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Sample records for human cell tissues

  1. Engineering musculoskeletal tissues with human embryonic germ cell derivatives.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Shyni; Hwang, Nathaniel S; Ferran, Angela; Hillel, Alexander; Theprungsirikul, Parnduangjai; Canver, Adam C; Zhang, Zijun; Gearhart, John; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2010-04-01

    The cells derived from differentiating embryoid bodies of human embryonic germ (hEG) cells express a broad spectrum of gene markers and have been induced toward ecto- and endodermal lineages. We describe here in vitro and in vivo differentiation of hEG-derived cells (LVEC line) toward mesenchymal tissues. The LVEC cells express many surface marker proteins characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells and differentiated into cartilage, bone, and fat. Homogenous hyaline cartilage was generated from cells after 63 population doublings. In vivo results demonstrate cell survival, differentiation, and tissue formation. The high proliferative capacity of hEG-derived cells and their ability to differentiate and form three-dimensional mesenchymal tissues without teratoma formation underscores their significant potential for regenerative medicine. The adopted coculture system also provides new insights into how a microenvironment comprised of extracellular and cellular components may be harnessed to generate hierarchically complex tissues from pluripotent cells.

  2. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues

    PubMed Central

    Freud, Aharon G.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34+CD45RA+ hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field. PMID:24661538

  3. Human natural killer cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    For nearly a decade it has been appreciated that critical steps in human natural killer (NK) cell development likely occur outside of the bone marrow and potentially necessitate distinct microenvironments within extramedullary tissues. The latter include the liver and gravid uterus as well as secondary lymphoid tissues such as tonsils and lymph nodes. For as yet unknown reasons these tissues are naturally enriched with NK cell developmental intermediates (NKDI) that span a maturation continuum starting from an oligopotent CD34(+)CD45RA(+) hematopoietic precursor cell to a cytolytic mature NK cell. Indeed despite the detection of NKDI within the aforementioned tissues, relatively little is known about how, why, and when these tissues may be most suited to support NK cell maturation and how this process fits in with other components of the human immune system. With the discovery of other innate lymphoid subsets whose immunophenotypes overlap with those of NKDI, there is also need to revisit and potentially re-characterize the basic immunophenotypes of the stages of the human NK cell developmental pathway in vivo. In this review, we provide an overview of human NK cell development in secondary lymphoid tissues and discuss the many questions that remain to be answered in this exciting field.

  4. Natural killer cell distribution and trafficking in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Few data are available regarding the recirculation of natural killer (NK) cells among human organs. Earlier studies have been often impaired by the use of markers then proved to be either not sufficiently specific for NK cells (e.g., CD57, CD56) or expressed only by subsets of NK cells (e.g., CD16). At the present, available data confirmed that human NK cells populate blood, lymphoid organs, lung, liver, uterus (during pregnancy), and gut. Several studies showed that NK cell homing appears to be subset-specific, as secondary lymphoid organs and probably several solid tissues are preferentially inhabited by CD56brightCD16neg/dull non-cytotoxic NK cells. Similar studies performed in the mouse model showed that lymph node and bone marrow are preferentially populated by CD11bdull NK cells while blood, spleen, and lung by CD27dull NK cells. Therefore, an important topic to be addressed in the human system is the contribution of factors that regulate NK cell tissue homing and egress, such as chemotactic receptors or homeostatic mechanisms. Here, we review the current knowledge on NK cell distribution in peripheral tissues and, based on recent acquisitions, we propose our view regarding the recirculation of NK cells in the human body. PMID:23230434

  5. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  6. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  11. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration.

  12. Microimaging FT-IR of oral cavity tumours. Part III: Cells, inoculated tissues and human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Ferraris, P.; Giorgini, E.; Pieramici, T.; Possati, L.; Rocchetti, R.; Rubini, C.; Sabbatini, S.; Tosi, G.; Mariggiò, M. A.; Lo Muzio, L.

    2007-05-01

    The biochemistry of healthy and tumour cell cultures, inoculated tissues and oral cavity tissues have been studied by FT-IR Microscopy with the aim to relate spectral patterns with microbiological and histopathological findings. 'Supervised' and 'unsupervised' procedures of data handling afforded a satisfactory degree of accordance between spectroscopic and the other two techniques. In particular, changes in frequency and intensity of proteins, connective and nucleic acids vibrational modes as well as the visualization of biochemical single wave number or band ratio images, allowed an evaluation of the pathological changes. The spectroscopic patterns of inoculated tissues resulted quite similar to human tissues; differences of both types of sections with cellular lines could be explained by the influence of the environment.

  13. Human stem cells and articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Stoltz, J-F; Huselstein, C; Schiavi, J; Li, Y Y; Bensoussan, D; Decot, V; De Isla, N

    2012-12-01

    Injuries to articular cartilage are one of the most challenging issues of musculoskeletal medicine due to the poor intrinsic ability of this tissue for repair. Despite progress in orthopaedic surgery, cell-based surgical therapies such as autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) have been in clinical use for cartilage repair for over a decade but this approach has shown mixed results. Moreover, the lack of efficient modalities of treatment for large chondral defects has prompted research on cartilage tissue engineering combining cells, scaffold materials and environmental factors. This paper focuses on the main parameters in tissue engineering and in particular, on the potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as an alternative to cells derived from patient tissues in autologous transplantation and tissue engineering. We discussed the prospects of using autologous chondrocytes or MSCs in regenerative medicine and summarized the advantages and disadvantages of these cells in articular cartilage engineering.

  14. Engineering bone tissue substitutes from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Marcos-Campos, Iván; Kahler, David John; Alsalman, Dana; Shang, Linshan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2013-05-21

    Congenital defects, trauma, and disease can compromise the integrity and functionality of the skeletal system to the extent requiring implantation of bone grafts. Engineering of viable bone substitutes that can be personalized to meet specific clinical needs represents a promising therapeutic alternative. The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for bone tissue engineering. We first induced three hiPSC lines with different tissue and reprogramming backgrounds into the mesenchymal lineages and used a combination of differentiation assays, surface antigen profiling, and global gene expression analysis to identify the lines exhibiting strong osteogenic differentiation potential. We then engineered functional bone substitutes by culturing hiPSC-derived mesenchymal progenitors on osteoconductive scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors and confirmed their phenotype stability in a subcutaneous implantation model for 12 wk. Molecular analysis confirmed that the maturation of bone substitutes in perfusion bioreactors results in global repression of cell proliferation and an increased expression of lineage-specific genes. These results pave the way for growing patient-specific bone substitutes for reconstructive treatments of the skeletal system and for constructing qualified experimental models of development and disease.

  15. Fucosyltransferase activities in human pancreatic tissue: comparative study between cancer tissues and established tumoral cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mas, E; Pasqualini, E; Caillol, N; El Battari, A; Crotte, C; Lombardo, D; Sadoulet, M O

    1998-06-01

    Human pancreatic cancer is characterized by an alteration in fucose-containing surface blood group antigens such as H antigen, Lewis b, Lewis y, and sialyl-Lewis. These carbohydrate determinants can be synthesized by sequential action of alpha(2,3) sialyltransferases or alpha(1,2) fucosyltransferases (Fuc-T) and alpha(1,3/1,4) fucosyltransferases on (poly)N-acetyllactosamine chains. Therefore, the expression and the function of seven fucosyltransferases were investigated in normal and cancer pancreatic tissues and in four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Transcripts of FUT1, FUT2, FUT3, FUT4, FUT5, and FUT7 were detected by RT-PCR in carcinoma cell lines as well as in normal and tumoral tissues. Interestingly, the FUT6 message was only detected in tumoral tissues. Analysis of the acceptor substrate specificity for fucosyltransferases indicated that alpha(1,2) Fuc-T, alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, and alpha(1,4) Fuc-T were expressed in microsome preparations of all tissues as demonstrated by fucose incorporation into phenyl beta-d-galactoside, 2'-fucosyllactose, N-acetyllactosamine, 3'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, and lacto-N-biose. However, these fucosyltransferase activities varied between tissues. A substantial decrease of alpha(1,2) Fuc-T activity was observed in tumoral tissues and cell lines compared to normal tissues. Conversely, the activity of alpha(1,4) Fuc-T, which generates Lewis a and sialyl-Lewis a structures, and that of alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, able to generate a lactodifucotetraose structure, were very important in SOJ-6 and BxPC-3 cell lines. These increases correlated with an enhanced expression of Lewis a, sialyl-Lewis a, and Lewis y on the cell surface. The activity of alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, which participates in the synthesis of the sialyl-Lewis x structure, was not significantly modified in cell lines compared to normal tissues. However, the sialyl-Lewis x antigen was expressed preferentially on the surface of SOJ-6 and BxPC-3 cell lines but was not detected on Panc-1

  16. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Timper, Katharina; Seboek, Dalma; Eberhardt, Michael; Linscheid, Philippe; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Keller, Ulrich; Mueller, Beat; Zulewski, Henryk . E-mail: henryk.zulewski@unibas.ch

    2006-03-24

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin.

  17. Extracellular protonation modulates cell-cell interaction mechanics and tissue invasion in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hofschröer, Verena; Koch, Kevin Alexander; Ludwig, Florian Timo; Friedl, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Detachment of cells from the primary tumour precedes metastatic progression by facilitating cell release into the tissue. Solid tumours exhibit altered pH homeostasis with extracellular acidification. In human melanoma, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is an important modifier of the tumour nanoenvironment. Here we tested the modulation of cell-cell-adhesion by extracellular pH and NHE1. MV3 tumour spheroids embedded in a collagen matrix unravelled the efficacy of cell-cell contact loosening and 3D emigration into an environment mimicking physiological confinement. Adhesive interaction strength between individual MV3 cells was quantified using atomic force microscopy and validated by multicellular aggregation assays. Extracellular acidification from pHe7.4 to 6.4 decreases cell migration and invasion but increases single cell detachment from the spheroids. Acidification and NHE1 overexpression both reduce cell-cell adhesion strength, indicated by reduced maximum pulling forces and adhesion energies. Multicellular aggregation and spheroid formation are strongly impaired under acidification or NHE1 overexpression. We show a clear dependence of melanoma cell-cell adhesion on pHe and NHE1 as a modulator. These effects are opposite to cell-matrix interactions that are strengthened by protons extruded via NHE1. We conclude that these opposite effects of NHE1 act synergistically during the metastatic cascade. PMID:28205573

  18. Extracellular protonation modulates cell-cell interaction mechanics and tissue invasion in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hofschröer, Verena; Koch, Kevin Alexander; Ludwig, Florian Timo; Friedl, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-02-13

    Detachment of cells from the primary tumour precedes metastatic progression by facilitating cell release into the tissue. Solid tumours exhibit altered pH homeostasis with extracellular acidification. In human melanoma, the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 is an important modifier of the tumour nanoenvironment. Here we tested the modulation of cell-cell-adhesion by extracellular pH and NHE1. MV3 tumour spheroids embedded in a collagen matrix unravelled the efficacy of cell-cell contact loosening and 3D emigration into an environment mimicking physiological confinement. Adhesive interaction strength between individual MV3 cells was quantified using atomic force microscopy and validated by multicellular aggregation assays. Extracellular acidification from pHe7.4 to 6.4 decreases cell migration and invasion but increases single cell detachment from the spheroids. Acidification and NHE1 overexpression both reduce cell-cell adhesion strength, indicated by reduced maximum pulling forces and adhesion energies. Multicellular aggregation and spheroid formation are strongly impaired under acidification or NHE1 overexpression. We show a clear dependence of melanoma cell-cell adhesion on pHe and NHE1 as a modulator. These effects are opposite to cell-matrix interactions that are strengthened by protons extruded via NHE1. We conclude that these opposite effects of NHE1 act synergistically during the metastatic cascade.

  19. Cardiomyocyte clusters derived from human embryonic stem cells share similarities with human heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Asp, Julia; Steel, Daniella; Jonsson, Marianne; Améen, Caroline; Dahlenborg, Kerstin; Jeppsson, Anders; Lindahl, Anders; Sartipy, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Cardiotoxicity testing is a key activity in the pharmaceutical industry in order to detect detrimental effects of new drugs. A reliable human in vitro model would both be beneficial in selection of lead compounds and be important for reducing animal experimentation. However, the human heart is a complex organ composed of many distinct types of cardiomyocytes, but cardiomyocyte clusters (CMCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells could be an option for a cellular model. Data on functional properties of CMCs demonstrate similarities to their in vivo analogues in human. However, development of an in vitro model requires a more thorough comparison of CMCs to human heart tissue. Therefore, we directly compared individually isolated CMCs to human fetal, neonatal, adult atrial and ventricular heart tissues. Real-time qPCR analysis of mRNA levels and protein staining of ion channels and cardiac markers showed in general a similar expression pattern in CMCs and human heart. Moreover, a significant decrease in beat frequency was noted after addition of Zatebradine, a blocker to I(f) involved in regulation of spontaneous contraction in CMCs. The results underscore the similarities of CMCs to human cardiac tissue, and further support establishment of novel cardiotoxicity assays based on the CMCs in drug discovery.

  20. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Tissues: Primitive Cells with Potential for Clinical and Tissue Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Pierre; Hatlapatka, Tim; Marten, Dana; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Majore, Ingrida; Hass, Ralf; Kasper, Cornelia

    Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSCs) have a high potential for cell-based therapies as well as for tissue engineering applications. Since Friedenstein first isolated stem or precursor cells from the human bone marrow (BM) stroma that were capable of osteogenesis, BM is currently the most common source for MSCs. However, BM presents several disadvantages, namely low frequency of MSCs, high donor-dependent variations in quality, and painful invasive intervention. Thus, tremendous research efforts have been observed during recent years to find alternative sources for MSCs.

  1. Immunodetection of Human LINE-1 Expression in Cultured Cells and Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reema; Rodić, Nemanja; Burns, Kathleen H; Taylor, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1) is the only active protein-coding retrotransposon in humans. It is not expressed in somatic tissue but is aberrantly expressed in a wide variety of human cancers. ORF1p protein is the most robust indicator of LINE-1 expression; the protein accumulates in large quantities in cellular cytoplasm. Recently, monoclonal antibodies have allowed more complete characterizations of ORF1p expression and indicated potential for developing ORF1p as a clinical biomarker. Here, we describe a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for human LINE-1 ORF1p and its application in immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry of both cells and human tissues. We also describe detection of tagged LINE-1 ORF2p via immunofluorescence. These general methods may be readily adapted to use with many other proteins and antibodies.

  2. Concise Review: Tissue-Specific Microvascular Endothelial Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Hannah K.; Canfield, Scott G.; Shusta, Eric V.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial cells (ECs) display significant heterogeneity across tissue types, playing an important role in tissue regeneration and homeostasis. Recent work demonstrating the derivation of tissue-specific microvascular endothelial cells (TS-MVECs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has ignited the potential to generate tissue-specific models which may be applied to regenerative medicine and in vitro modeling applications. Here we review techniques by which hPSC-derived TS-MVECs have been made to date and discuss how current hPSC-EC differentiation protocols may be directed towards tissue-specific fates. We begin by discussing the nature of EC tissue specificity in vivo and review general hPSC-EC differentiation protocols generated over the last decade. Finally, we describe how specificity can be integrated into hPSC-EC protocols to generate hPSC-derived TS-MVECs in vitro, including EC and parenchymal cell co-culture, directed differentiation, and direct reprogramming strategies. PMID:25070152

  3. Distribution and compartmentalization of human circulating and tissue-resident memory T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Sathaliyawala, Taheri; Kubota, Masaru; Yudanin, Naomi; Turner, Damian; Camp, Philip; Thome, Joseph J. C.; Bickham, Kara L.; Lerner, Harvey; Goldstein, Michael; Sykes, Megan; Kato, Tomoaki; Farber, Donna L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Knowledge of human T cells derives chiefly from studies of peripheral blood, whereas their distribution and function in tissues remains largely unknown. Here, we present a unique analysis of human T cells in lymphoid and mucosal tissues obtained from individual organ donors, revealing tissue-intrinsic compartmentalization of naive, effector and memory subsets conserved between diverse individuals. Effector-memory CD4+ T cells producing IL-2 predominated in mucosal tissues and accumulated as central-memory subsets in lymphoid tissue, whereas CD8+ T cells were maintained as naïve subsets in lymphoid tissues and IFN-γ-producing effector-memory CD8+ T cells in mucosal sites. The T cell activation marker, CD69, was constitutively expressed by memory T cells in all tissues, distinguishing them from circulating subsets, with mucosal memory T cells exhibiting additional distinct phenotypic and functional properties. Our results provide an assessment of human T cell compartmentalization as a new baseline for understanding human adaptive immunity. PMID:23260195

  4. A method for establishing human primary gastric epithelial cell culture from fresh surgical gastric tissues.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Faisal; Yang, Xuesong; Wen, Qingping; Yan, Qiu

    2015-08-01

    At present, biopsy specimens, cancer cell lines and tissues obtained by gastric surgery are used in the study and analysis of gastric cancer, including the molecular mechanisms and proteomics. However, fibroblasts and other tissue components may interfere with these techniques. Therefore, the present study aimed to develop a procedure for the isolation of viable human gastric epithelial cells from gastric surgical tissues. A method was developed to culture human gastric epithelial cells using fresh, surgically excised tissues and was evaluated using immunocytochemistry, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and cell viability assays. Low cell growth was observed surrounding the gastric tissue on the seventh day of tissue explant culture. Cell growth subsequently increased, and at 12 days post-explant a high number of pure epithelial cells were detected. The gastric cancer cells exhibited rapid growth with a doubling time of 13-52 h, as compared to normal cells, which had a doubling time of 20-53 h. Immunocytochemical analyses of primary gastric cells revealed positive staining for cytokeratin 18 and 19, which indicated that the culture was comprised of pure epithelial cells and contained no fibroblasts. Furthermore, PAS staining demonstrated that the cultured gastric cells produced neutral mucin. Granulin and carbohydrate antigen 724 staining confirmed the purity of gastric cancer and normal cells in culture. This method of cell culture indicated that the gastric cells in primary culture consisted of mucin-secreting gastric epithelial cells, which may be useful for the study of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer.

  5. Design Principles for Engineering of Tissues from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matthys, Oriane B.; Hookway, Tracy A.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) technologies have enabled the engineering of human tissue constructs for developmental studies, disease modeling, and drug screening platforms. In vitro tissue formation can be generally described at three levels of cellular organization. Multicellular hPSC constructs are initially formed either with polymeric scaffold materials or simply via self-assembly, adhesive mechanisms. Heterotypic interactions within hPSC tissue constructs can be achieved by physically mixing independently differentiated cell populations or coaxed to simultaneously co-emerge from a common population of undifferentiated cells. Higher order tissue architecture can be engineered by imposing external spatial constraints, such as molds and scaffolds, or depend upon cell-driven organization that exploits endogenous innate developmental mechanisms. The multicellular, heterogeneous, and highly organized structure of hPSC constructs ultimately dictates the resulting form and function of in vitro engineered human tissue models. PMID:27330934

  6. Three-dimensional tissues using human pluripotent stem cell spheroids as biofabrication building blocks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haishuang; Li, Qiang; Lei, Yuguo

    2017-03-13

    A recently emerged approach for tissue engineering is to biofabricate tissues using cellular spheroids as building blocks. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), can be cultured to generate large numbers of cells and presumably be differentiated into all the cell types of human body in vitro, thus are ideal cell source for biofabrication. We previously developed a hydrogel-based cell culture system that can economically produce large numbers of hPSC spheroids. With hPSCs and this culture system, there are two potential methods to biofabricate a desired tissue. In Method 1, hPSC spheroids are first utilized to biofabricate a hPSC tissue that is subsequently differentiated into the desired tissue. In Method 2, hPSC spheroids are first converted into tissue spheroids in the hydrogel-based culture system and the tissue spheroids are then utilized to biofabricate the desired tissue. In this paper, we systematically measured the fusion rates of hPSC spheroids without and with differentiation toward cortical and midbrain dopaminergic neurons and found spheroids' fusion rates dropped sharply as differentiation progressed. We found Method 1 was appropriated for biofabricating neural tissues.

  7. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Myeloid Cells in Human Blood, Bronchoalveolar Lavage, and Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yen-Rei A.; Hotten, Danielle F.; Malakhau, Yuryi; Volker, Ellen; Ghio, Andrew J.; Noble, Paul W.; Kraft, Monica; Hollingsworth, John W.; Gunn, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Clear identification of specific cell populations by flow cytometry is important to understand functional roles. A well-defined flow cytometry panel for myeloid cells in human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue is currently lacking. The objective of this study was to develop a flow cytometry–based panel for human BAL and lung tissue. We obtained and performed flow cytometry/sorting on human BAL cells and lung tissue. Confocal images were obtained from lung tissue using antibodies for cluster of differentiation (CD)206, CD169, and E cadherin. We defined a multicolor flow panel for human BAL and lung tissue that identifies major leukocyte populations. These include macrophage (CD206+) subsets and other CD206− leukocytes. The CD206− cells include: (1) three monocyte (CD14+) subsets, (2) CD11c+ dendritic cells (CD14−, CD11c+, HLA-DR+), (3) plasmacytoid dendritic cells (CD14−, CD11c−, HLA-DR+, CD123+), and (4) other granulocytes (neutrophils, mast cells, eosinophils, and basophils). Using this panel on human lung tissue, we defined two populations of pulmonary macrophages: CD169+ and CD169− macrophages. In lung tissue, CD169− macrophages were a prominent cell type. Using confocal microscopy, CD169+ macrophages were located in the alveolar space/airway, defining them as alveolar macrophages. In contrast, CD169− macrophages were associated with airway/alveolar epithelium, consistent with interstitial-associated macrophages. We defined a flow cytometry panel in human BAL and lung tissue that allows identification of multiple immune cell types and delineates alveolar from interstitial-associated macrophages. This study has important implications for defining myeloid cells in human lung samples. PMID:26267148

  8. Three-dimensional epithelial tissues generated from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Kyle J; Shamis, Yulia; Carlson, Mark W; Aberdam, Edith; Aberdam, Daniel; Garlick, Jonathan A

    2009-11-01

    The use of pluripotent human embryonic stem (hES) cells for tissue engineering may provide advantages over traditional sources of progenitor cells because of their ability to give rise to multiple cell types and their unlimited expansion potential. We derived cell populations with properties of ectodermal and mesenchymal cells in two-dimensional culture and incorporated these divergent cell populations into three-dimensional (3D) epithelial tissues. When grown in specific media and substrate conditions, two-dimensional cultures were enriched in cells (EDK1) with mesenchymal morphology and surface markers. Cells with a distinct epithelial morphology (HDE1) that expressed cytokeratin 12 and beta-catenin at cell junctions became the predominant cell type when EDK1 were grown on surfaces enriched in keratinocyte-derived extracellular matrix proteins. When these cells were incorporated into the stromal and epithelial tissue compartments of 3D tissues, they generated multilayer epithelia similar to those generated with foreskin-derived epithelium and fibroblasts. Three-dimensional tissues demonstrated stromal cells with morphologic features of mature fibroblasts, type IV collagen deposition in the basement membrane, and a stratified epithelium that expressed cytokeratin 12. By deriving two distinct cell lineages from a common hES cell source to fabricate complex tissues, it is possible to explore environmental cues that will direct hES-derived cells toward optimal tissue form and function.

  9. Advanced imaging and tissue engineering of the human limbal epithelial stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Massie, Isobel; Dziasko, Marc; Kureshi, Alvena; Levis, Hannah J; Morgan, Louise; Neale, Michael; Sheth, Radhika; Tovell, Victoria E; Vernon, Amanda J; Funderburgh, James L; Daniels, Julie T

    2015-01-01

    The limbal epithelial stem cell niche provides a unique, physically protective environment in which limbal epithelial stem cells reside in close proximity with accessory cell types and their secreted factors. The use of advanced imaging techniques is described to visualize the niche in three dimensions in native human corneal tissue. In addition, a protocol is provided for the isolation and culture of three different cell types, including human limbal epithelial stem cells from the limbal niche of human donor tissue. Finally, the process of incorporating these cells within plastic compressed collagen constructs to form a tissue-engineered corneal limbus is described and how immunohistochemical techniques may be applied to characterize cell phenotype therein.

  10. Advanced Imaging and Tissue Engineering of the Human Limbal Epithelial Stem Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Isobel; Dziasko, Marc; Kureshi, Alvena; Levis, Hannah J.; Morgan, Louise; Neale, Michael; Sheth, Radhika; Tovell, Victoria E.; Vernon, Amanda J.; Funderburgh, James L.; Daniels, Julie T.

    2015-01-01

    The limbal epithelial stem cell niche provides a unique, physically protective environment in which limbal epithelial stem cells reside in close proximity with accessory cell types and their secreted factors. The use of advanced imaging techniques is described to visualize the niche in three dimensions in native human corneal tissue. In addition, a protocol is provided for the isolation and culture of three different cell types, including human limbal epithelial stem cells from the limbal niche of human donor tissue. Finally, the process of incorporating these cells within plastic compressed collagen constructs to form a tissue-engineered corneal limbus is described and how immunohistochemical techniques may be applied to characterize cell phenotype therein. PMID:25388395

  11. [The application progress of human urine derived stem cells in bone tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Jiang, Dapeng; Li, Zhaozhu

    2016-04-01

    The research of bone tissue engineering bases on three basic directions of seed cells, scaffold materials and growth information. Stem cells have been widely studied as seed cells. Human urine-derived stem cell (hUSC) is extracted from urine and described to be adhesion growth, cloning, expression of the majority of mesenchymal stem cell markers and peripheral cell markers, multi-potential and no tumor but stable karyotype with passaging many times. Some researches proposed that hUSC might be a new source of seed cells in tissue engineering because of their invasive and convenient obtention, stable culture and multiple differentiation potential.

  12. "The state of the heart": Recent advances in engineering human cardiac tissue from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sirabella, Dario; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-08-01

    The pressing need for effective cell therapy for the heart has led to the investigation of suitable cell sources for tissue replacement. In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell research expanded tremendously, in particular since the derivation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells. In parallel, bioengineering technologies have led to novel approaches for in vitro cell culture. The combination of these two fields holds potential for in vitro generation of high-fidelity heart tissue, both for basic research and for therapeutic applications. However, this new multidisciplinary science is still at an early stage. Many questions need to be answered and improvements need to be made before clinical applications become a reality. Here we discuss the current status of human stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and the combined use of bioengineering approaches for cardiac tissue formation and maturation in developmental studies, disease modeling, drug testing, and regenerative medicine.

  13. Recommendation of short tandem repeat profiling for authenticating human cell lines, stem cells, and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Barallon, Rita; Bauer, Steven R.; Butler, John; Capes-Davis, Amanda; Dirks, Wilhelm G.; Furtado, Manohar; Kline, Margaret C.; Kohara, Arihiro; Los, Georgyi V.; MacLeod, Roderick A. F.; Masters, John R. W.; Nardone, Mark; Nardone, Roland M.; Nims, Raymond W.; Price, Paul J.; Reid, Yvonne A.; Shewale, Jaiprakash; Sykes, Gregory; Steuer, Anton F.; Storts, Douglas R.; Thomson, Jim; Taraporewala, Zenobia; Alston-Roberts, Christine; Kerrigan, Liz

    2010-01-01

    Cell misidentification and cross-contamination have plagued biomedical research for as long as cells have been employed as research tools. Examples of misidentified cell lines continue to surface to this day. Efforts to eradicate the problem by raising awareness of the issue and by asking scientists voluntarily to take appropriate actions have not been successful. Unambiguous cell authentication is an essential step in the scientific process and should be an inherent consideration during peer review of papers submitted for publication or during review of grants submitted for funding. In order to facilitate proper identity testing, accurate, reliable, inexpensive, and standardized methods for authentication of cells and cell lines must be made available. To this end, an international team of scientists is, at this time, preparing a consensus standard on the authentication of human cells using short tandem repeat (STR) profiling. This standard, which will be submitted for review and approval as an American National Standard by the American National Standards Institute, will provide investigators guidance on the use of STR profiling for authenticating human cell lines. Such guidance will include methodological detail on the preparation of the DNA sample, the appropriate numbers and types of loci to be evaluated, and the interpretation and quality control of the results. Associated with the standard itself will be the establishment and maintenance of a public STR profile database under the auspices of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The consensus standard is anticipated to be adopted by granting agencies and scientific journals as appropriate methodology for authenticating human cell lines, stem cells, and tissues. PMID:20614197

  14. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche1

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zach S.; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Weiqi; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Tamaresis, John S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Lee, Kitty; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein) and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014) and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006) and IL-1β (P = .001) in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche. PMID:26696367

  15. Dentin-like tissue formation and biomineralization by multicellular human pulp cell spheres in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Maintaining or regenerating a vital pulp is a preferable goal in current endodontic research. In this study, human dental pulp cell aggregates (spheres) were applied onto bovine and human root canal models to evaluate their potential use as pre-differentiated tissue units for dental pulp tissue regeneration. Methods Human dental pulp cells (DPC) were derived from wisdom teeth, cultivated into three-dimensional cell spheres and seeded onto bovine and into human root canals. Sphere formation, tissue-like and mineralization properties as well as growth behavior of cells on dentin structure were evaluated by light microscopy (LM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Results Spheres and outgrown cells showed tissue-like properties, the ability to merge with other cell spheres and extra cellular matrix formation; CLSM investigation revealed a dense network of actin and focal adhesion contacts (FAC) inside the spheres and a pronounced actin structure of cells outgrown from the spheres. A dentin-structure-orientated migration of the cells was shown by SEM investigation. Besides the direct extension of the cells into dentinal tubules, the coverage of the tubular walls with cell matrix was detected. Moreover, an emulation of dentin-like structures with tubuli-like and biomineral formation was detected by SEM- and EDX-investigation. Conclusions The results of the present study show tissue-like behavior, the replication of tubular structures and the mineralization of human dental pulp spheres when colonized on root dentin. The application of cells in form of pulp spheres on root dentin reveals their beneficial potential for dental tissue regeneration. PMID:24946771

  16. Human Thymus Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Augment Force Production in Self-Organized Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sondergaard, Claus S.; Hodonsky, Chani J.; Khait, Luda; Shaw, John; Sarkar, Bedabrata; Birla, Ravi; Bove, Edward; Nolta, Jan; Si, Ming-Sing

    2011-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells have been recently isolated from thymus gland tissue discarded after surgical procedures. The role of this novel cell type in heart regeneration has yet to be defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of human thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells using self-organized cardiac tissue as an in vitro platform for quantitative assessment. Methods Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from discarded thymus tissue from neonates undergoing heart surgery and were incubated in differentiation media to demonstrate multipotency. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes self-organized into cardiac tissue fibers in a custom culture dish either alone or in combination with varying numbers of mesenchymal stromal cells. A transducer measured force generated by spontaneously contracting self-organized cardiac tissue fibers. Work and power outputs were calculated from force tracings. Immunofluorescence was performed to determine the fate of the thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Results Mesenchymal stromal cells were successfully isolated from discarded thymus tissue. After incubation in differentiation media, mesenchymal stromal cells attained the expected phenotypes. Although mesenchymal stromal cells did not differentiate into mature cardiomyocytes, addition of these cells increased the rate of fiber formation, force production, and work and power outputs. Self-organized cardiac tissue containing mesenchymal stromal cells acquired a defined microscopic architecture. Conclusions Discarded thymus tissue contains mesenchymal stromal cells, which can augment force production and work and power outputs of self-organized cardiac tissue fibers by several-fold. These findings indicate the potential utility of mesenchymal stromal cells in treating heart failure. PMID:20732499

  17. From cell lines to tissues: extrapolation of transcriptional effects to human tissues (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new suite of assays in the metabolically-competent, human hepatocyte-derived HepaRG cell line has been added to the ToxCast screening suite. For 1066 chemicals we have evaluated the chemical treatment-induced changes in expression for a diverse set of 93 genes representative of...

  18. Prospective isolation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors that integrate into human fetal heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Ardehali, Reza; Ali, Shah R; Inlay, Matthew A; Abilez, Oscar J; Chen, Michael Q; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Yazawa, Masayuki; Gong, Yongquan; Nusse, Roeland; Drukker, Micha; Weissman, Irving L

    2013-02-26

    A goal of regenerative medicine is to identify cardiovascular progenitors from human ES cells (hESCs) that can functionally integrate into the human heart. Previous studies to evaluate the developmental potential of candidate hESC-derived progenitors have delivered these cells into murine and porcine cardiac tissue, with inconclusive evidence regarding the capacity of these human cells to physiologically engraft in xenotransplantation assays. Further, the potential of hESC-derived cardiovascular lineage cells to functionally couple to human myocardium remains untested and unknown. Here, we have prospectively identified a population of hESC-derived ROR2(+)/CD13(+)/KDR(+)/PDGFRα(+) cells that give rise to cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro at a clonal level. We observed rare clusters of ROR2(+) cells and diffuse expression of KDR and PDGFRα in first-trimester human fetal hearts. We then developed an in vivo transplantation model by transplanting second-trimester human fetal heart tissues s.c. into the ear pinna of a SCID mouse. ROR2(+)/CD13(+)/KDR(+)/PDGFRα(+) cells were delivered into these functioning fetal heart tissues: in contrast to traditional murine heart models for cell transplantation, we show structural and functional integration of hESC-derived cardiovascular progenitors into human heart.

  19. Transplanted human embryonic stem cells as biological 'catalysts' for tissue repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Liu, Hua; Cao, Tong

    2005-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have tremendous potential in the newly emerging field of regenerative medicine. Recently, it was demonstrated that the rescue of lethal cardiac defects in Id knockout mutant mouse embryos was not due to the transplanted cells giving rise to functional new tissues within the defective embryonic heart. Instead, there is indirect evidence that the observed therapeutic effect was due to various secreted factors emanating from the transplanted cells. This therefore, introduces the exciting prospect of utilizing human embryonic stem cells as biological 'catalysts' to promote tissue repair and regeneration in transplantation therapy. However, the immunological barrier against allogenic transplantation, as well as the teratogenic potential of human embryonic stem cells poses major technical challenges. A possible strategy to overcome the immunological barrier may be to impose a temporary regimen of immunosuppressive drugs followed by their gradual withdrawal, once adequate tissue regeneration has been achieved. Other more novel alternatives include the use of microencapsulation to block interaction with the transplant recipient's immune system, and co-transplantation with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have been demonstrated to possess immuno-suppressive properties. The teratogenic potential of human embryonic stem cells could possibly be alleviated by directing the differentiation of these cells to specific lineages prior to transplantation, or through mitotic inactivation (gamma irradiation or mitomycin C exposure). Co-transplantation with autologous adult stem cells may represent a novel strategy to further enhance the 'catalytic' effects of human embryonic stem cells. The various factors secreted by human embryonic stem cells could then have a concentrated localized effect on relatively large numbers of co-transplanted autologous adult stem cells, which may in turn lead to enhanced repair and regeneration of the damaged

  20. The expression of TIPE1 in murine tissues and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Zhang, Guizhong; Hao, Chunyan; Wang, Yan; Lou, Yunwei; Zhang, Wenqian; Wang, Juan; Liu, Suxia

    2011-07-01

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein-8 (TNFAIP8 or TIPE) family play important roles in immune homeostasis and cancer. TIPE1 (TNFAIP8-like 1) is a new member of the TIPE family that may regulate cell death. However, due to the lack of a suitable antibody, the nature of cells and tissues that express TIPE1 protein has not been determined. In this study, we generated a highly specific antibody to TIPE1 and examined TIPE1 expression in various murine tissues and human cell lines by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription real-time PCR, and Western blot. We found that TIPE1 protein was detected in a wide variety of tissues in C57BL/6 mice, such as neurons in brain, hepatocytes, germ cells of female and male reproductive organs, muscular tissues, and a variety of cells of the epithelial origin, particularly those with secretory functions. TIPE1 protein was not expressed in mature T or B lymphocytes, but detectable in human B lymphoblast cell line HMy2.CIR and murine T cell line EL4. Furthermore, high levels of TIPE1 mRNA were detected in most human carcinoma cell lines, especially in cells transformed with viral genomes. These results indicate that TIPE1 may perform functions in cell secretion and carcinogenesis, but not in immunity.

  1. Development of human nervous tissue upon differentiation of embryonic stem cells in three-dimensional culture.

    PubMed

    Preynat-Seauve, Olivier; Suter, David M; Tirefort, Diderik; Turchi, Laurent; Virolle, Thierry; Chneiweiss, Herve; Foti, Michelangelo; Lobrinus, Johannes-Alexander; Stoppini, Luc; Feki, Anis; Dubois-Dauphin, Michel; Krause, Karl Heinz

    2009-03-01

    Researches on neural differentiation using embryonic stem cells (ESC) require analysis of neurogenesis in conditions mimicking physiological cellular interactions as closely as possible. In this study, we report an air-liquid interface-based culture of human ESC. This culture system allows three-dimensional cell expansion and neural differentiation in the absence of added growth factors. Over a 3-month period, a macroscopically visible, compact tissue developed. Histological coloration revealed a dense neural-like neural tissue including immature tubular structures. Electron microscopy, immunochemistry, and electrophysiological recordings demonstrated a dense network of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes able to propagate signals. Within this tissue, tubular structures were niches of cells resembling germinal layers of human fetal brain. Indeed, the tissue contained abundant proliferating cells expressing markers of neural progenitors. Finally, the capacity to generate neural tissues on air-liquid interface differed for different ESC lines, confirming variations of their neurogenic potential. In conclusion, this study demonstrates in vitro engineering of a human neural-like tissue with an organization that bears resemblance to early developing brain. As opposed to previously described methods, this differentiation (a) allows three-dimensional organization, (b) yields dense interconnected neural tissue with structurally and functionally distinct areas, and (c) is spontaneously guided by endogenous developmental cues.

  2. Three-dimensional functional human myocardial tissues fabricated from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Komae, Hyoe; Sekine, Hidekazu; Dobashi, Izumi; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Ono, Minoru; Okano, Teruo; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2017-03-01

    The most radical treatment currently available for severe heart failure is heart transplantation; however, the number of donor hearts is limited. A better approach is to make human cardiac tissues. We developed an original cell sheet-based tissue-engineering technology to fabricate human cardiac tissue by layering myocardial cell sheets. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells were differentiated into cardiomyocytes to fabricate cardiomyocyte sheets. Initially, three-layer human iPS cardiomyocyte (hiPSCM) sheets were transplanted on subcutaneous tissues of nude rats. Next, to fabricate thicker tissue, three-layer sheets were transplanted on one day, then additional three-layer sheets were transplanted onto them the following day, after the first sheets were vascularized. On day 3, the final three-layer sheets were again transplanted, creating a nine-layer graft (multi-step transplantation procedure). In the last step, six-layer sheets were transplanted on fat tissues of the inguinal portion, which were subsequently resected together with the femoral arteries and veins to make transplantable grafts with connectable vessels. They were then transplanted ectopically to the neck portion of other rats by anastomosing vessels with the host's jugular arteries and veins. Transplanted three-layer hiPSCMs were beating and, histologically, showed a cardiac muscle-like structure with vascular systems. Moreover, transplanted hiPSCMs proliferated and matured in vivo. Significantly thicker tissues were fabricated by a multi-step transplantation procedure. The ectopically transplanted graft survived and continued to beat. We succeeded in fabricating functional human cardiac tissue with cell sheet technology. Transplanting this cardiac tissue may become a new treatment option for severe heart failure. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Tubular Cardiac Tissues Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Pulse Pressure In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seta, Hiroyoshi; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Sekine, Hidekazu; Yamazaki, Kenji; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiac cells provide the possibility to fabricate cardiac tissues for transplantation. However, it remains unclear human bioengineered cardiac tissues function as a functional pump in vivo. Human iPS cells induced to cardiomyocytes in suspension were cultured on temperature-responsive dishes to fabricate cardiac cell sheets. Two pairs of triple-layered sheets were transplanted to wrap around the inferior vena cava (IVC) of nude rats. At 4 weeks after transplantation, inner pressure changes in the IVC were synchronized with electrical activations of the graft. Under 80 pulses per minute electrical stimulation, the inner pressure changes at 8 weeks increased to 9.1 ± 3.2 mmHg, which were accompanied by increases in the baseline inner pressure of the IVC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that 0.5-mm-thick cardiac troponin T-positive cardiac tissues, which contained abundant human mitochondria, were clearly engrafted lamellar around the IVC and surrounded by von Willebrand factor-positive capillary vessels. The mRNA expression of several contractile proteins in cardiac tissues at 8 weeks in vivo was significantly upregulated compared with those at 4 weeks. We succeeded in generating pulse pressure by tubular human cardiac tissues in vivo. This technology might lead to the development of a bioengineered heart assist pump. PMID:28358136

  4. From the Cover: Cell-replacement therapy for diabetes: Generating functional insulin-producing tissue from adult human liver cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapir, Tamar; Shternhall, Keren; Meivar-Levy, Irit; Blumenfeld, Tamar; Cohen, Hamutal; Skutelsky, Ehud; Eventov-Friedman, Smadar; Barshack, Iris; Goldberg, Iris; Pri-Chen, Sarah; Ben-Dor, Lya; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Karasik, Avraham; Shimon, Ilan; Mor, Eytan; Ferber, Sarah

    2005-05-01

    Shortage in tissue availability from cadaver donors and the need for life-long immunosuppression severely restrict the large-scale application of cell-replacement therapy for diabetic patients. This study suggests the potential use of adult human liver as alternate tissue for autologous beta-cell-replacement therapy. By using pancreatic and duodenal homeobox gene 1 (PDX-1) and soluble factors, we induced a comprehensive developmental shift of adult human liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. PDX-1-treated human liver cells express insulin, store it in defined granules, and secrete the hormone in a glucose-regulated manner. When transplanted under the renal capsule of diabetic, immunodeficient mice, the cells ameliorated hyperglycemia for prolonged periods of time. Inducing developmental redirection of adult liver offers the potential of a cell-replacement therapy for diabetics by allowing the patient to be the donor of his own insulin-producing tissue. pancreas | transdifferentiation

  5. Normal human epithelial cells regulate the size and morphology of tissue-engineered capillaries.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Marie-Hélène; Fradette, Julie; Fortin, Véronique; Tomasetig, Florence; Roberge, Charles J; Baker, Kathleen; Berthod, François; Auger, François A; Germain, Lucie

    2010-05-01

    The survival of thick tissues/organs produced by tissue engineering requires rapid revascularization after grafting. Although capillary-like structures have been reconstituted in some engineered tissues, little is known about the interaction between normal epithelial cells and endothelial cells involved in the in vitro angiogenic process. In the present study, we used the self-assembly approach of tissue engineering to examine this relationship. An endothelialized tissue-engineered dermal substitute was produced by adding endothelial cells to the tissue-engineered dermal substitute produced by the self-assembly approach. The latter consists in culturing fibroblasts in the medium supplemented with serum and ascorbic acid. A network of tissue-engineered capillaries (TECs) formed within the human extracellular matrix produced by dermal fibroblasts. To determine whether epithelial cells modify TECs, the size and form of TECs were studied in the endothelialized tissue-engineered dermal substitute cultured in the presence or absence of epithelial cells. In the presence of normal keratinocytes from skin, cornea or uterine cervix, endothelial cells formed small TECs (cross-sectional area estimated at less than 50 microm(2)) reminiscent of capillaries found in the skin's microcirculation. In contrast, TECs grown in the absence of epithelial cells presented variable sizes (larger than 50 microm(2)), but the addition of keratinocyte-conditioned media or exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor induced their normalization toward a smaller size. Vascular endothelial growth factor neutralization inhibited the effect of keratinocyte-conditioned media. These results provide new direct evidence that normal human epithelial cells play a role in the regulation of the underlying TEC network, and advance our knowledge in tissue engineering for the production of TEC networks in vitro.

  6. Human vascular tissue models formed from human induced pluripotent stem cell derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Belair, David G.; Whisler, Jordan A.; Valdez, Jorge; Velazquez, Jeremy; Molenda, James A.; Vickerman, Vernella; Lewis, Rachel; Daigh, Christine; Hansen, Tyler D.; Mann, David A.; Thomson, James A.; Griffith, Linda G.; Kamm, Roger D.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Murphy, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a strategy to model blood vessel development using a well-defined iPSC-derived endothelial cell type (iPSC-EC) cultured within engineered platforms that mimic the 3D microenvironment. The iPSC-ECs used here were first characterized by expression of endothelial markers and functional properties that included VEGF responsiveness, TNF-α-induced upregulation of cell adhesion molecules (MCAM/CD146; ICAM1/CD54), thrombin-dependent barrier function, shear stress-induced alignment, and 2D and 3D capillary-like network formation in Matrigel. The iPSC-ECs also formed 3D vascular networks in a variety of engineering contexts, yielded perfusable, interconnected lumen when co-cultured with primary human fibroblasts, and aligned with flow in microfluidics devices. iPSC-EC function during tubule network formation, barrier formation, and sprouting was consistent with that of primary ECs, and the results suggest a VEGF-independent mechanism for sprouting, which is relevant to therapeutic anti-angiogenesis strategies. Our combined results demonstrate the feasibility of using a well-defined, stable source of iPSC-ECs to model blood vessel formation within a variety of contexts using standard in vitro formats. PMID:25190668

  7. The regulation of allogeneic human cells and tissue products as biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kazuo; Tsuyuki, Kenichiro; Watanabe, Natsumi; Kasanuki, Hiroshi; Yamato, Masayuki

    2013-04-01

    The current definition of biomaterials differs vastly from it of just a decade ago. According to advancing technologies, it encompasses unpredictable materials such as engineered human cells and tissue. These biomaterials also have to be approved to use in health care business by regulatory authority, which are defined as drug, medical device, or biologics in the regulation. This Leading Opinion Paper addresses the regulatory issues of engineered human cells and tissue products using allogeneic cells that should have a great possibility to develop therapeutics for life-threating diseases or orphan diseases. Six allogeneic human cells and tissue products derived from neonatal or infant fibroblasts and/or keratinocytes were approved as medical devices or biologics in the United States as well as a hematopoietic cell product. For five of the seven products, well-controlled comparative clinical trials were conducted as pre-approval evaluation followed by post-approval evaluation. Although these products avoid a sterilization process usually used for medical devices, no serious malfunction that would lead to class 1 recall was reported. This article would provide insight for development of the engineered human cells and tissue.

  8. Species-Specific Metastasis of Human Tumor Cells in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse Engrafted with Human Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtivelman, Emma; Namikawa, Reiko

    1995-05-01

    We have attempted to model human metastatic disease by implanting human target organs into the immunodeficient C.B-17 scid/scid (severe combined immunodeficiency; SCID) mouse, creating SCID-hu mice. Preferential metastasis to implants of human fetal lung and human fetal bone marrow occurred after i.v. injection of human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells into SCID-hu mice; the homologous mouse organs were spared. Clinically more aggressive variant SCLC cells metastasized more efficiently to human fetal lung implants than did cells from classic SCLC. Metastasis of variant SCLC to human fetal bone marrow was enhanced in SCID-hu mice exposed to γ-irradiation or to interleukin 1α. These data indicate that the SCID-hu mice may provide a model in which to study species- and tissue-specific steps of the human metastatic process.

  9. Isolation and characterisation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human placenta tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vellasamy, Shalini; Sandrasaigaran, Pratheep; Vidyadaran, Sharmili; George, Elizabeth; Ramasamy, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of placenta tissue as a reliable and efficient source for generating mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). METHODS: MSC were generated from human placenta tissue by enzymatic digestion and mechanical dissociation. The placenta MSC (PLC-MSC) were characterized for expression of cell surface markers, embryonic stem cell (ECS) gene expression and their differentiation ability into adipocytes and osteocytes. The immunosuppressive properties of PLC-MSC on resting and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulated allogenic T cells were assessed by means of cell proliferation via incorporation of tritium thymidine (3H-TdR). RESULTS: The generated PLC-MSC appeared as spindle-shaped cells, expressed common MSC surface markers and ESC transcriptional factors. They also differentiated into adipogenic and osteogenic lineages when induced. However, continuous cultivation up to passage 15 caused changes in morphological appearance and cellular senescence, although the stem cell nature of their protein expression was unchanged. In terms of their immunosuppressive properties, PLC-MSC were unable to stimulate resting T cell proliferation; they inhibited the PHA stimulated T cells in a dose dependent manner through cell to cell contact. In our study, MSC generated from human placenta exhibited similar mesenchymal cell surface markers; MSC-like gene expression pattern and MSC-like differentiation potential were comparable to other sources of MSC. CONCLUSION: We suggest that placenta tissues can serve as an alternative source of MSC for future experimental and clinical studies. PMID:22993662

  10. Effect of Human Adipose Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Ovine Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zorzi, Alessandro R.; Amstalden, Eliane M. I.; Plepis, Ana Maria G.; Martins, Virginia C. A.; Ferretti, Mario; Antonioli, Eliane; Duarte, Adriana S. S.; Luzo, Angela C. M.; Miranda, João B.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is a promising approach to improve cartilage healing. Adipose tissue is an abundant and readily accessible cell source. Previous studies have demonstrated good cartilage repair results with adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells in small animal experiments. This study aimed to examine these cells in a large animal model. Thirty knees of adult sheep were randomly allocated to three treatment groups: CELLS (scaffold seeded with human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells), SCAFFOLD (scaffold without cells), or EMPTY (untreated lesions). A partial thickness defect was created in the medial femoral condyle. After six months, the knees were examined according to an adaptation of the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS 1) score, in addition to a new Partial Thickness Model scale and the ICRS macroscopic score. All of the animals completed the follow-up period. The CELLS group presented with the highest ICRS 1 score (8.3 ± 3.1), followed by the SCAFFOLD group (5.6 ± 2.2) and the EMPTY group (5.2 ± 2.4) (p = 0.033). Other scores were not significantly different. These results suggest that human adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells promoted satisfactory cartilage repair in the ovine model. PMID:26569221

  11. Combinations of parabens at concentrations measured in human breast tissue can increase proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Charles, Amelia K; Darbre, Philippa D

    2013-05-01

    The alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens), which are used as preservatives in consumer products, possess oestrogenic activity and have been measured in human breast tissue. This has raised concerns for a potential involvement in the development of human breast cancer. In this paper, we have investigated the extent to which proliferation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells can be increased by exposure to the five parabens either alone or in combination at concentrations as recently measured in 160 human breast tissue samples. Determination of no-observed-effect concentrations (NOEC), lowest-observed-effect concentrations (LOEC), EC50 and EC100 values for stimulation of proliferation of MCF-7 cells by five parabens revealed that 43/160 (27%) of the human breast tissue samples contained at least one paraben at a concentration ≥ LOEC and 64/160 (40%) > NOEC. Proliferation of MCF-7 cells could be increased by combining all five parabens at concentrations down to the 50(th) percentile (median) values measured in the tissues. For the 22 tissue samples taken at the site of ER + PR + primary cancers, 12 contained a sufficient concentration of one or more paraben to stimulate proliferation of MCF-7 cells. This demonstrates that parabens, either alone or in combination, are present in human breast tissue at concentrations sufficient to stimulate the proliferation of MCF-7 cells in vitro, and that functional consequences of the presence of paraben in human breast tissue should be assessed on the basis of all five parabens and not single parabens individually.

  12. The phenotype and tissue-specific nature of multipotent cells derived from human mature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wu, Min-Ke; Wang, Hang; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Sato, Soh; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2014-02-21

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from mature adipocytes have been considered to be a homogeneous group of multipotent cells, which present to be an alternative source of adult stem cells for regenerative medicine. However, many aspects of the cellular nature about DFAT cells remained unclarified. This study aimed to elucidate the basic characteristics of DFAT cells underlying their functions and differentiation potentials. By modified ceiling culture technique, DFAT cells were converted from human mature adipocytes from the human buccal fat pads. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that those derived cells were a homogeneous population of CD13(+) CD29(+) CD105(+) CD44(+) CD31(-) CD34(-) CD309(-) α-SMA(-) cells. DFAT cells in this study demonstrated tissue-specific differentiation properties with strong adipogenic but much weaker osteogenic capacity. Neither did they express endothelial markers under angiogenic induction.

  13. Comparison of Characteristics of Human Amniotic Membrane and Human Adipose Tissue Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dizaji Asl, Khadijeh; Shafaei, Hajar; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Nozad, Hojjat Ollah

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are ideal candidates for treatment of diseases. Amniotic membranes are an inexpensive source of MSCs (AM-MSC) without any donor site morbidity in cell therapy. Adipose tissue derived stem cells (ASCs) are also suitable cells for cell therapy. There is discrepancy in CD271 expression among MSCs from different sources. In this study, the characteristics of AM-MSC and ASCs and CD271 expression were compared. METHODS Adult adipose tissue samples were obtained from patients undergoing elective surgical procedure, and samples of amniotic membrane were collected immediately after caesarean operation. After isolation and expansion of MSCs, the proliferation rate and viability of cells were evaluated through calculating DT and MTT assay. Expression of routine mesenchymal specific surface antigens of MSCs and CD271 was evaluated by flow cytometry for both types of cells. RESULTS The growth rate and viability of the MSCs from the amniotic membrane was significantly higher compared with the ASCs. The low expression of CD14 and CD45 indicated that AM-MSC and ASCs are non hematopoietic cells, and both cell types expressed high percentages of CD44, CD105. The results revealed that AM-MSC and ASCs expressed no CD271 on their surfaces. CONCLUSION This study showed that amniotic membrane is a suitable cell source for cell therapy, and CD271 is a negative marker for MSCs identification from amniotic membrane and adipose tissue. PMID:28289611

  14. Concise reviews: Characteristics and potential applications of human dental tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junjun; Yu, Fang; Sun, Yao; Jiang, Beizhan; Zhang, Wenjun; Yang, Jianhua; Xu, Guo-Tong; Liang, Aibin; Liu, Shangfeng

    2015-03-01

    Recently, numerous types of human dental tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated and characterized, including dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, periodontal ligament stem cells, dental follicle progenitor cells, alveolar bone-derived MSCs, stem cells from apical papilla, tooth germ progenitor cells, and gingival MSCs. All these MSC-like cells exhibit self-renewal, multilineage differentiation potential, and immunomodulatory properties. Several studies have demonstrated the potential advantages of dental stem cell-based approaches for regenerative treatments and immunotherapies. This review outlines the properties of various dental MSC-like populations and the progress toward their use in regenerative therapy. Several dental stem cell banks worldwide are also introduced, with a view toward future clinical application.

  15. A High-Dimensional Atlas of Human T Cell Diversity Reveals Tissue-Specific Trafficking and Cytokine Signatures.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael Thomas; Ong, David Eng Hui; Lim, Frances Sheau Huei; Teng, Karen Wei Weng; McGovern, Naomi; Narayanan, Sriram; Ho, Wen Qi; Cerny, Daniela; Tan, Henry Kun Kiaang; Anicete, Rosslyn; Tan, Bien Keem; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon; Chan, Chung Yip; Cheow, Peng Chung; Lee, Ser Yee; Takano, Angela; Tan, Eng-Huat; Tam, John Kit Chung; Tan, Ern Yu; Chan, Jerry Kok Yen; Fink, Katja; Bertoletti, Antonio; Ginhoux, Florent; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria Alicia; Newell, Evan William

    2016-08-16

    Depending on the tissue microenvironment, T cells can differentiate into highly diverse subsets expressing unique trafficking receptors and cytokines. Studies of human lymphocytes have primarily focused on a limited number of parameters in blood, representing an incomplete view of the human immune system. Here, we have utilized mass cytometry to simultaneously analyze T cell trafficking and functional markers across eight different human tissues, including blood, lymphoid, and non-lymphoid tissues. These data have revealed that combinatorial expression of trafficking receptors and cytokines better defines tissue specificity. Notably, we identified numerous T helper cell subsets with overlapping cytokine expression, but only specific cytokine combinations are secreted regardless of tissue type. This indicates that T cell lineages defined in mouse models cannot be clearly distinguished in humans. Overall, our data uncover a plethora of tissue immune signatures and provide a systemic map of how T cell phenotypes are altered throughout the human body.

  16. Characterization and Differentiation of Stem Cells Isolated from Human Newborn Foreskin Tissue.

    PubMed

    Somuncu, Özge Sezin; Taşlı, Pakize Neslihan; Şişli, Hatice Burcu; Somuncu, Salih; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2015-11-01

    Circumcision is described as a cultural, medical, and religious process which states surgical removal of the foreskin either partly or fully. Cells isolated from the circumcised tissues are referred as foreskin cells. They have been thought as feeder cell lines for embryonic stem cells. Their fibroblastic properties were also utilized for several experiments. The waste tissues that remain after the circumcision thought to have stem cell properties. Therefore, there have been very few attempts to expose their stem cell properties without turning them into induced pluripotent stem cells. Although stem cell isolation from prepuce and their mesenchymal multilineage differentiation potential have been presented many times in the literature, the current study explored hematopoietical phenotype of newborn foreskin stem cells for the first time. According to the results, human newborn foreskin stem cells (hnFSSCs) were identified by their capability to turn into all three germ layer cell types under in vitro conditions. In addition, these cells have exhibited a stable phenotype and have remained as a monolayer in vitro. hnFSSCs suggested to carry different treatment potentials for bone damages, cartilage problems, nerve damages, lesion formations, and other diseases that are derive from mesodermal, endodermal, and ectodermal origins. Owing to the location of the tissue in the body and differentiation capabilities of hnFSSCs, these cells can be considered as easily obtainable and utilizable even better than the other stem cell sources. In addition, hnFSSCs offers a great potential for tissue engineering approaches due to exhibiting embryonic stem cell-like characteristics, not having any ethical issues, and teratoma induction as in embryonic stem cell applications.

  17. Uptake, accumulation, and egress of erythromycin by tissue culture cells of human origin.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J R; Johnson, P; Miller, M F

    1985-01-01

    The ability of erythromycin A base to penetrate and accumulate in tissue culture cells of human origin was investigated. The antibiotic was highly concentrated by early passage cells of normal bronchus, kidney, liver, lung, and skin and by cancer cells derived from breast, liver, and lung. Intracellular levels 4 to 12 times that of the extracellular milieu were obtained in both early-passage and transformed cells. The total quantity of erythromycin accumulated depended on the extracellular concentration of antibiotic, but the cellular/extracellular ratios were, for the most part, independent of the initial extracellular drug concentration. In all cell types tested, the accumulated antibiotic rapidly egressed when cells were incubated in antibiotic-free medium. Bioactivity assays demonstrated that the expelled drug was unmetabolized, fully active antibiotic. The concentration of erythromycin by a variety of human cell types probably accounts, in part, for the effectiveness of the antibiotic against intracellular parasites such as Legionella and Chlamydia spp. PMID:3994346

  18. Beware of the commercialization of human cells and tissues: situation in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Vanderkelen, Alain; Ectors, Nadine; Delloye, Christian; Dufrane, Denis; Baudoux, Etienne; Van Brussel, Michel; Casaer, Michael P; De Vos, Daniel; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Rose, Thomas; Jennes, Serge; Neirinckx, Pierre; Laire, Geert; Zizi, Martin; Verbeken, Gilbert

    2012-08-01

    With this analysis we would like to raise some issues that emerge as a result of recent evolutions in the burgeoning field of human cells, tissues, and cellular and tissue-based product (HCT/P) transplantation, and this in the light of the current EU regulatory framework. This paper is intended as an open letter addressed to the EU policy makers, who will be charged with the review and revision of the current legislation. We propose some urgent corrections or additions to cope with the rapid advances in biomedical science, an extensive commercialization of HCT/Ps, and the growing expectation of the general public regarding the ethical use of altruistically donated cells and tissues. Without a sound wake-up call, the diverging interests of this newly established 'healthcare' industry and the wellbeing of humanity will likely lead to totally unacceptable situations, like some of which we are reporting here.

  19. Explant culture: An advantageous method for isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from human tissues.

    PubMed

    Hendijani, Fatemeh

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) research progressively moves towards clinical phases. Accordingly, a wide range of different procedures were presented in the literature for MSC isolation from human tissues; however, there is not yet any close focus on the details to offer precise information for best method selection. Choosing a proper isolation method is a critical step in obtaining cells with optimal quality and yield in companion with clinical and economical considerations. In this concern, current review widely discusses advantages of omitting proteolysis step in isolation process and presence of tissue pieces in primary culture of MSCs, including removal of lytic stress on cells, reduction of in vivo to in vitro transition stress for migrated/isolated cells, reduction of price, processing time and labour, removal of viral contamination risk, and addition of supporting functions of extracellular matrix and released growth factors from tissue explant. In next sections, it provides an overall report of technical highlights and molecular events of explant culture method for isolation of MSCs from human tissues including adipose tissue, bone marrow, dental pulp, hair follicle, cornea, umbilical cord and placenta. Focusing on informative collection of molecular and methodological data about explant methods can make it easy for researchers to choose an optimal method for their experiments/clinical studies and also stimulate them to investigate and optimize more efficient procedures according to clinical and economical benefits.

  20. Stromal Cells in Dense Collagen Promote Cardiomyocyte and Microvascular Patterning in Engineered Human Heart Tissue.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Meredith A; Tran, Dominic; Coulombe, Kareen L K; Razumova, Maria; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles E; Zheng, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a strategy to replace damaged contractile tissue and model cardiac diseases to discover therapies. Current cardiac and vascular engineering approaches independently create aligned contractile tissue or perfusable vasculature, but a combined vascularized cardiac tissue remains to be achieved. Here, we sought to incorporate a patterned microvasculature into engineered heart tissue, which balances the competing demands from cardiomyocytes to contract the matrix versus the vascular lumens that need structural support. Low-density collagen hydrogels (1.25 mg/mL) permit human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) to form a dense contractile tissue but cannot support a patterned microvasculature. Conversely, high collagen concentrations (density ≥6 mg/mL) support a patterned microvasculature, but the hESC-CMs lack cell-cell contact, limiting their electrical communication, structural maturation, and tissue-level contractile function. When cocultured with matrix remodeling stromal cells, however, hESC-CMs structurally mature and form anisotropic constructs in high-density collagen. Remodeling requires the stromal cells to be in proximity with hESC-CMs. In addition, cocultured cardiac constructs in dense collagen generate measurable active contractions (on the order of 0.1 mN/mm(2)) and can be paced up to 2 Hz. Patterned microvascular networks in these high-density cocultured cardiac constructs remain patent through 2 weeks of culture, and hESC-CMs show electrical synchronization. The ability to maintain microstructural control within engineered heart tissue enables generation of more complex features, such as cellular alignment and a vasculature. Successful incorporation of these features paves the way for the use of large scale engineered tissues for myocardial regeneration and cardiac disease modeling.

  1. Human Kidney-Derived Cells Ameliorate Acute Kidney Injury Without Engrafting into Renal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Santeramo, Ilaria; Herrera Perez, Zeneida; Illera, Ana; Taylor, Arthur; Kenny, Simon; Murray, Patricia; Wilm, Bettina; Gretz, Norbert

    2017-04-04

    Previous studies have suggested that CD133(+) cells isolated from human kidney biopsies have the potential to ameliorate injury following intravenous (IV) administration in rodent models of kidney disease by integrating into damaged renal tissue and generating specialized renal cells. However, whether renal engraftment of CD133(+) cells is a prerequisite for ameliorating injury has not yet been unequivocally resolved. Here, we have established a cisplatin-induced nephropathy model in immunodeficient rats to assess the efficacy of CD133(+) human kidney cells in restoring renal health, and to determine the fate of these cells after systemic administration. Specifically, following IV administration, we evaluated the impact of the CD133(+) cells on renal function by undertaking longitudinal measurements of the glomerular filtration rate using a novel transcutaneous device. Using histological assays, we assessed whether the human kidney cells could promote renal regeneration, and if this was related to their ability to integrate into the damaged kidneys. Our results show that both CD133(+) and CD133(-) cells improve renal function and promote renal regeneration to a similar degree. However, this was not associated with engraftment of the cells into the kidneys. Instead, after IV administration, both cell types were exclusively located in the lungs, and had disappeared by 24 hours. Our data therefore indicate that renal repair is not mediated by CD133(+) cells homing to the kidneys and generating specialized renal cells. Instead, renal repair is likely to be mediated by paracrine or endocrine factors. © Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017.

  2. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  3. Interactions of human blood and tissue cell types with 95-nm-high nanotopography.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Matthew J; Marshall, George E; Johnstone, Heather J H; Affrossman, Stanley; Riehle, Mathis O

    2002-03-01

    Two of the major concerns for tissue engineering materials are inflammatory responses from blood cells and fibrous encapsulation by the body in order to shield the implant from blood reaction. A further hurdle is that of vascularization. In order to develop new tissues, or to repair parts of the vascular system, nutrients need to be carried to the basal cell layers. If a material promotes tissue formation, but not vascularization, necrosis will be observed as multilayered cells develop. In this paper, polymer demixed island topography with a 95-nm Z axis was tested using human mononuclear blood cells, platelets, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. The results showed no difference in blood response between the islands and the flat controls, suggesting that in vivo there would be negligible immunological difference. Fibroblasts reacted by changing morphology into a rounded shape with thick processes and poorly developed cytoskeleton. Retardation of fibroblast growth may be an advantageous, as it is this cell type that forms the fibrous capsule, preventing growth of the required tissue type. Finally, endothelial cells were seen to form arcuate, or curved, morphologies in response to the islands. This is the normal, in vivo, morphology for vascular endothelium. This result suggests that the nano-features are promoting a more phenotypically correct morphology.

  4. Exploring the Transcriptome of Ciliated Cells Using In Silico Dissection of Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ivliev, Alexander E.; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M. C.; Peters, Dorien J. M.; Sergeeva, Marina G.

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are cell organelles that play important roles in cell motility, sensory and developmental functions and are involved in a range of human diseases, known as ciliopathies. Here, we search for novel human genes related to cilia using a strategy that exploits the previously reported tendency of cell type-specific genes to be coexpressed in the transcriptome of complex tissues. Gene coexpression networks were constructed using the noise-resistant WGCNA algorithm in 12 publicly available microarray datasets from human tissues rich in motile cilia: airways, fallopian tubes and brain. A cilia-related coexpression module was detected in 10 out of the 12 datasets. A consensus analysis of this module's gene composition recapitulated 297 known and predicted 74 novel cilia-related genes. 82% of the novel candidates were supported by tissue-specificity expression data from GEO and/or proteomic data from the Human Protein Atlas. The novel findings included a set of genes (DCDC2, DYX1C1, KIAA0319) related to a neurological disease dyslexia suggesting their potential involvement in ciliary functions. Furthermore, we searched for differences in gene composition of the ciliary module between the tissues. A multidrug-and-toxin extrusion transporter MATE2 (SLC47A2) was found as a brain-specific central gene in the ciliary module. We confirm the localization of MATE2 in cilia by immunofluorescence staining using MDCK cells as a model. While MATE2 has previously gained attention as a pharmacologically relevant transporter, its potential relation to cilia is suggested for the first time. Taken together, our large-scale analysis of gene coexpression networks identifies novel genes related to human cell cilia. PMID:22558177

  5. Human Corneal Endothelial Cells Expanded In Vitro Are a Powerful Resource for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongsong; Sun, Hong; Hu, Min; Zhu, Min; Tighe, Sean; Chen, Shuangling; Zhang, Yuan; Su, Chenwei; Cai, Subo; Guo, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells have two major functions: barrier function mediated by proteins such as ZO-1 and pump function mediated by Na-K-ATPase which help to maintain visual function. However, human corneal endothelial cells are notorious for their limited proliferative capability in vivo and are therefore prone to corneal endothelial dysfunction that eventually may lead to blindness. At present, the only method to cure corneal endothelial dysfunction is by transplantation of a cadaver donor cornea with normal corneal endothelial cells. Due to the global shortage of donor corneas, it is vital to engineer corneal tissue in vitro that could potentially be transplanted clinically. In this review, we summarize the advances in understanding the behavior of human corneal endothelial cells, their current engineering strategy in vitro and their potential applications. PMID:28260988

  6. A mystery unraveled: nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells in human adult tissues

    PubMed Central

    Simerman, Ariel A; Perone, Marcelo J; Gimeno, María L; Dumesic, Daniel A; Chazenbalk, Gregorio D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have emerged as the gold standard of pluripotent stem cells and the class of stem cell with the highest potential for contribution to regenerative and therapeutic application; however, their translational use is often impeded by teratoma formation, commonly associated with pluripotency. We discuss a population of nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, termed Multilineage Differentiating Stress Enduring (Muse) cells, which offer an innovative and exciting avenue of exploration for the potential treatment of various human diseases. Areas covered: This review discusses the origin of Muse cells, describes in detail their various unique characteristics, and considers future avenues of their application and investigation with respect to what is currently known of adult pluripotent stem cells in scientific literature. We begin by defining cell potency, then discuss both mesenchymal and various reported populations of pluripotent stem cells, and finally delve into Muse cells and the characteristics that set them apart from their contemporaries. Expert opinion: Muse cells derived from adipose tissue (Muse-AT) are efficiently, routinely and painlessly isolated from human lipoaspirate material, exhibit tripoblastic differentiation both spontaneously and under media-specific induction, and do not form teratomas. We describe qualities specific to Muse-AT cells and their potential impact on the field of regenerative medicine and cell therapy. PMID:24745973

  7. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived beating cardiac tissues on paper.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xu, Cong; Zhu, Yujuan; Yu, Yue; Sun, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Feng, Ke; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-11-21

    There is a growing interest in using paper as a biomaterial scaffold for cell-based applications. In this study, we made the first attempt to fabricate a paper-based array for the culture, proliferation, and direct differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into functional beating cardiac tissues and create "a beating heart on paper." This array was simply constructed by binding a cured multi-well polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold with common, commercially available paper substrates. Three types of paper material (print paper, chromatography paper and nitrocellulose membrane) were tested for adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human-derived iPSCs. We found that hiPSCs grew well on these paper substrates, presenting a three-dimensional (3D)-like morphology with a pluripotent property. The direct differentiation of human iPSCs into functional cardiac tissues on paper was also achieved using our modified differentiation approach. The cardiac tissue retained its functional activities on the coated print paper and chromatography paper with a beating frequency of 40-70 beats per min for up to three months. Interestingly, human iPSCs could be differentiated into retinal pigment epithelium on nitrocellulose membrane under the conditions of cardiac-specific induction, indicating the potential roles of material properties and mechanical cues that are involved in regulating stem cell differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that different grades of paper could offer great opportunities as bioactive, low-cost, and 3D in vitro platforms for stem cell-based high-throughput drug testing at the tissue/organ level and for tissue engineering applications.

  8. Chondrogenic induction of human mesenchymal stem cells using combined growth factors for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bosetti, Michela; Boccafoschi, Francesca; Leigheb, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Andrea E; Cannas, Mario

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether growth factors (FGF-2, FGF-4 and FGF-6) used alone or in combination with TGFβ2 are able to increase the proliferation and induce the differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to chondrocytes, with a view to using them in cartilage tissue engineering. Cells cultured in monolayer, used to test the activity of the growth factors on cell proliferation, showed that a combination of FGFs with TGFβ2 increases cell proliferation compared to cells cultured in control medium or in the presence of growth factors alone. The chondrogenic potential, evaluated in three-dimensional (3D) cell aggregates, showed that FGF-2 and FGF-6, when used in combination with TGFβ2 increased the size and glycosaminoglycan content of the cell aggregates without increasing cell number. Extracellular matrix (ECM) also showed higher collagen type II immunoreactivity, which was particularly evident in an area similar to a germinative pole that was observed only in pellets cultured with FGF-2 and FGF-6 combined with TGFβ2, or in pellets cultured with FGF-2 alone. Moreover, the RT-PCR assay has highlighted an increased expression of collagen type II and Sox9, used as gene markers for chondrogenesis. We can conclude that combinations of FGF-2 or FGF-6 with TGFβ2 may provide a novel tool to induce the differentiation of adult human mesenchymal stem cells for applications in cartilage tissue engineering.

  9. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gavin, Kathleen M.; Gutman, Jonathan A.; Kohrt, Wendy M.; Wei, Qi; Shea, Karen L.; Miller, Heidi L.; Sullivan, Timothy M.; Erickson, Paul F.; Helm, Karen M.; Acosta, Alistaire S.; Childs, Christine R.; Musselwhite, Evelyn; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Kelly, Kimberly; Majka, Susan M.; Klemm, Dwight J.

    2016-01-01

    White adipocytes in adults are typically derived from tissue resident mesenchymal progenitors. The recent identification of de novo production of adipocytes from bone marrow progenitor-derived cells in mice challenges this paradigm and indicates an alternative lineage specification that adipocytes exist. We hypothesized that alternative lineage specification of white adipocytes is also present in human adipose tissue. Bone marrow from transgenic mice in which luciferase expression is governed by the adipocyte-restricted adiponectin gene promoter was adoptively transferred to wild-type recipient mice. Light emission was quantitated in recipients by in vivo imaging and direct enzyme assay. Adipocytes were also obtained from human recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. DNA was isolated, and microsatellite polymorphisms were exploited to quantify donor/recipient chimerism. Luciferase emission was detected from major fat depots of transplanted mice. No light emission was observed from intestines, liver, or lungs. Up to 35% of adipocytes in humans were generated from donor marrow cells in the absence of cell fusion. Nontransplanted mice and stromal-vascular fraction samples were used as negative and positive controls for the mouse and human experiments, respectively. This study provides evidence for a nontissue resident origin of an adipocyte subpopulation in both mice and humans.—Gavin, K. M., Gutman, J. A., Kohrt, W. M., Wei, Q., Shea, K. L., Miller, H. L., Sullivan, T. M., Erickson, P. F., Helm, K. M., Acosta, A. S., Childs, C. R., Musselwhite, E., Varella-Garcia, M., Kelly, K., Majka, S. M., Klemm, D. J. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue. PMID:26581599

  10. De novo generation of adipocytes from circulating progenitor cells in mouse and human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Kathleen M; Gutman, Jonathan A; Kohrt, Wendy M; Wei, Qi; Shea, Karen L; Miller, Heidi L; Sullivan, Timothy M; Erickson, Paul F; Helm, Karen M; Acosta, Alistaire S; Childs, Christine R; Musselwhite, Evelyn; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Kelly, Kimberly; Majka, Susan M; Klemm, Dwight J

    2016-03-01

    White adipocytes in adults are typically derived from tissue resident mesenchymal progenitors. The recent identification of de novo production of adipocytes from bone marrow progenitor-derived cells in mice challenges this paradigm and indicates an alternative lineage specification that adipocytes exist. We hypothesized that alternative lineage specification of white adipocytes is also present in human adipose tissue. Bone marrow from transgenic mice in which luciferase expression is governed by the adipocyte-restricted adiponectin gene promoter was adoptively transferred to wild-type recipient mice. Light emission was quantitated in recipients by in vivo imaging and direct enzyme assay. Adipocytes were also obtained from human recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. DNA was isolated, and microsatellite polymorphisms were exploited to quantify donor/recipient chimerism. Luciferase emission was detected from major fat depots of transplanted mice. No light emission was observed from intestines, liver, or lungs. Up to 35% of adipocytes in humans were generated from donor marrow cells in the absence of cell fusion. Nontransplanted mice and stromal-vascular fraction samples were used as negative and positive controls for the mouse and human experiments, respectively. This study provides evidence for a nontissue resident origin of an adipocyte subpopulation in both mice and humans.

  11. Characterization of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells with enhanced angiogenic and adipogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Lauvrud, Anne Therese; Kelk, Peyman; Wiberg, Mikael; Kingham, Paul J

    2016-02-02

    Autologous fat grafting is a popular method for soft tissue reconstructions but graft survival remains highly unpredictable. Supplementation of the graft with the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) or cultured adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) can enhance graft viability. In this study we have examined the phenotypic properties of a selected population of cells isolated from ASCs, with a view to determining their suitability for transplantation into grafts. ASCs were isolated from the SVF of human abdominal fat (n = 8 female patients) and CD146(+) cells were selected using immunomagnetic beads. The angiogenic and adipogenic properties of the positively selected cells were compared with the negative fraction. CD146(+) cells expressed the immunophenotypic characteristics of pericytes. With prolonged in vitro expansion, CD146(-) cells exhibited increased population doubling times and morphological signs of senescence, whereas CD146(+) cells did not. CD146(+) cells expressed higher levels of the angiogenic molecules VEGF-A, angiopoietin-1 and FGF-1. Conditioned medium taken from CD146(+) cells significantly increased formation of in vitro endothelial cell tube networks, whereas CD146(-) cells did not. CD146(+) cells could be differentiated into adipocytes in greater numbers than CD146(-) cells. Consistent with this, differentiated CD146(+) cells expressed higher levels of the adipocyte markers adiponectin and leptin. These results suggest that CD146(+) cells selected from a heterogeneous mix of ASCs have more favourable angiogenic and adipogenic properties, which might provide significant benefits for reconstructive and tissue-engineering applications. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Human eyelid adipose tissue-derived Schwann cells promote regeneration of a transected sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gangyang; Cao, Lingling; Wang, Yang; Hua, Yingqi; Cai, Zhengdong; Chen, Jun; Chen, Lulu; Jin, Yuqing; Niu, Lina; Shen, Hua; Lu, Yan; Shen, Zunli

    2017-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) can promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves while the clinical application is limited by donor site complications and the inability to generate an ample amount of cells. In this study, we have isolated human eyelid adipose-derived Schwann cells (hE-SCs) from human eyelid adipose tissue and identified the cell phenotype and function. Using immunofluorescence and H & E staining, we detected subtle nerve fibers and SCs in human eyelid adipose tissue. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that hE-SCs expressed glial markers, such as S100, p75NTR GFAP, Sox10 and Krox20. To explore whether hE-SCs promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves in vivo, a Balb/c-nu mice model was used in the study, and mice were randomly assigned to five groups: Matrigel; hE-SCs/P0; hE-SCs/P2; hE-FLCs/P2; and Autograft. After 12 weeks, functional and histological assessments of the regenerated nerves showed that sciatic nerve defect was more effectively repaired in the hE-SCs/P2 group which achieved 66.1 ± 6.5% purity, than the other three groups and recovered to similar level to the Autograft group. These results indicated that hE-SCs can promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve and the abundant, easily accessible supply of adipose tissue might be a promising source of SCs for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:28256528

  13. Evidence for a Proapoptotic Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase-26 in Human Prostate Cancer Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Khamis, Zahraa I.; Iczkowski, Kenneth A.; Man, Yan-Gao; Bou-Dargham, Mayassa J.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play intricate roles in cancer progression; some promote invasion and angiogenesis while others suppress tumor growth. For example, human MMP-26/endometase/matrilysin-2 was reported to be either protective or pro-tumorigenic. Our previous reports suggested pro-invasion and anti-inflammation properties in prostate cancer. Here, we provide evidence for a protective role of MMP-26 in the prostate. MMP-26 expression levels in androgen-repressed human prostate cancer (ARCaP) cells, transfected with sense or anti-sense MMP-26 cDNA, are directly correlated with those of the pro-apoptotic marker Bax. Immunohistochemical staining of prostate cancer tissue samples shows similar protein expression patterns, correlating the expression levels of MMP-26 and Bax in benign, neoplastic, and invasive prostate cancer tissues. The MMP-26 protein levels were upregulated in high grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and decreased during the course of disease progression. Further analysis using an indirect terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay showed that many tumor cells expressing MMP-26 were undergoing apoptosis. This study showed that the high level of MMP-26 expression is positively correlated with the presence of apoptotic cells. This pro-apoptotic role of MMP-26 in human prostate cancer cells and tissues may enhance our understanding of the paradoxical roles of MMP-26 in tumor invasion and progression. PMID:26722363

  14. A colonic tissue architecture assay applied to human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ilantzis, C; Stanners, C P

    1997-01-01

    A two-component tissue architecture assay system has been devised that tests the ability of human colon carcinoma cells to conform to the specific three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions characteristic of normal colonic tissues. Dissociated fetal rat colonic cells (FRCC) were allowed to reaggregate in suspension with or without the addition of different proportions (0.1%, 1%, and 10% of the total cells) of the human colon carcinoma cell lines, SW-1222 and LS-174T. Cellular aggregates obtained after 36 hours, incubation exhibited cell sorting by the formation of recognizable epithelial colonic crypt-like structures with glandular lumens in a mesenchyme-like background. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-positive SW-1222 cells in 10% mixed aggregates were organized into numerous well-formed glandular structures with a polarized apical distribution of CEA. LS-174T cells, on the other hand, were self-sorted but structurally disorganized with a continuous cell surface CEA distribution. Pure FRCC and mixed aggregates were implanted under the kidney capsules of Swiss nu/nu (nude) or CD-1 nu/nu mice and allowed to grow for a period of 7-10 days. Whereas the normal FRCC readily formed colonic tissue, the SW-1222 cells exhibited a capacity for differentiation into colonic crypts which became progressively less normal and more tumor-like as the proportion of carcinoma cells in the aggregates was increased. The LS-174T cells demonstrated poor differentiation at all concentrations. Cell surface levels of CEA and the CEA family member nonspecific crossreacting antigen (NCA), both overexpressed in colon cancer, were higher in LS-174T than in SW-1222 cells, whereas family member biliary glycoprotein (BGP), downregulated in colon carcinoma was higher in the SW-1222 cells. These results thus support the suggestion that deregulated expression of CEA family members can be involved in the ability of colonocytes to differentiate and conform to normal tissue architecture

  15. Tissue-specific mutation accumulation in human adult stem cells during life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokzijl, Francis; de Ligt, Joep; Jager, Myrthe; Sasselli, Valentina; Roerink, Sophie; Sasaki, Nobuo; Huch, Meritxell; Boymans, Sander; Kuijk, Ewart; Prins, Pjotr; Nijman, Isaac J.; Martincorena, Inigo; Mokry, Michal; Wiegerinck, Caroline L.; Middendorp, Sabine; Sato, Toshiro; Schwank, Gerald; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Vries, Robert G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Stratton, Michael R.; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin; van Boxtel, Ruben

    2016-10-01

    The gradual accumulation of genetic mutations in human adult stem cells (ASCs) during life is associated with various age-related diseases, including cancer. Extreme variation in cancer risk across tissues was recently proposed to depend on the lifetime number of ASC divisions, owing to unavoidable random mutations that arise during DNA replication. However, the rates and patterns of mutations in normal ASCs remain unknown. Here we determine genome-wide mutation patterns in ASCs of the small intestine, colon and liver of human donors with ages ranging from 3 to 87 years by sequencing clonal organoid cultures derived from primary multipotent cells. Our results show that mutations accumulate steadily over time in all of the assessed tissue types, at a rate of approximately 40 novel mutations per year, despite the large variation in cancer incidence among these tissues. Liver ASCs, however, have different mutation spectra compared to those of the colon and small intestine. Mutational signature analysis reveals that this difference can be attributed to spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine residues in the colon and small intestine, probably reflecting their high ASC division rate. In liver, a signature with an as-yet-unknown underlying mechanism is predominant. Mutation spectra of driver genes in cancer show high similarity to the tissue-specific ASC mutation spectra, suggesting that intrinsic mutational processes in ASCs can initiate tumorigenesis. Notably, the inter-individual variation in mutation rate and spectra are low, suggesting tissue-specific activity of common mutational processes throughout life.

  16. Human thymic epithelial primary cells produce exosomes carrying tissue-restricted antigens

    PubMed Central

    Skogberg, Gabriel; Lundberg, Vanja; Berglund, Martin; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; Telemo, Esbjörn; Lindgren, Susanne; Ekwall, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by cells into the extracellular space and have been shown to be present in thymic tissue both in mice and in humans. The source of thymic exosomes is however still an enigma and hence it is not known whether thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are able to produce exosomes. In this work, we have cultured human TECs and isolated exosomes. These exosomes carry tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), for example, myelin basic protein and desmoglein 3. The presence of TRAs indicates a possible role for thymic epithelium-derived exosomes in the selection process of thymocytes. The key contribution of these exosomes could be to disseminate self-antigens from the thymic epithelia, thus making them more accessible to the pool of maturing thymocytes. This would increase the coverage of TRAs within the thymus, and facilitate the process of positive and negative selection. PMID:25776846

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of cells and tissues from the upper and lower human female reproductive tract.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, A L; Edkins, R D; Rier, S E; Yeaman, G R; Stern, J E; Fanger, M W; Wira, C R

    1997-01-01

    Viable tissue sections and isolated cell cultures from the human fallopian tube, uterus, cervix, and vaginal mucosa were examined for susceptibility to infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We examined infectivity by using the monocytotropic strain HIV-1(JR-FL) and several primary isolates of HIV-1 obtained from infected neonates. HIV-1 infection was measured by p24 production in short-term culture and by immunofluorescence detection of HIV-1 Nef and p24 proteins by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Three-color immunofluorescence was used to phenotype HIV-infected cells within tissue sections from each site. Our findings indicate that epithelial, stromal, and dendritic cells and cells with CD14+ CD4+, CD14-CD4-, and CD4+ CD14- phenotypes from the female reproductive tract are infectable with HIV-1. Of importance is the finding that tissues from the upper reproductive tract are susceptible to infection with HIV-1. Moreover, tissue samples from women in all stages of the menstrual cycle, including postmenopausal women (inactive), could be infected with HIV-1. Female reproductive tract cells required a minimum of 60 min of exposure to HIV-1 in order for infection to occur, in contrast to peripheral blood lymphocytes, which became infected after being exposed to HIV-1 for only 1 min. These findings demonstrate that HIV-1 can infect cells and tissues from different sites within the female reproductive tract and suggest that multiple cell types, including epithelial cells, may be targets for the initial infection by HIV-1. PMID:9094621

  18. Trichostatin A enhances differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells to cardiogenic cells for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shiang Y; Sivakumaran, Priyadharshini; Crombie, Duncan E; Dusting, Gregory J; Pébay, Alice; Dilley, Rodney J

    2013-09-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a promising source of autologous cardiomyocytes to repair and regenerate myocardium for treatment of heart disease. In this study, we have identified a novel strategy to enhance cardiac differentiation of human iPS cells by treating embryoid bodies (EBs) with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), together with activin A and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4). Over a narrow window of concentrations, TSA (1 ng/ml) directed the differentiation of human iPS cells into a cardiomyocyte lineage. TSA also exerted an additive effect with activin A (100 ng/ml) and BMP4 (20 ng/ml). The resulting cardiomyocytes expressed several cardiac-specific transcription factors and contractile proteins at both gene and protein levels. Functionally, the contractile EBs displayed calcium cycling and were responsive to the chronotropic agents isoprenaline (0.1 μM) and carbachol (1 μM). Implanting microdissected beating areas of iPS cells into tissue engineering chambers in immunocompromised rats produced engineered constructs that supported their survival, and they maintained spontaneous contraction. Human cardiomyocytes were identified as compact patches of muscle tissue incorporated within a host fibrocellular stroma and were vascularized by host neovessels. In conclusion, human iPS cell-derived cardiomyocytes can be used to engineer functional cardiac muscle tissue for studying the pathophysiology of cardiac disease, for drug discovery test beds, and potentially for generation of cardiac grafts to surgically replace damaged myocardium.

  19. Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry for rapid recognition of human lung squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiping; Chen, Liru; Zhou, Wei; Chingin, Konstantin; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Zhu, Tenggao; Wen, Hua; Ding, Jianhua; Xu, Jianjun; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-05-01

    Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry (TSI-MS) directly on small tissue samples has been shown to provide highly specific molecular information. In this study, we apply this method to the analysis of 38 pairs of human lung squamous cell carcinoma tissue (cancer) and adjacent normal lung tissue (normal). The main components of pulmonary surfactants, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC, m/z 757.47), phosphatidylcholine (POPC, m/z 782.52), oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC, m/z 808.49), and arachidonic acid stearoyl phosphatidylcholine (SAPC, m/z 832.43), were identified using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Monte Carlo sampling partial least squares linear discriminant analysis (PLS-LDA) was used to distinguish full-mass-range mass spectra of cancer samples from the mass spectra of normal tissues. With 5 principal components and 30 - 40 Monte Carlo samplings, the accuracy of cancer identification in matched tissue samples reached 94.42%. Classification of a tissue sample required less than 1 min, which is much faster than the analysis of frozen sections. The rapid, in situ diagnosis with minimal sample consumption provided by TSI-MS is advantageous for surgeons. TSI-MS allows them to make more informed decisions during surgery.

  20. Standardized 3D Bioprinting of Soft Tissue Models with Human Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Rimann, Markus; Bono, Epifania; Annaheim, Helene; Bleisch, Matthias; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    Cells grown in 3D are more physiologically relevant than cells cultured in 2D. To use 3D models in substance testing and regenerative medicine, reproducibility and standardization are important. Bioprinting offers not only automated standardizable processes but also the production of complex tissue-like structures in an additive manner. We developed an all-in-one bioprinting solution to produce soft tissue models. The holistic approach included (1) a bioprinter in a sterile environment, (2) a light-induced bioink polymerization unit, (3) a user-friendly software, (4) the capability to print in standard labware for high-throughput screening, (5) cell-compatible inkjet-based printheads, (6) a cell-compatible ready-to-use BioInk, and (7) standard operating procedures. In a proof-of-concept study, skin as a reference soft tissue model was printed. To produce dermal equivalents, primary human dermal fibroblasts were printed in alternating layers with BioInk and cultured for up to 7 weeks. During long-term cultures, the models were remodeled and fully populated with viable and spreaded fibroblasts. Primary human dermal keratinocytes were seeded on top of dermal equivalents, and epidermis-like structures were formed as verified with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunostaining. However, a fully stratified epidermis was not achieved. Nevertheless, this is one of the first reports of an integrative bioprinting strategy for industrial routine application.

  1. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Freeman, Jennifer J.; Wieck, Minna M.; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Spence, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. PMID:26459240

  2. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  3. Current good tissue practice for human cell, tissue, and cellular and tissue-based product establishments; inspection and enforcement. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2004-11-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requiring human cell, tissue, and cellular and tissue-based product (HCT/P) establishments to follow current good tissue practice (CGTP), which governs the methods used in, and the facilities and controls used for, the manufacture of HCT/Ps; recordkeeping; and the establishment of a quality program. The agency is also issuing new regulations pertaining to labeling, reporting, inspections, and enforcement that will apply to manufacturers of those HCT/Ps regulated solely under the authority of the Public Health Service Act (PHS Act), and not as drugs, devices, and/or biological products. The agency's actions are intended to improve protection of the public health while keeping regulatory burden to a minimum, which in turn would encourage significant innovation.

  4. Obesity Determines the Immunophenotypic Profile and Functional Characteristics of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Pachón-Peña, Gisela; Serena, Carolina; Ejarque, Miriam; Petriz, Jordi; Duran, Xevi; Oliva-Olivera, W.; Simó, Rafael; Tinahones, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a major source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which possess a variety of properties that make them ideal candidates for regenerative and immunomodulatory therapies. Here, we compared the immunophenotypic profile of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) from lean and obese individuals, and explored its relationship with the apparent altered plasticity of hASCs. We also hypothesized that persistent hypoxia treatment of cultured hASCs may be necessary but not sufficient to drive significant changes in mature adipocytes. hASCs were obtained from subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy, adult, female donors undergoing abdominal plastic surgery: lean (n = 8; body mass index [BMI]: 23 ± 1 kg/m2) and obese (n = 8; BMI: 35 ± 5 kg/m2). Cell surface marker expression, proliferation and migration capacity, and adipogenic differentiation potential of cultured hASCs at two different oxygen conditions were studied. Compared with lean-derived hASCs, obese-derived hASCs demonstrated increased proliferation and migration capacity but decreased lipid droplet accumulation, correlating with a higher expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-II and cluster of differentiation (CD) 106 and lower expression of CD29. Of interest, adipogenic differentiation modified CD106, CD49b, HLA-ABC surface protein expression, which was dependent on the donor’s BMI. Additionally, low oxygen tension increased proliferation and migration of lean but not obese hASCs, which correlated with an altered CD36 and CD49b immunophenotypic profile. In summary, the differences observed in proliferation, migration, and differentiation capacity in obese hASCs occurred in parallel with changes in cell surface markers, both under basal conditions and during differentiation. Therefore, obesity is an important determinant of stem cell function independent of oxygen tension. Significance The obesity-related hypoxic environment may have latent effects on human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal

  5. PHB/PHBHHx scaffolds and human adipose-derived stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chuan; Hu, Ping; Ma, Min-Xian; Xiang, Yang; Liu, Ri-Guang; Shang, Xian-Wen

    2009-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)/poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx) (PHB/PHBHHx) to produce neocartilage upon seeding with differentiated human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). hASCs were grown on a three-dimensional PHB/PHBHHx scaffold in vitro with or without chondrogenic media for 14 days. Scanning electron microscopy showed that differentiated cells produced abundant extracellular matrices with increasing culture time. No cytotoxicity was observed by the live/dead cell viability assay. GAG and total collagen content in the differentiated cells increased significantly with in vitro culture time. After 14 days of in vitro culture, the differentiated cells grown on the (PHB/PHBHHx) scaffold (differentiated cells/(PHB/PHBHHx)) were implanted into the subcutaneous layer nude mice for 12 or 24 weeks, non-differentiated cells/(PHB/PHBHHx) were implanted as the control group. The differentiated cells/(PHB/PHBHHx) implants formed cartilage-like tissue after 24 weeks of implantation, and stained positive for collagen type II, safranin O, and toluidine blue. In addition, typical cartilage lacuna was observed, and there were no remnants of PHB/PHBHHx. Collagen type II was detected by Western blot at 12 and 24 weeks of implantation. In the control group, no cartilage formation was observed. This study demonstrated that PHB/PHBHHx is a suitable material for cartilage tissue engineering.

  6. Human norovirus infection of caco-2 cells grown as a three-dimensional tissue structure.

    PubMed

    Straub, Timothy M; Bartholomew, Rachel A; Valdez, Catherine O; Valentine, Nancy B; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J; Call, Douglas R

    2011-06-01

    Human norovirus (hNoV) infectivity was studied using a three-dimensional model of large intestinal epithelium. Large intestine Caco-2 cells were grown in rotating wall vessel bioreactors for 18-21 days at 37 degrees C and then transferred to 24-well tissue culture plates where they were infected with GI.1 and GII.4 human noroviruses collected from human challenge trials and various outbreak settings, respectively. Compared with uninfected cells, transmission micrographs of norovirus-infected cells displayed evidence of shortening or total loss of apical microvilli, and vacuolization. Quantitative reverse transcription real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated an approximate 2-3 log10 increase in viral RNA copies for the infected cells. A passage experiment examined both the ability for continued viral RNA and viral antigen detection. In the passaged samples 1.01x10(6) copies ml(-1) were detected by qRT-PCR. Immune electron microscopy using primary antibody to hNoV GI.1 capsids in conjunction with 6 nm gold-labelled secondary antibodies was performed on crude cellular lysates. Localization of antibody was observed in infected but not for uninfected cells. Our present findings, coupled with earlier work with the three-dimensional small intestinal INT407 model, demonstrate the utility of 3-D cell culture methods to develop infectivity assays for enteric viruses that do not readily infect mammalian cell cultures.

  7. Dendritic Cells Display Subset and Tissue-Specific Maturation Dynamics over Human Life.

    PubMed

    Granot, Tomer; Senda, Takashi; Carpenter, Dustin J; Matsuoka, Nobuhide; Weiner, Joshua; Gordon, Claire L; Miron, Michelle; Kumar, Brahma V; Griesemer, Adam; Ho, Siu-Hong; Lerner, Harvey; Thome, Joseph J C; Connors, Thomas; Reizis, Boris; Farber, Donna L

    2017-03-21

    Maturation and migration to lymph nodes (LNs) constitutes a central paradigm in conventional dendritic cell (cDC) biology but remains poorly defined in humans. Using our organ donor tissue resource, we analyzed cDC subset distribution, maturation, and migration in mucosal tissues (lungs, intestines), associated lymph nodes (LNs), and other lymphoid sites from 78 individuals ranging from less than 1 year to 93 years of age. The distribution of cDC1 (CD141(hi)CD13(hi)) and cDC2 (Sirp-α(+)CD1c(+)) subsets was a function of tissue site and was conserved between donors. We identified cDC2 as the major mature (HLA-DR(hi)) subset in LNs with the highest frequency in lung-draining LNs. Mature cDC2 in mucosal-draining LNs expressed tissue-specific markers derived from the paired mucosal site, reflecting their tissue-migratory origin. These distribution and maturation patterns were largely maintained throughout life, with site-specific variations. Our findings provide evidence for localized DC tissue surveillance and reveal a lifelong division of labor between DC subsets, with cDC2 functioning as guardians of the mucosa.

  8. Interaction of serum sex steroid-binding globulin with cell membranes of human decidual tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Avvakumov, G.V.; Survilo, L.I.; Strel'chenok, O.A.

    1986-01-20

    The interaction of the sex steroid-binding globulin (SBG) of human blood with plasma membranes of cells from human decidual tissue - the target tissue of estradiol - was studied. It was shown that SBG in complex with estradiol is capable of interacting specifically with these membranes. The dissociation (K/sub dis/) of this interaction is equal to (3.5 +/- 2.0) 10/sup -12/ M. The interaction of the SBG-estradiol complex with the membranes is characterized by high selectivity: such blood serum globulins as albumin, orosomucoid, transferrin, transcortin, and thyroxine-binding globulin do not compete with SBG for its binding sites on the membranes. The SBG-testosterone complex and SBG without steroid are also incapable of interacting with the membranes.

  9. Engineering vascular tissue with functional smooth muscle cells derived from human iPS cells and nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongyu; Hu, Jiang; Jiao, Jiao; Liu, Zhongning; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Chao; Chang, Lung-Ji; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X; Yang, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) are promising in the replacement of diseased vascular tissues. However, it remains a great challenge to obtain a sufficient number of functional smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in a clinical setting to construct patient-specific TEBVs. In addition, it is critical to develop a scaffold to accommodate these cells and retain their functional phenotype for the regeneration of TEBVs. In this study, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established from primary human aortic fibroblasts, and characterized with the pluripotency markers expression and cells' capabilities to differentiate into all three germ layer cells. A highly efficient method was then developed to induce these human iPSCs into proliferative SMCs. After multiple times of expansion, the expanded SMCs retained the potential to be induced into the functional contractile phenotype of mature SMCs, which was characterized by the contractile response to carbachol treatment, up-regulation of specific collagen genes under transforming growth factor β1 treatment, and up-regulation of specific matrix metalloproteinase genes under cytokine stimulation. We also developed an advanced macroporous and nanofibrous (NF) poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffold with suitable pore size and interpore connectivity to seed these human iPSC-derived SMCs and maintain their differentiated phenotype. Subcutaneous implantation of the SMC-scaffold construct in nude mice demonstrated vascular tissue formation, with robust collagenous matrix deposition inside the scaffold and the maintenance of differentiated SMC phenotype. Taken together, this study established an exciting approach towards the construction of patient-specific TEBVs. We established patient-specific human iPSCs, derived proliferative SMCs for expansion, turned on their mature contractile SMC phenotype, and developed an advanced scaffold for these cells to regenerate vascular tissue in vivo.

  10. Evaluation of two endometriosis models by transplantation of human endometrial tissue fragments and human endometrial mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarabadi, Mina; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Sadafi, Rana

    2017-01-01

    Background: The animal models of endometriosis could be a valuable alternative tool for clarifying the etiology of endometriosis. Objective: In this study two endometriosis models at the morphological and molecular levels was evaluated and compared. Materials and Methods: The human endometrial tissues were cut into small fragments then they were randomly considered for transplantation into γ irradiated mice as model A; or they were isolated and cultured up to fourth passages. 2×106 cultured stromal cells were transplanted into γ irradiated mice subcutaneously as model B. twenty days later the ectopic tissues in both models were studied morphologically by Periodic acid-Schiff and hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of osteopontin (OPN) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) genes were also assessed using real time RT-PCR. 17-β estradiol levels of mice sera were compared before and after transplantation. Results: The endometrial like glands and stromal cells were formed in the implanted subcutaneous tissue of both endometriosis models. The gland sections per cubic millimeter, the expression of OPN and MMP2 genes and the level of 17-β estradiol were higher in model B than model A (p=0.03). Conclusion: Our observation demonstrated that endometrial mesenchymal stromal cells showed more efficiency to establish endometriosis model than human endometrial tissue fragments. PMID:28280797

  11. GMP-compliant human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cellular therapy.

    PubMed

    Aghayan, Hamid-Reza; Goodarzi, Parisa; Arjmand, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells, which can be derived from different sources, demonstrate promising therapeutic evidences for cellular therapies. Among various types of stem cell, mesenchymal stem cells are one of the most common stem cells that are used in cellular therapy. Human subcutaneous adipose tissue provides an easy accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells with some considerable advantages. Accordingly, various preclinical and clinical investigations have shown enormous potential of adipose-derived stromal cells in regenerative medicine. Consequently, increasing clinical applications of these cells has elucidated the importance of safety concerns regarding clinical transplantation. Therefore, clinical-grade preparation of adipose-derived stromal cells in accordance with current good manufacturing practice guidelines is an essential part of their clinical applications to ensure the safety, quality, characteristics, and identity of cell products. Additionally, GMP-compliant cell manufacturing involves several issues to provide a quality assurance system during translation from the basic stem cell sciences into clinical investigations and applications. On the other hand, advanced cellular therapy requires extensive validation, process control, and documentation. It also evidently elucidates the critical importance of production methods and probable risks. Therefore, implementation of a quality management and assurance system in accordance with GMP guidelines can greatly reduce these risks particularly in the higher-risk category or "more than minimally manipulated" products.

  12. Differential Expression of Stem Cell Markers and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Human Retinoblastoma Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Martha; Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Dong Hun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the cancer stem cell-vascular niche complex in human retinoblastoma tissue. Methods Six human retinoblastoma specimens primarily enucleated for Reese-Ellsworth classification stage 5a were stained to detect cancer stem cell markers, including ABCG2 for the stem cell marker and MCM2 for the neural stem cell marker, as well as to detect VEGF for the angiogenic cytokine. Using immunofluorescence, the expression of these proteins was analyzed, and their relative locations noted. Results In non-neoplastic retina of tumor-bearing eyes, ABCG2 and MCM2 were sporadically expressed in the ganglion cell layer and the inner nuclear layer, whereas VEGF was sporadically expressed in inner retina where retinal vessels are abundantly distributed. In the tumor, ABCG2 was strongly expressed out of Wintersteiner rosettes, whereas MCM2 and VEGF were strongly stained in the rosettes. Interestingly, the outer portion of the rosettes was positive for MCM2, and the inner portion of the rosettes was positive for VEGF. Conclusions Our data demonstrated that MCM2 and VEGF are strongly expressed in the rosettes of the tumor, which were far from the area of ABCG2-positive cells. Although VEGF might not directly contribute to the cancer stem cell-vascular niche complex, it could play some role in the differentiation of tumor cells to build up the rosettes. PMID:20157412

  13. A comparison of whole genome gene expression profiles of HepaRG cells and HepG2 cells to primary human hepatocytes and human liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Hart, Steven N; Li, Ye; Nakamoto, Kaori; Subileau, Eva-anne; Steen, David; Zhong, Xiao-bo

    2010-06-01

    HepaRG cells, derived from a female hepatocarcinoma patient, are capable of differentiating into biliary epithelial cells and hepatocytes. More importantly, differentiated HepaRG cells are able to maintain activities of many xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, and expression of the metabolizing enzyme genes can be induced by xenobiotics. The ability of these cells to express and induce xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes is in stark contrast to the frequently used HepG2 cells. The previous studies have mainly focused on a set of selected genes; therefore, it is of significant interest to know the extent of similarity of gene expression at whole genome levels in HepaRG cells and HepG2 cells compared with primary human hepatocytes and human liver tissues. To accomplish this objective, we used Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) U133 Plus 2.0 arrays to characterize the whole genome gene expression profiles in triplicate biological samples from HepG2 cells, HepaRG cells (undifferentiated and differentiated cells), freshly isolated primary human hepatocytes, and frozen liver tissues. After using similarity matrix, principal components, and hierarchical clustering methods, we found that HepaRG cells globally transcribe genes at levels more similar to human primary hepatocytes and human liver tissues than HepG2 cells. In particular, many genes encoding drug-processing proteins are transcribed at a more similar level in HepaRG cells than in HepG2 cells compared with primary human hepatocytes and liver samples. The transcriptomic similarity of HepaRG with primary human hepatocytes is encouraging for use of HepaRG cells in the study of xenobiotic metabolism, hepatotoxicology, and hepatocyte differentiation.

  14. Human placental cell and tissue uptake of doxorubicin and its liposomal formulations.

    PubMed

    Soininen, Suvi K; Repo, Jenni K; Karttunen, Vesa; Auriola, Seppo; Vähäkangas, Kirsi H; Ruponen, Marika

    2015-12-03

    The anticancer drug doxorubicin and its liposomal formulations are in clinical use, doxorubicin also during pregnancy. However, little is known about how doxorubicin and its liposomal formulations are taken up by placental cells and whether they can cross human placenta. We therefore investigated quantitative cellular uptake and toxicity of doxorubicin and its two liposomal formulations, pH-sensitive liposomal doxorubicin (L-DOX) and commercially available pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PL-DOX), in human placental choriocarcinoma (BeWo) cells. PL-DOX showed significantly lower cellular uptake and toxicity compared with doxorubicin and L-DOX. In preliminary studies with human placental perfusion, PL-DOX did not cross the placenta at all in 4h, whereas doxorubicin and L-DOX crossed the placenta at low levels (max 12% of the dose). Furthermore, PL-DOX did not accumulate in placental tissue while doxorubicin did (up to 70% of the dose). Surface pegylation probably explains the low placental cell and tissue uptake of PL-DOX. Formulation of doxorubicin thus seems to enable a decrease of fetal exposure.

  15. Generating human intestinal tissues from pluripotent stem cells to study development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinagoga, Katie L; Wells, James M

    2015-01-01

    As one of the largest and most functionally complex organs of the human body, the intestines are primarily responsible for the breakdown and uptake of macromolecules from the lumen and the subsequent excretion of waste from the body. However, the intestine is also an endocrine organ, regulating digestion, metabolism, and feeding behavior. Intricate neuronal, lymphatic, immune, and vascular systems are integrated into the intestine and are required for its digestive and endocrine functions. In addition, the gut houses an extensive population of microbes that play roles in digestion, global metabolism, barrier function, and host–parasite interactions. With such an extensive array of cell types working and performing in one essential organ, derivation of functional intestinal tissues from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represents a significant challenge. Here we will discuss the intricate developmental processes and cell types that are required for assembly of this highly complex organ and how embryonic processes, particularly morphogenesis, have been harnessed to direct differentiation of PSCs into 3-dimensional human intestinal organoids (HIOs) in vitro. We will further describe current uses of HIOs in development and disease research and how additional tissue complexity might be engineered into HIOs for better functionality and disease modeling. PMID:25792515

  16. Generating human intestinal tissues from pluripotent stem cells to study development and disease.

    PubMed

    Sinagoga, Katie L; Wells, James M

    2015-05-05

    As one of the largest and most functionally complex organs of the human body, the intestines are primarily responsible for the breakdown and uptake of macromolecules from the lumen and the subsequent excretion of waste from the body. However, the intestine is also an endocrine organ, regulating digestion, metabolism, and feeding behavior. Intricate neuronal, lymphatic, immune, and vascular systems are integrated into the intestine and are required for its digestive and endocrine functions. In addition, the gut houses an extensive population of microbes that play roles in digestion, global metabolism, barrier function, and host-parasite interactions. With such an extensive array of cell types working and performing in one essential organ, derivation of functional intestinal tissues from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represents a significant challenge. Here we will discuss the intricate developmental processes and cell types that are required for assembly of this highly complex organ and how embryonic processes, particularly morphogenesis, have been harnessed to direct differentiation of PSCs into 3-dimensional human intestinal organoids (HIOs) in vitro. We will further describe current uses of HIOs in development and disease research and how additional tissue complexity might be engineered into HIOs for better functionality and disease modeling.

  17. Quantitative 3D Tracing of Gene-delivery Viral Vectors in Human Cells and Animal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ping-Jie; Li, Chengwen; Neumann, Aaron; Samulski, R Jude

    2012-01-01

    Trafficking through a variety of cellular structures and organelles is essential for the interaction between gene-delivery vectors (i.e., adeno-associated virus (AAV) and liposomes) and host cells/tissues. Here, we present a method of computer-assisted quantitative 3D biodistribution microscopy that samples the whole population of fluorescently-labeled vectors and document their trafficking routes. Using AAV as a working model, we first experimentally defined numerical parameters for the singularity of Cy5-labeled particles by combining confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We then developed a robust approach that integrates single-particle fluorescence imaging with 3D deconvolution and isosurface rendering to quantitate viral distribution and trafficking in human cells as well as animal tissues at the single-particle level. Using this quantitative method, we uncovered an as yet uncharacterized rate-limiting step during viral cell entry, while delineating nuclear accumulation of virions during the first 8 hours postinfection. Further, our studies revealed for the first time that following intramuscular injection, AAV spread progressively across muscle tissues through endomysium between myofibers instead of traversing through target cells. Such 3D resolution and quantitative dissection of vector–host interactions at the subcellular level should significantly improve our ability to resolve trafficking mechanisms of gene-delivery particles and facilitate the development of enhanced viral vectors. PMID:22108857

  18. Systemically transplanted human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells contributing to bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Quan-Chen; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Ji, Qiu-Xia; Yu, Xin-Bo; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Yuan, Chang-Qing; Deng, Jing; Yang, Pi-Shan

    2014-01-01

    As novel postnatal stem cells, gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GMSCs) have been considered as an ideal candidate cell resource for tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. GMSCs implanted into sites of injury have been confirmed to promote the injury repair. However, no studies have demonstrated whether systemically transplanted GMSCs can home to the bone injuries and contribute to the new bone formation in vivo. In this study, we transplanted human GMSCs into C57BL/6J mice with defects in mandibular bone via the tail vein to explore the capacity of transplanted GMSCs to promote bone regeneration. Results showed that the transplanted GMSCs were detected in the bone defects and employed in new bone formation. And the newly formed bone area in mice with GMSCs transplantation was significantly higher than that in control mice. Our findings indicate that systemically transplanted GMSCs can not only home to the mandibular defect but also promote bone regeneration.

  19. A reverse genetics cell-based evaluation of genes linked to healthy human tissue age

    PubMed Central

    Crossland, Hannah; Atherton, Philip J.; Strömberg, Anna; Gustafsson, Thomas; Timmons, James A.

    2017-01-01

    We recently developed a binary (i.e., young vs. old) classifier using human muscle RNA profiles that accurately distinguished the age of multiple tissue types. Pathway analysis did not reveal regulators of these 150 genes, so we used reverse genetics and pharmacologic methods to explore regulation of gene expression. Using small interfering RNA, well-studied age-related factors (i.e., rapamycin, resveratrol, TNF-α, and staurosporine), quantitative real-time PCR and clustering analysis, we studied gene–gene interactions in human skeletal muscle and renal epithelial cells. Individual knockdown of 10 different age genes yielded a consistent pattern of gene expression in muscle and renal cells, similar to in vivo. Potential epigenetic interactions included HIST1H3E knockdown, leading to decreased PHF19 and PCDH9, and increased ICAM5 in muscle and renal cells, while ICAM5 knockdown reduced HIST1H3E expression. Resveratrol, staurosporine, and TNF-α significantly regulated the in vivo aging genes, while only rapamycin perturbed the healthy-age gene expression signature in a manner consistent with in vivo. In vitro coordination of gene expression for this in vivo tissue age signature indicates a degree of direct coordination, and the observed link with mTOR activity suggests a direct link between a robust biomarker of healthy neuromuscular age and a major axis of life span in model systems.—Crossland, H., Atherton, P. J., Strömberg, A., Gustafsson, T., Timmons, J. A. A reverse genetics cell-based evaluation of genes linked to healthy human tissue age. PMID:27698205

  20. Recombinant human gelatin substitute with photoreactive properties for cell culture and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Takashi; Obuse, Sei; Adachi, Takahiro; Tomita, Masahiro; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2011-10-01

    The human recombinant collagen I α1 chain monomer (rh-gelatin) was modified by the incorporation of an azidophenyl group to prepare photoreactive human gelatin (Az-rh-gelatin), with approximately 90% of the lysine residues conjugated with azidobenzoic acid. Slight changes in conformation (circular dichroism spectra) and thermal properties (gelation and melting points) were noticed after modification. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation could immobilize the Az-rh-gelatin on polymer surfaces, such as polystyrene and polytetrafluoroethylene. Az-rh-gelatin was stably retained on the polymer surfaces, while unmodified gelatin was mostly lost by brief washing. Human mesenchymal cells grew more efficiently on the immobilized surface than on the coated surface. The immobilized Az-rh-gelatin on the polymer surfaces was able to capture engineered growth factors with collagen affinity, and the bound growth factors stimulated the growth of cells dose-dependently. It was also possible to immobilize Az-rh-gelatin in micropatterns (stripe, grid, and so on) using photomasks, and the cells grew according to the patterns. These results suggest that the photoreactive human gelatin, in combination with collagen-binding growth factors, will be clinically useful for surface modification of synthetic materials for cell culture systems and tissue engineering.

  1. The cultivation of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in clinical grade medium for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Pytlík, Robert; Stehlík, David; Soukup, Tomás; Kalbácová, Marie; Rypácek, Frantisek; Trc, Tomás; Mulinková, Katarína; Michnová, Petra; Kideryová, Linda; Zivný, Jan; Klener, Pavel; Veselá, Romana; Trnený, Marek; Klener, Pavel

    2009-07-01

    Clinical application of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) requires their expansion to be safe and rapid. We aimed to develop an expansion protocol which would avoid xenogeneic proteins, including fetal calf serum (FCS), and which would shorten the cultivation time and avoid multiple passaging. First, we have compared research-grade alpha-MEM medium with clinical grade CellGro for Hematopoietic Cells' Medium. When FCS was used for supplementation and non-adherent cells were discarded, both media were comparable. Both media were comparable also when pooled human serum (hS) was used instead of FCS, but the numbers of hMSCs were lower when non-adherent cells were discarded. However, significantly more hMSCs were obtained both in alpha-MEM and in CellGro supplemented with hS when the non-adherent cells were left in the culture. Furthermore, addition of recombinant cytokines and other supplements (EGF, PDGF-BB, M-CSF, FGF-2, dexamethasone, insulin and ascorbic acid) to the CellGro co-culture system with hS led to 40-fold increase of hMSCs' yield after two weeks of cultivation compared to alpha-MEM with FCS. The hMSCs expanded in the described co-culture system retain their osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential in vitro and produce bone-like mineralized tissue when propagated on 3D polylactide scaffolds in immunodeficient mice. Our protocol thus allows for very effective one-step, xenogeneic protein-free expansion of hMSCs, which can be easily transferred into good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions for large-scale, clinical-grade production of hMSCs for purposes of tissue engineering.

  2. MERAV: a tool for comparing gene expression across human tissues and cell types.

    PubMed

    Shaul, Yoav D; Yuan, Bingbing; Thiru, Prathapan; Nutter-Upham, Andy; McCallum, Scott; Lanzkron, Carolyn; Bell, George W; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-04

    The oncogenic transformation of normal cells into malignant, rapidly proliferating cells requires major alterations in cell physiology. For example, the transformed cells remodel their metabolic processes to supply the additional demand for cellular building blocks. We have recently demonstrated essential metabolic processes in tumor progression through the development of a methodological analysis of gene expression. Here, we present the Metabolic gEne RApid Visualizer (MERAV, http://merav.wi.mit.edu), a web-based tool that can query a database comprising ∼4300 microarrays, representing human gene expression in normal tissues, cancer cell lines and primary tumors. MERAV has been designed as a powerful tool for whole genome analysis which offers multiple advantages: one can search many genes in parallel; compare gene expression among different tissue types as well as between normal and cancer cells; download raw data; and generate heatmaps; and finally, use its internal statistical tool. Most importantly, MERAV has been designed as a unique tool for analyzing metabolic processes as it includes matrixes specifically focused on metabolic genes and is linked to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway search.

  3. Human bone marrow and adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells: a user's guide.

    PubMed

    Mosna, Federico; Sensebé, Luc; Krampera, Mauro

    2010-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells that hold great promise in the field of regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from almost any tissue of the body and display, after expansion, very similar properties and minor differences, probably due to their microenvironment of origin. Expansion in vitro can be obtained in cytokine-free, serum-enriched media, as well as in serum-free, basic fibroblast growth factor-enriched media. A detailed immunophenotypic analysis is required to test the purity of the preparation, but no unique distinguishing marker has been described as yet. Functional assays, that is, differentiation studies in vitro, are needed to prove multilineage differentiation of expanded cells, and demonstration of pluripotency is necessary to identify most immature precursors. MSCs show powerful immunomodulative properties toward most of the cells of the immune system: this strengthens the theoretical rationale for their use also in an allogeneic setting across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) immunological barriers. Systemic intravenous injection and local use have been tried: after systemic injection, MSCs show a high degree of chemotaxis based on pro-inflammatory cytokines, and localize at inflamed and neoplastic tissues; local regeneration has been improved using synthetic, as well as organic scaffolds. On the other hand, inadequate heterotopic in vivo differentiation and neoplastic transformation are potential risks of this form of cell therapy, even if evidence of this sort has been collected only from studies in mice, and generally after prolonged in vitro expansion. This review tries to provide a detailed technical overview of the methods used for human bone-marrow (BM)-derived and adipose-tissue (AT)-derived MSC isolation, in vitro expansion, and characterization for tissue repair. We chose to use BM-MSCs as a model to describe techniques that have been used for MSC isolation and expansion from very different sources, and

  4. Cell density-dependent transcriptional activation of endocrine-related genes in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sagar; Dean, Angela; Walter, Marc; Bao, Yongde; Hu, Yanfen; Ruan, Jianhua; Li, Rong

    2010-08-01

    Adipose tissue is recognized as an endocrine organ that plays an important role in human diseases such as type II diabetes and cancer. Human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs), a distinct cell population in adipose tissue, are capable of differentiating into multiple lineages including adipogenesis. When cultured in vitro under a confluent condition, ASCs reach a commitment stage for adipogenesis, which can be further induced into terminally differentiated adipocytes by a cocktail of adipogenic factors. Here we report that the confluent state of ASCs triggers transcriptional activation cascades for genes that are responsible for the endocrine function of adipose tissue. These include insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and aromatase (Cyp19), a key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis. Despite similar adipogenic potentials, ASCs from different individuals display huge variations in activation of these endocrine-related genes. Bioinformatics and experimental data suggest that transcription factor Foxo1 controls a large number of "early" confluency-response genes, which subsequently induce "late" response genes. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Foxo1 substantially compromises the ability of committed ASCs to stimulate tumor cell migration in vitro. Thus, our work suggests that cell density is an important determinant of the endocrine potential of ASCs.

  5. Connective tissue growth factor hammerhead ribozyme attenuates human hepatic stellate cell function

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Run-Ping; Brigstock, David R

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of hammerhead ribozyme targeting connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) on human hepatic stellate cell (HSC) function. METHODS: CCN2 hammerhead ribozyme cDNA plus two self-cleaving sequences were inserted into pTriEx2 to produce pTriCCN2-Rz. Each vector was individually transfected into cultured LX-2 human HSCs, which were then stimulated by addition of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 to the culture medium. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine mRNA levels for CCN2 or collagen I, while protein levels of each molecule in cell lysates and conditioned medium were measured by ELISA. Cell-cycle progression of the transfected cells was assessed by flow cytometry. RESULTS: In pTriEx2-transfected LX-2 cells, TGF-β1 treatment caused an increase in the mRNA level for CCN2 or collagen I, and an increase in produced and secreted CCN2 or extracellular collagen I protein levels. pTriCCN2-Rz-transfected LX-2 cells showed decreased basal CCN2 or collagen mRNA levels, as well as produced and secreted CCN2 or collagen I protein. Furthermore, the TGF-β1-induced increase in mRNA or protein for CCN2 or collagen I was inhibited partially in pTriCCN2-Rz-transfected LX-2 cells. Inhibition of CCN2 using hammerhead ribozyme cDNA resulted in fewer of the cells transitioning into S phase. CONCLUSION: Endogenous CCN2 is a mediator of basal or TGF-β1-induced collagen I production in human HSCs and regulates entry of the cells into S phase. PMID:19673024

  6. Transcriptional Landscape of Human Tissue Lymphocytes Unveils Uniqueness of Tumor-Infiltrating T Regulatory Cells.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Marco; Arrigoni, Alberto; Rossetti, Grazisa; Gruarin, Paola; Ranzani, Valeria; Politano, Claudia; Bonnal, Raoul J P; Provasi, Elena; Sarnicola, Maria Lucia; Panzeri, Ilaria; Moro, Monica; Crosti, Mariacristina; Mazzara, Saveria; Vaira, Valentina; Bosari, Silvano; Palleschi, Alessandro; Santambrogio, Luigi; Bovo, Giorgio; Zucchini, Nicola; Totis, Mauro; Gianotti, Luca; Cesana, Giancarlo; Perego, Roberto A; Maroni, Nirvana; Pisani Ceretti, Andrea; Opocher, Enrico; De Francesco, Raffaele; Geginat, Jens; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2016-11-15

    Tumor-infiltrating regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg) can suppress effector T cells specific for tumor antigens. Deeper molecular definitions of tumor-infiltrating-lymphocytes could thus offer therapeutic opportunities. Transcriptomes of T helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and Treg cells infiltrating colorectal or non-small-cell lung cancers were compared to transcriptomes of the same subsets from normal tissues and validated at the single-cell level. We found that tumor-infiltrating Treg cells were highly suppressive, upregulated several immune-checkpoints, and expressed on the cell surfaces specific signature molecules such as interleukin-1 receptor 2 (IL1R2), programmed death (PD)-1 Ligand1, PD-1 Ligand2, and CCR8 chemokine, which were not previously described on Treg cells. Remarkably, high expression in whole-tumor samples of Treg cell signature genes, such as LAYN, MAGEH1, or CCR8, correlated with poor prognosis. Our findings provide insights into the molecular identity and functions of human tumor-infiltrating Treg cells and define potential targets for tumor immunotherapy.

  7. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of human smooth muscle cells in bioengineered tissue scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackmann, Christian; Esguerra, Maricris; Olausson, Daniel; Delbro, Dick; Krettek, Alexandra; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2011-02-01

    The integration of living, human smooth muscle cells in biosynthesized cellulose scaffolds was monitored by nonlinear microscopy toward contractile artificial blood vessels. Combined coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied for studies of the cell interaction with the biopolymer network. CARS microscopy probing CH2-groups at 2845 cm-1 permitted three-dimensional imaging of the cells with high contrast for lipid-rich intracellular structures. SHG microscopy visualized the fibers of the cellulose scaffold, together with a small signal obtained from the cytoplasmic myosin of the muscle cells. From the overlay images we conclude a close interaction between cells and cellulose fibers. We followed the cell migration into the three-dimensional structure, illustrating that while the cells submerge into the scaffold they extrude filopodia on top of the surface. A comparison between compact and porous scaffolds reveals a migration depth of <10 μm for the former, whereas the porous type shows cells further submerged into the cellulose. Thus, the scaffold architecture determines the degree of cell integration. We conclude that the unique ability of nonlinear microscopy to visualize the three-dimensional composition of living, soft matter makes it an ideal instrument within tissue engineering.

  8. Transplantation of insulin-secreting cells differentiated from human adipose tissue-derived stem cells into type 2 diabetes mice.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ji Sun; Kang, Hyun Mi; Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Seah; Kim, Haekwon; Ahn, Chul Woo; Park, Jin Oh; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2014-01-10

    Currently, there are limited ways to preserve or recover insulin secretory capacity in human pancreas. We evaluated the efficacy of cell therapy using insulin-secreting cells differentiated from human eyelid adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hEAs) into type 2 diabetes mice. After differentiating hEAs into insulin-secreting cells (hEA-ISCs) in vitro, cells were transplanted into a type 2 diabetes mouse model. Serum levels of glucose, insulin and c-peptide were measured, and changes of metabolism and inflammation were assessed in mice that received undifferentiated hEAs (UDC group), differentiated hEA-ISCs (DC group), or sham operation (sham group). Human gene expression and immunohistochemical analysis were done. DC group mice showed improved glucose level, and survival up to 60 days compared to those of UDC and sham group. Significantly increased levels of human insulin and c-peptide were detected in sera of DC mice. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis showed human gene expression and the presence of human cells in kidneys of DC mice. When compared to sham mice, DC mice exhibited lower levels of IL-6, triglyceride and free fatty acids as the control mice. Transplantation of hEA-ISCs lowered blood glucose level in type 2 diabetes mice by increasing circulating insulin level, and ameliorating metabolic parameters including IL-6.

  9. Nano-regenerative medicine towards clinical outcome of stem cell and tissue engineering in humans

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Sindhu, Annu; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Chaudhury, Ashok; Rajakumar, Govindasamy; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a fast growing area of research that aims to create nanomaterials or nanostructures development in stem cell and tissue-based therapies. Concepts and discoveries from the fields of bio nano research provide exciting opportunities of using stem cells for regeneration of tissues and organs. The application of nanotechnology to stem-cell biology would be able to address the challenges of disease therapeutics. This review covers the potential of nanotechnology approaches towards regenerative medicine. Furthermore, it focuses on current aspects of stem- and tissue-cell engineering. The magnetic nanoparticles-based applications in stem-cell research open new frontiers in cell and tissue engineering. PMID:22260258

  10. Natural Scaffolds for Renal Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Kidney Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Batchelder, Cynthia A; Martinez, Michele L; Tarantal, Alice F

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enthusiasm for bioengineering of functional renal tissues for transplantation, many obstacles remain before the potential of this technology can be realized in a clinical setting. Viable tissue engineering strategies for the kidney require identification of the necessary cell populations, efficient scaffolds, and the 3D culture conditions to develop and support the unique architecture and physiological function of this vital organ. Our studies have previously demonstrated that decellularized sections of rhesus monkey kidneys of all age groups provide a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) with sufficient structural properties with spatial and organizational influences on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) migration and differentiation. To further explore the use of decellularized natural kidney scaffolds for renal tissue engineering, pluripotent hESC were seeded in whole- or on sections of kidney ECM and cell migration and phenotype compared with the established differentiation assays for hESC. Results of qPCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated upregulation of renal lineage markers when hESC were cultured in decellularized scaffolds without cytokine or growth factor stimulation, suggesting a role for the ECM in directing renal lineage differentiation. hESC were also differentiated with growth factors and compared when seeded on renal ECM or a new biologically inert polysaccharide scaffold for further maturation. Renal lineage markers were progressively upregulated over time on both scaffolds and hESC were shown to express signature genes of renal progenitor, proximal tubule, endothelial, and collecting duct populations. These findings suggest that natural scaffolds enhance expression of renal lineage markers particularly when compared to embryoid body culture. The results of these studies show the capabilities of a novel polysaccharide scaffold to aid in defining a protocol for renal progenitor differentiation from hESC, and advance the promise

  11. Cardiac troponin I is abnormally expressed in non-small cell lung cancer tissues and human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Liu, Jia-Bao; Bian, Zhi-Ping; Xu, Jin-Dan; Wu, Heng-Fang; Gu, Chun-Rong; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Ji-Nan; Chen, Xiang-Jian; Yang, Di

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is the only sarcomeric protein identified to date that is expressed exclusively in cardiac muscle. Its expression in cancer tissues has not been reported. Herein, we examined cTnI expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues, human adenocarcinoma cells SPCA-1 (lung) and BGC 823 (gastric) by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time PCR. Immunopositivity for cTnI was demonstrated in 69.4% (34/49) NSCLC tissues evaluated, and was strong intensity in 35.3% (6/17) lung squamous cell carcinoma cases. The non-cancer-bearing lung tissues except tuberculosis (9/9, 100%) showed negative staining for cTnI. Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human cTnI were applied in immunofluorescence. The result showed that the staining pattern within SPCA-1 and BGC 823 was dependent on the epitope of the cTnI mAbs. The membrane and nucleus of cancer cells were stained by mAbs against N-terminal peptides of cTnI, and cytoplasm was stained by mAbs against the middle and C-terminal peptides of cTnI. A ~25 kD band was identified by anti-cTnI mAb in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 extracts by western blot, as well as in cardiomyocyte extracts. The cTnI mRNA expressions in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells were about ten thousand times less than that in cardiomyocytes. Our study shows for the first time that cTnI protein and mRNA were abnormally expressed in NSCLC tissues, SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells. These findings challenge the conventional view of cTnI as a cardiac-specific protein, enabling the potential use of cTnI as a diagnostic marker or targeted therapy for cancer.

  12. Ex-Vivo Tissues Engineering Modeling for Reconstructive Surgery Using Human Adult Adipose Stem Cells and Polymeric Nanostructured Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Morena, Francesco; Argentati, Chiara; Calzoni, Eleonora; Cordellini, Marino; Emiliani, Carla; D’Angelo, Francesco; Martino, Sabata

    2016-01-01

    The major challenge for stem cell translation regenerative medicine is the regeneration of damaged tissues by creating biological substitutes capable of recapitulating the missing function in the recipient host. Therefore, the current paradigm of tissue engineering strategies is the combination of a selected stem cell type, based on their capability to differentiate toward committed cell lineages, and a biomaterial, that, due to own characteristics (e.g., chemical, electric, mechanical property, nano-topography, and nanostructured molecular components), could serve as active scaffold to generate a bio-hybrid tissue/organ. Thus, effort has been made on the generation of in vitro tissue engineering modeling. Here, we present an in vitro model where human adipose stem cells isolated from lipoaspirate adipose tissue and breast adipose tissue, cultured on polymeric INTEGRA® Meshed Bilayer Wound Matrix (selected based on conventional clinical applications) are evaluated for their potential application for reconstructive surgery toward bone and adipose tissue. We demonstrated that human adipose stem cells isolated from lipoaspirate and breast tissue have similar stemness properties and are suitable for tissue engineering applications. Finally, the overall results highlighted lipoaspirate adipose tissue as a good source for the generation of adult adipose stem cells.

  13. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Mechanobiology: Manipulating the Biophysical Microenvironment for Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Ronald G; Simmons, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    A stem cell in its microenvironment is subjected to a myriad of soluble chemical cues and mechanical forces that act in concert to orchestrate cell fate. Intuitively, many of these soluble and biophysical factors have been the focus of intense study to successfully influence and direct cell differentiation in vitro. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been of considerable interest in these studies due to their great promise for regenerative medicine. Culturing and directing differentiation of hPSCs, however, is currently extremely labor-intensive and lacks the efficiency required to generate large populations of clinical-grade cells. Improved efficiency may come from efforts to understand how the cell biophysical signals can complement biochemical signals to regulate cell pluripotency and direct differentiation. In this concise review, we explore hPSC mechanobiology and how the hPSC biophysical microenvironment can be manipulated to maintain and differentiate hPSCs into functional cell types for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications.

  14. Isolation of pluripotent neural crest-derived stem cells from adult human tissues by connexin-43 enrichment.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Daniel; Huang, Chun-Yuh Charles; Cheung, Herman S

    2013-11-01

    Identification and isolation of pluripotent stem cells in adult tissues represent an important advancement in the fields of stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. For several years, research has been performed on the identification of biomarkers that can isolate stem cells residing in neural crest (NC)-derived adult tissues. The NC is considered a good model in stem cell biology as cells from it migrate extensively and contribute to the formation of diverse tissues in the body during organogenesis. Migration of these cells is modulated, in part, by gap junction communication among the cell sheets. Here we present a study in which, selection of connexin 43 (Cx43) expressing cells from human adult periodontal ligament yields a novel pluripotent stem cell population. Cx43⁺ periodontal ligament stem cells express pluripotency-associated transcription factors OCT4, Nanog, and Sox2, as well as NC-specific markers Sox10, p75, and Nestin. When injected in vivo into an immunodeficient mouse model, these cells were capable of generating teratomas with tissues from the three embryological germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. Furthermore, the cells formed mature structures of tissues normally arising from the NC during embryogenesis such as eccrine sweat glands of the human skin, muscle, neuronal tissues, cartilage, and bone. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the human origin of the neoplastic cells as well as the ectodermal and endodermal nature of some of the structures found in the tumors. These results suggest that Cx43 may be used as a biomarker to select and isolate the remnant NC pluripotent stem cells from adult human tissues arising from this embryological structure. The isolation of these cells through routine medical procedures such as wisdom teeth extraction further enhances their applicability to the regenerative medicine field.

  15. Comparative gene expression profiling in human-induced pluripotent stem cell--derived cardiocytes and human and cynomolgus heart tissue.

    PubMed

    Puppala, Dinesh; Collis, Leon P; Sun, Sunny Z; Bonato, Vinicius; Chen, Xian; Anson, Blake; Pletcher, Mathew; Fermini, Bernard; Engle, Sandra J

    2013-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is one of the leading causes of drug attrition. Current in vitro models insufficiently predict cardiotoxicity, and there is a need for alternative physiologically relevant models. Here we describe the gene expression profile of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiocytes (iCC) postthaw over a period of 42 days in culture and compare this profile to human fetal and adult as well as adult cynomolgus nonhuman primate (NHP, Macaca fascicularis) heart tissue. Our results indicate that iCC express relevant cardiac markers such as ion channels (SCN5A, KCNJ2, CACNA1C, KCNQ1, and KCNH2), tissue-specific structural markers (MYH6, MYLPF, MYBPC3, DES, TNNT2, and TNNI3), and transcription factors (NKX2.5, GATA4, and GATA6) and lack the expression of stem cell markers (FOXD3, GBX2, NANOG, POU5F1, SOX2, and ZFP42). Furthermore, we performed a functional evaluation of contractility of the iCC and showed functional and pharmacological correlations with myocytes isolated from adult NHP hearts. These results suggest that stem cell-derived cardiocytes may represent a novel in vitro model to study human cardiac toxicity with potential ex vivo and in vivo translation.

  16. Human umbilical cord stem cell encapsulation in novel macroporous and injectable fibrin for muscle tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Xu, Hockin H.K.; Zhou, Hongzhi; Weir, Michael D.; Chen, Qianming; Trotman, Carroll Ann

    2012-01-01

    There has been little research on the seeding of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) in three-dimensional scaffolds for muscle tissue engineering. The objectives of this study were: (i) to seed hUCMSCs in a fibrin hydrogel containing fast-degradable microbeads (dMBs) to create macropores to enhance cell viability; and (ii) to investigate the encapsulated cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation for muscle tissue engineering. Mass fractions of 0–80% of dMBs were tested, and 35% of dMBs in fibrin was shown to avoid fibrin shrinkage while creating macropores and promoting cell viability. This construct was referred to as “dMB35”. Fibrin without dMBs was termed “dMB0”. Microbead degradation created macropores in fibrin and improved cell viability. The percentage of live cells in dMB35 reached 91% at 16 days, higher than the 81% in dMB0 (p < 0.05). Live cell density in dMB35 was 1.6-fold that of dMB0 (p < 0.05). The encapsulated hUCMSCs proliferated, increasing the cell density by 2.6 times in dMB35 from 1 to 16 days. MTT activity for dMB35 was substantially higher than that for dMB0 at 16 days (p < 0.05). hUCMSCs in dMB35 had high gene expressions of myotube markers of myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and alpha-actinin 3 (ACTN3). Elongated, multinucleated cells were formed with positive staining of myogenic specific proteins including myogenin, MYH, ACTN and actin alpha 1. Moreover, a significant increase in cell fusion was detected with myogenic induction. In conclusion, hUCMSCs were encapsulated in fibrin with degradable microbeads for the first time, achieving greatly enhanced cell viability and successful myogenic differentiation with formation of multinucleated myotubes. The injectable and macroporous fibrin–dMB–hUCMSC construct may be promising for muscle tissue engineering applications. PMID:22902812

  17. Mechanical Stimulation Protocols of Human Derived Cells in Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering - A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Khozoee, Baktash; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim S

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation is a key factor in articular cartilage generation and maintenance. Bioreactor systems have been designed and built in order to deliver specific types of mechanical stimulation. The focus has been twofold, applying a type of preconditioning in order to stimulate cell differentiation, and to simulate in vivo conditions in order to gain further insight into how cells respond to different stimulatory patterns. Due to the complex forces at work within joints, it is difficult to simulate mechanical conditions using a bioreactor. The aim of this review is to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of mechanical stimulation protocols by comparing those employed in bioreactors in the context of tissue engineering for articular cartilage, and to consider their effects on cultured cells. Allied and Complementary Medicine 1985 to 2016, Ovid MEDLINE[R] 1946 to 2016, and Embase 1974 to 2016 were searched using key terms. Results were subject to inclusion and exclusion criteria, key findings summarised into a table and subsequently discussed. Based on this review it is overwhelmingly clear that mechanical stimulation leads to increased chondrogenic properties in the context of bioreactor articular cartilage tissue engineering using human cells. However, given the variability and lack of controlled factors between research articles, results are difficult to compare, and a standardised method of evaluating stimulation protocols proved challenging. With improved standardisation in mechanical stimulation protocol reporting, bioreactor design and building processes, along with a better understanding of joint behaviours, we hope to perform a meta-analysis on stimulation protocols and methods.

  18. Harvesting Human Prostate Tissue Material and Culturing Primary Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Frame, Fiona M; Pellacani, Davide; Collins, Anne T; Maitland, Norman J

    2016-01-01

    In order to fully explore the biology of a complex solid tumor such as prostate cancer, it is desirable to work with patient tissue. Only by working with cells from a tissue can we take into account patient variability and tumor heterogeneity. Cell lines have long been regarded as the workhorse of cancer research and it could be argued that they are of most use when considered within a panel of cell lines, thus taking into account specified mutations and variations in phenotype between different cell lines. However, often very different results are obtained when comparing cell lines to primary cells cultured from tissue. It stands to reason that cells cultured from patient tissue represents a close-to-patient model that should and does produce clinically relevant data. This chapter aims to illustrate the methods of processing, storing and culturing cells from prostate tissue, with a description of potential uses.

  19. Effect of costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone on cell cycle, apoptosis, and ABC transporter expression in human soft tissue sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Nadine; Rinner, Beate; Stuendl, Nicole; Kaltenegger, Heike; Wolf, Elisabeth; Kunert, Olaf; Boechzelt, Herbert; Leithner, Andreas; Bauer, Rudolf; Lohberger, Birgit

    2012-11-01

    Human soft tissue sarcomas represent a rare group of malignant tumours that frequently exhibit chemotherapeutic resistance and increased metastatic potential following unsuccessful treatment. In this study, we investigated the effects of costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone, which have been isolated from Saussurea lappa using activity-guided isolation, on three soft tissue sarcoma cell lines of various origins. The effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis induction, and ABC transporter expression were analysed. Both compounds inhibited cell viability dose- and time-dependently. IC50 values ranged from 6.2 µg/mL to 9.8 µg/mL. Cells treated with costunolide showed no changes in cell cycle, little in caspase 3/7 activity, and low levels of cleaved caspase-3 after 24 and 48 h. Dehydrocostus lactone caused a significant reduction of cells in the G1 phase and an increase of cells in the S and G2/M phase. Moreover, it led to enhanced caspase 3/7 activity, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved PARP indicating apoptosis induction. In addition, the influence of costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone on the expression of ATP binding cassette transporters related to multidrug resistance (ABCB1/MDR1, ABCC1/MRP1, and ABCG2/BCRP1) was examined using real-time RT-PCR. The expressions of ABCB1/MDR1 and ABCG2/BCRP1 in liposarcoma and synovial sarcoma cells were significantly downregulated by dehydrocostus lactone. Our data demonstrate for the first time that dehydrocostus lactone affects cell viability, cell cycle distribution and ABC transporter expression in soft tissue sarcoma cell lines. Furthermore, it led to caspase 3/7 activity as well as caspase-3 and PARP cleavage, which are indicators of apoptosis. Therefore, this compound may be a promising lead candidate for the development of therapeutic agents against drug-resistant tumours.

  20. Rapid Expansion of Human Epithelial Stem Cells Suitable for Airway Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gowers, Kate H. C.; Lee, Dani Do Hyang; Brown, James M.; Crowley, Claire; Teixeira, Vitor H.; Smith, Claire M.; Urbani, Luca; Hamilton, Nicholas J.; Thakrar, Ricky M.; Booth, Helen L.; Birchall, Martin A.; De Coppi, Paolo; Giangreco, Adam; O’Callaghan, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Stem cell–based tracheal replacement represents an emerging therapeutic option for patients with otherwise untreatable airway diseases including long-segment congenital tracheal stenosis and upper airway tumors. Clinical experience demonstrates that restoration of mucociliary clearance in the lungs after transplantation of tissue-engineered grafts is critical, with preclinical studies showing that seeding scaffolds with autologous mucosa improves regeneration. High epithelial cell–seeding densities are required in regenerative medicine, and existing techniques are inadequate to achieve coverage of clinically suitable grafts. Objectives: To define a scalable cell culture system to deliver airway epithelium to clinical grafts. Methods: Human respiratory epithelial cells derived from endobronchial biopsies were cultured using a combination of mitotically inactivated fibroblasts and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibition using Y-27632 (3T3+Y). Cells were analyzed by immunofluorescence, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry to assess airway stem cell marker expression. Karyotyping and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification were performed to assess cell safety. Differentiation capacity was tested in three-dimensional tracheospheres, organotypic cultures, air–liquid interface cultures, and an in vivo tracheal xenograft model. Ciliary function was assessed in air–liquid interface cultures. Measurements and Main Results: 3T3-J2 feeder cells and ROCK inhibition allowed rapid expansion of airway basal cells. These cells were capable of multipotent differentiation in vitro, generating both ciliated and goblet cell lineages. Cilia were functional with normal beat frequency and pattern. Cultured cells repopulated tracheal scaffolds in a heterotopic transplantation xenograft model. Conclusions: Our method generates large numbers of functional airway basal epithelial cells with the efficiency demanded by clinical

  1. 78 FR 66366 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Use of Donor Screening Tests To Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Use of Donor Screening Tests to Test Donors of Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products (HCT/Ps) for Infection with Treponema pallidum (Syphilis),'' dated October 2013. The draft guidance document provides establishments that make donor eligibility......

  2. Tissue transglutaminase is involved in mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation of human ligamentum flavum cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yuan-Hung; Huang, Shih-Yung; Yang, Ruei-Cheng; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation might be the key cellular event in the calcification and ossification of ligamentum flavum. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tissue transglutaminase (TGM2) on mechanical load-induced osteogenesis of ligamentum flavum cells. Human ligamentum flavum cells were obtained from 12 patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Osteogenic phenotypes of ligamentum flavum cells, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin red-S stain, and gene expression of osteogenic makers were evaluated following the administration of mechanical load and BMP-2 treatment. The expression of TGM2 was evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Our results showed that mechanical load in combination with BMP-2 enhanced calcium deposition and ALP activity. Mechanical load significantly increased ALP and OC gene expression on day 3, whereas BMP-2 significantly increased ALP, OPN, and Runx2 on day 7. Mechanical load significantly induced TGM2 gene expression and enzyme activity in human ligamentum flavum cells. Exogenous TGM2 increased ALP and OC gene expression; while, inhibited TG activity significantly attenuated mechanical load-induced and TGM2-induced ALP activity. In summary, mechanical load-induced TGM2 expression and enzyme activity is involved in the progression of the calcification of ligamentum flavum.

  3. Cultured Human Adipose Tissue Pericytes and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display a Very Similar Gene Expression Profile

    PubMed Central

    Malta, Tathiane Maistro; de Deus Wagatsuma, Virgínia Mara; Palma, Patrícia Viana Bonini; Araújo, Amélia Goes; Ribeiro Malmegrim, Kelen Cristina; Morato de Oliveira, Fábio; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Silva, Wilson Araújo; Kashima Haddad, Simone; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are cultured cells that can give rise to mature mesenchymal cells under appropriate conditions and secrete a number of biologically relevant molecules that may play an important role in regenerative medicine. Evidence indicates that pericytes (PCs) correspond to mesenchymal stem cells in vivo and can give rise to MSCs when cultured, but a comparison between the gene expression profiles of cultured PCs (cPCs) and MSCs is lacking. We have devised a novel methodology to isolate PCs from human adipose tissue and compared cPCs to MSCs obtained through traditional methods. Freshly isolated PCs expressed CD34, CD140b, and CD271 on their surface, but not CD146. Both MSCs and cPCs were able to differentiate along mesenchymal pathways in vitro, displayed an essentially identical surface immunophenotype, and exhibited the ability to suppress CD3+ lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. Microarray expression data of cPCs and MSCs formed a single cluster among other cell types. Further analyses showed that the gene expression profiles of cPCs and MSCs are extremely similar, although MSCs differentially expressed endothelial cell (EC)-specific transcripts. These results confirm, using the power of transcriptomic analysis, that PCs give rise to MSCs and suggest that low levels of ECs may persist in MSC cultures established using traditional protocols. PMID:26192741

  4. Human muscle precursor cells overexpressing PGC-1α enhance early skeletal muscle tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Haralampieva, Deana; Salemi, Souzan; Dinulovic, Ivana; Sulser, Tullio; M Ametamey, Simon; Handschin, Christoph; Eberli, Daniel

    2017-02-03

    Muscle precursor cells (MPCs) are activated satellite cells capable of muscle fiber reconstruction. Therefore, autologous MPC transplantation is envisioned for the treatment of muscle diseases. However, the density of MPCs, as well as their proliferation and differentiation potential gradually decline with age. The goal of this research was to genetically modify human MPCs (hMPCs) to overexpress the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1α), a key regulator of exercise-mediated adaptation, and thereby to enhance early skeletal muscle formation and quality. We were able to confirm the sustained myogenic phenotype of the genetically modified hMPCs. While maintaining their viability and proliferation potential, PGC-1α modified hMPCs showed an enhanced myofiber formation capacity in vitro. Engineered muscle tissues were harvested 1, 2 and 4 weeks after subcutaneous injection of cell-collagen suspensions and histological analysis confirmed the earlier myotube formation in PGC-1α modified samples, predominantly of slow twitch myofibers. Increased contractile protein levels were detected by Western Blot. In summary, by genetically modifying hMPCs to overexpress PGC-1α we were able to promote early muscle fiber formation in vitro and in vivo, with an initial switch to slow type myofibers. Therefore, overexpressing PGC-1α is novel strategy to further enhance skeletal muscle tissue engineering.

  5. Tissue factor: A potent stimulator of Von Willebrand factor synthesis by human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Meiring, Muriel; Allers, W.; Le Roux, E.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and dysfunction of endothelial cells are thought to be triggers for the secretion of Von Willebrand factor. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and the coagulation factors, tissue factor and thrombin on the release and cleavage potential of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) and its cleavage protease by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were treated with IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, tissue factor (TF) and thrombin, and combinations thereof for 24 hours under static conditions. The cells were then exposed to shear stress after which the VWF-propeptide levels and the VWF cleavage protease, ADAMTS13 content were measured. All treatments and their combinations, excluding IL-6, significantly stimulated the secretion of VWF from HUVEC. The VWF secretion from the HUVEC was stimulated most by the combination of TF with TNF-α. Slightly lower levels of ADAMTS13 secretion were found with all treatments. This may explain the thrombogenicity of patients with inflammation where extremely high VWF levels and slightly lower ADAMTS13 levels are present. PMID:27766025

  6. Development of A Three-Dimensional Tissue Construct from Dental Human Ectomesenchymal Stem Cells: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Uribe, Daniela; Estrada, Keila Neri Alvarado; Guillén, Amaury de Jesús Pozos; Pérez, Silvia Martín; Ibáñez, Raúl Rosales

    2012-01-01

    Application of regenerative medicine technology provides treatment for patients with several clinical problems, like loss of tissue and its function. The investigation of biological tooth replacement, dental tissue engineering and cell culture, scaffolds and growth factors are considered essential. Currently, studies reported on the making of threedimensional tissue constructs focused on the use of animal cells in the early stages of embryogenesis applied to young biomodels. The purpose of this study was the development and characterization of a three-dimensional tissue construct from human dental cells. The construct was detached, cultured and characterized in mesenchymal and epithelial cells of a human tooth germ of a 12 year old patient. The cells were characterized by specific membrane markers (STRO1, CD44), making a biocomplex using Pura Matrix as a scaffold, and it was incubated for four days and transplanted into 30 adult immunosuppressed male Wistar rats. They were evaluated at 6 days, 10 days and 2 months, obtaining histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Cell cultures were positive for specific membrane markers, showing evident deviations in morphology under phase contrast microscope. Differentiation and organization were noted at 10 days, while the constructs at 2 months showed a clear difference in morphology, organization and cell type. It was possible to obtain a three-dimensional tissue construct from human dental ectomesenchymal cells achieving a degree of tissue organization that corresponds to the presence of cellular stratification and extracellular matrix. PMID:23308086

  7. Cystoisospora canis (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae): development of monozoic tissue cysts in human cells, demonstration of egress of zoites from tissue cysts, and demonstration of repeat monozoic tissue cyst formation by zoites.

    PubMed

    Houk, Alice E; Lindsay, David S

    2013-11-08

    Sporozoites of Cystoisospora canis penetrated and developed to monozoic tissue cysts in 4 human, 1 monkey, 1 bovine and 2 canine cell lines. No asexual division was documented although multiple infection of a single cell was observed. Examination of cultures using transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that they were monozoic tissue cysts and contained a single sporozoite. The appearance of monozoic tissue cysts in all cell lines was similar but the parasitophorous vacuole surrounding some sporozoites in DH82 dog macrophages was swollen. Monozoic tissue cysts were observed for up to 127 days in human pigmented retinal epithelial cells. Treatment of cell cultures containing monozoic tissue cysts with 0.75 sodium taurocholic acid and 0.25% trypsin stimulated egress of zoites (former sporozoites) from tissue cysts. Zoites collected from monozoic tissue cysts were able to penetrate and develop to monozoic tissue cysts in new host cells. Monozoic tissue cysts survived exposure to acid pepsin solution indicating that they would be orally infectious. The tissue cyst wall surrounding zoites did not autofluoresce as did oocyst and sporocyst walls exposed to UV light. We believe that C. canis can be used as a model system to study extra-intestinal monozoic tissue cysts stages of Cystoisospora belli of humans.

  8. [Safety evaluation of tissue engineered medical devices using normal human mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Sawada, Rumi; Ito, Tomomi; Tsuchiya, Toshie

    2007-05-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated the potential of bioengineering using somatic stem cells in regenerative medicine. Adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) derived from bone marrow have the pluripotency to differentiate into cells of mesodermal origin, e.g., bone, cartilage, adipose, and muscle cells; they, therefore, have many potential clinical applications. On the other hand, stem cells possess a self-renewal capability similar to cancer cells. For safety evaluation of tissue engineered medical devices using normal hMSCs, in this study, we investigated the expression levels of several genes that affect cell proliferation in hMSCs during in vitro culture. We focused on the relationship between the hMSC proliferation and their transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) signaling during in vitro culture. The proliferation rate of hMSCs gradually decreased and cellular senescence was observed for about 3 months. The mRNA expressions of TGFbeta1, TGFbeta2, and TGFbeta receptor type I (TGFbetaRI) in hMSCs increased with the length of cell culture. The mRNA expressions of Smad3 increased, but those of c-myc and nucleostemin decreased with the length hMSCs were in in vitro culture. In addition, the expression profiles of the genes which regulate cellular proliferation in hMSCs were significantly different from those of cancer cells. In conclusion, hMSCs derived from bone marrow seldom underwent spontaneous transformation during 1-2 months in vitro culture for use in clinical applications. In hMSCs as well as in epithelial cells, growth might be controlled by the TGFbeta family signaling.

  9. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pilarczyk, Götz; Raulf, Alexandra; Gunkel, Manuel; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Lemor, Robert; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. PMID:26751484

  10. Regulatory Advocacy Update: ASPS Comments in Response to the FDA Draft Guidance Documents on Human Cell and Tissue Products.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J Peter; D'Amico, Richard A; Rodriguez, Ricardo; Coleman, Sydney R; Cederna, Paul; Glasberg, Scot; Neumeister, Michael; Song, David H; Butler, Charles; Hume, Keith M

    2017-02-09

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released draft guidance documents on Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue-Based Products (HCT/P) Regulations. These proposed guidance documents can impact the practice of plastic surgery in the area of tissue grafting procedures. This article describes the relevant issues in these draft guidance documents, and presents the comments provided to the FDA by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

  11. Enhanced expression of FNDC5 in human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cells along with relevant embryonic neural tissues.

    PubMed

    Ghahrizjani, Fatemeh Ahmadi; Ghaedi, Kamran; Salamian, Ahmad; Tanhaei, Somayeh; Nejati, Alireza Shoaraye; Salehi, Hossein; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Baharvand, Hossein; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-02-25

    Availability of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has enhanced the capability of basic and clinical research in the context of human neural differentiation. Derivation of neural progenitor (NP) cells from hESCs facilitates the process of human embryonic development through the generation of neuronal subtypes. We have recently indicated that fibronectin type III domain containing 5 protein (FNDC5) expression is required for appropriate neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Bioinformatics analyses have shown the presence of three isoforms for human FNDC5 mRNA. To differentiate which isoform of FNDC5 is involved in the process of human neural differentiation, we have used hESCs as an in vitro model for neural differentiation by retinoic acid (RA) induction. The hESC line, Royan H5, was differentiated into a neural lineage in defined adherent culture treated by RA and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). We collected all cell types that included hESCs, rosette structures, and neural cells in an attempt to assess the expression of FNDC5 isoforms. There was a contiguous increase in all three FNDC5 isoforms during the neural differentiation process. Furthermore, the highest level of expression of the isoforms was significantly observed in neural cells compared to hESCs and the rosette structures known as neural precursor cells (NPCs). High expression levels of FNDC5 in human fetal brain and spinal cord tissues have suggested the involvement of this gene in neural tube development. Additional research is necessary to determine the major function of FDNC5 in this process.

  12. An atlas of active enhancers across human cell types and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Robin; Gebhard, Claudia; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Hoof, Ilka; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Chen, Yun; Zhao, Xiaobei; Schmidl, Christian; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ntini, Evgenia; Arner, Erik; Valen, Eivind; Li, Kang; Schwarzfischer, Lucia; Glatz, Dagmar; Raithel, Johanna; Lilje, Berit; Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jørgensen, Mette; Andersen, Peter Refsing; Bertin, Nicolas; Rackham, Owen; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Ishizu, Yuri; Shimizu, Yuri; Furuhata, Erina; Maeda, Shiori; Negishi, Yutaka; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Lassmann, Timo; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Kondo, Naoto; Kawai, Jun; Lennartsson, Andreas; Daub, Carsten O.; Heutink, Peter; Hume, David A.; Jensen, Torben Heick; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Müller, Ferenc; Consortium, The Fantom; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Carninci, Piero; Rehli, Michael; Sandelin, Albin

    2014-03-01

    Enhancers control the correct temporal and cell-type-specific activation of gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes. Knowing their properties, regulatory activity and targets is crucial to understand the regulation of differentiation and homeostasis. Here we use the FANTOM5 panel of samples, covering the majority of human tissues and cell types, to produce an atlas of active, in vivo-transcribed enhancers. We show that enhancers share properties with CpG-poor messenger RNA promoters but produce bidirectional, exosome-sensitive, relatively short unspliced RNAs, the generation of which is strongly related to enhancer activity. The atlas is used to compare regulatory programs between different cells at unprecedented depth, to identify disease-associated regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms, and to classify cell-type-specific and ubiquitous enhancers. We further explore the utility of enhancer redundancy, which explains gene expression strength rather than expression patterns. The online FANTOM5 enhancer atlas represents a unique resource for studies on cell-type-specific enhancers and gene regulation.

  13. An atlas of active enhancers across human cell types and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Hoof, Ilka; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Chen, Yun; Zhao, Xiaobei; Schmidl, Christian; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ntini, Evgenia; Arner, Erik; Valen, Eivind; Li, Kang; Schwarzfischer, Lucia; Glatz, Dagmar; Raithel, Johanna; Lilje, Berit; Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jørgensen, Mette; Andersen, Peter Refsing; Bertin, Nicolas; Rackham, Owen; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Ishizu, Yuri; Shimizu, Yuri; Furuhata, Erina; Maeda, Shiori; Negishi, Yutaka; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Lassmann, Timo; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Kondo, Naoto; Kawai, Jun; Lennartsson, Andreas; Daub, Carsten O.; Heutink, Peter; Hume, David A.; Jensen, Torben Heick; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Müller, Ferenc; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Carninci, Piero

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Enhancers control the correct temporal and cell type-specific activation of gene expression in higher eukaryotes. Knowing their properties, regulatory activity and targets is crucial to understand the regulation of differentiation and homeostasis. We use the FANTOM5 panel of samples covering the majority of human tissues and cell types to produce an atlas of active, in vivo transcribed enhancers. We show that enhancers share properties with CpG-poor mRNA promoters but produce bidirectional, exosome-sensitive, relatively short unspliced RNAs, the generation of which is strongly related to enhancer activity. The atlas is used to compare regulatory programs between different cells at unprecedented depth, identify disease-associated regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms, and classify cell type-specific and ubiquitous enhancers. We further explore the utility of enhancer redundancy, which explains gene expression strength rather than expression patterns. The online FANTOM5 enhancer atlas represents a unique resource for studies on cell type-specific enhancers and gene regulation. PMID:24670763

  14. An atlas of active enhancers across human cell types and tissues.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Robin; Gebhard, Claudia; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Hoof, Ilka; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Chen, Yun; Zhao, Xiaobei; Schmidl, Christian; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ntini, Evgenia; Arner, Erik; Valen, Eivind; Li, Kang; Schwarzfischer, Lucia; Glatz, Dagmar; Raithel, Johanna; Lilje, Berit; Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jørgensen, Mette; Andersen, Peter Refsing; Bertin, Nicolas; Rackham, Owen; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Baillie, J Kenneth; Ishizu, Yuri; Shimizu, Yuri; Furuhata, Erina; Maeda, Shiori; Negishi, Yutaka; Mungall, Christopher J; Meehan, Terrence F; Lassmann, Timo; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Kondo, Naoto; Kawai, Jun; Lennartsson, Andreas; Daub, Carsten O; Heutink, Peter; Hume, David A; Jensen, Torben Heick; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Müller, Ferenc; Forrest, Alistair R R; Carninci, Piero; Rehli, Michael; Sandelin, Albin

    2014-03-27

    Enhancers control the correct temporal and cell-type-specific activation of gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes. Knowing their properties, regulatory activity and targets is crucial to understand the regulation of differentiation and homeostasis. Here we use the FANTOM5 panel of samples, covering the majority of human tissues and cell types, to produce an atlas of active, in vivo-transcribed enhancers. We show that enhancers share properties with CpG-poor messenger RNA promoters but produce bidirectional, exosome-sensitive, relatively short unspliced RNAs, the generation of which is strongly related to enhancer activity. The atlas is used to compare regulatory programs between different cells at unprecedented depth, to identify disease-associated regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms, and to classify cell-type-specific and ubiquitous enhancers. We further explore the utility of enhancer redundancy, which explains gene expression strength rather than expression patterns. The online FANTOM5 enhancer atlas represents a unique resource for studies on cell-type-specific enhancers and gene regulation.

  15. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reendothelialize Porcine Heart Valve Scaffolds: Novel Perspectives in Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lanuti, Paola; Serafini, Francesco; Pierdomenico, Laura; Simeone, Pasquale; Bologna, Giuseppina; Ercolino, Eva; Di Silvestre, Sara; Guarnieri, Simone; Canosa, Carlo; Impicciatore, Gianna Gabriella; Chiarini, Stella; Magnacca, Francesco; Mariggiò, Maria Addolorata; Pandolfi, Assunta; Marchisio, Marco; Di Giammarco, Gabriele; Miscia, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Heart valve diseases are usually treated by surgical intervention addressed for the replacement of the damaged valve with a biosynthetic or mechanical prosthesis. Although this approach guarantees a good quality of life for patients, it is not free from drawbacks (structural deterioration, nonstructural dysfunction, and reintervention). To overcome these limitations, the heart valve tissue engineering (HVTE) is developing new strategies to synthesize novel types of valve substitutes, by identifying efficient sources of both ideal scaffolds and cells. In particular, a natural matrix, able to interact with cellular components, appears to be a suitable solution. On the other hand, the well-known Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs) plasticity, regenerative abilities, and their immunomodulatory capacities make them highly promising for HVTE applications. In the present study, we investigated the possibility to use porcine valve matrix to regenerate in vitro the valve endothelium by WJ-MSCs differentiated along the endothelial lineage, paralleled with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), used as positive control. Here, we were able to successfully decellularize porcine heart valves, which were then recellularized with both differentiated-WJ-MSCs and HUVECs. Data demonstrated that both cell types were able to reconstitute a cellular monolayer. Cells were able to positively interact with the natural matrix and demonstrated the surface expression of typical endothelial markers. Altogether, these data suggest that the interaction between a biological scaffold and WJ-MSCs allows the regeneration of a morphologically well-structured endothelium, opening new perspectives in the field of HVTE. PMID:26309804

  16. Notch signalling inhibits the adipogenic differentiation of single-cell-derived mesenchymal stem cell clones isolated from human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Osathanon, Thanaphum; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sastravaha, Panunn; Pavasant, Prasit

    2012-01-01

    ADSCs (adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are candidate adult stem cells for regenerative medicine. Notch signalling participates in the differentiation of a heterogeneous ADSC population. We have isolated, human adipose tissue-derived single-cell clones using a cloning ring technique and characterized for their stem cell characteristics. The role of Notch signalling in the differentiation capacity of these adipose-derived single-cell-clones has also been investigated. All 14 clones expressed embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell marker genes. These clones could differentiate into both osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. However, the differentiation potential of each clone was different. Low adipogenic clones had significantly higher mRNA expression levels of Notch 2, 3 and 4, Jagged1, as well as Delta1, compared with those of high adipogenic clones. In contrast, no changes in expression of Notch signalling component mRNA between low and high osteogenic clones was found. Notch receptor mRNA expression decreased with the adipogenic differentiation of both low and high adipogenic clones. The γ-secretase inhibitor, DAPT (N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-(S)-phenylglycine t-butyl ester), enhanced adipogenic differentiation. Correspondingly, cells seeded on a Notch ligand (Jagged1) bound surface showed lower intracellular lipid accumulation. These results were noted in both low and high adipogenic clones, indicating that Notch signalling inhibited the adipogenic differentiation of adipose ADSC clones, and could be used to identify an adipogenic susceptible subpopulation for soft-tissue augmentation application.

  17. Increased expression of the PRL-3 gene in human oral squamous cell carcinoma and dysplasia tissues.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Nur Mohammad Monsur; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Kameyama, Takeshi; Tada, Mitsuhiro; Nakagawa, Koji; Yoshida, Shoko; Kashiwazaki, Haruhiko; Yamazaki, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yukiko; Sasaki, Akira; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi; Inoue, Nobuo; Moriuchi, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) belongs to a class of the protein tyrosine phosphatase family, which is known so far to consist of 3 members, PRL-1, PRL-2, and PRL-3. The aim of this study was to uncover the role of PRL genes in development of oral malignancy. We analyzed expression levels of the 3 PRL genes in 50 human oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs), 11 dysplasia and 12 normal mucosa tissues by a real-time RT-PCR method. PRL-3 but not PRL-1 or PRL-2 expressions were significantly higher in OSCC and dysplasia than in normal mucosa tissues. Additionally, PRL-3 expressions were significantly higher in OSCC tissues harboring dominant-negative p53 or recessive p53 mutation than in those harboring wild-type p53. These results suggest that PRL-3 plays a role in oral cancer development and can be useful as a marker of pre-malignant and malignant lesion of oral mucosa.

  18. The suitability of human adipose-derived stem cells for the engineering of ligament tissue.

    PubMed

    Eagan, Michael J; Zuk, Patricia A; Zhao, Ke-Wei; Bluth, Benjamin E; Brinkmann, Elyse J; Wu, Benjamin M; McAllister, David R

    2012-10-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the one of the most common sports-related injuries. With its poor healing capacity, surgical reconstruction using either autografts or allografts is currently required to restore function. However, serious complications are associated with graft reconstructions and the number of such reconstructions has steadily risen over the years, necessitating the search for an alternative approach to ACL repair. Such an approach may likely be tissue engineering. Recent engineering approaches using ligament-derived fibroblasts have been promising, but the slow growth rate of such fibroblasts in vitro may limit their practical application. More promising results are being achieved using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) is often proposed as an alternative choice to the MSC and, as such, may be a suitable stem cell for ligament engineering. However, the use of ASCs in ligament engineering still remains relatively unexplored. Therefore, in this study, the potential use of human ASCs in ligament tissue engineering was initially explored by examining their ability to express several ligament markers under growth factor treatment. ASC populations treated for up to 4 weeks with TGFβ1 or IGF1 did not show any significant and consistent upregulation in the expression of collagen types 1 and 3, tenascin C and scleraxis. While treatment with EGF or bFGF resulted in increased tenascin C expression, increased expression of collagens 1 and 3 were never observed. Therefore, simple in vitro treatment of human ASC populations with growth factors may not stimulate their ligament differentiative potential.

  19. Human dental pulp stem cells cultured onto dentin derived scaffold can regenerate dentin-like tissue in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ha Le Bao; Doan, Vu Nguyen

    2015-12-01

    Regeneration of dentin tissues in the pulp space of teeth serves the ultimate goal of preserving teeth via endodontic approaches. In recent times, many studies suggested that human dentin scaffolds combined with dental stem cells was a potential strategy for the complete dentin tissue regeneration. In this study, human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and cultured. Dentin specimens were prepared from human third molars and treated with ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid and citric acid to remove the smear layer. Then, DPSCs were cultured onto human treated dentin (hTD) and implanted in mouse model for 4, 6 and 8 weeks. The resulting grafts were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin stain and immunohistochemical stains. As a result, DPSCs were supported and induced to regenerate of dentin-like tissues which expressed specific dentin markers such as dentin sialophosphoprotein and dentin matrix protein 1 by combination with hTD in vivo. Furthermore, cells existed in the newly-formed dentin-like tissues also expressed typical human mitochondria antibodies, demonstrated that new tissues originated from human. In conclusion, the obtain results extend hopefully newly-established therapy to apply in endodontics and traumatic dental hard tissues.

  20. Tumor cell and connective tissue cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Transfer of platelet-derived growth factor-AB/BB to stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, C.; Branting, M.; Gerdin, B.; Rubin, K.

    1997-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying stimulation of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) beta-receptors expressed on connective tissue cells in human colorectal adenocarcinoma were investigated in this study. PDGF-AB/BB, but not PDGF receptors, was expressed by tumor cells in situ, as well as in tumor cell isolates of low passage from human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In an experimental co-culture system, conditioned medium from tumor cells only marginally activated PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. In contrast, co-culturing of the two cell types led to a marked PDGF beta-receptor activation. Functional PDGF-AB/BB was found to be associated with heparinase-I-sensitive components on the tumor cell surface. PDGF-AB/BB, isolated from heparinase-I-sensitive cell surface components, induced a marked activation of PDGF beta-receptors. Furthermore, co-culturing tumor cells together with fibroblasts led to a sustained activation of PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. Double immunofluorescence staining of tissue sections from human colorectal adenocarcinoma, combined with computer-aided image analysis, revealed that nonproliferating tumor cells were the predominant cellular source of PDGF-AB/BB in the tumor stroma. In addition, PDGF-AB/BB-expressing tumor cells were found juxtapositioned to microvascular cells expressing activated PDGF beta-receptors. Confocal microscopy revealed a cytoplasmic and cell-membrane-associated expression of PDGF-AB/BB in tumor cells situated in the stroma. In contrast, epithelial cells situated in normal or tumorous acinar structures revealed only a cell-membrane-associated PDGF-AB/BB expression. The is vitro and in situ results demonstrate that tumor cells not only facilitate but also have the ability to modulate connective tissue cell responsiveness to PDGF-AB/BB in a paracrine fashion, through direct cell-cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9250160

  1. Functional Expression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor on Mast Cells Populating Human Endometriotic Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Orsaria, Maria; Marzinotto, Stefania; Londero, Ambrogio P; Bulfoni, Michela; Candotti, Veronica; Zanello, Andrea; Ballico, Maurizio; Mimmi, Maria C; Calcagno, Angelo; Marchesoni, Diego; Di Loreto, Carla; Beltrami, Antonio P; Cesselli, Daniela; Gri, Giorgia

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis is an inflammatory disease characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrial tissue outside the uterus. A diffuse infiltration of mast cells (MCs) is observed throughout endometriotic lesions, but little is known about how these cells contribute to the network of molecules that modulate the growth of ectopic endometrial implants and promote endometriosis-associated inflammation. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR), a transcription factor known to respond to environmental toxins and endogenous compounds, is present in MCs. In response to AhR activation, MCs produce IL-17 and reactive oxygen species, highlighting the potential impact of AhR ligands on inflammation via MCs. Here, we investigated the possibility that endometrial MCs promote an inflammatory microenvironment by sensing AhR ligands, thus sustaining endometriosis development. Using human endometriotic tissue (ET) samples, we performed the following experiments: i) examined the cytokine expression profile; ii) counted AhR-expressing MCs; iii) verified the phenotype of AhR-expressing MCs to establish whether MCs have a tolerogenic (IL-10-positive) or inflammatory (IL-17-positive) phenotype; iv) measured the presence of AhR ligands (tryptophan-derived kynurenine) and tryptophan-metabolizing enzymes (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1)); v) treated ET organ cultures with an AhR antagonist in vitro to measure changes in the cytokine milieu; and vi) measured the growth of endometrial stromal cells cultured with AhR-activated MC-conditioned medium. We found that ET tissue was conducive to cytokine production, orchestrating chronic inflammation and a population of AhR-expressing MCs that are both IL-17 and IL-10-positive. ET was rich in IDO1 and the AhR-ligand kynurenine compared with control tissue, possibly promoting MC activation through AhR. ET was susceptible to treatment with an AhR antagonist, and endometrial stromal cell growth was improved in the presence of soluble factors released by

  2. Interaction of Tissue Engineering Substrates with Serum Proteins and Its Influence on Human Primary Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Tamilselvan; Niegelhell, Katrin; Nagaraj, Chandran; Reishofer, David; Spirk, Stefan; Olschewski, Andrea; Stana Kleinschek, Karin; Kargl, Rupert

    2017-02-13

    Polymer-based biomaterials particularly polycaprolactone (PCL) are one of the most promising substrates for tissue engineering. The surface chemistry of these materials plays a major role since it governs protein adsorption, cell adhesion, viability, degradation, and biocompatibility in the first place. This study correlates the interaction of the most abundant serum proteins (albumin, immunoglobulins, fibrinogen) with the surface properties of PCL and its influence on the morphology and metabolic activity of primary human arterial endothelial cells that are seeded on the materials. Prior to that, thin films of PCL are manufactured by spin-coating and characterized in detail. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), a multiparameter surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy instrument (MP-SPR), wettability data, and atomic force microscopy are combined to elucidate the pH-dependent protein adsorption on the PCL substrates. Primary endothelial cells are cultured on the protein modified polymer, and conclusions are drawn on the significant impact of type and form of proteins coatings on cell morphology and metabolic activity.

  3. Ubiquitination of tissue transglutaminase is modulated by interferon alpha in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Carla; Marra, Monica; Giuberti, Gaia; D'Alessandro, Anna Maria; Porta, Raffaele; Cozzolino, Anna; Caraglia, Michele; Abbruzzese, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    The addition of 2500 i.u./ml interferon alpha (IFNalpha) for 48 h induced apoptosis, and caused an approx. 4-fold increase in the activity and expression of tissue transglutaminase (tTG), in human lung cancer H1355 cells. However, the increase in mRNA levels for tTG was just 1.6-fold. On the basis of these data, we investigated whether tTG levels may be regulated through regulation of its degradation via ubiquitination. It was found that 2500 i.u./ml IFNalpha induced a time-dependent decrease in tTG ubiquitination. On the other hand, addition of the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin led to accumulation of the ubiquitinated form of the enzyme and to a consequent increase in its expression. Treatment of the cells with the two agents combined antagonized the accumulation of the ubiquitinated isoforms of tTG induced by lactacystin and caused a potentiation of tTG expression. Moreover, the tTG inducer retinoic acid was also able to cause increased expression and ubiquitination of tTG in H1355 cells. The addition of monodansylcadaverine (a tTG inhibitor) to IFNalpha-treated H1355 cells completely antagonized growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by the cytokine. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that tTG is ubiquitinated and degraded by a proteasome-dependent pathway. Moreover, IFNalpha can, at least in part, induce apoptosis through the modulation of this pathway. PMID:12401132

  4. Minimally oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces tissue factor expression in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Drake, T. A.; Hannani, K.; Fei, H. H.; Lavi, S.; Berliner, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein is present in atherosclerotic lesions and has been proposed to play an important role in atherogenesis through its biologic effects on vascular cells. This study examined the effects of minimally oxidized preparations of LDL (MM-LDL) on tissue factor (TF) expression by cultured human endothelial cells. Low-density lipoprotein purified from normal donors was modified by exposure to iron or by prolonged storage, resulting in levels of thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances of approximately 2.5 to 4 nmoles/mg cholesterol. Preparations had less than 2.5 pg of endotoxin per microgram LDL and had no intrinsic procoagulant activity. This form of modified but not native LDL induced TF expression in endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Peak TF coagulant activity in cells exposed to 40 micrograms/ml MM-LDL were observed at 4 to 6 hours, and ranged from 50 to 500 pg/10(5) cells, compared with less than 10 pg/10(5) cells exposed to native LDL. Northern blot analysis showed TF mRNA levels to increase approximately 30-fold with exposure to MM-LDL for 2 hours. Induction of TF activity was dependent on the concentration of MM-LDL from 1 microgram/ml to 80 micrograms/ml, a range in which cell viability and morphology were unaffected. The findings suggest that minimally oxidized LDL may be a local mediator promoting thrombosis in atherosclerotic lesions. Images Figure 1 PMID:2000938

  5. Repair of full-thickness tendon injury using connective tissue progenitors efficiently derived from human embryonic stem cells and fetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Shahar; Leshansky, Lucy; Zussman, Eyal; Burman, Michael; Srouji, Samer; Livne, Erella; Abramov, Natalie; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2010-10-01

    The use of stem cells for tissue engineering (TE) encourages scientists to design new platforms in the field of regenerative and reconstructive medicine. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have been proposed to be an important cell source for cell-based TE applications as well as an exciting tool for investigating the fundamentals of human development. Here, we describe the efficient derivation of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from hESC lines and fetal tissues. The CTPs were significantly expanded and induced to generate tendon tissues in vitro, with ultrastructural characteristics and biomechanical properties typical of mature tendons. We describe a simple method for engineering tendon grafts that can successfully repair injured Achilles tendons and restore the ankle joint extension movement in mice. We also show the CTP's ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and fat both in vitro and in vivo. This study offers evidence for the possibility of using stem cell-derived engineered grafts to replace missing tissues, and sets a basic platform for future cell-based TE applications in the fields of orthopedics and reconstructive surgery.

  6. Human adipose-derived stem cells: definition, isolation, tissue-engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Nae, S; Bordeianu, I; Stăncioiu, A T; Antohi, N

    2013-01-01

    Recent researches have demonstrated that the most effective repair system of the body is represented by stem cells - unspecialized cells, capable of self-renewal through successive mitoses, which have also the ability to transform into different cell types through differentiation. The discovery of adult stem cells represented an important step in regenerative medicine because they no longer raises ethical or legal issues and are more accessible. Only in 2002, stem cells isolated from adipose tissue were described as multipotent stem cells. Adipose tissue stem cells benefits in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are numerous. Development of adipose tissue engineering techniques offers a great potential in surpassing the existing limits faced by the classical approaches used in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Adipose tissue engineering clinical applications are wide and varied, including reconstructive, corrective and cosmetic procedures. Nowadays, adipose tissue engineering is a fast developing field, both in terms of fundamental researches and medical applications, addressing issues related to current clinical pathology or trauma management of soft tissue injuries in different body locations.

  7. Cartilage Regeneration in Human with Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: Current Status in Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Kartolo, Wiwi Andralia; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common debilitating disorders among the elderly population. At present, there is no definite cure for the underlying causes of OA. However, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in the form of stromal vascular fraction (SVF) may offer an alternative at this time. ADSCs are one type of mesenchymal stem cells that have been utilized and have demonstrated an ability to regenerate cartilage. ADSCs have been shown to regenerate cartilage in a variety of animal models also. Non-culture-expanded ADSCs, in the form of SVF along with platelet rich plasma (PRP), have recently been used in humans to treat OA and other cartilage abnormalities. These ADSCs have demonstrated effectiveness without any serious side effects. However, due to regulatory issues, only ADSCs in the form of SVF are currently allowed for clinical uses in humans. Culture-expanded ADSCs, although more convenient, require clinical trials for a regulatory approval prior to uses in clinical settings. Here we present a systematic review of currently available clinical studies involving ADSCs in the form of SVF and in the culture-expanded form, with or without PRP, highlighting the clinical effectiveness and safety in treating OA. PMID:26881220

  8. Access to bacteriophage therapy: discouraging experiences from the human cell and tissue legal framework.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, G; Huys, I; De Vos, D; De Coninck, A; Roseeuw, D; Kets, E; Vanderkelen, A; Draye, J P; Rose, T; Jennes, S; Ceulemans, C; Pirnay, J P

    2016-02-01

    Cultures of human epithelial cells (keratinocytes) are used as an additional surgical tool to treat critically burnt patients. Initially, the production environment of keratinocyte grafts was regulated exclusively by national regulations. In 2004, the European Tissues and Cells Directive 2004/23/EC (transposed into Belgian Law) imposed requirements that resulted in increased production costs and no significant increase in quality and/or safety. In 2007, Europe published Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 on Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products. Overnight, cultured keratinocytes became (arguably) 'Advanced' Therapy Medicinal Products to be produced as human medicinal products. The practical impact of these amendments was (and still is) considerable. A similar development appears imminent in bacteriophage therapy. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that can be used for tackling the problem of bacterial resistance development to antibiotics. Therapeutic natural bacteriophages have been in clinical use for almost 100 years. Regulators today are framing the (re-)introduction of (natural) bacteriophage therapy into 'modern western' medicine as biological medicinal products, also subject to stringent regulatory medicinal products requirements. In this paper, we look back on a century of bacteriophage therapy to make the case that therapeutic natural bacteriophages should not be classified under the medicinal product regulatory frames as they exist today. It is our call to authorities to not repeat the mistake of the past.

  9. Impact of Cell Composition and Geometry on Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells-Derived Engineered Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nakane, Takeichiro; Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Tinney, Joseph P.; Yuan, Fangping; Kowalski, William J.; Ye, Fei; LeBlanc, Amanda J.; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K.; Keller, Bradley B.

    2017-01-01

    The current study describes a scalable, porous large-format engineered cardiac tissue (LF-ECT) composed of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived multiple lineage cardiac cells with varied 3D geometries and cell densities developed towards the goal of scale-up for large animal pre-clinical studies. We explored multiple 15 × 15 mm ECT geometries using molds with rectangular internal staggered posts (mesh, ME), without posts (plain sheet, PS), or long parallel posts (multiple linear bundles, ML) and a gel matrix containing hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, endothelial, and vascular mural cells matured in vitro for 14 days. ME-ECTs displayed the lowest dead cell ratio (p < 0.001) and matured into 0.5 mm diameter myofiber bundles with greater 3D cell alignment and higher active stress than PS-ECTs. Increased initial ECT cell number beyond 6 M per construct resulted in reduced cell survival and lower active stress. The 6M-ME-ECTs implanted onto 1 week post-infarct immune tolerant rat hearts engrafted, displayed evidence for host vascular coupling, and recovered myocardial structure and function with reduced scar area. We generated a larger (30 × 30 mm) ME-ECT to confirm scalability. Thus, large-format ECTs generated from hiPSC-derived cardiac cells may be feasible for large animal preclinical cardiac regeneration paradigms. PMID:28368043

  10. Toad skin extract cinobufatini inhibits migration of human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells into a model stromal tissue.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Munehiro; Mori, Shuya; Kamoshida, Yo; Kawaguchi, Shota; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko; Gao, Bo; Tang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Toad skin extract cinobufatini study has been focused on anticancer activity, especially apoptosis-inducing activity by bufosteroids. The present study examined effect of the toad skin extract on cancer cell migration into model stromal tissues. Human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 was incubated in the presence or absence of toad skin extract on a surface of reconstituted type I collagen gel as a model stromal tissue allowing the cells to migrate into the gel. Frozen sections were microscopically observed after azan staining. Data showed a decrease of cell number in a microscopic field and shortening of cell migration into the model stromal tissue in a dose dependent manner. This suggests that toad skin extract may possess migration-preventing activity in addition to cell toxicity such as apoptosis-inducing activity. The multifaceted effects including apoptosis-inducing and cancer cell migration-preventing activities would improve usefulness of toad skin extract cinobufatini as an anticancer medicine.

  11. Presence of interleukin-4-producing cells for human bone regeneration after application of guided tissue regeneration membranes.

    PubMed

    Kabashima, H; Nagata, K

    2001-07-01

    To study the process of bone regeneration we examined three samples of periapical regenerative tissue obtained from two patients under a guided tissue regeneration treatment in endodontic surgery by the immunohistochemical and enzyme histochemical methods. The regenerative tissue consisted of a large number of fibroblast-like cells and a small number of mononuclear cells. Fibroblast-like cells stained positively for alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin, whereas mononuclear cells stained positively for CD4. Interleukin-4-producing cells could be detected in adjacent sections. However, interferon-y-producing cells could not be detected. These findings suggest that interleukin-4-producing cells may be one of the elements associated with success in the human bone regeneration process in vivo.

  12. Value of human amniotic epithelial cells in tissue engineering for cornea.

    PubMed

    Fatimah, Simat Siti; Ng, Sook Luan; Chua, Kien Hui; Hayati, Abdul Rahman; Tan, Ay Eeng; Tan, Geok Chin

    2010-11-01

    Human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) are potentially one of the key players in tissue engineering due to their easy availability. The aim of the present study was to develop an optimal isolation and transportation technique, as well as to determine the immunophenotype and epithelial gene expression of hAECs. Amnion was mechanically peeled off from the chorion and digested with trypsin-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The isolated hAECs were cultured in medium containing 10 ng/mL epidermal growth factor until P4. The epithelial gene expression, cell surface antigen and protein expression of hAECs were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. hAECs were also cultured in adipogenic, osteogenic and neurogenic induction media. The best cell yield of hAECs was seen in the digestion of 15 pieces of amnion (2 × 2 cm) and isolated 30 min after digestion with trypsin. F12:Dulbecco's modified eagle medium was the best medium for short term storage at 4 °C. hAECs expressed CD9, CD44, CD73 and CD90, and negligibly expressed CD31, CD34, CD45 and CD117. After serial passage, CK3, CK19 and involucrin gene expressions were upregulated, while p63, CK1 and CK14 gene expressions were downregulated. Sustained gene expressions of integrin β1 and CK18 were observed. At initial culture, these cells might have stem-like properties. However, they differentiated after serial passage. Nonetheless, hAECs have epithelial stem cell characteristics and have the potential to differentiate into corneal epithelial cells. Further investigations are still needed to elucidate the mechanism of differentiation involved and to optimize the culture condition for long term in vitro culture.

  13. Butyrate stimulates tissue-type plasminogen-activator synthesis in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, T; van den Berg, J; Töns, A; Platenburg, G; Rijken, D C; van den Berg, E

    1987-01-01

    Incubation of cultured human endothelial cells with 5 mM-dibutyryl cyclic AMP led to an approx. 2-fold increase in tissue-type plasminogen-activator (t-PA) production over a 24 h incubation period. The stimulating effect of dibutyryl cyclic AMP could be explained by the slow liberation of butyrate, as the effect could be reproduced by addition of free butyrate to the medium, but not by addition of 8-bromo cyclic AMP or forskolin, agents known to raise intracellular cyclic AMP levels. With butyrate, an accelerated accumulation of t-PA antigen in the conditioned medium (CM) was observed after a lag period of about 6 h. Increasing amounts of butyrate caused an increasingly stimulatory effect, reaching a plateau at 5 mM-butyrate. The relative enhancement of t-PA production in the presence of 5 mM-butyrate varied among different endothelial cell cultures from 6- to 25-fold in 24 h CM. Such an increase in t-PA production was observed with both arterial and venous endothelial cells. The butyrate-induced increases in t-PA production were accompanied by increased t-PA mRNA levels. Analysis of radiolabelled CM and cell extracts by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis indicated that the potent action of butyrate is probably restricted to a small number of proteins. The accumulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in CM from butyrate-treated cells varied only moderately. In our study of the relationship between structure and stimulatory activity, we found that a straight-chain C4 monocarboxylate structure with a methyl group at one end and a carboxy moiety at the other seems to be required for the optimal induction of t-PA in cultured endothelial cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:2827633

  14. Comparison of human nasal epithelial cells grown as explant outgrowth cultures or dissociated tissue cultures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian; Meng, Na; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Luo

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cell growth characteristics, ciliated cell differentiation, and function of human nasal epithelial cells established as explant outgrowth cultures or dissociated tissue cultures. Human nasal mucosa of the uncinate process was obtained by endoscopy and epithelial cell cultures were established by explant outgrowth or dissociated tissue culture methods. Epithelial cell growth characteristics were observed by inverted phase contrast microscopy. Ciliated cell differentiation was detected by β-tubulin IVand ZO-1 immunocytochemistry. Basal and ATP-stimulated ciliary beat frequency (CBF) was measured using a highspeed digital microscopic imaging system. Both the explant and dissociated tissue cultures established as monolayers with tight junctions and differentiated cell composition, with both types of cultures comprising ciliated and non-ciliated epithelial cells. Fibroblasts were also frequently found in explant cultures but rarely seen in dissociated tissue cultures. In both culture systems, the highest ciliated cell density appeared at 7th-10th culture day and declined with time, with the lifespan of ciliated cells ranging from 14 to 21 days. Overall, 10% of the cells in explant cultures and 20% of the cells in the dissociated tissue cultures were ciliated. These two cultures demonstrated similar ciliary beat frequency values at baseline (7.78 ± 1.99 Hz and 7.91 ± 2.52 Hz, respectively) and reacted equivalently following stimulation with 100 μM ATP. The results of this study indicate that both the explant outgrowth and dissociated tissue culture techniques are suitable for growing well-differentiated nasal ciliated and non-ciliated cells, which have growth characteristics and ciliary activity similar to those of nasal epithelial cells in vivo.

  15. Decrease of apoptosis markers during adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lo Furno, Debora; Graziano, Adriana C E; Caggia, Silvia; Perrotta, Rosario E; Tarico, Maria Stella; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera

    2013-05-01

    Although the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue (AT) have been widely studied, relatively little information is available on the underlying mechanism of apoptosis during the adipogenic differentiation. Thus, the aim of this study was to analyze how the expression of some apoptotic markers is affected by in vitro expansion during adipogenic differentiation of AT-MSCs. The cultures incubated or not with adipogenic medium were investigated by Western blot at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days for the production of p53, AKT, pAKT, Bax, PDCD4 and PTEN. MSCs were recognized for their immunoreactivity to MSC-specific cell types markers by immunocytochemical procedure. The effectiveness of adipogenic differentiation was assessed by staining with Sudan III and examination of adipogenic markers expression, such as PPAR-γ and FABP, at different time points by Western blot. The adipogenic differentiation medium led to the appearance, after 7 days, of larger rounded cells presenting numerous vacuoles containing lipids in which it was evident a red-orange staining, that increased in size in a time-dependent manner, parallel to an increase of the levels of expression of PPAR-γ and FABP. More than 50 % of human MSCs were fully differentiated into adipocytes within the four-week induction period. The results showed that during adipogenic differentiation of AT-MSCs the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is activated and that p53, PTEN, PDCD4, and Bax proteins are down-regulated in time-dependent manner. Our data provide new information on the behavior of some apoptotic markers during adipogenic differentiation of AT-MSCs to apply for tissues repair and regeneration.

  16. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2005-07-01

    Lack of accurate data for epidemiological studies of low dose radiation effects necessitates development of dosimetric models allowing prediction of cancer risks for different organs. The objective of this work is to develop a model of the radiation response of human bronchiolar tissue with single cell resolution. The computer model describes epithelial tissue as an ensemble of individual cells, with the geometry of a human bronchiole and the properties of different cell types are taken into account. The model simulates the tissue kinetics and radiation exposure in four dimensions: three spatial dimensions and a temporal dimension. The bronchiole is modeled as a regular hollow cylinder with the epithelial cells of three different types (basal, secretory, and ciliated) lining its interior. For the purposes of assessment of radiation damage to the cells only the nuclei of the cells have been modeled. Subroutines describing cellular kinetics have been developed to simulate cell turnover in a normal epithelial tissue. Monte Carlo subroutines have been developed to simulate exposure to alpha particles; the GEANT4 toolkit has been used to simulate exposure to low LET radiation. Each hit cell is provided with a record of energy deposition, and this record is passed to the progeny if the cell survives. The model output provides data on the number of basal progenitor cells in different phases of a cell life-cycle and secretory to ciliated cell ratio after several generations of cell proliferation. The model calculates labeling and mitotic indices and estimates the average cell turnover time for the bronchiolar tissue. Microdosimetric calculations are performed for cells traversed by ionizing particles. The model will be used to assess the accumulation of damage in cells due to protracted low level radiation exposure. The model output may provide directions for the future experimental design.

  17. Tissue resident memory T cells in the human conjunctiva and immune signatures in human dry eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Tanima; Lee, Ryan; Hou, Aihua; Tong, Louis; Chandy, K. George

    2017-01-01

    Non-recirculating resident memory (TRM) and recirculating T cells mount vigorous immune responses to both self and foreign antigens in barrier tissues like the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract. Using impression cytology followed by flow cytometry we identified two TRM subsets and four recirculating T-subsets in the healthy human ocular surface. In dry eye disease, principal component analysis (PCA) revealed two clusters of patients with distinct T-cell signatures. Increased conjunctival central memory and naïve T cells characterized Cluster-1 patients, and increased CD8+ TRMs and CD4+ recirculating memory T cells characterized Cluster-2 patients. Interestingly these T-cell signatures are associated with different clinical features: the first signature correlated with increased ocular redness, and the second with reduced tear break up times. These findings open the door to immune-based characterization of dry eye disease and T-subset specific immunotherapies to suppress T-subsets involved in disease. They may also help with patient stratification during clinical trials of immunomodulators. PMID:28345628

  18. Tissue resident memory T cells in the human conjunctiva and immune signatures in human dry eye disease.

    PubMed

    Bose, Tanima; Lee, Ryan; Hou, Aihua; Tong, Louis; Chandy, K George

    2017-03-27

    Non-recirculating resident memory (TRM) and recirculating T cells mount vigorous immune responses to both self and foreign antigens in barrier tissues like the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract. Using impression cytology followed by flow cytometry we identified two TRM subsets and four recirculating T-subsets in the healthy human ocular surface. In dry eye disease, principal component analysis (PCA) revealed two clusters of patients with distinct T-cell signatures. Increased conjunctival central memory and naïve T cells characterized Cluster-1 patients, and increased CD8(+) TRMs and CD4(+) recirculating memory T cells characterized Cluster-2 patients. Interestingly these T-cell signatures are associated with different clinical features: the first signature correlated with increased ocular redness, and the second with reduced tear break up times. These findings open the door to immune-based characterization of dry eye disease and T-subset specific immunotherapies to suppress T-subsets involved in disease. They may also help with patient stratification during clinical trials of immunomodulators.

  19. Tooth Tissue Engineering: The Importance of Blood Products as a Supplement in Tissue Culture Medium for Human Pulp Dental Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pisciolaro, Ricardo Luiz; Duailibi, Monica Talarico; Novo, Neil Ferreira; Juliano, Yara; Pallos, Debora; Yelick, Pamela Crotty; Vacanti, Joseph Phillip; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Duailibi, Silvio Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    One of the goals in using cells for tissue engineering (TE) and cell therapy consists of optimizing the medium for cell culture. The present study compares three different blood product supplements for improved cell proliferation and protection against DNA damage in cultured human dental pulp stem cells for tooth TE applications. Human cells from dental pulp were first characterized as adult stem cells (ectomesenchymal mixed origin) by flow cytometry. Next, four different cell culture conditions were tested: I, supplement-free; II, supplemented with fetal bovine serum; III, allogeneic human serum; and IV, autologous human serum. Cultured cells were then characterized for cell proliferation, mineralized nodule formation, and colony-forming units (CFU) capability. After 28 days in culture, the comet assay was performed to assess possible damage in cellular DNA. Our results revealed that Protocol IV achieved higher cell proliferation than Protocol I (p = 0.0112). Protocols II and III resulted in higher cell proliferation than Protocol I, but no statistical differences were found relative to Protocol IV. The comet assay revealed less cell damage in cells cultured using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. The damage percentage observed on Protocol II was significantly higher than all other protocols. CFUs capability was highest using Protocol IV (p = 0.0018) and III, respectively, and the highest degree of mineralization was observed using Protocol IV as compared to Protocols II and III. Protocol IV resulted in significantly improved cell proliferation, and no cell damage was observed. These results demonstrate that human blood product supplements can be used as feasible supplements for culturing adult human dental stem cells.

  20. Transcriptional Networks in Single Perivascular Cells Sorted from Human Adipose Tissue Reveal a Hierarchy of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hardy, W Reef; Moldovan, Nicanor I; Moldovan, Leni; Livak, Kenneth J; Datta, Krishna; Goswami, Chirayu; Corselli, Mirko; Traktuev, Dmitry O; Murray, Iain R; Péault, Bruno; March, Keith

    2017-02-24

    Adipose tissue is a rich source of multipotent mesenchymal stem-like cells, located in the perivascular niche. Based on their surface markers, these have been assigned to two main categories: CD31(-) /CD45(-) /CD34(+) /CD146(-) cells (adventitial stromal/stem cells [ASCs]) and CD31(-) /CD45(-) /CD34(-) /CD146(+) cells (pericytes [PCs]). These populations display heterogeneity of unknown significance. We hypothesized that aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, a functional marker of primitivity, could help to better define ASC and PC subclasses. To this end, the stromal vascular fraction from a human lipoaspirate was simultaneously stained with fluorescent antibodies to CD31, CD45, CD34, and CD146 antigens and the ALDH substrate Aldefluor, then sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Individual ASCs (n = 67) and PCs (n = 73) selected from the extremities of the ALDH-staining spectrum were transcriptionally profiled by Fluidigm single-cell quantitative polymerase chain reaction for a predefined set (n = 429) of marker genes. To these single-cell data, we applied differential expression and principal component and clustering analysis, as well as an original gene coexpression network reconstruction algorithm. Despite the stochasticity at the single-cell level, covariation of gene expression analysis yielded multiple network connectivity parameters suggesting that these perivascular progenitor cell subclasses possess the following order of maturity: (a) ALDH(br) ASC (most primitive); (b) ALDH(dim) ASC; (c) ALDH(br) PC; (d) ALDH(dim) PC (least primitive). This order was independently supported by specific combinations of class-specific expressed genes and further confirmed by the analysis of associated signaling pathways. In conclusion, single-cell transcriptional analysis of four populations isolated from fat by surface markers and enzyme activity suggests a developmental hierarchy among perivascular mesenchymal stem cells supported by markers and

  1. Isolation of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Cryopreserved Human Umbilical Cord Tissue.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2016-02-01

    Umbilical cord stroma is an easily available, convenient, and promising source of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for regenerative medicine. Cryogenic storage of umbilical cord tissue provides more possibilities for further isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for autologous transplantation or scientific purposes. Here we developed a protocol for preparation of the whole umbilical cord tissue for cryogenic storage that in combination with the previously described modified method of isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells allowed us to isolate cells with high proliferative potential, typical phenotype, and preserved differentiation potencies.

  2. Characterization of Three-Dimensional Retinal Tissue Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Adherent Monolayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ratnesh K.; Mallela, Ramya K.; Cornuet, Pamela K.; Reifler, Aaron N.; Chervenak, Andrew P.; West, Michael D.; Wong, Kwoon Y.; Nasonkin, Igor O.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy of retinal degenerative conditions is a promising modality to treat blindness, but requires new strategies to improve the number of functionally integrating cells. Grafting semidifferentiated retinal tissue rather than progenitors allows preservation of tissue structure and connectivity in retinal grafts, mandatory for vision restoration. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we derived retinal tissue growing in adherent conditions consisting of conjoined neural retina and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and evaluated cell fate determination and maturation in this tissue. We found that deriving such tissue in adherent conditions robustly induces all eye field genes (RX, PAX6, LHX2, SIX3, SIX6) and produces four layers of pure populations of retinal cells: RPE (expressing NHERF1, EZRIN, RPE65, DCT, TYR, TYRP, MITF, PMEL), early photoreceptors (PRs) (coexpressing CRX and RCVRN), inner nuclear layer neurons (expressing CALB2), and retinal ganglion cells [RGCs, expressing BRN3B and Neurofilament (NF) 200]. Furthermore, we found that retinal progenitors divide at the apical side of the hESC-derived retinal tissue (next to the RPE layer) and then migrate toward the basal side, similar to that found during embryonic retinogenesis. We detected synaptogenesis in hESC-derived retinal tissue, and found neurons containing many synaptophysin-positive boutons within the RGC and PR layers. We also observed long NF200-positive axons projected by RGCs toward the apical side. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that putative amacrine and/or ganglion cells exhibited electrophysiological responses reminiscent of those in normal retinal neurons. These responses included voltage-gated Na+ and K+ currents, depolarization-induced spiking, and responses to neurotransmitter receptor agonists. Differentiation in adherent conditions allows generation of long and flexible pieces of 3D retinal tissue suitable for isolating transplantable slices of tissue for

  3. Characterisation of inorganic microparticles in pigment cells of human gut associated lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J J; Ainley, C C; Harvey, R S; Mason, I M; Kendall, M D; Sankey, E A; Dhillon, A P; Thompson, R P

    1996-01-01

    Macrophages at the base of human gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), become loaded early in life with dark granular pigment that is rich in aluminium, silicon, and titanium. The molecular characteristics, intracellular distribution, and source of this pigment is described. Laser scanning and electron microscopy showed that pigmented macrophages were often closely related to collagen fibres and plasma cells in GALT of both small and large intestine and contained numerous phagolysosomes, previously described as granules, that are rich in electron dense submicron sized particles. Morphological assessment, x ray microanalysis, and image electron energy loss spectroscopy showed three distinct types of microparticle: type I - spheres of titanium dioxide, 100-200 nm diameter, characterised as the synthetic food-additive polymorph anatase; type II - aluminosilicates, < 100-400 nm in length, generally of flaky appearance, often with adsorbed surface iron, and mostly characteristic of the natural clay mineral kaolinite; and type III - mixed environmental silicates without aluminium, 100-700 nm in length and of variable morphology. Thus, this cellular pigment that is partly derived from food additives and partly from the environment is composed of inert inorganic microparticles and loaded into phagolysosomes of macrophages within the GALT of all human subjects. These observations suggest that the pathogenicity of this pigment should be further investigated since, in susceptible individuals, the same intracellular distribution of these three types of submicron particle causes chronic latent granulomatous inflammation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:8675092

  4. Comprehensive discovery of DNA motifs in 349 human cells and tissues reveals new features of motifs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive motif discovery under experimental conditions is critical for the global understanding of gene regulation. To generate a nearly complete list of human DNA motifs under given conditions, we employed a novel approach to de novo discover significant co-occurring DNA motifs in 349 human DNase I hypersensitive site datasets. We predicted 845 to 1325 motifs in each dataset, for a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. These 2684 motifs contained 54.02 to 75.95% of the known motifs in seven large collections including TRANSFAC. In each dataset, we also discovered 43 663 to 2 013 288 motif modules, groups of motifs with their binding sites co-occurring in a significant number of short DNA regions. Compared with known interacting transcription factors in eight resources, the predicted motif modules on average included 84.23% of known interacting motifs. We further showed new features of the predicted motifs, such as motifs enriched in proximal regions rarely overlapped with motifs enriched in distal regions, motifs enriched in 5' distal regions were often enriched in 3' distal regions, etc. Finally, we observed that the 2684 predicted motifs classified the cell or tissue types of the datasets with an accuracy of 81.29%. The resources generated in this study are available at http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/.

  5. Results from a horizon scan on risks associated with transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells: from donor to patient.

    PubMed

    Herberts, C A; Park, M V D Z; Pot, J W G A; de Vries, C G J C A

    2015-03-01

    The successful transplantation of human materials such as organs, tissues and cells into patients does not only depend on the benefits, but also on the mitigation of risks. To gain insight into recent publications on risks associated with the process of transferring human materials from donor to recipient we performed a horizon scan by reviewing scientific literature and news websites of 2011 on this subject. We found there is ample information on how extended donor criteria, such as donor age, affect the survival rates of organs or patients. Interestingly, gender mismatch does not appear to be a major risk factor in organ rejection. Data on risks of donor tumor transmission was very scarce; however, risk categories for various tumor types have been suggested. In order to avoid rejection, a lot of research is directed towards engineering tissues from a patient's own tissues and cells. Some but not all of these developments have reached the clinic. Developments in the field of stem cell therapy are rapid. However, many hurdles are yet to be overcome before these cells can be applied on a large scale in the clinic. The processes leading to genetic abnormalities in cells differentiated from stem cells need to be identified in order to avoid transplantation of aberrant cells. New insights have been obtained on storage and preservation of human materials, a critical step for success of their clinical use. Likewise, quality management systems have been shown to improve the quality and safety of human materials used for transplantation.

  6. Cultivation of human bone-like tissue from pluripotent stem cell-derived osteogenic progenitors in perfusion bioreactors.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2014-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an unlimited source of skeletal tissue progenitors for studies of bone biology, pathogenesis, and the development of new approaches for bone reconstruction and therapies. In order to construct in vitro models of bone tissue development and to grow functional, clinical-size bone substitutes for transplantation, cell cultivation in three-dimensional environments composed of porous osteoconductive scaffolds and dynamic culture systems-bioreactors-has been studied. Here, we describe a stepwise procedure for the induction of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (collectively termed PSCs) into mesenchymal-like progenitors, and their subsequent cultivation on decellularized bovine bone scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors, to support the development of viable, stable bone-like tissue in defined geometries.

  7. Effect of FGF-2 on collagen tissue regeneration by human vertebral bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Soo; Park, Jung-Chul; Lee, Jung-Seok; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Ki-Joon; Jung, Byung-Joo; Shim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Eun-Young; Park, So-Yon; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-01-15

    The effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) on collagen tissue regeneration by human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) were investigated. hBMSCs were isolated from human vertebral body bone marrow during vertebral surgery and a population of hBMSCs with the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells was observed. The FGF-2 treatment (5 ng/mL) affected on the colony-forming efficiency, proliferation, and in vitro differentiation of hBMSCs. Insoluble/soluble collagen and hydroxyproline synthesis was significantly enhanced in hBMSCs expanded with FGF-2 and the treatment of FGF-2 caused a reduction in the mRNA expression of collagen type I, but an increase of collagen types II and III along with lysyl oxidase family genes. Collagen formation was also examined using an in vivo assay model by transplanting hBMSCs into immunocompromised mice (n=4) and the histologic and immunohistochemical results revealed that significantly more collagen with a well-organized structure was formed by FGF-2-treated hBMSCs at 8 weeks posttransplantation (P<0.05). The DNA microarray assay demonstrated that genes related to extracellular matrix formation were significantly upregulated. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, chemical inhibitors against extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were treated and following downstream expression was observed. Collectively, FGF-2 facilitated the collagen-producing potency of hBMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, rendering them more suitable for use in collagen regeneration in the clinical field.

  8. Fast-Degradable Microbeads Encapsulating Human Umbilical Cord Stem Cells in Alginate for Muscle Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hongzhi; Weir, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) are inexhaustible and can be obtained without an invasive surgery. To date, there has been no report on seeding hUCMSCs in three-dimensional scaffolds for muscle tissue engineering. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate hUCMSC seeding in a scaffold for muscle engineering and (2) develop a novel construct consisting of hUCMSC-encapsulating and fast-degradable microbeads inside a hydrogel matrix. The rationale was that the hydrogel matrix would maintain the defect volume, while the microbeads would degrade to release the cells and concomitantly create macropores in the matrix. hUCMSCs were encapsulated in alginate-fibrin microbeads, which were packed in an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified alginate matrix (AM). This construct is referred to as hUCMSC-microbead-AM. The control consisted of the usual cell encapsulation in AM without microbeads (referred to as hUCMSC-AM). In the hUCMSC-AM construct, the hUCMSCs showed as round dots with no spreading at 1–14 days. In contrast, cells in the hUCMSC-microbead-AM construct had a healthy spreading and elongated morphology. The microbeads successfully degraded and released the cells at 8 days. Myogenic expressions for hUCMSC-microbead-AM were more than threefold those of hUCMSC-AM (p<0.05). Immunofluorescence for myogenic markers was much stronger for hUCMSC-microbead-AM than hUCMSC-AM. Muscle creatine kinase of hUCMSC-microbead-AM at 14 days was twofold that of hUCMSC-AM (p<0.05). In conclusion, hUCMSC encapsulation in novel fast-degradable microbeads inside a hydrogel matrix was investigated for muscle engineering. Compared to the usual method of seeding cells in a hydrogel matrix, hUCMSC-microbead-AM construct had greatly improved cell viability and myogenic differentiation, and hence, is promising to enhance muscle regeneration. PMID:22697426

  9. Gene expression profiling and differentiation assessment in primary human hepatocyte cultures, established hepatoma cell lines, and human liver tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Olsavsky, Katy M.; Page, Jeanine L.; Johnson, Mary C.; Zarbl, Helmut; Strom, Stephen C.; Omiecinski, Curtis J. . E-mail: cjo10@psu.edu

    2007-07-01

    Frequently, primary hepatocytes are used as an in vitro model for the liver in vivo. However, the culture conditions reported vary considerably, with associated variability in performance. In this study, we characterized the differentiation character of primary human hepatocytes cultured using a highly defined, serum-free two-dimensional sandwich system, one that configures hepatocytes with collagen I as the substratum together with a dilute extracellular matrix (Matrigel{sup TM}) overlay combined with a defined serum-free medium containing nanomolar levels of dexamethasone. Gap junctional communication, indicated by immunochemical detection of connexin 32 protein, was markedly enhanced in hepatocytes cultured in the Matrigel sandwich configuration. Whole genome expression profiling enabled direct comparison of liver tissues to hepatocytes and to the hepatoma-derived cell lines, HepG2 and Huh7. PANTHER database analyses were used to identify biological processes that were comparatively over-represented among probe sets expressed in the in vitro systems. The robustness of the primary hepatocyte cultures was reflected by the extent of unchanged expression character when compared directly to liver, with more than 77% of the probe sets unchanged in each of the over-represented categories, representing such genes as C/EBP{alpha}, HNF4{alpha}, CYP2D6, and ABCB1. In contrast, HepG2 and Huh7 cells were unchanged from the liver tissues for fewer than 48% and 55% of these probe sets, respectively. Further, hierarchical clustering of the hepatocytes, but not the cell lines, shifted from donor-specific to treatment-specific when the probe sets were filtered to focus on phenobarbital-inducible genes, indicative of the highly differentiated nature of the hepatocytes when cultured in a highly defined two-dimensional sandwich system.

  10. Autophagy Releases Lipid That Promotes Fibrogenesis by Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells in Mice and in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    HERNÁNDEZ–GEA, VIRGINIA; GHIASSI–NEJAD, ZAHRA; ROZENFELD, RAPHAEL; GORDON, RONALD; FIEL, MARIA ISABEL; YUE, ZHENYU; CZAJA, MARK J.; FRIEDMAN, SCOTT L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The pathogenesis of liver fibrosis involves activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is associated with depletion of intracellular lipid droplets. When hepatocytes undergo autophagy, intracellular lipids are degraded in lysosomes. We investigated whether autophagy also promotes loss of lipids in hepatic stellate cells to provide energy for their activation and extended these findings to other fibrogenic cells. METHODS We analyzed hepatic stellate cells from C57BL/6 wild-type, Atg7F/F, and Atg7F/F-GFAP-Cre mice, as well as the mouse stellate cell line JS1. Fibrosis was induced in mice using CCl4 or thioacetamide (TAA); liver tissues and stellate cells were analyzed. Autophagy was blocked in fibrogenic cells from liver and other tissues using small interfering RNAs against Atg5 or Atg7 and chemical antagonists. Human pulmonary fibroblasts were isolated from samples of lung tissue from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or from healthy donors. RESULTS In mice, induction of liver injury with CCl4 or TAA increased levels of autophagy. We also observed features of autophagy in activated stellate cells within injured human liver tissue. Loss of autophagic function in cultured mouse stellate cells and in mice following injury reduced fibrogenesis and matrix accumulation; this effect was partially overcome by providing oleic acid as an energy substrate. Autophagy also regulated expression of fibrogenic genes in embryonic, lung, and renal fibroblasts. CONCLUSIONS Autophagy of activated stellate cells is required for hepatic fibrogenesis in mice. Selective reduction of autophagic activity in fibrogenic cells in liver and other tissues might be used to treat patients with fibrotic diseases. PMID:22240484

  11. Human T47D-ERβ breast cancer cells with tetracycline-dependent ERβ expression reflect ERα/ERβ ratios in rat and human breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Evers, N M; van de Klundert, T M C; van Aesch, Y M; Wang, S; de Roos, W K; Romano, A; de Haan, L H J; Murk, A J; Ederveen, A G H; Rietjens, I M C M; Groten, J P

    2013-09-01

    T47D-ERβ breast cancer cells with tetracycline-dependent ERβ expression and constant ERα expression can be used to investigate effects of varying ERα/ERβ ratios on estrogen-induced cellular responses. This study defines conditions at which ERα/ERβ ratios in T47D-ERβ cells best mimic ERα/ERβ ratios in breast and other estrogen-sensitive tissues in vivo in rat as well as in human. Protein and mRNA levels of ERα and ERβ were analyzed in T47D-ERβ cells exposed to a range of tetracycline concentrations and compared to ERα and ERβ levels found in breast, prostate, and uterus from rat and human origin. The ERα/ERβ ratio in T47D-ERβ cells exposed to >150ng/ml tetracycline is comparable to the ratio found in rat mammary gland and in human breast tissue. The ERα/ERβ ratio of other estrogen-sensitive rat and human tissues can also be mimicked in T47D-ERβ cells. The ERα/ERβ ratio found in MCF-7 and native T47D breast cancer cell lines did not reflect ratios in analyzed rat and human tissues, which further supports the use of T47D-ERβ cells as model for estrogen-responsive tissues. Using 17β-estradiol and the T47D-ERβ cells under the conditions defined to mimic various tissues it could be demonstrated how these different tissues vary in their proliferative response.

  12. Enhanced elastin synthesis and maturation in human vascular smooth muscle tissue derived from induced-pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eoh, Joon H; Shen, Nian; Burke, Jacqueline A; Hinderer, Svenja; Xia, Zhiyong; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    Obtaining vascular smooth muscle tissue with mature, functional elastic fibers is a key obstacle in tissue-engineered blood vessels. Poor elastin secretion and organization leads to a loss of specialization in contractile smooth muscle cells, resulting in over proliferation and graft failure. In this study, human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were differentiated into early smooth muscle cells, seeded onto a hybrid poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate/poly (l-lactide) (PEGdma-PLA) scaffold and cultured in a bioreactor while exposed to pulsatile flow, towards maturation into contractile smooth muscle tissue. We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow on cellular organization as well as elastin expression and assembly in the engineered tissue compared to a static control through immunohistochemistry, gene expression and functionality assays. We show that culturing under pulsatile flow resulted in organized and functional hiPSC derived smooth muscle tissue. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue with robust, well-organized cells and elastic fibers and the supporting microfibril proteins necessary for elastic fiber assembly. Through qRT-PCR analysis, we found significantly increased expression of elastin, fibronectin, and collagen I, indicating the synthesis of necessary extracellular matrix components. Functionality assays revealed that hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue cultured in the bioreactor had an increased calcium signaling and contraction in response to a cholinergic agonist, significantly higher mature elastin content and improved mechanical properties in comparison to the static control. The findings presented here detail an effective approach to engineering elastic human vascular smooth muscle tissue with the functionality necessary for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  13. Informing future cartilage repair strategies: a comparative study of three different human cell types for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin B

    2013-06-01

    A major clinical need exists for cartilage repair and regeneration. Despite many different strategies having been pursued, the identification of an optimised cell type and of pre-treatment conditions remains a challenge. This study compares the cartilage-like tissue generated by human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and human neonatal and adult chondrocytes cultured on three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds under various conditions in vitro and in vivo with the aim of informing future cartilage repair strategies based upon tissue-engineering approaches. After 3 weeks in vitro culture, all three cell types showed cartilage-like tissue formation on 3D poly (lactide-co-glycolide) acid scaffolds only when cultured in chondrogenic medium. After 6 weeks of chondro-induction, neonatal chondrocyte constructs revealed the most cartilage-like tissue formation with a prominent superficial zone-like layer, a middle zone-like structure and the thinnest fibrous capsule. HBMSC constructs had the thickest fibrous capsule formation. Under basal culture conditions, neonatal articular chondrocytes failed to form any tissue, whereas HBMSCs and adult chondrocytes showed thick fibrous capsule formation at 6 weeks. After in vivo implantation, all groups generated more compact tissues compared with in vitro constructs. Pre-culturing in chondrogenic media for 1 week before implantation reduced fibrous tissue formation in all cell constructs at week 3. After 6 weeks, only the adult chondrocyte group pre-cultured in chondrogenic media was able to maintain a more chondrogenic/less fibrocartilaginous phenotype. Thus, pre-culture under chondrogenic conditions is required to maintain a long-term chondrogenic phenotype, with adult chondrocytes being a more promising cell source than HBMSCs for articular cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. Adipose tissue can be generated in vitro by using adipocytes from human fat tissue mesenchymal stem cells seeded and cultured on fibrin gel sheet.

    PubMed

    Tran, Cong Toai; Huynh, Duy Thao; Gargiulo, Ciro; Tran, Le Bao Ha; Huynh, Minh Hang; Nguyen, Khanh Hoa; Filgueira, Luis; Strong, D Micheal

    2013-03-01

    The current study has developed an innovative procedure to generate ex novo fat tissue by culturing adipocytes from human fat tissue mesenchymal stem cells (hFTMSCs) on fibrin gel sheet towards applications in medicine and cosmetology. Fibrin gel has been obtained by combining two components fibrinogen and thrombin collected by human peripheral blood. By this procedure it was possible to generate blocks of fibrin gel containing adipocytes within the gel that show similar features and consistency to human fat tissue mass. Results were assessed by histological staining methods, fluorescent immune-histochemistry staining as well photos by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to demonstrate the adhesion and growth of cells in the fibrin gel. This result opens a real possibility for future clinical applications in the treatment of reconstructive and regenerative medicine where the use of stem cell may eventually be a unique solution or in the field of aesthetic medicine where autograft fat stem cells may grant for a safer and better outcome with long lasting results.

  15. Pluripotent stem cell-derived organoids: using principles of developmental biology to grow human tissues in a dish.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Heather A; Wells, James M

    2017-03-15

    Pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived organoids are miniature, three-dimensional human tissues generated by the application of developmental biological principles to PSCs in vitro The approach to generate organoids uses a combination of directed differentiation, morphogenetic processes, and the intrinsically driven self-assembly of cells that mimics organogenesis in the developing embryo. The resulting organoids have remarkable cell type complexity, architecture and function similar to their in vivo counterparts. In the past five years, human PSC-derived organoids with components of all three germ layers have been generated, resulting in the establishment of a new human model system. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of how principles of developmental biology have been essential for generating human organoids in vitro, and how organoids are now being used as a primary research tool to investigate human developmental biology.

  16. Engineered cartilaginous tubes for tracheal tissue replacement via self-assembly and fusion of human mesenchymal stem cell constructs.

    PubMed

    Dikina, Anna D; Strobel, Hannah A; Lai, Bradley P; Rolle, Marsha W; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-06-01

    There is a critical need to engineer a neotrachea because currently there are no long-term treatments for tracheal stenoses affecting large portions of the airway. In this work, a modular tracheal tissue replacement strategy was developed. High-cell density, scaffold-free human mesenchymal stem cell-derived cartilaginous rings and tubes were successfully generated through employment of custom designed culture wells and a ring-to-tube assembly system. Furthermore, incorporation of transforming growth factor-β1-delivering gelatin microspheres into the engineered tissues enhanced chondrogenesis with regard to tissue size and matrix production and distribution in the ring- and tube-shaped constructs, as well as luminal rigidity of the tubes. Importantly, all engineered tissues had similar or improved biomechanical properties compared to rat tracheas, which suggests they could be transplanted into a small animal model for airway defects. The modular, bottom up approach used to grow stem cell-based cartilaginous tubes in this report is a promising platform to engineer complex organs (e.g., trachea), with control over tissue size and geometry, and has the potential to be used to generate autologous tissue implants for human clinical applications.

  17. Regulation of LPS-induced tissue factor expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells by curcumin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane receptor, which initiates thrombotic episodes associated with various diseases. In addition to membrane-bound TF, we have discovered an alternatively spliced form of human TF mRNA. It was later confirmed that this form of TF mRNA expresses a soluble protein circ...

  18. Inhibition of Human Metapneumovirus Binding to Heparan Sulfate Blocks Infection in Human Lung Cells and Airway Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Klimyte, Edita M.; Smith, Stacy E.; Oreste, Pasqua; Lembo, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human metapneumovirus (HMPV), a recently discovered paramyxovirus, infects nearly 100% of the world population and causes severe respiratory disease in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients. We previously showed that HMPV binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and that HMPV binding requires only the viral fusion (F) protein. To characterize the features of this interaction critical for HMPV binding and the role of this interaction in infection in relevant models, we utilized sulfated polysaccharides, heparan sulfate mimetics, and occluding compounds. Iota-carrageenan demonstrated potent anti-HMPV activity by inhibiting binding to lung cells mediated by the F protein. Furthermore, analysis of a minilibrary of variably sulfated derivatives of Escherichia coli K5 polysaccharide mimicking the HS structure revealed that the highly O-sulfated K5 polysaccharides inhibited HMPV infection, identifying a potential feature of HS critical for HMPV binding. The peptide dendrimer SB105-A10, which binds HS, reduced binding and infection in an F-dependent manner, suggesting that occlusion of HS at the target cell surface is sufficient to prevent infection. HMPV infection was also inhibited by these compounds during apical infection of polarized airway tissues, suggesting that these interactions take place during HMPV infection in a physiologically relevant model. These results reveal key features of the interaction between HMPV and HS, supporting the hypothesis that apical HS in the airway serves as a binding factor during infection, and HS modulating compounds may serve as a platform for potential antiviral development. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a paramyxovirus that causes respiratory disease worldwide. It has been previously shown that HMPV requires binding to heparan sulfate on the surfaces of target cells for attachment and infection. In this study, we characterize the key features of this binding interaction using heparan sulfate

  19. Bacterial Species- and Strain-Dependent Induction of Tissue Factor in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Veltrop, M. H. A. M.; Beekhuizen, H.; Thompson, J.

    1999-01-01

    A cardinal process in bacterial endocarditis (BE) is the activation of the clotting system and the formation of a fibrin clot on the inner surface of the heart, the so-called endocardial vegetation. The processes that lead to the activation of the clotting system on endothelial surfaces upon exposure to bacteria are largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated in an in vitro model whether infection of human endothelial cells (EC) with bacteria that are relevant to BE, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sanguis, and Staphylococcus epidermidis, leads to induction of tissue factor (TF)-dependent procoagulant activity (TFA) and whether this process is influenced by host factors, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), that are produced in response to the bacteremia in vivo. The results show that S. aureus binds to and is internalized by EC, resulting in expression of TF mRNA and TF surface protein as well as generation of TFA within 4 to 8 h after infection. No TFA was found when EC were exposed to UV-irradiated S. aureus or bacterial cell wall fragments. S. sanguis and S. epidermidis, although also binding to EC, did not induce endothelial TFA. This indicates a species and strain dependency. EC also expressed TFA after exposure to IL-1. The enhanced TFA of EC after exposure to S. aureus was not prevented by IL-1 receptor antagonist, arguing against an auto- or paracrine contribution of endogenous IL-1. When IL-1 was applied together with bacteria, this had a synergistic effect on the induction of EC TFA. This was found in particular with S. aureus but also, although to a lesser degree, with S. sanguis and S. epidermidis. This influence of IL-1 on the species- and strain-dependent induction of EC TFA suggests that bacterial factors as well as host factors orchestrate the induction of coagulation in an early stage in the pathogenesis of endovascular disease, such as BE. PMID:10531276

  20. Distribution of obestatin and ghrelin in human tissues: immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Grönberg, Malin; Tsolakis, Apostolos V; Magnusson, Linda; Janson, Eva T; Saras, Jan

    2008-09-01

    Obestatin and ghrelin are two peptides derived from the same prohormone. It is well established that ghrelin is produced by endocrine cells in the gastric mucosa. However, the distribution of human obestatin immunoreactive cells is not thoroughly characterized. A polyclonal antibody that specifically recognizes human obestatin was produced. Using this antibody and a commercial antibody vs ghrelin, the distribution of obestatin and ghrelin immunoreactive cells was determined in a panel of human tissues using immunohistochemistry. The two peptides were detected in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract, from cardia to ileum, and in the pancreatic islets. Interestingly, epithelial cells in the ducts of mammary glands showed distinct immunoreactivity for both ghrelin and obestatin. By double immunofluorescence microscopy, it was shown that all detected cells were immunoreactive for both peptides. Furthermore, the subcellular localization of obestatin and ghrelin was essentially identical, indicating that obestatin and ghrelin are stored in the same secretory vesicles.

  1. Detection of (Leu-7)-positive cells with NK activity in human gingival tissues from patients with periodontitis

    SciTech Connect

    Komiyama, K.; Hirsch, H.Z.; Mestecky, J.; Moro, I.

    1986-03-05

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been identified in peripheral blood, lymphoid tissue and more recently in gut mucosa and may be involved in the regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis. They have assayed gingival tissues obtained from 25 periodontitis patients, for the presence and activity of NK cells. Routine histological techniques demonstrated an inflammatory infiltrate dominated by plasma cells and B lymphocytes. Indirect staining procedures with a biotin-labeled mouse anti-human, Leu-7 antibody revealed the presence of numerous positive cells accompanying the inflammatory cellular infiltrate in perivascular areas. Several specimens demonstrated positive-staining cells in the epithelium as well. Few cells were observed in histologically uninflammed areas. Single cell suspension obtained by collagenase digestion of 5 gingival samples were used in /sup 51/Cr release cytotoxicity assay against K562 cells. Three of the five samples were positive in this assay. The finding of Leu-7-positive cells in areas of intense plasma cell foci but not in uninflammed areas, may support a role for these cells in the regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis in oral mucosal tissues.

  2. Genetically engineering self-organization of human pluripotent stem cells into a liver bud-like tissue using Gata6.

    PubMed

    Guye, Patrick; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Kipniss, Nathan; Velazquez, Jeremy J; Schoenfeld, Eldi; Kiani, Samira; Griffith, Linda G; Weiss, Ron

    2016-01-06

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have potential for personalized and regenerative medicine. While most of the methods using these cells have focused on deriving homogenous populations of specialized cells, there has been modest success in producing hiPSC-derived organotypic tissues or organoids. Here we present a novel approach for generating and then co-differentiating hiPSC-derived progenitors. With a genetically engineered pulse of GATA-binding protein 6 (GATA6) expression, we initiate rapid emergence of all three germ layers as a complex function of GATA6 expression levels and tissue context. Within 2 weeks we obtain a complex tissue that recapitulates early developmental processes and exhibits a liver bud-like phenotype, including haematopoietic and stromal cells as well as a neuronal niche. Collectively, our approach demonstrates derivation of complex tissues from hiPSCs using a single autologous hiPSCs as source and generates a range of stromal cells that co-develop with parenchymal cells to form tissues.

  3. Concise Review: Human Dermis as an Autologous Source of Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Vapniarsky, Natalia; Arzi, Boaz; Hu, Jerry C.; Nolta, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    The exciting potential for regenerating organs from autologous stem cells is on the near horizon, and adult dermis stem cells (DSCs) are particularly appealing because of the ease and relative minimal invasiveness of skin collection. A substantial number of reports have described DSCs and their potential for regenerating tissues from mesenchymal, ectodermal, and endodermal lineages; however, the exact niches of these stem cells in various skin types and their antigenic surface makeup are not yet clearly defined. The multilineage potential of DSCs appears to be similar, despite great variability in isolation and in vitro propagation methods. Despite this great potential, only limited amounts of tissues and clinical applications for organ regeneration have been developed from DSCs. This review summarizes the literature on DSCs regarding their niches and the specific markers they express. The concept of the niches and the differentiation capacity of cells residing in them along particular lineages is discussed. Furthermore, the advantages and disadvantages of widely used methods to demonstrate lineage differentiation are considered. In addition, safety considerations and the most recent advancements in the field of tissue engineering and regeneration using DSCs are discussed. This review concludes with thoughts on how to prospectively approach engineering of tissues and organ regeneration using DSCs. Our expectation is that implementation of the major points highlighted in this review will lead to major advancements in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Significance Autologous dermis-derived stem cells are generating great excitement and efforts in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. The substantial impact of this review lies in its critical coverage of the available literature and in providing insight regarding niches, characteristics, and isolation methods of stem cells derived from the human dermis. Furthermore, it

  4. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells abrogate plasmablast formation and induce regulatory B cells independently of T helper cells.

    PubMed

    Franquesa, M; Mensah, F K; Huizinga, R; Strini, T; Boon, L; Lombardo, E; DelaRosa, O; Laman, J D; Grinyó, J M; Weimar, W; Betjes, M G H; Baan, C C; Hoogduijn, M J

    2015-03-01

    Mesenchymal or stromal stem cells (MSC) interact with cells of the immune system in multiple ways. Modulation of the immune system by MSC is believed to be a therapeutic option for autoimmune disease and transplant rejection. In recent years, B cells have moved into the focus of the attention as targets for the treatment of immune disorders. Current B-cell targeting treatment is based on the indiscriminate depletion of B cells. The aim of this study was to examine whether human adipose tissue-derived MSC (ASC) interact with B cells to affect their proliferation, differentiation, and immune function. ASC supported the survival of quiescent B cells predominantly via contact-dependent mechanisms. Coculture of B cells with activated T helper cells led to proliferation and differentiation of B cells into CD19(+) CD27(high) CD38(high) antibody-producing plasmablasts. ASC inhibited the proliferation of B cells and this effect was dependent on the presence of T cells. In contrast, ASC directly targeted B-cell differentiation, independently of T cells. In the presence of ASC, plasmablast formation was reduced and IL-10-producing CD19(+) CD24(high) CD38(high) B cells, known as regulatory B cells, were induced. These results demonstrate that ASC affect B cell biology in vitro, suggesting that they can be a tool for the modulation of the B-cell response in immune disease.

  5. Isolation, characterization and cardiac differentiation of human thymus tissue derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ze Bang; Qian, Bo; Yang, Yu Zhong; Zhou, Kai; Sun, Jian; Mo, Xu Ming; Wu, Kai Hong

    2015-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidate donor cells for replacement of cardiomyocyte loss during ischemia and in vitro generation of myocardial tissue. We have successfully isolated MSCs from the discarded neonatal thymus gland during cardiac surgery. The thymus MSCs were characterized by cell-surface antigen expression. These cells have high ability for proliferation and are able to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes in vitro. For cardiac differentiation, the cells were divided into 3 groups: untreated control; 5-azacytidine group and sequential exposure to 5-azacytidine, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Thymus MSCs showed a fibrolast-like morphology and some differentiated cells increased in size, formed a ball-like appearance over time and spontaneously contracting cells were observed in sequential exposure group. Immunostaining studies, cardiac specific genes/protein expression confirmed the cardiomyocyte phenotype of the differentiated cells. These results demonstrate that thymus MSCs can be a promising cellular source for cardiac cell therapy and tissue engineering.

  6. Diabetic human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells fail to differentiate in functional adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Ignazio; Li Volti, Giovanni; Galvano, Fabio; Tettamanti, Guido; Pluchinotta, Francesca R; Bergante, Sonia; Vanella, Luca

    2016-11-30

    Adipose tissue dysfunction represents a hallmark of diabetic patients and is a consequence of the altered homeostasis of this tissue. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their differentiation into adipocytes contribute significantly in maintaining the mass and function of adult adipose tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the differentiation of MSCs from patients suffering type 2 diabetes (dASC) and how such process results in hyperplasia or rather a stop of adipocyte turnover resulting in hypertrophy of mature adipocytes. Our results showed that gene profile of all adipogenic markers is not expressed in diabetic cells after differentiation indicating that diabetic cells fail to differentiate into adipocytes. Interestingly, delta like 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, and interleukin 1β were upregulated whereas Sirtuin 1 and insulin receptor substrate 1 gene expression were found downregulated in dASC compared to cells obtained from healthy subjects. Taken together our data indicate that dASC lose their ability to differentiate into mature and functional adipocytes. In conclusion, our in vitro study is the first to suggest that diabetic patients might develop obesity through a hypertrophy of existing mature adipocytes due to failure turnover of adipose tissue.

  7. A COMPARISON OF THE GROWTH OF SELECTED MYCOBACTERIA IN HELA, MONKEY KIDNEY, AND HUMAN AMNION CELLS IN TISSUE CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Charles C.

    1958-01-01

    HeLa, monkey kidney, and human amnion cells in tissue cultures were compared as sites for the multiplication of strains of tubercle bacilli or original and reduced pathogenicity, and for several other species of mycobacteria capable of causing disease in humans. The arrangement of the pathogenic species inorder of their growth rates in HeLa cells was Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium balnei, and the "yellow bacillus," followed closely by the tubercle bacillus. This order was also correct for these species in monkey kidney and human amnion cells, and is the same as that seen in bacteriological media. The arrangement of the strains of tubercle bacilli in order of their growth rates in all three types of cells was: H37Rv, then R1Rv, and lastly H37Ra, which multiplied about as slowly as BCG. An INH-resistant strain grew about as rapidly as H37Rv. Growth of the pathogenic species occurred at about the same rates in HeLa and monkey kidney cells, but was distinctly slower in human amnion cells, which are less active metabolically. Irradiation of the cells in doses up to 5000 r did not affect the subsequent growth of mycobacteria in them. Preliminary experiments with human leprosy bacilli indicate that they can be introduced into these cells in high numbers and that the bacilli then persist for the life of the cells. PMID:13491759

  8. Human glandular organoid formation in murine engineering chambers after collagenase digestion and flow cytometry isolation of normal human breast tissue single cells.

    PubMed

    Huo, Cecilia W; Huang, Dexing; Chew, Grace L; Hill, Prue; Vohora, Ambika; Ingman, Wendy V; Glynn, Danielle J; Godde, Nathan; Henderson, Michael A; Thompson, Erik W; Britt, Kara L

    2016-11-01

    Women with high mammographic density (MD) are at increased risk of breast cancer (BC) after adjustment for age and body mass index. We have developed a murine biochamber model in which both high MD (HMD) and low MD (LMD) tissue can be propagated. Here, we tested whether cells isolated by collagenase digestion and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) from normal breast can be reconstituted in our biochamber model, which would allow cell-specific manipulations to be tested. Fresh breast tissue was collected from women (n = 7) undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. The tissue underwent collagenase digestion overnight and, in some cases, additional FACS enrichment to obtain mature epithelial, luminal progenitor, mammary stem, and stromal cells. Cells were then transferred bilaterally into biochambers in SCID mice (n = 5-7) and incubated for 6 weeks, before harvesting for histological analyses, and immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratins (CK), vimentin, Ki-67, murine macrophages, and Cleaved Caspase-3. Biochambers inoculated with single cells after collagenase digestion or with flow cytometry contained glandular structures of human origin (human vimentin-positive), which expressed CK-14 and pan-CK, and were proliferating (Ki-67-positive). Glandular structures from the digested tissues were smaller than those in chambers seeded with finely chopped intact mammary tissue. Mouse macrophage infiltration was higher in the chambers arising from digested tissues. Pooled single cells and FACS fractionated cells were viable in the murine biochambers and formed proliferating glandular organoids of human origin. This is among the first report to demonstrate the success of formed human glandular organoids from isolated primary mammary cells in the murine biochamber model.

  9. A double chamber rotating bioreactor for enhanced tubular tissue generation from human mesenchymal stem cells: a promising tool for vascular tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Stefani, I; Asnaghi, M A; Cooper-White, J J; Mantero, S

    2016-10-24

    Cardiovascular diseases represent a major global health burden, with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Autologous grafts are commonly used to replace damaged or failing blood vessels; however, such approaches are hampered by the scarcity of suitable graft tissue, donor site morbidity and poor long-term stability. Tissue engineering has been investigated as a means by which exogenous vessel grafts can be produced, with varying levels of success to date, a result of mismatched mechanical properties of these vessel substitutes and inadequate ex vivo vessel tissue genesis. In this work, we describe the development of a novel multifunctional dual-phase (air/aqueous) bioreactor, designed to both rotate and perfuse small-diameter tubular scaffolds and encourage enhanced tissue genesis throughout such scaffolds. Within this novel dynamic culture system, an elastomeric nanofibrous, microporous composite tubular scaffold, composed of poly(caprolactone) and acrylated poly(lactide-co-trimethylene-carbonate) and with mechanical properties approaching those of native vessels, was seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and cultured for up to 14 days in inductive (smooth muscle) media. This scaffold/bioreactor combination provided a dynamic culture environment that enhanced (compared with static controls) scaffold colonization, cell growth, extracellular matrix deposition and in situ differentiation of the hMSCs into mature smooth muscle cells, representing a concrete step towards our goal of creating a mature ex vivo vascular tissue for implantation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Large scale expansion of human umbilical cord cells in a rotating bed system bioreactor for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Anne; Polchow, Bianca; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Henrich, Wolfgang; Hetzer, Roland; Lueders, Cora

    2013-01-01

    Widespread use of human umbilical cord cells for cardiovascular tissue engineering requires production of large numbers of well-characterized cells under controlled conditions. In current research projects, the expansion of cells to be used to create a tissue construct is usually performed in static cell culture systems which are, however, often not satisfactory due to limitations in nutrient and oxygen supply. To overcome these limitations dynamic cell expansion in bioreactor systems under controllable conditions could be an important tool providing continuous perfusion for the generation of large numbers of viable pre-conditioned cells in a short time period. For this purpose cells derived from human umbilical cord arteries were expanded in a rotating bed system bioreactor for up to 9 days. For a comparative study, cells were cultivated under static conditions in standard culture devices. Our results demonstrated that the microenvironment in the perfusion bioreactor was more favorable than that of the standard cell culture flasks. Data suggested that cells in the bioreactor expanded 39 fold (38.7 ± 6.1 fold) in comparison to statically cultured cells (31.8 ± 3.0 fold). Large-scale production of cells in the bioreactor resulted in more than 3 x 10(8) cells from a single umbilical cord fragment within 9 days. Furthermore cell doubling time was lower in the bioreactor system and production of extracellular matrix components was higher. With this study, we present an appropriate method to expand human umbilical cord artery derived cells with high cellular proliferation rates in a well-defined bioreactor system under GMP conditions.

  11. The cell-engineered construct of cartilage on the basis of biopolymer hydrogel matrix and human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Surguchenko, Valentina A; Ponomareva, Anna S; Kirsanova, Ljudmila A; Skaleckij, Nikolaj N; Sevastianov, Viktor I

    2015-02-01

    The study results of in vitro formation of tissue-engineered cartilage construct on the basis of cell-engineered construct composed of biopolymer hydrogel matrix and human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hADSCs) are presented. It was revealed that hADSCs in biopolymer hydrogel matrix Sphero®GEL under chondrogenic conditions generate three-dimensional structures and produce cartilaginous extracellular matrix components: collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans.

  12. Potential application of extracellular vesicles of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, Takeshi; Oki, Katsuyuki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    In the last 20 years, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have attracted attention as a versatile cell-cell communication mediator. The biological significance of EVs remains to be fully elucidated, but many reports have suggested that the functions of EVs mirror, at least in part, those of the cells from which they originate. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cell that can be isolated from connective tissue including bone marrow and adipose tissue and have emerged as an attractive candidate for cell therapy applications. Accordingly, an increasing number of reports have shown that EVs derived from MSCs have therapeutic potential in multiple diseases. We recently reported a novel therapeutic potential of EVs secreted from human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (hADSCs) (also known as adipose tissue-derived stem cells; ASCs) against Alzheimer's disease (AD). We found that hADSCs secrete exosomes carrying enzymatically active neprilysin, the most important β-amyloid peptide (Aβ)-degrading enzyme in the brain. In this chapter, we describe a method by which to evaluate the therapeutic potential of hADSC-derived EVs against AD from the point of view of their Aβ-degrading capacity.

  13. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models.

    PubMed

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire; Buob, David; Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien; Flamand, Vincent; Hennino, Marie-Flore; Perrais, Michaël; Lo-Guidice, Jean-Marc; Broly, Franck; Cauffiez, Christelle; Glowacki, François

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies.

  14. Rules of tissue packing involving different cell types: human muscle organization

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Sáez, Aurora; Gómez-Gálvez, Pedro; Paradas, Carmen; Escudero, Luis M.

    2017-01-01

    Natural packed tissues are assembled as tessellations of polygonal cells. These include skeletal muscles and epithelial sheets. Skeletal muscles appear as a mosaic composed of two different types of cells: the “slow” and “fast” fibres. Their relative distribution is important for the muscle function but little is known about how the fibre arrangement is established and maintained. In this work we capture the organizational pattern in two different healthy muscles: biceps brachii and quadriceps. Here we show that the biceps brachii muscle presents a particular arrangement, based on the different sizes of slow and fast fibres. By contrast, in the quadriceps muscle an unbiased distribution exists. Our results indicate that the relative size of each cellular type imposes an intrinsic organization into natural tessellations. These findings establish a new framework for the analysis of any packed tissue where two or more cell types exist. PMID:28071729

  15. Rules of tissue packing involving different cell types: human muscle organization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Daniel; Sáez, Aurora; Gómez-Gálvez, Pedro; Paradas, Carmen; Escudero, Luis M

    2017-01-10

    Natural packed tissues are assembled as tessellations of polygonal cells. These include skeletal muscles and epithelial sheets. Skeletal muscles appear as a mosaic composed of two different types of cells: the "slow" and "fast" fibres. Their relative distribution is important for the muscle function but little is known about how the fibre arrangement is established and maintained. In this work we capture the organizational pattern in two different healthy muscles: biceps brachii and quadriceps. Here we show that the biceps brachii muscle presents a particular arrangement, based on the different sizes of slow and fast fibres. By contrast, in the quadriceps muscle an unbiased distribution exists. Our results indicate that the relative size of each cellular type imposes an intrinsic organization into natural tessellations. These findings establish a new framework for the analysis of any packed tissue where two or more cell types exist.

  16. Direct hydrogel encapsulation of pluripotent stem cells enables ontomimetic differentiation and growth of engineered human heart tissues.

    PubMed

    Kerscher, Petra; Turnbull, Irene C; Hodge, Alexander J; Kim, Joonyul; Seliktar, Dror; Easley, Christopher J; Costa, Kevin D; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-01

    Human engineered heart tissues have potential to revolutionize cardiac development research, drug-testing, and treatment of heart disease; however, implementation is limited by the need to use pre-differentiated cardiomyocytes (CMs). Here we show that by providing a 3D poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen hydrogel microenvironment, we can directly differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into contracting heart tissues. Our straight-forward, ontomimetic approach, imitating the process of development, requires only a single cell-handling step, provides reproducible results for a range of tested geometries and size scales, and overcomes inherent limitations in cell maintenance and maturation, while achieving high yields of CMs with developmentally appropriate temporal changes in gene expression. We demonstrate that hPSCs encapsulated within this biomimetic 3D hydrogel microenvironment develop into functional cardiac tissues composed of self-aligned CMs with evidence of ultrastructural maturation, mimicking heart development, and enabling investigation of disease mechanisms and screening of compounds on developing human heart tissue.

  17. Direct Hydrogel Encapsulation of Pluripotent Stem Cells Enables Ontomimetic Differentiation and Growth of Engineered Human Heart Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kerscher, Petra; Turnbull, Irene C; Hodge, Alexander J; Kim, Joonyul; Seliktar, Dror; Easley, Christopher J; Costa, Kevin D; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Human engineered heart tissues have potential to revolutionize cardiac development research, drug-testing, and treatment of heart disease; however, implementation is limited by the need to use pre-differentiated cardiomyocytes (CMs). Here we show that by providing a 3D poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen hydrogel microenvironment, we can directly differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into contracting heart tissues. Our straight-forward, ontomimetic approach, imitating the process of development, requires only a single cell-handling step, provides reproducible results for a range of tested geometries and size scales, and overcomes inherent limitations in cell maintenance and maturation, while achieving high yields of CMs with developmentally appropriate temporal changes in gene expression. Here we demonstrate that hPSCs encapsulated within this biomimetic 3D hydrogel microenvironment develop into functional cardiac tissues composed of self-aligned CMs with evidence of ultrastructural maturation, mimicking heart development, and enabling investigation of disease mechanisms and screening of compounds on developing human heart tissue. PMID:26826618

  18. Purification of human adipose-derived stem cells from fat tissues using PLGA/silk screen hybrid membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Da-Chung; Chen, Li-Yu; Ling, Qing-Dong; Wu, Meng-Hsueh; Wang, Ching-Tang; Suresh Kumar, S; Chang, Yung; Munusamy, Murugan A; Alarfajj, Abdullah A; Wang, Han-Chow; Hsu, Shih-Tien; Higuchi, Akon

    2014-05-01

    The purification of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) from human adipose tissue cells (stromal vascular fraction) was investigated using membrane filtration through poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid)/silk screen hybrid membranes. Membrane filtration methods are attractive in regenerative medicine because they reduce the time required to purify hADSCs (i.e., less than 30 min) compared with conventional culture methods, which require 5-12 days. hADSCs expressing the mesenchymal stem cell markers CD44, CD73, and CD90 were concentrated in the permeation solution from the hybrid membranes. Expression of the surface markers CD44, CD73, and CD99 on the cells in the permeation solution from the hybrid membranes, which were obtained using 18 mL of feed solution containing 50 × 10⁴ cells, was statistically significantly higher than that of the primary adipose tissue cells, indicating that the hADSCs can be purified in the permeation solution by the membrane filtration method. Cells expressing the stem cell-associated marker CD34 could be successfully isolated in the permeation solution, whereas CD34⁺ cells could not be purified by the conventional culture method. The hADSCs in the permeation solution demonstrated a superior capacity for osteogenic differentiation based on their alkali phosphatase activity, their osterix gene expression, and the results of mineralization analysis by Alizarin Red S and von Kossa staining compared with the cells from the suspension of human adipose tissue. These results suggest that the hADSCs capable of osteogenic differentiation preferentially permeate through the hybrid membranes.

  19. Tissue engineering a human phalanx.

    PubMed

    Landis, W J; Chubinskaya, S; Tokui, T; Wada, Y; Isogai, N; Jacquet, R

    2016-03-21

    A principal purpose of tissue engineering is the augmentation, repair or replacement of diseased or injured human tissue. This study was undertaken to determine whether human biopsies as a cell source could be utilized for successful engineering of human phalanges consisting of both bone and cartilage. This paper reports the use of cadaveric human chondrocytes and periosteum as a model for the development of phalanx constructs. Two factors, osteogenic protein-1 [OP-1/bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7)], alone or combined with insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), were examined for their potential enhancement of chondrocytes and their secreted extracellular matrices. Design of the study included culture of chondrocytes and periosteum on biodegradable polyglycolic acid (PGA) and poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA)-poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds and subsequent implantation in athymic nu/nu (nude) mice for 5, 20, 40 and 60 weeks. Engineered constructs retrieved from mice were characterized with regard to genotype and phenotype as a function of developmental (implantation) time. Assessments included gross observation, X-ray radiography or microcomputed tomography, histology and gene expression. The resulting data showed that human cell-scaffold constructs could be successfully developed over 60 weeks, despite variability in donor age. Cartilage formation of the distal phalanx models enhanced with both OP-1 and IGF-1 yielded more cells and extracellular matrix (collagen and proteoglycans) than control chondrocytes without added factors. Summary data demonstrated that human distal phalanx models utilizing cadaveric chondrocytes and periosteum were successfully fabricated and OP-1 and OP-1/IGF-1 accelerated construct development and mineralization. The results suggest that similar engineering and transplantation of human autologous tissues in patients are clinically feasible. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Comparison of Methods for Quantification of Global DNA Methylation in Human Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Bartłomiej; De Prins, Sofie; Jacobs, Griet; Koppen, Gudrun; Mathers, John C.; Langie, Sabine A. S.

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic modification which, in mammals, occurs mainly at CpG dinucleotides. Most of the CpG methylation in the genome is found in repetitive regions, rich in dormant transposons and endogenous retroviruses. Global DNA hypomethylation, which is a common feature of several conditions such as ageing and cancer, can cause the undesirable activation of dormant repeat elements and lead to altered expression of associated genes. DNA hypomethylation can cause genomic instability and may contribute to mutations and chromosomal recombinations. Various approaches for quantification of global DNA methylation are widely used. Several of these approaches measure a surrogate for total genomic methyl cytosine and there is uncertainty about the comparability of these methods. Here we have applied 3 different approaches (luminometric methylation assay, pyrosequencing of the methylation status of the Alu repeat element and of the LINE1 repeat element) for estimating global DNA methylation in the same human cell and tissue samples and have compared these estimates with the “gold standard” of methyl cytosine quantification by HPLC. Next to HPLC, the LINE1 approach shows the smallest variation between samples, followed by Alu. Pearson correlations and Bland-Altman analyses confirmed that global DNA methylation estimates obtained via the LINE1 approach corresponded best with HPLC-based measurements. Although, we did not find compelling evidence that the gold standard measurement by HPLC could be substituted with confidence by any of the surrogate assays for detecting global DNA methylation investigated here, the LINE1 assay seems likely to be an acceptable surrogate in many cases. PMID:24260150

  1. Immune suppression of human lymphoid tissues and cells in rotating suspension culture and onboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Wendy; Chen, Silvia; Walz, Carl; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Margolis, Leonid; Grivel, Jean-Charles

    2009-12-01

    The immune responses of human lymphoid tissue explants or cells isolated from this tissue were studied quantitatively under normal gravity and microgravity. Microgravity was either modeled by solid body suspension in a rotating, oxygenated culture vessel or was actually achieved on the International Space Station (ISS). Our experiments demonstrate that tissues or cells challenged by recall antigen or by polyclonal activator in modeled microgravity lose all their ability to produce antibodies and cytokines and to increase their metabolic activity. In contrast, if the cells were challenged before being exposed to modeled microgravity suspension culture, they maintained their responses. Similarly, in microgravity in the ISS, lymphoid cells did not respond to antigenic or polyclonal challenge, whereas cells challenged prior to the space flight maintained their antibody and cytokine responses in space. Thus, immune activation of cells of lymphoid tissue is severely blunted both in modeled and true microgravity. This suggests that suspension culture via solid body rotation is sufficient to induce the changes in cellular physiology seen in true microgravity. This phenomenon may reflect immune dysfunction observed in astronauts during space flights. If so, the ex vivo system described above can be used to understand cellular and molecular mechanisms of this dysfunction.

  2. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire; Buob, David; Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien; Flamand, Vincent; Hennino, Marie-Flore; Perrais, Michaël; and others

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue.

  3. Computational cell quantification in the human brain tissues based on hard x-ray phase-contrast tomograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieber, Simone E.; Bikis, Christos; Khimchenko, Anna; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Thalmann, Peter; Chicherova, Natalia; Rack, Alexander; Zdora, Marie-Christine; Zanette, Irene; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Hench, Jürgen; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Cell visualization and counting plays a crucial role in biological and medical research including the study of neurodegenerative diseases. The neuronal cell loss is typically determined to measure the extent of the disease. Its characterization is challenging because the cell density and size already differs by more than three orders of magnitude in a healthy cerebellum. Cell visualization is commonly performed by histology and fluorescence microscopy. These techniques are limited to resolve complex microstructures in the third dimension. Phase- contrast tomography has been proven to provide sufficient contrast in the three-dimensional imaging of soft tissue down to the cell level and, therefore, offers the basis for the three-dimensional segmentation. Within this context, a human cerebellum sample was embedded in paraffin and measured in local phase-contrast mode at the beamline ID19 (ESRF, Grenoble, France) and the Diamond Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 (Diamond Light Source, Didcot, UK). After the application of Frangi-based filtering the data showed sufficient contrast to automatically identify the Purkinje cells and to quantify their density to 177 cells per mm3 within the volume of interest. Moreover, brain layers were segmented in a region of interest based on edge detection. Subsequently performed histological analysis validated the presence of the cells, which required a mapping from the two- dimensional histological slices to the three-dimensional tomogram. The methodology can also be applied to further tissue types and shows potential for the computational tissue analysis in health and disease.

  4. New Adipose Tissue Formation by Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells with Hyaluronic Acid Gel in Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Lin, Yun-Nan; Lee, Su-Shin; Chai, Chee-Yin; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Lin, Tsai-Ming; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Sin-Daw

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently available injectable fillers have demonstrated limited durability. This report proposes the in vitro culture of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) on hyaluronic acid (HA) gel for in vivo growth of de novo adipose tissue. Methods: For in vitro studies, hASCs were isolated from human adipose tissue and were confirmed by multi-lineage differentiation and flow cytometry. hASCs were cultured on HA gel. The effectiveness of cell attachment and proliferation on HA gel was surveyed by inverted light microscopy. For in vivo studies, HA gel containing hASCs, hASCs without HA gel, HA gel alone were allocated and subcutaneously injected into the subcutaneous pocket in the back of nude mice (n=6) in each group. At eight weeks post-injection, the implants were harvested for histological examination by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain, Oil-Red O stain and immunohistochemical staining. The human-specific Alu gene was examined. Results: hASCs were well attachment and proliferation on the HA gel. In vivo grafts showed well-organized new adipose tissue on the HA gel by histologic examination and Oil-Red O stain. Analysis of neo-adipose tissues by PCR revealed the presence of the Alu gene. This study demonstrated not only the successful culture of hASCs on HA gel, but also their full proliferation and differentiation into adipose tissue. Conclusions: The efficacy of injected filler could be permanent since the reduction of the volume of the HA gel after bioabsorption could be replaced by new adipose tissue generated by hASCs. This is a promising approach for developing long lasting soft tissue filler. PMID:25589892

  5. Rap1 integrates tissue polarity, lumen formation, and tumorigenicpotential in human breast epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Masahiko; Nelson, Celeste M.; Myers, Connie A.; Bissell,Mina J.

    2006-09-29

    Maintenance of apico-basal polarity in normal breast epithelial acini requires a balance between cell proliferation, cell death, and proper cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix signaling. Aberrations in any of these processes can disrupt tissue architecture and initiate tumor formation. Here we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is a crucial element in organizing acinar structure and inducing lumen formation. Rap1 activity in malignant HMT-3522 T4-2 cells is appreciably higher than in S1 cells, their non-malignant counterparts. Expression of dominant-negative Rap1 resulted in phenotypic reversion of T4-2 cells, led to formation of acinar structures with correct apico-basal polarity, and dramatically reduced tumor incidence despite the persistence of genomic abnormalities. The resulting acini contained prominent central lumina not observed when other reverting agents were used. Conversely, expression of dominant-active Rap1 in T4-2 cells inhibited phenotypic reversion and led to increased invasiveness and tumorigenicity. Thus, Rap1 acts as a central regulator of breast architecture, with normal levels of activation instructing apical polarity during acinar morphogenesis, and increased activation inducing tumor formation and progression to malignancy.

  6. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells are Readily Recoverable from Lung Tissue, but not the Alveolar Space, in Healthy Humans.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, K A; Yerkovich, S T; Chen, T; McQualter, J L; Hopkins, P M-A; Wells, C A; Chambers, D C

    2016-10-01

    Stromal support is critical for lung homeostasis and the maintenance of an effective epithelial barrier. Despite this, previous studies have found a positive association between the number of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from the alveolar compartment and human lung diseases associated with epithelial dysfunction. We hypothesised that bronchoalveolar lavage derived MSCs (BAL-MSCs) are dysfunctional and distinct from resident lung tissue MSCs (LT-MSCs). In this study, we comprehensively interrogated the phenotype and transcriptome of human BAL-MSCs and LT-MSCs. We found that MSCs were rarely recoverable from the alveolar space in healthy humans, but could be readily isolated from lung transplant recipients by bronchoalveolar lavage. BAL-MSCs exhibited a CD90(Hi) , CD73(Hi) , CD45(Neg) , CD105(Lo) immunophenotype and were bipotent, lacking adipogenic potential. In contrast, MSCs were readily recoverable from healthy human lung tissue and were CD90(Hi or Lo) , CD73(Hi) , CD45(Neg) , CD105(Int) and had full tri-lineage potential. Transcriptional profiling of the two populations confirmed their status as bona fide MSCs and revealed a high degree of similarity between each other and the archetypal bone-marrow MSC. 105 genes were differentially expressed; 76 of which were increased in BAL-MSCs including genes involved in fibroblast activation, extracellular matrix deposition and tissue remodelling. Finally, we found the fibroblast markers collagen 1A1 and α-smooth muscle actin were increased in BAL-MSCs. Our data suggests that in healthy humans, lung MSCs reside within the tissue, but in disease can differentiate to acquire a profibrotic phenotype and migrate from their in-tissue niche into the alveolar space. Stem Cells 2016;34:2548-2558.

  7. TGF β1 and PDGF AA override Collagen type I inhibition of proliferation in human liver connective tissue cells

    PubMed Central

    Geremias, Alvaro T; Carvalho, Marcelo A; Borojevic, Radovan; Monteiro, Alvaro NA

    2004-01-01

    Background A marked expansion of the connective tissue population and an abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix proteins are hallmarks of chronic and acute injuries to liver tissue. Liver connective tissue cells, also called stellate cells, derived from fibrotic liver have been thoroughly characterized and correspond phenotypically to myofibroblasts. They are thought to derive from fat-storing Ito cells in the perisinusoidal space and acquire a contractile phenotype when activated by tissue injury. In the last few years it has become evident that several peptide growth factors such as PDGF AA and TGF-β are involved in the development of fibrosis by modulating myofibroblast proliferation and collagen secretion. The fact that during the development of chronic fibrosis there is concomitant deposition of collagen, a known inhibitory factor, and sustained cell proliferation, raises the possibility that stellate cells from chronic liver fibrosis patients fail to respond to normal physiologic controls. Methods In this study we address whether cells from fibrotic liver patients respond to normal controls of proliferation. We compared cell proliferation of primary human liver connective tissue cells (LCTC) from patients with liver fibrosis and skin fibroblasts (SF) in the presence of collagens type I and IV; TGF-β, PDGF AA and combinations of collagen type I and TGF-β or PDGF AA. Results Our results indicate that despite displaying normal contact and collagen-induced inhibition of proliferation LCTC respond more vigorously to lower concentrations of PDGF AA. In addition, we show that collagen type I synergizes with growth factors to promote mitogenesis of LCTC but not SF. Conclusions The synergistic interaction of growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins may underlie the development of chronic liver fibrosis. PMID:15579200

  8. Calcium Sensing Receptor (CaSR) activation elevates proinflammatory factor expression in human adipose cells and adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes, Mariana; Fuentes, Cecilia; Acevedo, Ingrid; Villalobos, Elisa; Hugo, Eric; Ben Jonathan, Nira; Reyes, Marcela

    2013-01-01

    We have previously established that human adipose cells and the human adipose cell line LS14 express the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) and that its expression is elevated upon exposure to inflammatory cytokines that are typically elevated in obese humans. Research in recent years has established that an important part of the adverse metabolic and cardiovascular consequences of obesity derive from a dysfunction of the tissue, one of the mechanisms being a disordered secretion pattern leading to an excess of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Given the reported association of the CaSR to inflammatory processes in other tissues, we sought to evaluate its role elevating the adipose expression of inflammatory factors. We exposed adipose tissue and in-vitro cultured LS14 preadipocytes and differentiated adipocytes to the calcimimetic cinacalcet and evaluated the expression or production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL6, IL1β and TNFα as well as the chemoattractant factor CCL2. CaSR activation elicited an elevation in the expression of the inflammatory factors, which was in part reverted by SN50, an inhibitor of the inflammatory mediator NFκB. Our observations suggest that CaSR activation elevates cytokine and chemokine production through a signaling pathway involving activation of NFκB nuclear translocation. These findings confirm the relevance of the CaSR in the pathophysiology of obesity-induced adipose tissue dysfunction, with an interesting potential for pharmacological manipulation in the fight against obesity- associated diseases. PMID:22449852

  9. Three-Dimensional Human Cardiac Tissue Engineered by Centrifugation of Stacked Cell Sheets and Cross-Sectional Observation of Its Synchronous Beatings by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Kobayashi, Mari; Iwana, Shin-ichi; Kabetani, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissues are engineered by stacking cell sheets, and these tissues have been applied in clinical regenerative therapies. The optimal fabrication technique of 3D human tissues and the real-time observation system for these tissues are important in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, cardiac physiology, and the safety testing of candidate chemicals. In this study, for aiming the clinical application, 3D human cardiac tissues were rapidly fabricated by human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived cardiac cell sheets with centrifugation, and the structures and beatings in the cardiac tissues were observed cross-sectionally and noninvasively by two optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems. The fabrication time was reduced to approximately one-quarter by centrifugation. The cross-sectional observation showed that multilayered cardiac cell sheets adhered tightly just after centrifugation. Additionally, the cross-sectional transmissions of beatings within multilayered human cardiac tissues were clearly detected by OCT. The observation showed the synchronous beatings of the thicker 3D human cardiac tissues, which were fabricated rapidly by cell sheet technology and centrifugation. The rapid tissue-fabrication technique and OCT technology will show a powerful potential in cardiac tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery research. PMID:28326324

  10. Human Periodontal Cells Demonstrate Osteoblast-Like and Fibroblast-Like Characteristics in Tissue Culture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-05

    this study was to characterize the phenotypes of cells cultured from human periodontium in order to provide insight into healing mechanisms ...migration using membranes is best suited to isolated defects 4 Figure 1. Models of Wound Healing Figure 1A. Cellular Mechanisms Mesenchymal stem cells... mechanisms and improve the clinical success of regenerative procedures. Listgarten (1986) further sug- gests wound healing is significant to the progression

  11. The E3 ligase axotrophin/MARCH-7: protein expression profiling of human tissues reveals links to adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Szigyarto, Cristina A; Sibbons, Paul; Williams, Gill; Uhlen, Mathias; Metcalfe, Su M

    2010-04-01

    Axotrophin/MARCH-7 was first identified in mouse embryonic stem cells as a neural stem cell gene. Using the axotrophin/MARCH-7 null mouse, we discovered profound effects on T lymphocyte responses, including 8-fold hyperproliferation and 5-fold excess release of the stem cell cytokine leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Our further discovery that axotrophin/MARCH-7 is required for targeted degradation of the LIF receptor subunit gp190 implies a direct role in the regulation of LIF signaling. Bioinformatics studies revealed a highly conserved RING-CH domain in common with the MARCH family of E3-ubiquitin ligases, and accordingly, axotrophin was renamed "MARCH-7." To probe protein expression of human axotrophin/MARCH-7, we prepared antibodies against different domains of the protein. Each antibody bound its specific target epitope with high affinity, and immunohistochemistry cross-validated target specificity. Forty-eight human tissue types were screened. Epithelial cells stained strongly, with trophoblasts having the greatest staining. In certain tissues, specific cell types were selectively positive, including neurons and neuronal progenitor cells in the hippocampus and cerebellum, endothelial sinusoids of the spleen, megakaryocytes in the bone marrow, crypt stem cells of the small intestine, and alveolar macrophages in the lung. Approximately 20% of central nervous system neuropils were positive. Notably, axotrophin/MARCH-7 has an expression profile that is distinct from that of other MARCH family members. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials.

  12. Pig but not Human Interferon-γ Initiates Human Cell-Mediated Rejection of Pig Tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Parvez; Murray, Allan G.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Lorber, Marc I.; Askenase, Philip W.; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.; Pober, Jordan S.

    1997-08-01

    Split-thickness pig skin was transplanted on severe combined immunodeficient mice so that pig dermal microvessels spontaneously inosculated with mouse microvessels and functioned to perfuse the grafts. Pig endothelial cells in the healed grafts constitutively expressed class I and class II major histocompatibility complex molecules. Major histocompatibility complex molecule expression could be further increased by intradermal injection of pig interferon-γ (IFN-γ ) but not human IFN-γ or tumor necrosis factor. Grafts injected with pig IFN-γ also developed a sparse infiltrate of mouse neutrophils and eosinophils without evidence of injury. Introduction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into the animals by intraperitoneal inoculation resulted in sparse perivascular mononuclear cell infiltrates in the grafts confined to the pig dermis. Injection of pig skin grafts on mice that received human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with pig IFN-γ (but not human IFN-γ or heat-inactivated pig IFN-γ ) induced human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and macrophages to more extensively infiltrate the pig skin grafts and injure pig dermal microvessels. These findings suggest that human T cell-mediated rejection of xenotransplanted pig organs may be prevented if cellular sources of pig interferon (e.g., passenger lymphocytes) are eliminated from the graft.

  13. Mammosphere Formation Assay from Human Breast Cancer Tissues and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Coombes, Charles R.; Stebbing, Justin; Castellano, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Similar to healthy tissues, many blood and solid malignancies are now thought to be organised hierarchically, with a subset of stem-like cancer cells that self-renew while giving rise to more differentiated progeny. Understanding and targeting these cancer stem cells in breast cancer, which may possess enhanced chemo- and radio-resistance compared to the non-stem tumor bulk, has become an important research area. Markers including CD44, CD24, and ALDH activity can be assessed using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to prospectively isolate cells that display enhanced tumorigenicity when implanted into immunocompromised mice: the mammosphere assay has also become widely used for its ability to retrospectively identify sphere-forming cells that develop from single stem cell-like clones. Here we outline approaches for the appropriate culturing of mammospheres from cell lines or primary patient samples, their passaging, and calculations to estimate sphere forming efficiency (SFE). First we discuss key considerations and pitfalls in the appropriate planning and interpretation of mammosphere experiments. PMID:25867607

  14. Business oriented EU human cell and tissue product legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Vanderkelen, Alain; De Vos, Daniel; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Rose, Thomas; Ceulemans, Carl; Ectors, Nadine; Huys, Isabelle; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert

    2013-12-01

    The transplantation of conventional human cell and tissue grafts, such as heart valve replacements and skin for severely burnt patients, has saved many lives over the last decades. The late eighties saw the emergence of tissue engineering with the focus on the development of biological substitutes that restore or improve tissue function. In the nineties, at the height of the tissue engineering hype, industry incited policymakers to create a European regulatory environment, which would facilitate the emergence of a strong single market for tissue engineered products and their starting materials (human cells and tissues). In this paper we analyze the elaboration process of this new European Union (EU) human cell and tissue product regulatory regime-i.e. the EU Cell and Tissue Directives (EUCTDs) and the Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product (ATMP) Regulation and evaluate its impact on Member States' health care systems. We demonstrate that the successful lobbying on key areas of regulatory and policy processes by industry, in congruence with Europe's risk aversion and urge to promote growth and jobs, led to excessively business oriented legislation. Expensive industry oriented requirements were introduced and contentious social and ethical issues were excluded. We found indications that this new EU safety and health legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems; since 30 December 2012 (the end of the ATMP transitional period) there is a clear threat to the sustainability of some lifesaving and established ATMPs that were provided by public health institutions and small and medium-sized enterprises under the frame of the EUCTDs. In the light of the current economic crisis it is not clear how social security systems will cope with the inflation of costs associated with this new regulatory regime and how priorities will be set with regard to reimbursement decisions. We argue that the ATMP Regulation should urgently be revised to focus on delivering

  15. Bone tissue engineering via human induced pluripotent, umbilical cord and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in rat cranium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Xian; Zhao, Liang; Weir, Michael D; Sun, Jirun; Chen, Wenchuan; Man, Yi; Xu, Hockin H K

    2015-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are an exciting cell source with great potential for tissue engineering. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) have been used in clinics but are limited by several disadvantages, hence alternative sources of MSCs such as umbilical cord MSCs (hUCMSCs) are being investigated. However, there has been no report comparing hiPSCs, hUCMSCs and hBMSCs for bone regeneration. The objectives of this pilot study were to investigate hiPSCs, hUCMSCs and hBMSCs for bone tissue engineering, and compare their bone regeneration via seeding on biofunctionalized macroporous calcium phosphate cement (CPC) in rat cranial defects. For all three types of cells, approximately 90% of the cells remained alive on CPC scaffolds. Osteogenic genes were up-regulated, and mineral synthesis by cells increased with time in vitro for all three types of cells. The new bone area fractions at 12weeks (mean±sd; n=6) were (30.4±5.8)%, (27.4±9.7)% and (22.6±4.7)% in hiPSC-MSC-CPC, hUCMSC-CPC and hBMSC-CPC respectively, compared to (11.0±6.3)% for control (p<0.05). No significant differences were detected among the three types of stem cells (p>0.1). New blood vessel density was higher in cell-seeded groups than control (p<0.05). De novo bone formation and participation by implanted cells was confirmed via immunohistochemical staining. In conclusion, (1) hiPSCs, hUCMSCs and hBMSCs greatly enhanced bone regeneration, more than doubling the new bone amount of cell-free CPC control; (2) hiPSC-MSCs and hUCMSCs represented viable alternatives to hBMSCs; (3) biofunctionalized macroporous CPC-stem cell constructs had a robust capacity for bone regeneration.

  16. Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Differentiate Into Corneal Tissue and Prevent Ocular Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Hernández-Galilea, Emiliano; Lorenzo, Rebeca; Herrero, Carmen; Velasco, Almudena; Carrancio, Soraya; Caballero-Velázquez, Teresa; Rodríguez-Barbosa, José Ignacio; Parrilla, Marta; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; San Miguel, Jesús; Aijón, José; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials have assessed the use of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) for the treatment of immune-related disorders such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In the current study, we show that GFP(+)-transduced hBMSCs generated from bone marrow migrate and differentiate into corneal tissue after subconjunctival injection in mice. Interestingly, these hBMSCs display morphological features of epithelial, stromal, and endothelial cells and appear at different layers and with different morphologies depending on their position within the epithelium. Furthermore, these cells display ultrastructural properties, such as bundles of intermediate filaments, interdigitations, and desmosomes with GFP(-) cells, which confirms their differentiation into corneal tissues. GFP(+)-transduced hBMSCs were injected at different time points into the right eye of lethally irradiated mice undergoing bone marrow transplantation, which developed ocular GVHD (oGVHD). Remarkably, hBMSCs massively migrate to corneal tissues after subconjunctival injection. Both macroscopic and histopathological examination showed minimal or no evidence of GVHD in the right eye, while the left eye, where no hBMSCs were injected, displayed features of GVHD. Thus, in the current study, we confirm that hBMSCs may induce their therapeutic effect at least in part by differentiation and regeneration of damaged tissues in the host. Our results provide experimental evidence that hBMSCs represent a potential cellular therapy to attenuate oGVHD.

  17. Distribution of type XV collagen transcripts in human tissue and their production by muscle cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Kivirikko, S.; Saarela, J.; Myers, J. C.; Autio-Harmainen, H.; Pihlajaniemi, T.

    1995-01-01

    Type XV collagen is a recently identified member of the diverse family of collagens, its structure being characterized by extensive interruptions in the collagenous sequences. A combination of Northern blot hybridization of fetal and adult human tissues and in situ hybridization analyses of a fetus with Down's syndrome, several placentas, and adult skin were used to localize expression of its mRNAs. Northern blot analysis revealed marked expression in heart, skeletal muscle, and placenta tissues and moderate levels in the kidney and pancreas. Clear in situ hybridization signals were detected in fibroblasts and endothelial cells in all tissues studied. Examination of fetal heart, skeletal muscle, and smooth muscle tissues showed that the high type XV collagen mRNA level in the muscle RNA was localized not only to fibroblasts residing in the endomysium but also to myoblasts. Interestingly, type XV collagen mRNAs were also synthesized by certain epithelial cells in kidney, lung, pancreas, and placenta. It was the morphologically immature glomeruli in the kidney and the lower parts of the nephron, especially the collecting ducts, that contained these mRNAs but not the mature glomeruli or proximal tubules, suggesting differences in expression during development. These findings indicate a wide distribution of type XV collagen transcripts, the main producers being mesenchymally derived cells, particularly muscle cells and fibroblasts. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7485412

  18. TFH cells accumulate in mucosal tissues of humanized-DRAG mice and are highly permissive to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Allam, Atef; Majji, Sai; Peachman, Kristina; Jagodzinski, Linda; Kim, Jiae; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Wijayalath, Wathsala; Merbah, Melanie; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Alving, Carl R; Casares, Sofia; Rao, Mangala

    2015-06-02

    CD4(+) T follicular helper cells (TFH) in germinal centers are required for maturation of B-cells. While the role of TFH-cells has been studied in blood and lymph nodes of HIV-1 infected individuals, its role in the mucosal tissues has not been investigated. We show that the gut and female reproductive tract (FRT) of humanized DRAG mice have a high level of human lymphocytes and a high frequency of TFH (CXCR5(+)PD-1(++)) and precursor-TFH (CXCR5(+)PD-1(+)) cells. The majority of TFH-cells expressed CCR5 and CXCR3 and are the most permissive to HIV-1 infection. A single low-dose intravaginal HIV-1 challenge of humanized DRAG mice results in 100% infectivity with accumulation of TFH-cells mainly in the Peyer's patches and FRT. The novel finding of TFH-cells in the FRT may contribute to the high susceptibility of DRAG mice to HIV-1 infection. This mouse model thus provides new opportunities to study TFH-cells and to evaluate HIV-1 vaccines.

  19. TFH cells accumulate in mucosal tissues of humanized-DRAG mice and are highly permissive to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Atef; Majji, Sai; Peachman, Kristina; Jagodzinski, Linda; Kim, Jiae; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Wijayalath, Wathsala; Merbah, Melanie; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Alving, Carl R.; Casares, Sofia; Rao, Mangala

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T follicular helper cells (TFH) in germinal centers are required for maturation of B-cells. While the role of TFH-cells has been studied in blood and lymph nodes of HIV-1 infected individuals, its role in the mucosal tissues has not been investigated. We show that the gut and female reproductive tract (FRT) of humanized DRAG mice have a high level of human lymphocytes and a high frequency of TFH (CXCR5+PD-1++) and precursor-TFH (CXCR5+PD-1+) cells. The majority of TFH-cells expressed CCR5 and CXCR3 and are the most permissive to HIV-1 infection. A single low-dose intravaginal HIV-1 challenge of humanized DRAG mice results in 100% infectivity with accumulation of TFH-cells mainly in the Peyer’s patches and FRT. The novel finding of TFH-cells in the FRT may contribute to the high susceptibility of DRAG mice to HIV-1 infection. This mouse model thus provides new opportunities to study TFH-cells and to evaluate HIV-1 vaccines. PMID:26034905

  20. Human endothelial colony-forming cells expanded with an improved protocol are a useful endothelial cell source for scaffold-based tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Denecke, Bernd; Horsch, Liska D; Radtke, Stefan; Fischer, Johannes C; Horn, Peter A; Giebel, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    One of the major challenges in tissue engineering is to supply larger three-dimensional (3D) bioengineered tissue transplants with sufficient amounts of nutrients and oxygen and to allow metabolite removal. Consequently, artificial vascularization strategies of such transplants are desired. One strategy focuses on endothelial cells capable of initiating new vessel formation, which are settled on scaffolds commonly used in tissue engineering. A bottleneck in this strategy is to obtain sufficient amounts of endothelial cells, as they can be harvested only in small quantities directly from human tissues. Thus, protocols are required to expand appropriate cells in sufficient amounts without interfering with their capability to settle on scaffold materials and to initiate vessel formation. Here, we analysed whether umbilical cord blood (CB)-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) fulfil these requirements. In a first set of experiments, we showed that marginally expanded ECFCs settle and survive on different scaffold biomaterials. Next, we improved ECFC culture conditions and developed a protocol for ECFC expansion compatible with 'Good Manufacturing Practice' (GMP) standards. We replaced animal sera with human platelet lysates and used a novel type of tissue-culture ware. ECFCs cultured under the new conditions revealed significantly lower apoptosis and increased proliferation rates. Simultaneously, their viability was increased. Since extensively expanded ECFCs could still settle on scaffold biomaterials and were able to form tubular structures in Matrigel assays, we conclude that these ex vivo-expanded ECFCs are a novel, very potent cell source for scaffold-based tissue engineering.

  1. Human histocultures (tissue explants) in retrovirology

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses’ diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues and cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Human histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervico-vaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a pre-clinical platform for antivirals evaluation. PMID:24158827

  2. Meniscus tissue engineering using a novel combination of electrospun scaffolds and human meniscus cells embedded within an extracellular matrix hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jihye; Chen, Xian; Sovani, Sujata; Jin, Sungho; Grogan, Shawn P; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2015-04-01

    Meniscus injury and degeneration have been linked to the development of secondary osteoarthritis (OA). Therapies that successfully repair or replace the meniscus are, therefore, likely to prevent or delay OA progression. We investigated the novel approach of building layers of aligned polylactic acid (PLA) electrospun (ES) scaffolds with human meniscus cells embedded in extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogel to lead to formation of neotissues that resemble meniscus-like tissue. PLA ES scaffolds with randomly oriented or aligned fibers were seeded with human meniscus cells derived from vascular or avascular regions. Cell viability, cell morphology, and gene expression profiles were monitored via confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), respectively. Seeded scaffolds were used to produce multilayered constructs and were examined via histology and immunohistochemistry. Morphology and mechanical properties of PLA scaffolds (with and without cells) were influenced by fiber direction of the scaffolds. Both PLA scaffolds supported meniscus tissue formation with increased COL1A1, SOX9, and COMP, yet no difference in gene expression was found between random and aligned PLA scaffolds. Overall, ES materials, which possess mechanical strength of meniscus and can support neotissue formation, show potential for use in cell-based meniscus regeneration strategies.

  3. Comparative study of human dental follicle cell sheets and periodontal ligament cell sheets for periodontal tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shujuan; Guo, Weihua; Ding, Yi; Gong, Jian; Zou, Qing; Xie, Dan; Chen, Yali; Wu, Yafei; Tian, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal ligament cell (PDLC) sheets have been shown to contribute to periodontal tissue regeneration. Dental follicle cells (DFCs), acknowledged as the precursor cells of PDLCs, have demonstrated stemness, embryonic features, heterogeneity, and pluripotency. Therefore, we hypothesized that DFC sheets might be more effective and suitable for periodontal tissue regeneration than PDLC sheets. In this study, we compared the biological characteristics of DFC sheets and PDLC sheets in vitro. To investigate the potential for periodontal tissue regeneration in vivo, complexes composed of two types of cell sheets combined with dentin matrix were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice for 6 weeks. Our results showed that, when forming cell sheets, DFCs secreted richer extracellular matrix than PDLCs. And compared to DFCs, DFC sheets expressed high levels of calcification-related genes, including alkaline phosphatase (alp), bone sialoprotein (bsp), osteopontin (opn), runt-related transcription factor (runx2), as well as the periodontal ligament-specific genes collagen III (col III) and periostin, while the gene expression of bsp, osteocalcin (ocn), and opn were greatly increased in PDLC sheets, when compared to PDLCs. col I expression did not change significantly. However, cementum protein 23 (cp-23) expression increased several fold in PDLC sheets compared to PDLCs but decreased in DFC sheets compared to DFCs. DFC and PDLC sheets were both positive for Collagen I (Col I), cementum attachment protein (CAP), ALP, BSP, OCN, and OPN protein expression, and Col I, ALP, BSP, and OPN expression were increased after cell sheets were formed. Furthermore, the levels of laminin and fibronectin were higher in DFCs and DFC sheets than that of PDLCs and PDLC sheets, respectively. In vivo, DFC and PDLC sheets could both regenerate periodontal tissue-like structures, but DFC sheets demonstrated stronger periodontal regeneration potential than PDLC sheets. Therefore, DFC sheets derived

  4. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Extraembryonic Tissues of Fetuses Affected by Monogenic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Rosa V; Botta, Annalisa; Murdocca, Michela; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Orlandi, Augusto; Giardina, Emiliano; Santoro, Massimo; Brancati, Francesco; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-08-01

    The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from an autologous extraembryonic fetal source is an innovative personalized regenerative technology that can transform own-self cells into embryonic stem-like ones. These cells are regarded as a promising candidate for cell-based therapy, as well as an ideal target for disease modeling and drug discovery. Thus, hiPSCs enable researchers to undertake studies for treating diseases or for future applications of in utero therapy. We used a polycistronic lentiviral vector (hSTEMCCA-loxP) encoding OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC genes and containing loxP sites, excisible by Cre recombinase, to reprogram patient-specific fetal cells derived from prenatal diagnosis for several genetic disorders, such as myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), β-thalassemia (β-Thal), lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LDS), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), cystic fibrosis (CF), as well as from wild-type (WT) fetal cells. Because cell types tested to create hiPSCs influence both the reprogramming process efficiency and the kinetics, we used chorionic villus (CV) and amniotic fluid (AF) cells, demonstrating how they represent an ideal cell resource for a more efficient generation of hiPSCs. The successful reprogramming of both CV and AF cells into hiPSCs was confirmed by specific morphological, molecular, and immunocytochemical markers and also by their teratogenic potential when inoculated in vivo. We further demonstrated the stability of reprogrammed cells over 10 and more passages and their capability to differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers, as well as into neural cells. These data suggest that hiPSCs-CV/AF can be considered a valid cellular model to accomplish pathogenesis studies and therapeutic applications.

  5. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-based microphysiological tissue models of myocardium and liver for drug development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Drug discovery and development to date has relied on animal models, which are useful but are often expensive, slow, and fail to mimic human physiology. The discovery of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has led to the emergence of a new paradigm of drug screening using human and disease-specific organ-like cultures in a dish. Although classical static culture systems are useful for initial screening and toxicity testing, they lack the organization of differentiated iPS cells into microphysiological, organ-like structures deemed necessary for high-content analysis of candidate drugs. One promising approach to produce these organ-like structures is the use of advanced microfluidic systems, which can simulate tissue structure and function at a micron level, and can provide high-throughput testing of different compounds for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Here, we provide a brief outline on the different approaches, which have been used to engineer in vitro tissue constructs of iPS cell-based myocardium and liver functions on chip. Combining these techniques with iPS cell biology has the potential of reducing the dependence on animal studies for drug toxicity and efficacy screening. PMID:24565415

  6. Nuclear localisation of endogenous SUMO-1-modified PDGF-C in human thyroid tissue and cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Reigstad, Laila J.; Martinez, Aurora; Varhaug, Jan Erik; Lillehaug, Johan R. . E-mail: johan.lillehaug@mbi.uib.no

    2006-04-01

    We investigated post-translational modification and subcellular localisation of endogenous platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) in human thyroid papillary carcinomas (PTC), non-neoplastic thyroid tissues, and a selection of cultured cell lines. PDGF-C expressed nuclear localisation in 95% of all tested cell types in culture and in 10% of the thyrocytes from both PTC and non-neoplastic tissue. The cell lines expressed two forms of full-length PDGF-C, {approx}39 and {approx}55 kDa, in cell membrane and cytosol, while the {approx}55 kDa form dominated in the nucleus where it was partly chromatin-associated. The {approx}55 kDa form was post-translationally modified by SUMO-1. The putative PDGF-C SUMOylation site is the surface exposed {sup 314}lysine part of a positively charged loop ({sup 312}RPKTGVRGLHK{sup 322}) with characteristics of a nuclear localisation signal. The tissue thyrocytes expressed a non-SUMOylated {approx}43 kDa and the 55 kDa PDGF-C. The SUMO-1 modified {approx}55 kDa PDGF-C expression was low in PTC where the {approx}43 kDa PDGF-C dominated. This is in contrast to non-neoplastic tissue and cultured cells where the SUMOylated {approx}55 kDa PDGF-C was strongly expressed. Our data provide novel evidence for nuclear localisation of PDGF-C, post-translational modification by SUMOylation and the expression of a novel form of PDGF-C in human papillary thyroid carcinomas.

  7. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  8. CD49a Expression Defines Tissue-Resident CD8(+) T Cells Poised for Cytotoxic Function in Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Stanley; Schlums, Heinrich; Gallais Sérézal, Irène; Martini, Elisa; Chiang, Samuel C; Marquardt, Nicole; Gibbs, Anna; Detlofsson, Ebba; Introini, Andrea; Forkel, Marianne; Höög, Charlotte; Tjernlund, Annelie; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Folkersen, Lasse; Mjösberg, Jenny; Blomqvist, Lennart; Ehrström, Marcus; Ståhle, Mona; Bryceson, Yenan T; Eidsmo, Liv

    2017-02-21

    Tissue-resident memory T (Trm) cells form a heterogeneous population that provides localized protection against pathogens. Here, we identify CD49a as a marker that differentiates CD8(+) Trm cells on a compartmental and functional basis. In human skin epithelia, CD8(+)CD49a(+) Trm cells produced interferon-γ, whereas CD8(+)CD49a(-) Trm cells produced interleukin-17 (IL-17). In addition, CD8(+)CD49a(+) Trm cells from healthy skin rapidly induced the expression of the effector molecules perforin and granzyme B when stimulated with IL-15, thereby promoting a strong cytotoxic response. In skin from patients with vitiligo, where melanocytes are eradicated locally, CD8(+)CD49a(+) Trm cells that constitutively expressed perforin and granzyme B accumulated both in the epidermis and dermis. Conversely, CD8(+)CD49a(-) Trm cells from psoriasis lesions predominantly generated IL-17 responses that promote local inflammation in this skin disease. Overall, CD49a expression delineates CD8(+) Trm cell specialization in human epithelial barriers and correlates with the effector cell balance found in distinct inflammatory skin diseases.

  9. Expression and Functional Activity of the Human Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R38 in Human Placental Tissues and JEG-3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wölfle, Ute; Elsholz, Floriana A; Kersten, Astrid; Haarhaus, Birgit; Schumacher, Udo; Schempp, Christoph M

    2016-03-03

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are expressed in mucous epithelial cells of the tongue but also outside the gustatory system in epithelial cells of the colon, stomach and bladder, in the upper respiratory tract, in the cornified squamous epithelium of the skin as well as in airway smooth muscle cells, in the testis and in the brain. In the present work we addressed the question if bitter taste receptors might also be expressed in other epithelial tissues as well. By staining a tissue microarray with 45 tissue spots from healthy human donors with an antibody directed against the best characterized bitter taste receptor TAS2R38, we observed an unexpected strong TAS2R38 expression in the amniotic epithelium, syncytiotrophoblast and decidua cells of the human placenta. To analyze the functionality we first determined the TAS2R38 expression in the placental cell line JEG-3. Stimulation of these cells with diphenidol, a clinically used antiemetic agent that binds TAS2Rs including TAS2R38, demonstrated the functionality of the TAS2Rs by inducing calcium influx. Restriction enzyme based detection of the TAS2R38 gene allele identified JEG-3 cells as PTC (phenylthiocarbamide)-taster cell line. Calcium influx induced by PTC in JEG-3 cells could be inhibited with the recently described TAS2R38 inhibitor probenecid and proved the specificity of the TAS2R38 activation. The expression of TAS2R38 in human placental tissues points to further new functions and hitherto unknown endogenous ligands of TAS2Rs far beyond bitter tasting.

  10. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Sielski, Neil L; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2014-01-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C). Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP) model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate-) cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  11. Effects of cathepsin K on Emdogain-induced hard tissue formation by human periodontal ligament stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fen; Zhou, Zhi-Fei; An, Ying; Yu, Yang; Wu, Rui-Xin; Yin, Yuan; Xue, Yang; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2016-07-12

    Recent studies have shown that patients with pycnodysostosis caused by cathepsin K (CTSK) genetic mutations exhibit significantly abnormal periodontal hard tissue structure. This finding suggests that CTSK may play a role in regulating the development of alveolar bone and cementum. However, the source of CTSK in the periodontal environment and the role of CTSK in periodontal regeneration, particularly hard tissue regeneration and development, remain unclear. After the isolation, cultivation, identification, and multi-lineage induction of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs), the present study used light and scanning electron microscopy, reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, micro-computed tomography, immunohistochemical assays and ectopic hard tissue formation experiments to examine CTSK expression in hPDLSCs. The results indicated that CTSK expression was significantly upregulated in hPDLSCs during Emdogain induction but underwent minimal change during osteogenic or adipogenic induction. The present study also showed that the downregulation of CTSK expression inhibited osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation and ectopic hard tissue formation of hPDLSCs. It is therefore concluded that hPDLSCs expressed CTSK and that CTSK levels were significantly upregulated during Emdogain induction. Furthermore, CTSK promoted not only the osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation of hPDLSCs but also their ability to form ectopic hard tissue. These new findings may enhance the understanding of periodontal hard tissue development and functional regeneration. However, the specific underlying mechanisms require further investigation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Preferential elevation of Prx I and Trx expression in lung cancer cells following hypoxia and in human lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Chae, H Z; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y H; Hwangs, T S; Park, E M; Park, Y M

    2003-10-01

    Transient/chronic microenvironmental hypoxia that exists within a majority of solid tumors has been suggested to have a profound influence on tumor growth and therapeutic outcome. Since the functions of novel antioxidant proteins, peroxiredoxin I (Prx I) and II, have been implicated in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, it was of our special interest to probe a possible role of Prx I and II in the context of hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Since both Prx I and II use thioredoxin (Trx) as an electron donor and Trx is a substrate for thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), we investigated the regulation of Trx and TrxR as well as Prx expression following hypoxia. Here we show a dynamic change of glutathione homeostasis in lung cancer A549 cells and an up-regulation of Prx I and Trx following hypoxia. Western blot analysis of 10 human lung cancer and paired normal lung tissues also revealed an elevated expression of Prx I and Trx proteins in lung cancer tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis of the lung cancer tissues confirmed an augmented Prx I and Trx expression in cancer cells with respect to the parenchymal cells in adjacent normal lung tissue. Based on these results, we suggest that the redox changes in lung tumor microenvironment could have acted as a trigger for the up-regulation of Prx I and Trx in lung cancer cells. Although the clinical significance of our finding awaits more rigorous future study, preferential augmentation of the Prx I and Trx in lung cancer cells may well represent an attempt of cancer cells to manipulate a dynamic redox change in tumor microenvironment in a manner that is beneficial for their proliferation and malignant progression.

  13. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs.

    PubMed

    Woon, Heng Giap; Braun, Asolina; Li, Jane; Smith, Corey; Edwards, Jarem; Sierro, Frederic; Feng, Carl G; Khanna, Rajiv; Elliot, Michael; Bell, Andrew; Hislop, Andrew D; Tangye, Stuart G; Rickinson, Alan B; Gebhardt, Thomas; Britton, Warwick J; Palendira, Umaimainthan

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that were CD69+CD103+ and CD69+CD103-, and were retained within the spleen and tonsils in the absence of recent T cell stimulation. These two types of memory cells were distinct not only in their phenotype and transcriptional profile, but also in their anatomical localization within tonsils and spleen. The EBV-specific, but not CMV-specific, CD8+ memory T cells preferentially accumulated in the tonsils and acquired a phenotype that ensured their retention at the epithelial sites where EBV replicates. In vitro studies revealed that the cytokine IL-15 can potentiate the retention of circulating effector memory CD8+ T cells by down-regulating the expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, required for T cell exit from tissues, and its transcriptional activator, Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). Within the tonsils the expression of IL-15 was detected in regions where CD8+ T cells localized, further supporting a role for this cytokine in T cell retention. Together this study provides evidence for the compartmentalization of distinct types of resident memory T cells that could contribute to the long-term protection against persisting viral infections.

  14. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jane; Smith, Corey; Edwards, Jarem; Sierro, Frederic; Feng, Carl G.; Khanna, Rajiv; Bell, Andrew; Hislop, Andrew D.; Tangye, Stuart G.; Rickinson, Alan B.; Gebhardt, Thomas; Britton, Warwick J.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that were CD69+CD103+ and CD69+CD103—, and were retained within the spleen and tonsils in the absence of recent T cell stimulation. These two types of memory cells were distinct not only in their phenotype and transcriptional profile, but also in their anatomical localization within tonsils and spleen. The EBV-specific, but not CMV-specific, CD8+ memory T cells preferentially accumulated in the tonsils and acquired a phenotype that ensured their retention at the epithelial sites where EBV replicates. In vitro studies revealed that the cytokine IL-15 can potentiate the retention of circulating effector memory CD8+ T cells by down-regulating the expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, required for T cell exit from tissues, and its transcriptional activator, Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). Within the tonsils the expression of IL-15 was detected in regions where CD8+ T cells localized, further supporting a role for this cytokine in T cell retention. Together this study provides evidence for the compartmentalization of distinct types of resident memory T cells that could contribute to the long-term protection against persisting viral infections. PMID:27540722

  15. CD56(bright)perforin(low) noncytotoxic human NK cells are abundant in both healthy and neoplastic solid tissues and recirculate to secondary lymphoid organs via afferent lymph.

    PubMed

    Carrega, Paolo; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Di Carlo, Emma; Morandi, Barbara; Paul, Petra; Rizzello, Valeria; Cipollone, Giuseppe; Navarra, Giuseppe; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2014-04-15

    As limited information is available regarding the distribution and trafficking of NK cells among solid organs, we have analyzed a wide array of tissues derived from different human compartments. NK cells were widely distributed in most solid tissues, although their amount varied significantly depending on the tissue/organ analyzed. Interestingly, the distribution appeared to be subset specific, as some tissues were preferentially populated by CD56(bright)perforin(low) NK cells, with others by the CD56(dim)perforin(high) cytotoxic counterpart. Nevertheless, most tissues were highly enriched in CD56(bright)perforin(low) cells, and the distribution of NK subsets appeared in accordance with tissue gene expression of chemotactic factors, for which receptors are differently represented in the two subsets. Remarkably, chemokine expression pattern of tissues was modified after neoplastic transformation. As a result, although the total amount of NK cells infiltrating the tissues did not significantly change upon malignant transformation, the relative proportion of NK subsets infiltrating the tissues was different, with a trend toward a tumor-infiltrating NK population enriched in noncytotoxic cells. Besides solid tissues, CD56(bright)perforin(low) NK cells were also detected in seroma fluids, which represents an accrual of human afferent lymph, indicating that they may leave peripheral solid tissues and recirculate to secondary lymphoid organs via lymphatic vessels. Our results provide a comprehensive mapping of NK cells in human tissues, demonstrating that discrete NK subsets populate and recirculate through most human tissues and that organ-specific chemokine expression patterns might affect their distribution. In this context, chemokine switch upon neoplastic transformation might represent a novel mechanism of tumor immune escape.

  16. Tissue factor is induced by interleukin-33 in human endothelial cells: a new link between coagulation and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovic, Stefan; Kaun, Christoph; Basilio, Jose; Rauscher, Sabine; Hell, Lena; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Bonstingl, Cornelia; de Martin, Rainer; Gröger, Marion; Ay, Cihan; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Neumayer, Christoph; Huk, Ihor; Huber, Kurt; Demyanets, Svitlana; Wojta, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary trigger of coagulation. Elevated levels of TF are found in atherosclerotic plaques, and TF leads to thrombus formation when released upon plaque rupture. Interleukin (IL)-33 was previously shown to induce angiogenesis and inflammatory activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Here, we investigated the impact of IL-33 on TF in human ECs, as a possible new link between inflammation and coagulation. IL-33 induced TF mRNA and protein in human umbilical vein ECs and coronary artery ECs. IL-33-induced TF expression was ST2- and NF-κB-dependent, but IL-1-independent. IL-33 also increased cell surface TF activity in ECs and TF activity in ECs-derived microparticles. IL-33-treated ECs reduced coagulation time of whole blood and plasma but not of factor VII-deficient plasma. In human carotid atherosclerotic plaques (n = 57), TF mRNA positively correlated with IL-33 mRNA expression (r = 0.691, p < 0.001). In this tissue, IL-33 and TF protein was detected in ECs and smooth muscle cells by immunofluorescence. Furthermore, IL-33 and TF protein co-localized at the site of clot formation within microvessels in plaques of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. Through induction of TF in ECs, IL-33 could enhance their thrombotic capacity and thereby might impact on thrombus formation in the setting of atherosclerosis. PMID:27142573

  17. Immunohistochemical evidence for ubiquitous distribution of metalloendoprotease insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; insulysin) in human non-malignant tissues and tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Weirich, Gregor; Mengele, Karin; Yfanti, Christina; Gkazepis, Apostolos; Hellmann, Daniela; Welk, Anita; Giersig, Cecylia; Kuo, Wen-Liang; Rosner, Marsha Rich; Tang, Wei-Jen; Schmitt, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemical evidence for ubiquitous distribution of metalloprotease insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; insulysin) in human non-malignant tissues and tumor cells is presented. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on a multi-organ tissue microarray (pancreas, lung, kidney, central/peripheral nervous system, liver, breast, placenta, myocardium, striated muscle, bone marrow, thymus, spleen) and on a cell microarray encompassing 31 tumor cell lines of different origin plus trophoblast cells, and normal blood lymphocytes and granulocytes. IDE protein is expressed by all of the tissues assessed and in all of the tumor cell lines except Raji and HL-60; trophoblast cells and granulocytes but not normal lymphocytes are also IDE-positive. PMID:18783335

  18. Chemically modified RNA induces osteogenesis of stem cells and human tissue explants as well as accelerates bone healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Balmayor, Elizabeth R; Geiger, Johannes P; Aneja, Manish K; Berezhanskyy, Taras; Utzinger, Maximilian; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Rudolph, Carsten; Plank, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Limitations associated to the use of growth factors represent a major hurdle to musculoskeletal regeneration. On the one hand, they are needed to induce neo-tissue formation for the substitution of a necrotic or missing tissue. On the other hand, these factors are used in supraphysiological concentrations, are short lived and expensive and result in many side effects. Here we develop a gene transfer strategy based on the use of chemically modified mRNA (cmRNA) coding for human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP-2) that is non-immunogenic and highly stable when compared to unmodified mRNA. Transfected stem cells secrete hBMP-2, show elevated alkaline phosphatase levels and upregulated expression of RunX2, ALP, Osterix, Osteocalcin, Osteopontin and Collagen Type I genes. Mineralization was induced as seen by positive Alizarin red staining. hBMP-2 cmRNA transfected human fat tissue also yielded an osteogenic response in vitro as indicated by expression of hBMP-2, RunX2, ALP and Collagen Type I. Delivering hBMP-2 cmRNA to a femur defect in a rat model results in new bone tissue formation as early as 2 weeks after application of very low doses. Overall, our studies demonstrate the feasibility and therapeutic potential of a new cmRNA-based gene therapy strategy that is safe and efficient. When applied clinically, this approach could overcome BMP-2 growth factor associated limitations in bone regeneration.

  19. Regeneration of Cartilage in Human Knee Osteoarthritis with Autologous Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells and Autologous Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This clinical case series demonstrates that percutaneous injections of autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and homogenized extracellular matrix (ECM) in the form of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF), along with hyaluronic acid (HA) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) activated by calcium chloride, could regenerate cartilage-like tissue in human knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Autologous lipoaspirates were obtained from adipose tissue of the abdominal origin. Afterward, the lipoaspirates were minced to homogenize the ECM. These homogenized lipoaspirates were then mixed with collagenase and incubated. The resulting mixture of ADSCs and ECM in the form of SVF was injected, along with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, into knees of three Korean patients with OA. The same affected knees were reinjected weekly with additional PRP activated by calcium chloride for 3 weeks. Pretreatment and post-treatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, functional rating index, range of motion (ROM), and pain score data were then analyzed. All patients' MRI data showed cartilage-like tissue regeneration. Along with MRI evidence, the measured physical therapy outcomes in terms of ROM, subjective pain, and functional status were all improved. This study demonstrates that percutaneous injection of ADSCs with ECM contained in autologous adipose SVF, in conjunction with HA and PRP activated by calcium chloride, is a safe and potentially effective minimally invasive therapy for OA of human knees. PMID:27588219

  20. Murine and Human Tissue-Engineered Esophagus Form from Sufficient Stem/Progenitor Cells and Do Not Require Microdesigned Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Spurrier, Ryan Gregory; Speer, Allison L.; Hou, Xiaogang; El-Nachef, Wael N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Tissue-engineered esophagus (TEE) may serve as a therapeutic replacement for absent foregut. Most prior esophagus studies have favored microdesigned biomaterials and yielded epithelial growth alone. None have generated human TEE with mesenchymal components. We hypothesized that sufficient progenitor cells might only require basic support for successful generation of murine and human TEE. Materials and Methods: Esophageal organoid units (EOUs) were isolated from murine or human esophagi and implanted on a polyglycolic acid/poly-l-lactic acid collagen-coated scaffold in adult allogeneic or immune-deficient mice. Alternatively, EOU were cultured for 10 days in vitro prior to implantation. Results: TEE recapitulated all key components of native esophagus with an epithelium and subjacent muscularis. Differentiated suprabasal and proliferative basal layers of esophageal epithelium, muscle, and nerve were identified. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple EOU could contribute to the epithelium and mesenchyme of a single TEE. Cultured murine EOU grew as an expanding sphere of proliferative basal cells on a neuromuscular network that demonstrated spontaneous peristalsis in culture. Subsequently, cultured EOU generated TEE. Conclusions: TEE forms after transplantation of mouse and human organ-specific stem/progenitor cells in vivo on a relatively simple biodegradable scaffold. This is a first step toward future human therapies. PMID:25298083

  1. Osteogenic potential of human adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on 3D-printed porous structured titanium.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Eric A; Jones, Dakota L; Dudakovic, Amel; Thaler, Roman; Paradise, Christopher R; Kremers, Hilal M; Abdel, Matthew P; Kakar, Sanjeev; Dietz, Allan B; Cohen, Robert C; Lewallen, David G; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-05-01

    Integration of porous metal prosthetics, which restore form and function of irreversibly damaged joints, into remaining healthy bone is critical for implant success. We investigated the biological properties of adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (AMSCs) and addressed their potential to alter the in vitro microenvironment of implants. We employed human AMSCs as a practical source for musculoskeletal applications because these cells can be obtained in large quantities, are multipotent, and have trophic paracrine functions. AMSCs were cultured on surgical-grade porous titanium disks as a model for orthopedic implants. We monitored cell/substrate attachment, cell proliferation, multipotency, and differentiation phenotypes of AMSCs upon osteogenic induction. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy and histology revealed that AMSCs adhere to the porous metallic surface. Compared to standard tissue culture plastic, AMSCs grown in the porous titanium microenvironment showed differences in temporal expression for genes involved in cell cycle progression (CCNB2, HIST2H4), extracellular matrix production (COL1A1, COL3A1), mesenchymal lineage identity (ACTA2, CD248, CD44), osteoblastic transcription factors (DLX3, DLX5, ID3), and epigenetic regulators (EZH1, EZH2). We conclude that metal orthopedic implants can be effectively seeded with clinical-grade stem/stromal cells to create a pre-conditioned implant.

  2. Acquisition of innate-like microbial reactivity in mucosal tissues during human fetal MAIT-cell development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeansyah, Edwin; Loh, Liyen; Nixon, Douglas F.; Sandberg, Johan K.

    2014-01-01

    Innate-like, evolutionarily conserved MR1-restricted mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells represent a large antimicrobial T-cell subset in humans. Here, we investigate the development of these cells in second trimester human fetal tissues. MAIT cells are rare and immature in the fetal thymus, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. In contrast, mature IL-18Rα+ CD8αα MAIT cells are enriched in the fetal small intestine, liver and lung. Independently of localization, MAIT cells express CD127 and Ki67 in vivo and readily proliferate in response to Escherichia coli in vitro. Maturation is accompanied by the gradual post-thymic acquisition of the PLZF transcription factor and the ability to produce IFNγ and IL-22 in response to bacteria in mucosa. Thus, MAIT cells acquire innate-like antimicrobial responsiveness in mucosa before exposure to environmental microbes and the commensal microflora. Establishment of this arm of immunity before birth may help protect the newborn from a range of pathogenic microbes.

  3. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  4. Effective combination of hydrostatic pressure and aligned nanofibrous scaffolds on human bladder smooth muscle cells: implication for bladder tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ahvaz, Hana Hanaee; Soleimani, Masoud; Mobasheri, Hamid; Bakhshandeh, Behnaz; Shakhssalim, Naser; Soudi, Sara; Hafizi, Maryam; Vasei, Mohammad; Dodel, Masumeh

    2012-09-01

    Bladder tissue engineering has been the focus of many studies due to its highly therapeutic potential. In this regard many aspects such as biochemical and biomechanical factors need to be studied extensively. Mechanical stimulations such as hydrostatic pressure and topology of the matrices are critical features which affect the normal functions of cells involved in bladder regeneration. In this study, hydrostatic pressure (10 cm H(2)O) and stretch forces were exerted on human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMCs) seeded on aligned nanofibrous polycaprolactone/PLLA scaffolds, and the alterations in gene and protein expressions were studied. The gene transcription patterns for collagen type I, III, IV, elastin, α-SMA, calponin and caldesmon were monitored on days 3 and 5 quantitatively. Changes in the expressions of α-SMA, desmin, collagen type I and III were quantified by Enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. The scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscope, contact angle measurement and tensile testing. The positive effect of mechanical forces on the functional improvement of the engineered tissue was supported by translational down-regulation of α-SMA and VWF, up-regulation of desmin and improvement of collagen type III:I ratio. Altogether, our study reveals that proper hydrostatic pressure in combination with appropriate surface stimulation on hBSMCs causes a tissue-specific phenotype that needs to be considered in bladder tissue engineering.

  5. ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells in human normal tissues and protects from C1q-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Yuka; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Shimoda, Masayuki; Ohara, Kentaro; Abe, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Shuji; Kazuno, Saiko; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Ochiai, Hiroki; Kitagawa, Yuko; Okada, Yasunori

    2016-05-01

    ADAM28 (disintegrin and metalloproteinase 28), which was originally reported to be lymphocyte-specific, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and plays a key role in cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. We studied ADAM28 expression in human normal tissues and examined its biological function. By using antibodies specific to ADAM28, ADAM28 was immunolocalized mainly to epithelial cells in several tissues, including epididymis, bronchus and stomach, whereas lymphocytes in lymph nodes and spleen were negligibly immunostained. RT-PCR, immunoblotting and ELISA analyses confirmed the expression in these tissues, and low or negligible expression by lymphocytes was found in the lymph node and spleen. C1q was identified as a candidate ADAM28-binding protein from a human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system, and specific binding was demonstrated by binding assays, immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance. C1q treatment of normal bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B and NHBE cells, both of which showed low-level expression of ADAM28, caused apoptosis through activation of p38 and caspase-3, and cell death with autophagy through accumulation of LC3-II and autophagosomes, respectively. C1q-induced cell death was attenuated by treatment of the cells with antibodies against the C1q receptor gC1qR/p33 or cC1qR/calreticulin. Treatment of C1q with recombinant ADAM28 prior to addition to culture media reduced C1q-induced cell death, and knockdown of ADAM28 using siRNAs increased cell death. These data demonstrate that ADAM28 is expressed by epithelial cells of several normal organs, and suggest that ADAM28 plays a role in cell survival by suppression of C1q-induced cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial cells.

  6. Functional EpoR Pathway Utilization Is Not Detected in Primary Tumor Cells Isolated from Human Breast, Non-Small Cell Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Tumor Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Scott D.; Rossi, John M.; Paweletz, Katherine L.; Fitzpatrick, V. Dan; Begley, C. Glenn; Busse, Leigh; Elliott, Steve; McCaffery, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical trials in oncology have reported increased mortality or disease progression associated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. One hypothesis proposes that erythropoiesis-stimulating agents directly stimulate tumor proliferation and/or survival through cell-surface receptors. To test this hypothesis and examine if human tumors utilize the erythropoietin receptor pathway, the response of tumor cells to human recombinant erythropoietin was investigated in disaggregated tumor cells obtained from 186 patients with colorectal, breast, lung, ovarian, head and neck, and other tumors. A cocktail of well characterized tumor growth factors (EGF, HGF, and IGF-1) were analyzed in parallel as a positive control to determine whether freshly-isolated tumor cells were able to respond to growth factor activation ex vivo. Exposing tumor cells to the growth factor cocktail resulted in stimulation of survival and proliferation pathways as measured by an increase in phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins AKT and ERK. In contrast, no activation by human recombinant erythropoietin was observed in isolated tumor cells. Though tumor samples exhibited a broad range of cell-surface expression of EGFR, c-Met, and IGF-1R, no cell-surface erythropoietin receptor was detected in tumor cells from the 186 tumors examined (by flow cytometry or Western blot). Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents did not act directly upon isolated tumor cells to stimulate pathways known to promote proliferation or survival of human tumor cells isolated from primary and metastatic tumor tissues. PMID:25807104

  7. Cell sheet transplantation for heart tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2013-08-10

    Cell transplantation is attracting considerable attention as the next-generation therapy for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We have developed cell sheet engineering as a type of scaffold-less tissue engineering for application in myocardial tissue engineering and the repair of injured heart tissue by cell transplantation. Various types of cell sheet transplantation have improved cardiac function in animal models and clinical settings. Furthermore, cell-based tissue engineering with human induced pluripotent stem cell technology is about to create thick vascularized cardiac tissue for cardiac grafts and heart tissue models. In this review, we summarize the current cardiac cell therapies for treating heart failure with cell sheet technology and cell sheet-based tissue engineering.

  8. Simvastatin coating of TiO₂ scaffold induces osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pullisaar, Helen; Reseland, Janne E; Haugen, Håvard J; Brinchmann, Jan E; Ostrup, Esben

    2014-04-25

    Bone tissue engineering requires an osteoconductive scaffold, multipotent cells with regenerative capacity and bioactive molecules. In this study we investigated the osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAD-MSCs) on titanium dioxide (TiO2) scaffold coated with alginate hydrogel containing various concentrations of simvastatin (SIM). The mRNA expression of osteoblast-related genes such as collagen type I alpha 1 (COL1A1), alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), osteopontin (SPP1), osteocalcin (BGLAP) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) was enhanced in hAD-MSCs cultured on scaffolds with SIM in comparison to scaffolds without SIM. Furthermore, the secretion of osteoprotegerin (OPG), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin (OC) to the cell culture medium was higher from hAD-MSCs cultured on scaffolds with SIM compared to scaffolds without SIM. The TiO2 scaffold coated with alginate hydrogel containing SIM promote osteogenic differentiation of hAD-MSCs in vitro, and demonstrate feasibility as scaffold for hAD-MSC based bone tissue engineering.

  9. PHBV and predifferentiated human adipose-derived stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiong; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Yunqiang; Lin, Yunfeng; Hu, Ping; Ye, Chuan

    2010-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether in vitro chondrogenic differentiated human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) can maintain the chondrogenic phenotype in (3-hydroxybutrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) scaffolds and whether differentiated hASCs/PHBV construct can produce neocartilage in a heterotopic animal model. hASCs were cultured with or without chondrogenic media in vitro and then seeded on PHBV foams. Differentiated cell/PHBV constructs were subcutaneously implanted in nude mice for 8 or 16 weeks; nondifferentiated cell/PHBV constructs were implanted in the control group. The results in the control group showed no cartilage formation and the disappearance of the scaffold at 8 weeks. Conversely, all differentiated hASCs/PHBV implants kept their original shape throughout 16 weeks. These implants at 16 weeks had stronger chondrocytes-specific histochemical staining than those at 8 weeks, with GAG, total collagen, and compressive moduli increased with implantation time. Cartilage lacunae were observed in all retrieved implants at 16 weeks. The chondrocytes-specific genes were detected by RT-PCR at 16 weeks. The remnants of PHBV were observed in the implants throughout 16 weeks. This study demonstrates that chondrogenic predifferentiated hASCs have the ability to maintain a chondrogenic phenotype in PHBV and that cell/PHBV constructs can produce neocartilage in a heterotopic site, but the degradation rates of PHBV in different environments needs more investigation.

  10. Electrophoretic separation and analysis of living cells from solid tissues by several methods - Human embryonic kidney cell cultures as a model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Paul; Plank, Lindsay D.; Kunze, M. Elaine; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of free-fluid electrophoresis methods to separate tissue cells having a specific function is discussed. It is shown that cells suspended by trypsinization from cultures of human embryonic kidney are electrophoretically heterogeneous and tolerate a wide range of electrophoresis buffers and conditions without significant attenuation of function. Moreover, these cells do not separate electrophoretically on the basis of size or cell position alone and can be separated according to their ability to give rise to progeny that produce specific plasminogen activators.

  11. Identification of tonsillar CD4(+)CD25(-)LAG3(+) T cells as naturally occurring IL-10-producing regulatory T cells in human lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Sumitomo, Shuji; Nakachi, Shinichiro; Okamura, Tomohisa; Tsuchida, Yumi; Kato, Rika; Shoda, Hirofumi; Furukawa, Asayo; Kitahara, Nobuo; Kondo, Kenji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Fujio, Keishi

    2017-01-01

    IL-10-producing regulatory T cells (IL-10-producing Tregs) are one of the regulatory T cell subsets characterized by the production of high amounts of IL-10, the lack of FOXP3 expression and the strong immunosuppressive capabilities. IL-10-producing Tregs have been primarily reported as induced populations thus far, in part because identifying naturally occurring IL-10-producing Tregs was difficult due to the lack of definitive surface markers. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a CD4 homologue that we have identified as being expressed on IL-10 producing Tregs. In human PBMC, LAG3 combined with CD49b efficiently identifies IL-10-producing Tregs. However, naturally occurring IL-10-producing Tregs in human secondary lymphoid tissue have not been described. In this report, we identified CD4(+)CD25(-)LAG3(+) T cells in human tonsil. This T cell subset produced high amounts of IL-10 and expressed low levels of FOXP3. Surface markers and microarray analysis revealed that this is a distinct tonsillar CD4(+) T cell subset. CD4(+)CD25(-)LAG3(+) T cells expressed interleukin 10 (IL10), PR/SET domain 1 (PRDM1), and CD274 at high levels and chemokine receptor 5 (CXCR5) at low levels. CD4(+)CD25(-)LAG3(+) T cells suppressed antibody production more efficiently than CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(-)LAG3(+) T cells induced B cell apoptosis. Moreover, analysis of humanized mice revealed that this cell subset suppressed a graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) reaction in vivo. Our study reveals the existence of naturally occurring IL-10-producing Tregs in human secondary lymphoid tissue and their function in immune regulation.

  12. Cell-cycle-associated markers and clinical outcome in human epithelial cancers: a tissue microarray study.

    PubMed

    Abdulkader, I; Sánchez, L; Cameselle-Teijeiro, J; Gude, F; Chávez, J E; López-López, R; Forteza, J; Fraga, M

    2005-12-01

    The development and progression of epithelial cancers are the result of an imbalance in signals promoting and inhibiting cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of cell-cycle and apoptosis regulators and correlate them with clinical outcome in the most frequent carcinomas, in order to establish common prognostic biomarkers independent of cancer origin. Using tissue microarrays (TMAs), we have analysed the immuno-expression of Ki-67, Bcl-2, Bax, cyclin D1, cyclin D3, CDK1, CDK2, CDK6, p16, p21, and p27 in a series of 205 carcinomas of the large bowel, breast, lung and prostate (80, 73, 37 and 15 cases, respectively). By univariate analysis, positivity for p27, p16 and Bcl-2 was associated with better overall survival (P<0.0135, P<0.0442 and P<0.0001, respectively). The risk of mortality was 2.3-fold greater in patients without Bcl-2 expression. TMA immunohistochemical analysis identified a subset of epithelial cancers with overlapping alterations in cell-cycle checkpoints, apoptosis regulators and tumour suppressor pathways. We found that in most common epithelial cancers, regardless of origin, Bcl-2 appears to be the key biological factor influencing clinical behaviour.

  13. Label-free multiphoton fluorescence imaging monitors metabolism in living primary human cells used for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leng-Chun; Lloyd, William R.; Kuo, Shiuhyang; Marcelo, Cynthia L.; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence redox imaging was employed to monitor the metabolic activity of primary human oral keratinocytes prior to the development of tissue-engineered constructs. Keratinocytes with controlled culture conditions were treated with varying levels of chemical stimuli, resulting in differing cellular morphology, growth rate, and metabolic activity. Fluorescence images of keratinocytes were noninvasively acquired from endogenous intracellular metabolic fluorophores NAD(P)H and FAD. A redox ratio quantitatively analyzed each pair of images, showing that fluorescence redox imaging may be a novel technique to characterize live cell viability

  14. Gene Expression Profiles of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Modified by Cell Culture Density

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Keon Hee; Lee, Tae-Hee; Kim, Hye Jin; Jang, In Keun; Chun, Yong Hoon; Kim, Hyung Joon; Park, Seung Jo; Lee, Soo Hyun; Son, Meong Hi; Jung, Hye Lim; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies conducted cell expansion ex vivo using low initial plating densities for optimal expansion and subsequent differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, MSC populations are heterogeneous and culture conditions can affect the characteristics of MSCs. In this study, differences in gene expression profiles of adipose tissue (AT)-derived MSCs were examined after harvesting cells cultured at different densities. AT-MSCs from three different donors were plated at a density of 200 or 5,000 cells/cm2. After 7 days in culture, detailed gene expression profiles were investigated using a DNA chip microarray, and subsequently validated using a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Gene expression profiles were influenced primarily by the level of cell confluence at harvest. In MSCs harvested at ∼90% confluence, 177 genes were up-regulated and 102 genes down-regulated relative to cells harvested at ∼50% confluence (P<0.05, FC>2). Proliferation-related genes were highly expressed in MSCs harvested at low density, while genes that were highly expressed in MSCs harvested at high density (∼90% confluent) were linked to immunity and defense, cell communication, signal transduction and cell motility. Several cytokine, chemokine and growth factor genes involved in immunosuppression, migration, and reconstitution of damaged tissues were up-regulated in MSCs harvested at high density compared with MSCs harvested at low density. These results imply that cell density at harvest is a critical factor for modulating the specific gene-expression patterns of heterogeneous MSCs. PMID:24400072

  15. An in vitro 3D bone metastasis model by using a human bone tissue culture and human sex-related cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Salamanna, Francesca; Borsari, Veronica; Brogini, Silvia; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Parrilli, Annapaola; Cepollaro, Simona; Cadossi, Matteo; Martini, Lucia; Mazzotti, Antonio; Fini, Milena

    2016-01-01

    One of the main limitations, when studying cancer-bone metastasis, is the complex nature of the native bone environment and the lack of reliable, simple, inexpensive models that closely mimic the biological processes occurring in patients and allowing the correct translation of results. To enhance the understanding of the mechanisms underlying human bone metastases and in order to find new therapies, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) cancer-bone metastasis model by culturing human breast or prostate cancer cells with human bone tissue isolated from female and male patients, respectively. Bone tissue discarded from total hip replacement surgery was cultured in a rolling apparatus system in a normoxic or hypoxic environment. Gene expression profile, protein levels, histological, immunohistochemical and four-dimensional (4D) micro-CT analyses showed a noticeable specificity of breast and prostate cancer cells for bone colonization and ingrowth, thus highlighting the species-specific and sex-specific osteotropism and the need to widen the current knowledge on cancer-bone metastasis spread in human bone tissues. The results of this study support the application of this model in preclinical studies on bone metastases and also follow the 3R principles, the guiding principles, aimed at replacing/reducing/refining (3R) animal use and their suffering for scientific purposes. PMID:27765913

  16. The myocardial regenerative potential of three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissues composed of multiple human iPS cell-derived cardiovascular cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Takeichiro; Tinney, Joseph P.; Yuan, Fangping; Ye, Fei; Kowalski, William J.; Minakata, Kenji; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K.; Keller, Bradley B.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a robust source for cardiac regenerative therapy due to their potential to support autologous and allogeneic transplant paradigms. The in vitro generation of three-dimensional myocardial tissue constructs using biomaterials as an implantable hiPSC-derived myocardium provides a path to realize sustainable myocardial regeneration. We generated engineered cardiac tissues (ECTs) from three cellular compositions of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and vascular mural cells (MCs) differentiated from hiPSCs. We then determined the impact of cell composition on ECT structural and functional properties. In vitro force measurement showed that CM+EC+MC ECTs possessed preferential electromechanical properties versus ECTs without vascular cells indicating that incorporation of vascular cells augmented tissue maturation and function. The inclusion of MCs facilitated more mature CM sarcomeric structure, preferential alignment, and activated multiple tissue maturation pathways. The CM+EC+MC ECTs implanted onto infarcted, immune tolerant rat hearts engrafted, displayed both host and graft-derived vasculature, and ameliorated myocardial dysfunction. Thus, a composition of CMs and multiple vascular lineages derived from hiPSCs and incorporated into ECTs promotes functional maturation and demonstrates myocardial replacement and perfusion relevant for clinical translation. PMID:27435115

  17. Detergent decellularization of heart valves for tissue engineering: toxicological effects of residual detergents on human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cebotari, Serghei; Tudorache, Igor; Jaekel, Thomas; Hilfiker, Andres; Dorfman, Suzanne; Ternes, Waldemar; Haverich, Axel; Lichtenberg, Artur

    2010-03-01

    Detergents are powerful agents for tissue decellularization. Despite this, the high toxicity of detergent residua can be a major limitation. This study evaluated the efficacy of detergent removal from decellularized pulmonary valves (PVs) and the consequences of repopulation with human endothelial cells (HECs). Porcine PVs were treated with 1% sodium deoxycholate (SDC), group A; 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), group B; and a mixture of 0.5% SDC/0.5% SDS, group C (n = 5 each). After each of 10 succeeding wash cycles (WCs), samples of the washing solution (WS) were analyzed by solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography for the presence of detergents. Metabolic activity of HEC was also assessed in the WS samples (cytotoxicity and MTS assays). Decellularized and washed PVs were reseeded with HEC. Histological analysis demonstrated efficient tissue decellularization in all groups. Detergents' concentration in all WSs decreased exponentially and was below 50 mg/L after 6, 8, and 4 WCs in groups A, B, and C, respectively. This concentration resulted in no significant toxic influence on cell cultures, and scaffolds could be efficiently reseeded with HEC. In conclusion, intensive washing of detergent decellularized valvular scaffolds lowers the residual contamination below a hazardous threshold and allows their successful repopulation with HEC for tissue engineering purposes.

  18. Human acellular cartilage matrix powders as a biological scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering with synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Chia-Chun; Liao, Cheng-Hao; Lin, Feng-Huei; Hsu, Yuan-Ming; Fang, Hsu-Wei

    2014-07-01

    In our previous study, we found that cartilage fragments from osteoarthritic knee promoted chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we further transformed the cartilage tissues into acellular cartilage matrix (ACM) and explored the feasibility of using ACM as a biological scaffold. Nonworn parts of cartilage tissues were obtained during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery and were successfully fabricated into ACM powders. The ACM powders and human synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) were mixed into collagen gel for in vitro culture. Histological results showed a synergistic effect of ACM powders and chondrogenic growth factors in the formation of engineered cartilage. The findings of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) suggested that ACM powders had the potential of promoting type II collagen gene expression in the growth factors-absent environment. Moreover, with growth factors induction, the ACM powders could reduce the hypertrophy in chondrogenesis of SMSCs. In summary, ACM powders could serve as a functional scaffold that benefited the chondrogenesis of SMSCs for cartilage tissue engineering.

  19. Induction of microparticle- and cell-associated intravascular tissue factor in human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Aras, Omer; Shet, Arun; Bach, Ronald R; Hysjulien, Jessica L; Slungaard, Arne; Hebbel, Robert P; Escolar, Gines; Jilma, Bernd; Key, Nigel S

    2004-06-15

    The precise role of intravascular tissue factor (TF) remains poorly defined, due to the limited availability of assays capable of measuring circulating TF procoagulant activity (PCA). As a model of inflammation-associated intravascular thrombin generation, we studied 18 volunteers receiving an infusion of endotoxin. A novel assay that measures microparticle (MP)-associated TF PCA from a number of cellular sources (but not platelets) demonstrated an 8-fold increase in activity at 3 to 4 hours after endotoxin administration (P <.001), with a return to baseline by 8 hours. TF antigen-positive MPs isolated from plasma were visualized by electron microscopy. Interindividual MP-associated TF response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was highly variable. In contrast, a previously described assay that measures total (cell and MP-borne) whole-blood TF PCA demonstrated a more modest increase, with a peak in activity (1.3-fold over baseline; P <.000 01) at 3 to 4 hours, and persistence for more than 24 hours. This surprisingly modest increase in whole-blood TF activity is likely explained by a profound although transient LPS-induced monocytopenia. MP-associated TF PCA was highly correlated with whole-blood TF PCA and total number of circulating MPs, and whole-blood TF PCA was highly correlated with TF mRNA levels.

  20. Inhibition of connective tissue growth factor attenuates paraquat-induced lung fibrosis in a human MRC-5 cell line.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Yang, Huifang; Zhu, Lingqin; Li, Honghui; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Zhijun

    2016-11-01

    Chronic exposure to Paraquat (PQ) may result in progressive pulmonary fibrosis and subsequent chronic obstructive pulmonary malfunction. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been proposed as a key determinant in the development of lung fibrosis. We investigated thus whether knock down of CTGF can prevent human lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) activation and proliferation with the subsequent inhibition of PQ-induced fibrosis. MRC-5 was transfected with CTGF-siRNAs and exposed to different concentrations of PQ. The siRNA-silencing efficacy was evaluated using western blotting analyses, qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. Next, the viability and migration of MRC-5 was determined. MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 accumulation were quantified to evaluate the lung fibrosis exposure to PQ. Over expression of CTGF mRNA was observed in human MRC-5 cell as early as 6 h following PQ stimulation. CTGF gene expression in MRC-5 cells was substantially reduced by RNAi, which significantly suppressed the expression of the lung fibrosis markers such as tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) that were stimulated by PQ. Inhibition of CTGF expression suppressed impeded the proliferation and migration ability of MRC-5 cells and resulted in cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) protein accumulation in cells. Our results suggest that CTGF promoted the development of PQ-induced lung fibrosis in collaboration with transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). Furthermore, the observed arresting effects of CTGF knock down during this process suggested that CTGF is the potential target site for preventing PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1620-1626, 2016.

  1. Human bone marrow stem cells cultured under hypoxic conditions present altered characteristics and enhanced in vivo tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Seok; Park, Jung-Chul; Kim, Tae-Wan; Jung, Byung-Joo; Lee, Youngseok; Shim, Eun-Kyung; Park, Soyon; Choi, Eun-Young; Cho, Kyoo-Sung; Kim, Chang-Sung

    2015-09-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) were isolated from bone marrow of the vertebral body. The hBMSCs were cultured under either hypoxic (1% O2) or normoxic (21% O2; control) conditions and the characteristics as mesenchymal stem cells were compared. Results revealed that hypoxia reduced proliferative potential and colony-forming efficiency of hBMSCs, and significantly enhanced osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The hBMSCs enhanced the regenerative potential of bone in vivo. In vitro synthesis of soluble and insoluble collagen was significantly increased in the hypoxic condition. In vivo collagen tissue regeneration was also enhanced under the hypoxic condition, with concomitant increased expressions of various subtypes of collagen and lysyl-oxidase family mRNA. MicroRNA assays revealed that miR-155-5p, which negatively regulates HIF-1α, was significantly highly expressed. These observations demonstrate that hBMSCs obtained from human vertebrae exhibit altered characteristics under hypoxic conditions, and each factor contributing to hBMSC-mediated tissue healing should be evaluated with the goal of allowing their clinical application.

  2. Assay of anticancer drugs in tissue culture: cell cultures of biopsies from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D; Freshney, R I; Darling, J L; Thomas, D G; Celik, F

    1983-02-01

    A method has been developed for measuring the drug sensitivity of human gliomas in short-term culture, using scintillation counting or autofluorography. Cell cultures prepared from malignant astrocytomas were treated with anticancer drugs whilst in exponential growth in microtitration plates. After drug treatment and a recovery period, residual viability was measured by [3H] leucine incorporation followed by scintillation counting or by [35S] methionine incorporation and autofluorography in situ. In 5 glioma cell lines tested against 6 drugs, the microtitration method correlated well with monolayer cloning. Although replicate samples of the same tumour showed little variation in chemosensitivity, there was marked variation between the chemosensitivities of cultures derived from the tumours of different patients. However, as variability between replicates was apparent during drug exposure or shortly after, it is important to allow the assay to run as long as possible after drug removal. It is hoped that this assay may provide the basis of a method for the prediction of in vivo chemosensitivity or the screening of potential chemotherapeutic drugs.

  3. Assay of anticancer drugs in tissue culture: cell cultures of biopsies from human astrocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, D.; Freshney, R. I.; Darling, J. L.; Thomas, D. G.; Celik, F.

    1983-01-01

    A method has been developed for measuring the drug sensitivity of human gliomas in short-term culture, using scintillation counting or autofluorography. Cell cultures prepared from malignant astrocytomas were treated with anticancer drugs whilst in exponential growth in microtitration plates. After drug treatment and a recovery period, residual viability was measured by [3H] leucine incorporation followed by scintillation counting or by [35S] methionine incorporation and autofluorography in situ. In 5 glioma cell lines tested against 6 drugs, the microtitration method correlated well with monolayer cloning. Although replicate samples of the same tumour showed little variation in chemosensitivity, there was marked variation between the chemosensitivities of cultures derived from the tumours of different patients. However, as variability between replicates was apparent during drug exposure or shortly after, it is important to allow the assay to run as long as possible after drug removal. It is hoped that this assay may provide the basis of a method for the prediction of in vivo chemosensitivity or the screening of potential chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:6297528

  4. Projection Stereolithographic Fabrication of Human Adipose Stem Cell-Incorporated Biodegradable Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Aaron X.; Lin, Hang; Beck, Angela M.; Kilroy, Evan J.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2015-01-01

    The poor self-healing ability of cartilage necessitates the development of methods for cartilage regeneration. Scaffold construction with live stem cell incorporation and subsequent differentiation presents a promising route. Projection stereolithography (PSL) offers high resolution and processing speed as well as the ability to fabricate scaffolds that precisely fit the anatomy of cartilage defects using medical imaging as the design template. We report here the use of a visible-light-based PSL (VL-PSL) system to encapsulate human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) into a biodegradable polymer [poly-d,l-lactic acid/polyethylene glycol/poly-d,l-lactic acid (PDLLA-PEG)]/hyaluronic acid (HA) matrix to produce live cell constructs with customized architectures. After fabrication, hASCs showed high viability (84%) and were uniformly distributed throughout the constructs, which possessed high mechanical properties with a compressive modulus of 780 kPa. The hASC-seeded constructs were then cultured in control or TGF-β3-containing chondrogenic medium for up to 28 days. In chondrogenic medium-treated group (TGF-β3 group), hASCs maintained 77% viability and expressed chondrogenic genes Sox9, collagen type II, and aggrecan at 11, 232, and 2.29 × 105 fold increases, respectively compared to levels at day 0 in non-chondrogenic medium. The TGF-β3 group also produced a collagen type II and glycosaminoglycan-rich extracellular matrix, detected by immunohistochemistry, Alcian blue staining, and Safranin O staining suggesting robust chondrogenesis within the scaffold. Without chondroinductive addition (Control group), cell viability decreased with time (65% at 28 days) and showed poor cartilage matrix deposition. After 28 days, mechanical strength of the TGF-β3 group remained high at 240 kPa. Thus, the PSL and PDLLA-PEG/HA-based fabrication method using adult stem cells is a promising approach in producing mechanically competent engineered cartilage for joint

  5. Erythropoietin triggers a burst of GATA-1 in normal human erythroid cells differentiating in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Dalyot, N; Fibach, E; Ronchi, A; Rachmilewitz, E A; Ottolenghi, S; Oppenheim, A

    1993-01-01

    GATA-1 is a central transcription-activator of erythroid differentiation. In the present work we have studied the kinetics of its expression and activity during development of normal human erythroid progenitors, grown in primary cultures. In response to the addition of erythropoietin (Epo), the cells undergo proliferation and differentiation in a synchronized fashion. This recently developed experimental system allows biochemical dissection of erythroid differentiation in a physiological meaningful environment. No DNA-binding activity of GATA-1 could be detected before the addition of Epo, although a very low level of mRNA was observed. Following Epo addition there was a sharp parallel rise in both mRNA and DNA-binding activity, consistent with positive autoregulation of the GATA-1 gene. After reaching a peak on day 7-9, both mRNA and protein activity decreased. The binding activity of the ubiquitous factor SP1 showed a biphasic pattern; its second peak usually coincided with the GATA-1 peak, suggesting that SP1 also plays a specific role in erythroid maturation. The highest activity of GATA-1 per erythroid cell was found on day 6-8, immediately preceding the major rise in globin gene mRNA and in the number of hemoglobinized cells. The results imply that a high level of GATA-1 activity is necessary for globin gene expression and erythroid maturation, suggesting that a requirement for a threshold concentration of GATA-1 is part of the mechanism that determines the final steps of erythroid maturation. Images PMID:8371977

  6. Differentiation potential of human adipose tissue derived stem cells into photoreceptors through explants culture and enzyme methods

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei-Wei; Huang, Li; Chong, Kelvin K.L.; Leung, Doreen S.Y.; Li, Benjamin F.L.; Yin, Zheng-Qin; Huang, Yi-Fei; Pang, Chi Pui

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the retinal photoreceptor differentiation potential of human orbital adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) generated by enzyme (EN) and explant (EX) culture methods. METHODS We investigated potentials of human orbital ADSCs to differentiate into photoreceptors through EN and EX culture methods. EN and EX orbital ADSCs were obtained from the same donor during rehabilitative orbital decompression, and then were subject to a 3-step induction using Noggin, DKK-1, IGF-1 and b-FGF at different time points for 38d. Stem cell, eye-field and photoreceptor-related gene and protein markers were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescent (IMF) staining. RESULTS Both EX and EN orbital ADSCs expressed CD133, a marker of cell differentiation. Moreover, PAX6 and rhodopsin, markers of the retinal progenitor cells, were detected from EX and EN orbital ADSCs. In EX orbital ADSCs, PAX6 mRNA was detected on the 17th day and then the rhodopsin mRNA was detected on the 24th day. In contrast, the EN orbital ADSCs expressed PAX6 and rhodopsin mRNA on the 31st day. EX orbital ADSCs expressed rhodopsin protein on the 24th day, while EN orbital ADSCs expressed rhodopsin protein on the 31st day. CONCLUSION Orbital ADSCs isolated by direct explants culture show earlier and stronger expressions of markers towards eye field and retinal photoreceptor differentiation than those generated by conventional EN method. PMID:28149772

  7. Expression of miR-15/107 Family MicroRNAs in Human Tissues and Cultured Rat Brain Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wang-Xia; Danaher, Robert J.; Miller, Craig S.; Berger, Joseph R.; Nubia, Vega G.; Wilfred, Bernard S.; Neltner, Janna H.; Norris, Christopher M.; Nelson, Peter T.

    2014-01-01

    The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs), sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively). In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS). In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs). Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes. PMID:24480177

  8. Expressed sequence tag analysis of adult human optic nerve for NEIBank: Identification of cell type and tissue markers

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Steven L; Guo, Yan; Peterson, Katherine; Wistow, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Background The optic nerve is a pure white matter central nervous system (CNS) tract with an isolated blood supply, and is widely used in physiological studies of white matter response to various insults. We examined the gene expression profile of human optic nerve (ON) and, through the NEIBANK online resource, to provide a resource of sequenced verified cDNA clones. An un-normalized cDNA library was constructed from pooled human ON tissues and was used in expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis. Location of an abundant oligodendrocyte marker was examined by immunofluorescence. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western analysis were used to compare levels of expression for key calcium channel protein genes and protein product in primate and rodent ON. Results Our analyses revealed a profile similar in many respects to other white matter related tissues, but significantly different from previously available ON cDNA libraries. The previous libraries were found to include specific markers for other eye tissues, suggesting contamination. Immune/inflammatory markers were abundant in the new ON library. The oligodendrocyte marker QKI was abundant at the EST level. Immunofluorescence revealed that this protein is a useful oligodendrocyte cell-type marker in rodent and primate ONs. L-type calcium channel EST abundance was found to be particularly low. A qRT-PCR-based comparative mammalian species analysis reveals that L-type calcium channel expression levels are significantly lower in primate than in rodent ON, which may help account for the class-specific difference in responsiveness to calcium channel blocking agents. Several known eye disease genes are abundantly expressed in ON. Many genes associated with normal axonal function, mRNAs associated with axonal transport, inflammation and neuroprotection are observed. Conclusion We conclude that the new cDNA library is a faithful representation of human ON and EST data provide an initial overview

  9. Therapeutic effects of human adipose tissue-derived stem cell (hADSC) transplantation on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Chen, Ying; Chen, Zhibo; Huang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Dehao; Su, Zhongqian; Weng, Yiyun; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Xu

    2017-01-01

    This study is to investigate the therapeutic effects of human adipose tissue-derived stem cell (hADSC) transplantation on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice. EAE mouse model was established by MOG35-55 immunization. Body weight and neurological function were assessed. H&E and LFB staining was performed to evaluate histopathological changes. Flow cytometry was used to detect Th17 and Treg cells. ELISA and real-time PCR were performed to determine transcription factor and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Transplantation of hADSCs significantly alleviated the body weight loss and neurological function impairment of EAE mice. Inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination were significantly increased, which were relieved by hADSC transplantation. Moreover, the Th17 cells and the ROR-γt mRNA level were significantly elevated, while the Treg cells and the Foxp3 mRNA level were significantly declined, resulting in significantly increased Th17/Treg ratio. This was reversed by the transplantation of hADSCs. Furthermore, serum levels of IL-17A, IL-6, IL-23, and TGF-β, were significantly increased, which could be influenced by the hADSC transplantation. Transplantation of hADSCs alleviates the neurological function impairment and histological changes, and reduces the inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination in EAE mice, which might be associated with the regulation of Th17/Treg balance. PMID:28198408

  10. Transplantation of three-dimensional artificial human vascular tissues fabricated using an extracellular matrix nanofilm-based cell-accumulation technique.

    PubMed

    Asano, Yoshiya; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Okano, Daisuke; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2017-04-01

    We have established a novel three-dimensional (3D) tissue-constructing technique, referred to as the 'cell-accumulation method', which is based on the self-assembly of cultured human cells. In this technique, cells are coated with fibronectin and gelatin to construct extracellular matrix (ECM) nanofilms and cultured to form multi-layers in vitro. By using this method, we have successfully fabricated artificial tissues with vascular networks constructed by co-cultivation of human umbilical vein-derived vascular endothelial cells between multi-layers of normal human dermal fibroblasts. In this study, to assess these engineered vascular tissues as therapeutic implants, we transplanted the 3D human tissues with microvascular networks, fabricated based on the cell-accumulation method, onto the back skin of nude mice. After the transplantation, we found vascular networks with perfusion of blood in the transplanted graft. At the boundary between host and implanted tissue, connectivity between murine and human vessels was found. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted artificial vascular tubules demonstrated the ultrastructural features of blood capillaries. Moreover, maturation of the vascular tissues after transplantation was shown by the presence of pericyte-like cells and abundant collagen fibrils in the ECM surrounding the vasculature. These results demonstrated that artificial human vascular tissues constructed by our method were engrafted and matured in animal skin. In addition, the implanted artificial human vascular networks were connected with the host circulatory system by anastomosis. This method is an attractive technique for engineering prevascularized artificial tissues for transplantation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Pulsed electromagnetic fields stimulate osteogenic differentiation in human bone marrow and adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ongaro, Alessia; Pellati, Agnese; Bagheri, Leila; Fortini, Cinzia; Setti, Stefania; De Mattei, Monica

    2014-09-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) play a regulatory role on osteoblast activity and are clinically beneficial during fracture healing. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from different sources have been extensively used in bone tissue engineering. Compared with MSCs isolated from bone marrow (BMSCs), those derived from adipose tissue (ASCs) are easier to obtain and available in larger amounts, although they show a less osteogenic differentiation potential than BMSCs. The hypothesis tested in this study was to evaluate whether PEMFs favor osteogenic differentiation both in BMSCs and in ASCs and to compare the role of PEMFs alone and in combination with the biochemical osteogenic stimulus bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. Early and later osteogenic markers, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin levels, and matrix mineralization, were analyzed at different times during osteogenic differentiation. Results showed that PEMFs induced osteogenic differentiation by increasing ALP activity, osteocalcin, and matrix mineralization in both BMSCs and ASCs, suggesting that PEMF activity is maintained during the whole differentiation period. The addition of BMP-2 in PEMF exposed cultures further increased all the osteogenic markers in BMSCs, while in ASCs, the stimulatory role of PEMFs was independent of BMP-2. Our results indicate that PEMFs may stimulate an early osteogenic induction in both BMSCs and ASCs and they suggest PEMFs as a bioactive factor to enhance the osteogenesis of ASCs, which are an attractive cell source for clinical applications. In conclusion, PEMFs may be considered a possible tool to improve autologous cell-based regeneration of bone defects in orthopedics.

  12. Self-Organizing 3D Human Neural Tissue Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Recapitulate Alzheimer’s Disease Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Waseem K.; Mungenast, Alison E.; Lin, Yuan-Ta; Ko, Tak; Abdurrob, Fatema; Seo, Jinsoo; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The dismal success rate of clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) motivates us to develop model systems of AD pathology that have higher predictive validity. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows us to model pathology and study disease mechanisms directly in human neural cells from healthy individual as well as AD patients. However, two-dimensional culture systems do not recapitulate the complexity of neural tissue, and phenotypes such as extracellular protein aggregation are difficult to observe. We report brain organoids that use pluripotent stem cells derived from AD patients and recapitulate AD-like pathologies such as amyloid aggregation, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and endosome abnormalities. These pathologies are observed in an age-dependent manner in organoids derived from multiple familial AD (fAD) patients harboring amyloid precursor protein (APP) duplication or presenilin1 (PSEN1) mutation, compared to controls. The incidence of AD pathology was consistent amongst several fAD lines, which carried different mutations. Although these are complex assemblies of neural tissue, they are also highly amenable to experimental manipulation. We find that treatment of patient-derived organoids with β- and γ-secretase inhibitors significantly reduces amyloid and tau pathology. Moreover, these results show the potential of this model system to greatly increase the translatability of pre-clinical drug discovery in AD. PMID:27622770

  13. Characterization of Human Vaginal Mucosa Cells for Autologous In Vitro Cultured Vaginal Tissue Transplantation in Patients with MRKH Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nodale, Cristina; D'Amici, Sirio; Maffucci, Diana; Ceccarelli, Simona; Monti, Marco; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Romano, Ferdinando; Angeloni, Antonio; Marchese, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) is a rare syndrome characterized by congenital aplasia of the uterus and vagina. The most common procedure used for surgical reconstruction of the neovagina is the McIndoe vaginoplasty, which consists in creation of a vaginal canal covered with a full-thickness skin graft. Here we characterized the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue proposed as alternative material in our developed modified McIndoe vaginoplasty in order to underlie its importance in autologous total vaginal replacement. To this aim human vaginal mucosa cells (HVMs) were isolated from vaginal mucosa of patients affected by MRKH syndrome and characterized with respect to growth kinetics, morphology, PAS staining, and expression of specific epithelial markers by immunofluorescence, Western blot, and qRT-PCR analyses. The presence of specific epithelial markers along with the morphology and the presence of mucified cells demonstrated the epithelial nature of HMVs, important for an efficient epithelialization of the neovagina walls and for creating a functional vaginal cavity. Moreover, these cells presented characteristics of effective proliferation as demonstrated by growth kinetics assay. Therefore, the autologous in vitro cultured vaginal tissue might represent a highly promising and valid material for McIndoe vaginoplasty. PMID:25162002

  14. Low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field affects proliferation, tissue-specific gene expression, and cytokines release of human tendon cells.

    PubMed

    de Girolamo, L; Stanco, D; Galliera, E; Viganò, M; Colombini, A; Setti, S; Vianello, E; Corsi Romanelli, M M; Sansone, V

    2013-07-01

    Low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has proven to be effective in the modulation of bone and cartilage tissue functional responsiveness, but its effect on tendon tissue and tendon cells (TCs) is still underinvestigated. PEMF treatment (1.5 mT, 75 Hz) was assessed on primary TCs, harvested from semitendinosus and gracilis tendons of eight patients, under different experimental conditions (4, 8, 12 h). Quantitative PCR analyses were conducted to identify the possible effect of PEMF on tendon-specific gene transcription (scleraxis, SCX and type I collagen, COL1A1); the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was also assessed. Our findings show that PEMF exposure is not cytotoxic and is able to stimulate TCs' proliferation. The increase of SCX and COL1A1 in PEMF-treated cells was positively correlated to the treatment length. The release of anti-inflammatory cytokines in TCs treated with PEMF for 8 and 12 h was significantly higher in comparison with untreated cells, while the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was not affected. A dramatically higher increase of VEGF-A mRNA transcription and of its related protein was observed after PEMF exposure. Our data demonstrated that PEMF positively influence, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation, tendon-specific marker expression, and release of anti-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factor in a healthy human TCs culture model.

  15. Constraining the Pluripotent Fate of Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Cell Therapy - The Turning Point of Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Xuejun H

    2013-10-01

    To date, the lack of a clinically-suitable source of engraftable human stem/progenitor cells with adequate neurogenic potential has been the major setback in developing safe and effective cell-based therapies for regenerating the damaged or lost CNS structure and circuitry in a wide range of neurological disorders. Similarly, the lack of a clinically-suitable human cardiomyocyte source with adequate myocardium regenerative potential has been the major setback in regenerating the damaged human heart. Given the limited capacity of the CNS and heart for self-repair, there is a large unmet healthcare need to develop stem cell therapies to provide optimal regeneration and reconstruction treatment options to restore normal tissues and function. Derivation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) provides a powerful in vitro model system to investigate molecular controls in human embryogenesis as well as an unlimited source to generate the diversity of human somatic cell types for regenerative medicine. However, realizing the developmental and therapeutic potential of hESC derivatives has been hindered by the inefficiency and instability of generating clinically-relevant functional cells from pluripotent cells through conventional uncontrollable and incomplete multi-lineage differentiation. Recent advances and breakthroughs in hESC research have overcome some major obstacles in bringing hESC therapy derivatives towards clinical applications, including establishing defined culture systems for de novo derivation and maintenance of clinical-grade pluripotent hESCs and lineage-specific differentiation of pluripotent hESCs by small molecule induction. Retinoic acid was identified as sufficient to induce the specification of neuroectoderm direct from the pluripotent state of hESCs and trigger a cascade of neuronal lineage-specific progression to human neuronal progenitors and neurons of the developing CNS in high efficiency, purity, and neuronal lineage specificity by promoting

  16. Effects of FGF-2 on human adipose tissue derived adult stem cells morphology and chondrogenesis enhancement in Transwell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kabiri, Azadeh; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Hashemibeni, Batool; Kazemi, Mohammad; Mardani, Mohammad; Esmaeili, Abolghasem

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated effects of FGF-2 on hADSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine changes in the level of gene expressions of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FGF-2 induces chondrogenesis in hADSCs, which Bullet Increasing information will decrease quality if hospital costs are very different. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The result of this study may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering. -- Abstract: Injured cartilage is difficult to repair due to its poor vascularisation. Cell based therapies may serve as tools to more effectively regenerate defective cartilage. Both adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs) are regarded as potential stem cell sources able to generate functional cartilage for cell transplantation. Growth factors, in particular the TGF-b superfamily, influence many processes during cartilage formation, including cell proliferation, extracellular matrix synthesis, maintenance of the differentiated phenotype, and induction of MSCs towards chondrogenesis. In the current study, we investigated the effects of FGF-2 on hADSC morphology and chondrogenesis in Transwell culture. hADSCs were obtained from patients undergoing elective surgery, and then cultured in expansion medium alone or in the presence of FGF-2 (10 ng/ml). mRNA expression levels of SOX-9, aggrecan and collagen type II and type X were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The morphology, doubling time, trypsinization time and chondrogenesis of hADSCs were also studied. Expression levels of SOX-9, collagen type II, and aggrecan were all significantly increased in hADSCs expanded in presence of FGF-2. Furthermore FGF-2 induced a slender morphology, whereas doubling time and trypsinization time decreased. Our results suggest that FGF-2 induces hADSCs chondrogenesis in Transwell culture, which may be beneficial in cartilage tissue engineering.

  17. Lysophosphatidic acid-induced ADAM12 expression mediates human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell-stimulated tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Do, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Young Mi; Heo, Soon Chul; Kwon, Yang Woo; Shin, Sang Hun; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Yoon, Man-Soo; Kim, Jae Ho

    2012-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is involved in mesenchymal stem cell-stimulated tumor growth in vivo. However, the molecular mechanism by which mesenchymal stem cells promote tumorigenesis remains elusive. In the present study, we demonstrate that conditioned medium from A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 CM) induced the expression of ADAM12, a disintegrin and metalloproteases family member, in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). A549 CM-stimulated ADAM12 expression was abrogated by pretreatment of hASCs with the LPA receptor 1 inhibitor Ki16425 or by small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of LPA receptor 1, suggesting a key role for the LPA-LPA receptor 1 signaling axis in A549 CM-stimulated ADAM12 expression. Silencing of ADAM12 expression using small interfering RNA or short hairpin RNA abrogated LPA-induced expression of both α-smooth muscle actin, a marker of carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, and ADAM12 in hASCs. Using a xenograft transplantation model of A549 cells, we demonstrated that silencing of ADAM12 inhibited the hASC-stimulated in vivo growth of A549 xenograft tumors and the differentiation of transplanted hASCs to α-smooth muscle actin-positive carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. LPA-conditioned medium from hASCs induced the adhesion of A549 cells and silencing of ADAM12 inhibited LPA-induced expression of extracellular matrix proteins, periostin and βig-h3, in hASCs and LPA-conditioned medium-stimulated adhesion of A549 cells. These results suggest a pivotal role for LPA-stimulated ADAM12 expression in tumor growth and the differentiation of hASCs to carcinoma-associated fibroblasts expressing α-smooth muscle actin, periostin, and βig-h3.

  18. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 promotes human adipose tissue-derived stem cell survival and chronic wound healing

    PubMed Central

    LI, QIANG; GUO, YANPING; CHEN, FEIFEI; LIU, JING; JIN, PEISHENG

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) hold great potential for the stem cell-based therapy of cutaneous wound healing. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) activates CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)4+ and CXCR7+ cells and plays an important role in wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests a critical role for SDF-1 in cell apoptosis and the survival of mesenchymal stem cells. However, the function of SDF-1 in the apoptosis and wound healing ability of ADSCs is not well understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of SDF-1 on the apoptosis and therapeutic effect of ADSCs in cutaneous chronic wounds in vitro and in vivos. By flow cytometric analysis, it was found that hypoxia and serum free promoted the apoptosis of ADSCs. When pretreated with SDF-1, the apoptosis of ADSCs induced by hypoxia and serum depletion was partly recovered. Furthermore, in vivo experiments established that the post-implantation cell survival and chronic wound healing ability of ADSCs were increased following pretreatment with SDF-1 in a diabetic mouse model of chronic wound healing. To explore the potential mechanism underlying the effect of SDF-1 on ADSC apoptosis, western blot analysis was employed and the results indicate that SDF-1 may protect against cell apoptosis in hypoxic and serum-free conditions through activation of the caspase signaling pathway in ADSCs. This study provides evidence that SDF-1 pretreatment can increase the therapeutic effect of ADSCs in cutaneous chronic wounds in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27347016

  19. Comparison of human adult stem cells from adipose tissue and bone marrow in the treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While administration of ex vivo culture-expanded stem cells has been used to study immunosuppressive mechanisms in multiple models of autoimmune diseases, less is known about the uncultured, nonexpanded stromal vascular fraction (SVF)-based therapy. The SVF is composed of a heterogeneous population of cells and has been used clinically to treat acute and chronic diseases, alleviating symptoms in a range of tissues and organs. Methods In this study, the ability of human SVF cells was compared with culture-expanded adipose stem cells (ASCs) and bone-derived marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as a treatment of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (35–55)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalitis in C57Bl/6J mice, a well-studied multiple sclerosis model (MS). A total of 1 × 106 BMSCs, ASCs, or SVF cells were administered intraperitoneally concomitantly with the induction of disease. Mice were monitored daily for clinical signs of disease by three independent, blinded investigators and rated on a scale of 0 to 5. Spinal cords were obtained after euthanasia at day 30 and processed for histological staining using luxol fast blue, toluidine blue, and hematoxylin and eosin to measure myelin and infiltrating immune cells. Blood was collected from mice at day 30 and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum levels of inflammatory cytokines. Results The data indicate that intraperitoneal administration of all cell types significantly ameliorates the severity of disease. Furthermore, the data also demonstrate, for the first time, that the SVF was as effective as the more commonly cultured BMSCs and ASCs in an MS model. All cell therapies also demonstrated a similar reduction in tissue damage, inflammatory infiltrates, and sera levels of IFNγ and IL-12. While IFNγ levels were reduced to comparable levels between treatment groups, levels of IL-12 were significantly lower in SVF-treated than BMSC-treated or ASC-treated mice. Conclusions Based

  20. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  1. An in vitro expansion score for tissue-engineering applications with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bertolo, Alessandro; Mehr, Marco; Janner-Jametti, Tiziana; Graumann, Ursula; Aebli, Niklaus; Baur, Martin; Ferguson, Stephen J; Stoyanov, Jivko V

    2016-02-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have limited growth potential in vitro and cease to divide due to replicative senescence, which from a tissue-engineering perspective has practical implications, such as defining the correct starting points for differentiation and transplantation. Time spent in culture before the loss of required differentiation potential is different and reflects patient variability, which is a problem for cell expansion. This study aimed to develop a score set which can be used to quantify the senescent state of MSCs and predict whether cells preserve their ability to differentiate to osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic phenotypes, based on colony-forming unit (CFU) assay, population doubling time (PDT), senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity, cell size, telomere length and gene expression of MSCs cultured in vitro over 11 passages. This set of morphological, physiological and genetic senescence markers was correlated to the ability of MSCs to differentiate. Differentiation efficiency was assessed by marker genes and protein expression. CFUs decreased with increasing passage number, whereas SA-β-Gal activity and PDT increased; however, the correlation with MSCs' differentiation potential was sometimes unexpected. The expression of genes related to senescence was higher in late-passage cells than in early-passage cells. Early-passage cells underwent efficient osteogenic differentiation, with mid-passage cells performing best in chondrogenic differentiation. Late-passage cells preserve only adipogenic differentiation potential. Based on this marker set, we propose a senescence score in which combined markers give a reliable quality control of MSCs, not depending only on mechanistic passage number.

  2. Transplantation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons in deaf guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sujeong; Cho, Hyong-Ho; Kim, Song-Hee; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Bum; Park, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Han-Seong

    2016-06-01

    Excessive noise, ototoxic drugs, infections, autoimmune diseases, and aging can cause loss of spiral ganglion neurons, leading to permanent sensorineural hearing loss in mammals. Stem cells have been confirmed to be able to differentiate into spiral ganglion neurons. Little has been reported on adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons. In this study, we hypothesized that transplantation of neural induced-human ADSCs (NI-hADSCs) can repair the injured spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs with neomycin-induced sensorineural hearing loss. NI-hADSCs were induced with culture medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor and forskolin and then injected to the injured cochleae. Guinea pigs that received injection of Hanks' balanced salt solution into the cochleae were used as controls. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the number of surviving spiral ganglion neurons in the cell transplantation group was significantly increased than that in the control group. Also at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, immunohistochemical staining showed that a greater number of NI-hADSCs in the spiral ganglions were detected in the cell transplantation group than in the control group, and these NI-hADSCs expressed neuronal markers neurofilament protein and microtubule-associated protein 2. Within 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the guinea pigs in the cell transplantation group had a gradually decreased auditory brainstem response threshold, while those in the control group had almost no response to 80 dB of clicks or pure tone burst. These findings suggest that a large amount of NI-hADSCs migrated to the spiral ganglions, survived for a period of time, repaired the injured spiral ganglion cells, and thereby contributed to the recovery of sensorineural hearing loss in guinea pigs.

  3. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells alleviate atopic dermatitis via regulation of B lymphocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soon Won; Shin, Ji-Hee; Kang, Insung; Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Hong-Ki; Jung, Jae-Eon; Choi, Yong-Woon; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Yoon, Jin-Sang; Choi, Jin-Sub; Lee, Chi-Seung; Seo, Yoojin; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) has been applied for the therapy of allergic disorders due to its beneficial immunomodulatory abilities. However, the underlying mechanisms for therapeutic efficacy are reported to be diverse according to the source of cell isolation or the route of administration. We sought to investigate the safety and the efficacy of human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (hAT-MSCs) in mouse atopic dermatitis (AD) model and to determine the distribution of cells after intravenous administration. Murine AD model was established by multiple treatment of Dermatophagoides farinae. AD mice were intravenously infused with hAT-MSCs and monitored for clinical symptoms. The administration of hAT-MSCs reduced the gross and histological signatures of AD, as well as serum IgE level. hAT-MSCs were mostly detected in lung and heart of mice within 3 days after administration and were hardly detectable at 2 weeks. All of mice administered with hAT-MSCs survived until sacrifice and did not demonstrate any adverse events. Co-culture experiments revealed that hAT-MSCs significantly inhibited the proliferation and the maturation of B lymphocytes via cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 signaling. Moreover, mast cell (MC) degranulation was suppressed by hAT-MSC. In conclusion, the intravenous infusion of hAT-MSCs can alleviate AD through the regulation of B cell function. PMID:27888809

  4. The proliferative potential of human cardiac stem cells was unaffected after a long-term cryopreservation of tissue blocks

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Nobuo; Cho, Yasunori; Inoue, Masaki; Murakami, Tsutomu; Tabata, Minoru; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Tomoike, Hitonobu

    2017-01-01

    Background Human c-kit-positive cardiac stem cells (CSCs) have been used to treat patients suffering from ischemic cardiomyopathy. This study aimed to investigate whether a long-term storage of cardiac tissues would influence the growth potential of the subsequently isolated CSCs. Methods A total of 34 fresh samples were obtained from various cardiac regions [right atrium (RA), left atrium (LA), and/or left ventricle (LV)] of 21 patients. From 12 of these patients, 18 samples kept frozen for ~2 years were employed to prepare and characterize the CSCs. After confirming the specificity of the cell sorting by c-kit immunolabeling, the growth rate (number of doublings per day), BrdU positivity, and colony forming unit (CFU) were measured in each CSC population; the values were compared among distinct cardiac regions as well as between fresh and frozen tissues from which CSCs were derived. Results Among independent measurements indicating growth potential, the growth rate and BrdU positivity remarkably correlated in freshly prepared CSCs. The cells obtained from every examined region displayed a high proliferative capacity with the growth rate of 0.48±0.19 and the BrdU positivity of 15.0%±7.6%. The right atrial CSCs tended to show a greater growth than those in the other two areas. Similarly, the CSCs were isolated from tissue blocks, cryopreserved for ~2 years, and compared with CSCs derived from the fresh specimens of the same patients. Importantly, we were able to obtain and culture CSCs from every frozen material, and their proliferative potential, represented by the growth rate of 0.47±0.22 and the BrdU positivity of 13.7%±7.9%, was not inferior to that of the freshly prepared cells. Conclusions The long-term cryopreservation of cardiac tissues did not affect the growth potential of the derivative CSCs. Our findings should expand the therapeutic applications of these cells over a longer time span. PMID:28251120

  5. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-09-06

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application.

  6. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J.; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm2 intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  7. Bone tissue engineering by using a combination of polymer/Bioglass composites with human adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Ji, Kun; Kirkham, Jennifer; Yan, Yu; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Kellett, Margaret; Jin, Yan; Yang, Xuebin B

    2014-04-01

    Translational research in bone tissue engineering is essential for "bench to bedside" patient benefit. However, the ideal combination of stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for bone repair/regeneration is still unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the osteogenic capacity of a combination of poly(DL-lactic acid) (PDLLA) porous foams containing 5 wt% and 40 wt% of Bioglass particles with human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Live/dead fluorescent markers, confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that PDLLA/Bioglass porous scaffolds supported ADSC attachment, growth and osteogenic differentiation, as confirmed by enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Higher Bioglass content of the PDLLA foams increased ALP activity compared with the PDLLA only group. Extracellular matrix deposition after 8 weeks in the in vitro cultures was evident by Alcian blue/Sirius red staining. In vivo bone formation was assessed by using scaffold/ADSC constructs in diffusion chambers transplanted intraperitoneally into nude mice and recovered after 8 weeks. Histological and immunohistochemical assays indicated significant new bone formation in the 40 wt% and 5 wt% Bioglass constructs compared with the PDLLA only group. Thus, the combination of a well-developed biodegradable bioactive porous PDLLA/Bioglass composite scaffold with a high-potential stem cell source (human ADSCs) could be a promising approach for bone regeneration in a clinical setting.

  8. Gene Expression in Single Cells Isolated from the CWR-R1 Prostate Cancer Cell Line and Human Prostate Tissue Based on the Side Population Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gangavarapu, Kalyan J; Miller, Austin; Huss, Wendy J

    2016-01-01

    Defining biological signals at the single cell level can identify cancer initiating driver mutations. Techniques to isolate single cells such as microfluidics sorting and magnetic capturing systems have limitations such as: high cost, labor intense, and the requirement of a large number of cells. Therefore, the goal of our current study is to identify a cost and labor effective, reliable, and reproducible technique that allows single cell isolation for analysis to promote regular laboratory use, including standard reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In the current study, we utilized single prostate cells isolated from the CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line and human prostate clinical specimens, based on the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter efflux of dye cycle violet (DCV), side population assay. Expression of four genes: ABCG2; Aldehyde dehydrogenase1A1 (ALDH1A1); androgen receptor (AR); and embryonic stem cell marker, Oct-4, were determined. Results from the current study in the CWR-R1 cell line showed ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 gene expression in 67% of single side population cells and in 17% or 100% of non-side population cells respectively. Studies using single cells isolated from clinical specimens showed that the Oct-4 gene is detected in only 22% of single side population cells and in 78% of single non-side population cells. Whereas, AR gene expression is in 100% single side population and non-side population cells isolated from the same human prostate clinical specimen. These studies show that performing RT-PCR on single cells isolated by FACS can be successfully conducted to determine gene expression in single cells from cell lines and enzymatically digested tissue. While these studies provide a simple yes/no expression readout, the more sensitive quantitative RT-PCR would be able to provide even more information if necessary. PMID:27785389

  9. Effect of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal-stem-cell bioactive materials on porcine embryo development.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo-Young; Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Seung-Eun; Choi, Hyun-Yong; Moon, Jeremiah Jiman; Park, Min-Jee; Son, Yeo-Jin; Lee, Jun-Beom; Jeong, Chang-Jin; Lee, Dong-Sun; Riu, Key-Jung; Park, Se-Pill

    2013-12-01

    Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAT-MSCs) secrete bioactive materials that are beneficial for tissue repair and regeneration. In this study, we characterized human hAT-MSC bioactive material (hAT-MSC-BM), and examined the effect of hAT-MSC-BM on porcine embryo development. hAT-MSC-BM was enriched with several growth factors and cytokines, including fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), and interleukin 6 (IL6). Among the various concentrations and days of treatment tested, 10% hAT-MSC-BM treatment beginning on culture Day 4 provided the best environment for the in vitro growth of parthenogenetic porcine embryos. While the addition of 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) increased the hatching rate and the total cell number of parthenogenetic porcine embryos compared with the control and hAT-MSC culture medium group, the best results were from the group cultured with 10% hAT-MSC-BM. Mitochondrial activity was also higher in the 10% hAT-MSC-BM-treated group. Moreover, the relative mRNA expression levels of development and anti-apoptosis genes were significantly higher in the 10% hAT-MSC-BM-treated group than in control, hAT-MSC culture medium, or 10% FBS groups, whereas the transcript abundance of an apoptosis gene was slightly lower. Treatment with 10% hAT-MSC-BM starting on Day 4 also improved the development rate and the total cell number of in vitro-fertilized embryos. This is the first report on the benefits of hAT-MSC-BM in a porcine embryo in vitro culture system. We conclude that hAT-MSC-BM is a new, alternative supplement that can improve the development of porcine embryos during both parthenogenesis and fertilization in vitro.

  10. Electron microscopy, micro-analysis, and X-ray diffraction characterization of the mineral-like tissue deposited by human cementum tumor-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Arzate, H; Alvarez-Pérez, M A; Alvarez-Fregoso, O; Wusterhaus-Chávez, A; Reyes-Gasga, J; Ximénez-Fyvie, L A

    2000-01-01

    The nature and characteristics of the mineralized-like tissue deposited by cementoblasts are not well-known due to the difficulties in obtaining and culturing cells representing the cementum phenotype. We hypothesized that a putative cementoblastic cell line derived from a human cementoblastoma could serve as a suitable model to study the physical, chemical, and morphological features of the cementum-like tissue deposited in vitro. The cementoblastoma cell line was studied by transmission electron, high resolution, scanning, and atomic force microscopy and compared with human cellular cementum, human osteoblasts, and human alveolar bone. The analyses of the crystals and mineral-like tissue in the cell line were performed by x-ray diffraction microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray micro-analysis. TEM examination of cementoblastoma cells revealed the presence of electron-dense intracellular vesicles surrounded by a membrane that contained filaments and needle-like structures. The diffraction patterns obtained from the intracellular material and human cellular cementum were similar, with D-spacings of 3.36 and 2.8, consistent with those of hydroxyapatite (3.440 and 2.814). The composition of the mineral-like tissue had a Ca/P ratio of 1.60 for cementoblastoma cells and 1.97 for human cellular cementum. Na (5.29%) and Cl (1.47%) were present in the composition of cementoblastoma cells. Human cellular cementum additionally contained Mg (4.95%). Osteoblastic cells showed a Ca/P ratio of 1.6280. Na represented 4.52% and Cl 1.22% of its composition. Human alveolar bone had a Ca/P ratio value of 2.01. Na (6.63%), Mg (2.10%), and Cl (0.84%) were also present. All samples examined represented biological-type hydroxyapatite. Based on the compositional and morphological features, these findings indicate that cementoblastoma-derived cells express the human cellular cementum phenotype.

  11. Tissue Specificity of Human Disease Module

    PubMed Central

    Kitsak, Maksim; Sharma, Amitabh; Menche, Jörg; Guney, Emre; Ghiassian, Susan Dina; Loscalzo, Joseph; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-01-01

    Genes carrying mutations associated with genetic diseases are present in all human cells; yet, clinical manifestations of genetic diseases are usually highly tissue-specific. Although some disease genes are expressed only in selected tissues, the expression patterns of disease genes alone cannot explain the observed tissue specificity of human diseases. Here we hypothesize that for a disease to manifest itself in a particular tissue, a whole functional subnetwork of genes (disease module) needs to be expressed in that tissue. Driven by this hypothesis, we conducted a systematic study of the expression patterns of disease genes within the human interactome. We find that genes expressed in a specific tissue tend to be localized in the same neighborhood of the interactome. By contrast, genes expressed in different tissues are segregated in distinct network neighborhoods. Most important, we show that it is the integrity and the completeness of the expression of the disease module that determines disease manifestation in selected tissues. This approach allows us to construct a disease-tissue network that confirms known and predicts unexpected disease-tissue associations. PMID:27748412

  12. Human adipose CD34+ CD90+ stem cells and collagen scaffold constructs grafted in vivo fabricate loose connective and adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Giuseppe A; De Francesco, Francesco; Nicoletti, Gianfranco; Paino, Francesca; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Tirino, Virginia; D'Andrea, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    Stem cell based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues are of great interest for a high number of diseases. Adult stem cells, instead, are more available, abundant and harvested with minimally invasive procedures. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multi-potent progenitors, able to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and adipose tissues. Human adult adipose tissue seems to be the most abundant source of MSCs and, due to its easy accessibility; it is able to give a considerable amount of stem cells. In this study, we selected MSCs co-expressing CD34 and CD90 from adipose tissue. This stem cell population displayed higher proliferative capacity than CD34(-) CD90(-) cells and was able to differentiate in vitro into adipocytes (PPARγ(+) and adiponectin(+)) and endothelial cells (CD31(+) VEGF(+) Flk1(+)). In addition, in methylcellulose without VEGF, it formed a vascular network. The aim of this study was to investigate differentiation potential of human adipose CD34(+) /CD90(+) stem cells loaded onto commercial collagen sponges already used in clinical practice (Gingistat) both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that human adult adipose and loose connective tissues can be obtained in vivo, highlighting that CD34(+) /CD90 ASCs are extremely useful for regenerative medicine.

  13. A complex 3D human tissue culture system based on mammary stromal cells and silk scaffolds for modeling breast morphogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuli; Sun, Lin; Maffini, Maricel V; Soto, Ana; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Kaplan, David L

    2010-05-01

    Epithelial-stromal interactions play a crucial role in normal embryonic development and carcinogenesis of the human breast while the underlying mechanisms of these events remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we constructed a physiologically relevant, three-dimensional (3D) culture surrogate of complex human breast tissue that included a tri-culture system made up of human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A), human fibroblasts and adipocytes, i.e., the two dominant breast stromal cell types, in a Matrigel/collagen mixture on porous silk protein scaffolds. The presence of stromal cells inhibited MCF10A cell proliferation and induced both alveolar and ductal morphogenesis and enhanced casein expression. In contrast to the immature polarity exhibited by co-cultures with either fibroblasts or adipocytes, the alveolar structures formed by the tri-cultures exhibited proper polarity similar to that observed in breast tissue in vivo. Only alveolar structures with reverted polarity were observed in MCF10A monocultures. Consistent with their phenotypic appearance, more functional differentiation of epithelial cells was also observed in the tri-cultures, where casein alpha- and -beta mRNA expression was significantly increased. This in vitro tri-culture breast tissue system sustained on silk scaffold effectively represents a more physiologically relevant 3D microenvironment for mammary epithelial cells and stromal cells than either co-cultures or monocultures. This experimental model provides an important first step for bioengineering an informative human breast tissue system, with which to study normal breast morphogenesis and neoplastic transformation.

  14. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small

  15. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal tissue in two primate models of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Hiroshi; Mandai, Michiko; Matsushita, Keizo; Kuwahara, Atsushi; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Nakano, Tokushige; Assawachananont, Juthaporn; Kimura, Toru; Saito, Koichi; Terasaki, Hiroko; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Sasai, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    Retinal transplantation therapy for retinitis pigmentosa is increasingly of interest due to accumulating evidence of transplantation efficacy from animal studies and development of techniques for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells into retinal tissues or cells. In this study, we aimed to assess the potential clinical utility of hESC-derived retinal tissues (hESC-retina) using newly developed primate models of retinal degeneration to obtain preparatory information regarding the potential clinical utility of these hESC-retinas in transplantation therapy. hESC-retinas were first transplanted subretinally into nude rats with or without retinal degeneration to confirm their competency as a graft to mature to form highly specified outer segment structure and to integrate after transplantation. Two focal selective photoreceptor degeneration models were then developed in monkeys by subretinal injection of cobalt chloride or 577-nm optically pumped semiconductor laser photocoagulation. The utility of the developed models and a practicality of visual acuity test developed for monkeys were evaluated. Finally, feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation was assessed in the developed monkey models under practical surgical procedure and postoperational examinations. Grafted hESC-retina was observed differentiating into a range of retinal cell types, including rod and cone photoreceptors that developed structured outer nuclear layers after transplantation. Further, immunohistochemical analyses suggested the formation of host–graft synaptic connections. The findings of this study demonstrate the clinical feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation and provide the practical tools for the optimization of transplantation strategies for future clinical applications. PMID:26699487

  16. Tissue-resident Eomes(hi) T-bet(lo) CD56(bright) NK cells with reduced proinflammatory potential are enriched in the adult human liver.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Cathal; Robinson, Mark W; Fahey, Ronan; Whelan, Sarah; Houlihan, Diarmaid D; Geoghegan, Justin; O'Farrelly, Cliona

    2016-09-01

    The adult human liver is enriched with natural killer (NK) cells, accounting for 30-50% of hepatic lymphocytes, which include tissue-resident hepatic NK-cell subpopulations, distinct from peripheral blood NK cells. In murine liver, a subset of liver-resident hepatic NK cells have altered expression of the two highly related T-box transcription factors, T-bet and eomesodermin (Eomes). Here, we investigate the heterogeneity of T-bet and Eomes expression in NK cells from healthy adult human liver with a view to identifying human liver-resident populations. Hepatic NK cells were isolated from donor liver perfusates and biopsies obtained during orthotopic liver transplantation (N = 28). Hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells were Eomes(hi) T-bet(lo) , a phenotype virtually absent from peripheral blood. These NK cells express the chemokine receptor CXCR6 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 6), a marker of tissue residency, which is absent from hepatic CD56(dim) and blood NK cells. Compared to blood populations, these hepatic CD56(bright) NK cells have increased expression of activatory receptors (NKp44, NKp46, and NKG2D). They show reduced ability to produce IFN-γ but enhanced degranulation in response to challenge with target cells. This functionally distinct population of hepatic NK cells constitutes 20-30% of the total hepatic lymphocyte repertoire and represents a tissue-resident immune cell population adapted to the tolerogenic liver microenvironment.

  17. Partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls into human cells and adipose tissues: evaluation of octanol, triolein, and liposomes as surrogates.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Cristina L; van der Heijden, Stephan A; Wania, Frank; Jonker, Michiel T O

    2014-05-20

    Whereas octanol, triacylglycerides, and liposomes have all been proposed as surrogates for measuring the affinity of hydrophobic organic contaminants to human lipids, no comparative evaluation of their suitability exists. Here we conducted batch sorption experiments with polyoxymethylene passive samplers to determine the partition coefficients at 37 °C of 18 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from water into (i) triolein (Ktriolein/water), (ii) eight types of liposomes (Kliposome/water), (iii) human abdominal fat tissues (KAFT/water) from seven individuals, and (iv) human MCF-7 cells cultured in vitro (Kcell/water). Differences between KAFT/water among individuals and between Kliposome/water among liposome types were very small and not correlated to structural attributes of the PCBs. Similarly, the length and degree of saturation of the phospholipid carbon chains, the headgroup, and the composition of the liposome did not affect the partitioning of PCBs into the studied liposomes. Whereas Kliposome/water values were similar to literature values of Koctanol/water adjusted to 37 °C, they both were lower than KAFT/water and Kcell/water by a factor of 3 on average. Partitioning of PCBs into triolein on the other hand closely mimicked that into human lipids, for which triolein is thus a better surrogate than either octanol or liposomes. Previously published polyparameter linear free energy relationships for partitioning from water into storage lipids and liposomes predicted the measured partition coefficients with a root-mean-square error of less than 0.15 log units, if the chosen equations and solute descriptors do not allow chlorine substitution in the ortho-position to influence the prediction. By guiding the selection of (i) a surrogate for the experimental determination and (ii) a method for the prediction of partitioning into human lipids, this study contributes to a better assessment of hydrophobic organic contaminant bioaccumulation in humans.

  18. Variation in alternative splicing across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene; Holste, Dirk; Kreiman, Gabriel; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-01-01

    Background Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is widely used by higher eukaryotes to generate different protein isoforms in specific cell or tissue types. To compare AS events across human tissues, we analyzed the splicing patterns of genomically aligned expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from libraries of cDNAs from different tissues. Results Controlling for differences in EST coverage among tissues, we found that the brain and testis had the highest levels of exon skipping. The most pronounced differences between tissues were seen for the frequencies of alternative 3' splice site and alternative 5' splice site usage, which were about 50 to 100% higher in the liver than in any other human tissue studied. Quantifying differences in splice junction usage, the brain, pancreas, liver and the peripheral nervous system had the most distinctive patterns of AS. Analysis of available microarray expression data showed that the liver had the most divergent pattern of expression of serine-arginine protein and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein genes compared to the other human tissues studied, possibly contributing to the unusually high frequency of alternative splice site usage seen in liver. Sequence motifs enriched in alternative exons in genes expressed in the brain, testis and liver suggest specific splicing factors that may be important in AS regulation in these tissues. Conclusions This study distinguishes the human brain, testis and liver as having unusually high levels of AS, highlights differences in the types of AS occurring commonly in different tissues, and identifies candidate cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors likely to have important roles in tissue-specific AS in human cells. PMID:15461793

  19. Enhanced propagation of adult human renal epithelial progenitor cells to improve cell sourcing for tissue-engineered therapeutic devices for renal diseases.

    PubMed

    Westover, Angela J; Buffington, Deborah A; Humes, H D

    2012-08-01

    Renal cell therapy employing cells derived from adult renal epithelial cell (REC) progenitors promises to reduce the morbidity of patients with renal insufficiency due to acute renal failure and end stage renal disease. To this end, tissue engineered devices addressing the neglected biologic component of renal replacement therapy are being developed. Because human donor tissue is limited, novel enhanced progenitor cell propagation (EP) techniques have been developed and applied to adult human kidney transplant discards from six donors. Changes include more efficient digestion and the amplification of progenitors prior to terminal epithelial differentiation promoted by contact inhibition and the addition of retinoic acid. Differentiated morphology in EP populations was demonstrated by the ability to form polarized epithelium with tight junctions, apical central cilia and expression of brush border membrane enzymes. Evaluation of lipopolysaccharide stimulated interleukin-8 secretion and γ-glutamyl transpeptisade activity in EP derived cells was used to confirm therapeutic equivalence to REC obtained using published techniques, which have previously shown efficacy in large animal models and clinical trials. Yield exceeded 10(16) cells/gram cortex from the only kidney obtained due to an anatomical defect, while the average yield from diseased kidneys ranged from 1.1 × 10(9) to 8.8 × 10(11) cells/gram cortex, representing an increase of more than 10 doublings over standard methods. Application of the EP protocol to REC expansion has solved the problem of cell sourcing as the limiting factor to the manufacture of cell based therapies targeting renal diseases and may provide a method for autologous device fabrication from core kidney biopsies.

  20. A growth factor-responsive gene of murine BALB/c 3T3 cells encodes a protein homologous to human tissue factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hartzell, S.; Ryder, K.; Lanahan, A.; Nathans, D.; Lau, L.F.

    1989-06-01

    Polypeptide growth factors rapidly induce the transcription of a set of genes that appear to mediate cell growth. The authors report that one of the genes induced in BALB/c mouse 3T3 cells encodes a transmembrane protein (mTF) homologous to human tissue factor, which is involved in the proteolytic activation of blood clotting. mTF mRNA is present in many murine tissues and cell lines. The authors' results raise the possibility that mTF may also play a role in cell growth.

  1. miR-21 modulates tumor outgrowth induced by human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Keun Koo; Lee, Ae Lim; Kim, Jee Young; Lee, Sun Young; Bae, Yong Chan; Jung, Jin Sup

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-21 modulates hADSC-induced increase of tumor growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The action is mostly mediated by the modulation of TGF-{beta} signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of miR-21 enhances the blood flow recovery in hindlimb ischemia. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in clinical situations, due principally to their potential use in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. However, the therapeutic application of MSCs remains limited, unless the favorable effects of MSCs on tumor growth in vivo, and the long-term safety of the clinical applications of MSCs, can be more thoroughly understood. In this study, we determined whether microRNAs can modulate MSC-induced tumor outgrowth in BALB/c nude mice. Overexpression of miR-21 in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) inhibited hADSC-induced tumor growth, and inhibition of miR-21 increased it. Downregulation of transforming growth factor beta receptor II (TGFBR2), but not of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, in hADSCs showed effects similar to those of miR-21 overexpression. Downregulation of TGFBR2 and overexpression of miR21 decreased tumor vascularity. Inhibition of miR-21 and the addition of TGF-{beta} increased the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 in hADSCs. Transplantation of miR-21 inhibitor-transfected hADSCs increased blood flow recovery in a hind limb ischemia model of nude mice, compared with transplantation of control oligo-transfected cells. These findings indicate that MSCs might favor tumor growth in vivo. Thus, it is necessary to study the long-term safety of this technique before MSCs can be used as therapeutic tools in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  2. Propyl Gallate Inhibits Adipogenesis by Stimulating Extracellular Signal-Related Kinases in Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeung-Eun; Kim, Jung-Min; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Lim, Se-young; Choi, Seon-Jeong; Lee, Nan-Hee; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Choi, Ung-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Propyl gallate (PG) used as an additive in various foods has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Although the functional roles of PG in various cell types are well characterized, it is unknown whether PG has effect on stem cell differentiation. In this study, we demonstrated that PG could inhibit adipogenic differentiation in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) by decreasing the accumulation of intracellular lipid droplets. In addition, PG significantly reduced the expression of adipocyte-specific markers including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), CCAAT enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBP-α), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein 2 (aP2). PG inhibited adipogenesis in hAMSCs through extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Decreased adipogenesis following PG treatment was recovered in response to ERK blocking. Taken together, these results suggest a novel effect of PG on adipocyte differentiation in hAMSCs, supporting a negative role of ERK1/2 pathway in adipogenic differentiation. PMID:25813451

  3. Enhancing neuronal growth from human endometrial stem cells derived neuron-like cells in three-dimensional fibrin gel for nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Amoabedini, Ghasem; Noroozi, Abbas; Azami, Mahmoud; Asmani, Mohammad N; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Saberi, Hooshang; Ai, Armin; Ai, Jafar

    2014-08-01

    Nerve tissue engineering (NTE) is one of the most promising methods to restore central nerve systems in human health care. Three-dimensional (3D) distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold composed of nanofibers are of clinical significance for NTE. In this study, an attempt was made to develop and characterize the use of fibrin gel and human endometrial stem cells (hEnSCs)-derived neuron-like cells simultaneously to support cell behavior especially neuron outgrowth. The structural and mechanical characteristics of fibrin gel scaffold were examined with SEM and rheometer. Also, hEnSCs-derived neuron-like cells were cultured in fibrin gel and were subsequently analyzed with immunofluorescent staining against neuronal markers. In parallel, the survival and growth rates of the cells were determined by MTT assay and neurite extension. At the end, cell-matrix interactions were investigated with SEM and TEM micrographs. Mechanical properties of fabricated scaffold were studied and results indicated appropriate choice of material, SEM and TEM showed excellent integration of cells with nanofibers regarding the relation between cells and fibrin gel. Immunofluorescent staining of fibrin gel after 6 days of cell seeding and culture demonstrated well expanded and incorporated network of neurons. In addition, viability, proliferation, and neuronal growth of seeded cells were analyzed at days 1, 3, and 6. Comparing those results with 2D culture of seeded cells showed positive effect of 3D culture. Taken together, the results suggest that fibrin can provide a suitable, three-dimensional scaffold for neuronal survival and outgrowth for regeneration of the central nervous system.

  4. Human adipose tissue stem cells: relevance in the pathophysiology of obesity and metabolic diseases and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Cignarelli, Angelo; Perrini, Sebastio; Ficarella, Romina; Peschechera, Alessandro; Nigro, Pasquale; Giorgino, Francesco

    2012-12-10

    Stem cells are unique cells exhibiting self-renewing properties and the potential to differentiate into multiple specialised cell types. Totipotent or pluripotent stem cells are generally abundant in embryonic or fetal tissues, but the use of discarded embryos as sources of these cells raises challenging ethical problems. Adult stem cells can also differentiate into a wide variety of cell types. In particular, adult adipose tissue contains a pool of abundant and accessible multipotent stem cells, designated as adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), that are able to replicate as undifferentiated cells, to develop as mature adipocytes and to differentiate into multiple other cell types along the mesenchymal lineage, including chondrocytes, myocytes and osteocytes, and also into cells of endodermal and neuroectodermal origin, including beta-cells and neurons, respectively. An impairment in the differentiation potential and biological functions of ASCs may contribute to the development of obesity and related comorbidities. In this review, we summarise different aspects of the ASCs with special reference to the isolation and characterisation of these cell populations, their relation to the biochemical features of the adipose tissue depot of origin and to the metabolic characteristics of the donor subject and discuss some prospective therapeutic applications.

  5. Engraftment Potential of Adipose Tissue-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Transplantation in the Fetal Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Itziar; Moreno, Rafael; Petriz, Jordi; Gratacós, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Due to their favorable intrinsic features, including engraftment, differentiation, and immunomodulatory potential, adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed for therapeutic in utero intervention. Further improvement of such attributes for particular diseases might merely be achieved by ex vivo MSC genetic engineering previous to transplantation. Here, we evaluated for the first time the feasibility, biodistribution, long-term engraftment, and transgenic enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression of genetically engineered human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (EGFP+-ASCs) after intra-amniotic xenotransplantation at E17 of gestation into our validated pregnant rabbit model. Overall, the procedure was safe (86.4% survival rate; absence of anatomical defects). Stable, low-level engraftment of EGFP+-ASCs was confirmed by assessing the presence of the pWT-EGFP lentiviral provirus in the young transplanted rabbit tissues. Accordingly, similar frequencies of provirus-positive animals were found at both 8 weeks (60%) and 16 weeks (66.7%) after in utero intervention. The presence of EGFP+-ASCs was more frequent in respiratory epithelia (lung and trachea), according to the route of administration. However, we were unable to detect EGFP expression, neither by real-time polymerase chain reaction nor by immunohistochemistry, in the provirus-positive tissues, suggesting EGFP transgene silencing mediated by epigenetic events. Moreover, we noticed lack of both host cellular immune responses against xenogeneic ASCs and humoral immune responses against transgenic EGFP. Therefore, the fetal microchimerism achieved by the EGFP+-ASCs in the young rabbit hosts indicates induction of donor-specific tolerance after fetal rabbit xenotransplantation, which should boost postnatal transplantation for the early treatment/prevention of many devastating congenital disorders. PMID:22738094

  6. Enhanced differentiation of human embryonic stem cells on extracellular matrix-containing osteomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Katy; Cheng, Qingsu; Pryzhkova, Marina; Harris, Greg M; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan

    2014-11-01

    Current methods of treating critical size bone defects include autografts and allografts, however, both present major limitations including donor-site morbidity, risk of disease transmission, and immune rejection. Tissue engineering provides a promising alternative to circumvent these shortcomings through the use of autologous cells, three-dimensional scaffolds, and growth factors. We investigated the development of a scaffold with native bone extracellular matrix (ECM) components for directing the osteogenic differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Toward this goal, a microsphere-sintering technique was used to fabricate poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds with optimum mechanical and structural properties. Human osteoblasts (hOBs) were seeded on these scaffolds to deposit bone ECM for 14 days. This was followed by a decellularization step leaving the mineralized matrix intact. Characterization of the decellularized PLGA scaffolds confirmed the deposition of calcium, collagen II, and alkaline phosphatase by osteoblasts. hESCs were seeded on the osteomimetic substrates in the presence of osteogenic growth medium, and osteogenicity was determined according to calcium content, osteocalcin expression, and bone marker gene regulation. Cell proliferation studies showed a constant increase in number for hESCs seeded on both PLGA and ECM-coated PLGA scaffolds. Calcium deposition by hESCs was significantly higher on the osteomimetic scaffolds compared with the control groups. Consistently, immunofluorescence staining demonstrated an increased expression of osteocalcin in hESCs seeded on ECM-coated osteomimetic PLGA scaffolds. Gene expression analysis of RUNX2 and osteocalcin further confirmed osteogenic differentiation of hESCs at the highest expression level on osteomimetic PLGA. These results together demonstrate the potential of PLGA scaffolds with native bone ECM components to direct osteogenic differentiation of hESCs and induce bone formation.

  7. Enhanced Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells on Extracellular Matrix-Containing Osteomimetic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, Katy; Cheng, Qingsu; Pryzhkova, Marina; Harris, Greg M.

    2014-01-01

    Current methods of treating critical size bone defects include autografts and allografts, however, both present major limitations including donor-site morbidity, risk of disease transmission, and immune rejection. Tissue engineering provides a promising alternative to circumvent these shortcomings through the use of autologous cells, three-dimensional scaffolds, and growth factors. We investigated the development of a scaffold with native bone extracellular matrix (ECM) components for directing the osteogenic differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Toward this goal, a microsphere-sintering technique was used to fabricate poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds with optimum mechanical and structural properties. Human osteoblasts (hOBs) were seeded on these scaffolds to deposit bone ECM for 14 days. This was followed by a decellularization step leaving the mineralized matrix intact. Characterization of the decellularized PLGA scaffolds confirmed the deposition of calcium, collagen II, and alkaline phosphatase by osteoblasts. hESCs were seeded on the osteomimetic substrates in the presence of osteogenic growth medium, and osteogenicity was determined according to calcium content, osteocalcin expression, and bone marker gene regulation. Cell proliferation studies showed a constant increase in number for hESCs seeded on both PLGA and ECM-coated PLGA scaffolds. Calcium deposition by hESCs was significantly higher on the osteomimetic scaffolds compared with the control groups. Consistently, immunofluorescence staining demonstrated an increased expression of osteocalcin in hESCs seeded on ECM-coated osteomimetic PLGA scaffolds. Gene expression analysis of RUNX2 and osteocalcin further confirmed osteogenic differentiation of hESCs at the highest expression level on osteomimetic PLGA. These results together demonstrate the potential of PLGA scaffolds with native bone ECM components to direct osteogenic differentiation of hESCs and induce bone formation

  8. Prevascularization of self-organizing engineered heart tissue by human umbilical vein endothelial cells abrogates contractile performance.

    PubMed

    Sondergaard, Claus Svane; Witt, Russell; Mathews, Grant; Najibi, Skender; Le, Lisa; Clift, Tracy; Si, Ming-Sing

    2012-12-01

    Establishing vascularization is a critical obstacle to the generation of engineered heart tissue (EHT) of substantial thickness. Addition of endothelial cells to the formative stages of EHT has been demonstrated to result in prevascularization, or the formation of capillary-like structures. The detailed study of the effects of prevascularization on EHT contractile function is lacking. Here, we evaluated the functional impact of prevascularization by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in self-organizing EHT. EHT fibers were generated by the self-organization of neonatal rat cardiac cells on a fibrin hydrogel scaffold with or without HUVECs. Contractile function was measured and force-length relationship and rate of force production were assessed. Immunofluorescent studies were used to evaluate arrangement and distribution of HUVECs within the EHT fibers. RT-PCR was used to assess the transcript levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1a (Hif-1α). EHT with HUVECs manifested tubule-like structures at the periphery during fiber formation. After fiber formation, HUVECs were heterogeneously located throughout the EHT fiber and human CD31+ tubule-like structures were identified. The expression level of Hif-1α did not change with the addition of HUVECs. However, maximal force and rate of force generation were not improved in HUVECs containing EHT as compared to control EHT fibers. The addition of HUVECs may result in sparse microvascularization of EHT. However, this perceived benefit is overshadowed by a significant decrease in contractile function and highlights the need for perfused vascularization strategies in order to generate EHT that approaches clinically relevant dimensions.

  9. Effects of corticosteroids on the proliferation of normal and abnormal human connective tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Priestley, G C; Brown, J C

    1980-01-01

    Four corticosteroids were tested in vitro for effect on the proliferation of four strains of fibroblasts from scleroderma skin, four strains from normal adult skin and four strains of rheumatoid synovial cells. Significant effects on fibroblasts occurred only at the highest steroid concentration tested (10 microgram/ml) where the inhibitory ranking of the steriods was clobetasol propionate greater than clobetasone butyrate greater than betamethasone valerate greater than hydrocortisone. Hydrocortisone and betamethasone valerate stimulated proliferation of two normal strains, had no certain effect on the scleroderma group, and inhibited growth of synovial cells. Clobetasone butyrate and clobetasol propionate inhibited growth of all cells. All four steroids substantially reduced acid mucopolysaccharide secretion by scleroderma fibroblasts. These results suggest that fibroblasts from normal and abnormal skin show only small differences in their responses to corticosteroids in vitro, but contrast sharply with the mouse L-929 fibroblasts previously used in some assays of topical corticosteroid potency.

  10. Characterization of human tissue carnosinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lenney, J F; Peppers, S C; Kucera-Orallo, C M; George, R P

    1985-01-01

    Human tissue carnosinase (EC 3.4.13.3) had optimum activity at pH9.5 and was a cysteine peptidase, being activated by dithiothreitol and inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. By optimizing assay conditions, the activity per g of tissue was increased 10-fold compared with values in the literature. The enzyme was present in every human tissue assayed and was entirely different from serum carnosinase. Highly purified tissue carnosinase had a broader specificity than hog kidney carnosinase. Although tissue carnosinase was very strongly inhibited by bestatin, it did not hydrolyse tripeptides, and thus appears to be a dipeptidase rather than an aminopeptidase. It had a relative molecular mass of 90 000, an isoelectric point of 5.6, and a Km value of 10 mM-carnosine. Two forms of kidney and brain carnosinase were separated by high-resolution anion-exchange chromatography, although only one form was detected by various electrophoretic methods. Homocarnosinase and Mn2+-independent carnosinase were not detected in human tissues, although these enzymes are present in rat and hog kidney. PMID:4026801

  11. ST6Gal-I protein expression is upregulated in human epithelial tumors and correlates with stem cell markers in normal tissues and colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Swindall, Amanda F; Londoño-Joshi, Angelina I; Schultz, Matthew J; Fineberg, Naomi; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Bellis, Susan L

    2013-04-01

    The ST6Gal-I sialyltransferase adds an α2-6-linked sialic acid to the N-glycans of certain receptors. ST6Gal-I mRNA has been reported to be upregulated in human cancer, but a prior lack of antibodies has limited immunochemical analysis of the ST6Gal-I protein. Here, we show upregulated ST6Gal-I protein in several epithelial cancers, including many colon carcinomas. In normal colon, ST6Gal-I localized selectively to the base of crypts, where stem/progenitor cells are found, and the tissue staining patterns were similar to the established stem cell marker ALDH1. Similarly, ST6Gal-I expression was restricted to basal epidermal layers in skin, another stem/progenitor cell compartment. ST6Gal-I was highly expressed in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, with no detectable expression in the fibroblasts from which iPS cells were derived. On the basis of these observations, we investigated further an association of ST6Gal-I with cancer stem cells (CSC). Selection of irinotecan resistance in colon carcinoma cells led to a greater proportion of CSCs compared with parental cells, as measured by the CSC markers CD133 and ALDH1 activity (Aldefluor). These chemoresistant cells exhibited a corresponding upregulation of ST6Gal-I expression. Conversely, short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated attenuation of ST6Gal-I in colon carcinoma cells with elevated endogenous expression decreased the number of CD133/ALDH1-positive cells present in the cell population. Collectively, our results suggest that ST6Gal-I promotes tumorigenesis and may serve as a regulator of the stem cell phenotype in both normal and cancer cell populations.

  12. Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells: A Reliable, Challenging Tool for In Vitro Osteogenesis and Bone Tissue Engineering Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Ute; Müller, Katrin; Preissler, Carolin; Noack, Carolin; Boxberger, Sabine; Dieter, Peter; Bornhäuser, Martin; Wobus, Manja

    2016-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) are important for many scientific purposes because of their multipotency, availability, and relatively easy handling. They are frequently used to study osteogenesis in vitro. Most commonly, hBMSC are isolated from bone marrow aspirates collected in clinical routine and cultured under the “aspect plastic adherence” without any further selection. Owing to the random donor population, they show a broad heterogeneity. Here, the osteogenic differentiation potential of 531 hBMSC was analyzed. The data were supplied to correlation analysis involving donor age, gender, and body mass index. hBMSC preparations were characterized as follows: (a) how many passages the osteogenic characteristics are stable in and (b) the influence of supplements and culture duration on osteogenic parameters (tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), octamer binding transcription factor 4, core-binding factor alpha-1, parathyroid hormone receptor, bone gla protein, and peroxisome proliferator-activated protein γ). The results show that no strong prediction could be made from donor data to the osteogenic differentiation potential; only the ratio of induced TNAP to endogenous TNAP could be a reliable criterion. The results give evidence that hBMSC cultures are stable until passage 7 without substantial loss of differentiation potential and that established differentiation protocols lead to osteoblast-like cells but not to fully authentic osteoblasts. PMID:27293446

  13. Vanillin attenuates negative effects of ultraviolet A on the stemness of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Yeol; Park, See-Hyoung; Kim, Mi Ok; Lim, Inhwan; Kang, Mingyeong; Oh, Sae Woong; Jung, Kwangseon; Jo, Dong Gyu; Cho, Il-Hoon; Lee, Jongsung

    2016-10-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation induces various changes in cell biology. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of vanillin on UVA irradiation-induced damages in the stemness properties of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs). UVA-antagonizing mechanisms of vanillin were also examined. The results revealed that vanillin attenuated UVA-induced reduction of the proliferative potential and stemness of hAMSCs evidenced by increased proliferative activity in BrdU incorporation assay and upregulation of stemness-related genes (OCT4, NANOG and SOX2) in response to vanillin treatment. UVA-induced reduction in mRNA level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was significantly recovered by vanillin. In addition, the antagonizing effect of vanillin on UVA was found to be mediated by reduced production of PGE2 through inhibiting JNK and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these findings showed that vanillin could improve the reduced stemness of hAMSCs induced by UVA. The effect of vanillin is mediated by upregulating HIF-1α via inhibiting PGE2-cAMP signaling. Therefore, vanillin might be used as an antagonizing agent to mitigate the effects of UVA.

  14. Cardiosphere conditioned media influence the plasticity of human mediastinal adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Camilla; Chimenti, Isotta; Ibrahim, Mohsen; Napoletano, Chiara; Mangino, Giorgio; Scafetta, Gaia; Zoccai, Giuseppe Biondi; Rendina, Erino Angelo; Calogero, Antonella; Frati, Giacomo; De Falco, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, cardiac regenerative medicine is facing many limitations because of the complexity to find the most suitable stem cell source and to understand the regenerative mechanisms involved. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown great regenerative potential due to their intrinsic properties and ability to restore cardiac functionality, directly by transdifferentiation and indirectly by paracrine effects. Yet, how MSCs could respond to definite cardiac-committing microenvironments, such as that created by resident cardiac progenitor cells in the form of cardiospheres (CSs), has never been addressed. Recently, a putative MSC pool has been described in the mediastinal fat (hmADMSCs), but both its biology and function remain hitherto unexplored. Accordingly, we investigated the potential of hmADMSCs to be committed toward a cardiovascular lineage after preconditioning with CS-conditioned media (CCM). Results indicated that CCM affects cell proliferation. Gene expression levels of multiple cardiovascular and stemness markers (MHC, KDR, Nkx2.5, Thy-1, c-kit, SMA) are significantly modulated, and the percentage of hmADMSCs preconditioned with CCM and positive for Nkx2.5, MHC, and KDR is significantly higher relative to FBS and explant-derived cell conditioned media (EDCM, the unselected stage before CS formation). Growth factor-specific and survival signaling pathways (i.e., Erk1/2, Akt, p38, mTOR, p53) present in CCM are all equally regulated. Nonetheless, earlier BAD phosphorylation (Ser112) occurs associated with the CS microenvironment (and to a lesser extent to EDCM), whereas faster phosphorylation of PRAS40 in FBS, and of Akt (Ser473) in EDCM and 5-azacytidine occurs compared to CCM. For the first time, we demonstrated that the MSC pool held in the mediastinal fat is adequately plastic to partially differentiate in vitro toward a cardiac-like lineage. Besides, we have provided novel evidence of the potent inductive niche-like microenvironment that the CS

  15. New medium used in the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to retinal cells is comparable to fetal human eye tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobing; Xiong, Kai; Lin, Cong; Lv, Lei; Chen, Jing; Xu, Chongchong; Wang, Songtao; Gu, Dandan; Zheng, Hua; Yu, Hurong; Li, Yan; Xiao, Honglei; Zhou, Guomin

    2015-06-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to differentiate along the retinal lineage. However, most induction systems are dependent on multiple small molecular compounds such as Dkk-1, Lefty-A, and retinoic acid. In the present study, we efficiently differentiated hPSCs into retinal cells using a retinal differentiation medium (RDM) without the use of small molecular compounds. This novel differentiation system recapitulates retinal morphogenesis in humans, i.e. hPSCs gradually differentiate into optic vesicle-shaped spheres, followed by optic cup-shaped spheres and, lastly, retinal progenitor cells. Furthermore, at different stages, hPSC-derived retinal cells mirror the transcription factor expression profiles seen in their counterparts during human embryogenesis. Most importantly, hinge epithelium was found between the hPSC-derived neural retina (NR) and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These data suggest that our culture system provides a new method for generating hPSC-derived retinal cells that, for the first time, might be used in human transplantation.

  16. QUANTITATIVE TOXICOPROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF CARCINOGEN-TREATED ANIMAL TISSUES AND HUMAN CELLS FOR HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to a variety of environmental toxicants, and this together with a large number of interacting factors can contribute to an individual's risk for health. To understand the toxic mechanisms and/or modes of action for human health risk assessment, molecular charac...

  17. Human adipose tissue possesses a unique population of pluripotent stem cells with nontumorigenic and low telomerase activities: potential implications in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Fumitaka; Wakao, Shohei; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Tsuchiyama, Kenichiro; Bagheri, Mozhdeh; Heneidi, Saleh; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Aiba, Setsuya; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that a small population of pluripotent stem cells, termed adipose multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (adipose-Muse) cells, exist in adult human adipose tissue and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adipose-MSCs). They can be identified as cells positive for both MSC markers (CD105 and CD90) and human pluripotent stem cell marker SSEA-3. They intrinsically retain lineage plasticity and the ability to self-renew. They spontaneously generate cells representative of all three germ layers from a single cell and successfully differentiate into targeted cells by cytokine induction. Cells other than adipose-Muse cells exist in adipose-MSCs, however, do not exhibit these properties and are unable to cross the boundaries from mesodermal to ectodermal or endodermal lineages even under cytokine inductions. Importantly, adipose-Muse cells demonstrate low telomerase activity and transplants do not promote teratogenesis in vivo. When compared with bone marrow (BM)- and dermal-Muse cells, adipose-Muse cells have the tendency to exhibit higher expression in mesodermal lineage markers, while BM- and dermal-Muse cells were generally higher in those of ectodermal and endodermal lineages. Adipose-Muse cells distinguish themselves as both easily obtainable and versatile in their capacity for differentiation, while low telomerase activity and lack of teratoma formation make these cells a practical cell source for potential stem cell therapies. Further, they will promote the effectiveness of currently performed adipose-MSC transplantation, particularly for ectodermal and endodermal tissues where transplanted cells need to differentiate across the lineage from mesodermal to ectodermal or endodermal in order to replenish lost cells for tissue repair.

  18. Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alice A; Thomas, David K; Ong, Luvena L; Schwartz, Robert E; Golub, Todd R; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2011-07-19

    "Humanized" mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury but these methods have not gained widespread use due to the duration and variability of hepatocyte repopulation. In light of the significant progress that has been achieved in clinical cell transplantation through tissue engineering, we sought to develop a humanized mouse model based on the facile and ectopic implantation of a tissue-engineered human liver. These human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs) stabilize the function of cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes through juxtacrine and paracrine signals in polymeric scaffolds. In contrast to current methods, HEALs can be efficiently established in immunocompetent mice with normal liver function. Mice transplanted with HEALs exhibit humanized liver functions persistent for weeks, including synthesis of human proteins, human drug metabolism, drug-drug interaction, and drug-induced liver injury. Here, mice with HEALs are used to predict the disproportionate metabolism and toxicity of "major" human metabolites using multiple routes of administration and monitoring. These advances may enable manufacturing of reproducible in vivo models for diverse drug development and research applications.

  19. Mesenchymal-epithelial transitions: spontaneous and cumulative syntheses of epithelial marker molecules and their assemblies to novel cell junctions connecting human hematopoietic tumor cells to carcinomatoid tissue structures.

    PubMed

    Franke, Werner W; Rickelt, Steffen

    2011-12-01

    Using biochemical as well as light- and electron-microscopic immunolocalization methods, in cultures of unicellular human blood tumor cells, we have studied the phenomenon of spontaneous and cumulative syntheses of certain epithelial proteins and glycoproteins and their assemblies to two major kinds of novel cell-cell junctions, adhering junctions (AJs) and junctions based on the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). More than two decades, we have selected and characterized clonal sublines of multipotential hematopoietic K562 cells, which are enriched in newly formed AJs based on cis-clusters of desmoglein Dsg2, in some sublines accompanied by desmocollin Dsc2. Both desmosomal cadherins can be anchored in a submembranous plaque containing plakoglobin and plakophilins Pkp2 and Pkp3, with or without other armadillo proteins and desmoplakin. Also, these cells are often connected by an additional, extended junction system, in which the transmembrane epithelial glycoprotein EpCAM is associated with a cytoplasmic plaque rich in several actin-binding proteins such as afadin, α-actinin, ezrin and vinculin. Both kinds of junctions contribute to connections of K562 cells into epithelioid monolayers or even three-dimensional, tissue-like structures, thus markedly changing the cell biological nature and behavior of the resulting tumor subforms (mesenchymal-epithelial transitions). We discuss molecular mechanisms involved in the formation and function of these junctions, also with respect to tumor spread and metastasis, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic consequences.

  20. Improved adipogenic in vitro differentiation: comparison of different adipogenic cell culture media on human fat and bone stroma cells for fat tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ghoniem, Amir-Alexander; Açil, Yahya; Wiltfang, Jörg; Gierloff, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    To date there is no sufficient in vitro fat tissue engineering and a protocol has not been well established for this purpose. Therefore, we evaluated the in vitro influence of two different adipogenic growth media for their stimulation potential on different cell lineages to clearly define the most potent adipogenic growth media for future in vitro tissue engineering approaches. The samples for differentiation were composed of human adipogenic-derived stroma cells (hADSCs) and human bone marrow mesenchymal stroma cells (hMSCs). A normal adipogenic medium (NAM) and a specific adipogenic medium (SAM) were tested for their adipogenic stimulation potential. After 10 days and 21 days the relative gene expression was measured for the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ2, C/EBPα, FABP4, LPL, and GLUT4 detected through real time reverse transcriptase polymease chain reaction (RT-PCR). Other study variables were the comparison between NAM and SAM and between the used cells hADSCs and hMSCs. Additionally an Oil-Red staining was performed after 21 days. Our results revealed that only SAM was significantly (P<0.05) superior in the differentiation process in contrast to NAM for 10 days and 21 days. As well was SAM superior to differentiate the used cell lineages. This was evaluated by the detected marker genes PPARγ2, C/EBPα, FABP4, LPL, and GLUT4 through real time RT-PCR and by Oil-Red staining. In addition, the hMSCs proofed to be equal donor cells for adipogenic differentiation especially when stimulated by SAM. The results suggest that the SAM should be established as a new standard medium for a more promising in vitro adipogenic differentiation.

  1. Growing vascularized heart tissue from stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shiang Y; Hernández, Damián; Dusting, Gregory J

    2013-08-01

    The promise of stem cells to repair the heart after damage or heart attack has not been realized because most such cells are lost after transplantation. A new approach is to grow substantial viable pieces of cardiac tissue from human stem cells by cardiac tissue engineering. Such constructs must be fully vascularized and perfused to ensure the viability of clinically relevant volumes of tissue. This requires careful choice of cells, culture conditions, a biomaterial to act as scaffold, and crucial strategies for vascularization. Autologous stem cells with high plasticity, which would avoid the need for antirejection therapies after transplantation, are an attractive source of both cardiomyocytes and vascular cells. Most stem cells also have inherent paracrine activity, releasing cytoprotective factors and growth-promoting cytokines that can further stimulate tissue regeneration and neovascularization through recruitment of endogenous stem and progenitor cells. Current advances for growing vascularized and functional cardiac constructs with human stem cells are described, bringing us a step closer to the engineering of complex cardiac tissues such as pacemaker, conducting tissue, or contractile myocardial flaps ideal for transplantation. From studies in rats successful transplantation of thin constructs to the ventricle has been reported, but there remain further issues to resolve before larger human constructs will be available to test in the clinic.

  2. In Vitro Characterization of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Different Tissues with a Potential to Promote Complex Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Matula, Zsolt; Szigeti, Anna; Várady, György; Szalma, József; Szabó, Gyula; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balázs; Német, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue regeneration is a major, worldwide medical need, and several strategies have been developed to support the regeneration of extensive bone defects, including stem cell based bone grafts. In addition to the application of stem cells with high osteogenic potential, it is important to maintain proper blood flow in a bone graft to avoid inner graft necrosis. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may form both osteocytes and endothelial cells; therefore we examined the combined in vitro osteogenic and endothelial differentiation capacities of MSCs derived from adipose tissue, Wharton's jelly, and periodontal ligament. Based on a detailed characterization presented here, MSCs isolated from adipose tissue and periodontal ligament may be most appropriate for generating vascularized bone grafts. PMID:27999599

  3. Tissue kallikrein-modified human endothelial progenitor cell implantation improves cardiac function via enhanced activation of akt and increased angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuyu; Sheng, Zulong; Li, YeFei; Fu, Cong; Ma, Genshan; Liu, Naifeng; Chao, Julie; Chao, Lee

    2013-05-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been shown to enhance angiogenesis not only by incorporating into the vasculature but also by secreting cytokines, thereby serving as an ideal vehicle for gene transfer. As tissue kallikrein (TK) has pleiotropic effects in inhibiting apoptosis and oxidative stress, and promoting angiogenesis, we evaluated the salutary potential of kallikrein-modified human EPCs (hEPCs; Ad.hTK-hEPCs) after acute myocardial infarction (MI). We genetically modified hEPCs with a TK gene and evaluated cell survival, engraftment, revascularization, and functional improvement in a nude mouse left anterior descending ligation model. hEPCs were manipulated to overexpress the TK gene. In vitro, the antiapoptotic and paracrine effects were assessed under oxidative stress. TK protects hEPCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis via inhibition of activation of caspase-3 and -9, induction of Akt phosphorylation, and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor. In vivo, the Ad.hTK-hEPCs were transplanted after MI via intracardiac injection. The surviving cells were tracked after transplantation using near-infrared optical imaging. Left ventricular (LV) function was evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography. Capillary density was quantified using immunohistochemical staining. Engrafted Ad.hTK-hEPCs exhibited advanced protection against ischemia by increasing LV ejection fraction. Compared with Ad.Null-hEPCs, transplantation with Ad.hTK-hEPCs significantly decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis in association with increased retention of transplanted EPCs in the myocardium. Capillary density and arteriolar density in the infarct border zone was significantly higher in Ad.hTK-hEPC-transplanted mice than in Ad.Null-hEPC-treated mice. Transplanted hEPCs were clearly incorporated into CD31(+) capillaries. These results indicate that implantation of kallikrein-modified EPCs in the heart provides advanced benefits in protection against ischemia-induced MI by

  4. Preclinical Biosafety Evaluation of Genetically Modified Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Clinical Applications to Brainstem Glioma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Ah; Yun, Jun-Won; Joo, Kyeung Min; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kwak, Pil Ae; Lee, Young Eun; You, Ji-Ran; Kwon, Euna; Kim, Woo Ho; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2016-06-15

    Stem-cell based gene therapy is a promising novel therapeutic approach for inoperable invasive tumors, including brainstem glioma. Previously, we demonstrated the therapeutic potential of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAT-MSC) genetically engineered to express a secreted form of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL) against brainstem glioma. However, safety concerns should be comprehensively investigated before clinical applications of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL. At first, we injected stereotactically low (1.2 × 10(5) cells/18 μL), medium (2.4 × 10(5)/18 μL), or high dose (3.6 × 10(5)/18 μL) of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL into the brainstems of immunodeficient mice reflecting the plan of the future clinical trial. Local toxicity, systemic toxicity, secondary tumor formation, and biodistribution of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL were investigated. Next, presence of hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was confirmed in the brain and major organs at 4, 9, and 14 weeks in brainstem glioma-bearing mice. In the 15-week subchronic toxicity test, no serious adverse events in terms of body weight, food consumption, clinical symptom, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, organ weight, and histopathology were observed. In the 26-week tumorigenicity test, hAT-MSC.sTRAIL made no detectable tumors, whereas positive control U-87 MG cells made huge tumors in the brainstem. No remaining hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed in any organs examined, including the brainstem at 15 or 26 weeks. In brainstem glioma-bearing mice, injected hAT-MSC.sTRAIL was observed, but gradually decreased over time in the brain. The mRNA of human specific GAPDH and TRAIL was not detected in all major organs. These results indicate that the hAT-MSC.sTRAIL could be applicable to the future clinical trials in terms of biosafety.

  5. Apoptosis, stem cells, and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Andreas; Steller, Hermann

    2010-10-26

    Most metazoans have at least some ability to regenerate damaged cells and tissues, although the regenerative capacity varies depending on the species, organ, or developmental stage. Cell replacement and regeneration occur in two contexts: renewal of spent cells during tissue homeostasis (homeostatic growth), and in response to external injury, wounding, or amputation (epimorphic regeneration). Model organisms that display remarkable regenerative capacity include amphibians, planarians, Hydra, and the vertebrate liver. In addition, several mammalian organs--including the skin, gut, kidney, muscle, and even the human nervous system--have some ability to replace spent or damaged cells. Although the regenerative response is complex, it typically involves the induction of new cell proliferation through formation of a blastema, followed by cell specification, differentiation, and patterning. Stem cells and undifferentiated progenitor cells play an important role in both tissue homeostasis and tissue regeneration. Stem cells are typically quiescent or passing slowly through the cell cycle in adult tissues, but they can be activated in response to cell loss and wounding. A series of studies, mostly performed in Drosophila as well as in Hydra, Xenopus, and mouse, has revealed an unexpected role of apoptotic caspases in the production of mitogenic signals that stimulate the proliferation of stem and progenitor cells to aid in tissue regeneration. This Review summarizes some of the key findings and discusses links to stem cell biology and cancer.

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Ginsenoside Rg3 via NF-κB Pathway in A549 Cells and Human Asthmatic Lung Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Seung; Uh, InJoon; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Park, Jiyoung; Kim, Yumi; Jung, Ji-Hoon; Jung, Hee-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is limited information of the anti-inflammatory effects of Rg3 on inflamed lung cells and tissues. Therefore, we confirmed the anti-inflammatory mechanism of ginsenoside Rg3 in inflamed human airway epithelial cells (A549) and tissues whether Rg3 regulates nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. Methods. To induce the inflammation, IL-1β (10 ng/ml) was treated to A549 cells for 4 h. The effects of Rg3 on NF-κB activity and COX-2 expression were evaluated by western blotting analysis in both IL-1β-induced inflamed A549 cell and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. Using multiplex cytokines assay, the secretion levels of NF-κB-mediated cytokines/chemokines were measured. Result. Rg3 showed the significant inhibition of NF-κB activity thereby reduced COX-2 expression was determined in both IL-1β-induced inflamed A549 cell and human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. In addition, among NF-κB-mediated cytokines, the secretion levels of IL-4, TNF-α, and eotaxin were significantly decreased by Rg3 in asthma tissues. Even though there was no significant difference, IL-6, IL-9, and IL-13 secretion showed a lower tendency compared to saline-treated human asthmatic airway epithelial tissues. Conclusion. The results from this study demonstrate the potential of Rg3 as an anti-inflammatory agent through regulating NF-κB activity and reducing the secretion of NF-κB-mediated cytokines/chemokines. PMID:28116321

  7. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2: differential expression and secretion in human kidney tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Emlet, David R; Pastor-Soler, Nuria; Marciszyn, Allison; Wen, Xiaoyan; Gomez, Hernando; Humphries, William H; Morrisroe, Seth; Volpe, Jacob K; Kellum, John A

    2017-02-01

    We have characterized the expression and secretion of the acute kidney injury (AKI) biomarkers insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) in human kidney epithelial cells in primary cell culture and tissue. We established cell culture model systems of primary kidney cells of proximal and distal tubule origin and observed that both proteins are indeed expressed and secreted in both tubule cell types in vitro. However, TIMP-2 is both expressed and secreted preferentially by cells of distal tubule origin, while IGFBP7 is equally expressed across tubule cell types yet preferentially secreted by cells of proximal tubule origin. In human kidney tissue, strong staining of IGFBP7 was seen in the luminal brush-border region of a subset of proximal tubule cells, and TIMP-2 stained intracellularly in distal tubules. Additionally, while some tubular colocalization of both biomarkers was identified with the injury markers kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, both biomarkers could also be seen alone, suggesting the possibility for differential mechanistic and/or temporal profiles of regulation of these early AKI biomarkers from known markers of injury. Last, an in vitro model of ischemia-reperfusion demonstrated enhancement of secretion of both markers early after reperfusion. This work provides a rationale for further investigation of these markers for their potential role in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury.

  8. An Innovative Collagen-Based Cell-Printing Method for Obtaining Human Adipose Stem Cell-Laden Structures Consisting of Core-Sheath Structures for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Yeo, MyungGu; Lee, Ji-Seon; Chun, Wook; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2016-04-11

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell printing processes have been used widely in various tissue engineering applications due to the efficient embedding of living cells in appropriately designed micro- or macro-structures. However, there are several issues to overcome, such as the limited choice of bioinks and tailor-made fabricating strategies. Here, we suggest a new, innovative cell-printing process, supplemented with a core-sheath nozzle and an aerosol cross-linking method, to obtain multilayered cell-laden mesh structure and a newly considered collagen-based cell-laden bioink. To obtain a mechanically and biologically enhanced cell-laden structure, we used collagen-bioink in the core region, and also used pure alginate in the sheath region to protect the cells in the collagen during the printing and cross-linking process and support the 3D cell-laden mesh structure. To achieve the most appropriate conditions for fabricating cell-embedded cylindrical core-sheath struts, various processing conditions, including weight fractions of the cross-linking agent and pneumatic pressure in the core region, were tested. The fabricated 3D MG63-laden mesh structure showed significantly higher cell viability (92 ± 3%) compared with that (83 ± 4%) of the control, obtained using a general alginate-based cell-printing process. To expand the feasibility to stem cell-embedded structures, we fabricated a cell-laden mesh structure consisting of core (cell-laden collagen)/sheath (pure alginate) using human adipose stem cells (hASCs). Using the selected processing conditions, we could achieve a stable 3D hASC-laden mesh structure. The fabricated cell-laden 3D core-sheath structure exhibited outstanding cell viability (91%) compared to that (83%) of an alginate-based hASC-laden mesh structure (control), and more efficient hepatogenic differentiations (albumin: ∼ 1.7-fold, TDO-2: ∼ 7.6-fold) were observed versus the control. The selection of collagen-bioink and the new printing strategy

  9. Catechol-Functionalized Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels Enhance Angiogenesis and Osteogenesis of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells in Critical Tissue Defects.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Ji; Jin, Yoonhee; Shin, Jisoo; Yang, Kisuk; Lee, Changhyun; Yang, Hee Seok; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2016-06-13

    Over the last few decades, stem cell therapies have been highlighted for their potential to heal damaged tissue and aid in tissue reconstruction. However, materials used to deliver and support implanted cells often display limited efficacy, which has resulted in delaying translation of stem cell therapies into the clinic. In our previous work, we developed a mussel-inspired, catechol-functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA-CA) hydrogel that enabled effective cell transplantation due to its improved biocompatibility and strong tissue adhesiveness. The present study was performed to further expand the utility of HA-CA hydrogels for use in stem cell therapies to treat more clinically relevant tissue defect models. Specifically, we utilized HA-CA hydrogels to potentiate stem cell-mediated angiogenesis and osteogenesis in two tissue defect models: critical limb ischemia and critical-sized calvarial bone defect. HA-CA hydrogels were found to be less cytotoxic to human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in vitro compared to conventional photopolymerized HA hydrogels. HA-CA hydrogels also retained the angiogenic functionality of hADSCs and supported osteogenic differentiation of hADSCs. Because of their superior tissue adhesiveness, HA-CA hydrogels were able to mediate efficient engraftment of hADSCs into the defect regions. When compared to photopolymerized HA hydrogels, HA-CA hydrogels significantly enhanced hADSC-mediated therapeutic angiogenesis (promoted capillary/arteriole formation, improved vascular perfusion, attenuated ischemic muscle degeneration/fibrosis, and reduced limb amputation) and bone reconstruction (mineralized bone formation, enhanced osteogenic marker expression, and collagen deposition). This study proves the feasibility of using bioinspired HA-CA hydrogels as functional biomaterials for improved tissue regeneration in critical tissue defects.

  10. Artificial human tissues from cord and cord blood stem cells for multi-organ regenerative medicine: viable alternatives to animal in vitro toxicology.

    PubMed

    Jurga, Marcin; Forraz, Nico; McGuckin, Colin P

    2010-05-01

    New medicinal products and procedures must meet very strict safety criteria before being applied for use in humans. The laboratory procedures involved require the use of large numbers of animals each year. Furthermore, such investigations do not always give an accurate translation to the human setting. Here, we propose a viable alternative to animal testing, which uses novel technology featuring human cord and cord blood stem cells. With over 130 million children born each year, cord and cord blood remains the most widely available alternative to the use of animals or cadaveric human tissues for in vitro toxicology.

  11. Tissue factor expression in human arterial smooth muscle cells. TF is present in three cellular pools after growth factor stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Schecter, A D; Giesen, P L; Taby, O; Rosenfield, C L; Rossikhina, M; Fyfe, B S; Kohtz, D S; Fallon, J T; Nemerson, Y; Taubman, M B

    1997-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that initiates the coagulation cascade. Because of the potential role of TF in mediating arterial thrombosis, we have examined its expression in human aortic and coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMC). TF mRNA and protein were induced in SMC by a variety of growth agonists. Exposure to PDGF AA or BB for 30 min provided all of the necessary signals for induction of TF mRNA and protein. This result was consistent with nuclear runoff analyses, demonstrating that PDGF-induced TF transcription occurred within 30 min. A newly developed assay involving binding of digoxigenin-labeled FVIIa (DigVIIa) and digoxigenin-labeled Factor X (DigX) was used to localize cellular TF. By light and confocal microscopy, prominent TF staining was seen in the perinuclear cytoplasm beginning 2 h after agonist treatment and persisting for 10-12 h. Surface TF activity, measured on SMC monolayers under flow conditions, increased transiently, peaking 4-6 h after agonist stimulation and returning to baseline within 16 h. Peak surface TF activity was only approximately 20% of total TF activity measured in cell lysates. Surface TF-blocking experiments demonstrated that the remaining TF was found as encrypted surface TF, and also in an intracellular pool. The relatively short-lived surface expression of TF may be critical for limiting the thrombotic potential of intact SMC exposed to growth factor stimulation. In contrast, the encrypted surface and intracellular pools may provide a rich source of TF under conditions associated with SMC damage, such as during atherosclerotic plaque rupture or balloon arterial injury. PMID:9410905

  12. Decellularization of bovine anterior cruciate ligament tissues minimizes immunogenic reactions to alpha-gal epitopes by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryu; Vavken, Patrick; Murray, Martha M

    2012-10-01

    Rupture of ACL is a common injury. While the current surgical treatments are effective, many patients still suffer from precocious osteoarthritis, and there is an increasing interest in bioengineering approaches to improve ACL repair. Bovine collagen is a material currently in use for tissue engineering of ligaments. The alpha-gal epitopes found on bovine cells are a source of immunogenic stimulus for human cells. In this study, we wished to determine if those epitopes could be removed sufficiently to mitigate an immunogenic response using either a decellularization protocol or decellularization followed by alpha-galactosidase treatment. Bovine ACLs were treated with Triton-X, sodium deoxycholate, ribonuclease, and deoxyribonuclease to remove cells. A subset of the decellularized tissues was further treated with alpha-galactosidase. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were exposed to untreated, decellularized, and alpha-galactosidase-treated tissues, and PBMC migration and IL-6 release were measured. PBMCs were significantly more attracted to untreated ACL compared to decellularized or alpha-galactosidase-treated tissue, but no difference was seen between the two treatment groups. PBMCs also released significantly more IL-6 when exposed to untreated tissue compared to decellularized ACL or alpha-galactosidase-treated ACL, but no difference was seen between the two treatment groups. Immunohistochemistry using anti-alpha-gal antibody detected the epitopes throughout the untreated ACL, but similar areas of reaction were not seen on decellularized or alpha-galactosidase-treated ACL. These results suggest that our decellularization protocol minimizes the immunogenic reactions of human PBMCs to bovine ACL tissue. Therefore, decellularized bovine ACL tissue may be a safe, effective biomaterial for ACL injury treatments.

  13. Inhibition of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) expression decreases the survival and myogenic differentiation of human rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Croci, Stefania; Landuzzi, Lorena; Astolfi, Annalisa; Nicoletti, Giordano; Rosolen, Angelo; Sartori, Francesca; Follo, Matilde Y; Oliver, Noelynn; De Giovanni, Carla; Nanni, Patrizia; Lollini, Pier-Luigi

    2004-03-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), a cysteine-rich protein of the CCN (Cyr61, CTGF, Nov) family of genes, emerged from a microarray screen of genes expressed by human rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Rhabdomyosarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma of childhood deriving from skeletal muscle cells. In this study, we investigated the role of CTGF in rhabdomyosarcoma. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells of the embryonal (RD/12, RD/18, CCA) and the alveolar histotype (RMZ-RC2, SJ-RH4, SJ-RH30), rhabdomyosarcoma tumor specimens, and normal skeletal muscle cells expressed CTGF. To determine the function of CTGF, we treated rhabdomyosarcoma cells with a CTGF antisense oligonucleotide or with a CTGF small interfering RNA (siRNA). Both treatments inhibited rhabdomyosarcoma cell growth, suggesting the existence of a new autocrine loop based on CTGF. CTGF antisense oligonucleotide-mediated growth inhibition was specifically due to a significant increase in apoptosis, whereas cell proliferation was unchanged. CTGF antisense oligonucleotide induced a strong decrease in the level of myogenic differentiation of rhabdomyosarcoma cells, whereas the addition of recombinant CTGF significantly increased the proportion of myosin-positive cells. CTGF emerges as a survival and differentiation factor and could be a new therapeutic target in human rhabdomyosarcoma.

  14. Human mesenchymal stem cells: a bank perspective on the isolation, characterization and potential of alternative sources for the regeneration of musculoskeletal tissues.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Lorenzo; Fornasari, Pier Maria

    2013-04-01

    The continuous discovery of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in different tissues is stirring up a tremendous interest as a cell source for regenerative medicine therapies. Historically, hMSCs have been always considered a sub-population of mononuclear cells present in the bone marrow (BM). Although BM-hMSCs are still nowadays considered as the most promising mesenchymal stem cell population to reach the clinics due to their capacity to differentiate into multiple tissues, hMSCs derived from other adult and fetal tissues have also demonstrated to possess similar differentiation capacities. Furthermore, different reports have highlighted a higher recurrence of hMSCs in some of these tissues as compared to BM. This offer a fascinating panorama for cell banking, since the creation of a stem cell factory could be envisioned where hMSCs are stocked and used for ad hoc clinical applications. In this review, we summarize the main findings and state of the art in hMSCs isolation, characterization, and differentiation from alternative tissue sources and we attempt to compare their potency for musculoskeletal regeneration.

  15. Ginsenoside Rg1 and platelet-rich fibrin enhance human breast adipose-derived stem cell function for soft tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang-Tian; Liang, Zhi-Jie; Li, Hong-Mian; Peng, Qi-Liu; Huang, Min-Hong; Li, De Quan; Liang, Yi-Dan; Chi, Gang-Yi; Li, De Hui; Yu, Bing-Chao; Huang, Ji-Rong

    2016-06-07

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can be used to repair soft tissue defects, wounds, burns, and scars and to regenerate various damaged tissues. The cell differentiation capacity of ASCs is crucial for engineered adipose tissue regeneration in reconstructive and plastic surgery. We previously reported that ginsenoside Rg1 (G-Rg1 or Rg1) promotes proliferation and differentiation of ASCs in vitro and in vivio. Here we show that both G-Rg1 and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) improve the proliferation, differentiation, and soft tissue regeneration capacity of human breast adipose-derived stem cells (HBASCs) on collagen type I sponge scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Three months after transplantation, tissue wet weight, adipocyte number, intracellular lipid, microvessel density, and gene and protein expression of VEGF, HIF-1α, and PPARγ were higher in both G-Rg1- and PRF-treated HBASCs than in control grafts. More extensive new adipose tissue formation was evident after treatment with G-Rg1 or PRF. In summary, G-Rg1 and/or PRF co-administration improves the function of HBASCs for soft tissue regeneration engineering.

  16. Ginsenoside Rg1 and platelet-rich fibrin enhance human breast adipose-derived stem cells function for soft tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Mian; Peng, Qi-Liu; Huang, Min-Hong; Li, De-Quan; Liang, Yi-Dan; Chi, Gang-Yi; Li, De-Hui; Yu, Bing-Chao; Huang, Ji-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) can be used to repair soft tissue defects, wounds, burns, and scars and to regenerate various damaged tissues. The cell differentiation capacity of ASCs is crucial for engineered adipose tissue regeneration in reconstructive and plastic surgery. We previously reported that ginsenoside Rg1 (G-Rg1 or Rg1) promotes proliferation and differentiation of ASCs in vitro and in vivio. Here we show that both G-Rg1 and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) improve the proliferation, differentiation, and soft tissue regeneration capacity of human breast adipose-derived stem cells (HBASCs) on collagen type I sponge scaffolds in vitro and in vivo. Three months after transplantation, tissue wet weight, adipocyte number, intracellular lipid, microvessel density, and gene and protein expression of VEGF, HIF-1α, and PPARγ were higher in both G-Rg1- and PRF-treated HBASCs than in control grafts. More extensive new adipose tissue formation was evident after treatment with G-Rg1 or PRF. In summary, G-Rg1 and/or PRF co-administration improves the function of HBASCs for soft tissue regeneration engineering. PMID:27191987

  17. [Heart tissue from embryonic stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, W-H

    2008-09-01

    Embryonic stem cells can give rise to all somatic cells, making them an attractive cell source for tissue engineering applications. The propensity of cells to form tissue-like structures in a culture dish has been well documented. We and others made use of this intrinsic property to generate bioartificial heart muscle. First proof-of-concept studies involved immature heart cells mainly from fetal chicken, neonatal rats and mice. They eventually provided evidence that force-generating heart muscle can be engineered in vitro. Recently, the focus shifted to the application of stem cells to eventually enable the generation of human heart muscle and reach following long-term goals: (1) development of a simplified in vitro model of heart muscle development; (2) generation of a human test-bed for drug screening and development; (3) allocation of surrogate heart tissue to myocardial repair applications. This overview will provide the background for cell-based myocardial repair, introduce the main myocardial tissue engineering concepts, discuss the use of embryonic and non-embryonic stem cells, and lays out the potential direct and indirect therapeutic use of human tissue engineered myocardium.

  18. Human dental pulp stem cells can differentiate into Schwann cells and promote and guide neurite outgrowth in an aligned tissue-engineered collagen construct in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martens, Wendy; Sanen, Kathleen; Georgiou, Melanie; Struys, Tom; Bronckaers, Annelies; Ameloot, Marcel; Phillips, James; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the differentiation potential of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) toward Schwann cells, together with their functional capacity with regard to myelination and support of neurite outgrowth in vitro. Successful Schwann cell differentiation was confirmed at the morphological and ultrastructural level by transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, compared to undifferentiated hDPSCs, immunocytochemistry and ELISA tests revealed increased glial marker expression and neurotrophic factor secretion of differentiated hDPSCs (d-hDPSCs), which promoted survival and neurite outgrowth in 2-dimensional dorsal root ganglia cultures. In addition, neurites were myelinated by d-hDPSCs in a 3-dimensional collagen type I hydrogel neural tissue construct. This engineered construct contained aligned columns of d-hDPSCs that supported and guided neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence that hDPSCs are able to undergo Schwann cell differentiation and support neural outgrowth in vitro, proposing them to be good candidates for cell-based therapies as treatment for peripheral nerve injury.

  19. Human Adipose-Tissue Derived Stromal Cells in Combination with Hypoxia Effectively Support Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood Haematopoietic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Andreeva, Elena R.; Buravkov, Sergey V.; Romanov, Yury A.; Buravkova, Ludmila B.

    2015-01-01

    The optimisation of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell expansion is on demand in modern cell therapy. In this work, haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been selected from unmanipulated cord blood mononuclear cells (cbMNCs) due to adhesion to human adipose-tissue derived stromal cells (ASCs) under standard (20%) and tissue-related (5%) oxygen. ASCs efficiently maintained viability and supported further HSPC expansion at 20% and 5% O2. During co-culture with ASCs, a new floating population of differently committed HSPCs (HSPCs-1) grew. This suspension was enriched with СD34+ cells up to 6 (20% O2) and 8 (5% O2) times. Functional analysis of HSPCs-1 revealed cobble-stone area forming cells (CAFCs) and lineage-restricted colony-forming cells (CFCs). The number of CFCs was 1.6 times higher at tissue-related O2, than in standard cultivation (20% O2). This increase was related to a rise in the number of multipotent precursors - BFU-E, CFU-GEMM and CFU-GM. These changes were at least partly ensured by the increased concentration of MCP-1 and IL-8 at 5% O2. In summary, our data demonstrated that human ASCs enables the selection of functionally active HSPCs from unfractionated cbMNCs, the further expansion of which without exogenous cytokines provides enrichment with CD34+ cells. ASCs efficiently support the viability and proliferation of cord blood haematopoietic progenitors of different commitment at standard and tissue-related O2 levels at the expense of direct and paracrine cell-to-cell interactions. PMID:25919031

  20. Response of human limbal epithelial cells to wounding on 3D RAFT tissue equivalents: effect of airlifting and human limbal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Massie, Isobel; Levis, Hannah J; Daniels, Julie T

    2014-10-01

    Limbal epithelial stem cell deficiency can cause blindness but may be treated by human limbal epithelial cell (hLE) transplantation, normally on human amniotic membrane. Clinical outcomes using amnion can be unreliable and so we have developed an alternative tissue equivalent (TE), RAFT (Real Architecture for 3D Tissue), which supports hLE expansion, and stratification when airlifted. Human limbal fibroblasts (hLF) may be incorporated into RAFT TEs, where they support overlying hLE and improve phenotype. However, the impact of neither airlifting nor hLF on hLE function has been investigated. hLE on RAFT TEs (±hLF and airlifting) were wounded using heptanol and re-epithelialisation (fluorescein diacetate staining), and percentage putative stem cell marker p63α and proliferative marker Ki67 expression (wholemount immunohistochemistry), measured. Airlifted, hLF- RAFT TEs were unable to close the wound and p63α expression was 7 ± 0.2% after wounding. Conversely, non-airlifted, hLF- RAFT TEs closed the wound within 9 days and p63α expression was higher at 22 ± 5% (p < 0.01). hLE on both hLF- and hLF+ RAFT TEs (non-airlifted) closed the wound and p63α expression was 26 ± 8% and 36 ± 3% respectively (ns). Ki67 expression by hLE increased from 1.3 ± 0.5% before wounding to 7.89 ± 2.53% post-wounding for hLF- RAFT TEs (p < 0.01), and 0.8 ± 0.08% to 17.68 ± 10.88% for hLF+ RAFT TEs (p < 0.05), suggesting that re-epithelialisation was a result of proliferation. These data suggest that neither airlifting nor hLF are necessarily required to maintain a functional epithelium on RAFT TEs, thus simplifying and shortening the production process. This is important when working towards clinical application of regenerative medicine products.

  1. Wnt5a-mediating neurogenesis of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells in a 3D microfluidic cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeein; Kim, Sohyeun; Jung, Jinsun; Lim, Youngbin; Kang, Kyungsun; Park, Seungsu; Kang, Sookyung

    2011-10-01

    In stem cell biology, cell plasticity refers to the ability of stem cells to differentiate into a variety of cell lineages. Recently, cell plasticity has been used to refer to the ability of a given cell type to reversibly de-differentiate, re-differentiate, or transdifferentiate in response to specific stimuli. These processes are regulated by multiple intracellular and extracellular growth and differentiation factors, including low oxygen. Our recent study showed that 3D microfluidic cell culture induces activation of the Wnt5A/β-catenin signaling pathway in hATSCs (human Adipose Tissue-derived Stem Cells). This resulted in self renewal and transdifferentiation of hATSCs into neurons. To improve neurogenic potency of hATSCs in response to low oxygen and other unknown physical factors, we developed a gel-free 3D microfluidic cell culture system (3D-μFCCS). The functional structure was developed for the immobilization of 3D multi-cellular aggregates in a microfluidic channel without the use of a matrix on the chip. Growth of hATSCs neurosphere grown on a chip was higher than the growth of control cells grown in a culture dish. Induction of differentiation in the Chip system resulted in a significant increase in the induction of neuronal-like cell structures and the presentation of TuJ or NF160 positive long neuritis compared to control cells after active migration from the center of the microfluidic channel layer to the outside of the microfluidic channel layer. We also observed that the chip neurogenesis system induced a significantly higher level of GABA secreting neurons and, in addition, almost 60% of cells were GABA + cells. Finally, we observed that 1 month of after the transplantation of each cell type in a mouse SCI lesion, chip cultured and neuronal differentiated hATSCs exhibited the ability to effectively transdifferentiate into NF160 + motor neurons at a high ratio. Interestingly, our CHIP/PCR analysis revealed that HIF1α-induced hATSCs neurogenesis

  2. Povidone-iodine-induced cell death in cultured human epithelial HeLa cells and rat oral mucosal tissue.

    PubMed

    Sato, So; Miyake, Masao; Hazama, Akihiro; Omori, Koichi

    2014-07-01

    Although povidone-iodine (PVP-I) has been used as a gargle since 1956, its effectiveness and material safety have been remained controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxicity of PVP-I to epithelial cells in a concentration range significantly lower than that used clinically. Study design was in vitro laboratory investigations and in vivo histological and immunologic analysis. We examined the effects of PVP-I at concentrations of 1 × 10(-2) to 1 × 10(3) μM and 1 × 10(-4) to 1 × 10 μM on HeLa cells as a model of epithelial cells and rat oral mucosa, respectively, after 1 or 2 days of exposure. Annexin V/FLUOS was used to distinguish live, apoptotic and necrotic cells. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method was also used to observe whether apoptotic epithelial cells exist in rat oral mucosa after 1 day of exposure of PVP-I. HeLa cells developed concentration-dependent cytotoxicity, and epithelium of rat oral mucosa was thinned in a concentration-dependent manner. HeLa cell apoptosis increased after 1 × 10(0) μM of PVP-I exposure for 2 days. In the TUNEL method, many apoptotic epithelial cells were observed in the rat oral mucosa after 1 day of exposure to diluted 1 × 10(-2) μM of PVP-I, but minimal apoptotic epithelial cells were observed using 1 × 10(-3) μM of PVP-I. Our findings suggest that exposure to PVP-I, of which concentrations are even lower than those used clinically, causes toxicity in epithelial cells. This knowledge would help us better understand the risk of the use of PVP-I against mucosa.

  3. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Approach for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering Using a Single Stem Cell Source.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Liliana F; Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Williams, John; Kannan, Arthi; Dent, Morgan R; Guilak, Farshid; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2015-09-01

    We have previously shown that elevating extracellular calcium from a concentration of 1.8 to 8 mM accelerates and increases human adipose-derived stem cell (hASC) osteogenic differentiation and cell-mediated calcium accretion, even in the absence of any other soluble osteogenic factors in the culture medium. However, the effects of elevated calcium on hASC chondrogenic differentiation have not been reported. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of varied calcium concentrations on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC. We hypothesized that exposure to elevated extracellular calcium (8 mM concentration) in a chondrogenic differentiation medium (CDM) would inhibit chondrogenesis of hASC when compared to basal calcium (1.8 mM concentration) controls. We further hypothesized that a full osteochondral construct could be engineered by controlling local release of calcium to induce site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis using only hASC as the cell source. Human ASC was cultured as micromass pellets in CDM containing transforming growth factor-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein 6 for 28 days at extracellular calcium concentrations of either 1.8 mM (basal) or 8 mM (elevated). Our findings indicated that elevated calcium induced osteogenesis and inhibited chondrogenesis in hASC. Based on these findings, stacked polylactic acid nanofibrous scaffolds containing either 0% or 20% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) nanoparticles were electrospun and tested for site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Histological assays confirmed that human ASC differentiated locally to generate calcified tissue in layers containing 20% TCP, and cartilage in the layers with no TCP when cultured in CDM. This is the first study to report the effects of elevated calcium on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC, and to develop osteochondral nanofibrous scaffolds using a single cell source and controlled calcium release to induce site-specific differentiation. This approach

  4. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Chondrogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: A Novel Approach for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering Using a Single Stem Cell Source

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana F.; Mohiti-Asli, Mahsa; Williams, John; Kannan, Arthi; Dent, Morgan R.; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that elevating extracellular calcium from a concentration of 1.8 to 8 mM accelerates and increases human adipose-derived stem cell (hASC) osteogenic differentiation and cell-mediated calcium accretion, even in the absence of any other soluble osteogenic factors in the culture medium. However, the effects of elevated calcium on hASC chondrogenic differentiation have not been reported. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of varied calcium concentrations on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC. We hypothesized that exposure to elevated extracellular calcium (8 mM concentration) in a chondrogenic differentiation medium (CDM) would inhibit chondrogenesis of hASC when compared to basal calcium (1.8 mM concentration) controls. We further hypothesized that a full osteochondral construct could be engineered by controlling local release of calcium to induce site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis using only hASC as the cell source. Human ASC was cultured as micromass pellets in CDM containing transforming growth factor-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein 6 for 28 days at extracellular calcium concentrations of either 1.8 mM (basal) or 8 mM (elevated). Our findings indicated that elevated calcium induced osteogenesis and inhibited chondrogenesis in hASC. Based on these findings, stacked polylactic acid nanofibrous scaffolds containing either 0% or 20% tricalcium phosphate (TCP) nanoparticles were electrospun and tested for site-specific chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Histological assays confirmed that human ASC differentiated locally to generate calcified tissue in layers containing 20% TCP, and cartilage in the layers with no TCP when cultured in CDM. This is the first study to report the effects of elevated calcium on chondrogenic differentiation of hASC, and to develop osteochondral nanofibrous scaffolds using a single cell source and controlled calcium release to induce site-specific differentiation. This approach

  5. Altered Metabolic and Stemness Capacity of Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells from Obese Mouse and Human

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Laura M.; Bernal, Aurora; de Lucas, Beatriz; San Martin, Nuria; Mastrangelo, Annalaura; García, Antonia; Barbas, Coral; Gálvez, Beatriz G.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) are an appealing source of cells for therapeutic intervention; however, the environment from which ASCs are isolated may impact their usefulness. Using a range of functional assays, we have evaluated whether ASCs isolated from an obese environment are comparable to cells from non-obese adipose tissue. Results showed that ASCs isolated from obese tissue have a reduced proliferative ability and a loss of viability together with changes in telomerase activity and DNA telomere length, suggesting a decreased self-renewal capacity. Metabolic analysis demonstrated that mitochondrial content and function was impaired in obese-derived ASCs resulting in changes in favored oxidative substrates. These findings highlight the impact of obesity on adult stem properties. Hence, caution should be exercised when considering the source of ASCs for cellular therapies since their therapeutic potential may be impaired. PMID:25875023

  6. Altered metabolic and stemness capacity of adipose tissue-derived stem cells from obese mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Laura M; Bernal, Aurora; de Lucas, Beatriz; San Martin, Nuria; Mastrangelo, Annalaura; García, Antonia; Barbas, Coral; Gálvez, Beatriz G

    2015-01-01

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) are an appealing source of cells for therapeutic intervention; however, the environment from which ASCs are isolated may impact their usefulness. Using a range of functional assays, we have evaluated whether ASCs isolated from an obese environment are comparable to cells from non-obese adipose tissue. Results showed that ASCs isolated from obese tissue have a reduced proliferative ability and a loss of viability together with changes in telomerase activity and DNA telomere length, suggesting a decreased self-renewal capacity. Metabolic analysis demonstrated that mitochondrial content and function was impaired in obese-derived ASCs resulting in changes in favored oxidative substrates. These findings highlight the impact of obesity on adult stem properties. Hence, caution should be exercised when considering the source of ASCs for cellular therapies since their therapeutic potential may be impaired.

  7. Potential therapeutic effect of the secretome from human uterine cervical stem cells against both cancer and stromal cells compared with adipose tissue stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Samuel; Bermúdez, María A.; Lamelas, Maria Luz; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Schneider, José; Perez-Fernandez, Roman; Vizoso, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Evidences indicate that tumor development and progression towards a malignant phenotype depend not only on cancer cells themselves, but are also deeply influenced by tumor stroma reactivity. The present study uses mesenchymal stem cells from normal human uterine cervix (hUCESCs), isolated by the minimally invasive method of routine Pap cervical smear, to study their effect on the three main cell types in a tumor: cancer cells, fibroblasts and macrophages. Administration of hUCESCs-conditioned medium (CM) to a highly invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line and to human breast tumors with high cell proliferation rates had the effect of reducing cell proliferation, modifying the cell cycle, inducing apoptosis, and decreasing invasion. In a xenograft mouse tumor model, hUCESCs-CM reduced tumor growth and increased overall survival. In cancer-associated fibroblasts, administration of hUCESCs-CM resulted in reduced cell proliferation, greater apoptosis and decreased invasion. In addition, hUCESCs-CM inhibited and reverted macrophage differentiation. The analysis of hUCESCs-CM (fresh and lyophilized) suggests that a complex paracrine signaling network could be implicated in the anti-tumor potential of hUCESCs. In light of their anti-tumor potential, the easy cell isolation method, and the fact that lyophilization of their CM conserves original properties make hUCESCs good candidates for experimental or clinical applications in anticancer therapy. PMID:25296979

  8. Potential therapeutic effect of the secretome from human uterine cervical stem cells against both cancer and stromal cells compared with adipose tissue stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eiró, Noemí; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Seoane, Samuel; Bermúdez, María A; Lamelas, Maria Luz; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Schneider, José; Perez-Fernandez, Roman; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2014-11-15

    Evidences indicate that tumor development and progression towards a malignant phenotype depend not only on cancer cells themselves, but are also deeply influenced by tumor stroma reactivity. The present study uses mesenchymal stem cells from normal human uterine cervix (hUCESCs), isolated by the minimally invasive method of routine Pap cervical smear, to study their effect on the three main cell types in a tumor: cancer cells, fibroblasts and macrophages. Administration of hUCESCs-conditioned medium (CM) to a highly invasive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line and to human breast tumors with high cell proliferation rates had the effect of reducing cell proliferation, modifying the cell cycle, inducing apoptosis, and decreasing invasion. In a xenograft mouse tumor model, hUCESCs-CM reduced tumor growth and increased overall survival. In cancer-associated fibroblasts, administration of hUCESCs-CM resulted in reduced cell proliferation, greater apoptosis and decreased invasion. In addition, hUCESCs-CM inhibited and reverted macrophage differentiation. The analysis of hUCESCs-CM (fresh and lyophilized) suggests that a complex paracrine signaling network could be implicated in the anti-tumor potential of hUCESCs. In light of their anti-tumor potential, the easy cell isolation method, and the fact that lyophilization of their CM conserves original properties make hUCESCs good candidates for experimental or clinical applications in anticancer therapy.

  9. Decreased Expression of Inhibitor of Caspase-Activated DNase (ICAD) in Renal Cell Carcinoma – Tissue Microarray of Human Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rajandram, Retnagowri; Razack, Azad H. A.; Ng, Keng Lim

    2016-01-01

    Although primary localised tumours of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can be treated relatively successfully with surgery, metastatic RCC has poor prognosis because of late diagnosis and resistance to therapies. In the present study, we were interested in profiling the protein expression of “inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase” (ICAD), an apoptosis inhibitor, in kidney cancer and its paired normal kidney. Immunohistochemistry with automated batch staining and morphometry using digital pathology were used to compare ICAD in 121 RCC specimens with their paired normal kidney tissue. Tissue microarray of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archival tissue was used. Intensity and localisation of ICAD were compared between normal and cancer samples, and against grading within the cancers. The results demonstrated that, in this cohort, ICAD was highly expressed in the proximal tubular epithelium of normal kidney, and significantly decreased in clear cell RCC tissue (p < 0.05) as well as other subtypes of RCC (p < 0.01) compared with normal kidney. There was a tendency towards nuclear localisation of ICAD in clear cell RCC, but not in other subtypes of RCC. No significant association was found between ICAD intensity and grade of RCC. In summary, down-regulation of ICAD occurs in RCC. ICAD normally inhibits DNA fragmentation and apoptosis; thus, its down-regulation was unexpected in a cancer known for its resistance to apoptosis. However, these RCC samples were from primary, not metastatic, RCC sites, and down-regulated ICAD may be part of a progressive pathway that promotes RCC metastasis.

  10. Surgical retrieval, isolation and in vitro expansion of human anterior cruciate ligament-derived cells for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashim; Sharif, Kevin; Walters, Megan; Woods, Mia D; Potty, Anish; Main, Benjamin J; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2014-04-30

    Injury to the ACL is a commonly encountered problem in active individuals. Even partial tears of this intra-articular knee ligament lead to biomechanical deficiencies that impair function and stability. Current options for the treatment of partial ACL tears range from nonoperative, conservative management to multiple surgical options, such as: thermal modification, single-bundle repair, complete reconstruction, and reconstruction of the damaged portion of the native ligament. Few studies, if any, have demonstrated any single method for management to be consistently superior, and in many cases patients continue to demonstrate persistent instability and other comorbidities. The goal of this study is to identify a potential cell source for utilization in the development of a tissue engineered patch that could be implemented in the repair of a partially torn ACL. A novel protocol was developed for the expansion of cells derived from patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. To isolate the cells, minced hACL tissue obtained during ACL reconstruction was digested in a Collagenase solution. Expansion was performed using DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 1% penicillin/streptomycin (P/S). The cells were then stored at -80 ºC or in liquid nitrogen in a freezing medium consisting of DMSO, FBS and the expansion medium. After thawing, the hACL derived cells were then seeded onto a tissue engineered scaffold, PLAGA (Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid) and control Tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). After 7 days, SEM was performed to compare cellular adhesion to the PLAGA versus the control TCPS. Cellular morphology was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining. SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) micrographs demonstrated that cells grew and adhered on both PLAGA and TCPS surfaces and were confluent over the entire surfaces by day 7. Immunofluorescence staining showed normal, non-stressed morphological patterns on both surfaces. This technique is

  11. Prevention of Osmotic Injury to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells for Biopreservation: A First Step Toward Biobanking of Endothelial Cells for Vascular Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dan; Zhao, Gang; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ping; Cao, Yunxia

    2016-03-01

    High-survival-rate cryopreservation of endothelial cells plays a critical role in vascular tissue engineering, while optimization of osmotic injuries is the first step toward successful cryopreservation. We designed a low-cost, easy-to-use, microfluidics-based microperfusion chamber to investigate the osmotic responses of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) at different temperatures, and then optimized the protocols for using cryoprotective agents (CPAs) to minimize osmotic injuries and improve processes before freezing and after thawing. The fundamental cryobiological parameters were measured using the microperfusion chamber, and then, the optimized protocols using these parameters were confirmed by survival evaluation and cell proliferation experiments. It was revealed for the first time that HUVECs have an unusually small permeability coefficient for Me2SO. Even at the concentrations well established for slow freezing of cells (1.5 M), one-step removal of CPAs for HUVECs might result in inevitable osmotic injuries, indicating that multiple-step removal is essential. Further experiments revealed that multistep removal of 1.5 M Me2SO at 25°C was the best protocol investigated, in good agreement with theory. These results should prove invaluable for optimization of cryopreservation protocols of HUVECs.

  12. Longitudinal label-free tracking of cell death dynamics in living engineered human skin tissue with a multimodal microscope

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Youbo; Marjanovic, Marina; Chaney, Eric J.; Graf, Benedikt W.; Mahmassani, Ziad; Boppart, Marni D.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate real-time, longitudinal, label-free tracking of apoptotic and necrotic cells in living tissue using a multimodal microscope. The integrated imaging platform combines multi-photon microscopy (MPM, based on two-photon excitation fluorescence), optical coherence microscopy (OCM), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Three-dimensional (3-D) co-registered images are captured that carry comprehensive information of the sample, including structural, molecular, and metabolic properties, based on light scattering, autofluorescence intensity, and autofluorescence lifetime, respectively. Different cell death processes, namely, apoptosis and necrosis, of keratinocytes from different epidermal layers are longitudinally monitored and investigated. Differentiation of the two cell death processes in a complex living tissue environment is enabled by quantitative image analysis and high-confidence classification processing based on the multidimensional, cross-validating imaging data. These results suggest that despite the limitations of each individual label-free modality, this multimodal imaging approach holds the promise for studies of different cell death processes in living tissue and in vivo organs. PMID:25360383

  13. Growth suppression effect of human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and Wharton’s jelly of umbilical cord on PBMCs

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Maryam; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Razmkhah, Mahboobeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Immunosuppressive property of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has great attraction in regenerative medicine especially when dealing with tissue damage involving immune reactions. The most attractive tissue sources of MSCs used in clinical applications are bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue (AT), and Wharton’s jelly (WJ) of human umbilical cord. The current study has compared immunomodulatory properties of human BM, AT, and WJ-MSCs. Materials and Methods: Three different types of human MSCs were isolated, cultured, and characterized by flow cytometry and differentiation potentials. The MSCs were co-cultured with allogeneic phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The proliferation of PBMCs was assessed by flow cytometry of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) stained cells and compared to each other and to the growth of PBMCs in the absence of MSCs. Additionally, the growth suppression was indirectly assessed by using the transwell culture system. Results: The proliferation of PBMCs reduced to 6.2, 7 and 15.4- fold in cultures with AT-MSCs, WJ-MSCs, and BM-MSCs, respectively, compared to the PHA-activated cells. When the growth suppression was indirectly assessed by using the transwell culture system, it was revealed that AT-MSCs, WJ-MSCs, and BM-MSCs caused growth reduction in PBMCs to 3, 8, and 8 -fold, respectively, compared to the PHA-activated cells. Conclusion: These data collectively conclude that the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs, which may mostly carry out through direct cell to cell contact, are different between various sources. Accordingly results of this study may contribute to the application of these cells in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. PMID:27081458

  14. Purinergic P2Y2 Receptor Control of Tissue Factor Transcription in Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwei; Zhang, Lingxin; Wang, Chuan; Roy, Shama; Shen, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that the P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) is the predominant nucleotide receptor expressed in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and that P2Y2R activation by ATP or UTP induces dramatic up-regulation of tissue factor (TF), a key initiator of the coagulation cascade. However, the molecular mechanism of this P2Y2R-TF axis remains unclear. Here, we report the role of a newly identified AP-1 consensus sequence in the TF gene promoter and its original binding components in P2Y2R regulation of TF transcription. Using bioinformatics tools, we found that a novel AP-1 site at −1363 bp of the human TF promoter region is highly conserved across multiple species. Activation of P2Y2R increased TF promoter activity and mRNA expression in HCAEC. Truncation, deletion, and mutation of this distal AP-1 site all significantly suppressed TF promoter activity in response to P2Y2R activation. EMSA and ChIP assays further confirmed that upon P2Y2R activation, c-Jun, ATF-2, and Fra-1, but not the typical c-Fos, bound to the new AP-1 site. In addition, loss-of-function studies using siRNAs confirmed a positive transactivation role of c-Jun and ATF-2 but unexpectedly revealed a strong negative role of Fra-1 in P2Y2R-induced TF up-regulation. Furthermore, we found that P2Y2R activation promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation through Src, leading to Fra-1 activation, whereas Rho/JNK mediated P2Y2R-induced activation of c-Jun and ATF-2. These findings reveal the molecular basis for P2Y G protein-coupled receptor control of endothelial TF expression and indicate that targeting the P2Y2R-Fra-1-TF pathway may be an attractive new strategy for controlling vascular inflammation and thrombogenicity associated with endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26631725

  15. A method for high purity intestinal epithelial cell culture from adult human and murine tissues for the investigation of innate immune function.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christina L; Harden, Scott W; LaPato, Melissa; Nelson, Michael; Amador, Byron; Sorenson, Heather; Frazier, Charles J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2014-12-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) serve as an important physiologic barrier between environmental antigens and the host intestinal immune system. Thus, IECs serve as a first line of defense and may act as sentinel cells during inflammatory insults. Despite recent renewed interest in IEC contributions to host immune function, the study of primary IEC has been hindered by lack of a robust culture technique, particularly for small intestinal and adult tissues. Here, a novel adaptation for culture of primary IEC is described for human duodenal organ donor tissue as well as duodenum and colon of adult mice. These epithelial cell cultures display characteristic phenotypes and are of high purity. In addition, the innate immune function of human primary IEC, specifically with regard to Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression and microbial ligand responsiveness, is contrasted with a commonly used intestinal epithelial cell line (HT-29). Specifically, TLR expression at the mRNA level and production of cytokine (IFNγ and TNFα) in response to TLR agonist stimulation is assessed. Differential expression of TLRs as well as innate immune responses to ligand stimulation is observed in human-derived cultures compared to that of HT-29. Thus, use of this adapted method to culture primary epithelial cells from adult human donors and from adult mice will allow for more appropriate studies of IECs as innate immune effectors.

  16. Effects of Gravity on Cells, Tissues, and Organisms: Their Implications on Habitat and Human Support in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will demonstrate that gravity plays a major role in advanced human life support in a closed habitat. The examples include, but are not limited to, control of purity in drinking water supplies (application of biocides), control of urine in space rodent habitats and operation of space septic tanks (waste management). Our goal is to understand and determine possible mechanisms that describe the process by which cells anchor to a substrate to form dynamic, vibrant communities of cells which influence human health in absence of gravity. The balance of all forces (mechanotransduction) acting on a cell will determine whether a cell thrives and multiplies or dies in a process called apoptosis and/or necrosis. The balance of forces are tightly coupled to the transport of nutrients and metabolic products (biochemotransduction) to and from the cell interface. We will highlight our effort to improve astronaut health by showing that microgravity life support systems have to be designed differently from those on Earth.

  17. Differential expression of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues and cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Weiguo; Fang, Dejian; Ye, Dongping; Zou, Longqiang; Shen, Yan; Dai, Libing; Xu, Jiake

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • ERK5 involved in NP cells. • ERK5 involved in NP tissue. • It was important modulator. - Abstract: Extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and regulates a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, necrosis, apoptosis and degeneration. However, the expression of ERK5 and its role in degenerated human nucleus pulposus (NP) is hitherto unknown. In this study, we observed the differential expression of ERK5 in normal and degenerated human nucleus pulposus tissues by using immunohistochemical staining and Western blot. Treatment of NP cells with Pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α decreased ERK5 gene expression as well as NP marker gene expression; including the type II collagen and aggrecan. Suppression of ERK5 gene expression in NP cells by ERK5 siRNA resulted in decreased gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK5 activation by BIX02188 (5 μM) decreased the gene expression of type II collagen and aggrecan in NP cells. Our results document the expression of ERK5 in degenerated nucleus pulposus tissues, and suggest a potential involvement of ERK5 in human degenerated nucleus pulposus.

  18. Cell sheet-based tissue engineering for fabricating 3-dimensional heart tissues.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    In addition to stem cell biology, tissue engineering is an essential research field for regenerative medicine. In contrast to cell injection, bioengineered tissue transplantation minimizes cell loss and has the potential to repair tissue defects. A popular approach is scaffold-based tissue engineering, which utilizes a biodegradable polymer scaffold for seeding cells; however, new techniques of cell sheet-based tissue engineering have been developed. Cell sheets are harvested from temperature-responsive culture dishes by simply lowering the temperature. Monolayer or stacked cell sheets are transplantable directly onto damaged tissues and cell sheet transplantation has already been clinically applied. Cardiac cell sheet stacking produces pulsatile heart tissue; however, lack of vasculature limits the viable tissue thickness to 3 layers. Multistep transplantation of triple-layer cardiac cell sheets cocultured with endothelial cells has been used to form thick vascularized cardiac tissue in vivo. Furthermore, in vitro functional blood vessel formation within 3-dimensional (3D) tissues has been realized by successfully imitating in vivo conditions. Triple-layer cardiac cell sheets containing endothelial cells were layered on vascular beds and the constructs were media-perfused using novel bioreactor systems. Interestingly, cocultured endothelial cells migrate into the vascular beds and form perfusable blood vessels. An in vitro multistep procedure has also enabled the fabrication of thick, vascularized heart tissues. Cell sheet-based tissue engineering has revealed great potential to fabricate 3D cardiac tissues and should contribute to future treatment of severe heart diseases and human tissue model production.

  19. Multiphoton nanosurgery in cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Anhut, Tiemo; Stracke, Frank; Le Harzic, Ronan; Koenig, Karsten

    2005-04-01

    Multiphoton Microscopy with a femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser in the near infrared (NIR) enables the user not only to image cells and tissues with a subcellular resolution but also to perform highly precise nanosurgery. Intratissue compartments, single cells and even cell organelles like mitochondria, membranes or chromosomes can be manipulated and optically knocked out. Working at transient TW/cm2 laser intensities, single cells of tumor-sphaeroids were eliminated efficiently inside the sphaeroid without damaging the neighbour cells. Also single organelles of cells inside tissues could be optically knocked out with the nanoscalpel without collateral damage. Tissue structures inside a human tooth have been ablated with sizes below 1 μm. This method may become a useful instrument for nano-manipulating and surgery in several fields of science, including targeted transfection.

  20. Counting mycobacteria in infected human cells and mouse tissue: a comparison between qPCR and CFU.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Sharad; Awuh, Jane A; Leversen, Nils Anders; Flo, Trude H; Asjø, Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    Due to the slow growth rate and pathogenicity of mycobacteria, enumeration by traditional reference methods like colony counting is notoriously time-consuming, inconvenient and biohazardous. Thus, novel methods that rapidly and reliably quantify mycobacteria are warranted in experimental models to facilitate basic research, development of vaccines and anti-mycobacterial drugs. In this study we have developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays for simultaneous quantification of mycobacterial and host DNA in infected human macrophage cultures and in mouse tissues. The qPCR method cannot discriminate live from dead bacteria and found a 10- to 100-fold excess of mycobacterial genomes, relative to colony formation. However, good linear correlations were observed between viable colony counts and qPCR results from infected macrophage cultures (Pearson correlation coefficient [r] for M. tuberculosis = 0.82; M. a. avium = 0.95; M. a. paratuberculosis = 0.91). Regression models that predict colony counts from qPCR data in infected macrophages were validated empirically and showed a high degree of agreement with observed counts. Similar correlation results were also obtained in liver and spleen homogenates of M. a. avium infected mice, although the correlations were distinct for the early phase (< day 9 post-infection) and later phase (≥ day 20 post-infection) liver r = 0.94 and r = 0.91; spleen r = 0.91 and r = 0.87, respectively. Interestingly, in the mouse model the number of live bacteria as determined by colony counts constituted a much higher proportion of the total genomic qPCR count in the early phase (geometric mean ratio of 0.37 and 0.34 in spleen and liver, respectively), as compared to later phase of infection (geometric mean ratio of 0.01 in both spleen and liver). Overall, qPCR methods offer advantages in biosafety, time-saving, assay range and reproducibility compared to colony counting. Additionally, the duplex format allows enumeration of

  1. Construction of engineering adipose-like tissue in vivo utilizing human insulin gene-modified umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells with silk fibroin 3D scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Long; Liu, Yi; Hui, Ling

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the use of a combination of human insulin gene-modified umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (hUMSCs) with silk fibroin 3D scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering. In this study hUMSCs were isolated and cultured. HUMSCs infected with Ade-insulin-EGFP were seeded in fibroin 3D scaffolds with uniform 50-60 µm pore size. Silk fibroin scaffolds with untransfected hUMSCs were used as control. They were cultured for 4 days in adipogenic medium and transplanted under the dorsal skins of female Wistar rats after the hUMSCs had been labelled with chloromethylbenzamido-1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (CM-Dil). Macroscopical impression, fluorescence observation, histology and SEM were used for assessment after transplantation at 8 and 12 weeks. Macroscopically, newly formed adipose tissue was observed in the experimental group and control group after 8 and 12 weeks. Fluorescence observation supported that the formed adipose tissue originated from seeded hUMSCs rather than from possible infiltrating perivascular tissue. Oil red O staining of newly formed tissue showed that there was substantially more tissue regeneration in the experimental group than in the control group. SEM showed that experimental group cells had more fat-like cells, whose volume was larger than that of the control group, and degradation of the silk fibroin scaffold was greater under SEM observation. This study provides significant evidence that hUMSCs transfected by adenovirus vector have good compatibility with silk fibroin scaffold, and adenoviral transfection of the human insulin gene can be used for the construction of tissue-engineered adipose.

  2. Microbiota of Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Urbaniak, Camilla; Cummins, Joanne; Brackstone, Muriel; Macklaim, Jean M.; Gloor, Gregory B.; Baban, Chwanrow K.; Scott, Leslie; O'Hanlon, Deidre M.; Burton, Jeremy P.; Francis, Kevin P.; Tangney, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a greater appreciation for the microbes inhabiting human body sites has emerged. In the female mammary gland, milk has been shown to contain bacterial species, ostensibly reaching the ducts from the skin. We decided to investigate whether there is a microbiome within the mammary tissue. Using 16S rRNA sequencing and culture, we analyzed breast tissue from 81 women with and without cancer in Canada and Ireland. A diverse population of bacteria was detected within tissue collected from sites all around the breast in women aged 18 to 90, not all of whom had a history of lactation. The principal phylum was Proteobacteria. The most abundant taxa in the Canadian samples were Bacillus (11.4%), Acinetobacter (10.0%), Enterobacteriaceae (8.3%), Pseudomonas (6.5%), Staphylococcus (6.5%), Propionibacterium (5.8%), Comamonadaceae (5.7%), Gammaproteobacteria (5.0%), and Prevotella (5.0%). In the Irish samples the most abundant taxa were Enterobacteriaceae (30.8%), Staphylococcus (12.7%), Listeria welshimeri (12.1%), Propionibacterium (10.1%), and Pseudomonas (5.3%). None of the subjects had signs or symptoms of infection, but the presence of viable bacteria was confirmed in some samples by culture. The extent to which these organisms play a role in health or disease remains to be determined. PMID:24610844

  3. Comparative expression profiles of mRNAs and microRNAs among human mesenchymal stem cells derived from breast, face, and abdominal adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-Hung; Kao, An-Pei; Singh, Sher; Yu, Sung-Liang; Kao, Li-Pin; Tsai, Zong Yun; Lin, Sin-Daw; Li, Steven Shoei-Lung

    2010-03-01

    We determined the expression of both mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) from human mesenchymal stem cells BM19, FM30, and AM3, which is derived from breast, face, and abdominal adipose tissues, respectively. BM19, FM30, and AM3 cells exhibited considerably similar mRNA profiles, and their 1,038 abundantly common genes were involved in regulating six cell adhesion and three cytoskeleton remodeling processes among the top ten GeneGo canonical pathway maps. The 39 most abundant miRNAs in AM3 cells were expressed at very similar levels in BM19 cells. However, seven abundant miRNAs (miR-19b, miR-320, miR-186, miR-199a, miR-339, miR-99a, and miR-152) in AM3 cells were expressed at much lower levels than that in FM30 cells, and 38 genes targeted by these miRNAs were consequently upregulated more than 3-fold in FM30 cells compared with AM3 cells. Therefore, autologous abdominal adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells are suitable for tissue engineering of breast reconstruction because of very similar expression profiles of mRNAs and miRNAs between AM3 and BM19 cells. Conversely, abdominal AM3 cells might not be suitable for facial rejuvenation, since the 38 highly expressed genes targeted by miRNAs in FM30 cells might play an important role(s) in the development of facial tissue.

  4. Tissue engineering of cementum/periodontal-ligament complex using a novel three-dimensional pellet cultivation system for human periodontal ligament stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenhua; Jin, Fang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ma, Dandan; Han, Chun; Huo, Na; Wang, Yinxiong; Zhang, Yunfei; Lin, Zhu; Jin, Yan

    2009-12-01

    Limitations of conventional regeneration modalities underscore the necessity of recapitulating development for periodontal tissue engineering. In this study, we proposed a novel three-dimensional pellet cultivation system for periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to recreate the biological microenvironment similar to those of a regenerative milieu. Monodispersed human PDLSCs were cultured in medium with ascorbic acid and conditioned medium from developing apical tooth germ cells and were subsequently harvested from culture plate as a contiguous cell sheet with abundant extracellular matrix. The detached cell-matrix membrane spontaneously contracted to produce a single-cell pellet. The PDLSCs embedded within this cell-matrix complex exhibited several phenotypic characteristics of cementoblast lineages, as indicated by upregulated alkaline phosphatase activity, accelerated mineralization, and the expression of bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin genes. When this PDLSC pellets were transplanted into immunocompromised mice, a regular aligned cementum/PDL-like complex was formed. These results suggest that the combination of apical tooth germ cell-conditioned medium and endogenous extracellular matrix could maximally mimic the microenvironment of root/periodontal tissue development and enhance the reconstruction of physiological architecture of a cementum/PDL-like complex in a tissue-mimicking way; on the other hand, such PDLSC pellet may also be a promising alternative to promote periodontal defect repair for future clinical applications.

  5. Gene therapy with human and mouse T-cell receptors mediates cancer regression and targets normal tissues expressing cognate antigen

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laura A.; Morgan, Richard A.; Dudley, Mark E.; Cassard, Lydie; Yang, James C.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Kammula, Udai S.; Royal, Richard E.; Sherry, Richard M.; Wunderlich, John R.; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Schwarz, Susan L.; Cogdill, Alexandria P.; Bishop, Rachel J.; Kim, Hung; Brewer, Carmen C.; Rudy, Susan F.; VanWaes, Carter; Davis, Jeremy L.; Mathur, Aarti; Ripley, Robert T.; Nathan, Debbie A.; Laurencot, Carolyn M.

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy of human cancer using genetically engineered lymphocytes is dependent on the identification of highly reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) with antitumor activity. We immunized transgenic mice and also conducted high-throughput screening of human lymphocytes to generate TCRs highly reactive to melanoma/melanocyte antigens. Genes encoding these TCRs were engineered into retroviral vectors and used to transduce autologous peripheral lymphocytes administered to 36 patients with metastatic melanoma. Transduced patient lymphocytes were CD45RA− and CD45RO+ after ex vivo expansion. After infusion, the persisting cells displayed a CD45RA+ and CD45RO− phenotype. Gene-engineered cells persisted at high levels in the blood of all patients 1 month after treatment, responding patients with higher ex vivo antitumor reactivity than nonresponders. Objective cancer regressions were seen in 30% and 19% of patients who received the human or mouse TCR, respectively. However, patients exhibited destruction of normal melanocytes in the skin, eye, and ear, and sometimes required local steroid administration to treat uveitis and hearing loss. Thus, T cells expressing highly reactive TCRs mediate cancer regression in humans and target rare cognate–antigen-containing cells throughout the body, a finding with important implications for the gene therapy of cancer. This trial was registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as NCI-07-C-0174 and NCI-07-C-0175. PMID:19451549

  6. Osseous differentiation of human fat tissue grafts: From tissue engineering to tissue differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bondarava, Maryna; Cattaneo, Chiara; Ren, Bin; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Jansson, Volkmar; Müller, Peter E.; Betz, Oliver B.

    2017-01-01

    Conventional bone tissue engineering approaches require isolation and in vitro propagation of autologous cells, followed by seeding on a variety of scaffolds. Those protracted procedures impede the clinical applications. Here we report the transdifferentiation of human fat tissue fragments retrieved from subcutaneous fat into tissue with bone characteristics in vitro without prior cell isolation and propagation. 3D collagen-I cultures of human fat tissue were cultivated either in growth medium or in osteogenic medium (OM) with or without addition of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) BMP-2, BMP-7 or BMP-9. Ca2+ depositions were observed after two weeks of osteogenic induction which visibly increased when either type of BMP was added. mRNA levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN) increased when cultured in OM alone but addition of BMP-2, BMP-7 or BMP-9 caused significantly higher expression levels of ALP and OCN. Immunofluorescent staining for OCN, osteopontin and sclerostin supported the observed real-time-PCR data. BMP-9 was the most effective osteogenic inducer in this system. Our findings reveal that tissue regeneration can be remarkably simplified by omitting prior cell isolation and propagation, therefore removing significant obstacles on the way to clinical applications of much needed regeneration treatments. PMID:28054585

  7. Tissue distribution of mucosal antibody-producing cells specific for respiratory syncytial virus in severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mice engrafted with human tonsils.

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, D; Albini, B; Schläpfer, E; Chen, C; Brodsky, L; Ogra, P L

    1991-01-01

    Groups of C.B-17 SCID mice were reconstituted intraperitoneally with human tonsillar mononuclear cells (hu-TMC) from children seropositive for antibody to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and subsequently challenged intraperitoneally with inactivated RSV or sham-immunized. The synthesis and the distribution characteristics of human antibody to RSV in various murine tissues were studied using an enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT). No specific antibody was observed in sham-immunized animals. In contrast, mice engrafted with hu-TMC exhibited the appearance of specific human antibody secreting cells (hu-ASC) after i.p. immunization with inactivated RSV. RSV-specific hu-ASC were detected only in animals engrafted with cells from donors seropositive for antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus. Hu-TMC engrafted mice showed RSV-specific IgM and, in lower numbers, IgG hu-ASC in several tissues including the lungs. Numbers of RSV-specific IgA hu-ASC were low, however, and detected only in the lung. No RSV-specific hu-ASC were detected in the intestine. These data demonstrate for the first time that hu-TMC-SCID chimeras respond to immunization with viral antigen. Furthermore, the results suggest that hu-TMC engraft in lungs but not in the intestinal tissue. PMID:1893614

  8. Characterization of stromal vascular fraction and adipose stem cells from subcutaneous, preperitoneal and visceral morbidly obese human adipose tissue depots

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Karina Ribeiro; Côrtes, Isis; Liechocki, Sally; Carneiro, João Regis Ivar; Souza, Antônio Augusto Peixoto; Borojevic, Radovan; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa Menezes

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives The pathological condition of obesity is accompanied by a dysfunctional adipose tissue. We postulate that subcutaneous, preperitoneal and visceral obese abdominal white adipose tissue depots could have stromal vascular fractions (SVF) with distinct composition and adipose stem cells (ASC) that would differentially account for the pathogenesis of obesity. Methods In order to evaluate the distribution of SVF subpopulations, samples of subcutaneous, preperitoneal and visceral adipose tissues from morbidly obese women (n = 12, BMI: 46.2±5.1 kg/m2) were collected during bariatric surgery, enzymatically digested and analyzed by flow cytometry (n = 12). ASC from all depots were evaluated for morphology, surface expression, ability to accumulate lipid after induction and cytokine secretion (n = 3). Results A high content of preadipocytes was found in the SVF of subcutaneous depot (p = 0.0178). ASC from the three depots had similar fibroblastoid morphology with a homogeneous expression of CD34, CD146, CD105, CD73 and CD90. ASC from the visceral depot secreted the highest levels of IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF (p = 0.0278). Interestingly, preperitoneal ASC under lipid accumulation stimulus showed the lowest levels of all the secreted cytokines, except for adiponectin that was enhanced (p = 0.0278). Conclusions ASC from preperitoneal adipose tissue revealed the less pro-inflammatory properties, although it is an internal adipose depot. Conversely, ASC from visceral adipose tissue are the most pro-inflammatory. Therefore, ASC from subcutaneous, visceral and preperitoneal adipose depots could differentially contribute to the chronic inflammatory scenario of obesity. PMID:28323901

  9. Stem cells, tissue engineering and periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Menicanin, D; Gronthos, S; Bartold, P M

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the clinical utility of stem cells in periodontal regeneration by reviewing relevant literature that assesses the periodontal-regenerative potential of stem cells. We consider and describe the main stem cell populations that have been utilized with regard to periodontal regeneration, including bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and the main dental-derived mesenchymal stem cell populations: periodontal ligament stem cells, dental pulp stem cells, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, stem cells from apical papilla and dental follicle precursor cells. Research into the use of stem cells for tissue regeneration has the potential to significantly influence periodontal treatment strategies in the future.

  10. New application of a subcellular fractionation method to kidney and testis for the determination of conjugated linoleic acid in selected cell organelles of healthy and cancerous human tissues.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kristina; Blaudszun, Jörg; Brunken, Claus; Höpker, Wilhelm-Wolfgang; Tauber, Roland; Steinhart, Hans

    2005-03-01

    To clarify the mechanism of the anticarcinogenic effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), its intracellular distribution needs to be determined. Subcellular fractionation using centrifugation techniques is a method that is frequently used for isolation of cell organelles from different tissues. But as the size and density of the organelles differ, the method needs to be optimised for every type of tissue. The novelty of this study is the application of a subcellular fractionation method to human healthy and cancerous renal and testicular tissue. Separation of total tissue homogenate into nuclei, cytosol, and a mixture of mitochondria and plasma membranes was achieved by differential centrifugation. As mitochondria and plasma membranes seemed to be too similar in size and weight to be separated by differential centrifugation, discontinuous density-gradient centrifugation was carried out successfully. The purity of the subcellular fractions was checked by measuring the activity of marker enzymes. All fractions were highly enriched in their corresponding marker enzyme. However, the nuclear fractions of kidney and renal cell carcinoma were slightly contaminated with mitochondria and plasma membrane fractions of all tissues with lysosomes. The fraction designated the cytosolic fraction contained not only cytosol, but also microsomes and lysosomes. The CLA contents of the subcellular fractions were in the range 0.13-0.37% of total fatty acids and were lowest in the plasma membrane fractions of all types of tissue studied. C16:0, C18:0, C18:1 c9, C18:2 n-6, and C20:4 n-6 were found to be the major fatty acids in all the subcellular fractions studied. However, marked variations in fatty acid content between subcellular fractions and between types of tissue were detectable. Because of these differences between tissues, no general statement on characteristic fatty acid profiles of single subcellular fractions is possible.

  11. [Changes of ultrastructure of the capillary endotheliocytes of ischemized and nonaffected muscular tissue after transplantation of human hemopoietic stem cells of fetal liver in experiment in vivo].

    PubMed

    Saliutin, R V; Zadorozhna, T D; Medvets'kyĭ, E B; Driuk, M F; Petrenko, A Iu

    2010-04-01

    In experiment was investigated ultrastructure of the capillaries endothelial cells and histological peculiarities of muscular tissue on various stages after transplantation of hemopoietic stem cells of fetal liver (HSCFL). There was proved, that in ischemic environment HSCFL stimulate processes of angiogenesis, and in the case of transplantation into intact muscular tissue they are differentiating into the tissue macrophages, not interfering with muscular tissue structure.

  12. Human somatic cells acquire the plasticity to generate embryoid-like metamorphosis via the actin cytoskeleton in injured tissues.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jairo A; Murillo, Mauricio F; Mendoza, Jhonan A; Barreto, Ana M; Poveda, Lina S; Sanchez, Lina K; Poveda, Laura C; Mora, Katherine T

    2016-01-01

    Emergent biological responses develop via unknown processes dependent on physical collision. In hypoxia, when the tissue architecture collapses but the geometric core is stable, actin cytoskeleton filament components emerge, revealing a hidden internal order that identifies how each molecule is reassembled into the original mold, using one common connection, i.e., a fractal self-similarity that guides the system from the beginning in reverse metamorphosis, with spontaneous self-assembly of past forms that mimics an embryoid phenotype. We captured this hidden collective filamentous assemblage in progress: Hypoxic deformed cells enter into intercellular collisions, generate migratory ejected filaments, and produce self-assembly of triangular chiral hexagon complexes; this dynamic geometry guides the microenvironment scaffold in which this biological process is incubated, recapitulating embryonic morphogenesis. In all injured tissues, especially in damaged skeletal (striated) muscle cells, visibly hypertrophic intercalated actin-myosin filaments are organized in zebra stripe pattern along the anterior-posterior axis in the interior of the cell, generating cephalic-caudal polarity segmentation, with a high selective level of immunopositivity for Actin, Alpha Skeletal Muscle antibody and for Neuron-Specific Enolase expression of ectodermal differentiation. The function of actin filaments in emergent responses to tissue injury is to reconstitute, reactivate and orchestrate cellular metamorphosis, involving the re-expression of fetal genes, providing evidence of the reverse flow of genetic information within a biological system. The resultant embryoid phenotype emerges as a microscopic fractal template copy of the organization of the whole body, likely allowing the modification and reprogramming of the phenotype of the tumor in which these structures develop, as well as establishing a reverse primordial microscopic mold to collectively re-form cellular building blocks to

  13. Human somatic cells acquire the plasticity to generate embryoid-like metamorphosis via the actin cytoskeleton in injured tissues

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Jairo A; Murillo, Mauricio F; Mendoza, Jhonan A; Barreto, Ana M; Poveda, Lina S; Sanchez, Lina K; Poveda, Laura C; Mora, Katherine T

    2016-01-01

    Emergent biological responses develop via unknown processes dependent on physical collision. In hypoxia, when the tissue architecture collapses but the geometric core is stable, actin cytoskeleton filament components emerge, revealing a hidden internal order that identifies how each molecule is reassembled into the original mold, using one common connection, i.e., a fractal self-similarity that guides the system from the beginning in reverse metamorphosis, with spontaneous self-assembly of past forms that mimics an embryoid phenotype. We captured this hidden collective filamentous assemblage in progress: Hypoxic deformed cells enter into intercellular collisions, generate migratory ejected filaments, and produce self-assembly of triangular chiral hexagon complexes; this dynamic geometry guides the microenvironment scaffold in which this biological process is incubated, recapitulating embryonic morphogenesis. In all injured tissues, especially in damaged skeletal (striated) muscle cells, visibly hypertrophic intercalated actin-myosin filaments are organized in zebra stripe pattern along the anterior-posterior axis in the interior of the cell, generating cephalic-caudal polarity segmentation, with a high selective level of immunopositivity for Actin, Alpha Skeletal Muscle antibody and for Neuron-Specific Enolase expression of ectodermal differentiation. The function of actin filaments in emergent responses to tissue injury is to reconstitute, reactivate and orchestrate cellular metamorphosis, involving the re-expression of fetal genes, providing evidence of the reverse flow of genetic information within a biological system. The resultant embryoid phenotype emerges as a microscopic fractal template copy of the organization of the whole body, likely allowing the modification and reprogramming of the phenotype of the tumor in which these structures develop, as well as establishing a reverse primordial microscopic mold to collectively re-form cellular building blocks to

  14. Resorbable polymeric scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: the influence of their microstructure on the growth of human osteoblast-like MG 63 cells.

    PubMed

    Pamula, Elzbieta; Filová, Elena; Bacáková, Lucie; Lisá, Vera; Adamczyk, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Degradable three-dimensional porous scaffolds applicable as cell carriers for bone tissue engineering were developed by an innovative solvent casting/particulate leaching technique from poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG). Three types of PLG scaffolds were prepared, and these had the same high porosity (83%) but increasing diameter of the pores (180-200 microm, 250-320 microm, and 400-600 microm) and increasing pore interconnectivity. The colonization of the scaffolds with human osteoblast-like MG 63 cells was then studied in vitro in a conventional static cell culture system. The number of cells growing on the scaffolds on days 1 and 7 after seeding was highest in the material with the largest pore diameter, but on day 15, the differences among the scaffolds disappeared. Confocal microscopy revealed that on day 1 after seeding, the cells penetrated to a depth of 490 +/- 100 microm, 720 +/- 170 microm, and 720 +/- 120 microm into the scaffolds of small, medium, and large pore size, respectively. Incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into newly synthesized DNA and the concentration of vinculin, beta-actin, osteopontin, and osteocalcin in cells on the scaffolds of all pore sizes were similar to the values obtained on standard tissue culture polystyrene, which indicated good biocompatibility of the scaffolds. These results suggest that all scaffolds could serve as good carriers for bone cells, although the quickest colonization with cells was found in the scaffolds with the largest pore diameter from 400 to 600 microm.

  15. Availability of extracellular matrix biopolymers and differentiation state of human mesenchymal stem cells determine tissue-like growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Herklotz, Manuela; Prewitz, Marina C; Bidan, Cécile M; Dunlop, John W C; Fratzl, Peter; Werner, Carsten

    2015-08-01

    To explore the space-filling growth of adherent mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into tissue-like structures in vitro, human bone marrow derived MSC were exposed to fibronectin-coated, millimeter-sized, triangular channels casted in poly(dimethyl siloxane) carriers. The results revealed that the three dimensional (3D) growth of MSC differs in dependence on differentiation status and availability of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins: Massive 3D structure formation was observed for MSC under pro-osteogenic stimulation but not for undifferentiated MSC nor for MSC under pro-adipogenic stimulation; boosting cellular matrix secretion and addition of soluble ECM proteins caused extensive 3D tissue formation of undifferentiated MSC. The reported findings may contribute to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo analyses and guide the application of MSC in tissue replacement approaches.

  16. Human SPF45, a Splicing Factor, Has Limited Expression in Normal Tissues, Is Overexpressed in Many Tumors, and Can Confer a Multidrug-Resistant Phenotype to Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Janardhan; Long, Pandy R.; Shepard, Robert L.; Xia, Xiaoling; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Sandusky, George E.; Perry, William L.; Dantzig, Anne H.; Williamson, Mark; Rolfe, Mark; Moore, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Our effort to identify novel drug-resistant genes in cyclophosphamide-resistant EMT6 mouse mammary tumors led us to the identification of SPF45. Simultaneously, other groups identified SPF45 as a component of the spliceosome that is involved in alternative splicing. We isolated the human homologue and examined the normal human tissue expression, tumor expression, and the phenotype caused by overexpression of human SPF45. Our analyses revealed that SPF45 is expressed in many, but not all, normal tissues tested with predominant expression in normal ductal epithelial cells of the breast, liver, pancreas, and prostate. Our analyses using tissue microarrays and sausages of tumors indicated that SPF45 is highly expressed in numerous carcinomas including bladder, breast, colon, lung, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate. Interestingly, this study revealed that overexpression of SPF45 in HeLa, a cervical carcinoma cell line, resulted in drug resistance to doxorubicin and vincristine, two chemotherapeutic drugs commonly used in cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing tumor overexpression of an alternate splicing factor resulting in drug resistance. PMID:14578179

  17. MicroRNA-1 and microRNA-206 improve differentiation potential of human satellite cells: a novel approach for tissue engineering of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Koning, Merel; Werker, Paul M N; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Bank, Ruud A; Harmsen, Martin C

    2012-05-01

    Innovative strategies based on regenerative medicine, in particular tissue engineering of skeletal muscle, are promising for treatment of patients with skeletal muscle damage. However, the efficiency of satellite cell differentiation in vitro is suboptimal. MicroRNAs are involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. We hypothesized that transient overexpression of microRNA-1 or microRNA-206 enhances the differentiation potential of human satellite cells by downregulation quiescent satellite cell regulators, thereby increasing myogenic regulator factors. To investigate this, we isolated and cultured human satellite cells from muscle biopsies. First, through immunofluorescent analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we showed that in satellite cell cultures, low Pax7 expression is related to high MyoD expression on differentiation, and, subsequently, more extensive sarcomere formation, that is, muscle differentiation, was detected. Second, using qRT-PCR, we showed that microRNA-1 and microRNA-206 are robustly induced in differentiating satellite cells. Finally, a gain-of-function approach was used to investigate microRNA-1 and microRNA-206 potential in human satellite cells to improve differentiation potential. As a proof of concept, this was also investigated in a three-dimensional bioartificial muscle construct. After transfection with microRNA-1, the number of Pax7 expressing cells decreased compared with the microRNA-scrambled control. In differentiated satellite cell cultures transfected with either microRNA-1 or microRNA-206, the number of MyoD expressing cells increased, and α-sarcomeric actin and myosin expression increased compared with microRNA-scrambled control cultures. In addition, in a three-dimensional bioartificial muscle construct, an increase in MyoD expression occurred. Therefore, we conclude that microRNA-1 and microRNA-206 can improve human satellite cell differentiation. It

  18. Suppression of SIK1 by miR-141 in human ovarian cancer cell lines and tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Long; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Liu, Nai-Fu

    2016-06-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), the sixth most common cancer in women worldwide, is the most commonly fatal gynecologic malignancy in developed countries. One of the main reasons for this is that relatively little was known about the molecular events responsible for the development of this highly aggressive disease. In the present study, we demonstrated that salt‑inducible kinase 1 (SIK1; which is also known as MSK/SIK/SNF1LK) was downregulated in ovarian cancer tissue samples. Using HEY ovarian cancer cells, we noted that SIK1 overexpression inhibited proliferation as well as cancer stem cell-associated traits. Silencing SIK1 promoted the proliferation of the EG ovarian cancer cell line. We performed an analysis of potential microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) target sites using three commonly used prediction algorithms: miRanda, TargetScan and PicTar. All three algorithms predicted that miR-141 targets the 3'UTR of SIK1. Subsequent experiments not only confirmed this prediction, but also showed that miR-141 was associated with the progression of this disease. Finally, we found that miR-141 promoted proliferation of EG cells, whereas silencing miR-141 restored SIK1 expression and inhibited the proliferation of the HEY cells. Elucidating the molecular mechanism of ovarian cancer not only enables us to further understand the pathogenesis and progression of the disease, but also provides new targets for effective therapies.

  19. Activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 in macrophages, Caco-2 cells and intact human gut tissue by Maillard reaction products and coffee.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Tanja; Raithel, Martin; Kressel, Jürgen; Münch, Gerald; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2013-06-01

    In addition to direct antioxidative effects, Maillard reaction products (MRPs) could increase the antioxidative capacity of cells through the induction of cytoprotective enzymes. Since many of those enzymes are regulated by the transcription factor Nrf2, the effect of MRPs on nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in macrophages and Caco-2 cells was investigated. Stimulation of both cell types by MRPs showed a concentration-dependent significant increase in nuclear translocation of Nrf2 up to fivefold after short-term (2 h) and up to 50-fold after long-term treatment (24 h). In intact human gut tissue, nuclear translocation of Nrf2 was significantly twofold increased after short-term incubation. To study the activation mechanisms, macrophages and Caco-2 cells were stimulated with MRPs in the presence of catalase, which significantly suppressed Nrf2 activation. Thus, activation was related to extracellular H2O2 continuously formed from MRPs. Short-term incubation with coffee, a MRP-rich beverage, led to a trend towards Nrf2 activation in macrophages, but not in Caco-2 cells or intact human gut tissue. Long-term incubation with coffee (1-4 mg/mL) significantly increased nuclear Nrf2 up to 17-fold. Since raw coffee was inactive under the tested conditions, the effect was related to roasting products. Coffee-induced Nrf2 translocation was, however, only slightly reversed by catalase. Therefore, the Nrf2 activity of coffee can only partially be explained by MRP-induced, H2O2-dependent mechanisms. Thus, it can be concluded that MRPs may increase the antioxidative capacity inside the cell by inducing Nrf2-regulated signalling pathways not only in different cell types, but also in intact gut tissue.

  20. Characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells derived from Wharton's jelly of human umbilical cord and for fabrication of non-scaffold tissue-engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuyun; Hou, Ke Dong; Yuan, Mei; Peng, Jiang; Zhang, Li; Sui, Xiang; Zhao, Bin; Xu, Wenjing; Wang, Aiyuan; Lu, Shibi; Guo, Quanyi

    2014-02-01

    Once cartilage is damaged, it has limited potential for self-repair. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is an effective treatment, but patients may suffer during cartilage harvesting and the donor-site morbidity may accelerate joint degeneration. Using autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived chondrocytes is another selection, while it also causes some injuring. The umbilical cord, an ecto-embryo tissue may be an ideal source of cells, because of its accessibility, abundant resources, painless procedures for harvesting, and lack of ethical issues. We isolated MSCs from Wharton's jelly of human umbilical cord (WMSCs), which expressed CD44, CD105 and CD271 but not CD34 and CD45 with flow cytometry analysis. RT-PCR showed not only positive expression of CD90, c-kit, Sca1, SH2 and SH3 but also positive expression of the chondrocyte markers Sox-9 and Col-2A1. WMSCs cultured in high-density in the presence of transforming growth factor β1 and dexamethasone showed cartilage extracellular matrix-secretion and integrated into a thin piece of cell-based membrane. The cell-based thin membrane cultured in rotary cell culture system formed a round, opaque, glistening non-scaffold cartilage-like tissue, larger and condenser than what was formed with conventional pellet culture. Glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen content significantly increased after 3-week culture. The human WMSCs express characteristics of pre-chondrocytes, low immunogenicity and are easy to be obtained with higher purity because there have no hematopoietic cells in Wharton's jelly, so it may be a new seed cells more suitable for constructing tissue-engineered cartilage.

  1. Identification of human skin from a tissue fragment by detection of squamous cell carcinoma-related antigen using an enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Kitao, T; Miyaishi, S; Yamamoto, Y; Ishizu, H

    1996-12-02

    A new method of identifying human skin from a tissue fragment by detection of squamous cell carcinoma-related (SCC) antigen, using an enzyme immunoassay, was developed. When an extract was prepared from 0.1 g human skin homogenized with 1 ml of phosphate buffered saline, this method was able to detect SCC antigen in extracts diluted 10(2)-fold. There was no difference in the detection limit between individuals. Species specificity was good, and there was no cross reaction observed with skins from animals. Our method could also discriminate between skin and other organs or tissues, except for esophagus and lung. A practical case to which this method was applied is presented.

  2. Three-dimensional bioprinting of multilayered constructs containing human mesenchymal stromal cells for osteochondral tissue regeneration in the rabbit knee joint.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Ki-Mo; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Park, Ju Young; Jung, Hyuntae; Oh, Kyunghoon; Park, Kyeng Min; Yeom, Junseok; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Wang, Joon Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-02-04

    The use of cell-rich hydrogels for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture has shown great potential for a variety of biomedical applications. However, the fabrication of appropriate constructs has been challenging. In this study, we describe a 3D printing process for the preparation of a multilayered 3D construct containing human mesenchymal stromal cells with a hydrogel comprised of atelocollagen and supramolecular hyaluronic acid (HA). This construct showed outstanding regenerative ability for the reconstruction of an osteochondral tissue in the knee joints of rabbits. We found that the use of a mechanically stable, host-guest chemistry-based hydrogel was essential and allowed two different types of extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels to be easily printed and stacked into one multilayered construct without requiring the use of potentially harmful chemical reagents or physical stimuli for post-crosslinking. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to validate the potential of a 3D printed multilayered construct consisting of two different ECM materials (atelocollagen and HA) for heterogeneous tissue regeneration using an in vivo animal model. We believe that this 3D printing-based platform technology can be effectively exploited for regeneration of various heterogeneous tissues as well as osteochondral tissue.

  3. Non-invasive Imaging and Tracking of Engineered Human Muscle Precursor Cells for Skeletal Muscle Tissue Engineering Using Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Haralampieva, Deana; Betzel, Thomas; Dinulovic, Ivana; Salemi, Souzan; Stoelting, Meline; Kraemer, Stefanie; Schibli, Roger; Sulser, Tullio; Handschin, Christoph; Eberli, Daniel; Ametamey, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of human muscle precursor cells (hMPCs) is envisioned for the treatment of various muscle diseases. However, a feasible non-invasive tool to monitor cell survival, migration and integration into the host tissue is still missing. Methods In this study, we designed an adenoviral delivery system to genetically modify hMPCs to express a signaling-deficient form of a human dopamine D2 receptor (hD2R). The gene expression levels of the receptor were evaluated by Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RTPCR) and infection efficiency was visualized by fluorescent microscopy. Viability, proliferation and differentiation capacity of the transduced cells were confirmed and their sustained myogenic phenotype was shown by flow cytometry analysis and fluorescent microscopy. 18F-Fallypride and 18F-FMISO, two well-established PET radioligands, were successfully synthesized and evaluated for their potential to image engineered hMPCs in a mouse model. Furthermore, biodistribution studies and autoradiography were also performed to determine the extent of signal specificity. Results To address the feasibility of the presented approach for tracking of hMPCs in an in vivo model, we first evaluated the safety of the adenoviral gene-delivery, which showed no detrimental effects on the primary human cells. Specific binding of 18F-Fallypride to hD2R_hMPCs was demonstrated in vitro, as well as in vivo, by performing autoradiography, biodistribution and PET experiments, respectively. Furthermore, 18F-FMISO uptake was evaluated at different time-points after cell inoculation in vivo, showing high signal only at the early stages. Finally, histological assessment of the harvested tissues confirmed the sustained survival of the transplanted cells at different time-points with formation of muscle tissue at the site of injection. Conclusion We here propose a signaling-deficient human D2R as a potent reporter for in vivo hMPCs PET tracking by 18F-Fallypride. This approach

  4. Human and Murine Tissue-Engineered Colon Exhibit Diverse Neuronal Subtypes and Can Be Populated by Enteric Nervous System Progenitor Cells When Donor Colon Is Aganglionic

    PubMed Central

    Wieck, Minna M.; El-Nachef, Wael N.; Hou, Xiaogang; Spurrier, Ryan G.; Holoyda, Kathleen A.; Schall, Kathy A.; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Collins, Malie K.; Trecartin, Andrew; Cheng, Zhi; Frykman, Philip K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Tissue-engineered colon (TEC) might potentially replace absent or injured large intestine, but the enteric nervous system (ENS), a key component, has not been investigated. In various enteric neuropathic diseases in which the TEC is derived from aganglionic donor colon, the resulting construct might also be aganglionic, limiting tissue engineering applications in conditions such as Hirschsprung disease (HD). We hypothesized that TEC might contain a diverse population of enteric neuronal subtypes, and that aganglionic TEC can be populated by neurons and glia when supplemented with ENS progenitor cells in the form of neurospheres. Materials and Methods: Human and murine organoid units (OU) and multicellular clusters containing epithelium and mesenchyme were isolated from both mouse and human donor tissues, including from normally innervated and aganglionic colon. The OU were seeded onto a biodegradable scaffold and implanted within a host mouse, resulting in the growth of TEC. Aganglionic murine and human OU were supplemented with cultured neurospheres to populate the absent ENS not provided by the OU to rescue the HD phenotype. Results: TEC demonstrated abundant smooth muscle and clusters of neurons and glia beneath the epithelium and deeper within the mesenchyme. Motor and afferent neuronal subtypes were identified in TEC. Aganglionic OU formed TEC with absent neural elements, but neurons and glia were abundant when aganglionic OU were supplemented with ENS progenitor cells. Conclusion: Murine and human TEC contain key components of the ENS that were not previously identified, including glia, neurons, and fundamental neuronal subtypes. TEC derived from aganglionic colon can be populated with neurons and glia when supplemented with neurospheres. Combining tissue engineering and cellular replacement therapies represents a new strategy for treating enteric neuropathies, particularly HD. PMID:26414777

  5. Hippocampus and epilepsy: findings from human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Huberfeld, Gilles; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Miles, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Surgical removal of the epileptogenic zone provides an effective therapy for several epileptic syndromes. This surgery offers the opportunity to study pathological activity in living human tissue for pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy syndromes including (1) temporal lobe epilepsies with hippocampal sclerosis, (2) cortical dysplasias, (3) epilepsies associated with tumors and (4) developmental malformations. Slices of tissue from patient with these syndromes retain functional neuronal networks and may generate epileptic activities. The properties of cells in this tissue may not be greatly changed, but excitatory synaptic transmission is often enhanced and GABAergic inhibition is preserved. Typically epileptic activity is not generated spontaneously by the neocortex, whether dysplastic or not, but can be induced by convulsants. The initiation of ictal discharges in neocortex depends on both GABAergic signaling and increased extracellular potassium. In contrast, a spontaneous interictal-like activity is generated by tissues from patients with temporal lobe epilepsies associated with hippocampal sclerosis. This activity is initiated, not in the hippocampus but in the subiculum an output region which projects to the entorhinal cortex. Interictal events seem to be triggered by GABAergic cells which paradoxically excite about 20% of subicular pyramidal cells while simultaneously inhibiting the majority. Interictal discharges thus depend on both GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling. The depolarizing effects of GABA depend on a pathological elevation in levels of chloride in some subicular cells, similar to those of developmentally immature cells. Such defect is caused by a perturbed expression of the cotransporters regulating intracellular chloride concentration, the importer NKCC1 and the extruder KCC2. Blockade of NKCC1 actions by the diuretic bumetanide, restores intracellular chloride and thus hyperpolarizing GABAergic actions so suppressing interictal activity. PMID

  6. Human Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells as a Source of Smooth Muscle Cells in the Regeneration of Muscular Layer of Urinary Bladder Wall

    PubMed Central

    SALEM, Salah Abood; HWIE, Angela Ng Min; SAIM, Aminuddin; CHEE KONG, Christopher Ho; SAGAP, Ismail; SINGH, Rajesh; YUSOF, Mohd Reusmaazran; MD ZAINUDDIN, Zulkifili; HJ IDRUS, Ruszymah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adipose tissue provides an abundant source of multipotent cells, which represent a source of cell-based regeneration strategies for urinary bladder smooth muscle repair. Our objective was to confirm that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can be differentiated into smooth muscle cells. Methods: In this study, adipose tissue samples were digested with 0.075% collagenase, and the resulting ADSCs were cultured and expanded in vitro. ADSCs at passage two were differentiated by incubation in smooth muscle inductive media (SMIM) consisting of MCDB I31 medium, 1% FBS, and 100 U/mL heparin for three and six weeks. ADSCs in non-inductive media were used as controls. Characterisation was performed by cell morphology and gene and protein expression. Result: The differentiated cells became elongated and spindle shaped, and towards the end of six weeks, sporadic cell aggregation appeared that is typical of smooth muscle cell culture. Smooth muscle markers (i.e. alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA), calponin, and myosin heavy chain (MHC)) were used to study gene expression. Expression of these genes was detected by PCR after three and six weeks of differentiation. At the protein expression level, ASMA, MHC, and smoothelin were expressed after six weeks of differentiation. However, only ASMA and smoothelin were expressed after three weeks of differentiation. Conclusion: Adipose tissue provides a possible source of smooth muscle precursor cells that possess the potential capability of smooth muscle differentiation. This represents a promising alternative for urinary bladder smooth muscle repair. PMID:24044001

  7. Dinaciclib potently suppresses MCL-1 and selectively induces the cell death in human iPS cells without affecting the viability of cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Alsayegh, Khaled; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Sekine, Hidekazu; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells hold great potential for being a major source of cells for regenerative medicine. One major issue that hinders their advancement to clinic is the persistence of undifferentiated iPS cells in iPS-derived tissue. In this report, we show that the CDKs inhibitor, Dinaciclib, selectively eliminates iPS cells without affecting the viability of cardiac cells. We found that low nanomolar concentration of dinaciclib increased DNA damage and p53 protein levels in iPSCs. This was accompanied by negative regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein MCL-1. Gene knockdown experiments revealed that p53 downregulation only increased the threshold of dinaciclib induced apoptosis in iPS cells. Dinaciclib also inhibited the phosphorylation of Serine 2 of the C-terminal domain of RNA Polyemrase II through CDK9 inhibition. This resulted in the inhibition of transcription of MCL-1 and the pluripotency genes, NANOG and c-MYC. Even though dinaciclib caused a slight downregulation of MCL-1 in iPS-derived cardiac cells, the viability of the cells was not significantly affected, and beating iPS-derived cardiac cell sheet could still be fabricated. These findings suggest a difference in tolerance of MCL-1 downregulation between iPSCs and iPS-derived cardiac cells which could be exploited to eliminate remaining iPS cells in bioengineered cell sheet tissues. PMID:28361959

  8. Age and sex differences in the incorporation of EPA and DHA into plasma fractions, cells and adipose tissue in humans

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Celia G.; Browning, Lucy M.; Mander, Adrian P.; Madden, Jackie; West, Annette L.; Calder, Philip C.; Jebb, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether age and sex influence both the status and the incorporation of EPA and DHA into blood plasma, cells and tissues. The study was a double-blind, randomised, controlled intervention, providing EPA+DHA equivalent to 0, 1, 2 or 4 portions of oily fish per week, for 12 months. Participants were stratified by age and sex. A linear regression model was used to analyse baseline outcomes, with covariates for age or sex groups, and adjusting for BMI. The change from baseline to 12 months in outcome was analysed with additional adjusting of treatment and average compliance. Fatty acid profiles were determined in plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC), cholesteryl esters (CE), NEFA and TAG, mononuclear cells (MNC), erythrocyte membranes (RBC), platelets (PLAT), buccal cells (BU) and adipose tissue (AT). At baseline, EPA concentration in plasma NEFA and DHA concentration in MNC, BU and AT was higher in females than males (all P<0.05). EPA in AT (P=0.003) and DHA in plasma TAG (P<0.01) and AT (P<0.001) were higher with increasing age. Following 12 months supplementation with EPA+DHA, adjusted mean difference for change in EPA in plasma TAG was significantly higher in females than males (P<0.05) and was greater with increasing age (P=0.02). Adjusted mean difference for change in DHA in AT was significantly smaller with increasing age (P=0.02). Although small differences in incorporation with age and sex were identified, these were not of sufficient magnitude to warrant a move away from population-level diet recommendations for n-3 PUFA. PMID:24063767

  9. Age and sex differences in the incorporation of EPA and DHA into plasma fractions, cells and adipose tissue in humans.

    PubMed

    Walker, Celia G; Browning, Lucy M; Mander, Adrian P; Madden, Jackie; West, Annette L; Calder, Philip C; Jebb, Susan A

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether age and sex influence both the status and incorporation of EPA and DHA into blood plasma, cells and tissues. The study was a double-blind, randomised, controlled intervention trial, providing EPA plus DHA equivalent to 0, 1, 2 or 4 portions of oily fish per week for 12 months. The participants were stratified by age and sex. A linear regression model was used to analyse baseline outcomes, with covariates for age or sex groups and by adjusting for BMI. The change in outcomes from baseline to 12 months was analysed with additional adjustment for treatment and average compliance. Fatty acid profiles in plasma phosphatidylcholine, cholesteryl esters, NEFA and TAG, mononuclear cells (MNC), erythrocyte membranes, platelets, buccal cells (BU) and adipose tissue (AT) were determined. At baseline, EPA concentrations in plasma NEFA and DHA concentrations in MNC, BU and AT were higher in females than in males (all P< 0·05). The concentrations of EPA in AT (P= 0·003) and those of DHA in plasma TAG (P< 0·01) and AT (P< 0·001) were higher with increasing age. Following 12-month supplementation with EPA plus DHA, adjusted mean difference for change in EPA concentrations in plasma TAG was significantly higher in females than in males (P< 0·05) and was greater with increasing age (P= 0·02). Adjusted mean difference for change in DHA concentrations in AT was significantly smaller with increasing age (P= 0·02). Although small differences in incorporation with age and sex were identified, these were not of sufficient magnitude to warrant a move away from population-level diet recommendations for n-3 PUFA.

  10. Fcγ receptor antigen targeting potentiates cross-presentation by human blood and lymphoid tissue BDCA-3+ dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Flinsenberg, Thijs W H; Compeer, Ewoud B; Koning, Dan; Klein, Mark; Amelung, Femke J; van Baarle, Debbie; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Boes, Marianne

    2012-12-20

    The reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) poses a serious health threat to immune compromised individuals. As a treatment strategy, dendritic cell (DC) vaccination trials are ongoing. Recent work suggests that BDCA-3(+) (CD141(+)) subset DCs may be particularly effective in DC vaccination trials. BDCA-3(+) DCs had however been mostly characterized for their ability to cross-present antigen from necrotic cells. We here describe our study of human BDCA-3(+) DCs in elicitation of HCMV-specific CD8(+) T-cell clones. We show that Fcgamma-receptor (FcγR) antigen targeting facilitates antigen cross-presentation in several DC subsets, including BDCA-3(+) DCs. FcγR antigen targeting stimulates antigen uptake by BDCA-1(+) rather than BDCA-3(+) DCs. Conversely, BDCA-3(+) DCs and not BDCA-1(+) DCs show improved cross-presentation by FcγR targeting, as measured by induced release of IFNγ and TNF by antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. FcγR-facilitated cross-presentation requires antigen processing in both an acidic endosomal compartment and by the proteasome, and did not induce substantial DC maturation. FcγRII is the most abundantly expressed FcγR on both BDCA-1(+) and BDCA-3(+) DCs. Furthermore we show that BDCA-3(+) DCs express relatively more stimulatory FcγRIIa than inhibitory FcγRIIb in comparison with BDCA-1(+) DCs. These studies support the exploration of FcγR antigen targeting to BDCA-3(+) DCs for human vaccination purposes.

  11. Inhibitor of DNA Binding 4 (ID4) Is Highly Expressed in Human Melanoma Tissues and May Function to Restrict Normal Differentiation of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Yuval; Wu, Hong; Patel, Shayan; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Katz, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma tissues and cell lines are heterogeneous, and include cells with invasive, proliferative, stem cell-like, and differentiated properties. Such heterogeneity likely contributes to the aggressiveness of the disease and resistance to therapy. One model suggests that heterogeneity arises from rare cancer stem cells (CSCs) that produce distinct cancer cell lineages. Another model suggests that heterogeneity arises through reversible cellular plasticity, or phenotype-switching. Recent work indicates that phenotype-switching may include the ability of cancer cells to dedifferentiate to a stem cell-like state. We set out to investigate the phenotype-switching capabilities of melanoma cells, and used unbiased methods to identify genes that may control such switching. We developed a system to reversibly synchronize melanoma cells between 2D-monolayer and 3D-stem cell-like growth states. Melanoma cells maintained in the stem cell-like state showed a striking upregulation of a gene set related to development and neural stem cell biology, which included SRY-box 2 (SOX2) and Inhibitor of DNA Binding 4 (ID4). A gene set related to cancer cell motility and invasiveness was concomitantly downregulated. Intense and pervasive ID4 protein expression was detected in human melanoma tissue samples, suggesting disease relevance for this protein. SiRNA knockdown of ID4 inhibited switching from monolayer to 3D-stem cell-like growth, and instead promoted switching to a highly differentiated, neuronal-like morphology. We suggest that ID4 is upregulated in melanoma as part of a stem cell-like program that facilitates further adaptive plasticity. ID4 may contribute to disease by preventing stem cell-like melanoma cells from progressing to a normal differentiated state. This interpretation is guided by the known role of ID4 as a differentiation inhibitor during normal development. The melanoma stem cell-like state may be protected by factors such as ID4, thereby potentially identifying a

  12. Efficient generation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiac progenitors based on tissue-specific enhanced green fluorescence protein expression.

    PubMed

    Szebényi, Kornélia; Péntek, Adrienn; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Várady, György; Orbán, Tamás I; Sarkadi, Balázs; Apáti, Ágota

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are committed to the cardiac lineage but retain their proliferative capacity before becoming quiescent mature cardiomyocytes (CMs). In medical therapy and research, the use of human pluripotent stem cell-derived CPCs would have several advantages compared with mature CMs, as the progenitors show better engraftment into existing heart tissues, and provide unique potential for cardiovascular developmental as well as for pharmacological studies. Here, we demonstrate that the CAG promoter-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) reporter system enables the identification and isolation of embryonic stem cell-derived CPCs. Tracing of CPCs during differentiation confirmed up-regulation of surface markers, previously described to identify cardiac precursors and early CMs. Isolated CPCs express cardiac lineage-specific transcripts, still have proliferating capacity, and can be re-aggregated into embryoid body-like structures (CAG-EGFP(high) rEBs). Expression of troponin T and NKX2.5 mRNA is up-regulated in long-term cultured CAG-EGFP(high) rEBs, in which more than 90% of the cells become Troponin I positive mature CMs. Moreover, about one third of the CAG-EGFP(high) rEBs show spontaneous contractions. The method described here provides a powerful tool to generate expandable cultures of pure human CPCs that can be used for exploring early markers of the cardiac lineage, as well as for drug screening or tissue engineering applications.

  13. The interaction between a combined knitted silk scaffold and microporous silk sponge with human mesenchymal stem cells for ligament tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haifeng; Fan, Hongbin; Wang, Yue; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James C H

    2008-02-01

    Cell seeding on knitted scaffolds often require a gel system, which was found to be practically unsuitable for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction as the cell-gel composite often gets dislodged from the scaffold in the in vivo dynamic situations. In order to solve this problem, we fabricated this combined silk scaffold with weblike microporous silk sponges formed in the openings of a knitted silk scaffold and subsequently combined with adult human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for in vitro ligament tissue engineering. Human MSCs adhered and grew well on the combined silk scaffolds. Moreover, in comparison with the knitted silk scaffolds seeded with hMSCs in fibroin gel the cellular function was more actively exhibited on the combined silk scaffolds, as evident by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis for ligament-related gene markers (e.g., type I, III collagen and tenascin-C), immunohistochemical and western blot evaluations of ligament-related extracellular matrix (ECM) components. While the knitted structure holds the microporous silk sponges together and provides the structural strength of the combined silk scaffold, the microporous structure of the silk sponges mimic the ECM which consequently promotes cell proliferation, function, and differentiation. This feature overcomes the limitation of knitted scaffold for ligament tissue engineering application.

  14. Enhanced Dentin-Like Mineralized Tissue Formation by AdShh-Transfected Human Dental Pulp Cells and Porous Calcium Phosphate Cement

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Lizhen; Zeng, Deliang; Zhang, Xiuli; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Jiang, Xinquan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) on human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) and the potential of complexes with Shh gene modified hDPCs and porous calcium phosphate cement (CPC) for mineralized tissue formation. hDPCs were cultured and transfected with adenoviral mediated human Shh gene (AdShh). Overexpression of Shh and cell proliferation was tested by real-time PCR analysis, western blotting analysis, and MTT analysis, respectively. The odontoblastic differentiation was assessed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and real-time PCR analysis on markers of Patched-1 (Ptc-1), Smoothened (Smo), Gli 1, Gli 2, Gli 3, osteocalcin (OCN), dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP). Finally, AdShh-transfected hDPCs were combined with porous CPC and placed subcutaneously in nude mice for 8 and 12 weeks, while AdEGFP-transfected and untransfected hDPCs were treated as control groups. Results indicated that Shh could promote proliferation and odontoblastic differentiation of hDPCs, while Shh/Gli 1 signaling pathway played a key role in this process. Importantly, more mineralized tissue formation was observed in combination with AdShh transfected hDPCs and porous CPC, moreover, the mineralized tissue exhibited dentin-like features such as structures similar to dentin-pulp complex and the positive staining for DSPP protein similar to the tooth tissue. These results suggested that the constructs with AdShh-transfected hDPCs and porous CPC might be a better alternative for dental tissue regeneration. PMID:23675415

  15. Human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor-activated cellular functions and signaling pathways in extra-pituitary tissues and cancer cells (Review).

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo; Huerta-Reyes, Maira

    2009-11-01

    Human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) and its natural ligand human gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) were initially described as signaling complexes that play a key role in reproductive functions. By binding to specific receptors present on pituitary gonadotropes, GnRH regulates the sperm and ovum maturation, as well as steroidogenesis within the context of the hypothalamus-hypophysis axis. The expression of GnRH and its receptor has clearly been established in many extra-pituitary organs. Some of them are tumors from non-reproductive tissues such as liver, larynx, pancreas, colon, lymphoma, kidney, skin, blood and brain as well as tissues from reproductive track, for example ovary, endometrium, prostate and breast or tumors derived from these organs. Expression of GnRH and its receptor in these organs has gained much attention and several research groups have established their role during cell proliferation and cell motility. Although the signaling pathways and their effector proteins in these samples remain unclear, the molecular mechanism employed for GnRH and its receptor in extra-pituitary tissues could be related with non-classical GnRHR-signaling pathways. In the present review, we explore the vast literature reported on GnRH and GnRHR principally in tumors, describing how cross-talk between GnRHR and growth factor receptor, the coupling between GnRHR and many G proteins depending on cell context, and the regulation of several proteins associated with cell proliferation and cell motility are employed by GnRHR/GnRH to regulate their extra-pituitary activities.

  16. Delphinidin Reduces Glucose Uptake in Mice Jejunal Tissue and Human Intestinal Cells Lines through FFA1/GPR40.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Teuber, Stefanie; Morera, Francisco J; Ojeda, Camila; Flores, Carlos A; Hidalgo, María A; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos; Burgos, Rafael A

    2017-04-05

    Anthocyanins are pigments with antihyperglycemic properties, and they are potential candidates for developing functional foods for the therapy or prevention of Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The mechanism of these beneficial effect