape-wound closure. ► Gap27 enhanced scrape-wound closure by reducing Cx43-mediated communication, whereas IGFBP-5 retarded cell migration. ► IGF-I and IGFBP-5 did not affect connexin-mediated pathways. ► Gap27 can override altered glucose, insulin, IGF-I, and IGFBP-5 in ‘diabetic’ skin models and thus has therapeutic potential.

  17. Effect of human milk on blood and bone marrow cells in a malnourished mice model; comparative study with cow milk.

    PubMed

    García, Isabel; Salva, Susana; Zelaya, Hortensia; Villena, Julio; Agüero, Graciela

    2013-11-01

    We studied the impact of human (HM) and cow (CM) milk on the recovery of blood and bone marrow cells in malnourished mice. Results: both milks normalized serum albumin levels and improved thymus weight. HM was less effective than CM to increase body weight and serum transferrin levels. In contrast, HM was more effective than CM to increase the number of leukocytes and lymphocytes in peripheral blood. Both milks induced an increment in mitotic pool cells in bone marrow and α-naphthyl butyrate esterase positive cells in peripheral blood. They also normalized phagocytic function in blood neutrophils and oxidative burst in peritoneal cells. Conclusion: both milks were equally effective to exert favorable effects on the number of the bone marrow cells and the functions of the blood and peritoneal cells involved in immune response. However, only HM normalized the number of leukocytes and increased the number of neutrophils in peripheral blood.

  18. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  19. The allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in a human-mouse chimera model of asthma is T cell and IL-4 and IL-5 dependent.

    PubMed

    Tournoy, K G; Kips, J C; Pauwels, R A

    2001-06-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) of patients with allergic asthma remain unclear. A role for Th2 inflammatory cells was suggested based on murine asthma models. No direct evidence exists on the role of these cells in human asthma. The development of a mouse-human chimera might be useful, allowing the in vivo study of the components of the human immune system relevant to asthma. We investigated the role of allergen-reactive T lymphocytes in a human-mouse SCID model. SCID mice were reconstituted intratracheally with human PBMC from healthy, nonallergic, nonasthmatic donors and exposed to an aerosol of house dust mite allergen after i.p. injection with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus I Ag and alum. The donor T lymphocytes had a Th1 cytokine phenotype. The reconstituted and allergen-challenged mice developed AHR to carbachol. The mouse airways and lungs were infiltrated with human T lymphocytes. No eosinophils or increases in human IgE were observed. The intrapulmonary human T lymphocytes demonstrated an increase in intracytoplasmic IL-4 and IL-5 and a decrease in IFN-gamma after exposure to allergen adjuvant. Antagonizing human IL-4/IL-13 or IL-5 resulted in a normalization of the airway responsiveness, despite a sustained intracellular Th2 cytokine production. These results provide evidence that the activated human allergen-reactive Th2 cells producing IL-4 or IL-5 are pivotal in the induction of AHR, whereas no critical role for eosinophils or IgE could be demonstrated. They also demonstrate that human allergen-specific Th1 lymphocytes can be driven to a Th2 phenotype.

  20. Comparative Proteomic Characterization of 4 Human Liver-Derived Single Cell Culture Models Reveals Significant Variation in the Capacity for Drug Disposition, Bioactivation, and Detoxication

    PubMed Central

    Sison-Young, Rowena L. C.; Mitsa, Dimitra; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Mottram, David; Alexandre, Eliane; Richert, Lysiane; Aerts, Hélène; Weaver, Richard J.; Jones, Robert P.; Johann, Esther; Hewitt, Philip G.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Goldring, Christopher E. P.; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Park, B. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    In vitro preclinical models for the assessment of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) are usually based on cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes (cPHH) or human hepatic tumor-derived cell lines; however, it is unclear how well such cell models reflect the normal function of liver cells. The physiological, pharmacological, and toxicological phenotyping of available cell-based systems is necessary in order to decide the testing purpose for which they are fit. We have therefore undertaken a global proteomic analysis of 3 human-derived hepatic cell lines (HepG2, Upcyte, and HepaRG) in comparison with cPHH with a focus on drug metabolizing enzymes and transport proteins (DMETs), as well as Nrf2-regulated proteins. In total, 4946 proteins were identified, of which 2722 proteins were common across all cell models, including 128 DMETs. Approximately 90% reduction in expression of cytochromes P450 was observed in HepG2 and Upcyte cells, and approximately 60% in HepaRG cells relative to cPHH. Drug transporter expression was also lower compared with cPHH with the exception of MRP3 and P-gp (MDR1) which appeared to be significantly expressed in HepaRG cells. In contrast, a high proportion of Nrf2-regulated proteins were more highly expressed in the cell lines compared with cPHH. The proteomic database derived here will provide a rational basis for the context-specific selection of the most appropriate ‘hepatocyte-like’ cell for the evaluation of particular cellular functions associated with DILI and, at the same time, assist in the construction of a testing paradigm which takes into account the in vivo disposition of a new drug. PMID:26160117

  1. Bacillus anthracis spore movement does not require a carrier cell and is not affected by lethal toxin in human lung models.

    PubMed

    Booth, J Leland; Duggan, Elizabeth S; Patel, Vineet I; Langer, Marybeth; Wu, Wenxin; Braun, Armin; Coggeshall, K Mark; Metcalf, Jordan P

    2016-10-01

    The lung is the entry site for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the most deadly form of the disease. Spores escape from the alveolus to regional lymph nodes, germinate and enter the circulatory system to cause disease. The roles of carrier cells and the effects of B. anthracis toxins in this process are unclear. We used a human lung organ culture model to measure spore uptake by antigen presenting cells (APC) and alveolar epithelial cells (AEC), spore partitioning between these cells, and the effects of B. anthracis lethal toxin and protective antigen. We repeated the study in a human A549 alveolar epithelial cell model. Most spores remained unassociated with cells, but the majority of cell-associated spores were in AEC, not in APC. Spore movement was not dependent on internalization, although the location of internalized spores changed in both cell types. Spores also internalized in a non-uniform pattern. Toxins affected neither transit of the spores nor the partitioning of spores into AEC and APC. Our results support a model of spore escape from the alveolus that involves spore clustering with transient passage through intact AEC. However, subsequent transport of spores by APC from the lung to the lymph nodes may occur.

  2. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  3. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems. PMID:27226981

  4. Adult-Derived Human Liver Stem/Progenitor Cells Infused 3 Days Postsurgery Improve Liver Regeneration in a Mouse Model of Extended Hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Astrid; Prigent, Julie; Lombard, Catherine; Rosseels, Valérie; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Breckpot, Karine; Najimi, Mustapha; Deblandre, Gisèle; Sokal, Etienne M

    2017-02-16

    There is growing evidence that cell therapy constitutes a promising strategy for liver regenerative medicine. In the setting of hepatic cancer treatments, cell therapy could prove a useful therapeutic approach for managing the acute liver failure that occurs following extended hepatectomy. In this study, we examined the influence of delivering adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSCs) at two different early time points in an immunodeficient mouse model (Rag2-/-IL2Rγ-/-) that had undergone a 70% hepatectomy procedure. The hepatic mesenchymal cells were intrasplenically infused either immediately after surgery (n = 26) or following a critical 3-day period (n = 26). We evaluated the cells' capacity to engraft at day 1 and day 7 following transplantation by means of human Alu qPCR quantification, along with histological assessment of human albumin and α-smooth muscle actin. In addition, cell proliferation (anti-mouse and human Ki-67 staining) and murine liver weight were measured in order to evaluate liver regeneration. At day 1 posttransplantation, the ratio of human to mouse cells was similar in both groups, whereas 1 week posttransplantation this ratio was significantly improved (p < 0.016) in mice receiving ADHLSC injection at day 3 posthepatectomy (1.7%), compared to those injected at the time of surgery (1%). On the basis of liver weight, mouse liver regeneration was more extensive 1 week posttransplantation in mice transplanted with ADHLSCs (+65.3%) compared to that of mice from the sham vehicle group (+42.7%). In conclusion, infusing ADHLSCs 3 days after extensive hepatectomy improves the cell engraftment and murine hepatic tissue regeneration, thereby confirming that ADHLSCs could be a promising cell source for liver cell therapy and hepatic tissue repair.

  5. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and chorionic plate-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote axon survival in a rat model of optic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sokjoong; Rho, Seungsoo; Kim, Gijin; Kim, So-Ra; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Kang, Myungseo; Lew, Helen

    2016-05-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cell therapy in regenerative medicine has great potential, particularly in the treatment of nerve injury. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) reportedly contains stem cells, which have been widely used as a hematopoietic source and may have therapeutic potential for neurological impairment. Although ongoing research is dedicated to the management of traumatic optic nerve injury using various measures, novel therapeutic strategies based on the complex underlying mechanisms responsible for optic nerve injury, such as inflammation and/or ischemia, are required. In the present study, a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury was established in order to examine the effects of transplanting human chorionic plate-derived MSCs (CP‑MSCs) isolated from the placenta, as well as human UCB mononuclear cells (CB-MNCs) on compressed rat optic nerves. Expression markers for inflammation, apoptosis, and optic nerve regeneration were analyzed, as well as the axon survival rate by direct counting. Increased axon survival rates were observed following the injection of CB‑MNCs at at 1 week post-transplantation compared with the controls. The levels of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP‑43) were increased after the injection of CB‑MNCs or CP‑MSCs compared with the controls, and the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were also significantly increased following the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs. ERM-like protein (ERMN) and SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2) were found to be expressed in the optic nerves of the CP‑MSC-injected rats with ONC injury. The findings of our study suggest that the administration of CB‑MNCs or CP‑MSCs may promote axon survival through systemic concomitant mechanisms involving GAP‑43 and HIF‑1α. Taken together, these findings provide further understanding of the mechanisms repsonsible for optic nerve injury and may aid in the development of novel cell

  6. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and chorionic plate-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote axon survival in a rat model of optic nerve crush injury

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, SOKJOONG; RHO, SEUNGSOO; KIM, GIJIN; KIM, SO-RA; BAEK, KWANG-HYUN; KANG, MYUNGSEO; LEW, HELEN

    2016-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cell therapy in regenerative medicine has great potential, particularly in the treatment of nerve injury. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) reportedly contains stem cells, which have been widely used as a hematopoietic source and may have therapeutic potential for neurological impairment. Although ongoing research is dedicated to the management of traumatic optic nerve injury using various measures, novel therapeutic strategies based on the complex underlying mechanisms responsible for optic nerve injury, such as inflammation and/or ischemia, are required. In the present study, a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury was established in order to examine the effects of transplanting human chorionic plate-derived MSCs (CP-MSCs) isolated from the placenta, as well as human UCB mononuclear cells (CB-MNCs) on compressed rat optic nerves. Expression markers for inflammation, apoptosis, and optic nerve regeneration were analyzed, as well as the axon survival rate by direct counting. Increased axon survival rates were observed following the injection of CB-MNCs at at 1 week post-transplantation compared with the controls. The levels of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) were increased after the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs compared with the controls, and the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were also significantly increased following the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs. ERM-like protein (ERMN) and SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2) were found to be expressed in the optic nerves of the CP-MSC-injected rats with ONC injury. The findings of our study suggest that the administration of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs may promote axon survival through systemic concomitant mechanisms involving GAP-43 and HIF-1α. Taken together, these findings provide further understanding of the mechanisms repsonsible for optic nerve injury and may aid in the development of novel cell-based therapeutic strategies with

  7. A model for the development of human IgD-only B cells: Genotypic analyses suggest their generation in superantigen driven immune responses.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Marc; Steimle-Grauer, Susanne A; Goossens, Tina; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Bräuninger, Andreas; Küppers, Ralf

    2009-02-01

    Human peripheral blood (PB) B cells expressing only IgD and tonsillar IgD-secreting plasma cells carry highly mutated V(H) genes and show preferential Iglambda usage. To further characterize these peculiar cells and gain insight into their generation, we analysed rearranged V(H) and V(L) genes of single IgD-only lambda(+) PB B cells and IgD(+) plasma cells from four individuals each. We demonstrate that the high somatic hypermutation activity in these cells is not restricted to V(H) genes but also present in V(L) genes. Moreover, not only PB IgD-only B cells, as reported earlier, but also IgD-expressing plasma cells often belong to very large clones. Surprisingly, the V(H)3-30 gene segment was used in each PB donor by >30% of IgD-only cells and in 2 tonsils by >50% of IgD plasma cells, whereas it was used less frequent in other B cells. All these features fit to a model in which IgD-only cells develop in superantigen-driven germinal center reactions, in which B cells are activated by binding of antigens to constant parts of Cdelta and often lambda light chains and the V(H)3-30 segment, and are selected for deletion of Cmu. IgD-only B cells may hence represent a unique B lineage subset generated in response to particular antigens.

  8. Nutraceutical Improvement Increases the Protective Activity of Broccoli Sprout Juice in a Human Intestinal Cell Model of Gut Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ferruzza, Simonetta; Natella, Fausta; Ranaldi, Giulia; Murgia, Chiara; Rossi, Carlotta; Trošt, Kajetan; Mattivi, Fulvio; Nardini, Mirella; Maldini, Mariateresa; Giusti, Anna Maria; Moneta, Elisabetta; Scaccini, Cristina; Sambuy, Yula; Morelli, Giorgio; Baima, Simona

    2016-08-12

    Benefits to health from a high consumption of fruits and vegetables are well established and have been attributed to bioactive secondary metabolites present in edible plants. However, the effects of specific health-related phytochemicals within a complex food matrix are difficult to assess. In an attempt to address this problem, we have used elicitation to improve the nutraceutical content of seedlings of Brassica oleracea grown under controlled conditions. Analysis, by LC-MS, of the glucosinolate, isothiocyanate and phenolic compound content of juices obtained from sprouts indicated that elicitation induces an enrichment of several phenolics, particularly of the anthocyanin fraction. To test the biological activity of basal and enriched juices we took advantage of a recently developed in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium. Both sprouts' juices protected intestinal barrier integrity in Caco-2 cells exposed to tumor necrosis factor α under marginal zinc deprivation, with the enriched juice showing higher protection. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that the extent of rescue from stress-induced epithelial dysfunction correlated with the composition in bioactive molecules of the juices and, in particular, with a group of phenolic compounds, including several anthocyanins, quercetin-3-Glc, cryptochlorogenic, neochlorogenic and cinnamic acids.

  9. Nutraceutical Improvement Increases the Protective Activity of Broccoli Sprout Juice in a Human Intestinal Cell Model of Gut Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferruzza, Simonetta; Natella, Fausta; Ranaldi, Giulia; Murgia, Chiara; Rossi, Carlotta; Trošt, Kajetan; Mattivi, Fulvio; Nardini, Mirella; Maldini, Mariateresa; Giusti, Anna Maria; Moneta, Elisabetta; Scaccini, Cristina; Sambuy, Yula; Morelli, Giorgio; Baima, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Benefits to health from a high consumption of fruits and vegetables are well established and have been attributed to bioactive secondary metabolites present in edible plants. However, the effects of specific health-related phytochemicals within a complex food matrix are difficult to assess. In an attempt to address this problem, we have used elicitation to improve the nutraceutical content of seedlings of Brassica oleracea grown under controlled conditions. Analysis, by LC-MS, of the glucosinolate, isothiocyanate and phenolic compound content of juices obtained from sprouts indicated that elicitation induces an enrichment of several phenolics, particularly of the anthocyanin fraction. To test the biological activity of basal and enriched juices we took advantage of a recently developed in vitro model of inflamed human intestinal epithelium. Both sprouts’ juices protected intestinal barrier integrity in Caco-2 cells exposed to tumor necrosis factor α under marginal zinc deprivation, with the enriched juice showing higher protection. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that the extent of rescue from stress-induced epithelial dysfunction correlated with the composition in bioactive molecules of the juices and, in particular, with a group of phenolic compounds, including several anthocyanins, quercetin-3-Glc, cryptochlorogenic, neochlorogenic and cinnamic acids. PMID:27529258

  10. Early Developmental Perturbations in a Human Stem Cell Model of MODY5/HNF1B Pancreatic Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Adrian Kee Keong; Lau, Hwee Hui; Valdez, Ivan Achel; Dirice, Ercument; Tjora, Erling; Raeder, Helge; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Patients with an HNF1BS148L/+ mutation (MODY5) typically exhibit pancreatic hypoplasia. However, the molecular mechanisms are unknown due to inaccessibility of patient material and because mouse models do not fully recapitulate MODY5. Here, we differentiated MODY5 human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into pancreatic progenitors, and show that the HNF1BS148L/+ mutation causes a compensatory increase in several pancreatic transcription factors, and surprisingly, a decrease in PAX6 pancreatic gene expression. The lack of suppression of PDX1, PTF1A, GATA4, and GATA6 indicates that MODY5-mediated pancreatic hypoplasia is mechanistically independent. Overexpression studies demonstrate that a compensatory increase in PDX1 gene expression is due to mutant HNF1BS148L/+ but not wild-type HNF1B or HNF1A. Furthermore, HNF1B does not appear to directly regulate PAX6 gene expression necessary for glucose tolerance. Our results demonstrate compensatory mechanisms in the pancreatic transcription factor network due to mutant HNF1BS148L/+ protein. Thus, patients typically develop MODY5 but not neonatal diabetes despite exhibiting pancreatic hypoplasia. PMID:26876668

  11. Conditioned medium from the stem cells of human dental pulp improves cognitive function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mita, Tsuneyuki; Furukawa-Hibi, Yoko; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Hattori, Hisashi; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Hibi, Hideharu; Ueda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-10-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease characterized by a decline in cognitive abilities and the appearance of β-amyloid plaques in the brain. Although the pathogenic mechanisms associated with AD are not fully understood, activated microglia releasing various neurotoxic factors, including pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress mediators, appear to play major roles. Here, we investigated the therapeutic benefits of a serum-free conditioned medium (CM) derived from the stem cells of human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) in a mouse model of AD. The intranasal administration of SHEDs in these mice resulted in substantially improved cognitive function. SHED-CM contained factors involved in multiple neuroregenerative mechanisms, such as neuroprotection, axonal elongation, neurotransmission, the suppression of inflammation, and microglial regulation. Notably, SHED-CM attenuated the pro-inflammatory responses induced by β-amyloid plaques, and generated an anti-inflammatory/tissue-regenerating environment, which was accompanied by the induction of anti-inflammatory M2-like microglia. Our data suggest that SHED-CM may provide significant therapeutic benefits for AD.

  12. Advanced flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle targeting to rare leukemic stem cells in peripheral human blood in a defined model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christy L.; Leary, James F.

    2015-03-01

    Leukemia stem cells are both stem-like and leukemic-like. This complicates their detection as rare circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of leukemia patients. Since leukemic stem cells are also resistant to standard chemotherapeutic regimens, new therapeutic strategies need to be designed to kill the leukemic stem cells without killing normal stem cells. In these initial targeting studies we utilized a bioinformatics approach to design an antibodyfluorescent nanoparticle conjugate for targeting to these leukemic stem cells and to minimize targeting to normal stemprogenitor cells. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were performed on a BD FACS Aria III. Human leukemic stem cell-like cell RS4;11 (with putative immunophenotype CD133+/CD24+/-, CD34+/-, CD38+, CD10-/Flt3+) was spiked into normal hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells obtained from a "buffy coat" prep (with putative immunophenotype CD133- /CD34+/CD38-/CD10-/Flt-3-) to be used as a model human leukemia patient. To analyze the model system, digital data mixtures of the two cell types were first created and assigned classifiers in order to create truth sets. ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) and multidimensional cluster analyses were used to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the immunophenotyping panel and for automated cell population identification, respectively. Costs of misclassification (false targeting) were also accounted for by this analysis scheme. Ultimately, this analysis scheme will be applied to use of nanoparticle-antibody conjugates at therapeutic doses for targeted killing of leukemia stem cells preferentially to normal stem -progenitor cells.

  13. Satellite cells in human skeletal muscle plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P.; McKay, Bryon R.; Joanisse, Sophie; Verdijk, Lex B.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Parise, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle satellite cells are considered to play a crucial role in muscle fiber maintenance, repair and remodeling. Our knowledge of the role of satellite cells in muscle fiber adaptation has traditionally relied on in vitro cell and in vivo animal models. Over the past decade, a genuine effort has been made to translate these results to humans under physiological conditions. Findings from in vivo human studies suggest that satellite cells play a key role in skeletal muscle fiber repair/remodeling in response to exercise. Mounting evidence indicates that aging has a profound impact on the regulation of satellite cells in human skeletal muscle. Yet, the precise role of satellite cells in the development of muscle fiber atrophy with age remains unresolved. This review seeks to integrate recent results from in vivo human studies on satellite cell function in muscle fiber repair/remodeling in the wider context of satellite cell biology whose literature is largely based on animal and cell models. PMID:26557092

  14. Hepatic Stellate Cells Improve Engraftment of Human Primary Hepatocytes: A Preclinical Transplantation Study in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Dusabineza, Ange-Clarisse; Najimi, Mustapha; van Hul, Noémi; Legry, Vanessa; Khuu, Dung Ngoc; van Grunsven, Leo A; Sokal, Etienne; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    Human hepatocytes are used for liver cell therapy, but the small number of engrafting cells limits the benefit of cell transplantation. We tested whether cotransplantation of hepatocytes with hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) could improve hepatocyte engraftment in vivo. Human primary hepatocytes were transplanted into SCID mice either alone or in a mixture with HSCs (quiescent or after culture activation) or LX-2 cells (ratio 20:1). Four weeks after transplantation into mouse livers, human albumin-positive (huAlb(+)) hepatocytes were found scattered. When cotransplanted in a mixture with HSCs or LX-2 cells, huAlb(+) hepatocytes formed clusters and were more numerous occupying 2- to 5.9-fold more surface on the tissue section than in livers transplanted with hepatocytes alone. Increased huAlb mRNA expression in livers transplanted with the cell mixtures confirmed those results. The presence of HSCs increased the number of hepatocytes entrapped in the host liver at an early time point posttransplantation but not their proliferation in situ as assessed by cumulative incorporation of BrdU. Importantly, 4 weeks posttransplantation, we found no accumulation of αSMA(+)-activated HSCs or collagen deposition. To follow the fate of transplanted HSCs, HSCs derived from GFP(+) mice were injected into GFP(-) littermates: 17 h posttransplant, GFP(+) HSCs were found in the sinusoids, without proliferating or actively producing ECM; they were undetectable at later time points. Coculture with HSCs improved the number of adherent hepatocytes, with best attachment obtained when hepatocytes were seeded in contact with activated HSCs. In vivo, cotransplantation of hepatocytes with HSCs into a healthy liver recipient does not generate fibrosis, but significantly improves the engraftment of hepatocytes, probably by ameliorating cell homing.

  15. Assessing the Cytotoxicity of Black Carbon As A Model for Ultrafine Anthropogenic Aerosol Across Human and Murine Cells: A Chronic Exposure Model of Nanosized Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, E.

    2015-12-01

    Combustion-derived nanomaterials or ultrafine (<1 μm) atmospheric aerosols are primarily products of anthropogenic activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels. Ultrafine particles (UFPs) can absorb other noxious pollutants including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), toxic organic compounds, and heavy metals. The combination of high population density, meteorological conditions, and industrial productivity brings high levels of air pollution to the metropolitan area of El Paso, Texas, USA/ Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico, comprising the Paso del Norte air basin. A study conducted by scientists from the Research Triangle Park in North Carolina, analyzed sites adjacent to heavy-traffic highways in El Paso and elucidated higher UFP concentrations in comparison to previously published work exploring pollution and adverse health effects in the basin. UFPs can penetrate deep into the alveolar sacs of the lung, reaching distant alveolar sacs and inducing a series of immune responses that are detrimental to the body: evidence suggests that UFPs can also cross the alveolar-blood barrier and potentially endanger the body's immune response. The physical properties of UFPs and the dynamics of local atmospheric and topographical conditions indicate that emissions of nanosized carbonaceous aerosols could pose significant threats to biological tissues upon inhalation by local residents of the Paso del Norte. This study utilizes Black Carbon (BC) as a model for environmental UFPs and its effects on the immunological response. An in vitro approach is used to measure the ability of BC to promote cell death upon long-term exposure. Human epithelial lung cells (A549), human peripheral-blood monocytes (THP-1), murine macrophages (RAW264.7), and murine epithelial lung cells (LA-4) were treated with BC and assessed for metabolic activity after chronic exposure utilizing three distinct and independent cell viability assays. The cell viability

  16. Thymic and Postthymic Regulation of Naïve CD4+ T-Cell Lineage Fates in Humans and Mice Models

    PubMed Central

    Belizário, José E.; Brandão, Wesley; Rossato, Cristiano; Peron, Jean Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of how thymocytes differentiate into many subtypes has been increased progressively in its complexity. At early life, the thymus provides a suitable microenvironment with specific combination of stromal cells, growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines to induce the bone marrow lymphoid progenitor T-cell precursors into single-positive CD4+ and CD8+ T effectors and CD4+CD25+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs). At postthymic compartments, the CD4+ T-cells acquire distinct phenotypes which include the classical T-helper 1 (Th1), T-helper 2 (Th2), T-helper 9 (Th9), T-helper 17 (Th17), follicular helper T-cell (Tfh), and induced T-regulatory cells (iTregs), such as the regulatory type 1 cells (Tr1) and transforming growth factor-β- (TGF-β-) producing CD4+ T-cells (Th3). Tregs represent only a small fraction, 5–10% in mice and 1-2% in humans, of the overall CD4+ T-cells in lymphoid tissues but are essential for immunoregulatory circuits mediating the inhibition and expansion of all lineages of T-cells. In this paper, we first provide an overview of the major cell-intrinsic developmental programs that regulate T-cell lineage fates in thymus and periphery. Next, we introduce the SV40 immortomouse as a relevant mice model for implementation of new approaches to investigate thymus organogenesis, CD4 and CD8 development, and thymus cells tumorogenesis. PMID:27313405

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  18. Mancozeb, a fungicide routinely used in agriculture, worsens nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the human HepG2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Anna Virginia Adriana; Stellavato, Antonietta; La Gatta, Annalisa; Lamberti, Monica; Schiraldi, Chiara

    2016-05-13

    Mancozeb, a manganese/zinc ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate, is a fungicide routinely used in pest control programs. However, it has been found to have deleterious effects on human health and on the environment. Indeed, its massive use has raised the issue of possible health risks for agrarian communities; the molecule can also reach human cells via the food chain and alter metabolism, endocrine activity and cell survival. In particular, mancozeb induces many toxic effects on hepatic cell metabolism. For this reason, we investigated its effect in an in vitro model of hepatic damage, namely fatty acid-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in the HepG2 cell line. We found that the hepatic toxicity of the fungicide exacerbated fatty acid-induced steatosis, as manifested by an increase in intracellular lipid droplet accumulation. Furthermore, mancozeb altered cell metabolism and induced cell death through upregulation of lactate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c, respectively, in dose-dependent manners. Therefore, mancozeb may play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of chronic disease in humans and represents a danger for human health in high doses.

  19. Human immune cells' behavior and survival under bioenergetically restricted conditions in an in vitro fracture hematoma model.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Paula; Maschmeyer, Patrick; Gaber, Timo; Schütze, Tabea; Raue, Tobias; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Dziurla, René; Schellmann, Saskia; Lohanatha, Ferenz Leonard; Röhner, Eric; Ode, Andrea; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Duda, Georg N; Perka, Carsten; Buttgereit, Frank

    2013-03-01

    The initial inflammatory phase of bone fracture healing represents a critical step for the outcome of the healing process. However, both the mechanisms initiating this inflammatory phase and the function of immune cells present at the fracture site are poorly understood. In order to study the early events within a fracture hematoma, we established an in vitro fracture hematoma model: we cultured hematomas forming during an osteotomy (artificial bone fracture) of the femur during total hip arthroplasty (THA) in vitro under bioenergetically controlled conditions. This model allowed us to monitor immune cell populations, cell survival and cytokine expression during the early phase following a fracture. Moreover, this model enabled us to change the bioenergetical conditions in order to mimic the in vivo situation, which is assumed to be characterized by hypoxia and restricted amounts of nutrients. Using this model, we found that immune cells adapt to hypoxia via the expression of angiogenic factors, chemoattractants and pro-inflammatory molecules. In addition, combined restriction of oxygen and nutrient supply enhanced the selective survival of lymphocytes in comparison with that of myeloid derived cells (i.e., neutrophils). Of note, non-restricted bioenergetical conditions did not show any similar effects regarding cytokine expression and/or different survival rates of immune cell subsets. In conclusion, we found that the bioenergetical conditions are among the crucial factors inducing the initial inflammatory phase of fracture healing and are thus a critical step for influencing survival and function of immune cells in the early fracture hematoma.

  20. Study of Viral Vectors in a Three-dimensional Liver Model Repopulated with the Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line HepG2

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Thomas; Röhrs, Viola; Dehne, Eva-Maria; Wagner, Anke; Fechner, Henry; Lauster, Roland; Kurreck, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the generation of a three-dimensional (3D) ex vivo liver model and its application to the study and development of viral vector systems. The model is obtained by repopulating the extracellular matrix of a decellularized rat liver with a human hepatocyte cell line. The model permits studies in a vascularized 3D cell system, replacing potentially harmful experiments with living animals. Another advantage is the humanized nature of the model, which is closer to human physiology than animal models. In this study, we demonstrate the transduction of this liver model with a viral vector derived from adeno-associated viruses (AAV vector). The perfusion circuit that supplies the 3D liver model with media provides an easy means to apply the vector. The system permits monitoring of the major metabolic parameters of the liver. For final analysis, tissue samples can be taken to determine the extent of recellularization by histological techniques. Distribution of the virus vector and expression of the delivered transgene can be analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR), Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Numerous applications of the vector model in basic research and in the development of gene therapeutic applications can be envisioned, including the development of novel antiviral therapeutics, cancer research, and the study of viral vectors and their potential side effects. PMID:27805597

  1. STORM: A General Model to Determine the Number and Adaptive Changes of Epithelial Stem Cells in Teleost, Murine and Human Intestinal Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengyuan; Matsudaira, Paul; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells play a pivotal role in the epithelial tissue renewal, homeostasis and cancer development. The lack of a general marker for intestinal stem cells across species has hampered analysis of stem cell number in different species and their adaptive changes upon intestinal lesions or during development of cancer. Here a two-dimensional model, named STORM, has been developed to address this issue. By optimizing epithelium renewal dynamics, the model examines the epithelial stem cell number by taking experimental input information regarding epithelium proliferation and differentiation. As the results suggest, there are 2.0–4.1 epithelial stem cells on each pocket section of zebrafish intestine, 2.0–4.1 stem cells on each crypt section of murine small intestine and 1.8–3.5 stem cells on each crypt section of human duodenum. The model is able to provide quick results for stem cell number and its adaptive changes, which is not easy to measure through experiments. Its general applicability to different species makes it a valuable tool for analysis of intestinal stem cells under various pathological conditions. PMID:21124758

  2. Mesenchymal stromal cells from the human placenta promote neovascularization in a mouse model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kinzer, M; Hingerl, K; König, J; Reinisch, A; Strunk, D; Huppertz, B; Lang, I

    2014-07-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising strategy in regenerative medicine for revascularization of ischemic tissues. Based on our observation that placental mesenchymal stromal cells (PMSC) enhance endothelial cell viability in vitro via secretion of angiogenic factors, we asked whether PMSC support vascular growth in vivo. PMSC were isolated from amnion and placental endothelial cells (PLEC) from chorion and either separately or co-transplanted subcutaneously into immune-deficient mice. Co-transplantation resulted in a higher number of perfused human vessels (CD31+/vimentin+) containing mouse glycophorin A+ erythrocytes. Results indicate positive effects of PMSC on neovascularization in vivo, making them attractive candidates to create autologous PMSC/PLEC pairs for research and transplantation.

  3. Evaluation of the rotenone-induced activation of the Nrf2 pathway in a neuronal model derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zagoura, Dimitra; Canovas-Jorda, David; Pistollato, Francesca; Bremer-Hoffmann, Susanne; Bal-Price, Anna

    2016-09-09

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are considered as a powerful tool for drug and chemical screening and development of new in vitro testing strategies in the field of toxicology, including neurotoxicity evaluation. These cells are able to expand and efficiently differentiate into different types of neuronal and glial cells as well as peripheral neurons. These human cells-based neuronal models serve as test systems for mechanistic studies on different pathways involved in neurotoxicity. One of the well-known mechanisms that are activated by chemically-induced oxidative stress is the Nrf2 signaling pathway. Therefore, in the current study, we evaluated whether Nrf2 signaling machinery is expressed in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-derived mixed neuronal/glial culture and if so whether it becomes activated by rotenone-induced oxidative stress mediated by complex I inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. Rotenone was found to induce the activation of Nrf2 signaling particularly at the highest tested concentration (100 nM), as shown by Nrf2 nuclear translocation and the up-regulation of the Nrf2-downstream antioxidant enzymes, NQO1 and SRXN1. Interestingly, exposure to rotenone also increased the number of astroglial cells in which Nrf2 activation may play an important role in neuroprotection. Moreover, rotenone caused cell death of dopaminergic neurons since a decreased percentage of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH(+)) cells was observed. The obtained results suggest that hiPSC-derived mixed neuronal/glial culture could be a valuable in vitro human model for the establishment of neuronal specific assays in order to link Nrf2 pathway activation (biomarker of oxidative stress) with additional neuronal specific readouts that could be applied to in vitro neurotoxicity evaluation.

  4. Electrophoretic separation and analysis of living cells from solid tissues by several methods - Human embryonic kidney cell cultures as a model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Paul; Plank, Lindsay D.; Kunze, M. Elaine; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of free-fluid electrophoresis methods to separate tissue cells having a specific function is discussed. It is shown that cells suspended by trypsinization from cultures of human embryonic kidney are electrophoretically heterogeneous and tolerate a wide range of electrophoresis buffers and conditions without significant attenuation of function. Moreover, these cells do not separate electrophoretically on the basis of size or cell position alone and can be separated according to their ability to give rise to progeny that produce specific plasminogen activators.

  5. Investigation of alpha nascent polypeptide-associated complex functions in a human CD8+ T cell ex vivo expansion model using antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shanti, N; Steward, C G; Garland, R J; Rowbottom, A W

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine molecules involved in the differentiation and proliferation of human CD8+ cells, two ex vivo expansion models were established: coculture of freshly purified human CD8+ cells with irradiated autologous feeders (AF) or stimulation with anti-CD3. Two different proliferation kinetics of CD8+ cells and expression patterns of CD57 were observed between these conditions. Differential display reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction was applied to investigate the differential expression of mRNA species between CD8+ CD57+ and CD8+ CD57– populations. A differentially expressed RNA species called alpha nascent polypeptide associated complex (α NAC) was found at a higher level in CD8+ CD57– cells than in CD8+ CD57+ cells. In the presence of AF, the expression of α NAC was reduced on culturing whilst proliferation increased. Similarly, in cultures stimulated with anti-CD3, α NAC reverted to its inactive form and differentiation and proliferation increased. Using a phosphorothioate-modified oligodeoxynucleotide antisense directed specifically against α NAC mRNA, protein expression was inhibited and increased CD8+ cell proliferation and CD25 expression were observed irrespective of the culture conditions. This suggests that α NAC protein is antiproliferative molecule. This is the first description of the function of the α NAC protein in human CD8+ T cells. PMID:15196207

  6. Protein-based human iPS cells efficiently generate functional dopamine neurons and can treat a rat model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Yong-Hee; Ko, Ji-Yun; Chang, Mi-Yoon; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Dohoon; Kim, Chun-Hyung; Shim, Jae-Won; Jo, A-Young; Kim, Byung-Woo; Lee, Hyunsu; Lee, Suk-Ho; Suh, Wonhee; Park, Chang-Hwan; Koh, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Yong-Sung; Lanza, Robert; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2011-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) involves the selective loss of midbrain dopamine (mDA) neurons and is a possible target disease for stem cell-based therapy. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a potentially unlimited source of patient-specific cells for transplantation. However, it is critical to evaluate the safety of hiPSCs generated by different reprogramming methods. Here, we compared multiple hiPSC lines derived by virus- and protein-based reprogramming to human ES cells (hESCs). Neuronal precursor cells (NPCs) and dopamine (DA) neurons delivered from lentivirus-based hiPSCs exhibited residual expression of exogenous reprogramming genes, but those cells derived from retrovirus- and protein-based hiPSCs did not. Furthermore, NPCs derived from virus-based hiPSCs exhibited early senescence and apoptotic cell death during passaging, which was preceded by abrupt induction of p53. In contrast, NPCs derived from hESCs and protein-based hiPSCs were highly expandable without senescence. DA neurons derived from protein-based hiPSCs exhibited gene expression, physiological, and electrophysiological properties similar to those of mDA neurons. Transplantation of these cells into rats with striatal lesions, a model of PD, significantly rescued motor deficits. These data support the clinical potential of protein-based hiPSCs for personalized cell therapy of PD.

  7. The bovine model for elucidating the role of γδ T cells in controlling infectious diseases of importance to cattle and humans.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Cynthia L; Telfer, Janice C

    2015-07-01

    There are several instances of co-investigation and related discoveries and achievements in bovine and human immunology; perhaps most interesting is the development of the BCG vaccine, the tuberculin skin test and the more recent interferon-gamma test that were developed first in cattle to prevent and diagnosis bovine tuberculosis and then applied to humans. There are also a number of immune-physiological traits that ruminant share with humans including the development of their immune systems in utero which increases the utility of cattle as a model for human immunology. These are reviewed here with a particular focus on the use of cattle to unravel γδ T cell biology. Based on the sheer number of γδ T cells in this γδ T cell high species, it is reasonable to expect γδ T cells to play an important role in protective immune responses. For that reason alone cattle may provide good models for elucidating at least some of the roles γδ T cells play in protective immunity in all species. This includes fundamental research on γδ T cells as well as the responses of ruminant γδ T cells to a variety of infectious disease situations including to protozoan and bacterial pathogens. The role that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) play in the activation of γδ T cells may be unique relative to αβ T cells. Here we focus on that of the γδ T cell specific family of molecules known as WC1 or T19 in ruminants, which are part of the CD163 scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) family that includes SCART1 and SCART2 expressed on murine γδ T cells. We review the evidence for WC1 being a PRR as well as an activating co-receptor and the role that γδ T cells bearing these receptors play in immunity to leptospirosis and tuberculosis. This includes the generation of memory responses to vaccines, thereby continuing the tradition of co-discovery between cattle and humans.

  8. Sensory neurons do not induce motor neuron loss in a human stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Andrew J; Ebert, Allison D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to paralysis and early death due to reduced SMN protein. It is unclear why there is such a profound motor neuron loss, but recent evidence from fly and mouse studies indicate that cells comprising the whole sensory-motor circuit may contribute to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. Here, we used induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SMA patients to test whether sensory neurons directly contribute to motor neuron loss. We generated sensory neurons from SMA induced pluripotent stem cells and found no difference in neuron generation or survival, although there was a reduced calcium response to depolarizing stimuli. Using co-culture of SMA induced pluripotent stem cell derived sensory neurons with control induced pluripotent stem cell derived motor neurons, we found no significant reduction in motor neuron number or glutamate transporter boutons on motor neuron cell bodies or neurites. We conclude that SMA sensory neurons do not overtly contribute to motor neuron loss in this human stem cell system.

  9. Human Muse cells, non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells, have the capacity for liver regeneration by specific homing and replenishment of new hepatocytes in liver fibrosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Iseki, Masahiro; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Wakao, Shohei; Akimoto, Takahiro; Mizuma, Masamichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Asada, Ryuta; Shimizu, Shinobu; Unno, Michiaki; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Dezawa, Mari

    2016-11-02

    Muse cells, a novel type of non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells reside in the bone marrow, skin and adipose tissue, are collectable as cells positive for pluripotent surface marker SSEA-3. They are able to differentiate into cells representative of all three germ layers. The capacity of intravenously injected human bone marrow-Muse cells to repair the liver fibrosis model of immunodeficient mice was evaluated in this study. They exhibited the ability for differentiation spontaneously into hepatoblast/hepatocyte-lineage cells and high migration toward the serum and liver tissue of carbon tetrachloride-treated mice in vitro. In vivo, they specifically accumulated into the liver, but not into other organs except the lower rate in the lung at 2 weeks after intravenous injection into the liver fibrosis model. After homing, Muse cells spontaneously differentiated in vivo into HepPar-1 (71.1±15.2%), human albumin (54.3±8.2%) and anti-trypsin (47.9±4.6%)-positive cells without fusing with host hepatocytes, and expressed mature functional markers such as human-CYP1A2, and human-Glc-6-Pase, at 8 weeks. Recovery in serum total bilirubin and albumin, and significant attenuation of fibrosis were recognized with statistical differences between the Muse group and control groups which received the vehicle or the same number of non-Muse cells, namely cells other than Muse cells in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Thus, unlike ES and iPS cells, Muse cells are unique in their efficient migration and integration into damaged liver only by intravenous injection, nontumorigenicity, and spontaneous differentiation into hepatocytes, rendering induction into hepatocytes prior to transplantation unnecessary. They are suggested to repair liver fibrosis in two simple steps; expansion after collection from the bone marrow and intravenous injection. Such feasible strategy might provide impressive regenerative performance to liver disease patients.

  10. Humanized Mice as Preclinical Models in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Safinia, N; Becker, P D; Vaikunthanathan, T; Xiao, F; Lechler, R; Lombardi, G

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have been instrumental in our understanding of the mechanisms of rejection and the testing of novel treatment options in the context of transplantation. We have now entered an exciting era with research on humanized mice driving advances in translational studies and in our understanding of the function of human cells in response to pathogens and cancer as well as the recognition of human allogeneic tissues in vivo. In this chapter we provide a historical overview of humanized mouse models of transplantation to date, outlining the distinct strains and share our experiences in the study of human transplantation immunology.

  11. Human iPS cell model of type 3 long QT syndrome recapitulates drug-based phenotype correction.

    PubMed

    Malan, Daniela; Zhang, Miao; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Müller, Jovanca; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Sasse, Philipp; Greber, Boris

    2016-03-01

    Long QT syndrome is a potentially life-threatening disease characterized by delayed repolarization of cardiomyocytes, QT interval prolongation in the electrocardiogram, and a high risk for sudden cardiac death caused by ventricular arrhythmia. The genetic type 3 of this syndrome (LQT3) is caused by gain-of-function mutations in the SCN5A cardiac sodium channel gene which mediates the fast Nav1.5 current during action potential initiation. Here, we report the analysis of LQT3 human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). These were generated from a patient with a heterozygous p.R1644H mutation in SCN5A known to interfere with fast channel inactivation. LQT3 hiPSC-CMs recapitulated pathognomonic electrophysiological features of the disease, such as an accelerated recovery from inactivation of sodium currents as well as action potential prolongation, especially at low stimulation rates. In addition, unlike previously described LQT3 hiPSC models, we observed a high incidence of early after depolarizations (EADs) which is a trigger mechanism for arrhythmia in LQT3. Administration of specific sodium channel inhibitors was found to shorten action and field potential durations specifically in LQT3 hiPSC-CMs and antagonized EADs in a dose-dependent manner. These findings were in full agreement with the pharmacological response profile of the underlying patient and of other patients from the same family. Thus, our data demonstrate the utility of patient-specific LQT3 hiPSCs for assessing pharmacological responses to putative drugs and for improving treatment efficacies.

  12. Intramyocardial transplantation and tracking of human mesenchymal stem cells in a novel intra-uterine pre-immune fetal sheep myocardial infarction model: a proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Emmert, Maximilian Y; Weber, Benedikt; Wolint, Petra; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Zeisberger, Steffen M; Behr, Luc; Sammut, Sebastien; Scherman, Jacques; Brokopp, Chad E; Schwartländer, Ruth; Vogel, Viola; Vogt, Peter; Grünenfelder, Jürg; Alkadhi, Hatem; Falk, Volkmar; Boss, Andreas; Hoerstrup, Simon P

    2013-01-01

    Although stem-cell therapies have been suggested for cardiac-regeneration after myocardial-infarction (MI), key-questions regarding the in-vivo cell-fate remain unknown. While most available animal-models require immunosuppressive-therapy when applying human cells, the fetal-sheep being pre-immune until day 75 of gestation has been proposed for the in-vivo tracking of human cells after intra-peritoneal transplantation. We introduce a novel intra-uterine myocardial-infarction model to track human mesenchymal stem cells after direct intra-myocardial transplantation into the pre-immune fetal-sheep. Thirteen fetal-sheep (gestation age: 70-75 days) were included. Ten animals either received an intra-uterine induction of MI only (n = 4) or MI+intra-myocardial injection (IMI;n = 6) using micron-sized, iron-oxide (MPIO) labeled human mesenchymal stem cells either derived from the adipose-tissue (ATMSCs;n = 3) or the bone-marrow (BMMSCs;n = 3). Three animals received an intra-peritoneal injection (IPI;n = 3; ATMSCs;n = 2/BMMSCs;n = 1). All procedures were performed successfully and follow-up was 7-9 days. To assess human cell-fate, multimodal cell-tracking was performed via MRI and/or Micro-CT, Flow-Cytometry, PCR and immunohistochemistry. After IMI, MRI displayed an estimated amount of 1×10(5)-5×10(5) human cells within ventricular-wall corresponding to the injection-sites which was further confirmed on Micro-CT. PCR and IHC verified intra-myocardial presence via detection of human-specific β-2-microglobulin, MHC-1, ALU-Sequence and anti-FITC targeting the fluorochrome-labeled part of the MPIOs. The cells appeared viable, integrated and were found in clusters or in the interstitial-spaces. Flow-Cytometry confirmed intra-myocardial presence, and showed further distribution within the spleen, lungs, kidneys and brain. Following IPI, MRI indicated the cells within the intra-peritoneal-cavity involving the liver and kidneys. Flow

  13. Generation of Cholinergic and Dopaminergic Interneurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Relevant Tool for In Vitro Modeling of Neurological Disorders Pathology and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ochalek, Anna; Szczesna, Karolina; Petazzi, Paolo; Kobolak, Julianna

    2016-01-01

    The cellular and molecular bases of neurological diseases have been studied for decades; however, the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully elucidated. Compared with other disorders, diseases of the nervous system have been very difficult to study mainly due to the inaccessibility of the human brain and live neurons in vivo or in vitro and difficulties in examination of human postmortem brain tissue. Despite the availability of various genetically engineered animal models, these systems are still not adequate enough due to species variation and differences in genetic background. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) reprogrammed from patient somatic cells possess the potential to differentiate into any cell type, including neural progenitor cells and postmitotic neurons; thus, they open a new area to in vitro modeling of neurological diseases and their potential treatment. Currently, many protocols for generation of various neuronal subtypes are being developed; however, most of them still require further optimization. Here, we highlight accomplishments made in the generation of dopaminergic and cholinergic neurons, the two subtypes most affected in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and indirectly affected in Huntington's disease. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of hiPSC-derived neurons in the modeling and treatment of neurological diseases related to dopaminergic and cholinergic system dysfunction. PMID:28105055

  14. Protective effects of citrus and rosemary extracts on UV-induced damage in skin cell model and human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sánchez, A; Barrajón-Catalán, E; Caturla, N; Castillo, J; Benavente-García, O; Alcaraz, M; Micol, V

    2014-07-05

    Ultraviolet radiation absorbed by the epidermis is the major cause of various cutaneous disorders, including photoaging and skin cancers. Although topical sunscreens may offer proper skin protection, dietary plant compounds may significantly contribute to lifelong protection of skin health, especially when unconsciously sun UV exposed. A combination of rosemary and citrus bioflavonoids extracts was used to inhibit UV harmful effects on human HaCaT keratinocytes and in human volunteers after oral intake. Survival of HaCaT cells after UVB radiation was higher in treatments using the combination of extracts than in those performed with individual extracts, indicating potential synergic effects. The combination of extracts also decreased UVB-induced intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS) and prevented DNA damage in HaCaT cells by comet assay and decreased chromosomal aberrations in X-irradiated human lymphocytes. The oral daily consumption of 250 mg of the combination by human volunteers revealed a significant minimal erythema dose (MED) increase after eight weeks (34%, p<0.05). Stronger protection was achieved after 12 weeks (56%, p<0.01). The combination of citrus flavonoids and rosemary polyphenols and diterpenes may be considered as an ingredient for oral photoprotection. Their mechanism of action may deserve further attention.

  15. CRISPR-mediated knockout of Cybb in NSG mice establishes a model of chronic granulomatous disease for human stem cell gene therapy transplants.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Colin L; Choi, Uimook; Liu, Chengyu; Koontz, Sherry M; Ha, Seung-Kwon; Malech, Harry L

    2017-03-06

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by defects in production of microbicidal reactive oxygen species (ROS) by phagocytes. Testing of gene and cell therapies for treatment of CGD in human hematopoietic cells requires pre-clinical transplant