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Sample records for human cervical squamous

  1. An unexpected reason for elevated human chorionic gonadotropin in a young woman Cervical squamous carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Aynur; Bozdağ, Zehra; Tepe, Neslihan B.; Ozcan, Huseyin C.

    2016-01-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin has been used for decades, in addition to specific investigations, to detect pregnancy, trophoblastic tumors, as well as congenital defects. Rarely, it can be elevated in non-trophoblastic tumors such as squamous cell cancers and germ cell tumors. A 33-year-old Asian Syrian female had irregular menses accompanied with feelings of heaviness in the vagina. In addition to routine investigations, we measured the serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) level (based on the patient’s complaint of amenorrhea), which was 50.05 ml UI/ml. Cervical biopsy revealed a non-keratinized large cell squamous carcinoma. After excluding other causes, ß-hCG elevation was explained by the ectopic secretion of cancer cells line. Cervical biopsy was suggestive of large cell non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma and positive for human chorionic gonadotropin on immunohistochemistry. As a result, we manage the possibility of ectopic secretion of ß-HCG from non- trophoblastic disease. PMID:27464870

  2. An unexpected reason for elevated human chorionic gonadotropin in a young woman. Cervical squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Aynur; Bozdag, Zehra; Tepe, Neslihan B; Ozcan, Husiyen C

    2016-08-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin has been used for decades, in addition to specific investigations, to detect pregnancy, trophoblastic tumors, as well as congenital defects. Rarely, it can be elevated in  non-trophoblastic tumors such as squamous cell cancers and germ cell tumors. A 33-year-old Asian Syrian female had irregular menses accompanied with feelings of heaviness in the vagina. In addition to routine investigations, we measured the serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) level (based on the patient's complaint of amenorrhea), which was 50.05 ml UI/ml. Cervical biopsy revealed a non-keratinized large cell squamous carcinoma. After excluding other causes, ß-hCG elevation was explained by the ectopic secretion of cancer cells line. Cervical biopsy was suggestive of large cell non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma and positive for human chorionic gonadotropin on immunohistochemistry. As a result, we manage the possibility of ectopic secretion of ß-HCG from non- trophoblastic disease. PMID:27464870

  3. RNA interference targeting CD147 inhibits the invasion of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells by downregulating MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaobin; Wu, Weiguang; Shi, Haixia; Han, Jianqiu

    2013-07-01

    Cervical squamous carcinoma is a highly invasive tumour that has a great capacity to metastasise. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN or CD147), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is a widely distributed cell surface glycoprotein. It is highly expressed on malignant tumour cell surfaces, including human cervical squamous carcinoma. It also plays a critical role in the invasive and metastatic activity of malignant cells by stimulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The anti-invasive effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against CD147 on human cervical squamous carcinoma cells and its possible pathways has been investigated. The downregulation of CD147 by transfection with siRNA resulted in MMP-9 expression and decreased activity in the cervical squamous carcinoma cell line SiHa. In vitro analysis showed that the invasive capacity of SiHa cells decreased. Thus CD147 inhibition and subsequent MMP-9 deletion may have anti-tumour effects by inhibiting the invasiveness of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells.

  4. Human papilloma virus genotypes in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Cervantes, Laura; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Rojas-García, Aurora Elizabeth; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia Socorro; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; León, David Cantú-De; Hernández, Yael Yvette Bernal; Jáuregui-Martínez, Armando; Medina-Díaz, Irma Martha

    2016-01-01

    Objective In Mexico cervical cancer (CC) is the most common cause of death from neoplasia in women. Study aimed to analyze the current distribution of Human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and Cervical cancer (CC). Methodology Between January 2011 and July 2013, cervical samples were collected from female residents of the Mexican state of Nayarit and were analyzed by means of a LINEAR ARRAY® HPV genotyping test. Data analyses were performed using Stata ver. 8.0 statistical software. Results Of the samples analyzed, 91.2%, HPV DNA was detected. Of these positive samples, 82% were High-risk (HR) viral types. The most prevalent HPV genotypes identified were 16, 58, 31, 18, and 70. Forty two percent of participants had a single infection, while 23 and 26% of participants were infected with two or more HPV genotypes, respectively. HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype identified and was frequently present as a co-infection with HPV types 18, 51, 52, 59, 66, or 70. Conclusion Women <20 years of age were most often infected with HPV, and the HPV Quadrivalent vaccine (types 16, 18, 6, and 11), currently available in Mexico, no confers protection against a subset of the HPV genotypes identified in the present study (58, 31, 70, and 35). Thus, it is important evaluate the geographical distribution of specific HPV genotypes in all health of center across Mexico in order to implement a successful vaccination program and to diagnose CC in its early stages. PMID:27610056

  5. Human papilloma virus genotypes in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Cervantes, Laura; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Rojas-García, Aurora Elizabeth; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia Socorro; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; León, David Cantú-De; Hernández, Yael Yvette Bernal; Jáuregui-Martínez, Armando; Medina-Díaz, Irma Martha

    2016-01-01

    Objective In Mexico cervical cancer (CC) is the most common cause of death from neoplasia in women. Study aimed to analyze the current distribution of Human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and Cervical cancer (CC). Methodology Between January 2011 and July 2013, cervical samples were collected from female residents of the Mexican state of Nayarit and were analyzed by means of a LINEAR ARRAY® HPV genotyping test. Data analyses were performed using Stata ver. 8.0 statistical software. Results Of the samples analyzed, 91.2%, HPV DNA was detected. Of these positive samples, 82% were High-risk (HR) viral types. The most prevalent HPV genotypes identified were 16, 58, 31, 18, and 70. Forty two percent of participants had a single infection, while 23 and 26% of participants were infected with two or more HPV genotypes, respectively. HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype identified and was frequently present as a co-infection with HPV types 18, 51, 52, 59, 66, or 70. Conclusion Women <20 years of age were most often infected with HPV, and the HPV Quadrivalent vaccine (types 16, 18, 6, and 11), currently available in Mexico, no confers protection against a subset of the HPV genotypes identified in the present study (58, 31, 70, and 35). Thus, it is important evaluate the geographical distribution of specific HPV genotypes in all health of center across Mexico in order to implement a successful vaccination program and to diagnose CC in its early stages.

  6. Identification of high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV)-associated genes in early stage cervical squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Liu, Y; Liu, C-B; Ling, Z-Q

    2011-01-01

    This retrospective study investigated gene expression in tumour samples from 38 patients with early stage human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of viral markers of HPV16 or HPV18 infection. Gene expression profiles of tumour samples and the corresponding normal cervical epithelium were analysed using cDNA microarrays. Several genes showed differential expression between the two groups of HPV-infected CSCC patients, although seven genes showed similar changes in both groups. The four genes encoding cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A, matrix metallopeptidase 9, laminin γ-1, and epidermal growth factor receptor were up-regulated, and the three genes encoding transforming growth factor β receptor 1, interleukin-1α and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 6 were down-regulated, in both HPV16(+) and HPV18(+) CSCC. These proteins are involved in cell proliferation, cell structure and cell attachment, so their expression might be involved in the mechanism of HPV-induced carcino genesis. A clearer understanding of HPV type-specific gene expression might aid diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Human Papilloma Virus Persistence after Cone Excision in Women with Cervical High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pirtea, Laurențiu; Grigoraş, Dorin; Matusz, Petru; Pirtea, Marilena; Moleriu, Lavinia; Tudor, Anca; Ilina, Răzvan; Secoşan, Cristina; Mazilu, Octavian

    2016-01-01

    Background. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a necessary event in cervical cancer tumorigenesis. Our objectives were to estimate the rate of HPV infection persistence after large loop excision of the transformation zone (LEEP) in patients with high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and to investigate if HPV persistence is type related. Methods. We conducted a prospective study on 89 patients with HSIL treated with LEEP. DNA HPV was performed before surgery and at 6, 12, and 18 months after LEEP. Results. Four patients were excluded from the study. The HPV persistence in the remaining 85 patients was 32.95% (6 months), 14.12% (12 months), and 10.59% (18 months). Type 16 had the highest persistence rate, 23.5% (6 months), 11.8% (12 months), and 8.2% (18 months). Coinfection was found to be 54.12% before LEEP and 18.8% (6 months), 4.7% (12 months), and 3.5% (18 months) after LEEP. The rate of coinfections including type 16 was 46.83% of all coinfections. Coinfection including type 16 was not correlated with higher persistence rate compared to infection with type 16 only. Conclusions. HPV infection is not completely eradicated by LEEP in patients with HSIL lesion on PAP smear. HPV persistence after LEEP is influenced by HPV type. HPV type 16 has the highest persistence rate. PMID:27366164

  8. Correlation of p16INK4a immunoexpression and human papillomavirus (HPV) detected by in-situ hybridization in cervical squamous neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Cheah, P L; Koh, C C; Nazarina, A R; Teoh, K H; Looi, L M

    2016-04-01

    Persistence and eventual integration of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) into the cervical cell is crucial to the progression of cervical neoplasia and it would be beneficial to morphologically identify this transformation in routine surgical pathology practice. Increased p16(INK4a) (p16) expression is a downstream event following HPV E7 binding to pRB. A study was conducted to assess the correlation between hrHPV detection using a commercial in-situ hybridization assay (Ventana INFORM HPV ISH) and p16 immunoexpression (CINtec Histology Kit) in cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions and squamous carcinoma. 27 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 21 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and 51 squamous carcinoma (SCC) were interrogated. hrHPV was significantly more frequent in HSIL (76.2%) and SCC (88.2%) compared to LSIL(37.0%). p16 expression was similarly more frequent in HSIL (95.2%) and SCC (90.2%) compared to LSIL(3.7%). That the rates of hrHPV when compared with p16 expression were almost equivalent in HSIL and SCC while p16 was expressed in only 1 of the 10 LSIL with hrHPV, are expected considering the likelihood that transformation has occurred in HSIL and SCC but does not occur in majority of LSIL. PMID:27126662

  9. Correlation of p16INK4a immunoexpression and human papillomavirus (HPV) detected by in-situ hybridization in cervical squamous neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Cheah, P L; Koh, C C; Nazarina, A R; Teoh, K H; Looi, L M

    2016-04-01

    Persistence and eventual integration of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) into the cervical cell is crucial to the progression of cervical neoplasia and it would be beneficial to morphologically identify this transformation in routine surgical pathology practice. Increased p16(INK4a) (p16) expression is a downstream event following HPV E7 binding to pRB. A study was conducted to assess the correlation between hrHPV detection using a commercial in-situ hybridization assay (Ventana INFORM HPV ISH) and p16 immunoexpression (CINtec Histology Kit) in cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions and squamous carcinoma. 27 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 21 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and 51 squamous carcinoma (SCC) were interrogated. hrHPV was significantly more frequent in HSIL (76.2%) and SCC (88.2%) compared to LSIL(37.0%). p16 expression was similarly more frequent in HSIL (95.2%) and SCC (90.2%) compared to LSIL(3.7%). That the rates of hrHPV when compared with p16 expression were almost equivalent in HSIL and SCC while p16 was expressed in only 1 of the 10 LSIL with hrHPV, are expected considering the likelihood that transformation has occurred in HSIL and SCC but does not occur in majority of LSIL.

  10. Nanomechanical clues from morphologically normal cervical squamous cells could improve cervical cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Li; Feng, Jiantao; Sun, Quanmei; Liu, Jing; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jing; Ao, Zhuo; You, Ke; Guo, Yanli; Liao, Fulong; Zhang, Youyi; Guo, Hongyan; Han, Jinsong; Xiong, Guangwu; Zhang, Lufang; Han, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis.Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03662c

  11. Roles of galectin-7 and S100A9 in cervical squamous carcinoma: Clinicopathological and in vitro evidence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Wu, Tian-Cong; Chen, Wei-Qiong; Zhou, Li-Jun; Wu, Yue; Zeng, Liang; Pei, Hai-Ping

    2013-03-01

    In our study, we for the first time assessed the association of galectin-7 and S100A9 with clinicopathological variables and survival outcomes in cervical squamous carcinoma patients and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms in cervical squamous carcinoma cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis of 243 patient samples showed that the positive staining rate for galectin-7 and S100A9 gradually decreased from normal cervical tissue to intraepithelial neoplasia and to cervical squamous carcinoma. Both galectin-7 and S100A9 showed significant negative association with lymph node metastasis and staging of cervical squamous carcinoma. Cervical squamous carcinoma patients with negative staining of galectin-7 or S100A9 showed significantly lower 5-year overall survival rate than those with positive staining. Multivariate analysis with the Cox's proportional hazards model indicated that both galectin-7 and S100A9 had significant protective effect on cervical squamous carcinoma patients. Subsequent in vitro study in SiHa and C-33A human cervical squamous carcinoma cell lines revealed that knocking down galectin-7 or S100A9 enhanced tumor cell invasion and tumor cell viability against paclitaxel-induced apoptotic stress, likely through increasing the matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and activating the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway, respectively. Knocking down both galectin-7 and S100A9 produced a synergistic effect, with galectin-7 displaying more significant and consistent protective effects than S100A9 on cervical squamous carcinoma cells. In summary, our study for the first time provides clinicopathological and in vitro evidence showing that both galectin-7 and S100A9 play important protective roles in cervical squamous carcinoma, which provides fresh insights into the biology of cervical squamous carcinoma.

  12. EGFR Promoter Methylation, EGFR Mutation, and HPV Infection in Chinese Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Yinghao; Yu, Qingmiao; Qiang, Shaoying; Liang, Ping; Gao, Yane; Zhao, Xingye; Liu, Wenchao; Zhang, Ju

    2015-10-01

    Therapy strategy toward epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibition in cervical cancer has been ongoing. EGFR promoter methylation status and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor-sensitive mutations in cervical cancer may be significant for clinical outcome prediction using anti-EGFR treatment. In this study, EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor-sensitive mutations, EGFR exons 18, 19, and 21 mutations, were detected by sequencing in a total of 293 Chinese cervical squamous cell carcinoma tissue samples. EGFR promoter methylation status was detected by an EGFR asymmetric PCR and hybridization-fluorescence polarization assay and sequencing in 293 Chinese cervical squamous cell carcinoma tissue samples. High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in 293 Chinese cervical squamous cell carcinoma tissue samples were detected by an asymmetric GP5+/6+ PCR and hybridization-fluorescence polarization assay. No EGFR exons 18, 19, and 21 mutations were detected, EGFR promoter methylation status was identified in 98 samples, and HPV 16 infection was the first frequent HPV genotype. The methylated EGFR promoter was identified most frequently in cervical squamous cell carcinoma samples with HPV 16 infection (53.4%). Statistical significant difference of EGFR promoter methylation prevalence was found between HPV 16 and other HPV genotypes (P<0.01). This study suggested that there was no EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor-sensitive mutation in EGFR exons 18, 19, and 21 in Chinese cervical squamous cell carcinoma tissue samples. EGFR promoter methylation was common and it might be associated with HPV 16 infection in Chinese cervical squamous cell carcinoma. The results provided a novel understanding and an applicable pharmacogenomic tool for individualized management of cervical cancer patients.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of human papillomavirus genotype in women with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and cervical cancer: will a quadrivalent vaccine be necessary in Thailand?

    PubMed

    Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Pairoj, Wantanich; Saekang, Nipa; Pombubpha, Hiranyaratsami; Srichunrasami, Chutatip; Pongtippan, Atcharaporn; Junyangdikul, Pairoj; Chantratita, Wasun

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes among a group of patients with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) or worse cytology. Consequently, the genotype-specific HPV infection in a group of HSIL and invasive cervical cancer (ICC) samples was described. Specimens were collected prospectively from 132 women referred for colposcopic examination. All the women underwent Papanicolaou (Pap) smears and colposcopies and some also underwent cervical excision procedure biopsy. The HPV genotype was determined using the INNO-LiPA assay. Among the 132 genotyped samples, 90.91% (120/132) were diagnosed HSIL, whereas 9.09% (12/132) were ICC. From the overall prevalence of HPV in the patients, 77.27% (102/132) and 22.72% (30/132) of cases had single and multiple genotype infections, respectively. The most common cases with statistical significance were high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) infections in 128 samples (96.97%), whereas, four individuals (3.03%) barely were low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) infected, P < 0.0001, χ(2). The most prevalent genotypes were frequently HPV-16 (65/167; 38.92%, followed by HPV-58 (25/167; 14.97%), HPV-18 (18/167; 10.78%), HPV-33 (13/167; 7.19%), and HPV-68 (11/167; 6.59%). In addition, HPV-11 (2/132; 1.51%) and HPV-6 (1/132; 0.76%) also were observed in this study, which confirmed the high distribution of HR-HPV among women with HSIL and ICC. HPV-58; a unique high-risk HPV, is prevalent in a group of HSIL and ICC cases. These data also contribute evidence that HPV-16, -18, -58, -33, and -68 genotypes are high-risk and high distribution among women with HSIL and ICC. Therefore, HPV-58, HPV-33, and HPV-68 should be considered for development of the next vaccine generation in Thailand.

  14. Frequency of Human Papillumavirus among Women with High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions and Invasive Cervical Cancer Attending Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences Clinics, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    KHODAKARAMI, Nahid; MORADI, Afshin; MIRZAEI, Hamidreza; FARZANEH, Farah; YAVARI, Parvin; AKBARI, Mohamad Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The previous studies reported some information about prevalence release of high-risk HPV types in HSIL or cervical cancer globally and in Iran, however, this information is not enough for final judgment about vaccination against HPV or any screening program. The aim of the present study was to assess the HPV type distribution in HSIL and ICC specimens of women attending Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences teaching hospitals, Tehran, Iran for treatment during 10 years. Methods This retrospective- descriptive study evaluated the HPV type distribution of pathologic specimens of Iranian women with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) and high-grade squamous cell intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Formalin-fixed tumor biopsies that were retrieved from women presenting with histological confirmation for ICC and 17 pathologic confirmation for HSIL specimens. Results The most frequently identified HPV type 16 among both groups, women with invasive cervical cancer (4-2.18%) and women with High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion (29.41%), followed by HPV18, HPV31 and 26. HPV16 and / or 18 accounted for 82.2% of all infected samples. Conclusion The dominance of HPV16 over other high-risk types might be even higher than in a region with low HPV exposure. However, there was no strong evidence for any judgment that show to the policy makers; which one is cost-effectiveness and feasibility for cervical cancer prevention in Iran, vaccination, screening or both? More population based study and national meta-analysis needed for better understanding of HPV prevalence and HPV DNA patterns in Iran. PMID:26060725

  15. MMP-9 expression increases according to the grade of squamous intraepithelial lesion in cervical smears.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Erika R; Zonta, Marco A; Discacciati, Michelle G; Paruci, Priscila; Velame, Fernanda; Cardeal, Laura B S; Barros, Silvia B M; Pignatari, Antonio C; Maria-Engler, Silvya S

    2014-10-01

    Studies about cervical carcinogenesis have demonstrated the increased expression of matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) according to the grade of cervical intraepithelial lesions. Considering the importance of innovative techniques to introduce noninvasive and rapid diagnoses for patients, this study aimed to perform MMP-9 immunocytochemistry in cervical smears according to the cytopathological diagnoses, in order to monitor MMP activity in cervical smears. This cross-sectional study investigated the expression of MMP-9 in normal cervical smears, inflammatory cervical smears, squamous intraepithelial lesions, and cervical carcinoma. Cervical smears from 630 women were collected for cytopathological diagnoses and immunocytochemistry. Women with squamous intraepithelial lesions showed an increase in MMP-9 expression, with moderate to intense staining occurring with increasing cervical lesion grade. The prevalence of moderate to intense MMP-9 staining was 9% in normal cervical smears, 12% in cervical inflammation, 24% in low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), 92% in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and 100% in cervical carcinoma cases. In the specific case of LSIL, we found that association with MMP-9 is more evident when there is the simultaneous presence of an infectious agent. Thus, the expression of MMP-9 in cervical smears increases according to the grade of cervical lesion and LSIL in the presence of infectious agents showed higher MMP-9 expression than women with LSIL without infectious agents.

  16. The role of globular heads of the C1q receptor in HPV 16 E2-induced human cervical squamous carcinoma cell apoptosis is associated with p38 MAPK/JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16) E2 protein is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein. HPV 16 E2 regulates many biological responses, including DNA replication, gene expression, and apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among the receptor for globular heads of the human C1q (gC1qR) gene expression, HPV 16 E2 transfection and apoptosis regulation in human cervical squamous carcinoma cells (C33a and SiHa). Methods gC1qR expression was examined in C33a and SiHa cells using real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Apoptosis of C33a and SiHa cells was assessed by flow cytometry. C33a and SiHa cell viability, migration and proliferation were detected using the water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-1) assay, a transwell assay and 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA (3H-TdR), respectively. Results C33a and SiHa cells that were transfected with a vector encoding HPV 16 E2 displayed significantly increased gC1qR gene expression and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK)/ c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation as well as up-regulation of cellular apoptosis, which was abrogated by the addition of gC1qR small interfering RNA (siRNA). Furthermore, the changes in C33a and SiHa cell viability, migration and proliferation that were observed upon HPV 16 E2 transfection were abrogated by SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) or SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) treatment. Conclusion These data support a mechanism whereby HPV 16 E2 induces apoptosis by silencing the gC1qR gene or inhibiting p38 MAPK/JNK signalling in cervical squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:23651874

  17. Detection of Merkel cell polyomavirus in cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas from Japanese patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was identified originally in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare form of human skin neuroendocrine carcinoma. Evidence of MCPyV existence in other forms of malignancy such as cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) is growing. Cervical cancers became the focus of our interest in searching for potentially MCPyV-related tumors because: (i) the major histological type of cervical cancer is the SCC; (ii) the uterine cervix is a common site of neuroendocrine carcinomas histologically similar to MCCs; and (iii) MCPyV might be transmitted during sexual interaction as demonstrated for human papillomavirus (HPV). In this study, we aimed to clarify the possible presence of MCPyV in cervical SCCs from Japanese patients. Cervical adenocarcinomas (ACs) were also studied. Results Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 48 cervical SCCs and 16 cervical ACs were examined for the presence of the MCPyV genome by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analyses. PCR analysis revealed that 9/48 cervical SCCs (19%) and 4/16 cervical ACs (25%) were positive for MCPyV DNA. MCPyV-specific PCR products were sequenced to compare them with reference sequences. The nucleotide sequences in the MCPyV large T (LT)-sequenced region were the same among MCPyV-positive cervical SCCs and AC. Conversely, in the MCPyV viral protein 1 (VP1)-sequenced region, two cervical SCCs and three cervical ACs showed several nucleotide substitutions, of which three caused amino acid substitutions. These sequencing results suggested that three MCPyV variants of the VP1 were identified in our cases. Immunohistochemistry showed that the LT antigen was expressed in tumor cells in MCPyV-positive samples. Genotyping of human HPV in the MCPyV-positive samples revealed that infected HPVs were HPV types 16, 31 and 58 for SCCs and HPV types 16 and 18 for ACs. Conclusions This study provides the first observation that MCPyV coexists in a subset of HPV

  18. Association of human papillomavirus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis co-infections on the risk of high-grade squamous intraepithelial cervical lesion.

    PubMed

    de Abreu, André Lp; Malaguti, Natália; Souza, Raquel P; Uchimura, Nelson S; Ferreira, Érika C; Pereira, Monalisa W; Carvalho, Maria Db; Pelloso, Sandra M; Bonini, Marcelo G; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia El

    2016-01-01

    The link between high-risk human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the risk of developing cervical cancer still unclear. Thus, in this report we investigated the rates of co-infections between HPV and other important non-HPV STDs in different cervical findings using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) to simultaneously detect Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, HSV-1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum. A total of 838 women aged 18 to 68 years were screened using Papanicolaou smears for cervical abnormalities, HPV and non-HPV STDs using PCR and M-PCR methods. A total of 614 (73.3%) of the women had normal cytology (NILM) and 224 (26.7%) women exhibited abnormal cytology (≥ ASC-US). HPV-DNA prevalence was 33.9%, and HPV-16 was the most prevalent genotype in women with NILM and ≥ ASC-US cytology. Non-HPV STDs were detected in 30.4% women and T. vaginalis was the most prevalent one (11.6%). A higher increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL occurred in co-infections of HR-HPV with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with HSV-2 exhibited a similar increased risk but only with ≥ ASC-US. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with T. vaginalis demonstrated a similar increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL. We found that C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae were the primary pathogens associated with HR-HPV for the increased risk for all grades of cervical abnormalities but mainly for HSIL, suggesting a possible synergistic action in cervical lesions progression. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that some non-HPV STDs might play a role as co-factors in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis. These data improve our understanding of the etiology of SCC and may also be useful for disease prevention. PMID:27429850

  19. Association of human papillomavirus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis co-infections on the risk of high-grade squamous intraepithelial cervical lesion.

    PubMed

    de Abreu, André Lp; Malaguti, Natália; Souza, Raquel P; Uchimura, Nelson S; Ferreira, Érika C; Pereira, Monalisa W; Carvalho, Maria Db; Pelloso, Sandra M; Bonini, Marcelo G; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia El

    2016-01-01

    The link between high-risk human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the risk of developing cervical cancer still unclear. Thus, in this report we investigated the rates of co-infections between HPV and other important non-HPV STDs in different cervical findings using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) to simultaneously detect Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, HSV-1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum. A total of 838 women aged 18 to 68 years were screened using Papanicolaou smears for cervical abnormalities, HPV and non-HPV STDs using PCR and M-PCR methods. A total of 614 (73.3%) of the women had normal cytology (NILM) and 224 (26.7%) women exhibited abnormal cytology (≥ ASC-US). HPV-DNA prevalence was 33.9%, and HPV-16 was the most prevalent genotype in women with NILM and ≥ ASC-US cytology. Non-HPV STDs were detected in 30.4% women and T. vaginalis was the most prevalent one (11.6%). A higher increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL occurred in co-infections of HR-HPV with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with HSV-2 exhibited a similar increased risk but only with ≥ ASC-US. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with T. vaginalis demonstrated a similar increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL. We found that C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae were the primary pathogens associated with HR-HPV for the increased risk for all grades of cervical abnormalities but mainly for HSIL, suggesting a possible synergistic action in cervical lesions progression. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that some non-HPV STDs might play a role as co-factors in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis. These data improve our understanding of the etiology of SCC and may also be useful for disease prevention.

  20. Association of human papillomavirus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis co-infections on the risk of high-grade squamous intraepithelial cervical lesion

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, André LP; Malaguti, Natália; Souza, Raquel P; Uchimura, Nelson S; Ferreira, Érika C; Pereira, Monalisa W; Carvalho, Maria DB; Pelloso, Sandra M; Bonini, Marcelo G; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia EL

    2016-01-01

    The link between high-risk human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the risk of developing cervical cancer still unclear. Thus, in this report we investigated the rates of co-infections between HPV and other important non-HPV STDs in different cervical findings using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) to simultaneously detect Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, HSV-1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum. A total of 838 women aged 18 to 68 years were screened using Papanicolaou smears for cervical abnormalities, HPV and non-HPV STDs using PCR and M-PCR methods. A total of 614 (73.3%) of the women had normal cytology (NILM) and 224 (26.7%) women exhibited abnormal cytology (≥ ASC-US). HPV-DNA prevalence was 33.9%, and HPV-16 was the most prevalent genotype in women with NILM and ≥ ASC-US cytology. Non-HPV STDs were detected in 30.4% women and T. vaginalis was the most prevalent one (11.6%). A higher increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL occurred in co-infections of HR-HPV with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with HSV-2 exhibited a similar increased risk but only with ≥ ASC-US. Co-infections of HPV-DNA and HR-HPV with T. vaginalis demonstrated a similar increased risk of ≥ ASC-US and HSIL. We found that C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae were the primary pathogens associated with HR-HPV for the increased risk for all grades of cervical abnormalities but mainly for HSIL, suggesting a possible synergistic action in cervical lesions progression. Our results reinforce the hypothesis that some non-HPV STDs might play a role as co-factors in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis. These data improve our understanding of the etiology of SCC and may also be useful for disease prevention. PMID:27429850

  1. Human papillomavirus in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Loke, S L; Ma, L; Wong, M; Srivastava, G; Lo, I; Bird, C C

    1990-01-01

    Thirty seven cases of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma were studied by applying DNA slot blot analysis and in situ hybridisation using type specific probes for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18. Cases of condyloma accuminata, cervical carcinoma, and laryngeal papilloma were used as controls. Blocks including areas of invasive carcinoma, intraepithelial neoplasia, and normal epithelium were studied in each case. No HPV genome was detectable in any of the oesophageal cases. It is concluded that these types of HPV do not have an association with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Images PMID:2175754

  2. TERT promoter hot spot mutations are frequent in Indian cervical and oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Vilvanathan; Arunkumar, Ganesan; Revathidevi, Sundaramoorthy; Arun, Kanagaraj; Manikandan, Mayakannan; Rao, Arunagiri Kuha Deva Magendhra; Rajkumar, Kottayasamy Seenivasagam; Ajay, Chandrasekar; Rajaraman, Ramamurthy; Ramani, Rajendren; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix and oral cavity are most common cancers in India. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) overexpression is one of the hallmarks for cancer, and activation through promoter mutation C228T and C250T has been reported in variety of tumors and often shown to be associated with aggressive tumors. In the present study, we analyzed these two hot spot mutations in 181 primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity by direct DNA sequencing and correlated with patient's clinicopathological characteristics. We found relatively high frequency of TERT hot spot mutations in both cervical [21.4 % (30/140)] and oral [31.7 % (13/41)] squamous cell carcinomas. In cervical cancer, TERT promoter mutations were more prevalent (25 %) in human papilloma virus (HPV)-negative cases compared to HPV-positive cases (20.6 %), and both TERT promoter mutation and HPV infection were more commonly observed in advanced stage tumors (77 %). Similarly, the poor and moderately differentiated tumors of the uterine cervix had both the TERT hot spot mutations and HPV (16 and 18) at higher frequency (95.7 %). Interestingly, we observed eight homozygous mutations (six 228TT and two 250TT) only in cervical tumors, and all of them were found to be positive for high-risk HPV. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study from India reporting high prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity. Our results suggest that TERT reactivation through promoter mutation either alone or in association with the HPV oncogenes (E6 and E7) could play an important role in the carcinogenesis of cervical and oral cancers. PMID:26700669

  3. The landscape of alternative splicing in cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peng; Wang, Dan; Wu, Jun; Yang, Junjun; Ren, Tong; Zhu, Baoli; Xiang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is a key regulatory mechanism in protein synthesis and proteome diversity. In this study, we identified alternative splicing events in four pairs of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) and adjacent nontumor tissues using RNA sequencing. Methods The transcripts of the four paired samples were thoroughly analyzed by RNA sequencing. SpliceMap software was used to detect the splicing junctions. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis was conducted to detect the alternative spliced genes-related signal pathways. The alternative spliced genes were validated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results There were 35 common alternative spliced genes in the four CSCC samples; they were novel and CSCC specific. Sixteen pathways were significantly enriched (P<0.05). One novel 5′AS site in the KLHDC7B gene, encoding kelch domain-containing 7B, and an exon-skipping site in the SYCP2 gene, encoding synaptonemal complex 2, were validated by RT-PCR. The KLHDC7B gene with 5′AS was found in 67.5% (27/40) of CSCC samples and was significantly related with cellular differentiation and tumor size. The exon-skipping site of the SYCP2 gene was found in 35.0% (14/40) of CSCC samples and was significantly related with depth of cervical invasion. Conclusion The KLHDC7B and the SYCP2 genes with alternative spliced events might be involved in the development and progression of CSCC and could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of CSCC. PMID:25565867

  4. Gene expression profiles in squamous cell cervical carcinoma using array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y-W; Bae, S M; Kim, Y-W; Lee, H N; Kim, Y W; Park, T C; Ro, D Y; Shin, J C; Shin, S J; Seo, J-S; Ahn, W S

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to identify novel genomic regions of interest and provide highly dynamic range information on correlation between squamous cell cervical carcinoma and its related gene expression patterns by a genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). We analyzed 15 cases of cervical cancer from KangNam St Mary's Hospital of the Catholic University of Korea. Microdissection assay was performed to obtain DNA samples from paraffin-embedded cervical tissues of cancer as well as of the adjacent normal tissues. The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array used in this study consisted of 1440 human BACs and the space among the clones was 2.08 Mb. All the 15 cases of cervical cancer showed the differential changes of the cervical cancer-associated genetic alterations. The analysis limit of average gains and losses was 53%. A significant positive correlation was found in 8q24.3, 1p36.32, 3q27.1, 7p21.1, 11q13.1, and 3p14.2 changes through the cervical carcinogenesis. The regions of high level of gain were 1p36.33-1p36.32, 8q24.3, 16p13.3, 1p36.33, 3q27.1, and 7p21.1. And the regions of homozygous loss were 2q12.1, 22q11.21, 3p14.2, 6q24.3, 7p15.2, and 11q25. In the high level of gain regions, GSDMDC1, RECQL4, TP73, ABCF3, ALG3, HDAC9, ESRRA, and RPS6KA4 were significantly correlated with cervical cancer. The genes encoded by frequently lost clones were PTPRG, GRM7, ZDHHC3, EXOSC7, LRP1B, and NR3C2. Therefore, array-CGH analyses showed that specific genomic alterations were maintained in cervical cancer that were critical to the malignant phenotype and may give a chance to find out possible target genes present in the gained or lost clones.

  5. Home-Based or Clinic-Based Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Atypical Squamous Cell of Undetermined Significance; Cervical Carcinoma; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2/3; Health Status Unknown; Human Papillomavirus Infection; Low Grade Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Neoplasia; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer

  6. Proteomic Identification of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy-Related Proteins in Bulky Stage IB-IIA Squamous Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Shuangwei; Shen, Qi; Hua, Ying; Jiang, Wenxiao; Zhang, Wenwen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) on the human squamous cervical cancer using proteomics profiling and to obtain related proteins to NAC exposure and response. Methods: Paired samples of early-stage bulky squamous cervical cancer before and after NAC treatment from patients who responded to NAC were obtained and submitted to 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS). The expression and localization of the interesting proteins in additional paired samples were confirmed by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Results: The comparison of the proteins present before and after NAC revealed that 116 protein spots were significantly changed. In all, 31 proteins were analyzed by MS, and 15 proteins were upregulated in the cancer tissue after NAC relative to the level before NAC, whereas 16 proteins were downregulated after NAC. The significantly higher expression of peroxiredoxin 1 and significantly lower expression of galectin 1 after NAC treatment were confirmed by Western blot. Conclusions: Proteomics can be used to identify the NAC-related proteins in squamous cervical cancer. The change in proteins may be associated with NAC exposure and response, but insight into their relevance requires further study. PMID:23599374

  7. Genotype Distribution of Human Papillomavirus among Women with Cervical Cytological Abnormalities or Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a High-Incidence Area of Esophageal Carcinoma in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Shaohong; Shen, Jinhui; Peng, Yanyan; Chen, Lechuan; Mai, Ruiqin; Zhang, Guohong

    2016-01-01

    Data of HPV genotype including 16 high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) and 4 low-risk HPV from 38,397 women with normal cytology, 1341 women with cervical cytology abnormalities, and 223 women with ISCC were retrospectively evaluated by a hospital-based study. The prevalence of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 6.51%, 41.83%, and 96.86% in women with normal cytology, cervical cytology abnormalities, and ISCC, respectively. The three most common HPV types were HPV-52 (1.76%), HPV-16 (1.28%), and HPV-58 (0.97%) in women with normal cytology, whereas the most prevalent HPV type was HPV-16 (16.85%), followed by HPV-52 (9.55%) and HPV-58 (7.83%) in women with cervical cytology abnormalities. Specifically, HPV-16 had the highest frequency in ASC-H (24.16%, 36/149) and HSIL (35.71%, 110/308), while HPV-52 was the most common type in ASC-US (8.28%, 53/640) and LSIL (16.80%, 41/244). HPV-16 (75.78%), HPV18 (10.31%), and HPV58 (9.87%) were the most common types in women with ISCC. These data might contribute to increasing the knowledge of HPV epidemiology and providing the guide for vaccine selection for women in Shantou. PMID:27610364

  8. Genotype Distribution of Human Papillomavirus among Women with Cervical Cytological Abnormalities or Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a High-Incidence Area of Esophageal Carcinoma in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Shaohong; Shen, Jinhui; Peng, Yanyan; Chen, Lechuan; Mai, Ruiqin

    2016-01-01

    Data of HPV genotype including 16 high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) and 4 low-risk HPV from 38,397 women with normal cytology, 1341 women with cervical cytology abnormalities, and 223 women with ISCC were retrospectively evaluated by a hospital-based study. The prevalence of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 6.51%, 41.83%, and 96.86% in women with normal cytology, cervical cytology abnormalities, and ISCC, respectively. The three most common HPV types were HPV-52 (1.76%), HPV-16 (1.28%), and HPV-58 (0.97%) in women with normal cytology, whereas the most prevalent HPV type was HPV-16 (16.85%), followed by HPV-52 (9.55%) and HPV-58 (7.83%) in women with cervical cytology abnormalities. Specifically, HPV-16 had the highest frequency in ASC-H (24.16%, 36/149) and HSIL (35.71%, 110/308), while HPV-52 was the most common type in ASC-US (8.28%, 53/640) and LSIL (16.80%, 41/244). HPV-16 (75.78%), HPV18 (10.31%), and HPV58 (9.87%) were the most common types in women with ISCC. These data might contribute to increasing the knowledge of HPV epidemiology and providing the guide for vaccine selection for women in Shantou. PMID:27610364

  9. Genotype Distribution of Human Papillomavirus among Women with Cervical Cytological Abnormalities or Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a High-Incidence Area of Esophageal Carcinoma in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Shaohong; Shen, Jinhui; Peng, Yanyan; Chen, Lechuan; Mai, Ruiqin

    2016-01-01

    Data of HPV genotype including 16 high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) and 4 low-risk HPV from 38,397 women with normal cytology, 1341 women with cervical cytology abnormalities, and 223 women with ISCC were retrospectively evaluated by a hospital-based study. The prevalence of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) was 6.51%, 41.83%, and 96.86% in women with normal cytology, cervical cytology abnormalities, and ISCC, respectively. The three most common HPV types were HPV-52 (1.76%), HPV-16 (1.28%), and HPV-58 (0.97%) in women with normal cytology, whereas the most prevalent HPV type was HPV-16 (16.85%), followed by HPV-52 (9.55%) and HPV-58 (7.83%) in women with cervical cytology abnormalities. Specifically, HPV-16 had the highest frequency in ASC-H (24.16%, 36/149) and HSIL (35.71%, 110/308), while HPV-52 was the most common type in ASC-US (8.28%, 53/640) and LSIL (16.80%, 41/244). HPV-16 (75.78%), HPV18 (10.31%), and HPV58 (9.87%) were the most common types in women with ISCC. These data might contribute to increasing the knowledge of HPV epidemiology and providing the guide for vaccine selection for women in Shantou.

  10. IMP3 expression is associated with poor survival in cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingzhu; Yan, Jinhai; Fu, Bo; Liu, Jianghuan; Zhong, Ling; Yang, Qiao; Zhao, Tong

    2014-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II messenger RNA (mRNA)-binding protein 3 (IMP3) is an oncofetal protein that promotes tumor progression and metastasis in a number of malignancies. However, the clinical significance of IMP3 expression in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix is unclear. In this study, the correlation between IMP3 expression and cervical cancer progression and prognosis was assessed by immunohistochemistry. IMP3 expression was observed in a large number of tissue specimens from patients with normal cervical tissues, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I, CIN II, CIN III, and SCC. IMP3 protein and mRNA expression was also determined in the SiHa and HeLa human cervical cancer cell lines. IMP3 expression was observed in 0 (0%) of 62 CIN I, 0 (0%) of 38 CIN II, and 9 (8.7%) of 104 CIN III specimens. Of the 96 SCC cases, IMP3 expression was detected in 54 cases (56.3%). Significant difference in IMP3 expression existed between all of the groups tested (P < .001). IMP3 protein and mRNA expressions in SiHa and HeLa cell lines were dramatically increased, as compared with normal tissue (P < .001). IMP3 expression was significantly related to age (P < .001), International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (P < .001), and lymph node metastasis (P = .001). IMP3 expression was also shown to be an independent prognostic factor in SCC. In conclusion, these findings suggest that IMP3 expression may be a prognostic indicator of SCC.

  11. Detection of High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in India.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Krishnan; Kumar, P Kranthi; Karunanithi, Santha; Sethupathy, Subramanian; Thamaraiselvi, B; Swaruparani, S

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial tissues. Specific genotypes of human papillomavirus are the single most common etiological agents of cervical intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer. Cervical cancer usually arises at squamous metaplastic epithelium of transformation zone (TZ) of the cervix featuring infection with one or more oncogenic or high-risk HPV (HR- HPV) types. A hospital- based study in a rural set up was carried out to understand the association of HR-HPV with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) and cervical cancer. In the present study, HR-HPV was detected in 65.7% of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 84.6% of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) and 94% of cervical cancer as compared to 10.7% of controls. The association of HPV infection with SIL and cervical cancer was analyzed with Chi square test (p<0.001). The significant association found confirmed that detection of HR-HPV is a suitable candidate for early identification of cervical precancerous lesions and in the prevention of cervical cancer in India.

  12. [Interstitial collagenase, gelatinases A and B and their endogenous inhibitors in squamous cell cervical carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Ryzhakova, O S; Zavalishina, L É; Andreeva, Iu Iu; Solov'eva, N I

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial collagenase and gelatinases are matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), which play the key role in tumor invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the peculiarities of expression of interstitial collagenase (MMP-1), gelatinases A and B (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and their endogenous tissue inhibitors TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 as invasive factors of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of human cervical cancer. The study was carried out using 24 specimens of SCC and 11 specimens of adjacent to tumor morphologically normal tissue. All carcinoma specimens expressed E7 HPV-16 gene. It was shown that the increase of MMP-1 and MMP-9 expression and low of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression makes the main contribution to the destructive (invasive) potential of SCC. The change of MMP-2 expression is not so significant and it is less influenced to the destructive potential. Moreover, substantial expression of MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 was registered in the specimens of morphologically normal adjoining to tumor tissue. This expression was found to make an additional contribution to the destructive potential of cervical tumor.

  13. Human papillomavirus genotypes distribution in cervical samples from Uruguayan women.

    PubMed

    Ramas, Viviana; Mirazo, Santiago; Bonilla, Sylvia; Mendoza, Laura; Lago, Olga; Basiletti, Jorge; González, Joaquin; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Arbiza, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical preneoplasic lesions and invasive cervical cancer. This study evaluated the prevalence and distribution of HPV genotypes in cervical exfoliated cells from Uruguayan women. Five hundred sixty-eight cervical specimens were examined by PCR using MY09/11 primer set, and were genotyped by restriction enzyme digestion (RFLP). Some of the samples which remained undetermined were reanalyzed by PGMY PCR combined with reverse line blot hybridization. Overall, about 42% of samples were positive for HPV; 96% in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, 66% in low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, 15% in atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and 19% in samples negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy. HPV 16 was the most commonly found genotype, followed by HPV 68 and 58. Within low risk-HPV genotypes 6, 61, and 11 were the most frequent. This is the first cross-sectional study, accounting for prevalence and genotype distribution of HPV in Uruguayan women.

  14. The Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F. Xavier; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Cervical cancer has been recognized as a rare outcome of a common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI). The etiologic association is restricted to a limited number of viral types of the family of the Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs). The association is causal in nature and under optimal testing systems, HPV DNA can be identified in all specimens of invasive cervical cancer. As a consequence, it has been claimed that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The evidence is consistent worldwide and implies both the Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC), the adenocarcinomas and the vast majority (i.e. > 95%) of the immediate precursors, namely High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (HSIL)/Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 (CIN3)/Carcinoma in situ. Co-factors that modify the risk among HPV DNA positive women include the use of oral contraceptives (OC) for five or more years, smoking, high parity (five or more full term pregnancies) and previous exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases such as Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT) and Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2). Women exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) are at high risk for HPV infection, HPV DNA persistency and progression of HPV lesions to cervical cancer. PMID:17627057

  15. Absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashko, Pavlo; Peresunko, Olexander; Zelinska, Natalia; Alonova, Marina

    2014-08-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism Δ is insignificant in the researched spectral range λ=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  16. Oral Rigosertib for Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Anal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Skin Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Penile Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  17. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas.

  18. Increased expression of sialic acid in cervical biopsies with squamous intraepithelial lesions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Altered sialylation has been observed during oncogenic transformation. Sialylated oligosaccharides of glycoproteins and glycolipids have been implicated in tumor progression and metastases. In the cervical cancer high levels of sialic acid have been reported in the patients serum, and an increased of total sialic acid concentration has been reported for the cervical neoplasia and cervical cancer. This study investigates the changes in expression and distribution of α2,3-linked sialic acid and α2,6- linked sialic acid in low and high squamous intraepithelial lesions and in normal tissue. Methods Lectin histochemistry was used to examine the expression and distribution of sialic acid in different grades of cervical neoplasia. We applied Maackia amurensis lectin, which interacts with α2,3-linked sialic acid and Sambucus nigra lectin specific for α2,6-linked sialic acid. Results The histochemical analysis showed that α2,3-linked sialic acid and α2,6- linked sialic acid increased in intensity and distribution in concordance with the grade of squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL). These results are in concordance with a previous study that reports increased RNAm levels of three sialyltransferases. Conclusions These results show that the change in sialylation occurs before cancer development and may play an important role in cellular transformation. These findings provide the basis for more detailed studies of the possible role of cell surface glycoconjugates bearing sialic acid in the cellular cervix transformation. PMID:21092209

  19. The three most common human papillomavirus oncogenic types and their integration state in Thai women with cervical precancerous lesions and carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Aromseree, Sirinart; Chaiwongkot, Arkom; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Pientong, Chamsai

    2014-11-01

    To understand the potential role in cervical cancer development of the three most common high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPVs) in Thai women, HPV genotypes and viral genome statuses in different cervical lesions were investigated. Cervical tissues consisting of no cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (84 cases), grade I cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (176 cases), grade II-III cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (91 cases), and squamous cell carcinoma (66 cases) were subjected for HPV genotyping by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse line blot hybridization assay and for HPV genome status determination by amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts (APOT) assay. HPV prevalence was 28.6% in no cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, 40.3% in grade I cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, 70.3% in grade II-III cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 86.4% in squamous cell carcinoma cases. The three most common HR-HPV types were HPV 16, 58, and 18 which were distributed in all cervical lesions. HPV physical statuses could be investigated in 4 no cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, 2 grade I cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, 28 grade II-III cervical intraepithelial neoplasias and 31 squamous cell carcinomas. The integrated-derived transcripts were found 3.6% in grade II-III cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 48.4% in squamous cell carcinoma, whereas no viral genome integration was found in the group of no cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or grade I cervical intraepithelial neoplasia samples. The frequencies of HR-HPV integration in squamous cell carcinoma were found 40%, 100%, 20% of HPV 16, 18, and 58. This study indicates the oncogenic potential ability of the three most common HR-HPVs associated with cervical cancer progression.

  20. Oncogenic association of specific human papillomavirus types with cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, A T; Temple, G F; Kurman, R J; Jenson, A B; Lancaster, W D

    1987-10-01

    Molecular hybridization analysis of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from 190 cervical biopsy specimens from women in the United States, Brazil, and Peru revealed viral sequences in 2 (9%) of 23 biopsy specimens of normal mature squamous epithelium, 7 (44%) of 16 biopsy specimens of metaplastic squamous epithelia, 60 (77%) of 78 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), 57 (89%) of 64 invasive squamous carcinomas, and 8 (89%) of 9 endocervical adenocarcinomas. HPV typing by DNA hybridization revealed HPV 6 and HPV 11 sequences in metaplastic squamous epithelia, CIN I, and CIN II, but not in CIN III lesions or invasive carcinomas. HPV 16 was detected in metaplastic epithelium and in nearly half of the invasive squamous carcinomas and adenocarcinomas. It was present in 31% of CIN lesions, increasing in frequency with the severity of CIN from 20% of CIN I to 50% of CIN III. HPV 16 showed a striking difference in geographic distribution, being detected in 36% of the carcinomas from the United States compared to 64% of the carcinomas from Brazil and Peru. HPV 18 was found in metaplastic epithelia and in 17% of carcinomas but in only 1% of CIN lesions. HPV 31 was not found in metaplastic epithelium but was present in 6% of carcinomas and in 18% of CIN lesions. In addition, a group of uncharacterized HPVs, not corresponding to any of the probes used, was found in 5% of normal and metaplastic epithelia and in 18% of CIN and 19% of invasive cancers. These results suggest that individual HPV types that infect the cervix have varying degrees of oncogenic association. HPV 6 and HPV 11 appear to have very little oncogenic association, HPV 31 has low oncogenic association, and HPV 16 and HPV 18 have high oncogenic association. PMID:2821311

  1. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  2. SU-E-P-18: Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, W; Qiao, X; Zhou, Z; Song, Y; Zhang, R; Zhen, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the outcomes and prognostic factors of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods: Thirty-seven patients with cervical esophageal SCC treated with IMRT were analyzed retrospectively. They received 54–66 Gy in 27–32 fractions. Nineteen patients received concurrent (n=12) or sequential (n=7) platinum-based two drugs chemoradiotherapy. Overall survival (OS), local control rates (LCR) and prognostic factors were evaluated. Acute toxicities and patterns of first failures were observed. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months for alive patients. The l-, 3-, 4- and 5-year OS of the all patients were 83.8%, 59.1%, 47.5% and 32.6% respectively. The median survival time was 46 months. The l-, 3-,4- and 5-year LCR were 82.9%, 63.0%, 54.5% and 54.5%, respectively. Univariate and Multivariate analysis all showed that size of GTV was an independent prognostic factor (p=0.033, p=0.039). There were no patients with Grade 3 acute radiation esophagitis and Grade 2–4 acute pneumonitis. The local failure accounted for 70.0% of all treatment-related failures. Conclusion: IMRT is safe and effective in the treatment of cervical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Size of GTV is an independent prognostic factor. Local failure still remains the main reason of treatment failures. The authors declare no conflicts of interest in preparing this article.

  3. Requirement for Estrogen Receptor Alpha in a Mouse Model for Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Wiedmeyer, Kerri; Shai, Anny; Korach, Kenneth S.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of human cervical cancers are associated with the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which encode the potent E6 and E7 oncogenes. Upon prolonged treatment with physiological levels of exogenous estrogen, K14E7 transgenic mice expressing HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein in their squamous epithelia succumb to uterine cervical cancer. Furthermore, prolonged withdrawal of exogenous estrogen results in complete or partial regression of tumors in this mouse model. In the current study we investigated whether estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is required for the development of cervical cancer in K14E7 transgenic mice. We demonstrate that exogenous estrogen fails to promote either dysplasia or cervical cancer in K14E7/ERα−/− mice despite the continued presence of the presumed cervical cancer precursor cell type, reserve cells, and evidence for E7 expression therein. We also observed that cervical cancers in our mouse models are strictly associated with atypical squamous metaplasia (ASM), which is believed to be the precursor for cervical cancer in women. Consistently, E7 and exogenous estrogen failed to promote ASM in the absence of ERα. We conclude that ERα plays a crucial role at an early stage of cervical carcinogenesis in this mouse model. PMID:19047174

  4. Human Papilloma Virus in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma - The Enigma Unravelled.

    PubMed

    Khot, Komal P; Deshmane, Swati; Choudhari, Sheetal

    2016-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) has long been regarded as a disease entity having a remarkable incidence worldwide and a fairly onerous prognosis; thus encouraging further research on factors that might modify disease outcome. Squamous cell carcinomas encompass at least 90% of all oral malignancies. Several factors like tobacco and tobacco-related products, alcohol, genetic predisposition and hormonal factors are suspected as possible causative factors. Human papilloma virus (HPV), the causal agent of cervical cancer also appears to be involved in the aetiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancer. HPVpositive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) seems to differ from HPV-negative SCC. Many questions about the natural history of oral HPV infection remain under investigation. The aim of this review is to highlight the current understanding of HPV-associated oral cancer with an emphasis on its prognosis, detection and management. PMID:26981603

  5. Evaluating Nuclear Membrane Irregularity for the Classification of Cervical Squamous Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing Rui; Mat Isa, Nor Ashidi; Ch’ng, Ewe Seng

    2016-01-01

    Pap test involves searching of morphological changes in cervical squamous epithelial cells by pathologists or cytotechnologists to identify potential cancerous cells in the cervix. Nuclear membrane irregularity is one of the morphological changes of malignancy. This paper proposes two novel techniques for the evaluation of nuclear membrane irregularity. The first technique, namely, penalty-driven smoothing analysis, introduces different penalty values for nuclear membrane contour with different degrees of irregularity. The second technique, which can be subdivided into mean- or median-type residual-based analysis, computes the number of points of nuclear membrane contour that deviates from the mean or median of the nuclear membrane contour. Performance of the proposed techniques was compared to three state-of-the-art techniques, namely, radial asymmetric, shape factor, and rim difference. Friedman and post hoc tests using Holm, Shaffer, and Bergmann procedures returned significant differences for all the three classes, i.e., negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (NILM) versus low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), NILM versus high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), and LSIL versus HSIL when the span value equaled 3 was employed with linear penalty function. When span values equaled 5, 7, and 9, NILM versus LSIL and HSIL showed significant differences regardless of the penalty functions. In addition, the results of penalty-driven smoothing analysis were comparable with those of other state-of-the-art techniques. Residual-based analysis returned significant differences for the comparison among the three diagnostic classes. Findings of this study proved the significance of nuclear membrane irregularity as one of the features to differentiate the different diagnostic classes of cervical squamous epithelial cells. PMID:27741266

  6. Analysis of cytosine-adenine repeats in P1 promoter region of IGF-1 gene in peripheral blood cells and cervical tissue samples of females with cervical intraepithelial lesions and squamous cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    KWASNIEWSKI, WOJCIECH; GOZDZICKA-JOZEFIAK, ANNA; KOTARSKA, MARIA; POLAK, GRZEGORZ; BARCZYNSKI, BARTLOMIEJ; BRONIARCZYK, JUSTYNA; NOWAK, WITOLD; WOLUN-CHOLEWA, MARIA; KWASNIEWSKA, ANNA; KOTARSKI, JAN

    2015-01-01

    High oncogenic risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are closely associated with cancer of the cervix. However, HPV infection alone may not be sufficient to cause cervical cancer, and other factors or cofactors may have a cumulative effect on the risk of progression from cervical HPV infection to cancer. The present study investigates the cytosine-adenine (CA) repeat polymorphism in the P1 promoter region of the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene among cervical precancerous and cancer patients and healthy control females. The association between these polymorphisms, tissue and blood serum levels of IGF-1, and cervical cancer risk and progression is evaluated. The material for analysis consisted of blood cells and postoperative tissues from patients diagnosed with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (L-SILs), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (H-SILs) and invasive cervical cancer (ICC). A polymerase chain reaction amplification and the sequencing of DNA were used for the identification of (CA)n repeats in the IGF-1 P1 region and detection of HPV DNA. The blood serum concentration of IGF was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The identification of the IGF-1 protein in the cervical tissues was performed by immunohistochemical analysis. The range of the length of the CA repeats in the study DNA was 11 to 21. However, the most common allele length and genotype in the control and study patients from serum and tissues was 19 CA repeats and a homozygous genotype of CA19/19. Statistically significant differences in the concentration of IGF-1 in the blood serum were observed between H-SILs and controls, only (p=0.047). However, the concentration of IGF-1 in the group of females with CA19/19, CA19<19 and CA19>19 was significantly higher in the group of patients with H-SIL (P=0.041) and ICC (P=0.048) in comparison with the control group. An association was detected between CA repeat length <19 and/or >19, IGF concentration in blood serum and

  7. Tattoo-pigmented cervical lymph node that masqueraded as the sentinel lymph node in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Amith; Wieshmann, Hulya; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Shaw, Richard

    2015-11-01

    We describe a case of a pigmented cervical lymph node mimicking the sentinel node during sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) on a patient with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The patient had extensive tattoos on his neck. This pigmented lymph node was not identified to be the sentinel lymph node using static and dynamic lymphoscintigraphy. Subsequent histological analysis revealed tattoo pigment within this lymph node. It is important during cervical SLNB to be aware that cutaneous tattoos can pigment lymph nodes. PMID:26188933

  8. Characterization of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Tumor Necrosis Factor α Promoter Region and in Lymphotoxin α in Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions, Precursors of Cervical Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Nieves-Ramirez, Miriam Enriqueta; Partida-Rodriguez, Oswaldo; Alegre-Crespo, Pedro Eduardo; Tapia-Lugo, Maria del Carmen; Perez-Rodriguez, Martha Esthela

    2011-01-01

    Development of cervical cancer is a long process of abnormal cancerous cell growth in the cervix and is primarily the result of infection with specific high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV). The cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and lymphotoxin α (LTA) have an important role in all stages of cervical cancer and have the ability to induce the regression or promote the development of human tumors. Biologically important single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) occur within the TNFα and LTA genes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the SNPs in the TNFα promoter region (-163, -238, -244, -308, -376, -857, -863, and -1031) and in the first intron of LTA (+252) in women with precursor lesions of cervical cancer. Overall, we studied 396 women from Mexico City. A total of 191 patients with HPV infection and precursor cervical lesions were subdivided in two groups: those with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (n = 132) and those with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (n = 59). Women (n = 205) negative for HPV and without cervical lesions were also included in the study. DNA was extracted from peripheral white blood cells and from cervical samples, and detection of biallelic polymorphisms of TNFα and LTA was performed using the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe and restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques, respectively. We demonstrated that risk is associated with the genotype G/A (odds ratio = 2.48) and that protection is associated with the genotype G/G of SNP TNFα -376 (odds ratio = 0.37). PMID:22190997

  9. Proto-oncogenes and p53 protein expression in normal cervical stratified squamous epithelium and cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ngan, H Y; Liu, S S; Yu, H; Liu, K L; Cheung, A N

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this study was to study the protein expression of six proto-oncogenes (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), c-fms, c-myc, c-kit, c-erbB-2 and pan-ras) and one tumour suppressor gene (TP53), by immunohistochemical staining of normal cervical stratified squamous epithelium and cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN). Paraffin sections of 45 normal cervical specimens, 38 CIN grade one (CIN1), 37 CIN2 and 43 CIN3 were studied. An immunohistochemical (IHC) score was derived from the intensity of staining and the percentages of cells stained. In normal cervical specimens, a higher IHC score was found with EGFR and c-fms in superficial (S), intermediate (I) and parabasal (PB) cells compared with basal cells. In contrast, a higher IHC score was found with c-erbB-2 in basal cells in normal cervical specimens. Dysplastic cells in CIN had a higher IHC score with c-myc and c-erbB-2 than normal S/I and PB cells. Dysplastic cells had a higher score with EGFR than normal basal cells. However, a higher IHC score with EGFR and c-fms was found in normal S/I cells than dysplastic cells. These findings suggested that EGFR and c-fms were activated in more differentiated normal cells but were less active in less differentiated normal basal cells. However, EGFR was reactivated in dysplastic cells. Meanwhile, c-erbB-2 was activated in less differentiated normal basal cells and dysplastic cells, and was less active in differentiated normal cells. c-myc was activated in dysplastic cells. c-fms was more active in more differentiated normal cells and was not activated in less differentiated or dysplastic cells. c-kit, pan-ras and TP53 were not activated in normal nor dysplastic cervical cells. These results suggest EGFR, c-erbB-2 and c-myc may be important proto-oncogenes in CIN and that antibodies or anti-genes targeted against them may alter the progress of CIN to invasive cancer.

  10. Cervical Tissue Engineering Using Silk Scaffolds and Human Cervical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Cristina C.; Rice, William L.; Socrate, Simona; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth is a frequent complication of pregnancy and a common cause of morbidity in childhood. Obstetricians suspect abnormalities of the cervix are implicated in a significant number of preterm births. The cervix is composed of fibrous connective tissue and undergoes significant remodeling in preparation for birth. We hypothesized that a tissue engineering strategy could be used to develop three-dimensional cervical-like tissue constructs that would be suitable for investigating cervical remodeling. Cervical cells were isolated from two premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for a benign gynecological condition, and the cells were seeded on porous silk scaffolds in the presence or absence of dynamic culture and with 10% or 20% serum. Morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties were measured during the 8-week culture period. Cervical cells proliferated in three-dimensions and synthesized an extracellular matrix with biochemical constituents and morphology similar to native tissue. Compared to static culture, dynamic culture was associated with significantly increased collagen deposition (p < 0.05), sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthesis (p < 0.05), and mechanical stiffness (p < 0.05). Serum concentration did not affect measured variables. Relevant human tissue-engineered cervical-like constructs constitute a novel model system for a range of fundamental and applied studies related to cervical remodeling. PMID:20121593

  11. Alterations in exon 1 of c-myc and expression of p62c-myc in cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, J J; Landers, R J; Crowley, M; Healy, I; Kealy, W F; Hogan, J; Doyle, C T

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and negative squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix for structural alterations in exon 1 c-myc; and to investigate the expression pattern of p62, the protein product of c-myc. MATERIAL: Archival paraffin wax embedded tissues of cervical squamous cell carcinomas, stage I and II, retrieved from the files of the department of pathology, University College Cork, Ireland: 40 cases were examined for alterations in exon 1 of c-myc; 57 cases were used for immunocytochemical p62 analysis. METHODS: c-myc exon 1 PCR on HPV positive and negative stage I and II cervical squamous cell carcinomas was performed using primers designed to fragile sites in exon 1 of the c-myc oncogene, which are frequently involved in translocation phenomena and deletions in other neoplasms. This region is bordered by two promoter sequences P1 and P2. In addition, the expression of p62 was evaluated using the monoclonal antibody Mycl-9E10. RESULTS: Alterations in exon 1 of c-myc were shown in 7.5% of squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix. Changes in exon 1 and 2 of c-myc were also found in COLO 320 cells and Raji cells. These alterations were due to small deletions within exon 1 of c-myc, but point polymorphisms occurring within the priming sites (in one case) may also have occurred. The alterations uncovered appeared "clonal," as replicate samples showed the same amplicon band pattern. Expression of c-myc was variable, with cytoplasmic staining patterns predominating. All cases which showed exon 1 alterations were HPV positive and had strong nuclear positivity on p62 immunocytochemistry. CONCLUSIONS: Alterations in exon 1 of c-myc occur in a minority of cervical cancers and there was increased expression of p62 in a cohort of HPV positive and negative cervical squamous cell carcinomas. Exon 1 alterations may provide an alternative route to c-myc activation in early squamous cell carcinoma. Images PMID:9462237

  12. Pre-vaccination prevalence of infections with 25 non-high-risk human papillomavirus types among 1,000 Slovenian women in cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Učakar, Veronika; Poljak, Mario; Oštrbenk, Anja; Klavs, Irena

    2014-10-01

    Cervical infections with non-high-risk human papillomavirus (non-HR-HPV) types have been associated with genital warts and a fraction of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. The pre-vaccination prevalence of cervical infections with 25 non-HR-HPV types has been estimated, regardless of and without the coexistence of infection with HR-HPV types among Slovenian women 20-64 years old in cervical cancer screening, overall and according to age and cytology result. One thousand cervical specimens selected randomly from 4,455 specimens collected in 2010 in the Slovenian HPV prevalence survey were tested with Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test. Prevalence of cervical infections with any of the 25 non-HR-HPV types was 10.0% (95% CI: 8.1-11.9%) and with exclusively non-HR-HPV types 4.5% (95% CI: 3.2-5.8%). Prevalence of infections with any non-HR-HPV types among women with normal cytology was 8.8%, with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance 30.4%, with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions 60.0%, and with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions 7.7%. Non-HR-HPV types without coexisting HR-HPV types were found in 4.0% of women with normal cytology, 26.1% with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, 6.7% with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, and none with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. Non-HR-HPV type cervical infections without coexisting HR-HPV infections were common among Slovenian women in cervical cancer screening with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, while rare in those with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or worse. J. Med. Virol. 86: 1772-1779, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Human papillomavirus cervical infection and associated risk factors in a region of Argentina with a high incidence of cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Tonon, S A; Picconi, M A; Zinovich, J B; Liotta, D J; Bos, P D; Galuppo, J A; Alonio, L V; Ferreras, J A; Teyssié, A R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence and potential risk factors associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) cervical infection among women residing in a region of northeastern Argentina with a high incidence of cervical cancer. METHODS: A case-control study of 330 women participating in a cervical cytological screening program conducted in Posadas city, Misiones, Argentina, from February 1997 to November 1998 was carried out. Standardized questionnaires were administered, and clinical examination including colposcopy was performed. Fresh endocervical specimens for HPV DNA detection by generic polymerase chain reaction were collected and the products typed by dot-blot hybridization. RESULTS: Human papillomavirus DNA was found in 61% of samples analyzed (185/301). Samples with normal cytology had a 43% infection rate (85/199), while those classified as low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, and invasive cervical carcinoma had an infection rate of 96% (53/55), 100% (29/29), and 100% (18/18), respectively. Human papillomavirus typing showed a 64% (118/185) prevalence of type 16 among all the infected population analyzed; type 16 was detected among 49% (42/85) of infected samples with normal cytology and in an average of 74% (74/100) with abnormal cytology. Sexual behavior, residence in southern Paraguay, and history of a previous sexually transmitted diseases were the main risk factors associated with high-grade cervical lesions. CONCLUSIONS: An elevated prevalence of HPV infection was detected in this population, which also has a high incidence of cervical cancer. The broad distribution of high-risk HPV type 16 in women with normal cytology and colposcopy suggests that viral infection is an important determinant of regional cancer incidence. PMID:10524669

  14. Human papilloma virus and cervical preinvasive disease

    PubMed Central

    Bari, M; Iancu, G; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer lesions represent a major threat to the health of the women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for 99.7% of cervical cancer cases, the infectious etiology giving the possibility of preventing cervical cancer by vaccination. The most aggressive HPV types are 16 and 18, which cause about 70% of cases of invasive cancer. The vaccination is recommended to the girls aged 11–12. The diagnosis and the treatment of cervical preinvasive disease allow the doctor to prevent the development of the invasive disease. PMID:20108750

  15. c-Myc protein expression is not an independent prognostic predictor in cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Brenna, S M F; Zeferino, L C; Pinto, G A; Souza, R A; Andrade, L A L; Vassalo, J; Martinez, E Z; Syrjanen, K J

    2002-04-01

    The c-myc protein is known to regulate the cell cycle, and its down-regulation can lead to cell death by apoptosis. The role of c-myc protein as an independent prognostic determinant in cervical cancer is controversial. In the present study, a cohort of 220 Brazilian women (mean age 53.4 years) with FIGO stage I, II and III (21, 28 and 51%, respectively) cervical squamous cell carcinomas was analyzed for c-myc protein expression using immunohistochemistry. The disease-free survival and relapse-rate were analyzed using univariate (Kaplan-Meier) survival analysis for 116 women who completed the standard FIGO treatment and were followed up for 5 years. Positive c-myc staining was detected in 40% of carcinomas, 29% being grade 1, 9% grade 2, and 2% grade 3. The distribution of positive c-myc according to FIGO stage was 19% (17 women) in stage I, 33% (29) in stage II, and 48% (43) in stage III of disease. During the 60-month follow-up, disease-free survival in univariate (Kaplan-Meier) survival analysis (116 women) was lower for women with c-myc-positive tumors, i.e., 60.5, 47.5 and 36.6% at 12, 36, and 60 months, respectively (not significant). The present data suggest that immunohistochemical demonstration of c-myc does not possess any prognostic value independent of FIGO stage, and as such is unlikely to be a useful prognostic marker in cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

  16. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-22

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer

  17. Increased RIPK4 expression is associated with progression and poor prognosis in cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, De-Qing; Li, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Jiang-Bo; Zhou, Tie-Jun; Xue, Wen-Qiong; Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Yuan-Bin; Liao, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Shao-Dan; Hu, Ye-Zhu; Jia, Wei-Hua

    2015-07-07

    Aberrant expression of receptor interacting protein kinase 4 (RIPK4), a crucial regulatory protein of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, has recently been reported to be involved in several cancers. Here, we report the potential clinical implication and biological functions of RIPK4 in cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). One hundred and ninety-eight CSCC cases, 109 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 141 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) and 63 chronic cervicitis were collected. The expression of RIPK4 was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC), and its clinical value and oncogenic functions were further assessed. RIPK4 expression increased significantly with disease progression from 3.2% in chronic cervicitis, 19.3% in LSILs and 85.1% in HSILs to 94.4% in CSCCs (P < 0.001). Moreover, RIPK4 may serve as a useful biomarker to distinguish HSIL from chronic cervicitis/LSIL, which are two different clinical types for therapeutic procedures, with a high sensitivity and specificity (85.1% and 86.6%, respectively) and the performance improved when combined with p16(INK4a). Further, RIPK4 overexpression was associated with overall (HR = 2.085, P = 0.038) and disease-free survival (HR = 1.742, P = 0.037). Knockdown of RIPK4 reduced cell migration and invasion via inhibition of Vimentin, MMP2 and Fibronectin expression in cervical cancer cells. RIPK4 might act as a potential diagnostic and independent prognostic biomarker for CSCC patients.

  18. Identification of host transcriptional networks showing concentration-dependent regulation by HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins in basal cervical squamous epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen P.; Scarpini, Cinzia G.; Groves, Ian J.; Odle, Richard I.; Coleman, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Development of cervical squamous cell carcinoma requires increased expression of the major high-risk human-papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 in basal cervical epithelial cells. We used a systems biology approach to identify host transcriptional networks in such cells and study the concentration-dependent changes produced by HPV16-E6 and -E7 oncoproteins. We investigated sample sets derived from the W12 model of cervical neoplastic progression, for which high quality phenotype/genotype data were available. We defined a gene co-expression matrix containing a small number of highly-connected hub nodes that controlled large numbers of downstream genes (regulons), indicating the scale-free nature of host gene co-expression in W12. We identified a small number of ‘master regulators’ for which downstream effector genes were significantly associated with protein levels of HPV16 E6 (n = 7) or HPV16 E7 (n = 5). We validated our data by depleting E6/E7 in relevant cells and by functional analysis of selected genes in vitro. We conclude that the network of transcriptional interactions in HPV16-infected basal-type cervical epithelium is regulated in a concentration-dependent manner by E6/E7, via a limited number of central master-regulators. These effects are likely to be significant in cervical carcinogenesis, where there is competitive selection of cells with elevated expression of virus oncoproteins. PMID:27457222

  19. Age of Diagnosis of Squamous Cell Cervical Carcinoma and Early Sexual Experience

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Zoe R.; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Hughes, James P.; Johnson, Lisa G.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Galloway, Denise A.; Carter, Joseph J.; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Given the established links between young age at first intercourse (AFI), number of sex partners, high-risk human papillomavirus infection, and squamous cell cervical cancer (SCC), we hypothesized that women diagnosed with SCC at younger ages would be more likely to report young AFI than women diagnosed later in life. Methods We performed a population-based investigation among invasive SCC cases who were diagnosed between 1986 and 2004, were 22 to 53 years old, and lived in the metropolitan Seattle-Puget Sound region (n=333). Using multivariate linear regression, we estimated coefficients and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to assess the association between age at SCC diagnosis and AFI (<15, 15–18, ≥19) and number of sex partners before age 20 (0, 1, 2–4, 5–14, 15+), accounting for birth year and other factors. Interactions were assessed using the likelihood ratio test. Results The interval between AFI and SCC diagnosis ranged from 4 to 35 years. In a multivariate model, compared to SCC cases reporting AFI≥19, the mean age of diagnosis was 3.1 years younger for SCC cases reporting AFI<15 (CI: −5.8, −0.5) and 2.6 years younger for SCC cases reporting AFI 15–18 years (CI: −4.6, −0.6). Although number of sex partners before age 20 was associated with age at SCC diagnosis in a crude analysis, the association was not independent of AFI. However, in the AFI≥19 and AFI<15 groups, differences in effect were seen by number of sex partners before age 20 (p for interaction=0.08), with the association remaining strong and significant only in the AFI<15 group that had 2 or more partners before age 20 (coefficient: −4.2, CI: −6.3, −2.1). Conclusion Among younger and middle-aged women with SCC, early age of diagnosis was associated with early AFI, though the effect appeared to be modified by number of sex partners before age 20. PMID:19318437

  20. Effect of human papillomavirus vaccination on cervical cancer screening in Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong; Bell, Christopher; Sun, Maggie; Kliewer, Gordon; Xu, Linan; McInerney, Maria; Svenson, Lawrence W.; Yang, Huiming

    2016-01-01

    Background: A school-based program with quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination was implemented in Alberta in 2008. We assessed the impact of this program on Pap test cytology results using databases of province-wide vaccination and cervical cancer screening. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study involving a cohort of women in Alberta born between 1994 and 1997 who had at least 1 Pap test between 2012 and 2015. Women with negative cytology results were controls. Women with low-grade (atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) and high-grade (atypical squamous cells, cannot rule out a high-grade lesion; or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) cervical abnormalities were cases. Exposure status was assigned according to records of HPV vaccination. Odds ratios (ORs) for abnormal cytology results by vaccination status were adjusted for neighbourhood income, laboratory service, rural versus urban residency, and age. Results: The total study population was 10 204. Adjusting for age, vaccinated women had a higher screening rate than unvaccinated women (13.0% v. 11.4%, p < 0.001). Among women who received full vaccination (≥ 3 doses), the adjusted OR for cervical abnormalities was 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63–0.82). For high-grade lesions, the adjusted OR was 0.50 (95% CI 0.30–0.85). With 2-dose HPV vaccination, the adjusted OR for cervical abnormalities was 1.08 (95% CI 0.84–1.38). Interpretation: Quadrivalent HPV vaccination significantly reduced high-grade cervical abnormalities but required 3 doses. Vaccination against HPV was associated with screening uptake. Population-based vaccination and screening programs should work together to optimize cervical cancer prevention. PMID:27378467

  1. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  2. Screening of biomarkers in cervical squamous cell carcinomas via gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Li, Chundong; Zhang, Lei; Lv, Jiahui; Tong, Ying

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, gene expression profiles of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and invasive cervical squamous cell carcinomas (CSCC) were analyzed using bioinformatic tools to identify key genes and potential biomarkers. Analyses of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were performed for HSIL vs. normal control and invasive CSCC vs. normal control tissues using the Limma package in R. Pathway enrichment analysis was performed using KOBAS. A protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network for the DEGs in invasive CSCC was constructed using String. Functional enrichment analysis was performed for the DEGs in the PPI network using DAVID. Relevant small molecules were predicted using Cmap. A total of 633 and 881 DEGs were identified in HSIL and invasive CSCC, respectively, and the two groups had 305 DEGs in common. Genes associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway were enriched in the HSIL, while cell cycle-associated genes were over‑represented in invasive CSCC. The PPI network, containing 72 upregulated genes and 434 edges, was illustrated. Functional enrichment analysis showed that the cell cycle was the most significant gene ontology term. A total of six small molecules associated with the pathology of CSCC were identified, including the anti-cancer drug piperlongumine, which showed a negative correlation. The findings of the present study not only enhanced the current understanding of the pathogenesis of CSCC, but may also be a basis for the development of novel therapies. PMID:26398134

  3. Early determination of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma radioresponse identifies high- and low-response tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara, Kiyoshi . E-mail: ki-ohara@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Oki, Akinori; Tanaka, Yumiko Oishi; Onishi, Kayoko; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Satoh, Toyomi; Tsunoda, Hajime; Hata, Masaharu; Sugahara, Shinji; Tokuuye, Koichi; Akine, Yasuyuki; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether early-assessed radioresponse of tumors corresponds with late-assessed radioresponse, which is associated with local disease control in radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: This prospective study included 12 patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated by RT with or without concurrent cisplatin. Tumor volume was estimated by scheduled magnetic resonance imaging before (preRT), 3 to 4 weeks after (early assessment), and 6 to 7 weeks after (late assessment) RT initiation. Radioresponse was assessed with tumor shrinkage curves based on these volumes. Radioresponse for each tumor was calculated as the slope (day{sup -1}) of the shrinkage curve by fitting to an exponential equation. Results: Early-assessed radioresponse ranged from 0.001 to 0.106 day{sup -1} (median, 0.021 day{sup -1}) and late-assessed radioresponse from 0.009 to 0.091 day{sup -1} (median, 0.021 day{sup -1}), with no significant difference between them (p = 0.1191). The early-assessed radioresponse correlated with the late-assessed radioresponse (R {sup 2} = 0.714, p = 0.0005). Conclusions: Correspondence between early- and late-assessed radioresponse in a series of tumors showing a wide range of radioresponse was not particularly close overall. However, early assessment of radioresponsiveness did seem to be useful for characterizing those tumors with high or low radioresponsiveness.

  4. The Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Cancer in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, SH; Zali, MR; Raoufi, M; Nadji, M; Kowsarian, P; Nowroozi, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: The human papiloma virus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted, and most commonly causes genital warts, has been linked to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma. Of ninety plus types of HPV, HPV-16 is the most prevalent in cervical cancer, followed by HPV-18, and HPV-33. As HPV's implication has not been assessed in the Middle East the main focus of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of HPV -16,18, and 33 in cases of cervical cancer from Iran. Material and Methods: This retrospective study covered 100 patients with uterine cervical carcinomas who were referred to two referral centers for cancer in Tehran-Iran. Pathological blocks were collected for these cases and initial review of the blocks showed poor specimens in 18 cases, which left 82 cases for the study. These samples were histologically examined to verify the presence and the type of carcinoma. The next step was in situ hybridzation for the detection of HPV common DNA. In Situ hybridization was preformed on all samples. Finally, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was preformed for the HPV types 16, 18, and 33. PCR amplification of exon 5 of the p53 gene was used as an internal control for the integrity of DNA. Takara PCR Human papilloma Detection method was used which includes primer for HPV 16, 18, and 33. Three primers were used alone, or in combination, in order to increase the sensitivity of the detection. Results: The majority of tumors were squamous cell carcinomas (87%). The rest were adenosquamous carcinoma and adenocarcinomas. None of the 82 different cervical carcinoma tissue samples were found to be positive by in situ hybridization. In the PCR samples, amplification of DNA was observed for 69 tumor specimens. In the remainning13 cases, the DNA in fixed tissue was degraded, as verified by the absence of an internal control band (p53). Out of the total 69 tumors (85.5%) with adequate DNA contained HPV band on PCR. The majority (73.9%) of HPV

  5. [The relationship between expression of basement membrane in squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity and cervical lymph node metastasis].

    PubMed

    Gu, X; Shen, Z; Liu, S; Qian, Z

    1997-01-01

    Fifty seven cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were studied by immunohistochemical ABC method using type IV collagen and laminin antibody to investigate the relationship between expression and distribution of basement membrane in oral SCC and clinicopathologic characteristics and cervical lymph node metastasis. The distribution of basement membrane of oral SCC was discontinuous and in some cases the membranes disappeared. There was highly significant correlation between the staining patterns together with histologic differentiation degrees and cervical lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). These indicate that the expression of baasement membrane in oral SCC may be a useful parameter for evaluation of tumor histologic differentiation and tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:9868026

  6. Cervical Human Papillomavirus Screening among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Grainge, Matthew J.; Seth, Rashmi; Guo, Li; Neal, Keith R.; Coupland, Carol; Vryenhoef, Paul; Johnson, Jane; Jenkins, David

    2005-01-01

    Rates of acquisition and clearance of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) during a 3-year period in women 51 years of age were compared with rates in younger women to provide data on cervical screening for women >50 years of age. Paired, cytologically negative, archived cervical smears taken 3 years apart from 710 women in Nottingham, United Kingdom, were retrieved and tested for HPV infection with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with GP5+/6+ primers. Seventy-one (21.3%) of 333 women 51 years of age who were HPV negative at baseline were positive 3 years later. This percentage was higher than the corresponding acquisition rates among women 21 (15.2%), 31 (14.1%), and 41 (13.3%) years of age, although these differences were not significant. This retrospective study shows that HPV-negative women >50 years of age can acquire HPV and, therefore, require cervical screening. PMID:16318718

  7. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  8. Increased RIPK4 expression is associated with progression and poor prognosis in cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, De-Qing; Li, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Jiang-Bo; Zhou, Tie-Jun; Xue, Wen-Qiong; Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Yuan-Bin; Liao, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Shao-Dan; Hu, Ye-Zhu; Jia, Wei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of receptor interacting protein kinase 4 (RIPK4), a crucial regulatory protein of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, has recently been reported to be involved in several cancers. Here, we report the potential clinical implication and biological functions of RIPK4 in cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). One hundred and ninety-eight CSCC cases, 109 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 141 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) and 63 chronic cervicitis were collected. The expression of RIPK4 was detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC), and its clinical value and oncogenic functions were further assessed. RIPK4 expression increased significantly with disease progression from 3.2% in chronic cervicitis, 19.3% in LSILs and 85.1% in HSILs to 94.4% in CSCCs (P < 0.001). Moreover, RIPK4 may serve as a useful biomarker to distinguish HSIL from chronic cervicitis/LSIL, which are two different clinical types for therapeutic procedures, with a high sensitivity and specificity (85.1% and 86.6%, respectively) and the performance improved when combined with p16INK4a. Further, RIPK4 overexpression was associated with overall (HR = 2.085, P = 0.038) and disease-free survival (HR = 1.742, P = 0.037). Knockdown of RIPK4 reduced cell migration and invasion via inhibition of Vimentin, MMP2 and Fibronectin expression in cervical cancer cells. RIPK4 might act as a potential diagnostic and independent prognostic biomarker for CSCC patients. PMID:26148476

  9. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  10. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  11. CEACAM1 in Cervical Cancer and Precursor Lesions: Association With Human Papillomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Albarran-Somoza, Benibelks; Franco-Topete, Ramon; Delgado-Rizo, Vidal; Cerda-Camacho, Felipe; Acosta-Jimenez, Lourdes; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is an adhesion molecule expressed in a wide variety of tissues including epithelial cells, leukocytes, and tumors that may establish both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. The aim of this work was to study the protein expression pattern of CEACAM1 in cervical cancer and precursor lesions in the context of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. We used immunohistochemistry to analyze CEACAM1 expression in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical tissues from 15 healthy women, 15 patients with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL), 15 patients with high-grade SIL, and 15 patients with squamous carcinomas. HPV types were identified by PCR. CEACAM1 was either undetectable (13/15) or low (2/15) in normal cervical tissues. By contrast, CEACAM1 expression was increased in high-grade SIL (10 samples staining intermediate/high and 4 samples staining low) as compared with low-grade SIL with undetectable (n=3) or low (n= 12) expression. CEACAM1 expression was undetectable or low in cervical carcinoma. Our results suggest that CEACAM1 may be an interesting progression marker in SIL and cervical cancer, in particular due to reported immunoregulatory properties. PMID:16924126

  12. CEACAM1 in cervical cancer and precursor lesions: association with human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Albarran-Somoza, Benibelks; Franco-Topete, Ramon; Delgado-Rizo, Vidal; Cerda-Camacho, Felipe; Acosta-Jimenez, Lourdes; Lopez-Botet, Miguel; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian

    2006-12-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is an adhesion molecule expressed in a wide variety of tissues including epithelial cells, leukocytes, and tumors that may establish both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. The aim of this work was to study the protein expression pattern of CEACAM1 in cervical cancer and precursor lesions in the context of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. We used immunohistochemistry to analyze CEACAM1 expression in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical tissues from 15 healthy women, 15 patients with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL), 15 patients with high-grade SIL, and 15 patients with squamous carcinomas. HPV types were identified by PCR. CEACAM1 was either undetectable (13/15) or low (2/15) in normal cervical tissues. By contrast, CEACAM1 expression was increased in high-grade SIL (10 samples staining intermediate/high and 4 samples staining low) as compared with low-grade SIL with undetectable (n=3) or low (n=12) expression. CEACAM1 expression was undetectable or low in cervical carcinoma. Our results suggest that CEACAM1 may be an interesting progression marker in SIL and cervical cancer, in particular due to reported immunoregulatory properties.

  13. Induction of Human Squamous Cell-Type Carcinomas by Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Victor D.; Becker-Santos, Daiana D.; Vucic, Emily A.; Lam, Stephen; Lam, Wan L.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a potent human carcinogen. Around one hundred million people worldwide have potentially been exposed to this metalloid at concentrations considered unsafe. Exposure occurs generally through drinking water from natural geological sources, making it difficult to control this contamination. Arsenic biotransformation is suspected to have a role in arsenic-related health effects ranging from acute toxicities to development of malignancies associated with chronic exposure. It has been demonstrated that arsenic exhibits preference for induction of squamous cell carcinomas in the human, especially skin and lung cancer. Interestingly, keratins emerge as a relevant factor in this arsenic-related squamous cell-type preference. Additionally, both genomic and epigenomic alterations have been associated with arsenic-driven neoplastic process. Some of these aberrations, as well as changes in other factors such as keratins, could explain the association between arsenic and squamous cell carcinomas in humans. PMID:22175027

  14. Immunoexpression of HPV 16/18 E6 and E7 oncoproteins in high-grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions in HIV-positive women.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L C; Speck, N M de Gois; Focchi, G R de Azevedo; Schimidt, M A; Marques, R M; Ribalta, J C Lascasas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the immunoexpression of human papillomavirus genotypes 16 and 18 (E6 and E7) oncoproteins in cervical high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women. These results were also compared to the persistence and/or recurrence of lesions after loop electrosurgical excision procedure. Cervical samples from 158 patients were divided into three groups according to the presence or absence of HSIL in women who were or were not HIV-positive. By using the tissue microarray technique, immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze the expression of HPV 16/18 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Cervical samples from 95 HIV-positive women and 63 HIV-negative women were studied. A statistically significant difference was found in the immunoexpression of E6 and E7 oncoproteins in samples from HIV-positive women with HSIL and that of women with non-neoplastic tissue (P < 0.001). There was also a statistically significant correlation between the immunoexpression of E6 (P = 0.012) and E7 (P < 0.001) oncoproteins in lesion persistence among HIV-positive women. Within the limitations of this study, the immunoexpression of HPV 16/18 E6 and E7 oncoproteins may have prognostic value regarding lesion persistence in HIV-positive women. PMID:26909984

  15. Immunoexpression of HPV 16/18 E6 and E7 oncoproteins in high-grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions in HIV-positive women.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L C; Speck, N M de Gois; Focchi, G R de Azevedo; Schimidt, M A; Marques, R M; Ribalta, J C Lascasas

    2016-02-19

    The aim of this study was to assess the immunoexpression of human papillomavirus genotypes 16 and 18 (E6 and E7) oncoproteins in cervical high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women. These results were also compared to the persistence and/or recurrence of lesions after loop electrosurgical excision procedure. Cervical samples from 158 patients were divided into three groups according to the presence or absence of HSIL in women who were or were not HIV-positive. By using the tissue microarray technique, immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze the expression of HPV 16/18 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Cervical samples from 95 HIV-positive women and 63 HIV-negative women were studied. A statistically significant difference was found in the immunoexpression of E6 and E7 oncoproteins in samples from HIV-positive women with HSIL and that of women with non-neoplastic tissue (P < 0.001). There was also a statistically significant correlation between the immunoexpression of E6 (P = 0.012) and E7 (P < 0.001) oncoproteins in lesion persistence among HIV-positive women. Within the limitations of this study, the immunoexpression of HPV 16/18 E6 and E7 oncoproteins may have prognostic value regarding lesion persistence in HIV-positive women.

  16. Anatomic Invasive Depth Predicts Delayed Cervical Lymph Node Metastasis of Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Sohei; Tomioka, Toshifumi; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ugumori, Toru; Hato, Naohito; Fujii, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Delayed cervical lymph node metastasis (CLNM) is the most negative prognostic factor of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). This study analyzed the relationship between clinicopathologic factors, including anatomic invasive depth (AID), and CLNM. A total of 212 patients with clinically node-negative (cN0) tongue SCC who had undergone partial glossectomy through the mouth were eligible for this retrospective study. The deepest portions where tongue SCC cells invaded as determined by microscopic analyses were classified into 5 categories, including epithelial and submucosal tissue, lateral extrinsic tongue muscle (ETM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), paralingual and sublingual spaces, and medial ETM according to AID. We examined the relationship between clinicopathologic factors including AID and delayed CLNM. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that AID was an independent predictive factor for delayed CLNM (P=0.0022; odds ratio=7.1). Deeper invasion than ITM, including ITM, paralingual and sublingual spaces, and medial ETM, had high sensitivity and negative predictive value for delayed CLNM (94.4% and 95.7%, respectively). Precise elucidation of AID may be useful for the preoperative decision for performing elective neck dissection. None of 11 patients in whom the deepest portion where tumor invaded to lateral ETM (according to AID) showed delayed CLNM, although tongue SCC T4a tumor is defined by the presence of invasion of cancer cells to ETM. Tumors with invasion to lateral ETM might have to be excluded from the pathologic T4a category. PMID:27186852

  17. Up-Regulation of miR-21 Is Associated with Cervicitis and Human Papillomavirus Infection in Cervical Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bumrungthai, Sureewan; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya; Evans, Mark Francis; Chopjitt, Peechanika; Tangsiriwatthana, Thumwadee; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Kleebkaow, Pilaiwan; Luanratanakorn, Sanguanchoke; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Worawichawong, Suchin; Pientong, Chamsai

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is recognized as an oncomir and shows up-regulation in many types of human malignancy. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of miR-21 expression associated with HPV infection in normal and abnormal cervical tissues. Cervical tissue samples with different cytological or histopathological grades were investigated for HPV by PCR and for miR-21 and programmed cell death, protein 4 (PDCD4) expression using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) of stromal and epithelial tissues and in situ hybridization (ISH) using locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes were performed on a subset of fixed specimens. Cell line experiments were conducted on fibroblasts stimulated in culture media from HeLa cells, which were then assessed for miR-21, PDCD4, IL-6 and α-SMA expression by qRT-PCR. Twenty normal cervical cell, 12 cervicitis, 14 cervical intraepithelial neoplastic I (CIN I), 22 CIN II-III and 43 cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) specimens were investigated. miR-21 levels were significantly lower in normal than in abnormal tissues. The expression of miR-21 in HPV negative normal cytology was significantly lower than in HPV positive samples in abnormal tissue and SCC. The miR-21 expression was significantly higher in HPV negative cervicitis than HPV negative normal cells. LCM and ISH data showed that miR-21 is primarily expressed in the tumor-associated stromal cell microenvironment. Fibroblasts treated with HeLa cell culture media showed up-regulated expression of miR-21, which correlated with increased expression of α-SMA and IL-6 and with down-regulation of PDCD4. These results demonstrate that miR-21 is associated with HPV infection and involved in cervical lesions as well as cervicitis and its up-regulation in tumor-stroma might be involved in the inflammation process and cervical cancer progression. PMID:26010154

  18. Differences in human papillomavirus type distribution in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer in Europe.

    PubMed

    Tjalma, Wiebren A; Fiander, Alison; Reich, Olaf; Powell, Ned; Nowakowski, Andrzej M; Kirschner, Benny; Koiss, Robert; O'Leary, John; Joura, Elmar A; Rosenlund, Mats; Colau, Brigitte; Schledermann, Doris; Kukk, Kersti; Damaskou, Vasileia; Repanti, Maria; Vladareanu, Radu; Kolomiets, Larisa; Savicheva, Alevtina; Shipitsyna, Elena; Ordi, Jaume; Molijn, Anco; Quint, Wim; Raillard, Alice; Rosillon, Dominique; De Souza, Sabrina Collas; Jenkins, David; Holl, Katsiaryna

    2013-02-15

    Knowledge of differences in human papillomavirus (HPV)-type prevalence between high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-CIN) and invasive cervical cancer (ICC) is crucial for understanding the natural history of HPV-infected cervical lesions and the potential impact of HPV vaccination on cervical cancer prevention. More than 6,000 women diagnosed with HG-CIN or ICC from 17 European countries were enrolled in two parallel cross-sectional studies (108288/108290). Centralised histopathology review and standardised HPV-DNA typing were applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical specimens dated 2001-2008. The pooled prevalence of individual HPV types was estimated using meta-analytic methods. A total of 3,103 women were diagnosed with HG-CIN and a total of 3,162 with ICC (median ages: 34 and 49 years, respectively), of which 98.5 and 91.8% were HPV-positive, respectively. The most common HPV types in women with HG-CIN were HPV16/33/31 (59.9/10.5/9.0%) and in ICC were HPV16/18/45 (63.3/15.2/5.3%). In squamous cell carcinomas, HPV16/18/33 were most frequent (66.2/10.8/5.3%), and in adenocarcinomas, HPV16/18/45 (54.2/40.4/8.3%). The prevalence of HPV16/18/45 was 1.1/3.5/2.5 times higher in ICC than in HG-CIN. The difference in age at diagnosis between CIN3 and squamous cervical cancer for HPV18 (9 years) was significantly less compared to HPV31/33/'other' (23/20/17 years), and for HPV45 (1 year) than HPV16/31/33/'other' (15/23/20/17 years). In Europe, HPV16 predominates in both HG-CIN and ICC, whereas HPV18/45 are associated with a low median age of ICC. HPV18/45 are more frequent in ICC than HG-CIN and associated with a high median age of HG-CIN, with a narrow age interval between HG-CIN and ICC detection. These findings support the need for primary prevention of HPV16/18/45-related cervical lesions.

  19. FDG and FMISO PET Hypoxia Evaluation in Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  20. ADXS11-001 High Dose HPV+ Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Effects of Immunotherapy; Metastatic/Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  1. Methylation of Cervical Neoplastic Cells Infected With Human Papillomavirus 16

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Eun Young; Lee, Keun Ho; Hur, Soo Young; Rhee, Jee Eun; Kee, Mee Kyung; Kang, Chung; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate the role of methylation of adenylate cyclase activating peptide 1 (ADCYAP1), paired box gene 1 (PAX1), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), and T-lymphocyte maturation–associated protein (MAL) during carcinogenesis. Methods We evaluated the methylation of 4 genes by using the cervical carcinoma cell lines (CaSki, SiHa, HeLa, and C33A) and cervical neoplastic cells from 56 subjects with human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16)–infected low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 50 subjects with HPV16-infected high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs), and 24 subjects with HPV16-infected invasive cervical cancer who attended Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital. Methylation of the 4 genes was evaluated using quantitative bisulfate pyrosequencing. Results The ADCYAP1 promoter was hypermethylated in the 4 cell lines (CaSki, 97.40 ± 1.39; SiHa, 82.04 ± 17.02; HeLa, 96.14 ± 2.08; and C33A, 78 ± 10.18). PAX1 and CADM1 were hypermethylated in the HPV16/18-infected cell lines CaSki (PAX1, 91.18 ± 9.91; CADM1, 93.5 ± 7.33), SiHa (PAX1, 96.14 ± 2.08; CADM1, 93.15 ± 8.81), and HeLa (PAX1, 82.04 ± 17.02; CADM1, 92.43 ± 9.95). MAL was hypermethylated in the CaSki cell line (96.04 ± 4.74). Among human cervical neoplastic cells, the methylation indices of ADCYAP1 were 7.8 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 7.0–8.6) in subjects with LSILs and 39.8 (95% CI, 29.0–54.7) in those with cervical cancer (P < 0.001); for PAX1, 7.2 (95% CI, 6.1–8.5) and 37.8 (95% CI, 27.1–52.7), respectively; for CADM1, 3.5 (95% CI, 3.0–4.0) and 17.7 (95% CI, 10.8–29.1), respectively; for MAL, 2.7 (95% CI, 2.5–3.0) and 13.0 (95% CI, 7.6–22.0), respectively (P < 0.001 for each). Immunohistochemical staining results were positive in the cytoplasm of subjects with low methylation of the 4 gene promoters; however, they were negative in the cytoplasm of those with hypermethylation of the 4 gene promoters. Conclusions The results of this

  2. Human papillomavirus DNA and mRNA prevalence and association with cervical cytological abnormalities in the Irish HIV population.

    PubMed

    Loy, Aisling; McInerney, Jamie; Pilkington, Loretto; Keegan, Helen; Delamere, Sandra; Martin, Cara M; Sheils, Orla; O'Leary, John J; Mulcahy, Fiona

    2015-10-01

    The complex interplay between HIV and human papillomavirus and its link to cervical dysplasia is poorly understood. This is the first study to assess the prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus mRNA in HIV-positive women, its relationship to HIV and its potential use in the triage of cervical cancer screening in HIV-positive women. In this cross-sectional study, we included 321 HIV-positive women. In all, 28.7% had abnormal cervical cytology, 51.1% were human papillomavirus DNA-positive and 21.8% tested positive for human papillomavirus mRNA. Women with a CD4 count of <200 × 10(6)/L were more likely to test positive for human papillomavirus DNA and mRNA. Virally suppressed women were less likely to be human papillomavirus DNA-positive; however, the same did not hold true for human papillomavirus mRNA. We found the human papillomavirus mRNA screening to be more specific when screening for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion than human papillomavirus DNA at 84.53% compared to 57.36%. However, the sensitivity was less at 51.59% versus 91.07% for human papillomavirus DNA. It may be possible in the future to use human papillomavirus mRNA/DNA testing within a triage algorithm for the screening and management of cervical cancer in the HIV-positive patient.

  3. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  4. Human papillomavirus infection in couples with female low-grade intraepithelial cervical lesion.

    PubMed

    Simon, Philippe; Roumeguere, Thierry; Christophe Noël, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) are frequently found during cervical cancer screening. Usually they are associated with a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Does the high-transmission rate of HPV infection to the male partner represent a clinical risk for him? Are preventive measures to be taken to prevent the occurrence of male diseases? More than 80% of all LSIL are associated with HPV infections. The prevalence of HPV infection in males can range up to 40%, with 60% of the male partners of LSIL female patients presenting with penile flat lesions. The spontaneous cure rate for male infections is very high (90% at 5 years) but negative consequences in females (cervical high-grade lesion and cervical cancer) are frequent. Their male counterparts are far rarer but in some patients can require deleterious treatment. Transmission prevention by the use of condoms and circumcision is discussed. The effectiveness of HPV vaccination in this situation has not been validated. PMID:20646823

  5. Combination of external beam radiotherapy and Californium (Cf)-252 neutron intracavity brachytherapy is more effective in control of cervical squamous cell carcinoma than that of cervical adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yanli; Liu, Jia; Chen, Shu; Zhou, Qian; Xu, Wenjing; Tang, Chen; Chen, Yonghong; Yang, Mei; Lei, Xin

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of combined external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and Californium (Cf)-252 neutron intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT) on cervical squamous versus adenocarcinoma. A total of 106 patients with stage IB-IIIB cervical cancer were accrued between January 2005 and May 2011 and divided into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (AC) as a pair with 53 patients in each group according to tumor size, stage, age, and hemoglobin level using matched-pair design. The whole pelvic EBRT was performed with 2 Gy/fraction, 4 fractions/week. The total dose was 48-54 Gy (the center of whole pelvic field was blocked by 4 cm in width after 20-36 Gy). Cf-252 neutron ICBT was delivered with 11 and 12 Gy-eq/f with the total dose at point A of 44 and 48 Gy-eq for SCC and AC patients, respectively. The mean follow-up time was 43 months. The 5-year LC, OS, DFS, LAC rates, and mean survival time were 66.0, 56.6, 52.8.0, 17.0%, and 76.4 ± 6.2 months, respectively, for AC patients, whereas they were 81.1, 69.8, 67.9, 11.3%, and 93.3 ± 4.3 months, respectively, for SCC patients. Furthermore, the early treatment toxicity was mild in both groups, the late treatment complications were mainly radiation-induced proctitis and cystitis, and there were no grade 3 or higher complications. Although the combination of Cf-252 neutron ICBT and EBRT was effective in both histology types of cervical cancer, a more aggressive strategy is needed to control cervical AC.

  6. Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in Invasive Cervical Cancer in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Loya, Asif; Serrano, Beatriz; Rasheed, Farah; Tous, Sara; Hassan, Mariam; Clavero, Omar; Raza, Muhammad; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F. Xavier; Alemany, Laia

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Pakistan. We aim to provide specific information on HPV-type distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in the country. A total of 280 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were consecutively selected from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (Lahore, Pakistan). HPV-DNA was detected by SPF10 broad-spectrum PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by LiPA25. HPV-DNA prevalence was 87.5% (95%CI: 83.0–91.1), with 96.1% of cases histologically classified as squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the HPV-DNA positive cases presented single infections (95.9%). HPV16 was the most common type followed by HPV18 and 45. Among HPV-DNA positive, a significantly higher contribution of HPV16/18 was detected in Pakistan (78.4%; 72.7–83.3), compared to Asia (71.6%; 69.9–73.4) and worldwide (70.8%; 69.9–71.8) and a lower contribution of HPVs31/33/45/52/58 (11.1%; 7.9–15.7 vs. 19.8%; 18.3–21.3 and 18.5%; 17.7–19.3). HPV18 or HPV45 positive ICC cases were significantly younger than cases infected by HPV16 (mean age: 43.3, 44.4, 50.5 years, respectively). A routine cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination program does not yet exist in Pakistan; however, the country could benefit from national integrated efforts for cervical cancer prevention and control. Calculated estimations based on our results show that current HPV vaccine could potentially prevent new ICC cases. PMID:27483322

  7. Prevalence and risk factors of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions among HIV-infected women in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enju; McCree, Renicha; Mtisi, Expeditho; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Aris, Eric; Lema, Irene A; Hertzmark, Ellen; Chalamilla, Guerino; Li, Nan; Vermund, Sten H; Spiegelman, Donna

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence and predictors of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) among HIV-infected women in Tanzania, a cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV-infected women at HIV care and treatment clinics. A Papanicolaou (Pap) smear was used as a screening tool for detection of cervical SIL. From December 2006 to August 2009, 1365 HIV-infected women received cervical screening. The median age was 35 (interquartile range [IQR]: 30-42) years, and the median CD4 + cell count was 164 (IQR: 80-257) cells/mm(3). The prevalence of cervical SIL was 8.7% (119/1365). In multivariate analysis, older age (≥50 versus 30-<40 years: prevalence ratio [PR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-3.84, p for trend = 0.001), lower CD4 + cell counts (<100 versus ≥200 cells/mm(3): PR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.01-2.36, p for trend = 0.03) and cervical inflammation (PR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.16-2.60, p = 0.008) were associated with an increased risk of cervical SIL. Women with advanced WHO HIV disease stage (IV versus I/II: PR, 3.45; 95% CI, 1.35-8.85, p for trend = 0.01) had an increased risk for high-grade SIL. In resource-limited settings where it is not feasible to provide cervical cancer prevention services to all HIV-infected women, greater efforts should focus on scaling-up services among those who are older than 50 years, with lower CD4 cell counts and advanced HIV disease stage.

  8. Role of CD24 Protein in Predicting Metastatic Potential of Uterine Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ghee Young; Ha, Hongil; Ahn, Geunghwan; Park, Seon Young; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The protein CD24 is a cell surface protein that appears to function as an adhesion molecule; its expression has been shown to correlate with prognosis in a variety of tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoreactivity of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma to CD24 and determine whether CD24 is associated with clinical and pathologic parameters, including prognosis. Methods and Materials: The expression of CD24 protein was immunohistochemically studied in 73 cases of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. All patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy alone or with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Two pathologists independently analyzed the immunostaining; they did not have knowledge of the patient outcomes and evaluated any changes according to the percentage of tumor cells stained as follows: negative, <5% reactive; and positive, >5% reactive. Results: Positive staining was found in 43 cases (58.9%). The immunoreactivity did not correlate with age, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, lymph node metastasis, or tumor size. For patients who were CD24 negative, the total failure and distant metastasis rates were decreased about 20% compared with the rates for patients who were CD24 positive. On univariate analysis, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rate of CD24-negative patients was significantly greater than that of the CD24-positive patients (84.7% vs. 66.7%, respectively, p = 0.0497). The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and CD24 expression were significantly associated with distant metastasis-free survival on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: CD24 expression was a significant independent prognostic factor for distant metastasis-free survival in patients with uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. In the future, prospective determination of CD24 expression might aid clinical practice in the selection of the appropriate therapy for individual patients.

  9. Cervical lymph node metastases of squamous cell carcinoma from an unknown primary.

    PubMed

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Jassem, Jacek; Orecchia, Roberto

    2004-04-01

    Cervical lymph node metastases of squamous cell carcinoma from occult primary constitute about 2-5% of all patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUP). Metastases in the upper and middle neck are generally attributed to head and neck cancers, whereas the lower neck (supraclavicular area) involvement is often associated with primary malignancies below the clavicles. The diagnostic procedures include physical examination with thorough evaluation of the head and neck mucosa using fiber-optic endoscopy, biopsies from all suspicious sites or blindly from the sites of possible origin of the primary, computer tomography and/or magnetic resonance. A systematic tonsillectomy in the absence of suspicious lesions is often recommended since up to 25% of primary tumors can be detected in this site. The thoracic primary (tracheal, bronchial, lung, esophagus) has to be excluded, especially in the case of lower neck involvement. Positron emission tomography (PET) with fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose allows detection of primary tumor in about 25% of cases, but this procedure is still considered investigational. Therapeutic approaches include surgery (lymph node excision or neck dissection), with or without postoperative radiotherapy, radiotherapy alone and radiotherapy followed by surgery. In early stages (N1), neck dissection and radiotherapy seem to have similar efficacy, whereas more advanced cases (N2, N3) necessitate combined approaches. The extent of radiotherapy (irradiation of bilateral neck and mucosa versus ipsilateral neck radiotherapy) remains debatable. A potential benefit from extensive radiotherapy should be weighted against its acute and late morbidity and difficulties in re-irradiation in the case of subsequent primary emergence. The role of other methods, such as chemotherapy and hyperthermia, remains to be determined. PMID:15023433

  10. mTOR as a Molecular Target in HPV-Associated Oral and Cervical Squamous Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Marsh, Christina; Dinali, Mohamed El; Gangane, Nitin; Jennison, Kaitlin; Hewitt, Stephen; Patel, Vyomesh; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) associated with papillomavirus (HPV) infection has increased over the past decades in the US. We aimed at examining the global impact of HPV-associated HNSCC, and whether the established key role of mTOR activation in HNSCC is also observed in HPV+ HNSCC lesions, thereby providing novel treatment options for HPV-associated HNSCC patients. Experimental Design An international HNSCC tissue microarray (TMA) was used to analyze the expression of p16INK4A, a surrogate for HPV infection, and Akt-mTOR pathway activation. Results were confirmed in a large collection of HPV− and HPV+ HNSCC cases and in a cervical cancer (CCSCC) TMA. Observations were validated in HNSCC and CCSCC-derived cell lines, which were xenografted into immunodeficient mice for tumorigenesis assays. Results Approximately 20% of all HNSCC lesions could be classified as HPV+, irrespective of their country of origin. mTOR pathway activation was observed in most HPV+ HNSCC and CCSCC lesions and cell lines. The pre-clinical efficacy of mTOR inhibition by rapamycin and RAD001 was explored in HPV+ HNSCC and CCSCC tumor xenografts. Both mTOR inhibitors effectively decreased mTOR activity in vivo, and caused a remarkable decrease in tumor burden. These results emphasize the emerging global impact of HPV-related HNSCCs, and indicate that the activation of the mTOR pathway is a widespread event in both HPV− and HPV-associated HNSCC and CCSCC lesions. Conclusions The emerging results may provide a rationale for the clinical evaluation of mTOR inhibitors as a molecular targeted approach for the treatment of HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:22409888

  11. Human papillomavirus induced transformation in cervical and head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allie K; Wise-Draper, Trisha M; Wells, Susanne I

    2014-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed.

  12. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Allie K.; Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed. PMID:25226287

  13. Radiation Therapy Plus Cisplatin and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  14. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Studies of Hypoxia in Squamous Cervical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fjeldbo, Christina S.; Aarnes, Eva-Katrine; Malinen, Eirik; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an adverse factor in cervical cancer, and hypoxia-related gene expression could be a powerful biomarker for identifying the aggressive hypoxic tumors. Reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) is a valuable method for gene expression studies, but suitable reference genes for data normalization that are independent of hypoxia status and clinical parameters of cervical tumors are lacking. In the present work, we aimed to identify reference genes for RT-qPCR studies of hypoxia in squamous cervical cancer. From 422 candidate reference genes selected from the literature, we used Illumina array-based expression profiles to identify 182 genes not affected by hypoxia in cervical cancer, i.e. genes regulated by hypoxia in eight cervical cancer cell lines or correlating with the hypoxia-associated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging parameter ABrix in 42 patients, were excluded. Among the 182 genes, nine candidates (CHCHD1, GNB2L1, IPO8, LASP1, RPL27A, RPS12, SOD1, SRSF9, TMBIM6) that were not associated with tumor volume, stage, lymph node involvement or disease progression in array data of 150 patients, were selected for further testing by RT-qPCR. geNorm and NormFinder analyses of RT-qPCR data of 74 patients identified CHCHD1, SRSF9 and TMBIM6 as the optimal set of reference genes, with stable expression both overall and across patient subgroups with different hypoxia status (ABrix) and clinical parameters. The suitability of the three reference genes were validated in studies of the hypoxia-induced genes DDIT3, ERO1A, and STC2. After normalization, the RT-qPCR data of these genes showed a significant correlation with Illumina expression (P<0.001, n = 74) and ABrix (P<0.05, n = 32), and the STC2 data were associated with clinical outcome, in accordance with the Illumina data. Thus, CHCHD1, SRSF9 and TMBIM6 seem to be suitable reference genes for studying hypoxia-related gene expression in squamous cervical cancer samples by RT

  15. Identification and Validation of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Studies of Hypoxia in Squamous Cervical Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Fjeldbo, Christina S; Aarnes, Eva-Katrine; Malinen, Eirik; Kristensen, Gunnar B; Lyng, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an adverse factor in cervical cancer, and hypoxia-related gene expression could be a powerful biomarker for identifying the aggressive hypoxic tumors. Reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) is a valuable method for gene expression studies, but suitable reference genes for data normalization that are independent of hypoxia status and clinical parameters of cervical tumors are lacking. In the present work, we aimed to identify reference genes for RT-qPCR studies of hypoxia in squamous cervical cancer. From 422 candidate reference genes selected from the literature, we used Illumina array-based expression profiles to identify 182 genes not affected by hypoxia in cervical cancer, i.e. genes regulated by hypoxia in eight cervical cancer cell lines or correlating with the hypoxia-associated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging parameter ABrix in 42 patients, were excluded. Among the 182 genes, nine candidates (CHCHD1, GNB2L1, IPO8, LASP1, RPL27A, RPS12, SOD1, SRSF9, TMBIM6) that were not associated with tumor volume, stage, lymph node involvement or disease progression in array data of 150 patients, were selected for further testing by RT-qPCR. geNorm and NormFinder analyses of RT-qPCR data of 74 patients identified CHCHD1, SRSF9 and TMBIM6 as the optimal set of reference genes, with stable expression both overall and across patient subgroups with different hypoxia status (ABrix) and clinical parameters. The suitability of the three reference genes were validated in studies of the hypoxia-induced genes DDIT3, ERO1A, and STC2. After normalization, the RT-qPCR data of these genes showed a significant correlation with Illumina expression (P<0.001, n = 74) and ABrix (P<0.05, n = 32), and the STC2 data were associated with clinical outcome, in accordance with the Illumina data. Thus, CHCHD1, SRSF9 and TMBIM6 seem to be suitable reference genes for studying hypoxia-related gene expression in squamous cervical cancer samples by RT

  16. Gene Expression Changes in Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma After Initiation of Chemoradiation and Correlation With Clinical Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Klopp, Ann H.; Jhingran, Anuja Ramdas, Latha; Story, Michael D.; Broadus, Russell R.; Lu, Karen H.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate early gene expression changes after chemoradiation in a human solid tumor, allowing identification of chemoradiation-induced gene expression changes in the tumor as well as the tumor microenvironment. In addition we aimed to identify a gene expression profile that was associated with clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: Microarray experiments were performed on cervical cancer specimens obtained before and 48 h after chemoradiation from 12 patients with Stage IB2 to IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated between April 2001 and August 2002. Results: A total of 262 genes were identified that were significantly changed after chemoradiation. Genes involved in DNA repair were identified including DDB2, ERCC4, GADD45A, and XPC. In addition, significantly regulated cell-to-cell signaling pathways included insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), interferon, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. At a median follow-up of 41 months, 5 of 12 patients had experienced either local or distant failure. Supervised clustering analysis identified a 58-gene set from the pretreatment samples that were differentially expressed between patients with and without recurrence. Genes involved in integrin signaling and apoptosis pathways were identified in this gene set. Immortalization-upregulated protein (IMUP), IGF-2, and ARHD had particularly marked differences in expression between patients with and without recurrence. Conclusions: Genetic profiling identified genes regulated by chemoradiation including DNA damage and cell-to-cell signaling pathways. Genes associated with recurrence were identified that will require validation in an independent patient data set to determine whether the 58-gene set associated with clinical outcome could be useful as a prognostic assay.

  17. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in periungual squamous cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, R.L.; Eliezri, Y.D.; Bennett, R.G. ); Nuovo, G.J.; Siverstein, S. Columbia Univ., New York, NY ); Zitelli, J.A. )

    1989-05-12

    Ten squamous cell carcinomas (in situ or invasive) of the fingernail region were analyzed for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to human papilloma-virus (HPV) by dot blot hybridization. In most patients, the lesions were verrucae of long-term duration that were refractory to conventional treatment methods. Eight of the lesions contained HPV DNA sequences, and in six of these the sequences were related to HPV 16 as deduced from low-stringency nucleic acid hybridization followed by low- and high-stringency washes. Furthermore, the restriction endonuclease digestion pattern of DNA isolated from four of these lesions was diagnostic of episomal HPV 16. The high-frequency association of HPV 16 with periungual squamous cell carcinoma is similar to that reported for HPV 16 with squamous cell carcinomas on mucous membranes at other sites, notably the genital tract. The findings suggest that HPV 16 may play an important role in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the finger, most notably those lesions that are chronic and located in the periungual area.

  18. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes Among Women With High-Grade Cervical Lesions in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meizhu; Xu, Qiuxiang; Li, Hongyan; Gao, Huiqiao; Bie, Yachun; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) genotypes among Han women with high-grade cervical lesions in Beijing, China.Cervical cell specimens from patients with histopathologically confirmed cervical lesions at 7 hospitals in Beijing were examined with a validated HPV kit for 13 hr-HPV genotypes during the study period. The patients were divided into a low-grade cervical lesions group (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1, CIN1) and a high-grade cervical lesions group (CIN2+, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2, CIN2; cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3, CIN3; squamous cervical cancer, SCC; and adenocarcinoma of the cervix, ACC) based on the histopathology results.A total of 2817 eligible patients were enrolled, including 610 cases identified as CIN1 and 2207 as CIN2+. The hr-HPV positive rates in the CIN1 and CIN2+ groups were 78.2% (477/610) and 93.3% (2060/2207), respectively. The most frequently detected genotypes were HPV16, 58, 52 and18 in the CIN1 group and HPV16, 58, 33, and 52 in the CIN2+ group, in descending order of prevalence. In addition, the prevalence of HPV18 among the patients with ACC was 28.6% (14/49), significantly >7.2% (54/752) prevalence among the SCC patients (P < 0.001). Additionally, significantly more women in the CIN2+ group had multiple infections compared with those in the CIN1 group (38.1% and 24.9%, respectively; P < 0.001). However, as the cervical lesion grade increased, the prevalence of multiple hr-HPV infections gradually deceased to 44.2% in the CIN2 patients, 36.7% in the CIN3 patients, and 35.3% in the cervical cancer (CC) patients, which included SCC and ACC patients. In cases of multiple hr-HPV infections in the CIN2+ group, double infections accounted for ∼76.6%, and HPV16+58, HPV16+52, and HPV16+18 were the most common combinations, in descending order. The most frequent combination for triple infections was HPV16+58+31, with

  19. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes Among Women With High-Grade Cervical Lesions in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Meizhu; Xu, Qiuxiang; Li, Hongyan; Gao, Huiqiao; Bie, Yachun; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to investigate the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) genotypes among Han women with high-grade cervical lesions in Beijing, China. Cervical cell specimens from patients with histopathologically confirmed cervical lesions at 7 hospitals in Beijing were examined with a validated HPV kit for 13 hr-HPV genotypes during the study period. The patients were divided into a low-grade cervical lesions group (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1, CIN1) and a high-grade cervical lesions group (CIN2+, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2, CIN2; cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3, CIN3; squamous cervical cancer, SCC; and adenocarcinoma of the cervix, ACC) based on the histopathology results. A total of 2817 eligible patients were enrolled, including 610 cases identified as CIN1 and 2207 as CIN2+. The hr-HPV positive rates in the CIN1 and CIN2+ groups were 78.2% (477/610) and 93.3% (2060/2207), respectively. The most frequently detected genotypes were HPV16, 58, 52 and18 in the CIN1 group and HPV16, 58, 33, and 52 in the CIN2+ group, in descending order of prevalence. In addition, the prevalence of HPV18 among the patients with ACC was 28.6% (14/49), significantly >7.2% (54/752) prevalence among the SCC patients (P < 0.001). Additionally, significantly more women in the CIN2+ group had multiple infections compared with those in the CIN1 group (38.1% and 24.9%, respectively; P < 0.001). However, as the cervical lesion grade increased, the prevalence of multiple hr-HPV infections gradually deceased to 44.2% in the CIN2 patients, 36.7% in the CIN3 patients, and 35.3% in the cervical cancer (CC) patients, which included SCC and ACC patients. In cases of multiple hr-HPV infections in the CIN2+ group, double infections accounted for ∼76.6%, and HPV16+58, HPV16+52, and HPV16+18 were the most common combinations, in descending order. The most frequent combination for triple infections was HPV16

  20. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes Among Women With High-Grade Cervical Lesions in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Meizhu; Xu, Qiuxiang; Li, Hongyan; Gao, Huiqiao; Bie, Yachun; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) genotypes among Han women with high-grade cervical lesions in Beijing, China.Cervical cell specimens from patients with histopathologically confirmed cervical lesions at 7 hospitals in Beijing were examined with a validated HPV kit for 13 hr-HPV genotypes during the study period. The patients were divided into a low-grade cervical lesions group (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1, CIN1) and a high-grade cervical lesions group (CIN2+, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2, CIN2; cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3, CIN3; squamous cervical cancer, SCC; and adenocarcinoma of the cervix, ACC) based on the histopathology results.A total of 2817 eligible patients were enrolled, including 610 cases identified as CIN1 and 2207 as CIN2+. The hr-HPV positive rates in the CIN1 and CIN2+ groups were 78.2% (477/610) and 93.3% (2060/2207), respectively. The most frequently detected genotypes were HPV16, 58, 52 and18 in the CIN1 group and HPV16, 58, 33, and 52 in the CIN2+ group, in descending order of prevalence. In addition, the prevalence of HPV18 among the patients with ACC was 28.6% (14/49), significantly >7.2% (54/752) prevalence among the SCC patients (P < 0.001). Additionally, significantly more women in the CIN2+ group had multiple infections compared with those in the CIN1 group (38.1% and 24.9%, respectively; P < 0.001). However, as the cervical lesion grade increased, the prevalence of multiple hr-HPV infections gradually deceased to 44.2% in the CIN2 patients, 36.7% in the CIN3 patients, and 35.3% in the cervical cancer (CC) patients, which included SCC and ACC patients. In cases of multiple hr-HPV infections in the CIN2+ group, double infections accounted for ∼76.6%, and HPV16+58, HPV16+52, and HPV16+18 were the most common combinations, in descending order. The most frequent combination for triple infections was HPV16+58+31, with

  1. The Combined Influence of Oral Contraceptives and Human Papillomavirus Virus on Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.; Toland, Amanda E.; Lea, C. Suzanne; Phillips, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) will occur in those with fair complexion, tendency to burn, and high ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. Organ transplant recipients also are an important population at great risk for CSCC. An association has been reported between oral contraceptive (OC) use, human papillomavirus virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, and there could be a similar association for CSCC. The cutaneous HPV β-E6 protein, a close cousin of the transformative E6 protein underlying anogenital cancers, has been shown to inhibit apoptosis in response to UVR damage and stimulate morphologic transformation in rodent fibroblast cell lines. Furthermore, OC use has been shown to enhance HPV transcription and may contribute to CSCC risk through this pathway. PMID:21499554

  2. The effect of human papillomavirus on DNA repair in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Low, Garren M; Thylur, David S; N Yamamoto, Vicky; Sinha, Uttam K

    2016-10-01

    Much of the current literature regarding the molecular pathophysiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has focused on the virus's effect on cell cycle modulation and cell proliferation. A second mechanism of pathogenicity employed by HPV, dysregulation of cellular DNA repair processes, has been more sparsely studied. The purpose of this review is to describe current understanding about the effect of HPV on DNA repair in HNSCC, taking cues from cervical cancer literature. HPV affects DNA-damage response pathways by interacting with many proteins, including ATM, ATR, MRN, γ-H2AX, Chk1, Chk2, p53, BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51, Rb-related proteins 107 and 130, Tip60, and p16INK4A. Further elucidation of these pathways could lead to development of targeted therapies and improvement of current treatment protocols.

  3. The effect of human papillomavirus on DNA repair in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Low, Garren M; Thylur, David S; N Yamamoto, Vicky; Sinha, Uttam K

    2016-10-01

    Much of the current literature regarding the molecular pathophysiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has focused on the virus's effect on cell cycle modulation and cell proliferation. A second mechanism of pathogenicity employed by HPV, dysregulation of cellular DNA repair processes, has been more sparsely studied. The purpose of this review is to describe current understanding about the effect of HPV on DNA repair in HNSCC, taking cues from cervical cancer literature. HPV affects DNA-damage response pathways by interacting with many proteins, including ATM, ATR, MRN, γ-H2AX, Chk1, Chk2, p53, BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51, Rb-related proteins 107 and 130, Tip60, and p16INK4A. Further elucidation of these pathways could lead to development of targeted therapies and improvement of current treatment protocols. PMID:27688101

  4. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in the United States across time.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andrew P; Saha, Sandeep; Yu, Menggang; Kimple, Randall J; Lambert, Paul F

    2014-04-21

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in approximately 5% of all human cancer. Although initially recognized for causing nearly all cases of cervical carcinoma, much data has now emerged implicating HPVs as a causal factor in other anogenital cancers as well as a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), most commonly oropharyngeal cancers. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) have improved survival compared to patients with HPV- cancers. Furthermore, epidemiological evidence shows the incidence of OPSCC has been steadily rising over time in the United States. It has been proposed that an increase in HPV-related OPSCCs is the driving force behind the increasing rate of OPSCC. Although some studies have revealed an increase in HPV+ head and neck malignancies over time in specific regions of the United States, there has not been a comprehensive study validating this trend across the entire country. Therefore, we undertook this meta-analysis to assess all literature through August 2013 that reported on the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC for patient populations within the United States. The results show an increase in the prevalence of HPV+ OPSCC from 20.9% in the pre-1990 time period to 51.4% in 1990-1999 and finally to 65.4% for 2000-present. In this manner, our study provides further evidence to support the hypothesis that HPV-associated OPSCCs are driving the increasing incidence of OPSCC over time in the United States.

  5. Antibody diffusion in human cervical mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, W M; Radomsky, M L; Whaley, K J; Cone, R A

    1994-01-01

    The mucosal immune system actively transports large quantities of antibodies into all mucus secretions, and these secreted antibodies help prevent infectious entry of many pathogens. Mucus is generally thought to protect epithelial cells by forming a diffusional barrier through which only small molecules can pass. However, electron microscopy indicates that the pore size in mucus is approximately 100 nm, which suggests that antibodies as well as other large molecules might also diffuse through mucus. We measured the diffusion coefficients for antibodies and other proteins within human midcycle cervical mucus using two techniques: fluorescence imaging of concentration profiles and fluorescence photobleaching recovery. The two techniques are complementary, since the rates of diffusion are observed over millimeter distances with fluorescence imaging of concentration profiles and micron distances with fluorescence photobleaching recovery. Both methods yielded essentially the same diffusion coefficients. In contrast to previous reports indicating mucus significantly impedes diffusion of small molecules, antibody diffusion in mucus was relatively unimpeded. In our observations IgG, IgG fragments, IgA, and IgM diffused almost as rapidly in cervical mucus as in water (1.0 > Dmucus/Dwater > 0.7). Simple models for diffusion through water-filled pores suggest that the hydrodynamic pore size for cervical mucus is approximately 100 nm, smaller than the approximately 1000 nm pore size of a collagen gel (at 1 mg/ml) and larger than the approximately 10 nm pore size of gelatin (at 100 mg/ml). This estimated pore size is consistent both with electron micrographs and geometric models of interfiber spacing. Based on these results, we predict that particles as large as viruses can diffuse rapidly through human midcycle cervical mucus, provided the particle forms no adhesive interactions with mucus glycoproteins. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:8161703

  6. Human papillomaviruses in cervical cancer I. HPV-16 and 18 predominate in the Greek population.

    PubMed

    Vassilandonopoulou, G; Panotopoulou, E; Fotiou, S; Tserkezoglou, A; Machera, E; Kottaridis, S

    1997-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) and their role in carcinogenesis have been the subject of extensive investigation Specific types of HPV have been associated with cervical carcinoma HPV 16 and 18 are mainly associated with malignant progression and considered "high risk" viruses Using Southern blot analysis and in situ hybridization we investigated the presence of papilloma viruses in cervical carcinoma patients as well as appropriate controls. The results presented here support the aetiological role of HPV 16 and 18 in cervical carcinoma and demonstrate the prevalence of these viruses in Greek women. The role of viruses in carcinogenesis in well established in almost all species from fishes, to birds, to mammals. Although not well circumstantiated, viruses probably play as-great a role in human cancer as in other species. The role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) not only in benign proliferations, but also in a number of malignancies has long been postulated (1,2). Presently over 20 HPV types have been identified and there is evidence now associating specific types with certain human anogenital cancers, notably cervical cancer (3,4). Advance neoplasias such as squamous cell carcinomas are associated with types, 16,18 and 31, with type 16 prevailing in these lesions (5,6). In this paper we shall present evidence which extends and confirms that previously reported on the prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 in Greek women. PMID:9066640

  7. [Matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous regulators in squamous cervical carcinoma (review of the own data)].

    PubMed

    Solovуeva, N I; Timoshenko, O S; Gureeva, T A; Kugaevskaya, E V

    2015-01-01

    Expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous regulators has been investigated in squamous cervical carcinoma (SCC). The study included (i) immortalized fibroblasts (IF) and three clones of fibroblasts transformed by oncogene E7 HPV-16 (TF); (ii) cell lines associated with HPV-16 and HPV-18; (iii) tumor tissue samples from patients with SCC, associated with gene E7 HPV-16. Transfection of fibroblasts with the E7 HPV16 oncogen was accompanied by induction of collagenase (MMP-1, MMP-14) and gelatinase (MMP-9) gene expression and the increase in catalytic activity of these MMP, while gelatinase MMP-2 expression remained unchanged. Expression of MMP-9 was found only inTF. MMP-9 may serve as a TF marker. In TF expression mRNA TIMP-1 was decreased. The level of free endogenous inhibitors in TF was significantly lower then the level in IF. Expression MMP correlated with the tumorigenic potential of TF. Invasive potential of cell lines associated with HPV18 (HeLa and S4-1) was more pronounced than that of cell lines associated with HPV16 (SiHa and Caski). The cell lines differed substantially in the level of expression of MMPI and their endogenous regulators. In most cell lines mRNA levels of collagenases MMP-1 and MMP-14 and the activator (uPA) increased, while gelatinase MMP-2 mRNA and tissue inhibitors mRNAs changed insignificantly. MMP-9 expression in cell lines was not detected. Results of studies on these cell lines suggest existence of an imbalance in the system enzyme/inhibitor/activator, that increases destructive potential of these cells. The study of expression of MMP and their endogenous regulators performed using SCC tumor samples associated with HPV16 has shown that the invasive and metastatic potentials of tumor tissue in SCC is obviously determined by the increase of expression of collagenases MMP-1, MT1-MMP and gelatinase MMP-9, decreased expression of inhibitors (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2), and to a lesser extent to increased expression of

  8. Expression of E-, P- and N-Cadherin and Its Clinical Significance in Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Precancerous Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baohua; Shi, Haiyan; Wang, Fenfen; Hong, Die; Lv, Weiguo; Xie, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of classical cadherins has been observed in tumor invasion and metastasis, but its involvement in cervical carcinogenesis and cancer progression is not clear. We investigated E-, P- and N-cadherin expression and its significance in cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). This retrospective study enrolled 508 patients admitted to Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University with cervical lesions between January 2006 and December 2010. Immunochemical staining was performed in 98 samples of normal cervical epithelium (NC), 283 of CIN, and 127 of early-stage SCC. The association of cadherin staining with clinical characteristics and survival of the patients was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. We found gradients of decreasing E-cadherin expression and increasing P-cadherin expression from NC through CIN to SCC. Aberrant E-cadherin and P-cadherin expression were significantly associated with clinical parameters indicating poor prognosis and shorter patient survival. Interestingly, we found very low levels of positive N-cadherin expression in CIN and SCC tissues that were not related to CIN or cancer. Pearson chi-square tests showed that E-cadherin expression in SCC was inversely correlated with P-cadherin expression (E-P switch), and was not correlated with N-cadherin expression. More important, patients with tissues exhibiting an E-P switch in expression had highly aggressive phenotypes and poorer prognosis than those without E-P switch expression. Our findings suggest that E-cadherin and P-cadherin, but not N-cadherin staining, might be useful in diagnosing CIN and for predicting prognosis in patients with early-stage SCC. PMID:27223886

  9. Human Papillomavirus 18 Genetic Variation and Cervical Cancer Risk Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alyce A.; Gheit, Tarik; Franceschi, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) is the second most carcinogenic HPV type, after HPV16, and it accounts for approximately 12% of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as well as 37% of adenocarcinoma (ADC) of the cervix worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the worldwide diversity and carcinogenicity of HPV18 genetic variants by sequencing the entire long control region (LCR) and the E6 open reading frame of 711 HPV18-positive cervical samples from 39 countries, taking advantage of the International Agency for Research on Cancer biobank. A total of 209 unique HPV18 sequence variants were identified that formed three phylogenetic lineages (A, B, and C). A and B lineages each divided into four sublineages, including a newly identified candidate B4 sublineage. The distribution of lineages varied by geographical region, with B and C lineages found principally in Africa. HPV18 (sub)lineages were compared between 453 cancer cases and 236 controls, as well as between 81 ADC and 160 matched SCC cases. In region-stratified analyses, there were no significant differences in the distribution of HPV18 variant lineages between cervical cancer cases and controls or between ADC and SCC. In conclusion, our findings do not support the role of HPV18 (sub)lineages for discriminating cancer risk or explaining why HPV18 is more strongly linked with ADC than SCC. IMPORTANCE This is the largest and most geographically/ethnically diverse study of the genetic variation of HPV18 to date, providing a comprehensive reference for phylogenetic classification of HPV18 sublineages for epidemiological and biological studies. PMID:26269181

  10. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  11. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  12. Biological and clinical significance of NAC1 expression in cervical carcinomas: a comparative study between squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yeasmin, Shamima; Nakayama, Kentaro; Rahman, Mohammed Tanjimur; Rahman, Munmun; Ishikawa, Masako; Katagiri, Atsuko; Iida, Kouji; Nakayama, Naomi; Otuski, Yoshiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Satoru; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the biological and clinical significance of NAC1 (nucleus accumbens associated 1) expression in both cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas. Using immunohistochemistry, the frequency of positive NAC1 expression in adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas (31.0%; 18/58) was significantly higher than that in squamous cell carcinomas (16.2%; 12/74) (P = .043). NAC1 gene amplification was identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 5 (7.2%) of 69 squamous cell carcinomas. NAC1 amplification was not identified in the adenocarcinomas (0%; 0/58). Positive NAC1 expression was significantly correlated with shorter overall survival in squamous cell carcinomas (P < .0001). A multivariate analysis showed that positive NAC1 expression in squamous cell carcinomas was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival after standard radiotherapy (P = .0003). In contrast to squamous cell carcinomas, positive NAC1 expression did not correlate with shorter overall survival in adenocarcinomas/adenosquamous carcinomas (P = .317). Profound growth inhibition, increased apoptosis, decreased cell proliferation, and decreased cell migration and invasion were observed in silencing RNA-treated cancer cells with NAC1 overexpression compared with cancer cells without NAC1 expression. NAC1 overexpression stimulated proliferation, migration, and invasion in the cervical cancer cell lines TCS and Hela P3, which normally lack NAC1 expression. These findings indicate that NAC1 overexpression is critical to the growth and survival of cervical carcinomas irrespective of histologic type. Furthermore, they suggest that NAC1 silencing RNA-induced phenotypes depend on the expression status of the targeted cell line. Therefore, cervical carcinoma patients with NAC1 expression may benefit from a targeted therapy irrespective of histologic type.

  13. Human papillomavirus, current vaccines, and cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Teitelman, Anne M; Stringer, Marilyn; Averbuch, Tali; Witkoski, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infection, the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, is associated with the development of cervical cancer. The new human papillomavirus vaccine advances cervical cancer prevention; however, provider-recommended screening with Papanicolaou tests and lifestyle modifications are still needed. Widespread implementation of the vaccine and delivering cervical cancer screening to underserved populations remain a challenge. Nurses are ideally suited to address these needs by providing education to patients and families. PMID:19208050

  14. Biomechanical response of the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Duma, Stefan M; Kemper, Andrew R; Porta, David J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the biomechanical response of human cervical spine segments in dynamic axial compression. This was accomplished by performing dynamic axial compression tests on human cervical spine segments, C4-T1 and C6-T1, dissected from fresh frozen human male cadavers. The proximal and distal vertebral bodies were fixed to a load cell with a custom aluminum pot and subjected to dynamic compressive loading rates using a servo-hydraulic Material Testing System at a rate of 50 mm/s. The average force and moment at time of structural failure were found to be 3022 +/- 45 N and 46.1 +/-8.1 Nm, respectively, for C4-T1 segments and 6117 +/- 6639 N and 69.5 +/-6.8 Nm, respectively for C6-T1segments. The most severe injury as a result of this testing was compression fractures of the vertebral body. In addition, injuries to the intervertebral discs were only observed in specimens that sustained severe vertebral body fractures. This is consistent with the findings of previous researchers who have reported that intervertebral disc failures do not occur due to single acute loading events without associated severe boney fractures. PMID:19141905

  15. Association of human immunodeficiency virus-induced immunosuppression with human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Henry, M J; Stanley, M W; Cruikshank, S; Carson, L

    1989-02-01

    Human papillomavirus infection plays an important causal role in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma. The rate of infection with human papillomavirus as well as the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma are increased in immunosuppressed patients. We report a possible association between infection with human immunodeficiency virus and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with human papillomavirus infection.

  16. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Tirapazamine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  17. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  18. Comparison of Cervical Spine Anatomy in Calves, Pigs and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Xu, Hua-Zi; Wang, Yong-Li; Zhu, Qing-An; Mao, Fang-Min; Lin, Yan; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Context Animals are commonly used to model the human spine for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Many studies have investigated similarities and differences between animals and humans in the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. However, a quantitative anatomic comparison of calf, pig, and human cervical spines has not been reported. Purpose To compare fundamental structural similarities and differences in vertebral bodies from the cervical spines of commonly used experimental animal models and humans. Study Design Anatomical morphometric analysis was performed on cervical vertebra specimens harvested from humans and two common large animals (i.e., calves and pigs). Methods Multiple morphometric parameters were directly measured from cervical spine specimens of twelve pigs, twelve calves and twelve human adult cadavers. The following anatomical parameters were measured: vertebral body width (VBW), vertebral body depth (VBD), vertebral body height (VBH), spinal canal width (SCW), spinal canal depth (SCD), pedicle width (PW), pedicle depth (PD), pedicle inclination (PI), dens width (DW), dens depth (DD), total vertebral width (TVW), and total vertebral depth (TVD). Results The atlantoaxial (C1–2) joint in pigs is similar to that in humans and could serve as a human substitute. The pig cervical spine is highly similar to the human cervical spine, except for two large transverse processes in the anterior regions ofC4–C6. The width and depth of the calf odontoid process were larger than those in humans. VBW and VBD of calf cervical vertebrae were larger than those in humans, but the spinal canal was smaller. Calf C7 was relatively similar to human C7, thus, it may be a good substitute. Conclusion Pig cervical vertebrae were more suitable human substitutions than calf cervical vertebrae, especially with respect to C1, C2, and C7. The biomechanical properties of nerve vascular anatomy and various segment functions in pig and calf cervical vertebrae must be

  19. Estimate of the global burden of cervical adenocarcinoma and potential impact of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Data on the current burden of adenocarcinoma (ADC) and histology-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution are relevant to predict the future impact of prophylactic HPV vaccines. Methods We estimate the proportion of ADC in invasive cervical cancer, the global number of cases of cervical ADC in 2015, the effect of cervical screening on ADC, the number of ADC cases attributable to high-risk HPV types -16, -18, -45, -31 and -33, and the potential impact of HPV vaccination using a variety of data sources including: GLOBOCAN 2008, Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5) Volume IX, cervical screening data from the World Health Organization/Institut Català d'Oncologia Information Centre on HPV and cervical cancer, and published literature. Results ADC represents 9.4% of all ICC although its contribution varies greatly by country and region. The global crude incidence rate of cervical ADC in 2015 is estimated at 1.6 cases per 100,000 women, and the projected worldwide incidence of ADC in 2015 is 56,805 new cases. Current detection rates for HPV DNA in cervical ADC tend to range around 80–85%; the lower HPV detection rates in cervical ADC versus squamous cell carcinoma may be due to technical artefacts or to misdiagnosis of endometrial carcinoma as cervical ADC. Published data indicate that the five most common HPV types found in cervical ADC are HPV-16 (41.6%), -18 (38.7%), -45 (7.0%), -31 (2.2%) and -33 (2.1%), together comprising 92% of all HPV positive cases. Future projections using 2015 data, assuming 100% vaccine coverage and a true HPV causal relation of 100%, suggest that vaccines providing protection against HPV-16/18 may theoretically prevent 79% of new HPV-related ADC cases (44,702 cases annually) and vaccines additionally providing cross-protection against HPV-31/33/45 may prevent 89% of new HPV-related ADC cases (50,769 cases annually). Conclusions It is predicted that the currently available HPV vaccines will be highly effective

  20. Biphenotypic human papillomavirus-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Pitiyage, Gayani; Lei, Mary; Guererro Urbano, Teresa; Odell, Edward; Thavaraj, Selvam

    2015-07-11

    Human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is now recognised as a subtype of head and neck cancer with distinct clinical, molecular and histological characteristics. The majority of these carcinomas are of non-keratinising squamous type but there is a growing number of histomorphologic variants of this disease. Here we describe the clinical, histomorphologic and immunophenotypic features of two cases of human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrating a clearly delineated biphasic differentiated and undifferentiated phenotype.

  1. Human Papillomavirus–Related Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Chernock, Rebecca D.; Zhang, Qin; El-Mofty, Samir K.; Thorstad, Wade L.; Lewis, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the frequency of human papillomavirus–related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in African Americans and whites and to examine patient outcomes in these 2 groups. Design Retrospective study. Setting One tertiary care, university medical center. Patients Information on patients with stage III/IV oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma diagnosed between 1998 and 2007, and with primary surgical samples available for review, were selected from a radiotherapy database. One patient was Native American and was excluded from analysis; data on 174 patients were analyzed. Results One hundred forty-eight patients (85.1%) were white and 26 (14.9%) were African American. Human papillomavirus in situ hybridization–positive and p16-positive tumors were much more common in whites (63.5% and 83.1% of tumors, respectively) than in African Americans (11.5% and 34.6% of tumors, respectively) (P<.001). African Americans were also more likely to have received definitive (nonsurgical) rather than postoperative radiation therapy (P=.001) and had a higher frequency of T3/T4–stage tumors (P=.03) compared with whites. Disease-free survival was significantly shorter for African Americans (P=.02). In multivariate analysis, viral status (P=.006), T stage (P=.02), and treatment type (P=.002), but not race (P=.98), were significant factors contributing to disease-free survival. Conclusions In high-stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, the proportion of human papillomavirus–related tumors is much higher in whites than in African Americans. African Americans also appear to develop higher T-stage tumors and are more likely to receive definitive therapy. The shorter disease-free survival observed in African Americans may be due to viral status, treatment type, and higher T stage, but does not appear to be due to race. PMID:21339403

  2. Marijuana use is not associated with cervical human papillomavirus natural history or cervical neoplasia in HIV-seropositive or HIV-seronegative women.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Palefsky, Joel M; Zhong, Ye; Minkoff, Howard; Massad, L Stewart; Anastos, Kathy; Levine, Alexandra M; Moxley, Michael; Xue, Xiao N; Burk, Robert D; Strickler, Howard D

    2010-03-01

    Marijuana use was recently reported to have a positive cross-sectional association with human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer. Laboratory data suggest that marijuana could have an immunomodulatory effect. Little is known, however, regarding the effects of marijuana use on cervical HPV or neoplasia. Therefore, we studied the natural history (i.e., prevalence, incident detection, clearance/persistence) of cervical HPV and cervical neoplasia (i.e., squamous intraepithelial lesions; SIL) in a large prospective cohort of 2,584 HIV-seropositive and 915 HIV-seronegative women. Marijuana use was classified as ever/never, current/not current, and by frequency and duration of use. No positive associations were observed between use of marijuana, and either cervical HPV infection or SIL. The findings were similar among HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women, and in tobacco smokers and nonsmokers. These data suggest that marijuana use does not increase the burden of cervical HPV infection or SIL.

  3. Suppression of carbonyl reductase expression enhances malignant behaviour in uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma: carbonyl reductase predicts prognosis and lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akihiro; Fukushima, Chikako; Yoshidomi, Keiko; Sueoka, Kotaro; Nawata, Shugo; Yokoyama, Yoshihito; Tsuchida, Shigeki; Ismail, Endom; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Sugino, Norihiro

    2011-12-01

    Carbonyl reductase (CR) is an NADPH-dependent, mostly monomeric, cytosolic enzyme with broad substrate specificity for carbonyl compounds. CR appears to be involved in the regulation of tumour progression. However, molecular mechanisms of CR in tumour progression and clinical significance of CR status remain unclear in human uterine squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Here, we investigated the clinical significance of CR using immunohistochemical analyses of human uterine cervical SCC tissues and how CR affects cancer cell behaviour in vitro. Paraffin sections from uterine cervical SCC tissues, FIGO stage Ib1-IIb (n = 67) were immunostained with anti-CR antibodies. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Sense and antisense CR cDNAs were transfected into a human uterine SCC cell line (SiHa) to investigate the role of CR in cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that reduced CR expression patterns in primary cancer lesions were closely associated with a high incidence of pelvic lymph node metastasis, poor OS, and poor PFS. In an in vitro experiment, suppression of CR increased cancer cell invasion, secretion of MMP-2, -9 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and decreased E-cadherin expression. On the other hand, over-expression of CR increased E-cadherin expression and decreased MMP-2, -9 secretion and COX-2 expression. The reduced CR expression pattern, as measured by immunohistochemistry, can be a useful predictor of lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in patients with uterine SCC. This clinical result is supported by the in vitro data which show that suppression of CR expression promotes cancer cell invasion with decreased E-cadherin expression and increased MMP-2, -9 secretion.

  4. [Human papillomavirus detection in cervical cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Picconi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC), which is strongly associated to high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) infection, continues being a significant health problem in Latin America. The use of conventional cytology to detect precancerous cervical lesions has had no major impact on reducing CC incidence and mortality rates, which are still high in the region. New screening tools to detect precancerous lesions became available, which provide great opportunities for CC prevention, as do highly efficacious HPV vaccines able to prevent nearly all lesions associated with HPV-16 and -18 when applied before viral exposure. Currently, hr-HPV testing represents an invaluable component of clinical guidelines for screening, management and treatment of CC and their precursor lesions. Many testing strategies have been developed that can detect a broad spectrum of hr-HPV types in a single assay; however, only a small subset of them has documented clinical performance for any of the standard HPV testing indications. HPV tests that have not been validated and lack proof of reliability, reproducibility and accuracy should not be used in clinical management. Once incorporated into the lab, it is essential to submit the whole procedure of HPV testing to continuous and rigorous quality assurance to avoid sub-optimal, potentially harmful practices. Recent progress and current status of these methods are discussed in this article.

  5. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  6. The Number of Positive Pelvic Lymph Nodes and Multiple Groups of Pelvic Lymph Node Metastasis Influence Prognosis in Stage IA–IIB Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Zhao, Li-Jun; Li, Ming-Zhu; Li, Ming-Xia; Wang, Jian-Liu; Wei, Li-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pelvic lymph node metastasis (LNM) is an important prognostic factor in cervical cancer. Cervical squamous cell carcinoma accounts for approximately 75–80% of all cervical cancers. Analyses of the effects of the number of positive lymph nodes (LNs), unilateral versus bilateral pelvic LNM and a single group versus multiple groups of pelvic LNM on survival and recurrence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma are still lacking. The study aimed to analyze the effects of the number of positive pelvic LNs and a single group versus multiple groups of pelvic LNM on survival and recurrence. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of 296 patients diagnosed with Stage IA–IIB cervical squamous cell carcinoma who received extensive/sub-extensive hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy/pelvic LN sampling at Peking University People's Hospital from November 2004 to July 2013. Ten clinicopathological variables were evaluated as risk factors for pelvic LNM: Age at diagnosis, gravidity, clinical stage, histological grade, tumor diameter, lymph-vascular space involvement (LVSI), depth of cervical stromal invasion, uterine invasion, parametrial invasion, and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results: The incidence of pelvic LNM was 20.27% (60/296 cases). Pelvic LNM (P = 0.00) was significantly correlated with recurrence. Pelvic LNM (P = 0.00), the number of positive pelvic LNs (P = 0.04) and a single group versus multiple groups of pelvic LNM (P = 0.03) had a significant influence on survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that LVSI (P = 0.00), depth of cervical stromal invasion (P = 0.00) and parametrial invasion (P = 0.03) were independently associated with pelvic LNM. Conclusions: Patients with pelvic LNM had a higher recurrence rate and poor survival outcomes. Furthermore, more than 2 positive pelvic LNs and multiple groups of pelvic LNM appeared to identify patients with worse survival outcomes in node-positive IA-IIB cervical squamous cell carcinoma. LVSI

  7. Human Papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus co-infection in Cervical Carcinoma in Algerian women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that the implication of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of cervical cancer is well established, the impact of a co-infection with high risk HPV (HR-HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is still not fully understood. Methods Fifty eight randomly selected cases of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the uterine cervix, 14 normal cervices specimens, 21 CIN-2/3 and 16 CIN-1 cases were examined for EBV and HPV infections. Detection of HR-HPV specific sequences was carried out by PCR amplification using consensus primers of Manos and by Digene Hybrid Capture. The presence of EBV was revealed by amplifying a 660 bp specific EBV sequence of BALF1. mRNA expression of LMP-1 in one hand and protein levels of BARF-1, LMP-1 and EBNA-1 in the other hand were assessed by RT-PCR and immunoblotting and/or immunohischemistry respectively. Results HR-HPV infection was found in patients with SCC (88%), low-grade (75%) and high grade (95%) lesions compared to only 14% of normal cervix cases. However, 69%, 12.5%, 38.1%, and 14% of SCC, CIN-1, CIN-2/3 and normal cervix tissues, respectively, were EBV infected. The highest co-infection (HR-HPV and EBV) was found in squamous cell carcinoma cases (67%). The latter cases showed 27% and 29% expression of EBV BARF-1 and LMP-1 oncogenes respectively. Conclusion The high rate of HR-HPV and EBV co-infection in SCC suggests that EBV infection is incriminated in cervical cancer progression. This could be taken into account as bad prognosis in this type of cancer. However, the mode of action in dual infection in cervical oncogenesis needs further investigation. PMID:24252325

  8. Cell culture model predicts human disease: Altered expression of junction proteins and matrix metalloproteinases in cervical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is necessarily caused by human papillomaviruses, which encode three oncogenes manifesting their functions by interfering with a number of cellular proteins and pathways: the E5, E6, and E7 proteins. We have earlier found in our microarray studies that the E5 oncogene crucially affects the expression of cellular genes involved in adhesion and motility of epithelial cells. Methods In order to biologically validate our previous experimental findings we performed immunohistochemical staining of a representative set of tissue samples from different grades of high-risk human papillomavirus associated cervical disease as well as normal squamous and columnar cervical epithelium. Three-dimensional collagen raft cultures established from E5-expressing and control epithelial cells were also examined. The expression of p16, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -7, MMP-16, cytokeratin (CK) 8/18, laminin, E-cadherin and beta-catenin was studied. Results In agreement with our previous microarray studies, we found intense staining for E-cadherin and beta-catenin in adherens junctions even in high-grade cervical lesions. Staining for MMP-16 was increased in severe disease as well. No significant change in staining for MMP-7 and cytokeratin 8/18 along with the grade of cervical squamous epithelial disease was observed. Conclusions Here we have confirmed, using tissue material from human papillomavirus associated lesions, some of the cellular gene expression modifications that we earlier reported in an experimental system studying specifically the E5 oncogene of papillomaviruses. These findings were partially surprising in the context of cervical carcinogenesis and emphasize that the complexity of carcinogenesis is not yet fully understood. Microarray approaches provide a wide overwiev of gene expression in experimental settings, which may yield biologically valid biomarkers for disease diagnostics, prognosis, and follow-up. PMID:22863036

  9. The causal relation between human papillomavirus and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F X; Lorincz, A; Muñoz, N; Meijer, C J L M; Shah, K V

    2002-01-01

    The causal role of human papillomavirus infections in cervical cancer has been documented beyond reasonable doubt. The association is present in virtually all cervical cancer cases worldwide. It is the right time for medical societies and public health regulators to consider this evidence and to define its preventive and clinical implications. A comprehensive review of key studies and results is presented. PMID:11919208

  10. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    SciTech Connect

    Nuovo, G.J. ); Pedemonte, B.M. )

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  11. Human papillomavirus genotypes distribution in 175 invasive cervical cancer cases from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Invasive cervical cancer is the second most common malignant tumor affecting Brazilian women. Knowledge on Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in invasive cervical cancer cases is crucial to guide the introduction and further evaluate the impact of new preventive strategies based on HPV. We aimed to provide updated comprehensive data about the HPV types’ distribution in patients with invasive cervical cancer. Methods Fresh tumor tissue samples of histologically confirmed invasive cervical cancer were collected from 175 women attending two cancer reference hospitals from São Paulo State: ICESP and Hospital de Câncer de Barretos. HPV detection and genotyping were performed by the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Molecular Diagnostics, Pleasanton,USA). Results 170 out of 172 valid samples (99%) were HPV DNA positive. The most frequent types were HPV16 (77.6%), HPV18 (12.3%), HPV31 (8.8%), HPV33 (7.1%) and HPV35 (5.9%). Most infections (75%) were caused by individual HPV types. Women with adenocarcinoma were not younger than those with squamous cell carcinoma, as well, as women infected with HPV33 were older than those infected by other HPV types. Some differences between results obtained in the two hospitals were observed: higher overall prevalence of HPV16, absence of single infection by HPV31 and HPV45 was verified in HC-Barretos in comparison to ICESP patients. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is one of the largest studies made with fresh tumor tissues of invasive cervical cancer cases in Brazil. This study depicted a distinct HPV genotype distribution between two centers that may reflect the local epidemiology of HPV transmission among these populations. Due to the impact of these findings on cervical cancer preventive strategies, extension of this investigation to routine screening populations is warranted. PMID:23883423

  12. Human papillomavirus-related basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder associated with genital tract human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Ginori, Alessandro; Barone, Aurora; Santopietro, Rosa; Barbanti, Gabriele; Cecconi, Filippo; Tripodi, Sergio Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a biologically aggressive neoplasm mainly found in the head and neck region. Recently, four cases of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder have been reported, and three of them occurred in patients with neurogenic bladder, repeated catheterizations and human papillomavirus infection of the urinary tract. To the best of our knowledge, none of the patients affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder described in the literature had documented genital involvement by human papillomavirus. Herein, we describe the case of a woman with neurogenic bladder affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder and by a concomitant genital tract human papillomavirus infection.

  13. Human papillomavirus testing in the prevention of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Mark; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Kinney, Walter; Gage, Julia C; Castle, Philip E

    2011-03-01

    Strong evidence now supports the adoption of cervical cancer prevention strategies that explicitly focus on persistent infection with the causal agent, human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform an evidence-based transition to a new public health approach for cervical cancer screening, we summarize the natural history and cervical carcinogenicity of HPV and discuss the promise and uncertainties of currently available screening methods. New HPV infections acquired at any age are virtually always benign, but persistent infections with one of approximately 12 carcinogenic HPV types explain virtually all cases of cervical cancer. In the absence of an overtly persistent HPV infection, the risk of cervical cancer is extremely low. Thus, HPV test results predict the risk of cervical cancer and its precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3) better and longer than cytological or colposcopic abnormalities, which are signs of HPV infection. The logical and inevitable move to HPV-based cervical cancer prevention strategies will require longer screening intervals that will disrupt current gynecologic and cytology laboratory practices built on frequent screening. A major challenge will be implementing programs that do not overtreat HPV-positive women who do not have obvious long-term persistence of HPV or treatable lesions at the time of initial evaluation. The greatest potential for reduction in cervical cancer rates from HPV screening is in low-resource regions that can implement infrequent rounds of low-cost HPV testing and treatment.

  14. Detection of high risk human papillomavirus cervical infections by the hybrid capture in Asunción, Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Torres, Laura Mendoza; Páez, Malvina; Insaurralde, Ariel; Rodriguez, María Isabel; Castro, Amalia; Kasamatsu, Elena

    2009-06-01

    Cervical cancer is the most frequent malignant tumour of women in Latin America being human papillomavirus (HPV) the main cause. The aim of this study was to increase the knowledge about the cervical infections with oncogenic HPV types (HR-HPV) in Asuncion, Paraguay. Two hundred and seventy-two cervical samples were analyzed using hybrid capture II assay (HCA II) for HR-HPV. The frequency of HR-HPV in the study group was 44%. HR-HPV was detected in 25% of the women negative for squamous intraepithelial lesions (NSIL), 72% with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), 68% with low SIL and 78% with high SIL. A moderate concordance was observed between HCA II assay and cytology (kappa: 0.43 IC(95% 0.3-0.5)). It was detected a high frequency of HR-HPV in women from 11 to 30 years old and in those over 60 years old. The data obtained in this study showed a high frequency of HR-HPV in woman with NSIL and ASCUS, which corroborate that the use of cytology together with HCA II assay for HR-HPV could improve remarkably the efficiency of screening programs of cervical cancer in Paraguay. Furthermore, these findings point out the need for the periodical follow-up of HR-HPV infections in older women.

  15. Prognosis of Cervical Cancer in the Era of Concurrent Chemoradiation from National Database in Korea: A Comparison between Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Boram; Lim, Myong Cheol; Kim, Jae-Weon; Won, Young-Joo

    2015-01-01

    In 1999, the National Cancer Institute issued a clinical advisory strongly touting the advantage of cisplatin-based chemoradiation (CCRT) for cervical cancer patients requiring radiation for their treatment. This study aimed to compare survival outcomes of cervical squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma before and after the advent of CCRT. Data were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database for patients who were diagnosed with cervical cancers between 1993 and 2012. We compared survival according to histologic subtypes in cervical cancer patients diagnosed before (1993–1997), during (1998–2002), and after (2003–2012) the introduction of CCRT. A total of 80,766 patients were identified, including 64,531 (79.9%) women with squamous cell carcinomas and 7,265 (9.0%) with adenocarcinoma. With the introduction of CCRT, survival trends gradually increased in patients of both histologic subtypes with regional tumors. However, survival was significantly higher in squamous cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma patients regardless of treatment modalities (surgery alone, P < 0.001; surgery followed by CCRT, P < 0.001; or primary CCRT, P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that adenocarcinoma was an independent negative prognostic factor for survival regardless of the time period (before CCRT, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.37–1.62; after introduction of CCRT, HR = 1.40; 95% CI, 1.30–1.50). Although the survival of adenocarcinoma has improved after the introduction of CCRT, adenocarcinoma is still associated with worse overall survival compared to squamous cell carcinoma in the era of CCRT. PMID:26660311

  16. Human Papillomavirus 45 Genetic Variation and Cervical Cancer Risk Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alyce A.; Heideman, Daniëlle A. M.; Boon, Debby; Gheit, Tarik; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 45 (HPV45) is a member of the HPV18-related alpha-7 species and accounts for approximately 5% of all cervical cancer cases worldwide. This study evaluated the genetic diversity of HPV45 and the association of HPV45 variants with the risk of cervical cancer by sequencing the entire E6 and E7 open reading frames of 300 HPV45-positive cervical samples from 36 countries. A total of 43 HPV45 sequence variants were identified that formed 5 phylogenetic sublineages, A1, A2, A3, B1, and B2, the distribution of which varied by geographical region. Among 192 cases of cervical cancer and 101 controls, the B2 sublineage was significantly overrepresented in cervical cancer, both overall and in Africa and Europe separately. We show that the sequence analysis of E6 and E7 allows the classification of HPV45 variants and that the risk of cervical cancer may differ by HPV45 variant sublineage. IMPORTANCE This work describes the largest study to date of human papillomavirus 45 (HPV45)-positive cervical samples and provides a comprehensive reference for phylogenetic classification for use in epidemiological studies of the carcinogenicity of HPV45 genetic variants, particularly as our findings suggest that the B2 sublineage of HPV45 is associated with a higher risk of cervical cancer. PMID:24501412

  17. High-risk human papilloma virus genotypes in cervical carcinoma of Serbian women: Distribution and association with pathohistological findings.

    PubMed

    Stamenković, Miodrag; Knežević, Aleksandra; Knežević, Ivana; Kuzmanović, Igor; Karalić, Danijela; Milenković, Sanja; Jovanović, Tanja

    2016-09-01

    A significant role of high-risk Human papilloma viruses (HR HPV) in the development of cervical carcinoma is well known. HR HPV 16 and 18 account for approximately 70% of all cases of cervical cancer worldwide. The incidence of cervical cancer in Serbia, is one of the highest in Europe. The aim of our study was to investigate the distribution of HR HPV types in cervical carcinoma of Serbian women, as well as association between the HPV types and pathohistological findings. The study included 80 archival cervical cancer tissues from the same number of patients. The presence of HPV DNA was determined using MY09/MY11 primers for L1 gene and GP1/GP2 primers for E1 gene. HPV was detected in 78.75% tissues. HR HPV genotypes found in the decreasing order of frequency were: HPV16 (80.39%), HPV33 (7.84%), HPV58 (5.88%), HPV18 (1.96%), HPV45 (1.96%) and HPV53 (1.96%). The examined tissues were 91.25% squamous cell carcinomas and 8.75% adenocarcinoma. The high frequency of HPV 16 was observed in both types of carcinoma (80.8% and 75%, respectively) while the prevalence of HPV18 was low. These results may contribute to the implementation of cervical carcinoma prevention program in Serbia, including the selection of the most appropriate vaccine and immunization program. PMID:27461126

  18. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2, Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen, and Tissue Polypeptide-Specific Antigen Expression in Egyptian Patients with Cervical Carcinoma: Relationship with Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Maha Imam; Salahy, Eman-El; Tawfiq, Hassan; Khalifa, Ali; Hassan, Manal M.

    2004-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of proteolytic enzymes produced by both stromal and tumor cells, appear to have a key role in the events leading to local invasion and metastasis by malignant neoplasms. In the present study, we evaluated the role of MMP-2, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA), and tissue polypeptide – specific antigen (TPS) in cervical neoplasia. Using Western blotting and enzyme immunoassay (EIA), we analyzed 50 patients with cervical carcinoma (CC) and 25 normal controls for expression of MMP-2 in tissue cell lysates. We also quantified SCCA and TPS with microparticle immunoassay and EIA, respectively. The results were correlated with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, clinicopathological findings, and disease outcome. The cutoff point for each marker was estimated from receiver operating characteristic curves. Logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each marker. MMP-2, SCCA, and TPS protein expression were significantly higher in patients with CC than in normal controls. While TPS was the best marker for discriminating between patients and controls, MMP-2 was associated with an advanced tumor stage (OR, 13.9 [95% CI, 1.4-133.9]) and poor histological grade (OR, 10.2 [95% CI, 1.7-60.5]). Moreover, independent of the effect of an advanced CC stage and grade, the patients' age, and the presence of HPV infection, MMP-2 was considered a strong predictor for CC recurrence (OR, 8.1 [95% CI, 1.3- 49.1]). Tissue markers may be used to select high-risk patients for early detection of and adjuvant therapy for recurrence. Our MMP-2 findings are particularly relevant to the development of protease inhibitors as a new cancer therapy approach. PMID:15665394

  19. Analysis of p53 codon 72 polymorphism and its association with human papillomavirus 16 and 18 E6 in Chinese cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Min-min, H; Ming-rong, X; Ze-yi, C; Kai-xuan, Y; Zhi-lin, S

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analysis the relationship between p53 codon 72 polymorphism with human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 E6 in Chinese cervical cancer. A total of 81 cervical squamous cancer (specimens of G1, G2, and G3 are 13, 24, and 44, respectively; and of stage IB, IIA, IIB, and IIIA are 15, 37, 24, and 5, respectively), 18 cervical adenocarcinoma, 88 cervical intraepithelial neoplasm (CIN) (specimens of CIN II and III are 30 and 58), and 60 normal cervical specimens were included in this study. Polymerase chain reaction was used to examine p53 genotypes and HPV 16 and 18 E6. The frequencies of p53 Arg homozygosity in cervical squamous cancer, cervical adenocarcinoma, and CIN (II-III) were 58.02%, 55.55%, and 59.09%, respectively, that was much higher than that of p53 Arg/Pro heterozygosity (30.86%, 27.78%, and 21.59%) and of p53 Pro homozygosity (11.12%, 16.67%, and 19.32%) in each groups and higher than the frequency of p53 Arg homozygosity in normal samples (23.33%). There is no statistic difference in the normal samples for the frequency of p53 Arg homozygosity, p53 Arg/Pro heterozygosity, and p53 Pro homozygosity (23.33%, 40.00%, and 36.67%, respectively). The frequency of p53 Arg homozygosity in high risk (HR)-HPV E6-positive cervical squamous cancer samples (64.06%) is much higher than that in (HR)-HPV E6-negative cervical squamous cancer samples (35.29%) and in HR-HPV E6-positive normal samples (33.33%). No difference of p53 codon 72 polymorphism was found according to FIGO staging and grades. In conclusion, based on the findings of this study, it is suggested that p53 Arg homozygosity could act as a potential risk factor for the tumorigenesis of the cervix. p53 codon 72 polymorphism has no relation with the FIGO staging and grades of cervical cancer. p53 Arg homozygosity and HR-HPV E6 positive simultaneously can predict the fate of cervical lesions. PMID:17177838

  20. Human papillomavirus profile of women in Belize City, Belize: correlation with cervical cytopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Cathro, Helen P; Loya, Theresa; Dominguez, Frederick; Howe, Susan L; Howell, Renee; Orndorff, Kyle; Moreno, Jessica; Mendez, Elena; Fung, Po Chu; Beer, Natalie L; Allen, Peter; Sosa, Alba M; Gurka, Kelly K; Stoler, Mark H; Frierson, Henry F

    2009-07-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the most common cancer among Belizean women; however, data regarding the frequency of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and their association with cervical cancer are nonexistent. We therefore included HPV genotyping as part of a week-long cervical cancer screening campaign conducted in Belize City in 2007. Conventional Papanicolaou smears with Hybrid Capture (HC) 2 HPV testing were performed on 463 women. All HC2-positive samples were genotyped using a developmental GP5+/GP6+ polymerase chain reaction-coupled Luminex assay for 2 low-risk and 18 high-risk HPV types. The prevalence of high-risk HPV was 15.6% in the total population, 10.1% in those with normal cytologic findings, and 93.3% in women with a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. Of patients with HPV infections, 35% had multiple types (5.4% of the total group). Of all women and of women with normal cytologic findings, 5.2% and 2.8%, respectively, had HPV16 or 18. For all women, HPV16, 18, 56, and 52 were present in decreasing order of frequency. HPV11 was present in only one patient, and none had HPV6. HPV16 was found in 47% of high-grade squamous epithelial lesions; however, no case of HSIL had HPV18 or 45. HPV35 and HPV58 were the next most common types in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, each occurring in 20% of cases of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, followed by HPV31 in 13.3%. Although women younger than 25 years old were underrepresented, these data suggest that the HPV profile of this cohort of Belizean women differs somewhat from that in the region. In addition, these data are of importance with regard to the development of HPV vaccines that will be used in less developed countries, where care should be taken not to implement vaccination at the cost of basic screening and diagnostic services. PMID:19299000

  1. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection & cervical abnormalities in HIV-positive women in eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Chourasia, Ankita; Thakur, Minaxi; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Agrawal, Nisha Rani

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: India has the third highest burden of HIV and highest number of cervical cancer in the world. A cross-sectional study was performed to determine the prevalence and types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and the factors associated with HPV infection and abnormal cervical cytology in HIV-positive women attending the Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Centre in a tertiary care hospital in eastern India. Methods: We screened 216 HIV- positive women with Papanicolau smear cytology and HPV testing. HPV DNA was detected by using consensus primers followed by sequencing. Results: Of the 216 HIV-positive women screened, 58 (26.85%) were HPV-positive; 56 (25.9%) were of high-risk (HR) HPV type. The most prevalent HPV type was HPV-16 (7.9%); non 16 and 18 HPV types were present in 17.6 per cent patients. Age ≤ 35 yr [(OR), 2.56 (1.26-5.19)], illiteracy [OR, 2.30 (1.19-4.46)], rural residence [OR, 3.99 (1.27-12.56)] and CD4 ≤350/μl [OR, 2.46 (1.26-4.83)] were associated with increased risk of acquisition of HPV. One hundred thirty nine (74.33%) patients had normal/ negative for intraepithelial lesions (NILM) cytology, three (1.60%) had atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), 32 (17.11%) had low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 10 (5.35%) had high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and three (1.60%) had carcinoma cervix. WHO clinical Stage III and IV [OR, 2.83 (1.07-7.49)] and CD4 ≤350/μl [OR, 2.84 (1.30-6.20)] were risk factors for abnormal cytology. Interpretation &conclusions: Our study showed 26.85 per cent HPV positivity in HIV infected women in this region, with HPV-16 as the commonest genotype. Abnormal cervical cytology was seen in about 25 per cent women. Regular Pap smear screening as recommended by the National AIDS Control Organization will help in early detection of cervical abnormalities in HIV- positive women. PMID:26997018

  2. Correlation Between Platelet and Hemoglobin Levels and Pathological Characteristics and Prognosis of Early-Stage Squamous Cervical Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaowei; Tan, Cheng; Zhang, Wanxuan; Zhou, Jingyi; Wang, Zhiqi; Wang, Shijun; Wang, Jianliu; Wei, Lihui

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to determine the effect of pre-operative hemoglobin (HGB) and platelet (PLT) levels on the clinical features and prognosis of early-stage squamous cervical carcinoma (SCC). Material/Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 380 patients with SCC who underwent hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. SCC was confirmed post-operatively by pathological diagnosis. The relations between HGB and PLT levels and clinicopathological characteristics were observed, and a Cox regression analysis was performed to determine their influence on survival. Results There were significant differences in tumor staging, tumor diameter, and lymphatic metastasis between the 69 patients with PLT levels >300×109/L and the 311 patients with PLT levels ≤300×109/L (P<0.05). Tumor staging, extent of differentiation, and lymphatic metastasis were significantly different between 134 patients with HGB levels <120 g/L and 246 patients with HGB levels ≥120 g/L (P<0.05). The overall survival rate in the group with PLT levels >300×109/L was lower than that in the group with PLT levels ≤300 × 109/L, but this difference was not significant. The overall survival rate in the group with HGB levels <120 g/L was significantly lower than that in the group with HGB levels ≥120 g/L (P<0.05), and the overall survival rate in the group with PLT levels >300×109/L and HGB levels <120 g/L was significantly lower than that in the group with PLT levels ≤300×109/L and HGB levels ≥120 g/L (P<0.05). According to Cox regression analysis, a pre-operative HGB level <120 g/L was considered a separate risk factor affecting prognosis. Conclusions Close attention must be paid to pre-operative PLT and HGB levels, and anemia should be remedied to facilitate the treatment of cervical carcinoma. PMID:26670918

  3. Persistent Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Neoplasia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Lisa; Pimenta, Jeanne M.; Poole, Charles; Jenkins, David

    2008-01-01

    Detection of persistent cervical carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is used as a marker for cervical cancer risk in clinical trials. The authors performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the association between persistent HPV DNA and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2-3), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), and invasive cervical cancer (together designated CIN2-3/HSIL+) to evaluate the robustness of HPV persistence for clinical use. MEDLINE and Current Contents were searched through January 30, 2006. Relative risks (RRs) were stratified by HPV comparison group. Of 2,035 abstracts, 41 studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Over 22,500 women were included in calculation of RRs for persistent HPV DNA detection and cervical neoplasia. RRs ranged from 1.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.1, 1.5) to 813.0 (95% confidence interval: 168.2, 3,229.2) for CIN2-3/HSIL+ versus 12 months), wider testing intervals, CIN2-3/HSIL+, and use of an HPV-negative reference group were consistently associated with higher RRs. Thus, HPV persistence was consistently and strongly associated with CIN2-3/HSIL+, despite wide variation in definitions and study methods. The magnitude of association varied by duration of persistence and testing interval. Precise definition and standardization of HPV testing, sampling procedure, and test interval are needed for reliable clinical testing. These findings validate HPV persistence as a clinical marker and endpoint. PMID:18483125

  4. Human papillomavirus genotypes and their association with cervical neoplasia in a cohort of Western Australian women.

    PubMed

    Brestovac, Brian; Harnett, Gerry B; Smith, David W; Shellam, Geoffrey R; Frost, Felicity A

    2005-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is known to be the cause of almost all cervical cancers. The genotypes have been classified into high and low risk types according to their oncogenic potential. However, data for many of the genotypes are limited and some (HPV-26, 53, and 66) have no agreed status. A study was undertaken to determine the HPV genotype distribution in women of Western Australia and the association with cervical neoplasia. Liquid based cervical samples from a cohort of 282 Western Australian women were tested for HPV DNA by PCR followed by DNA sequencing to determine HPV genotypes. HPV-53 and HPV-16 were the most common genotypes found in this population. In addition 86 archived liquid based cervical samples from women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 1-3 (CIN 1-3) were tested for HPV DNA. Also 32 archived paraffin biopsy samples from women with squamous cell carcinoma were also tested. HPV-16 was the most common genotype found in these samples. Of the cohort of Western Australian women tested, 27% were found to contain HPV and approximately half of these contained known high-risk HPV genotypes, but only 30% of these were types 16 or 18. The data from this study indicate that HPV-53 is not oncogenic based on an R value and odds ratio (OR) of zero. The data also suggest that HPV-73 may be oncogenic, while HPV-66 is unlikely to be. Two high-risk HPV genotypes that are associated with the Asian region (HPV-52 and HPV-58) were found in Western Australian women suggesting a possible epidemiological link between women in these countries.

  5. A continuous fiber distribution material model for human cervical tissue.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kristin M; Hendon, Christine P; Gan, Yu; Yao, Wang; Yoshida, Kyoko; Fernandez, Michael; Vink, Joy; Wapner, Ronald J

    2015-06-25

    The uterine cervix during pregnancy is the vital mechanical barrier which resists compressive and tensile loads generated from a growing fetus. Premature cervical remodeling and softening is hypothesized to result in the shortening of the cervix, which is known to increase a woman׳s risk of preterm birth. To understand the role of cervical material properties in preventing preterm birth, we derive a cervical material model based on previous mechanical, biochemical and histological experiments conducted on nonpregnant and pregnant human hysterectomy cervical tissue samples. In this study we present a three-dimensional fiber composite model that captures the equilibrium material behavior of the tissue in tension and compression. Cervical tissue is modeled as a fibrous composite material, where a single family of preferentially aligned and continuously distributed collagen fibers are embedded in a compressible neo-Hookean ground substance. The total stress in the collagen solid network is calculated by integrating the fiber stresses. The shape of the fiber distribution is described by an ellipsoid where semi-principal axis lengths are fit to optical coherence tomography measurements. The composite material model is fit to averaged mechanical testing data from uni-axial compression and tension experiments, and averaged material parameters are reported for nonpregnant and term pregnant human cervical tissue. The model is then evaluated by investigating the stress and strain state of a uniform thick-walled cylinder under a compressive stress with collagen fibers preferentially aligned in the circumferential direction. This material modeling framework for the equilibrium behavior of human cervical tissue serves as a basis to determine the role of preferentially-aligned cervical collagen fibers in preventing cervical deformation during pregnancy.

  6. Comparison of human cervical mucus and artificial sperm penetration media.

    PubMed

    Tang, S; Garrett, C; Baker, H W

    1999-11-01

    The cervical mucus penetration tests aid research and determine the clinical importance of positive sperm antibody tests. Limited availability and variability of human cervical mucus have instigated the search for mucus substitutes for these tests. This study compares sperm migration in cervical mucus with that in artificial media including hyaluronate solution, egg white and albumin Tyrode solution. Results were quantified by measuring the migration distance (the maximum distance of capillary migration from a semen reservoir by spermatozoa after 1 h) and the sperm concentration at half the migration distance. The mean of both measures for cervical mucus and hyaluronate solution were equivalent [4.4 +/- 1.1 (SD) versus 4.3 +/- 1.0 cm and 118 +/- 51 versus 111 +/- 44x10(3)/ml], and higher than in egg white and albumin Tyrode solution. Antisperm antibodies impaired sperm penetration in cervical mucus and hyaluronate solution in a similar manner (r = 0.92). These results suggest that hyaluronate solution sufficiently resembles human cervical mucus in terms of penetrability that it may be used as a substitute for mucus in capillary tube tests of sperm function. The higher penetrability of cervical mucus and hyaluronate solution is probably related to a channelling effect due to their polymeric structure. PMID:10548628

  7. Molecular Detection and Typing of Human Papillomaviruses in Paraffin-Embedded Cervical Cancer and Pre-Cancer Tissue Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodi, Pezhman; Motamedi, Hossein; Seyfi Abad Shapouri, Masoud Reza; Bahrami Shehni, Mahjabin; Kargar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is one of the important reasons of mortality among females. Prevention, early diagnosis and immediate treatment can affect the rate of mortality in this cancer and several epidemiological studies have shown a strong relationship between human papilloma viruses (HPVs) and cervical cancer. Objectives: The present study was conducted to survey HPV infections in a women population with cervical cancer and cervical dysplasia/metaplasia in southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: 72 paraffin-embedded cervical biopsies which had been previously archived from women with cervical cancer and cervical dysplasia were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Afterward, the detected HPV strains were typed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of PCR amplicons. Results: 60 out of 72 samples had necessary requirements and HPV DNA was detected in 43.3% of these samples. Most HPV positive samples belonged to women aged from 48 to 63 years. On the other hand, HPV infection among patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was 48.78% and in women with dysplasia/metaplasia was 26.66%. The most prevalent type of the human papilloma virus was HPV16 (100%). Conclusions: Knowing the most prevalent type of the human papilloma viruses circulating in the population (HPV16) can be applied in the future screening and managing programs of this major disease and also in vaccination against the prevalent types of the virus. Meanwhile, it seems that more studies should be performed to determine the role of different risk factors involved in development of the disease, especially those related with social behaviors and traditions with respect to different areas. PMID:27366309

  8. Human papillomavirus infection in oral squamous cell carcinomas from Chilean patients.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Montserrat; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Pennacchiotti, Gina; Carrillo, Diego; Muñoz, Juan P; Peña, Nelson; Montes, Rodrigo; Lobos, Nelson; Aguayo, Francisco

    2015-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causal agent of cervical, anogenital and a subset of oropharyngeal carcinomas. In addition, the role of HPV in oral carcinogenesis has been suggested, although the findings are inconclusive. In this study, using conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genotyping by specific PCR and DNA sequencing, we analyzed the HPV presence in 80 oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) from Chilean subjects. In addition, we determined the expression of p16, p53, pRb and Ki-67 using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The CDKN2A (p16) promoter methylation was evaluated using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). HPV sequences were found in 9/80 (11%) OSCCs. Non-statistically significant association with p53, pRb, Ki-67 and p16 levels were found (p=0.77; 0.29; 0.83; 0.21, respectively). HPV-16 and 18 were the most prevalent HPV genotypes in 8/9 (89%) OSCCs. In addition, CDKN2A (p16) was methylated in 39% of OSCCs. No association with HPV presence (p=0.917) was found. These results suggest that HPV positive OSCCs are entities that do not resemble the molecular alterations of HPV-associated tumors in a Chilean population. More studies are warranted to determine the role of HPV in OSCCs.

  9. Human papillomavirus prevalence in paired urine and cervical samples in women invited for cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Burroni, Elena; Bonanni, Paolo; Sani, Cristina; Lastrucci, Vieri; Carozzi, Francesca; Iossa, Anna; Andersson, Karin Louise; Brandigi, Livia; Di Pierro, Carmelina; Confortini, Massimo; Levi, Miriam; Boccalini, Sara; Indiani, Laura; Sala, Antonino; Tanini, Tommaso; Bechini, Angela; Azzari, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    With the introduction of Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in young girls in 2007, it is important to monitor HPV infections and epidemiological changes in this target population. The present study has evaluated the detection of human papillomavirus DNA in paired cervical and urine samples to understand if HPV testing in urine could be used as non-invasive method to monitor HPV status in young women. The study enrolled 216 twenty five-year-old women, resident in Florence and invited for the first time to the cervical cancer Screening Program within a project evaluating the impact of HPV vaccination. HPV genotyping was performed on 216 paired urine and cervical samples. The overall concordance between cervix and urine samples, investigated by HPV genotyping (INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra), was: 85.6% (184/215), 84.6% (182/215), 80% (172/215) when the same HPV, at least the same HR HPV and all HR HPV, respectively, were detected. HPV type specific concordance in paired urine and cervical samples was observed in 85.8% (175/204) of women with normal cytology and in seven out of nine women with abnormal cytology. Urine seems to be a suitable and reliable biological material for HPV DNA detection as evidenced by the high concordance with HPV detected in cervical samples. These results suggest that urine could be a good noninvasive tool to monitor HPV infection in vaccinated women.

  10. Genotype distribution of cervical human papillomavirus DNA in women with cervical lesions in Bioko, Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    García-Espinosa, Benjamín; Nieto-Bona, Ma Paz; Rueda, Sonsoles; Silva-Sánchez, Luís Fernando; Piernas-Morales, Ma Concepción; Carro-Campos, Patricia; Cortés-Lambea, Luís; Moro-Rodríguez, Ernesto

    2009-01-01

    Background The HVP vaccine is a useful tool for preventing cervical cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine the most frequent HPV genotypes in Equatorial Guinea in order to develop future vaccination strategies to apply in this country. Methods A campaign against cervical cancer was carried out in the area on a total of 1,680 women. 26 of the women, following cytological screening, were treated surgically with a loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP). Cases were studied histologically and were genotyped from paraffin blocks by applying a commercial kit that recognized 35 HPV types. Results Cytological diagnoses included 17 HSIL, 1 LSIL, 5 ASC-H and 3 AGUS. Histological diagnosis resulted in 3 cases of microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma stage IA of FIGO, 9 CIN-3, 8 CIN-2, 2 CIN-1, 3 flat condylomas and mild dysplasia of the endocervical epithelium. Fifteen of twenty-five cases genotyped were positive for HPV (60%). HPV 16 and 33 were identified in four cases each, HPV 58 in two other cases, and HPV 18, 31, 52, and 82 in one case, with one HPV 16 and 58 coinfection. Conclusion The frequency of HPV types in the African area varies in comparison to other regions, particularly in Europe and USA. Vaccination against the five most common HPV types (16, 33, 58, 18, and 31) should be considered in the geographic region of West Africa and specifically in Equatorial Guinea. PMID:19740435

  11. Human papillomavirus detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vietía, Dayahindara; Liuzzi, Juan; Ávila, Maira; De Guglielmo, Zoraya; Prado, Yrneh; Correnti, María

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with benign and malignant lesions in different epitheliums. The relationship between specific genotypes of high-risk HPV and some human cancers is well established. The aim of this work was to detect the HPV genotypes present in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods We evaluated 71 samples of patients with histopathological diagnosis of HNSCC. The DNA extraction was conducted with the QIAGEN commercial kit. HPV detection and genotyping were performed by reverse hybridisation (INNO-LiPA) following the commercial specifications. Results The mean age of the patients evaluated was 60.7 ± 13.11 years. The distribution of the lesions included 25 (35.20%) cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity, 23 (32.39%) of larynx, 16 (22.50%) of the oropharynx, 4 (5.63%) of paranasal sinus, and 2 (2. 80%) cases of SCC of the nostril. Of the patients, 78.9% were males, and of these 76% were tobacco users and 67.6% were alcohol consumers. The viral DNA was detected in 67.6% of the samples. The oral cavity and the larynx were the highest HPV-positivity sites with 35.40% and 29.10% respectively. The most frequent genotype was 16 as single infection (18.70%), or in combination with another HPV types. In the oral cavity and larynx the genotypes 16 or the combination 6 and 51 were present in 11.76% and 14.28%, respectively; and in the oropharynx the most frequent genotype was 16 in 22.50% of the cases, and in the paranasal sinus 50% presented infection with HPV-6. We observed that tumours with most advanced size and stage presented greater HPV positivity. Conclusions This study shows a high percentage of HPV positivity in SCC is mainly associated with high-risk HPV. It is important to highlight that viral infection, especially HPV-16, could be a risk factor in HNSCC progression. PMID:25374623

  12. Preventive and Therapeutic Vaccines against Human Papillomaviruses Associated Cervical Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nayereh, Khadem Ghaebi; Khadem, Ghaeb

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is, globally known to be, one of the most common cancers among women especially in developing countries. More than 90% of cervical cancers are associated with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) particularly HPV types 16 and 18. Two major strategies have been developed for prevention and treatment of cervical cancer and other HPV-associated malignancies; the first one is based on HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) containing HPV structural proteins. VLP based vaccines can induce genotype specific virus neutralizing antibodies for preventing HPV infections. The other strategy is based on HPV early genes especially E6 and E7 for eliminating the established HPV infections; therefore they are classified as HPV therapeutic vaccines. This article reviews the preventive and therapeutic vaccines against HPV infections and cervical cancer. PMID:23493151

  13. The Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology Standardization Project for HPV-Associated Lesions: background and consensus recommendations from the College of American Pathologists and the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology.

    PubMed

    Darragh, Teresa M; Colgan, Terence J; Cox, J Thomas; Heller, Debra S; Henry, Michael R; Luff, Ronald D; McCalmont, Timothy; Nayar, Ritu; Palefsky, Joel M; Stoler, Mark H; Wilkinson, Edward J; Zaino, Richard J; Wilbur, David C

    2012-07-01

    The terminology for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated squamous lesions of the lower anogenital tract has a long history marked by disparate diagnostic terms derived from multiple specialties. It often does not reflect current knowledge of HPV biology and pathogenesis. A consensus process was convened to recommend terminology unified across lower anogenital sites. The goal was to create a histopathologic nomenclature system that reflects current knowledge of HPV biology, optimally uses available biomarkers, and facilitates clear communication across different medical specialties. The Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology (LAST) Project was cosponsored by the College of American Pathologists and the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology and included 5 working groups; 3 work groups performed comprehensive literature reviews and developed draft recommendations. Another work group provided the historical background and the fifth will continue to foster implementation of the LAST recommendations. After an open comment period, the draft recommendations were presented at a consensus conference attended by LAST work group members, advisors, and representatives from 35 stakeholder organizations including professional societies and government agencies. Recommendations were finalized and voted on at the consensus meeting. The final, approved recommendations standardize biologically relevant histopathologic terminology for HPV-associated squamous intraepithelial lesions and superficially invasive squamous carcinomas across all lower anogenital tract sites and detail the appropriate use of specific biomarkers to clarify histologic interpretations and enhance diagnostic accuracy. A plan for disseminating and monitoring recommendation implementation in the practicing community was also developed. The implemented recommendations will facilitate communication between pathologists and their clinical colleagues and improve accuracy of histologic diagnosis with the

  14. Patient-tailored conservative surgical treatment of invasive uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. A review.

    PubMed

    Menczer, J

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to review currently available data regarding the results of a more conservative, patient-tailored surgical approach in selected cases of early invasive uterine squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A PubMed search of investigations in the English language published from January 2000 to September 2012 containing the terms conservative surgery, conservative treatment, trachelectomy, parametrectomy, lymphadenectomy, sentinel lymph node biopsy and fertility sparing surgery in combination with SCC was made. Conization only is optimal for women with stage Ia1 disease mainly in tumors without lymph vascular space involvement (LVSI). In stage Ib1 patients interested to maintain reproductive capacity, vaginal or abdominal radical trachelectomy are the procedures of choice. Patients with small tumors (<2 cm), no deep invasion, no LVSI, and negative pelvic nodes are at very low risk of parametrial involvement and parametrectomy may be omitted in them. Such patients may benefit from less radical surgery and may be candidates for simple hysterectomy, simple trachelectomy, or conization with pelvic lymphadenectomy. Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is apparently a good predictor of node metastases and allows the performance of lymphadenectomy only in SLN positive cases. Thus lymphadenectomy may also be omitted in some patients. In young women with locally advanced tumors, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility-sparing surgery may also be a feasible treatment. A more conservative, patient-tailored surgical approach in selected cases of early SCC is possible resulting in lower morbidity and preservation of fertility without compromising the outcome. PMID:24051940

  15. Prevalence characteristics of high-risk human papillomaviruses in women living in Shanghai with cervical precancerous lesions and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ying; Ma, Chenyun; Zou, Jue; Zhu, Yi; Yang, Rong; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A complete understanding of the natural history of infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in cervical cancer requires data from regional and ethnic studies. The prevalence of high-risk HPVs was evaluated retrospectively in 2040 patients with cervicitis, 239 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1), 242 with CIN2/3, and 42 patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) based on data from patients who visited our hospital between May 2013 and May 2015. The rates of high-risk HPV infection in patients with cervicitis, CIN1, CIN2/3, and invasive SCC were 40.8%, 74.9%, 70.2%, and 83.3%, respectively. The three most dominant HPV genotypes were HPV16, 58, and 52. HPV16 and HPV58 positivity in cervicitis, CIN1, CIN2/3, and SCC patients were 20.9% and 16.4%, 19.0% and 20.1%, 44.1% and 23.5%, and 60.0% and 31.4%, respectively. Compared to cervicitis, the odds ratios (ORs) for CIN2/3 in HPV16- and HPV58-positive patients were 2.99 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.32–4.33) and 1.56 (1.11–3.21), respectively; for SCC, the corresponding values were 5.68 (2.31–7.893) and 2.33 (1.41–3.87). Further identifying of carcinogenic HPVs and a fully aware of regional differences in HPV genotype distribution are tasks of top priority for cervical cancer control and prevention. PMID:27013587

  16. Prevalence characteristics of high-risk human papillomaviruses in women living in Shanghai with cervical precancerous lesions and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Ma, Chenyun; Zou, Jue; Zhu, Yi; Yang, Rong; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-26

    A complete understanding of the natural history of infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in cervical cancer requires data from regional and ethnic studies. The prevalence of high-risk HPVs was evaluated retrospectively in 2040 patients with cervicitis, 239 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1), 242 with CIN2/3, and 42 patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) based on data from patients who visited our hospital between May 2013 and May 2015. The rates of high-risk HPV infection in patients with cervicitis, CIN1, CIN2/3, and invasive SCC were 40.8%, 74.9%, 70.2%, and 83.3%, respectively. The three most dominant HPV genotypes were HPV16, 58, and 52. HPV16 and HPV58 positivity in cervicitis, CIN1, CIN2/3, and SCC patients were 20.9% and 16.4%, 19.0% and 20.1%, 44.1% and 23.5%, and 60.0% and 31.4%, respectively. Compared to cervicitis, the odds ratios (ORs) for CIN2/3 in HPV16- and HPV58-positive patients were 2.99 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.32-4.33) and 1.56 (1.11-3.21), respectively; for SCC, the corresponding values were 5.68 (2.31-7.893) and 2.33 (1.41-3.87). Further identifying of carcinogenic HPVs and a fully aware of regional differences in HPV genotype distribution are tasks of top priority for cervical cancer control and prevention.

  17. Prevalence characteristics of high-risk human papillomaviruses in women living in Shanghai with cervical precancerous lesions and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Ma, Chenyun; Zou, Jue; Zhu, Yi; Yang, Rong; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-26

    A complete understanding of the natural history of infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) in cervical cancer requires data from regional and ethnic studies. The prevalence of high-risk HPVs was evaluated retrospectively in 2040 patients with cervicitis, 239 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1), 242 with CIN2/3, and 42 patients with invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) based on data from patients who visited our hospital between May 2013 and May 2015. The rates of high-risk HPV infection in patients with cervicitis, CIN1, CIN2/3, and invasive SCC were 40.8%, 74.9%, 70.2%, and 83.3%, respectively. The three most dominant HPV genotypes were HPV16, 58, and 52. HPV16 and HPV58 positivity in cervicitis, CIN1, CIN2/3, and SCC patients were 20.9% and 16.4%, 19.0% and 20.1%, 44.1% and 23.5%, and 60.0% and 31.4%, respectively. Compared to cervicitis, the odds ratios (ORs) for CIN2/3 in HPV16- and HPV58-positive patients were 2.99 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.32-4.33) and 1.56 (1.11-3.21), respectively; for SCC, the corresponding values were 5.68 (2.31-7.893) and 2.33 (1.41-3.87). Further identifying of carcinogenic HPVs and a fully aware of regional differences in HPV genotype distribution are tasks of top priority for cervical cancer control and prevention. PMID:27013587

  18. Co-expression of CD147 and GLUT-1 indicates radiation resistance and poor prognosis in cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin-Qiong; Chen, Xiang; Xie, Xiao-Xue; Zhou, Qin; Li, Kai; Li, Shan; Shen, Liang-Fang; Su, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of CD147 and GLUT-1, which play important roles in glycolysis in response to radiotherapy and clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma (LACSCC). The records of 132 female patients who received primary radiation therapy to treat LACSCC at FIGO stages IB-IVA were retrospectively reviewed. Forty-seven patients with PFS (progression-free survival) of less than 36 months were regarded as radiation-resistant. Eighty-five patients with PFS longer than 36 months were regarded as radiation-sensitive. Using pretreatment paraffin-embedded tissues, we evaluated CD147 and GLUT-1 expression by immunohistochemistry. Overexpression of CD147, GLUT-1, and CD147 and GLUT-1 combined were 44.7%, 52.9% and 36.5%, respectively, in the radiation-sensitive group, and 91.5%, 89.4% and 83.0%, respectively, in the radiation-resistant group. The 5-year progress free survival (PFS) rates in the CD147-low, CD147-high, GLUT-1-low, GLUT-1-high, CD147- and/or GLUT-1-low and CD147- and GLUT-1- dual high expression groups were 66.79%, 87.10%, 52.78%, 85.82%, 55.94%, 82.90% and 50.82%, respectively. CD147 and GLUT-1 co-expression, FIGO stage and tumor diameter were independent poor prognostic factors for patients with LACSCC in multivariate Cox regression analysis. Patients with high expression of CD147 alone, GLUT-1 alone or co-expression of CD147 and GLUT-1 showed greater resistance to radiotherapy and a shorter PFS than those with low expression. In particular, co-expression of CD147 and GLUT-1 can be considered as a negative independent prognostic factor. PMID:24817962

  19. Human Papillomavirus Infection in HIV-1 Infected Women in Catalonia (Spain): Implications for Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stuardo, Valeria; Agustí, Cristina; Godinez, José Manuel; Montoliu, Alexandra; Torné, Aureli; Tarrats, Antoni; Alcalde, Carmen; Martín, Dolores; Fernández-Montoli, Eulalia; Vanrell, Cristina; Solé, Josefa; Canet, Yolanda; Marqueta, José Manuel; Mohamed, Jadiyettu; Cuenca, Isabel; Lonca, Montserrat; Sirera, Guillem; Ferrer, Elena; Domingo, Pere; Lloveras, Belen; Miro, Josep María; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Casabona, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background High-risk human Papillomavirus infection is a necessary factor for cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions and invasive cervical cancer. In HIV-1-infected women, HPV infection is more prevalent and a higher risk of cervical cancer has been identified. We aimed to calculate the prevalence of infection by HR-HPV, determine the factors associated with this infection and abnormal cytology findings and to describe the history of cervical cancer screening in HIV-1-infected women. Methods We enrolled 479 HIV-1–infected women from the PISCIS cohort. Each patient underwent a gynecological check-up, PAP smear, HPV AND Hybrid capture, HPV genotyping, and colposcopy and biopsy, if necessary. We applied questionnaires to obtain information on sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical, and cervical screening variables. We present a cross-sectional analysis. Results Median age was 42 years. The prevalence of HR-HPV infection was 33.2% and that of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) was 3.8%. The most common genotypes were 16(23%), 53(20.3%), and 52(16.2%). The factor associated with HR-HPV infection was age <30 years (odds ratio[OR],2.5; 95%confidence interval[CI],1.1–5.6). The factors associated with the presence of HSIL or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) were CD4T-lymphocyte count <200cells/mm3 versus >500cells/mm3 (OR,8.4; 95%CI,3.7–19.2), HIV-1 viral load >10,000copies/mL versus <400copies/mL (OR,2.1; 95%CI,1.0–4.4), and use of oral contraceptives (OR,2.0; 95%CI,1.0–3.9). Sixty percent of HIV-1–infected women had had one Pap smear within the last 2 years. Conclusions The high prevalence of HPV infection and cervical lesions in the HIV-1–infected population in Catalonia, as well as the low coverage and frequency of screening in this group, means that better preventive efforts are necessary and should include vaccination against HPV, better accessibility to screening programs, training of health care professionals, and

  20. Papanicolau smear chances to be diagnostic for cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) with or without detectable HPV DNA at in situ hybridization analysis.

    PubMed

    Sopracordevole, F; Cadorin, L; Muffato, G; De Benetti, L; Parin, A

    1993-01-01

    The Authors have correlated 39 cervical diagnostic biopsies for squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) with correspective Papanicolau smears (PS), with relation to the presence or the absence of HPV of oncogenic type (HPV-one) detected by in situ hybridization (ISH). Agreement between cytological and histological diagnosis was present in 14 of 16 cases with detectable HPV-one and only in 12 of 23 cases without detectable HPV-one at ISH. The importance of the HPV type in the SILs with relation to the diagnostic accuracy of Papanicolaou smears has been discussed.

  1. Joint effects of different human papillomaviruses and Chlamydia trachomatis infections on risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix uteri.

    PubMed

    Luostarinen, T; Lehtinen, M; Bjørge, T; Abeler, V; Hakama, M; Hallmans, G; Jellum, E; Koskela, P; Lenner, P; Lie, A K; Paavonen, J; Pukkala, E; Saikku, P; Sigstad, E; Thoresen, S; Youngman, L D; Dillner, J; Hakulinen, T

    2004-05-01

    This case-control study based in Nordic serum banks evaluated the joint effects of infections with genital human papillomavirus (HPV) types, and Chlamydia trachomatis in the aetiology of cervical squamous cell carcinoma. Through a linkage with the cancer registries, 144 cases were identified and 420 controls matched to them. Exposure to past infections was defined by the presence of specific IgG antibodies. The odds ratio (OR) for the second-order interaction of HPV16, HPV6/11 and C. trachomatis was small (1.0) compared to the expected multiplicative OR, 57, and the additive OR, 11. The interactions were not materially different among HPV16 DNA-positive squamous cell carcinomas. When HPV16 was replaced with HPV18/33 in the analysis of second-order interactions with HPV6/11 and C. trachomatis, there was no evidence of interaction, the joint effect being close to the expected additive OR. Possible explanations for the observed antagonism include misclassification, selection bias or a true biological phenomenon with HPV6/11 and C. trachomatis exposures antagonizing the carcinogenic effects of HPV16.

  2. Tannic acid binding of cell surfaces in normal, premalignant, and malignant squamous epithelium of the human uterine cervix.

    PubMed

    Davina, J H; Lamers, G E; van Haelst, U J; Kenemans, P; Stadhouders, A M

    1984-01-01

    Alterations in tannic acid (TA) binding capacity of cell surface carbohydrates in normal, premalignant, and malignant squamous epithelium of the human uterine cervix have been studied using electron microscopic visualization in combination with microdensitometric evaluation. While in normal epithelium there is distinct binding in four to five cell layers of the deep intermediate zone, cells of carcinoma in situ and invasive cancer lesions lack TA binding. In moderate dysplasia an intermediate reacting pattern is found. Deep intermediate cells in areas bordering the carcinoma in situ lesions do not show any binding, although their ultrastructure cannot be distinguished from similar cells in normal tissue. The TA deposition within the deep intermediate zone is probably related to the presence here of glycoprotein-containing membrane-coating granules. The finding that TA binding discriminates between cells in normal squamous epithelium and morphologically normal cells in juxtaposition with lesional areas in premalignant and malignant epithelium opens the possibility for a more reliable cytologic diagnosis of cervical epithelial neoplasia.

  3. Immunohistochemical Expression of VEGF and Podoplanin in Uterine Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Belfort-Mattos, Patrícia Napoli; Focchi, Gustavo Rubino de Azevedo; Ribalta, Julisa Chamorro Lascasas; Megale De Lima, Tatiana; Nogueira Carvalho, Carmen Regina; Kesselring Tso, Fernanda; De Góis Speck, Neila Maria

    2016-01-01

    VEGF and podoplanin (PDPN) have been identified as angiogenesis and/or lymphangiogenesis regulators and might be essential to restrict tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. In the present study, we evaluate the association between the expression of these markers and CIN grade. Immunohistochemistry was performed in 234 uterine cervical samples using conventional histologic sections or TMA with the monoclonal antibodies to VEGF (C-1 clone) and podoplanin (D2-40 clone). Positive-staining rates of VEGF in 191 CIN specimens were significantly associated with histological grade (P < 0.001). Negative and/or focal immunostaining for PDPN were more frequent in CIN 3 (P = 0.016). We found that patients with CIN 3 more frequently had strong and more diffuse staining for VEGF and diminished staining for PDPN (P = 0.018). Strong and more diffuse VEGF immunoexpressions in CIN 2 and CIN 3 were detected when compared to CIN 1. Negative and/or focal PDPN immunoexpression appear to be more frequent in CIN 3. Moderate to strong VEGF expression may be a tendency among patients with high-grade lesions and diminished PDPN expression. PMID:27313335

  4. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  5. [Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and the regulators of its activity as invasive factors in squamous cell cervical carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, O S; Gureeva, T A; Kugaevskaia, E V; Solov'eva, N I

    2014-01-01

    Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1MMP) is one of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), which play а key role in tumor invasion and metastasis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the peculiarities of expression of MT1MMP and endogenous regulators of its activity: the activator - furin and the inhibitor - TIMP-2, as invasive factors of squamous cell cervical carcinomas (SCC). The study was carried out using 11 specimens of SCC and 11 specimens of morphologically normal tissue adjacent to the tumor. It was shown that the increase of MT1-MMP and furin expression and low of TIMP-2 expression makes the main contribution to the destructive (invasive) potential of SCC. Moreover, substantial expression of MT1-MMP was registered in the specimens of morphologically normal adjoining to tumor tissue. This expression was found to make an additional contribution to the destructive potential of the cervical tumor.

  6. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in the cervical epithelium of Mexican women: meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical epithelium has been identified as the main etiological factor in the developing of Cervical Cancer (CC), which has recently become a public health problem in Mexico. This finding has allowed for the development of vaccines that help prevent this infection. In the present study, we aimed to determine the prevalence and HPV type-distribution in Mexican women with CC, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), and Normal cytology (N) to estimate the impact of the HPV vaccines. Methods The PubMed database was used to identify and review all articles that reported data on HPV prevalence in CC, precursor lesions, and normal cytology of Mexican women. Results A total of 8,706 samples of the tissues of Mexican women were stratified according to diagnosis as follows: 499 for CC; 364 for HSIL; 1,425 for LSIL, and 6,418 for N. According to the results, the most prevalent genotypes are the following: HPV16 (63.1%), -18 (8.6%), -58, and −31 (5%) for CC; HPV-16 (28.3%), 58 (12.6%), 18 (7.4%), and 33 (6.5%) for HSIL; HPV-16 (13.1%), 33 (7.4%), 18 (4.2%), and 58 (2.6%) for LSIL, and HPV-16 (3.4%), 33 (2.1%), 18, and 58 (1.2%) for N. Conclusions Taken together, genotypes 58 and 31 (10%) are more common than type 18 (8.6%) in CC. Therefore, the inclusion of these two genotypes in a second-generation vaccine would provide optimal prevention of CC in Mexico. PMID:23199368

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I and II Alleles and Cervical Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Johnson, Lisa G.; Yu, Kai; Wang, Sophia S.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Hansen, John A.; Carrington, Mary; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Gao, Xiaojiang; Hildesheim, Allan; Madeleine, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Associations between human leukocyte antigens (HLA) alleles and cervical cancer are largely representative of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the major histologic subtype. We evaluated the association between HLA class I (A, B, and C) and class II (DRB1 and DQB1) loci and risk of cervical adenocarcinoma (ADC), a less common but aggressive histologic subtype. Methods: We pooled data from the Eastern and Western US Cervical Cancer studies, and evaluated the association between individual alleles and allele combinations and ADC (n = 630 ADC; n = 775 controls). Risk estimates were calculated for 11 a priori (based on known associations with cervical cancer regardless of histologic type) and 38 non a priori common alleles, as odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for age and study. In exploratory analysis, we compared the risk associations between subgroups with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA in ADC tumor tissues in the Western US study cases and controls. Results: Three of the a priori alleles were significantly associated with decreased risk of ADC [DRB1*13:01 (OR = 0.61; 95% CI: 0.41–0.93), DRB1*13:02 (OR = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.31–0.77), and DQB1*06:03 (OR = 0.64; 95% CI: 0.42–0.95)]; one was associated with increased risk [B*07:02 (OR = 1.39; 95% CI: 1.07–1.79)]. Among alleles not previously reported, DQB1*06:04 (OR = 0.46; 95% CI: 0.27–0.78) was associated with decreased risk of ADC and remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons, and C*07:02 (OR = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.09–1.81) was associated with increased risk. We did not observe a difference by histologic subtype. ADC was most strongly associated with increased risk with B*07:02/C*07:02 alleles (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.01–1.76) and decreased risk with DRB1*13:02/DQB1*06:04 (OR = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.21–0.80). Conclusion: Results suggest that HLA allele associations with cervical ADC are similar to those for cervical SCC. An intriguing

  8. Prevalence of human papillomaviruses in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in Lithuania and Belarus.

    PubMed

    Gudleviciene, Zivile; Didziapetriene, Janina; Mackeviciene, Irina; Cicenas, Saulius; Smolyakova, Raisa; Zhukavetc, Aliaksandr; Zivile, Gudleviciene; Janina, Didziapetriene; Irina, Mackeviciene; Saulius, Cicenas; Raisa, Smolyakova; Aliaksandr, Zhukavetc

    2014-03-01

    Overall, head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma accounts for more than 550,000 cases annually worldwide. It is well known that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for cervical cancer development. As the incidence and the mortality of cervical cancer are closely related to the HPV prevalence, we hypothesized that there is the same association between HPV prevalence and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore we performed the study aiming to compare the level of HPV infection and HPV type distribution between two groups of Lithuanian and Belarusian patients with head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma. One hundred ninety head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma patients were included in the study, 75 from Lithuania and 115 from Belarus. PCR was used for HPV detection and typing. The distribution of HPV infection among head and neck sqamous cell carcinoma patients was similar in the Lithuanian (20.0%) and Belarusian (18.3%) patient groups, however differences were found in the distribution of HPV types.

  9. Impact of human papillomavirus on head and neck squamous cell cancers in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Ingrid, Labouba; Chloé, Bertolus; Hervé, Koumakpayi Ismail; Ernest, Belembaogo; Jérôme, Miloundja; Nicolas, Berthet

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancers are among the most aggressive. Their incidence and mortality rates are relatively lower in Middle Africa than worldwide, but in Gabon, these rates tend to be 2-3 fold higher than in neighboring countries. The main risk factors are alcohol and tobacco consumption. However, in the last decades, there was cumulated evidence that human papillomaviruses were a significant risk factor, particularly for oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. In Gabon, as elsewhere in Africa, assessment of these 3 risk factors need to be improved to determine their respective role in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers. The potential differences in alcohol/tobacco consumption habits as well as in infectious ecology between developing and developed countries can make it difficult to transpose current data on this issue. Determining the respective role of alcohol/tobacco consumption and human papillomaviruses in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers is crucial for the management of these cancers that could become a serious public health issue in Gabon. Human papillomaviruses are not only a risk factor but also a biomarker with promising clinical potential for the follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers potentially able to select an adequate treatment. Then, assessing the epidemiological impact of human papillomaviruses in Gabon and in all of Africa would prove useful for the clinical follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers, and would also provide essential data to plan a global prevention strategy against head and neck squamous cell cancers due to human papillomaviruses. PMID:26557156

  10. Phase Ib Study of BKM120 With Cisplatin and XRT in High Risk Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; HPV Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Early Invasive Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Carcinoma of Larynx; Cancer of Nasopharynx

  11. Isolation of a novel human papillomavirus (type 51) from a cervical condyloma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuovo, G.J.; Crum, C.P.; Levine, R.U.; Silverstein, S.J. ); De Villiers, E.M. )

    1988-04-01

    The authors cloned the DNA from a novel human papillomavirus (HPV) present in a cervical condyloma. When DNA from this isolate was hybridized at high stringency with HPV types 1 through 50 (HPV-1 through HPV-50), it showed weak homology with HPV-6 and -16 and stronger homology with HPV-26. A detailed restriction endonuclease map was prepared which showed marked differences from the maps for other HPVs that have been isolated from the female genital tract. Reassociation kinetic analysis revealed that HPV-26 and this new isolate were less than 10% homologous; hence, the new isolate is a noel strain of HPV. The approximate positions of the open reading frames of the new strain were surmised by hybridization with probes derived from individual open reading frames of HPV-16. In an analysis of 175 genital biopsies from patients with abnormal Papanicolaou smears, sequences hybridizing under highly stringent conditions to probes from this novel HPV type were found in 4.2, 6.1, and 2.4% of biopsies containing normal squamous epithelium, condylomata, and intraepithelial neoplasia, respectively. In addition, sequences homologous to probes from this novel isolate were detected in one of five cervical carcinomas examined.

  12. Diagnostic tests for the detection of human papillomavirus-associated cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Current diagnostic approaches for primary cervical cancer screening, work-up of equivocal or positive screening results or follow- up after treatment of precancerous lesions primarily rely on the morphologic interpretation of squamous epithelial cells (Pap cytology), in some setting accompanied by the detection of human papillomavirus DNA and have largely contributed to remarkable reduction of disease incidence in countries with implemented screening programs. However, these approaches are limited by a poor sensitivity and reproducibility of Pap cytology and low specificity for high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of HPV DNA detection assays. Early detection might be improved by complementing or even replacing these tests by markers which are more directly related to molecular events triggering HPV-induced carcinogenesis and thereby might deliver more accurate diagnostic performance. The delineation of molecular changes which occur during different stages of HPV infections and the identification of changes which induce neoplastic alterations allow for the detection of markers that specifically highlight the transforming stage of the infection where viral oncogenes are overexpressed and therefore allow for a more specific diagnosis of lesions that require treatment. The evaluation of such markers in clinical studies revealed that some indeed show an improved diagnostic performance compared to Pap cytology or HPV DNA tests only.

  13. Human leukocyte antigen class II DRB1*1302 allele protects against cervical cancer: At which step of multistage carcinogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Koji; Maeda, Hiroo; Oki, Akinori; Takatsuka, Naoyoshi; Yasugi, Toshiharu; Furuta, Reiko; Hirata, Ranko; Mitsuhashi, Akira; Kawana, Kei; Fujii, Takuma; Iwata, Takashi; Hirai, Yasuo; Yokoyama, Masatoshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Watanabe, Yoh; Nagai, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles in multistage cervical carcinogenesis. Cross-sectional analysis for HLA association with cervical cancer included 1253 Japanese women: normal cytology (NL, n = 341), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN1, n = 505), CIN grade 2 or 3 (CIN2/3, n = 96), or invasive cervical cancer (ICC, n = 311). The HLA class II allele frequencies were compared by Fisher’s exact test or the χ2-test. The Bonferroni adjustment corrected for multiple comparisons. Among the study subjects, 454 women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cytology were prospectively monitored by cytology and colposcopy every 3–4 months to analyze cumulative risk of CIN3 within the next 10 years in relation to HLA class II alleles. HLA class II DRB1*1302 allele frequency was similar between women with NL (11.7%) and CIN1 (11.9%), but significantly decreased to 5.2% for CIN2/3 and 5.8% for ICC (P = 0.0003). Correction for multiple testing did not change this finding. In women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion cytology, the cumulative risk of CIN3 diagnosed within 10 years was significantly reduced among DRB1*1302-positive women (3.2% vs. 23.7%, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the two different types of analysis in this single study showed the protective effect of the DRB1*1302 allele against progression from CIN1 to CIN2/3. PMID:26235935

  14. Human papillomavirus infection in lung vs. oral squamous cell carcinomas: a polymerase chain reaction study.

    PubMed

    Halimi, M; Morshedi Asl, S

    2011-06-01

    The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been suspected in pathogenesis of various malignancies; however, the available data are not conclusive. This study aimed to determine and compare the frequency of HPV infection in oral and lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) by a sensitive method. Sixty specimens of oral and lung SCC (30 cases each one) were reevaluated in Tabriz Imam Reza Centre in a 24 month period. Following genomic DNA extract, the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) amplification was performed in presence of specific MY11 and MY09 primers for HPV infection. Three cervical specimens and a combination of PCR solution lacking DNA plus healthy persons' DNA samples were employed as positive and negative controls, respectively. The oral group was significantly older than the lung group (68.90 vs. 56.67 y, p < 0.001) with more males in the latter (83.3 vs. 60%; p = 0.04). Percentages of HPV infection in the oral and lung groups were comparable (20 vs. 10%, respectively; p = 0.47). Majority of patients with HPV infection were older than 60 years (88.9%) or male (88.9%). In the oral group, all these cases were well differentiated and the majority was of lower lip origin (83.3%). In the lung group, 66.7% of these specimens were moderately differentiated and the origin was bronchus in all cases. In conclusion, the rate of HPV infection in lung and oral SCC samples is rather lower than the previous reports in the literature. This rate is apparently higher in the oral than the lung SCC specimens. PMID:22235505

  15. Human papillomavirus types distribution in eastern Sicilian females with cervical lesions. A correlation with colposcopic and histological findings.

    PubMed

    Le Donne, Maria; Giuffrè, Giuseppe; Caruso, Carmela; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Alibrandi, Angela; Scalisi, Rosalba; Simone, Angela; Chiofalo, Benito; Triolo, Onofrio

    2013-07-01

    To determine human papillomavirus (HPV) types distribution in cervical lesions in a Southern Italian female population in Messina and their relationship between HPV type and grade of colposcopic and histopathological abnormality, a total of 253 women aged 17-68 years, with previous cytological abnormalities, were included in this study. HPV-DNA testing, colposcopy and biopsy were performed. For each sample, cervical cells were collected by centrifugation and DNA was extracted, followed by a PCR-based HPV-DNA assay and reverse dot blot genotyping. HPV-16 was found the most common type (46.6 %) followed by HPV-31 (26.9 %), -6 (18.6 %), -58 (8.8 %), -18 (6.7 %), -66 (5.7 %), -52 and -53 (4.7 %). Out of 62 women with abnormal transformation zone (ATZ) area compatible with squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) or cervical cancer (CC), 64.5 % was found high risk (HR) HPV-positive. Moreover the severity of the colposcopic diagnosis was positively correlated with the higher HPV oncogenicity risk (HPV-16 P = 0.023; and HPV-53 P = 0.047). The HPV-16 was found the most prevalent type within each histological category: 66.7 %, 31.2 %, 44 % and 37.2 % of CC, high grade (H)SIL, low grade (L)SIL and chronic cervicitis respectively; followed by HPV-31 present in 25 %, 8 %, and 13.3 % of HSIL, LSIL and chronic cervicitis respectively. A higher HPV incidence than the rest of Italy was found, in agreement with that detected by other authors for the South of the country. These data provide further information about the types prevalence in women with cervical lesions living in Eastern Sicily, suggesting the introduction of new targeted vaccines against a wider spectrum of HPV.

  16. Human papillomavirus types distribution in eastern Sicilian females with cervical lesions. A correlation with colposcopic and histological findings.

    PubMed

    Le Donne, Maria; Giuffrè, Giuseppe; Caruso, Carmela; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Alibrandi, Angela; Scalisi, Rosalba; Simone, Angela; Chiofalo, Benito; Triolo, Onofrio

    2013-07-01

    To determine human papillomavirus (HPV) types distribution in cervical lesions in a Southern Italian female population in Messina and their relationship between HPV type and grade of colposcopic and histopathological abnormality, a total of 253 women aged 17-68 years, with previous cytological abnormalities, were included in this study. HPV-DNA testing, colposcopy and biopsy were performed. For each sample, cervical cells were collected by centrifugation and DNA was extracted, followed by a PCR-based HPV-DNA assay and reverse dot blot genotyping. HPV-16 was found the most common type (46.6 %) followed by HPV-31 (26.9 %), -6 (18.6 %), -58 (8.8 %), -18 (6.7 %), -66 (5.7 %), -52 and -53 (4.7 %). Out of 62 women with abnormal transformation zone (ATZ) area compatible with squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) or cervical cancer (CC), 64.5 % was found high risk (HR) HPV-positive. Moreover the severity of the colposcopic diagnosis was positively correlated with the higher HPV oncogenicity risk (HPV-16 P = 0.023; and HPV-53 P = 0.047). The HPV-16 was found the most prevalent type within each histological category: 66.7 %, 31.2 %, 44 % and 37.2 % of CC, high grade (H)SIL, low grade (L)SIL and chronic cervicitis respectively; followed by HPV-31 present in 25 %, 8 %, and 13.3 % of HSIL, LSIL and chronic cervicitis respectively. A higher HPV incidence than the rest of Italy was found, in agreement with that detected by other authors for the South of the country. These data provide further information about the types prevalence in women with cervical lesions living in Eastern Sicily, suggesting the introduction of new targeted vaccines against a wider spectrum of HPV. PMID:23420303

  17. Clinical value of routine serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen in follow-up of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation or chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jinju; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Tae Sung; Kim, Ju Hyun; Koh, Suk Bong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefits of routine squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) monitoring of patients with locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiation or chemoradiation. Methods A total of 53 patients with recurrent cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiation were enrolled in this study. A retrospective review of medical records was conducted. The role of routine monitoring of serum SCC-Ag was evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness and effect on survival after diagnosis of recurrence. Results Serum SCC-Ag abnormality (≥2.5 ng/mL) was observed in 62.3% of patients when recurrent disease was diagnosed. The first indicator of relapse was abnormal serum SCC-Ag level in 21 patients (39.6%), 10 of whom had asymptomatic recurrent disease amenable to salvage therapy. Adding SCC-Ag measurement to the basic follow up protocol improved the sensitivity for detecting recurrence (The sensitivity of the basic protocol vs. addition of SCC-Ag: 49.1% vs. 88.7%, P<0.001). Twenty-three patients who were candidates for salvage therapy with curative intent showed better survival compared with those who were not candidates for therapy (5-year survival: 36.6% vs. 0%, P=0.012). Conclusion Surveillance with routine serum SCC-Ag monitoring can better detect asymptomatic recurrent disease that is potentially amenable to salvage therapy with curative intent. Early diagnosis of recurrent disease that can be treated with salvage therapy may lead to better survival. PMID:27462593

  18. Rapid induction of senescence in human cervical carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Edward C.; Yang, Eva; Lee, Chan-Jae; Lee, Han-Woong; Dimaio, Daniel; Hwang, Eun-Seong

    2000-09-01

    Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 regulatory protein in human cervical carcinoma cell lines repressed expression of the resident human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes and within a few days caused essentially all of the cells to synchronously display numerous phenotypic markers characteristic of cells undergoing replicative senescence. This process was accompanied by marked but in some cases transient alterations in the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and by decreased telomerase activity. We propose that the human papillomavirus E6 and E7 proteins actively prevent senescence from occurring in cervical carcinoma cells, and that once viral oncogene expression is extinguished, the senescence program is rapidly executed. Activation of endogenous senescence pathways in cancer cells may represent an alternative approach to treat human cancers.

  19. Associations between sexually transmitted infections, high-risk human papillomavirus infection, and abnormal cervical Pap smear results in OB/GYN outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to examine the meaning and usefulness of sexually transmitted infection (STI) test when caring for patients who have abnormal cervical cytology and/or positive high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test results. Methods Among patients who underwent liquid-based cervical cytology and HPV DNA tests at the Obstetrics and Gynecology outpatient clinic, 800 patients who showed abnormal cervical cytology were compared with 200 patients in the control group. Both groups were simultaneously tested via multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction for seven types of STI-causative microorganisms. Results The positive rate of high-risk HPV infection in total STIs positive group was 1.47 times higher than that of total STIs negative group. The probability of a cytological diagnosis of a grade equal to or higher than atypical squamous cells-cannot exclude high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H) was significantly higher in patients testing positive for total STIs (1.46 times), Chlamydia trachomatis (3.21 times), or Mycoplasma genitalicum (3.58 times) than in those testing negative. The total STIs positive rate was significantly higher for those having a cytological diagnosis of a grade equal to or higher than atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) when high-risk HPV test result was negative. Conclusion Correlations were present not only between STIs and high-risk HPV infection but also between abnormal cervical cytology and STIs. Therefore, additional evaluation of STIs will be helpful to appropriately diagnose and treat patients with abnormal cervical cytology, positive results on high-risk HPV DNA test, or a cytological diagnosis of ASC-US despite negative high-risk HPV DNA test result. PMID:27329197

  20. S100A8/A9 induces apoptosis and inhibits metastasis of CasKi human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fengjin; Song, Yao; Li, Zijian; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Youyi; Geng, Li

    2010-09-01

    S100 proteins, a family of Ca(2+)-binding proteins, have been linked to several human diseases in recent years. Deregulated expression of S100 proteins, including S100A9 and its partner S100A8, was reported to be associated with neoplastic disorders. In our previous study using serial analysis of gene expression, we identified decreased expressions of S100A9 and S100A8 in human cervical squamous cell carcinoma. To investigate the functions of S100A8 and S100A9 in cervical cancer, we purified recombinant S100A8 and S100A9 proteins and treated CaSki human cervical cancer cells with these proteins. We found that S100A8/A9 induced apoptosis and inhibited migration of CaSki cells; S100A8/A9 also reduced the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in CaSki cells. In summary, this study suggests that S100A8 and S100A9 have inhibitory effects on the proliferation of CaSki carcinoma cells by inducing cell apoptosis and on the invasiveness of CaSki cells.

  1. Detection of rare and possibly carcinogenic human papillomavirus genotypes as single infections in invasive cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Geraets, Daan; Alemany, Laia; Guimera, Nuria; de Sanjose, Silvia; de Koning, Maurits; Molijn, Anco; Jenkins, David; Bosch, Xavier; Quint, Wim

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types to the burden of cervical cancer has been well established. However, the role and contribution of phylogenetically related HPV genotypes and rare variants remains uncertain. In a recent global study of 8977 HPV-positive invasive cervical carcinomas (ICCs), the genotype remained unidentified in 3.7% by the HPV SPF10 PCR-DEIA-LiPA25 (version 1) algorithm. The 331 ICC specimens with unknown genotype were analysed by a novel sequence methodology, using multiple selected short regions in L1. This demonstrated HPV genotypes that have infrequently or never been detected in ICC, ie HPV26, 30, 61, 67, 68, 69, 73 and 82, and rare variants of HPV16, 18, 26, 30, 34, 39, 56, 67, 68, 69, 82 and 91. These are not identified individually by LiPA25 and only to some extent by other HPV genotyping assays. Most identified genotypes have a close phylogenetic relationship with established carcinogenic HPVs and have been classified as possibly carcinogenic by IARC. Except for HPV85, all genotypes in α-species 5, 6, 7, 9 and 11 were encountered as single infections in ICCs. These species of established and possibly carcinogenic HPV types form an evolutionary clade. We have shown that the possibly carcinogenic types were detected only in squamous cell carcinomas, which were often keratinizing and diagnosed at a relatively higher mean age (55.3 years) than those associated with established carcinogenic types (50.9 years). The individual frequency of the possibly carcinogenic types in ICCs is low, but together they are associated with 2.25% of the 8338 included ICCs with a single HPV type. This fraction is greater than seven of the established carcinogenic types individually. This study provides evidence that possibly carcinogenic HPV types occur as single infections in invasive cervical cancer, strengthening the circumstantial evidence of a carcinogenic role.

  2. Clinical Effect of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Patients With Cervical Cancer Undergoing Primary Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Huei-Jean; Chao, Angel; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in cervical cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 1,010 patients with cervical cancer after radiotherapy between 1993 and 2000 were eligible for this study. The HPV genotypes were determined by a genechip, which detects 38 types of HPV. The patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were analyzed using the Cox regression hazard model and classification and regression tree decision tree method. Results: A total of 25 genotypes of HPV were detected in 992 specimens (98.2%). The leading 8 types were HPV16, 58, 18, 33, 52, 39, 31, and 45. These types belong to two high-risk HPV species: alpha-7 (HPV18, 39, 45) and alpha-9 (HPV16, 31, 33, 52, 58). Three HPV-based risk groups, which were independent of established prognostic factors, such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, age, pathologic features, squamous cell carcinoma antigen, and lymph node metastasis, were associated with the survival outcomes. The high-risk group consisted of the patients without HPV infection or the ones infected with the alpha-7 species only. Patients co-infected with the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species belonged to the medium-risk group, and the others were included in the low-risk group. Conclusion: The results of the present study have confirmed the prognostic value of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy. The different effect of the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species on the radiation response deserves additional exploration.

  3. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer

  4. Strategies against human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woon-Won; Chun, Taehoon; Sul, Donggeun; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Kang, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Duck Joo; Han, In-Kwon

    2004-12-01

    Papillomaviruses infect a wide variety of animals, including humans. The human papillomavirus (HPV), in particular, is one of the most common causes of sexually transmitted disease. More than 200 types of HPV have been identified by DNA sequence data, and 85 HPV genotypes have been well characterized to date. HPV can infect the basal epithelial cells of the skin or inner tissue linings, and are, accordingly, categorized as either cutaneous or mucosal type. HPV is associated with a panoply of clinical conditions, ranging from innocuous lesions to cervical cancer. In the early 1980s, studies first reported a link between cervical cancer and genital HPV infection. Genital HPV infections are now recognized to be a major risk factor in at least 95% of cervical cancers. 30 different HPV genotypes have been identified as causative of sexually transmitted diseases, most of which induce lesions in the cervix, vagina, vulva, penis, and anus, as the result of sexual contact. There is also direct evidence demonstrating that at least four of these genotypes are prerequisite factors in cervical cancer. The main aim of this review was to evaluate the current literature regarding the pathovirology, diagnostics, vaccines, therapy, risk groups, and further therapeutic directions for HPV infections. In addition, we reviewed the current status of HPV infections in South Korean women, as evidenced by our data.

  5. The role of human papillomavirus in squamous carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M

    2006-03-01

    Human papillomavirus type-16 infection is associated with a significant portion of squamous carcinoma of the head and neck, particularly for the oropharynx and for those lacking the other risk factors of tobacco and alcohol. The link between human papillomavirus type-16 and carcinoma of the oropharynx is based on the identification of human papillomavirus type-16 in oropharyngeal tumors and the association of human papillomavirus type-16 with the risk of oropharyngeal cancer estimated in case-control epidemiologic studies. This review highlights the molecular mechanism of human papillomavirus carcinogenesis and the association of human papillomavirus type-16 as a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx as well as recent research efforts utilizing human papillomavirus as a biomarker of clinical outcomes.

  6. Nonlinear optical microscopy and ultrasound imaging of human cervical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, Lisa M.; Feltovich, Helen; Carlson, Lindsey C.; Hall, Gunnsteinn; Campagnola, Paul J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    The cervix softens and shortens as its collagen microstructure rearranges in preparation for birth, but premature change may lead to premature birth. The global preterm birth rate has not decreased despite decades of research, likely because cervical microstructure is poorly understood. Our group has developed a multilevel approach to evaluating the human cervix. We are developing quantitative ultrasound (QUS) techniques for noninvasive interrogation of cervical microstructure and corroborating those results with high-resolution images of microstructure from second harmonic generation imaging (SHG) microscopy. We obtain ultrasound measurements from hysterectomy specimens, prepare the tissue for SHG, and stitch together several hundred images to create a comprehensive view of large areas of cervix. The images are analyzed for collagen orientation and alignment with curvelet transform, and registered with QUS data, facilitating multiscale analysis in which the micron-scale SHG images and millimeter-scale ultrasound data interpretation inform each other. This novel combination of modalities allows comprehensive characterization of cervical microstructure in high resolution. Through a detailed comparative study, we demonstrate that SHG imaging both corroborates the quantitative ultrasound measurements and provides further insight. Ultimately, a comprehensive understanding of specific microstructural cervical change in pregnancy should lead to novel approaches to the prevention of preterm birth.

  7. Immunohistochemical demonstration of human papilloma virus (HPV) antigens in oral squamous cell lesions.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, K J; Pyrhönen, S; Syrjänen, S M; Lamberg, M A

    1983-06-01

    Six oral squamous cell tumours classified as focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), Condyloma acuminatum (CA) and squamous cell papilloma (SQP) were subjected to indirect immunoperoxidase staining with anti-human papillomavirus (anti-HPV) antiserum to demonstrate the possible presence of HPV antigens in these lesions. The results are discussed in the light of the observations on HPV-lesions elsewhere in the body (in uterine cervix), and a suggestion is made to adopt the name condyloma for all those tumours where HPV aetiology can be established by ultrastructural or immunohistochemical means.

  8. Concurrent Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx in a Married Couple.

    PubMed

    Brobst, Tyler D; García, Joaquín J; Price, Katharine A; Gao, Ge; Smith, David I; Price, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although alcohol and tobacco use are known risk factors for development of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck, human papillomavirus (HPV) has been increasingly associated with this group of cancers. We describe the case of a married couple who presented with HPV-positive oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma within two months of each other. Methods. Tumor biopsies were positive for p16 and high-risk HPV in both patients. Sanger sequencing showed a nearly identical HPV16 strain in both patients. Both patients received chemoradiation, and one patient also underwent transoral robotic tongue base resection with bilateral neck dissection. Results. Both patients showed no evidence of recurrent disease on follow-up PET imaging. Conclusions. New head and neck symptoms should be promptly evaluated in the partner of a patient with known HPV-positive oropharynx cancer. This case expands the limited current literature on concurrent presentation of HPV-positive oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma in couples. PMID:27418994

  9. Concurrent Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx in a Married Couple

    PubMed Central

    García, Joaquín J.; Price, Katharine A.; Gao, Ge; Smith, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although alcohol and tobacco use are known risk factors for development of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck, human papillomavirus (HPV) has been increasingly associated with this group of cancers. We describe the case of a married couple who presented with HPV-positive oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma within two months of each other. Methods. Tumor biopsies were positive for p16 and high-risk HPV in both patients. Sanger sequencing showed a nearly identical HPV16 strain in both patients. Both patients received chemoradiation, and one patient also underwent transoral robotic tongue base resection with bilateral neck dissection. Results. Both patients showed no evidence of recurrent disease on follow-up PET imaging. Conclusions. New head and neck symptoms should be promptly evaluated in the partner of a patient with known HPV-positive oropharynx cancer. This case expands the limited current literature on concurrent presentation of HPV-positive oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma in couples. PMID:27418994

  10. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution in women with cervical lesions: a cross-sectional study in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer ranks second among all cancers reported in Sri Lankan women. This study assessed the prevalence and type-distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) among Sri Lankan women with invasive cervical cancer (ICC) and pre-cancerous lesions. Methods 114 women aged 21 years and above, hospitalized in the National Cancer Institute, Sri Lanka with a diagnosis of ICC or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2/3 were prospectively enrolled between October 2009 and September 2010 (110430/NCT01221987). The cervical biopsy or excision specimens collected during routine clinical procedures were subjected to histopathological review. DNA was extracted from samples with a confirmed histological diagnosis and was amplified using polymerase chain reaction and HPV DNA was detected using Enzyme Immuno Assay. HPV positive samples were typed using reverse hybridization Line Probe Assay. Results Of the cervical samples collected, 93.0% (106/114) had a histologically confirmed diagnosis of either ICC (98/106) or CIN 2/3 (8/106). Among all ICC cases, squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed in the majority of women (81.6% [80/98]). HPV prevalence among ICC cases was 84.7% (83/98). The HPV types most commonly detected in ICC cases with single HPV infection (98.8% [82/83]) were HPV-16 (67.3%) and HPV-18 (9.2%). Infection with multiple HPV types was recorded in a single case (co-infection of HPV-16 and HPV-59). Conclusions HPV was prevalent in most women with ICC in Sri Lanka; HPV-16 and HPV-18 were the predominantly detected HPV types. An effective prophylactic vaccine against the most prevalent HPV types may help to reduce the burden of ICC disease. PMID:24558979

  11. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    PubMed

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the α-Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species α5 (HPV51), α6 (HPV56), α7 (HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59) and α9 (HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58). Less evidence is available for a thirteenth type (HPV68, α7), which is classified as a 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic). Moreover, seven other phylogenetically related types (HPV26, HPV53, HPV66, HPV67, HPV68, HPV70 and HPV73) were identified as single HPV infections in certain rare cases of cervical cancer and were considered possibly carcinogenic (2B carcinogens). Recently, Halec et al [7] demonstrated that the molecular signature of HPV-induced carcinogenesis (presence of type-specific spliced E6*| mRNA; increased expression of p16; and decreased expression of cyclin D1, p53 and Rb) was similar in cervical cancers containing single infections with one of the eight afore-mentioned 2A or 2B carcinogens to those in cancers with single infections with group 1 carcinogens. Ninety six percent of cervical cancers are attributable to one of the 13 most common HPV types (groups 1 and 2A). Including the additional seven HPV types (group 2B) added 2.6%, to reach a total of 98.7% of all HPV-positive cervical cancers. From recently updated meta-analyses, it was shown that HPV68, HPV26, HPV66, HPV67, HPV73 and HPV82 were significantly more common in cancer cases than in women with normal cervical cytology, suggesting that for these HPV types, an upgrading of the carcinogen classification could be considered. However, there is no need to include them in HPV screening tests or vaccines, given their rarity in

  12. Predictive Value of Cytokeratin 7 Immunohistochemistry in Cervical Low-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion as a Marker for Risk of Progression to a High-grade Lesion.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Cherie; Mills, Anne M; Stoler, Mark H

    2016-02-01

    The squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) cell population of the uterine cervix is a discrete epithelial area and the putative source of the majority of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). The SCJ cells can be identified by immunohistochemical (IHC) stains including cytokeratin 7 (CK7). Others have theorized that an SCJ marker-positive low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) has a higher risk for future HSIL compared with an SCJ marker-negative LSIL. This study has 2 aims: first, to refine the definition of a positive CK7 immunostaining pattern in cervical lesions, and, second, to test the hypothesis that CK7 positivity in LSIL indicates higher risk for future HSIL, with both questions addressed using a data set with consensus diagnoses. One hundred cases each of LSIL, moderate HSIL (CIN2), and severe HSIL (CIN3) were stained for CK7, with positivity defined as a diffuse cytoplasmic staining pattern (>5 to 6 contiguous cells); all others were considered negative. Using this model, 34% of CIN1, 45% of CIN2, and 60% of CIN3 were CK7 positive. With follow-up, CK7-positive LSILs were more likely to progress to HSIL compared with CK7-negative LSIL (32% vs. 11%, P=0.05), in concordance with the results of other researchers. This study simplifies cervical CK7 IHC grading into a reproducible system and supports the thesis that CK7 positivity in LSIL is associated with increased risk for future HSIL. Larger cohorts using consensus-diagnosed LSIL are needed to confirm these results before CK7 may be considered for clinical validation. PMID:26551618

  13. Potential impact of a nine-valent vaccine in human papillomavirus related cervical disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Information on human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution is necessary to evaluate the potential impact of current and future HPV vaccines. We estimated the relative contribution (RC) to invasive cervical cancer (ICC) and precancerous cervical lesions of the nine HPV types (HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58) included in an HPV vaccine currently under development. Methods Estimations on ICC were based on an international study of 8,977 HPV positive cases and estimations on precancerous cervical lesions were extracted from a published meta-analysis including 115,789 HPV positive women. Globocan 2008 and 2010 World Population Prospects were used to estimate current and future projections of new ICC cases. Results RC of the 9 HPV types in ICC was 89.4%, with 18.5% of cases positive for HPV 31/33/45/52/58. Regional variations were observed. RCs varied by histology, ranging between 89.1% in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and 95.5% in adenocarcinomas (ADC). HPV 16/18/45 were detected in 94.2% of ADC. RC of the 9 types altogether decreased with age (trend test p < 0.0001), driven by the decrease in older ages of HPV 16/18/45. In contrast, the RC of HPV 31/33/52/58 increased with age. Due to population growth alone, projected estimates of ICC cases attributable to the 9 types are expected to rise from 493,770 new cases in 2012 to 560,887 new cases in 2025. The RCs of individual high risk HPV types varied by cytological and histological grades of HPV-positive precancerous cervical lesions, and there was an under representation of HPV 18 and 45 compared to ICC. Conclusions The addition of HPV 31/33/45/52/58 to HPV types included in current vaccines could prevent almost 90% of ICC cases worldwide. If the nine-valent vaccine achieves the same degree of efficacy than previous vaccines, world incidence rates could be substantially reduced. PMID:23273245

  14. Human Papillomavirus in Brazilian women with and without cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) high-risk (HR) types are the causal factor for cervical cancer and premalignant dysplasia. Data on frequency of HPV types provide a basis to design and evaluate HPV prevention programs. Taking into account the heterogeneity of HPV types across and within populations this study aims to access the HPV frequency in Brazilian women. Results We identified 24 different types of HPV, including a Betapapillomavirus and a likely new type, previously reported, from 132 women positive for the virus analysed by Hybrid Capture II assay. These women were infected by a single or multiple HPV types and 142 HPV strains were identified. HR types were found in 75% of women and HPV types 16, 18, 45, 58, and 66 had the highest frequency. Significant differences in frequency of HR HPV types were found for presence of cervical lesions, and for different HPV species and women age. Conclusions Compared with previous studies in Brazil, our data indicated differences in frequency and HPV type diversity, a significant association of other HR-types but HPV16 and 18 and cervical lesions, and a trend for distinct distribution of HPV types by age. PMID:21208414

  15. Therapeutic Vaccines Against Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are linked to infection by a subset of so-called “highrisk” human papillomavirus types, which are estimated to infect nearly four hundred million women worldwide. Two prophylactic vaccines have been commercialized recently targeting HPV16 and 18, the most prevalent viral types found in cervical cancer, which operate through induction of capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, in patients with persistent infection these vaccines have not been found to protect against progression to neoplasia. Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines targeting nonstructural early viral proteins. Among these, E6 and E7 are the preferred targets, since they are essential for induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and are constitutively expressed by the transformed epithelial cells. Here are reviewed the most relevant potential vaccines based on HPV early antigens that have shown efficacy in preclinical models and that are being tested in clinical studies, which should determine their therapeutic capacity for eradicating HPV-induced premalignant and malignant lesions and cure cervical cancer. PMID:19915722

  16. Therapeutic vaccines against human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are linked to infection by a subset of so-called "highrisk" human papillomavirus types, which are estimated to infect nearly four hundred million women worldwide. Two prophylactic vaccines have been commercialized recently targeting HPV16 and 18, the most prevalent viral types found in cervical cancer, which operate through induction of capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, in patients with persistent infection these vaccines have not been found to protect against progression to neoplasia. Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines targeting nonstructural early viral proteins. Among these, E6 and E7 are the preferred targets, since they are essential for induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and are constitutively expressed by the transformed epithelial cells. Here are reviewed the most relevant potential vaccines based on HPV early antigens that have shown efficacy in preclinical models and that are being tested in clinical studies, which should determine their therapeutic capacity for eradicating HPV-induced premalignant and malignant lesions and cure cervical cancer. PMID:19915722

  17. Thrombospondin-induced attachment and spreading of human squamous carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Varani, J.; Dixit, V.M.; Fligiel, S.E.G.; McKeever, P.E.; Carey, T.E.

    1986-12-01

    Thrombospondin (TSP) induced the attachment and spreading of human squamous carcinoma cells on plastic culture dishes and dishes coated with type I or type IV collagen. Increased adhesion was detected as early as 15 min after treatment. Dose-response studies indicated that 1-5 ..mu..g of TSP per 35 mm (diameter) culture dish was sufficient to induce a response and that a half-maximal response occurred at 10 ..mu..g of TSP/dish. The squamous carcinoma cells synthesized TSP as indicated by biosynthetic labeling experiments. TSP was secreted (or shed) into the culture medium by these cells and also became bound to the cell surface. TSP also promoted adhesion of human keratinocytes, fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells but did not induce attachment or spreading of human melanoma or glioma cells, although these cells did respond to laminin.

  18. Evaluation of histomorphological and immunohistochemical parameters as biomarkers of cervical lymph node metastasis in squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, TN; Hemalatha, A; Harendra Kumar, ML; Azeem Mohiyuddin, SM

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is seen worldwide but is more common in India. Lymph node (LN) metastasis has been shown to be the strongest prognostic factor in OSCC. Many histopathological and immunohistochemical markers have been studied to predict the LN metastasis. Aims: To identify clinicopathological factors and immunohistochemical (IHC) biomarkers which predict cervical metastasis in OSCC patients. Study and Design: A total of 105 cases of OSCC were taken up for our study. Histopathological parameters such as tumor thickness, depth, degree of differentiation, pattern of invasion (POI), lymphovascular and neural invasion were assessed. IHC was done on all cases using antibodies against Ki-67, cyclin D, E-cadherin, p53, CD31 and each antibody was assessed according to the standard protocol. Statistical Analysis: To calculate the relation between clinical, histopathological parameter, IHC marker and the occurrence of LN metastasis, chi-square test was used. Variables were tested using multivariate logistic regression method to assess the predictive significance. Results: Out of 105 cases studied, 29 cases showed LN metastasis. Maximum numbers of cases affected were females with involvement of buccal mucosa. We found significant association of cervical LN metastasis with high grade of differentiation, lack of E-cadherin expression, high Ki-67 and cyclin D1 expression. In our study; tumor depth, thickness, extent of peritumoral lympho-plasmacytic infiltration, presence of eosinophils, tumor nest type, p53 and microvessel density (MVD) showed no significant correlation. Conclusion: Significant association of cervical LN metastasis with high grade of differentiation, lack of E-cadherin expression, high Ki-67 and cyclin D1 expression was seen. PMID:26097301

  19. [Human papillomavirus in squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. A study at the Ulm Military Hospital, Germany].

    PubMed

    Maier, M; Kraft, K; Steinestel, K; Schramm, A; Lorenz, K J; Tisch, M; Schwerer, M; Maier, H

    2013-07-01

    There is increasing evidence worldwide that human papillomavirus is a major risk factor for head and neck cancer. Only few studies on this association have been performed in Germany to date. For the purposes of the present study, tumor specimens from 223 patients with squamous cell cancer of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx and larynx were analyzed for HPV DNA and p16INK4a expression. The prevalence of HPV genotype 16 (HPV16) DNA in the study population was 17.5%. Further high-risk HPV types were not detected. All HPV16-positive tumors showed intense p16INK4a expression. HPV16 prevalence was highest in tonsillar carcinoma (37.5%) and lowest in laryngeal cancer (2.8%). We observed a significantly higher incidence of cervical lymph node metastases in patients with HPV16-positive tonsillar carcinoma in comparison to HPV-negative tumors (p < 0.016). Tobacco and/or alcohol consumption was significantly lower in patients with HPV-positive tumors (p < 0.0001).

  20. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  1. Apollon modulates chemosensitivity in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si; Tang, Wenqing; Weng, Shuqiang; Liu, Xijun; Rao, Benqiang; Gu, Jianxin; Chen, She; Wang, Qun; Shen, Xizhong; Xue, Ruyi; Dong, Ling

    2014-08-30

    Patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are often diagnosed with advanced diseases that respond poorly to chemotherapy. Here we reported that Apollon, a membrane-associated inhibitor of apoptosis protein, was overexpressed in ESCC cell lines and clinical ESCC tissues, and Apollon overexpression clinically correlated with poor response to chemotherapy (P = 0.001), and short overall survival (P = 0.021). Apollon knockdown increased cisplatin/docetaxel-induced apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and cytochrome c release in two ESCC cell lines. Apollon knockdown potentiated cisplatin/docetaxel-induced long-term cell growth inhibition, and enhanced chemosensitivity of ESCC cells to cisplatin/docetaxel in xenograft tumor models. Apollon knockdown also enhanced cisplatin/docetaxel-induced activation of caspase-8 (extrinsic pathway) and caspase-9 (intrinsic pathway) in ESCC cells and xenograft tumor models. Mechanism studies revealed that the effect of Apollon on chemosensitivity is mainly mediated by Smac. Apollon expression strongly and negatively correlated with Smac expression in clinical ESCC tissues (P = 0.001). Apollon targeted Smac for degradation in ESCC cells. The effect of Apollon on chemosensitivity was reversed by Smac knockdown in ESCC cells. Taken together, our data show association of Apollon expression with chemotherapeutic response in ESCC, and provide a strong rationale for combining Apollon antagonism with chemotherapy to treat ESCC.

  2. Alteration of cervical mucus by vanguard human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Katz, D F; Brofeldt, B T; Overstreet, J W; Hanson, F W

    1982-05-01

    Movement characteristics of 'vanguard' and 'following' human spermatozoa within cervical mucus were measured using high-speed cinemicrography. The data were applied to a mathematical model of the hydrodynamics of sperm-mucus interaction, using the methods of analysis of covariance and stepwise multiple regression. Vanguard spermatozoa swam more rapidly and more efficiently than did following spermatozoa, although the flagellar beat frequencies and amplitudes of the spermatozoa in the two populations did not differ. This distinction in sperm-mucus hydrodynamics could be due to reduced flagellar thrust and/or increased mucous resistance experienced by the following spermatozoa.

  3. Human papillomavirus detection from human immunodeficiency virus-infected Colombian women's paired urine and cervical samples.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Marina; Camargo, Milena; Soto-De Leon, Sara C; Sanchez, Ricardo; Parra, Diana; Pineda, Andrea C; Sussmann, Otto; Perez-Prados, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2013-01-01

    Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204) were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R). HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58) and two low-risk (LR-HPV) (HPV-6/11) types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine) followed by HPV-31(47.2%) in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7%) in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV) in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance.

  4. Genital Tract HIV RNA Levels and Their Associations with Human Papillomavirus Infection and Risk of Cervical Pre-Cancer

    PubMed Central

    GHARTEY, Jeny; KOVACS, Andrea; BURK, Robert D.; MASSAD, L. Stewart; MINKOFF, Howard; XIE, Xianhong; D’SOUZA, Gypsyamber; XUE, Xiaonan; WATTS, D. Heather; LEVINE, Alexandra M.; EINSTEIN, Mark H.; COLIE, Christine; ANASTOS, Kathryn; ELTOUM, Isam-Eldin; HEROLD, Betsy C.; PALEFSKY, Joel M.; STRICKLER, Howard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Plasma HIV RNA levels have been associated with risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical neoplasia in HIV-seropositive women. However, little is known regarding local genital tract HIV RNA levels and their relation with cervical HPV and neoplasia. Design/Methods In an HIV-seropositive women’s cohort with semi-annual follow-up, we conducted a nested case-control study of genital tract HIV RNA levels and their relation with incident high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions sub-classified as severe (severe HSIL), as provided for under the Bethesda 2001 classification system. Specifically, 66 incident severe HSIL were matched to 130 controls by age, CD4+ count, HAART use, and other factors. We also studied HPV prevalence, incident detection, and persistence in a random sample of 250 subjects. Results Risk of severe HSIL was associated with genital tract HIV RNA levels (odds ratio comparing HIV RNA ≥ the median among women with detectable levels versus undetectable [ORVL] 2.96; 95% CI: 0.99–8.84; Ptrend=0.03). However, this association became non-significant (Ptrend=0.51) following adjustment for plasma HIV RNA levels. There was also no association between genital tract HIV RNA levels and the prevalence of any HPV or oncogenic HPV. However, the incident detection of any HPV (Ptrend=0.02) and persistence of oncogenic HPV (Ptrend=0.04) were associated with genital tract HIV RNA levels, after controlling plasma HIV RNA levels. Conclusion These prospective data suggest that genital tract HIV RNA levels are not a significant independent risk factor for cervical pre-cancer in HIV-seropositive women, but leave open the possibility that they may modestly influence HPV infection, an early stage of cervical tumoriogenesis. PMID:24694931

  5. Ten human carcinoma cell lines derived from squamous carcinomas of the head and neck.

    PubMed Central

    Easty, D. M.; Easty, G. C.; Carter, R. L.; Monaghan, P.; Butler, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    Ten cell lines of human squamous carcinomas of the tongue and larynx have been established from surgical specimens removed from 36 unselected patients, in order to provide systems for investigating the invasive and tissue-destructive capacity of squamous carcinomas of the head and neck. The morphology, ultrastructure and growth characteristics of the 10 lines are described. Detailed cytogenetic analysis of the first 4 lines indicates that each is karyotypically unique, with no evidence of cross-contamination. Nine of the 10 cell lines secrete immunoreactive beta human chorionic gonadotrophin (beta-hCG) in the culture medium. No correlation was demonstrated between the ability of the cell lines to secrete plasminogen activator and their capacity to grow in soft agar or as xenografts in immune-deficient mice. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:7195729

  6. Clinical response to glycyrrhizinic acid in genital infection due to human papillomavirus and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Marcelino Hernández; Pacheco, Adia Carrillo; Quijano, Tomás Hernández; Girón, Antonio Vargas; López, Carlos Vargas

    2011-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) can infect any of the mucosal areas of the body and cause cervical cancer. Until recently, no specific treatments were available for this condition; therefore, any damaged tissue had to be removed or destroyed, which may have presented obstetrical repercussions for some women. Recently, new drugs have been developed that have shown to be effective for the cure of HPV infection. Glycyrrhizinic acid (GA) has shown fewer side effects and its systemic use makes it possible to reach difficult-to-treat lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of GA to eliminate the epithelial lesion and HPV. We carried out a longitudinal, descriptive study that included women of reproductive age who were diagnosed with HPV associated with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). Subjects began treatment based on GA using two routes of administration - systemic (oral) and topical (spray) - with assessments every month to determine the clinical changes of the lesions through colposcopy and Papanicolaou (Pap) smear. Simple statistics were used along with two-tailed Student's t-test; P<0.05 was considered statistically significant before and after treatment. There were 70 eligible patients, of whom 62 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Age of subjects was 27.8±9.5 years. At the time of the study, 100% of the patients had HPV infection, 40% were associated with LSIL, and only 16% used a barrier contraceptive (condom) method. Resolution was achieved in all patients from 4 weeks of treatment initiation and improvement was achieved in the majority of patients at 12 weeks (74%) (P<0.001). However, there was persistence of LSIL in 27.7% of patients and only one patient progressed to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) II. The use of GA proved to be effective in resolving clinical HPV lesions. For cervical lesions with epithelial changes (LSIL), treatment may be required for a longer period as with other drugs used for this

  7. Clinical response to glycyrrhizinic acid in genital infection due to human papillomavirus and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Marcelino Hernández; Pacheco, Adia Carrillo; Quijano, Tomás Hernández; Girón, Antonio Vargas; López, Carlos Vargas

    2011-09-28

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) can infect any of the mucosal areas of the body and cause cervical cancer. Until recently, no specific treatments were available for this condition; therefore, any damaged tissue had to be removed or destroyed, which may have presented obstetrical repercussions for some women. Recently, new drugs have been developed that have shown to be effective for the cure of HPV infection. Glycyrrhizinic acid (GA) has shown fewer side effects and its systemic use makes it possible to reach difficult-to-treat lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of GA to eliminate the epithelial lesion and HPV. We carried out a longitudinal, descriptive study that included women of reproductive age who were diagnosed with HPV associated with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). Subjects began treatment based on GA using two routes of administration - systemic (oral) and topical (spray) - with assessments every month to determine the clinical changes of the lesions through colposcopy and Papanicolaou (Pap) smear. Simple statistics were used along with two-tailed Student's t-test; P<0.05 was considered statistically significant before and after treatment. There were 70 eligible patients, of whom 62 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Age of subjects was 27.8±9.5 years. At the time of the study, 100% of the patients had HPV infection, 40% were associated with LSIL, and only 16% used a barrier contraceptive (condom) method. Resolution was achieved in all patients from 4 weeks of treatment initiation and improvement was achieved in the majority of patients at 12 weeks (74%) (P<0.001). However, there was persistence of LSIL in 27.7% of patients and only one patient progressed to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) II. The use of GA proved to be effective in resolving clinical HPV lesions. For cervical lesions with epithelial changes (LSIL), treatment may be required for a longer period as with other drugs used for this

  8. Increased cycling cell numbers and stem cell associated proteins as potential biomarkers for high grade human papillomavirus+ve pre-neoplastic cervical disease.

    PubMed

    Canham, Maurice; Charsou, Chara; Stewart, June; Moncur, Sharon; Hoodless, Laura; Bhatia, Ramya; Cong, Duanduan; Cubie, Heather; Busby-Earle, Camille; Williams, Alistair; McLoughlin, Victoria; Campbell, John D M; Cuschieri, Kate; Howie, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    High risk (oncogenic) human papillomavirus (HPV) infection causes cervical cancer. Infections are common but most clear naturally. Persistent infection can progress to cancer. Pre-neoplastic disease (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia/CIN) is classified by histology (CIN1-3) according to severity. Cervical abnormalities are screened for by cytology and/or detection of high risk HPV but both methods are imperfect for prediction of which women need treatment. There is a need to understand the host virus interactions that lead to different disease outcomes and to develop biomarker tests for accurate triage of infected women. As cancer is increasingly presumed to develop from proliferative, tumour initiating, cancer stem cells (CSCs), and as other oncogenic viruses induce stem cell associated gene expression, we evaluated whether presence of mRNA (detected by qRT-PCR) or proteins (detected by flow cytometry and antibody based proteomic microarray) from stem cell associated genes and/or increased cell proliferation (detected by flow cytometry) could be detected in well-characterised, routinely collected cervical samples from high risk HPV+ve women. Both cytology and histology results were available for most samples with moderate to high grade abnormality. We found that stem cell associated proteins including human chorionic gonadotropin, the oncogene TP63 and the transcription factor SOX2 were upregulated in samples from women with CIN3 and that the stem cell related, cell surface, protein podocalyxin was detectable on cells in samples from a subset of women with CIN3. SOX2, TP63 and human gonadotrophin mRNAs were upregulated in high grade disease. Immunohistochemistry showed that SOX2 and TP63 proteins clearly delineated tumour cells in invasive squamous cervical cancer. Samples from women with CIN3 showed increased proliferating cells. We believe that these markers may be of use to develop triage tests for women with high grade cervical abnormality to distinguish

  9. Detection and Typing of Human Papilloma Viruses by Nested Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalal Kiani, Seyed; Shatizadeh Malekshahi, Somayeh; Yousefi Ghalejoogh, Zohreh; Ghavvami, Nastaran; Shafiei Jandaghi, Nazanin Zahra; Shahsiah, Reza; Jahanzad, Isa; Yavarian, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in under-developed countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18 are the most prevalent types associated with carcinogenesis in the cervix. Conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), type-specific and consensus primer-based PCR followed by sequencing, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) or hybridization by specific probes are common methods for HPV detection and typing. In addition, some researchers have developed a multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection and typing of different HPVs. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and its types in cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) using the Nested Multiplex PCR (NMPCR) assay. Patients and Methods: Sixty-six samples with histologically confirmed SCC were evaluated. Total DNA was isolated by phenol–chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. Nested multiplex PCR was performed with first-round PCR by GP-E6/E7 consensus primers for amplification of the genomic DNA of all known mucosal HPV genotypes and second-round PCR by type-specific multiplex PCR primer cocktails. Results: Human papilloma virus infection was detected in 78.8% of samples, with the highest prevalence of HPV 16 (60.6%) while concurrent infections with two types was detected in 10.6%. Conclusions: The NMPCR assay is more convenient and easy for analysis of results, which is important for fast diagnosis and patient management, in a type-specific manner. PMID:26865940

  10. [Hpv cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alvaro P; Tulio, Siumara; Cruz, Olívia Russo

    2002-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a central rule in uterine cervix carcinogenesis. Other factors direct or indirectly influence the installation of this mechanism in cervical squamous epithelium. Investigations regarding mechanisms of interaction of these factors with viral elements are found in the literature of the last 20 years. The present review article discusses possible co-factors of HPV in the genesis of the squamous carcinoma of uterine cervix, taking into account only the factors whose association with the virus or cervical cancer has been documented by experimental studies, and not based just on clinical or epidemiological data. Among the approached parameters are immunological factors (local and humoral immune response), the association with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, genetic factors as protein p53 polymorphism, tabagism and the use of oral contraceptives. All these factors interact in variable intensity with oncoproteins and other HPV elements, increasing and facilitating the virus action in host cells, leading to the development of immortalization and carcinogenesis. PMID:12185639

  11. Cervical Microbiota Associated with Higher Grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia in Women Infected with High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Piyathilake, Chandrika J; Ollberding, Nicholas J; Kumar, Ranjit; Macaluso, Maurizio; Alvarez, Ronald D; Morrow, Casey D

    2016-05-01

    It is increasingly recognized that microbes that reside in and on human body sites play major roles in modifying the pathogenesis of several diseases, including cancer. However, specific microbes or microbial communities that can be mechanistically linked to cervical carcinogenesis remain largely unexplored. The purpose of the study was to examine the association between cervical microbiota and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+) in women infected with high-risk (HR) human papillomaviruses (HPV) and to assess whether the cervical microbiota are associated with oxidative DNA damage as indicated by the presence of cervical cells positive for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. The study included 340 women diagnosed with CIN 2+ (cases) and 90 diagnosed with CIN 1 (non-cases). Microbiota composition was determined by Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene amplified from DNA extracted from cervical mucus samples. Measures of alpha/beta-diversity were not associated with either CIN severity or oxidative DNA damage. However, a cervical mucosal community type (CT) dominated by L. iners and unclassified Lactobacillus spp was associated with CIN 2+ (OR = 3.48; 95% CI, 1.27-9.55). Sequence reads mapping to Lactobacillaceae, Lactobacillus, L. reuteri, and several sub-genus level Lactobacillus operational taxonomic units were also associated with CIN 2+ when examined independently (effect size >2.0; P < 0.05). Our 16S rRNA sequencing results need confirmation in independent studies using whole-genome shotgun sequencing and that would allow sharpening the suggested associations at finer taxonomic levels. Our results provide little evidence that DNA oxidative damage mediates the effect of the microbiome on the natural history of HPV infection and CIN severity. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 357-66. ©2016 AACR.

  12. Cervical Microbiota Associated with Higher Grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia in Women Infected with High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Piyathilake, Chandrika J; Ollberding, Nicholas J; Kumar, Ranjit; Macaluso, Maurizio; Alvarez, Ronald D; Morrow, Casey D

    2016-05-01

    It is increasingly recognized that microbes that reside in and on human body sites play major roles in modifying the pathogenesis of several diseases, including cancer. However, specific microbes or microbial communities that can be mechanistically linked to cervical carcinogenesis remain largely unexplored. The purpose of the study was to examine the association between cervical microbiota and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 2+) in women infected with high-risk (HR) human papillomaviruses (HPV) and to assess whether the cervical microbiota are associated with oxidative DNA damage as indicated by the presence of cervical cells positive for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. The study included 340 women diagnosed with CIN 2+ (cases) and 90 diagnosed with CIN 1 (non-cases). Microbiota composition was determined by Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene amplified from DNA extracted from cervical mucus samples. Measures of alpha/beta-diversity were not associated with either CIN severity or oxidative DNA damage. However, a cervical mucosal community type (CT) dominated by L. iners and unclassified Lactobacillus spp was associated with CIN 2+ (OR = 3.48; 95% CI, 1.27-9.55). Sequence reads mapping to Lactobacillaceae, Lactobacillus, L. reuteri, and several sub-genus level Lactobacillus operational taxonomic units were also associated with CIN 2+ when examined independently (effect size >2.0; P < 0.05). Our 16S rRNA sequencing results need confirmation in independent studies using whole-genome shotgun sequencing and that would allow sharpening the suggested associations at finer taxonomic levels. Our results provide little evidence that DNA oxidative damage mediates the effect of the microbiome on the natural history of HPV infection and CIN severity. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 357-66. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26935422

  13. Triapine With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With IB2-IVA Cervical or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-28

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Vulvar Adenocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  14. Effect of microRNA-203 on tumor growth in human hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ru; Fang, Jugao; Ma, Hongzhi; Feng, Lin; Lian, Meng; Yang, Fan; Wang, Haizhou; Wang, Qi; Chen, Xiaohong

    2015-07-01

    MicroRNAs (MiRNAs) have been recognized to regulate cancer initiation and progression in carcinogenesis as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, but their role in hypopharyngeal cancer development is not clearly defined. To determine whether miRNA-203 can promote tumor growth in human hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, we conducted experiments on the functional study of miRNA-203 and identification of miRNA-203 regulated target genes in hypopharyngeal cancer cells. We found that cell proliferation and cell colony-forming increased more in the miRNA-203 up-regulated cancer cells than in the negative control cancer cells. Up-regulation of miRNA-203 accelerated cell cycle progression in hypopharyngeal cancer cells. TP63 and B3GNT5 mRNAs were identified and validated as targets of miRNA-203. However, transwell assay and wound scratch assay showed that miRNA-203 did not involve in invasion and metastasis in hypopharyngeal cancer cells. According to the results, we conclude that miRNA-203 can promote tumor growth in human hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. These results provide the convincing evidence for the first time that up-regulation of miRNA-203 contributes to the malignancy of hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, possibly through down-regulating TP63 and B3GNT5.

  15. Human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: what the clinician should know.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; Sambur, Ian M; de Almeida, John R; Posner, Marshall; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Rodrigo, Juan P; Strojan, Primož; Takes, Robert P; Ferlito, Alfio

    2013-02-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is rising in contrast to the decreasing incidence of carcinomas arising in other subsites of the head and neck. The human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has played an increasing role in these epidemiological changes and as the etiology for a significant fraction of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, OPSCC in particular. Most importantly, many retrospective studies have shown that the prognosis differs significantly between patients with HPV-associated tumors and non-HPV associated tumors. Thus, questions arise on the choices of treatment for patients based on HPV status and the consequences of therapy. Given the recognized relevance of HPV status in OPSCC, many new questions concerning the biology, treatment, and prevention of HPV infection arise. This review is intended to highlight some of the major issues and frequently asked questions relevant for the clinician dealing with patients with OPSCC. PMID:22752642

  16. Low frequency of human papillomavirus infection in conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma of Mexican patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and conjunctiva cancer is controversial. HPV detection will provide more information about the role of this infectious agent in the biology of conjunctiva cancer. In the present study, DNA extracted and purified from 36 Conjunctival Squamous Cell Carcinomas (CSCC) was evaluated by PCR for HPV DNA sequences. The results were correlated with the clinical and histopathological variables. Results The results showed that HPV DNA was present in 8 CSCC samples (22%); HPV16 was the sole type detected. Significant association was found between HPV detection and the limbus tumor subtype (p = 0.03). All the samples were non-metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusions The HPV presence in CSCC from Mexican patients is not a common event. PMID:22099431

  17. Human papillomavirus in cervical and head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Psyrri, Amanda; DiMaio, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide and is initiated by infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs). High-risk HPVs, especially HPV-16, are associated with other anogenital cancers and a subgroup of head-and-neck cancers. Indeed, HPV infection could account for the development of head-and-neck cancer in certain individuals that lack the classical risk factors for this disease (tobacco and alcohol abuse). This Review summarizes the main events of the HPV life cycle, the functions of the viral proteins, and the implications of HPV infection on their hosts, with an emphasis on carcinogenic mechanisms and disease outcomes in head-and-neck cancer. The demonstration that HPVs have a role in human carcinogenesis has allowed the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing the incidence and mortality of HPV-associated cancers.

  18. Head and cervical spine posture in behaving rats: implications for modeling human conditions involving the head and cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C; Choong, W Y; Teh, W; Buxton, A J; Bolton, P S

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the temporal and spatial (postural) characteristics of the head and cervical vertebral column (spine) of behaving rats in order to better understand their suitability as a model to study human conditions involving the head and neck. Time spent in each of four behavioral postures was determined from video tape recordings of rats (n = 10) in the absence and presence of an intruder rat. Plain film radiographic examination of a subset of these rats (n = 5) in each of these postures allowed measurement of head and cervical vertebral column positions adopted by the rats. When single they were quadruped or crouched most (∼80%) of the time and bipedal either supported or free standing for only ∼10% of the time. The introduction of an intruder significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced the proportion of time rats spent quadruped (median, from 71% to 47%) and bipedal free standing (median, from 2.9% to 0.4%). The cervical spine was orientated (median, 25-75 percentile) near vertical (18.8°, 4.2°-30.9°) when quadruped, crouched (15.4°, 7.6°-69.3°) and bipedal supported (10.5°, 4.8°-22.6°) but tended to be less vertical oriented when bipedal free standing (25.9°, 7.7°-39.3°). The range of head positions relative to the cervical spine was largest when crouched (73.4°) and smallest when erect free standing (17.7°). This study indicates that, like humans, rats have near vertical orientated cervical vertebral columns but, in contrast to humans, they displace their head in space by movements at both the cervico-thoracic junction and the cranio-cervical regions.

  19. Acquisition of high-level chromosomal instability is associated with integration of human papillomavirus type 16 in cervical keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Pett, Mark R; Alazawi, William O F; Roberts, Ian; Dowen, Sally; Smith, David I; Stanley, Margaret A; Coleman, Nicholas

    2004-02-15

    Whereas two key steps in cervical carcinogenesis are integration of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) and acquisition of an unstable host genome, the temporal association between these events is poorly understood. Chromosomal instability is induced when HR-HPV E7 oncoprotein is overexpressed from heterologous promoters in vitro. However, it is not known whether such events occur at the "physiologically" elevated levels of E7 produced by deregulation of the homologous HR-HPV promoter after integration. Indeed, an alternative possibility is that integration in vivo is favored in an already unstable host genome. We have addressed these issues using the unique human papillomavirus (HPV) 16-containing cervical keratinocyte cell line W12, which was derived from a low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and thus acquired HPV16 by "natural" infection. Whereas W12 at low passage contains HPV16 episomes only, long-term culture results in the emergence of cells containing integrated HPV16 only. We show that integration of HPV16 in W12 is associated with 3' deletion of the E2 transcriptional repressor, resulting in deregulation of the homologous promoter of the integrant and an increase in E7 protein levels. We further demonstrate that high-level chromosomal instability develops in W12 only after integration and that the forms of instability observed correlate with the physical state of HPV16 DNA and the level of E7 protein. Whereas intermediate E7 levels are associated with numerical chromosomal abnormalities, maximal levels are associated with both numerical and structural aberrations. HR-HPV integration is likely to be a critical event in cervical carcinogenesis, preceding the development of chromosomal abnormalities that drive malignant progression.

  20. Viral load, E2 gene disruption status, and lineage of human papillomavirus type 16 infection in cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jo L K; Lo, Keith W K; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Tang, Julian W; Chan, Paul K S

    2006-12-15

    The clinical utility of human papillomavirus (HPV) load and integration status remains unclear. We applied refined methods to delineate the viral load, integration status, and lineage of 104 women with HPV-16 monotype infection, including 19 with normal cervices, 9 with histologically proven cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1, 24 with CIN 2, 27 with CIN 3, and 25 with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Higher crude viral load, as determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the E7 gene, was observed for SCC but became insignificant after normalization for cell content. Integration was located and quantified by real-time PCRs targeting, respectively, the carboxyl, amino, and hinge domains of the E2 gene. Pure episomal, integrated, and mixed forms were observed in all disease groups. Most E2 gene disruptions involved the amino-terminal, but sparing the hinge region that has been frequently used as a surrogate marker of integration. Large-fragment disruption involving all 3 E2 regions was observed only in the CIN 3 and SCC groups. Altogether, 33.3% of the CIN 3 group and 28.0% of the SCC group harbored pure episomal genomes. The Asian lineage was associated with a higher risk for CIN 3/SCC than the European lineage, and 6 of the 7 large-fragment E2 disruptions were from Asian lineage. The link between viral lineage, integration pattern, and oncogenesis deserves further study.

  1. Prevalence of human papillomavirus types in invasive cervical cancers from seven US cancer registries prior to vaccine introduction

    PubMed Central

    Hopenhayn, Claudia; Christian, Amy; Christian, W. Jay; Watson, Meg; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Lynch, Charles F.; Peters, Edward S.; Wilkinson, Edward J.; Huang, Youjie; Copeland, Glenn; Cozen, Wendy; Saber, Maria Sibug; Goodman, Marc T.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Steinau, Martin; Lyu, Christopher; Tucker, Thomas T.; Saraiya, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Objective We conducted a baseline study of human papillomavirus (HPV) type prevalence in invasive cervical cancers (ICC) using data from seven cancer registries (CR) in the US. Cases were diagnosed between 1994 and 2005, before the implementation of the HPV vaccines. Materials and Methods CRs from Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Hawaii, Iowa and Los Angeles, California identified eligible ICC cases, and obtained sections from representative blocks of archived tumor specimens for DNA extraction. All extracts were assayed by Linear Array and if inadequate or HPV negative, re-tested with INNO-LiPA Genotype test. Clinical and demographic factors were obtained from the CRs and merged with the HPV typing data to analyze factors associated with different types and with HPV negativity. Results A total of 777 ICCs were included in this analysis, with broad geographic, age and race distribution. Overall, HPV was detected in 91% of cases, including 51% HPV16, 16% HPV18 (HPV16 negative), and 24% other oncogenic and rare types. After HPV16 and 18, the most common types were 45, 33, 31, 35 and 52. Older age and non-squamous histology were associated with HPV negative typing. Conclusions This study provides baseline pre-vaccine HPV types for post-vaccine ICC surveillance in the future. HPV16 and/or 18 were found in 67% of ICCs, indicating the potential for vaccines to prevent a significant number of cervical cancers. PMID:24477171

  2. Use of anticontamination primers in the polymerase chain reaction for the detection of human papilloma virus genotypes in cervical scrapes and biopsies.

    PubMed

    van den Brule, A J; Claas, E C; du Maine, M; Melchers, W J; Helmerhorst, T; Quint, W G; Lindeman, J; Meijer, C J; Walboomers, J M

    1989-09-01

    A reliable application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of the human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes in cervical smears and biopsies was developed. Primers flanking the HPV cloning site were used to avoid detection of cloned HPV plasmids. These anticontamination primers were used for the specific detection of HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, and 33 in cervical scrapes that had been tested previously for HPV with a combined modified filter in situ hybridization (modified FISH) and dot blotting procedure. The PCR appeared to be superior. Two groups of women were screened for HPV genotypes. Group A consisted of women belonging to a regularly screened population, and group B contained women attending a gynaecological clinic. It appeared that the overall prevalence of HPV in cytologically normal scrapes in the first group was 6%, whereas in the second group 12% was found. In scrapes with cytological dysplasia, the prevalence of HPV in group A and B was approximately 40% and 60%, respectively. HPV 16 was present predominantly. In biopsies of squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix uteri, an HPV prevalence rate of 90% was found, all of which contained only HPV 16 and 18. These data indicate an important role for HPV detection in the screening of cervical scrapes to identify women with an increased risk of cervical cancer. PMID:2555442

  3. Risk of Newly Detected Infections and Cervical Abnormalities in Women Seropositive for Naturally Acquired Human Papillomavirus Type 16/18 Antibodies: Analysis of the Control Arm of PATRICIA

    PubMed Central

    Castellsagué, Xavier; Naud, Paulo; Chow, Song-Nan; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Germar, Maria Julieta V.; Lehtinen, Matti; Paavonen, Jorma; Jaisamrarn, Unnop; Garland, Suzanne M.; Salmerón, Jorge; Apter, Dan; Kitchener, Henry; Teixeira, Julio C.; Skinner, S. Rachel; Limson, Genara; Szarewski, Anne; Romanowski, Barbara; Aoki, Fred Y.; Schwarz, Tino F.; Poppe, Willy A. J.; Bosch, F. Xavier; de Carvalho, Newton S.; Peters, Klaus; Tjalma, Wiebren A. A.; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Raillard, Alice; Descamps, Dominique; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary; Rosillon, Dominique; Baril, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Background. We examined risk of newly detected human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical abnormalities in relation to HPV type 16/18 antibody levels at enrollment in PATRICIA (Papilloma Trial Against Cancer in Young Adults; NCT00122681). Methods. Using Poisson regression, we compared risk of newly detected infection and cervical abnormalities associated with HPV-16/18 between seronegative vs seropositive women (15–25 years) in the control arm (DNA negative at baseline for the corresponding HPV type [HPV-16: n = 8193; HPV-18: n = 8463]). Results. High titers of naturally acquired HPV-16 antibodies and/or linear trend for increasing antibody levels were significantly associated with lower risk of incident and persistent infection, atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or greater (ASCUS+), and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 1/2 or greater (CIN1+, CIN2+). For HPV-18, although seropositivity was associated with lower risk of ASCUS+ and CIN1+, no association between naturally acquired antibodies and infection was demonstrated. Naturally acquired HPV-16 antibody levels of 371 (95% confidence interval [CI], 242–794), 204 (95% CI, 129–480), and 480 (95% CI, 250–5756) EU/mL were associated with 90% reduction of incident infection, 6-month persistent infection, and ASCUS+, respectively. Conclusions. Naturally acquired antibodies to HPV-16, and to a lesser extent HPV-18, are associated with some reduced risk of subsequent infection and cervical abnormalities associated with the same HPV type. PMID:24610876

  4. Linking cervical cancer to the human papillomavirus: findings from a qualitative study with Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Sandra G; Becker, Davida; Tatum, Carrie; Aldrich, Tess; Fernández-C, Araceli

    2007-02-01

    Cervical cancer is an important cause of mortality for women in developing countries. Researchers have established a link between cervical cancer and the human papillomavirus (HPV). We explored Mexican women's beliefs about cervical cancer and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HPV, to better understand the social implications of this linkage. We conducted eight focus groups with middle-aged and young women in Mexico City. Cervical cancer elicited different social and emotional responses than STIs; participants generally attached less culpability to it and saw it as more life threatening. Information campaigns should take into account differences in lay conceptions of these illnesses.

  5. The Prevalence of Human Papilloma Virus in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Sadat; Monabati, Ahmad; Ghaderi, Abbasali

    2012-01-01

    Background: Carcinomas of esophagus, mostly squamous cell carcinomas, occur throughout the world. There are a number of suspected genetic or environmental etiologies. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is said to be a major etiology in areas with high incidence of esophageal carcinoma, while it is hardly detectable in low incidence regions. This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of HPV in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cases diagnosed in Pathology Department, Medical School, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: DNA material for PCR amplification of HPV genome was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of 92 cases of ESCC, diagnosed during 20 years from 1982 to 2002. Polymerase chain reaction was performed for amplification and detection of common HPV and type specific HPV-16 and HPV-18 genomic sequences in the presence of positive control (HPV-18 and HPV positive biopsies of uterine exocervix) and additional internal controls i.e. beta-globin and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4). Result: Good amplification of positive control and internal controls was observed. However, no amplification of HPV genome was observed. Conclusion: There is no association between HPV infection and the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in the cases evaluated. PMID:23115442

  6. Sonographic Evaluation of Cervical Lymphadenopathy; Comparison of Metastatic and Reactive Lymph Nodes in Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using Gray Scale and Doppler Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ghafoori, Mahyar; Azizian, Amin; Pourrajabi, Zahra; Vaseghi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical lymphadenopathy could be seen in several pathologic processes. An accurate differentiation between these conditions is of utmost importance to select an appropriate therapy and assess the prognosis. Gray scale and Doppler are appropriate sonographic techniques for evaluating internal and external features of lymph nodes. Although, various criteria have been proposed to differentiate metastatic lymph nodes from benign ones, the most valuable and specific sonographic features are still under dispute. Objectives: The present study was designed to determine valuable sonographic features for differentiating metastasis from benign nodes using gray scale and Doppler sonography. Patients and Methods: A prospective diagnostic study was performed on 63 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) treated and referred to surgery clinic of Hazrat Rasoul Akram hospital from November 2010 to June 2012 with complaint of palpable cervical lymph node. All patients’ necks were scanned multidirectionally by gray-scale and Doppler techniques. After sonography, lymph nodes were biopsied and investigated to find out whether they were metastatic or reactive. Finally, demographic, sonographic and pathologic data were statistically analyzed by SPSS ver. 16 software using t-test, a nonparametric test and ROC analysis. Ninety five percent confidence interval was considered for all parameters. Results: The study included 41 males and 22 females with a mean age of 57.56 ± 13.79 years. The number of metastatic lymph nodes was 47, while the remaining 16 were reactive. There were significant differences in length (P = 0.037), width (P = 0.001), resistance index (P < 0.001), pulsatility index (P < 0.001) and systolic velocity (P < 0.001) of metastatic and reactive lymph nodes. Cut points for resistive and pulsatility indexes and systolic velocity were calculated as 0.695, 1.35 and 16.5, respectively. The most valuable factor for defining a lymph node as

  7. [Vaccination perspective against human papillomavirus and consequences for the screening of uterine cervical neoplasm].

    PubMed

    Delvenne, Ph

    2007-01-01

    The link between cervical cancer and some types of human papillomavirus (HPV) has generated, in recent years, a great interest for the development of anti-HPV vaccines. The purpose of this article is to review the current perspectives for anti-HPV prophylactic vaccination and to describe the potential implications for the cervical cytology screening programs.

  8. Progressive squamous epithelial neoplasia in K14-human papillomavirus type 16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Arbeit, J M; Münger, K; Howley, P M; Hanahan, D

    1994-01-01

    To model human papillomavirus-induced neoplastic progression, expression of the early region of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was targeted to the basal cells of the squamous epithelium in transgenic mice, using a human keratin 14 (K14) enhancer/promoter. Twenty-one transgenic founder mice were produced, and eight lines carrying either wild-type or mutant HPV16 early regions that did not express the E1 or E2 genes were established. As is characteristic of human cancers, the E6 and E7 genes remained intact in these mutants. The absence of E1 or E2 function did not influence the severity of the phenotype that eventually developed in the transgenic mice. Hyperplasia, papillomatosis, and dysplasia appeared at multiple epidermal and squamous mucosal sites, including ear and truncal skin, face, snout and eyelids, and anus. The ears were the most consistently affected site, with pathology being present in all lines with 100% penetrance. This phenotype also progressed through discernible stages. An initial mild hyperplasia was followed by hyperplasia, which further progressed to dysplasia and papillomatosis. During histopathological progression, there was an incremental increase in cellular DNA synthesis, determined by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation, and a profound perturbation in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, as revealed by immunohistochemistry to K5, K14, and K10 and filaggrin. These K14-HPV16 transgenic mice present an opportunity to study the role of the HPV16 oncogenes in the neoplastic progression of squamous epithelium and provide a model with which to identify genetic and epigenetic factors necessary for carcinogenesis. Images PMID:7515971

  9. Nonradioactive RNA in situ hybridization detection of human papillomavirus 16-E7 transcripts in squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix using confocal laser scan microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    van den Brule, A. J.; Cromme, F. V.; Snijders, P. J.; Smit, L.; Oudejans, C. B.; Baak, J. P.; Meijer, C. J.; Walboomers, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Paraffin-embedded squamous cell carcinomas of the uterine cervix selected for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype 16 (n = 19) by polymerase chain reaction, were studied for transcription of the early open reading frame E7 (ORF E7). Nonradioactive RNA in situ hybridization (RISH) was performed using in vitro generated biotinylated probes. Hybrids were visualized by streptavidin gold and silver enhancement staining in combination with confocal laser scan microscopy. Quality of mRNA was verified by detection of beta-actin gene transcripts before E7 expression was studied. In all carcinomas containing HPV 16 DNA and showing beta-actin mRNA signals (n = 13), clear E7 ORF transcription could be found. Additional RNA-PCR on purified cytoplasmic RNA of snapfrozen tissue of identical carcinomas (n = 7) showed E6-E7 specific transcripts in all E7 RISH positive samples. These results indicate continuous expression of E7 ORF in all cervical carcinomas containing HPV 16 DNA and support an active role of the E7 ORF in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1719818

  10. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA by in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction in human papillomavirus equivocal and dysplastic cervical biopsies.

    PubMed

    Shroyer, K R; Lovelace, G S; Abarca, M L; Fennell, R H; Corkill, M E; Woodard, W D; Davilla, G H

    1993-09-01

    One hundred twenty-one paraffin-embedded cervical biopsy specimens were tested for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. By in situ hybridization using probes for HPV types 6/11, 16/18, 31/33/35, 42/43/44, 51/52, and 45/56, HPV DNA was found in none of 20 normal/squamous metaplasia biopsy specimens, in one of 76 HPV equivocal biopsy specimens, in seven of 12 condyloma/mild dysplasia biopsy specimens, and in 12 of 13 moderate/severe dysplasia biopsy specimens. Polymerase chain reaction using HPV L1 consensus sequence primers followed by filter hybridization of the amplification products was positive for HPV DNA in two of 20 normal/squamous metaplasia biopsy specimens, in 23 of 76 HPV equivocal biopsy specimens, in eight of 12 condyloma/mild dysplasia biopsy specimens, and in 12 of 13 moderate/severe dysplasia biopsy specimens. Among biopsies that tested positive by polymerase chain reaction but that were negative by in situ hybridization, the most commonly identified HPV was type 16. We conclude that although HPV equivocal biopsy specimens contain HPV DNA more frequently than histologically normal tissue, the majority of biopsy specimens in this category test negative for HPV DNA. The clinical significance of a positive test for HPV, in the absence of unequivocal histologic changes, remains to be determined.

  11. Type-specific human papillomavirus distribution in invasive cervical carcinomas in Paraguay. A study of 432 cases.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Elena; Cubilla, Antonio L; Alemany, Laia; Chaux, Alcides; Tous, Sara; Mendoza, Laura; Paez, Malvina; Klaustermeier, Jo Ellen; Quint, Wim; Lloveras, Belen; de Sanjose, Silvia; Muñoz, Nubia; Bosch, Francisco Xavier

    2012-10-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the most common malignant tumor among woman in Paraguay. Cytological screening programs have not been successful and a plan for human papillomavirus (HPV) based-screening program and/or vaccination is under evaluation. This study aimed to identify the contribution of HPV genotypes in invasive cervical cancer in Paraguay to provide essential background data to guide and assess the introduction and impact of new preventive strategies based on HPV. Four hundred thirty two histologically confirmed cases (1960-2004) were analyzed. HPV detection in paraffin blocks was performed at the Catalan Institute of Oncology using PCR with SPF-10 broad spectrum primers followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping with a reverse hybridization line probe analysis. The majority of cases were squamous cell carcinoma (92.8%). Mean patients age was 48 years old. HPV DNA was detected in 73.1% of the cases and single infections were predominant (97.8%). The most common HPV single types were 16, 18, 45, 33, 31, 52, 35, and 39. 73.1% of HPV positive cases had an HPV 16, 18 as single infection. HPV16 was frequent in SCC whereas HPV 18 and 45 were prevalent in glandular tumors. Significant decrease of HPV 16 with age groups (P-trend = 0.022) and increase in other HPV types (P-trend > 0.001) were observed. The potential impact of HPV 16 and 18 for a vaccination program was 73.1%. The study provide a profile of the HPV situation in the country, with robust clinical, pathological and virological data which would permit a better cervical cancer screening and vaccination programs.

  12. Sun exposure, sexual behavior and uterine cervical human papilloma virus.

    PubMed

    Hrushesky, William J M; Sothern, Robert B; Rietveld, Wop J; Du-Quiton, Jovelyn; Boon, Mathilde E

    2006-01-01

    We have previously observed marked seasonal fluctuations in the frequency of cervical smears positive for human papilloma virus (HPV) in a series of smears obtained in Holland, with a peak in the summer months, especially August. Here, we tested two possible mechanisms that might underlie this summer peak: (1) enhanced transmission of HPV due to increased seasonal sexual activity, or (2) suppression of immunity due to summertime population exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Data derived from a continuous series of >900,000 independent cervical smears obtained from 1983 to 1998 were assessed for histopathologic epithelial changes pathognomonic of HPV. The rate of HPV positivity was then compared to both the rate of sexual activity (using conception frequency as a readily available surrogate) as well as yearly and monthly fluctuations in solar-UV fluency. The rate of HPV positivity was found to be twice as high during the summer months, with a peak in August corresponding with maximal UV fluency. Furthermore, over these 16 consecutive years of continuous observation, maximum HPV detection rate and maximum UV fluency are positively correlated (r=0.59, P<0.01); the sunnier the year, the greater the rate of HPV. Likewise, there is a positive correlation of the monthly UV fluency, and monthly HPV discovery rate (r=0.16, P<0.03). In contrast, conception frequency (and, presumably, population sexual HPV transmission) was maximal near the vernal equinox, with relatively modest (<10%) seasonal fluctuation, i.e., not fully explaining this prominent August peak in HPV discovery. There is a clear relationship between the detection of HPV-positive cervical smears and sunlight exposure. We speculate that the well-known phenomenon of UV-mediated suppression of immune surveillance may be causally related to this unusual increase in cytologically defined active HPV infections during the summer months in northern countries such as Holland. Confirming this relationship

  13. Down-regulating overexpressed human Lon in cervical cancer suppresses cell proliferation and bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiaobo; Li, Min; Lu, Bin; Zhang, Yuxin; Lan, Linhua; Chen, Lin; Lu, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    The human mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease functions in regulating the metabolism and quality control of proteins and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). However, the role of Lon in cancer is not well understood. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the importance of Lon in cervical cancer cells from patients and in established cell lines. Microarray analysis from 30 cancer and 10 normal cervical tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for Lon protein levels. The expression of Lon was also examined by immunoblotting 16 fresh cervical cancer tissues and their respective non-tumor cervical tissues. In all cases, Lon expression was significantly elevated in cervical carcinomas as compared to normal tissues. Augmented Lon expression in tissue microarrays did not vary between age, tumor-node-metastasis grades, or lymph node metastasis. Knocking down Lon in HeLa cervical cancer cells by lentivrial transduction resulted in a substantial decrease in both mRNA and protein levels. Such down-regulation of Lon expression significantly blocked HeLa cell proliferation. In addition, knocking down Lon resulted in decreased cellular bioenergetics as determined by measuring aerobic respiration and glycolysis using the Seahorse XF24 extracellular flux analyzer. Together, these data demonstrate that Lon plays a potential role in the oncogenesis of cervical cancer, and may be a useful biomarker and target in the treatment of cervical cancer. Lon; immunohistochemistry; cervical cancer; cell proliferation; cellular bioenergetics.

  14. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, distribution of viral types and risk factors in cervical samples from human immunodeficiency virus-positive women attending three human immunodeficiency virus-acquired immune deficiency syndrome reference centres in northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Albert Eduardo Silva; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Garcia, Renan Gomes; Welkovic, Stefan; Barboza, Aureliana; Menezes, Maria Luiza Bezerra; Maruza, Magda; Tenório, Terezinha; Ximenes, Ricardo AA

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients have a greater prevalence of coinfection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is of high oncogenic risk. Indeed, the presence of the virus favours intraepithelial squamous cell lesion progression and may induce cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection, distribution of HPV types and risk factors among HIV-positive patients. Cervical samples from 450 HIV-positive patients were analysed with regard to oncotic cytology, colposcopy and HPV presence and type by means of polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. The results were analysed by comparing demographic data and data relating to HPV and HIV infection. The prevalence of HPV was 47.5%. Among the HPV-positive samples, 59% included viral types of high oncogenic risk. Multivariate analysis showed an association between HPV infection and the presence of cytological alterations (p = 0.003), age greater than or equal to 35 years (p = 0.002), number of partners greater than three (p = 0.002), CD4+ lymphocyte count < 200/mm3 (p = 0.041) and alcohol abuse (p = 0.004). Although high-risk HPV was present in the majority of the lesions studied, the low frequency of HPV 16 (3.3%), low occurrence of cervical lesions and preserved immunological state in most of the HIV-positive patients were factors that may explain the low occurrence of precancerous cervical lesions in this population. PMID:25317701

  15. Automated image analysis of uterine cervical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Gu, Jia; Ferris, Daron; Poirson, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and the leading cause of cancer mortality of women in developing countries. If detected early and treated adequately, cervical cancer can be virtually prevented. Cervical precursor lesions and invasive cancer exhibit certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician with a Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system. In colposcopy, epithelium that turns white after application of acetic acid is called acetowhite epithelium. Acetowhite epithelium is one of the major diagnostic features observed in detecting cancer and pre-cancerous regions. Automatic extraction of acetowhite regions from cervical images has been a challenging task due to specular reflection, various illumination conditions, and most importantly, large intra-patient variation. This paper presents a multi-step acetowhite region detection system to analyze the acetowhite lesions in cervical images automatically. First, the system calibrates the color of the cervical images to be independent of screening devices. Second, the anatomy of the uterine cervix is analyzed in terms of cervix region, external os region, columnar region, and squamous region. Third, the squamous region is further analyzed and subregions based on three levels of acetowhite are identified. The extracted acetowhite regions are accompanied by color scores to indicate the different levels of acetowhite. The system has been evaluated by 40 human subjects' data and demonstrates high correlation with experts' annotations.

  16. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses and ploidy in cervical lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Rihet, S; Lorenzato, M; Clavel, C

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To compare ploidy measurements obtained on tissue sections of selected low and high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions containing oncogenic HPV (types 16, 18 or 33) detected by in situ hybridisation (ISH) or PCR. METHODS: DNA ploidy was assessed by image cytometry after Feulgen staining of contiguous serial sections of eight lesions exhibiting atypical squamous cells or squamous atypia and 53 low and 63 high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions in which HPV had been detected by ISH or PCR. RESULTS: Aneuploidy was strongly associated with the presence of oncogenic HPV, being detected in 50% of lesions with squamous atypia and 75.5% of the low and 95.2% of the high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. The multiploid profile was highly associated with high grade lesions and with the pattern of HPV DNA integration. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of aneuploidy is strongly suggestive of the presence of oncogenic HPV types. Combining the detection of HPV by ISH and PCR with DNA image cytometry may provide the pathologist and the physician with important prognostic information about low grade lesions, especially when these lesions have a multiploid DNA profile and contain oncogenic HPV. PMID:8944607

  17. Zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine increase the radiosensitivity of human esophageal squamous cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan; Wang, Cong; Guan, Shanghui; Liu, Yuan; Han, Lihui; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase is a type of reverse transcriptase that is overexpressed in almost all human tumor cells, but not in normal tissues, which provides an opportunity for radiosensitization targeting telomerase. Zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine are reverse transcriptase inhibitors that have been applied in clinical practice for several years. We sought to explore the radiosensitization effect of these three drugs on human esophageal cancer cell lines. Eca109 and Eca9706 cells were treated with zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine for 48 h before irradiation was administered. Samples were collected 1 h after irradiation. Clonal efficiency assay was used to evaluate the effect of the combination of these drugs with radiation doses of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy. DNA damage was measured by comet assay. Telomerase activity (TA) and relative telomere length (TL) were detected and evaluated by real-time PCR. Apoptosis rates were assessed by flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that all the drugs tested sensitized the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell lines to radiation through an increase in radiation-induced DNA damage and cell apoptosis, deregulation of TA and decreasing the shortened TL caused by radiation. Each of the drugs investigated (zidovudine, abacavir and lamivudine) could be used for sensitizing human esophageal cancer cell lines to radiation. Consequently, the present study supports the potential of these three drugs as therapeutic agents for the radiosensitization of esophageal squamous cell cancer. PMID:27220342

  18. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) in histological sections of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical carcinoma in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical specimens from the city of Madrid (Spain), as a contribution to the knowledge of Human Papillomavirus genotype distribution and prevalence of carcinogenic HPV types in cervical lesions in Spain. Methods A total of 533 abnormal specimens, from the Hospital General Universitario “Gregorio Marañón” of Madrid, were studied. These included 19 benign lesions, 349 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias 1 (CIN1), 158 CIN2-3 and 7 invasive cervical carcinomas (ICC). HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. Results We detected 20 different HPV types: 13 carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (HR-HPVs), 2 probably carcinogenic high-risk HPV types (PHR-HPVs) and 5 carcinogenic low-risk HPV types (LR-HPVs). The most frequent HPV genotypes found in all specimens were HPV16 (26.0%), 31 (10.7%) and 58 (8.0%). HPV 18 was only detected in 5.0%. Co-infections were found in 30.7% of CIN 1 and 18.4% cases of CIN2-3. The highest percentage of HR HPVs was found in those specimens with a CIN2-3 lesion (93.7%). Conclusion As our study shows the current tetravalent vaccine could be effective in our geographical area for preventing all the invasive cervical carcinomas. In addition, upon the estimates of the important presence of other HR-HPV types – such as 31, 58, 33 and 52 – in different preneoplasic lesions the effectiveness of HPV vaccination in our geographical area, and others with similar genotype distribution, should be limited. PMID:23167826

  19. A retrospective study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radical hysterectomy versus radical hysterectomy alone in patients with stage II cervical squamous cell carcinoma presenting as a bulky mass

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Eriko; Shoji, Tadahiro; Takada, Anna; Nagasawa, Takayuki; Omi, Hideo; Kagabu, Masahiro; Honda, Tatsuya; Miura, Fumiharu; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Objective In order to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for stage II cervical squamous cell carcinoma with a bulky mass, we retrospectively compared patients receiving NAC followed by radical hysterectomy (RH; NAC group) with patients who underwent RH without NAC (Ope group). Patients and methods The study period was from June 2002 to March 2014. The subjects were 28 patients with a stage II bulky mass in the NAC group and 17 such patients in the Ope group. The chi-square test was used to compare operative time, volume of intraoperative blood loss, use of blood transfusion, and time from surgery to discharge between the two groups. Moreover, the log-rank test using the Kaplan–Meier method was performed to compare disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) between the groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in operative time, volume of intraoperative blood loss, or use of blood transfusion. However, the time from surgery to discharge was 18 days (14–25 days) in the NAC group and 25 days (21–34 days) in the Ope group; the patients in the NAC group were discharged earlier (P=0.032). The hazard ratio for DFS in the NAC group as compared with that in the Ope group was 0.36 (95% CI 0.08–0.91), and the 3-year DFS rates were 81.2% and 41.0%, respectively (P=0.028). Moreover, the hazard ratio for OS was 0.39 (95% CI 0.11–1.24), and the 3-year OS rates were 82.3% and 66.4%, respectively (P=0.101). Conclusion NAC with cisplatin and irinotecan was confirmed to prolong DFS as compared with RH alone. The results of this study suggest that NAC might be a useful adjunct to surgery in the treatment of stage II squamous cell carcinoma presenting as a bulky mass.

  20. A retrospective study of neoadjuvant chemotherapy plus radical hysterectomy versus radical hysterectomy alone in patients with stage II cervical squamous cell carcinoma presenting as a bulky mass

    PubMed Central

    Takatori, Eriko; Shoji, Tadahiro; Takada, Anna; Nagasawa, Takayuki; Omi, Hideo; Kagabu, Masahiro; Honda, Tatsuya; Miura, Fumiharu; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Objective In order to evaluate the usefulness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) for stage II cervical squamous cell carcinoma with a bulky mass, we retrospectively compared patients receiving NAC followed by radical hysterectomy (RH; NAC group) with patients who underwent RH without NAC (Ope group). Patients and methods The study period was from June 2002 to March 2014. The subjects were 28 patients with a stage II bulky mass in the NAC group and 17 such patients in the Ope group. The chi-square test was used to compare operative time, volume of intraoperative blood loss, use of blood transfusion, and time from surgery to discharge between the two groups. Moreover, the log-rank test using the Kaplan–Meier method was performed to compare disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) between the groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in operative time, volume of intraoperative blood loss, or use of blood transfusion. However, the time from surgery to discharge was 18 days (14–25 days) in the NAC group and 25 days (21–34 days) in the Ope group; the patients in the NAC group were discharged earlier (P=0.032). The hazard ratio for DFS in the NAC group as compared with that in the Ope group was 0.36 (95% CI 0.08–0.91), and the 3-year DFS rates were 81.2% and 41.0%, respectively (P=0.028). Moreover, the hazard ratio for OS was 0.39 (95% CI 0.11–1.24), and the 3-year OS rates were 82.3% and 66.4%, respectively (P=0.101). Conclusion NAC with cisplatin and irinotecan was confirmed to prolong DFS as compared with RH alone. The results of this study suggest that NAC might be a useful adjunct to surgery in the treatment of stage II squamous cell carcinoma presenting as a bulky mass. PMID:27695343

  1. A Functional Polymorphism in the Promoter of MiR-143/145 Is Associated With the Risk of Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yundan; Sun, Ruifen; Li, Lijuan; Yuan, Fang; Liang, Weibo; Wang, Li; Nie, Xinwen; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Lin; Gao, Linbo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract MiR-143/145 is down-regulated in cervical cancer, which may serve as a tumor suppressor by targeting KRAS and Ras-responsive element-binding protein (RREB1). Activated KRAS leads to down-regulation of miR-143/145 transcription in a RREB1-dependent manner, establishing a miR-143/145-KRAS-RREB1 feedback loop. A polymorphism rs4705343C/T in the promoter of miR-143/145 might influence the binding of TATA-binding protein. We hypothesized that the miR-143/145 rs4705343 and KRAS rs712 may be related to the occurrence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). In this study, we genotyped the 2 polymorphisms in 415 patients with CSCC and 504 controls using polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism. The promoter activities were measured by the Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay System. We found that the rs4705343TC genotype was associated with an increased risk of CSCC (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.80). The significantly increased association was also observed in a dominant genetic model (adjusted OR = 1.32; 95% CI, 1.01–1.72). Combined analysis showed that individuals carrying the genotypes of rs4705343 TC/CC and rs712GT/TT had a 1.47-fold increased risk of CSCC (adjusted OR = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.01–2.15). By using multifactor dimensionality reduction software method, we identified a significant interaction between the miR-143/145 rs4705343 and KRAS rs712. Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay showed that the luciferase activity was significantly lower in cells transfected with the rs4705343C allele than that of the rs4705343T allele. These findings indicate that miR-143/145 rs4705343 and KRAS rs712 may contribute to the etiology of CSCC in Chinese women. PMID:26252302

  2. Prevalence of high risk human papillomavirus infection with different cervical cytological features among women undergoing health examination at the National Cancer Institute, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Laowahutanont, Piyawat; Karalak, Anant; Wongsena, Metee; Loonprom, Komson; Pukcharoen, Phuttalak; Jamsri, Paphawin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn

    2014-01-01

    High-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is important in cervical cancer screening for triage colposcopy. The objective of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of HR HPV infection with different cervical cytological features among women undergoing health examination. A total of 2,897 women were retrospectively evaluated between May 2011 to December 2011. DNA was extracted from residual specimens collected during routine liquid-based cytology tests at the National Cancer Institute. Overall, HR HPV prevalence was 9.3% including 1.6% of HPV-16 and 0.4% of HPV-18. Of all 270 HPV positive samples, 211 (78.1% were HR-HPV non 16/18; 47 (17.4%) were HPV-16 and 12 (4.4%) were HPV-18. The prevalence of HPV infection was similar in all age groups, although a higher rate was observed in women age 31-40 years. Among women with normal cytology, HR HPV positive were found in 6.7%. In abnormal cytology, HR HPV were found 46.7% in atypical squamous cells (ASC), 54.8% in low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and 80.0% in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). HPV-16 was detected in 8.6%, 6.4% and 12.0% of ASC, LSIL and HSIL, respectively. The results of this study provide baseline information on the HPV type distribution, which may be useful for clinicians to decide who should be monitored or treated more aggressively.

  3. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) and co-infections in cervical cytologic specimens from two outpatient gynecological clinics in a region of southeast Spain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical cytologic specimens from Murcia Region, (southeast Spain), to obtain information regarding the possible effect of the ongoing vaccination campaign against HPV16 and HPV18. Methods A total of 458 cytologic specimens were obtained from two outpatient gynecological clinics. These included 288 normal benign (N/B) specimens, 56 atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASC-US), 75 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and 39 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. Results The most frequent genotype found was HPV16 (14.9% in N/B; 17.9% in ASC-US; 29.3% in LSIL and 33.3% HSIL). Distribution of other genotypes was heavily dependent on the cytologic diagnoses. Co-infections were found in 15.3% of N/B, 10.7% of ASC-US, 48% of LSIL and 25.6% of HSIL cases (significantly different at p < 0.001). Strikingly, in N/B diagnoses, genotypes from A5 species were found as coinfecting in all cases. Genotypes from A7 or A9 species appeared in co-infections in 56.5% and 54% respectively whereas genotypes from A6 species appeared in 25.1% of cases. Conclusion HPV vaccination might prevent 34.6% and 35.8% of LSIL and HSIL, respectively. Co-infection rate is dependent on both cytologic diagnosis and HPV genotype. Moreover, genotypes belonging to A5, A7 and A9 species are more often found as co-infections than genotype pertaining to A6 species. This suggests that phylogenetically related genotypes might have in common similar grades of dependency for cervical epithelium colonization. PMID:19664248

  4. Human papilloma virus (HPV) antigens and local immunologic reactivity in oral squamous cell tumors and hyperplasias.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, K; Happonen, R P; Syrjänen, S; Calonius, B

    1984-08-01

    A series of 191 oral mucosal tumors including those with suspected HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) etiology; squamous cell papilloma (SQP), condyloma acuminatum (CA), focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), as well as those regarded as unrelated to HPV; fibrous hyperplasia (FH), papillary hyperplasia (PH), and true fibroma (TF), were analyzed for HPV structural proteins (by indirect immunoperoxidase IP-PAP technique), for the presence of epithelial dysplasia, and for the cellular composition (B and T lymphocytes, mononuclear phagocytes, (MPS cells] of their local inflammatory cell infiltrates using ANAE-(acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase) stain. HPV structural proteins were disclosed in 85% of FEH, in 75% of CA, and in 41% of SQP. These three lesions significantly differed from PH and FH with regard to the intensity and cellular composition of the local infiltrates, being most intense and B cell predominated in the latter two. Mild dysplasia was found in 20% of both CA and SQP lesions, the former also showing moderate dysplasia in 12% of cases. The HPV antigen positivity was negatively correlated with dysplasia in CA and SQP, the intensity of the infiltrate showing positive association with dysplasia. The results are discussed in terms of HPV etiology of CA, SQP and FEH, of the host immunologic reactivity against these lesions, as well as of the possible role of HPV in human squamous cell carcinogenesis.

  5. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ishita; Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A "Pubmed" search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  6. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A “Pubmed” search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  7. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer: issues for biobehavioral and psychosocial research.

    PubMed

    Waller, Jo; McCaffery, Kirsten J; Forrest, Sue; Wardle, Jane

    2004-02-01

    There is now overwhelming evidence that high-risk, sexually transmitted types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are the main causal agent in cervical cancer. Biobehavioral and psychosocial research is uniquely capable of addressing many of the issues raised by HPV and its link with cervical cancer. In this article we review current findings in this area and identify issues for future research. The first of the three sections explores issues associated with the introduction of HPV testing for the detection and management of cervical abnormalities and the impact of growing public awareness of the sexually transmitted nature of cervical cancer. The implications for public understanding of cervical cancer, psychosocial issues associated with screening, and the potential impact on screening uptake are discussed. The second section addresses the role of biobehavioral factors in the persistence and progression of HPV infection as well as possible interventions to minimize the risk of persistence. Finally, primary prevention of HPV is discussed.

  8. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  9. The prognostic value of a histologic grading system, DNA profile, and MIB-1 expression in early stages of cervical squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Graflund, Marianne; Sorbe, B; Bryne, M; Karlsson, M

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the prognostic importance of a new grading system focusing on the invasive tumor front, DNA profile, and the proliferation marker MIB-1. A complete geographic series of 172 women treated with radical hysterectomy (Wertheim-Meigs) for FIGO stage I-II cervical carcinomas was the target population. The analyses were performed on 141 (82%) squamous cell carcinomas of the complete series. During the period of observation (mean 222 months), 17 recurrences (12.1%) were encountered. Prognostic factors for disease-free survival were lymph node status (P < 0.000001), radical surgical margins (P = 0.00004), and tumor size (P = 0.002). The complete score of the invasive front grading system (IFG), and the individual scores of two variables-pattern of invasion and host response-were all significantly (P = 0.002, P = 0.007, P = 0.0001) associated with pelvic lymph node metastases. Host response was the single most important factor in the IFG system, and it was superior to the complete score in predicting lymph node metastases. The total IFG score was also a significant (P = 0.003) prognostic factor for disease-free survival. DNA ploidy, S-phase fraction, and MIB-1 expression were nonsignificant factors in predicting pelvic lymph node metastases and disease-free survival of the patient. The IFG in the original or modified versions could predict low- and high-risk groups of tumors and therefore be of value in treatment planning for these patients. PMID:11975674

  10. Local immunological reactivity in oral squamous cell lesions of possible HPV (human papillomavirus) origin.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, K J; Syrjänen, S M; Lamberg, M A; Happonen, R P

    1983-01-01

    The immunocompetent cells (B and T lymphocytes, mononuclear phagocytes, MPS cells) known to be responsible for the rejection of the HPV- (Human Papillomavirus) induced tumors in the skin (warts) were analyzed in the infiltrates of 63 oral squamous cell lesions of suspected HPV origin (Condyloma, CA; Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia, FEH; Squamous Cell Papilloma, SQP) as well as in tumors thought to be unrelated to HPV (Fibrous Hyperplasia, FH; Papillary Hyperplasia, PH; True Fibroma, TF; Keratoacanthoma, KA), using the ANAE (acid alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase) technique. All tumors were also stained by the indirect immunoperoxidase-PAP method for the demonstration of HPV antigens. Of the SQP's, 60% were HPV-positive, as were 80% of CA's and one third of FEH's. In addition, 1/18 FH's and 2/14 PH's stained HPV-positive. On electron microscopy, viral particles could be disclosed within the nuclei of HPV-lesions. The highest proportions of the T and MPS cells (the elements of cell-mediated immunity) were found in CA's and SQP's (15-17%), as compared with the values of less than 10% in all others. The infiltrates in FEH's also showed low values of MPS and T cells, interpreted to suggest an etiology of the HPV type (determining the type of immune reaction) different from that of CA and SQP. HPV-positivity in the lesions did not influence the distribution of the immunocompetent cells. The results indicate that immunological mechanisms are involved in HPV lesions of the oral cavity as they are at other sites. The role of HPV in the etiology of these (and possibly of the oral squamous cell carcinoma) was discussed. Further analyses of the lymphocyte subsets are needed to establish the role of host reactions in the development and eradication of HPV lesions in oral cavity.

  11. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective. PMID:27617239

  12. The blame game: cervical cancer, knowledge of its link to human papillomavirus and stigma.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Melissa A; Gerend, Mary A

    2013-01-01

    This two-study paper examined stigma toward women with cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection (STI). For Study 1, participants (N = 352) were randomly assigned to one of four conditions in which they read a brief description of a patient with either cervical or ovarian cancer in which the cause of the patient's cancer was either specified (cervical: HPV, a STI vs. ovarian: family history) or unspecified. Participants in the cervical cancer/cause-specified condition rated the patient as more dirty, dishonest and unwise, and reported feeling more moral disgust and 'grossed out' than participants in the cervical cancer/cause-unspecified condition. For Study 2, participants (N = 126) were randomly assigned to read a vignette about a patient with cervical cancer in which the cause of cancer was either specified or unspecified. Consistent with Study 1, participants in the cause-specified condition rated the patient as more unwise, and reported feeling more moral disgust and 'grossed out' than participants in the cause-unspecified condition. These effects were mediated by attributions of blame toward the patient. Findings suggest that women with cervical cancer may be stigmatised and blame may play a role in this process.

  13. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    PubMed

    Chung, Soo-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective. PMID:27617239

  14. High-risk human papillomavirus genotypes in cervical lesions and vaccination challenges in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiu-Xiang; Zhang, Zhen-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer, mostly progressing from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Chinese women. This is largely due to high prevalence of high-risk human papillomaviruses (hr-HPVs) in the population. The prevalence of hr-HPV DNA in women and in cervical lesions women ranged from 9.9% to 17.% and from 50.5% to 70.9% in different regions of China, respectively. The most common genotypes somewhat differ between regions throughout the country and from those in many other countries. This may be a challenge to cervical cancer screening and prevention in China. Combined detection of particular HPV genotypes should be recommended in all geographical regions in China and greater attention must be paid to specific hr-HPV types during cervical cancer screening and follow-up of cervical lesions. Besides, vaccination for prevention of cervical cancer by particular HPV genotypes, has not been introduced to China so far. Updated knowledge on prevalent HPV genotypes should be provided to public health organizations to help with the development of more effective HPV vaccines, which can protect Chinese women against HPV types prevalent in local China and thus have a substantial impact on the cervical cancer burden.

  15. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective.

  16. Genetic polymorphism at codon 546 of the human RAD17 contributes to the risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Yukiko; Sakai, Akiko; Ito, Sachio; Mita, Yuichiro; Sonoyama, Takayuki; Tanabe, Shunsuke; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Naomoto, Yoshio; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Human RAD17, a human homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle checkpoint gene RAD17, plays a significant role in activating checkpoint signals in response to DNA damage. We evaluated the association of hRAD17 Leu546Arg (rs1045051), a missense single nucleotide polymorphism, with the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption history in 154 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma male patients and 695 cancer-free male controls by a case-control study conducted in Japan. The results showed that the hRAD17 Arg/Arg genotype compared to the Leu/Leu and Leu/Arg genotypes was significantly associated with the risk of the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with an adjusted odds ratios of 2.22 (95% CI: 1.19-4.16 P=0.013). In stratified studies, the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was markedly higher in light drinkers (less than 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype than in heavy drinkers (excess of 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype (OR=2.83, 95% CI: 1.05-7.61, P=0.04). We concluded that the genetic variant of hRAD17 Leu546Arg polymorphism exerts a significant effect on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk among Japanese men. PMID:27186329

  17. Genetic polymorphism at codon 546 of the human RAD17 contributes to the risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Yukiko; Sakai, Akiko; Ito, Sachio; Mita, Yuichiro; Sonoyama, Takayuki; Tanabe, Shunsuke; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Naomoto, Yoshio; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Human RAD17, a human homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle checkpoint gene RAD17, plays a significant role in activating checkpoint signals in response to DNA damage. We evaluated the association of hRAD17 Leu546Arg (rs1045051), a missense single nucleotide polymorphism, with the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption history in 154 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma male patients and 695 cancer-free male controls by a case-control study conducted in Japan. The results showed that the hRAD17 Arg/Arg genotype compared to the Leu/Leu and Leu/Arg genotypes was significantly associated with the risk of the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with an adjusted odds ratios of 2.22 (95% CI: 1.19-4.16 P=0.013). In stratified studies, the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was markedly higher in light drinkers (less than 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype than in heavy drinkers (excess of 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype (OR=2.83, 95% CI: 1.05-7.61, P=0.04). We concluded that the genetic variant of hRAD17 Leu546Arg polymorphism exerts a significant effect on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk among Japanese men. PMID:27186329

  18. Human Vagus Nerve Branching in the Cervical Region

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Niels; Glätzner, Juliane; Feja, Christine; Kühne, Christian; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Planitzer, Uwe; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Tillmann, Bernhard N.; Winkler, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Vagus nerve stimulation is increasingly applied to treat epilepsy, psychiatric conditions and potentially chronic heart failure. After implanting vagus nerve electrodes to the cervical vagus nerve, side effects such as voice alterations and dyspnea or missing therapeutic effects are observed at different frequencies. Cervical vagus nerve branching might partly be responsible for these effects. However, vagus nerve branching has not yet been described in the context of vagus nerve stimulation. Materials and Methods Branching of the cervical vagus nerve was investigated macroscopically in 35 body donors (66 cervical sides) in the carotid sheath. After X-ray imaging for determining the vertebral levels of cervical vagus nerve branching, samples were removed to confirm histologically the nerve and to calculate cervical vagus nerve diameters and cross-sections. Results Cervical vagus nerve branching was observed in 29% of all cases (26% unilaterally, 3% bilaterally) and proven histologically in all cases. Right-sided branching (22%) was more common than left-sided branching (12%) and occurred on the level of the fourth and fifth vertebra on the left and on the level of the second to fifth vertebra on the right side. Vagus nerves without branching were significantly larger than vagus nerves with branches, concerning their diameters (4.79 mm vs. 3.78 mm) and cross-sections (7.24 mm2 vs. 5.28 mm2). Discussion Cervical vagus nerve branching is considerably more frequent than described previously. The side-dependent differences of vagus nerve branching may be linked to the asymmetric effects of the vagus nerve. Cervical vagus nerve branching should be taken into account when identifying main trunk of the vagus nerve for implanting electrodes to minimize potential side effects or lacking therapeutic benefits of vagus nerve stimulation. PMID:25679804

  19. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in human cervical epithelial cells containing human papillomavirus type 16 episomes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lin; Lei, Yanjun; Srivastava, Ranjana; Qin, Weihua; Chen, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    The high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) that infect the anogenital tract are strongly associated with the development of cervical carcinoma, which is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Therapeutic drugs specifically targeting HPV are not available. Polyphenolic compounds have gained considerable attention because of their cytotoxic effects against a variety of cancers and certain viruses. In this study, we examined the effects of several polyphenols on cellular proliferation and death of the human cervical cancer cells and human cervical epithelial cells containing stable HPV type 16 episomes (HPVep). Our results show that three polyphenols inhibited proliferation of HeLa cells dose-dependently. Furthermore, one of the examined polyphenols, gallic acid (GA), also inhibited the proliferation of HPVep cells and exhibited significant specificity towards HPV-positive cells. The anti-proliferative effect of GA on HPVep and HeLa cells was associated with apoptosis and upregulation of p53. These results suggest that GA can be a potential candidate for the development of anti-HPV agents.

  20. Comparison of prevalence, viral load, physical status and expression of human papillomavirus-16, -18 and -58 in esophageal and cervical cancer: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a major risk factor for the development of nearly all cases of cervical cancer worldwide. The presence of HPV DNA in cases of esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (ESCC) has been reported repeatedly from Shantou, China, and other regions with a high incidence of esophageal carcinoma (EC). However, unlike in cervical squamous-cell carcinoma (CSCC), in ESCC, the characteristics of HPV are unclear. Thus, the role of high-risk HPV types in the carcinogenesis of ESCC remains uncertain. Methods Seventy cases of ESCC with 60 controls and 39 cases of CSCC with 54 controls collected from patients in Shantou region in China were compared for the distributions of HPV-16, -18 and -58; viral load; and viral integration using real-time PCR assay and HPV-16 expression using immunostaining. Results The detection rates and viral loads of HR-HPV infection were significantly lower in ESCC than in CSCC (50.0% vs. 79.48%, P = 0.005; 2.55 ± 3.19 vs. 361.29 ± 441.75, P = 0.002, respectively). The combined integration level of HPV-16, -18 and -58 was slightly lower in ESCC than in CSCC (P = 0.022). HPV-16 expression was detected in 59.26% of ESCC tissue and significantly associated with tumour grade (P = 0.027). Conclusions High levels of HR-HPV expression and integration may be an indicator of the risk of ESCC, at least for patients in the Shantou region of China. However, a relatively low HPV copy number and infection rate in ESCC is unlikely to play an essential a role in the carcinogenesis of ESCC as in cervical cancer. Factors other than HR-HPV infection may contribute to the carcinogenesis of ESCC. PMID:21108842

  1. Movements of HIV-virions in human cervical mucus

    PubMed Central

    Boukari, Hacène; Brichacek, Beda; Stratton, Pamela; Mahoney, Sheila F.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Margolis, Leonid; Nossal, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy were used to examine the movements of fluorescently-labeled HIV virions (~100 nm) added to samples of human cervical mucus. Particle-tracking analysis indicates that the motion of most virions is decreased 200-fold compared to that in aqueous solution and is not driven by typical diffusion. Rather, the time-dependence of their ensemble-averaged mean-square displacements is proportional to τα + v2τ2, describing a combination of anomalous diffusion (α~ 0.3) and flow-like behavior, τ being the lag time. We attribute the flow-like behavior to slowly-relaxing mucus matrix that follows mechanical perturbations such as stretching and twisting of the sample. Further analysis of the tracks and displacements of individual virions indicates differences in the local movements among the virions, including constrained motion and infrequent jumps, perhaps due to abrupt changes in matrix structure. Changes in the microenvironments due to slow structural changes may facilitate movement of the virions, allowing them to reach the epithelial layer. PMID:19711976

  2. Resequencing Microarray Technology for Genotyping Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Smears

    PubMed Central

    Berthet, Nicolas; Falguières, Michael; Filippone, Claudia; Bertolus, Chloé; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Brisse, Sylvain; Gessain, Antoine; Heard, Isabelle; Favre, Michel

    2014-01-01

    There are more than 40 human papillomaviruses (HPVs) belonging to the alpha genus that cause sexually transmitted infections; these infections are among the most frequent and can lead to condylomas and anogenital intra-epithelial neoplasia. At least 18 of these viruses are causative agents of anogenital carcinomas. We evaluated the performance of a resequencing microarray for the detection and genotyping of alpha HPV of clinical significance using cloned HPV DNA. To reduce the number of HPV genotypes tiled on microarray, we used reconstructed ancestral sequences (RASs) as they are more closely related to the various genotypes than the current genotypes are among themselves. The performance of this approach was tested by genotyping with a set of 40 cervical smears already genotyped using the commercial PapilloCheck kit. The results of the two tests were concordant for 70% (28/40) of the samples and compatible for 30% (12/40). Our findings indicate that RASs were able to detect and identify one or several HPV in clinical samples. Associating RASs with homonym sequences improved the genotyping of HPV present in cases of multiple infection. In conclusion, we demonstrate the diagnostic potential of resequencing technology for genotyping of HPV, and illustrate its value both for epidemiological studies and for monitoring the distribution of HPV in the post-vaccination era. PMID:25383888

  3. Detection of cervical lymph node micrometastasis and isolated tumor cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma using immunohistochemistry and serial sectioning

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Isha; Sandhu, Simarpreet V; Bhandari, Rajat; Sood, Neena; Bhullar, Ramanpreet Kaur; Sethi, Neerja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) comprises one of the largest subsets of cancers with a tendency for regional metastasis. Nodal status is a key prognostic indicator in patients with OSCC, particularly with N0 neck. Occult metastasis in the form of micrometastasis (MM) and isolated tumor cells (ITCs), often goes undetected by routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) examination using 1–2 sections for analysis. This limitation could be overcome by combining serial sectioning (SS) with immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the detection of MM and ITC. Pan-cytokeratin (pan-CK) (AE1/AE3) is particularly a useful marker to detect these deposits as their presence has resulted in varied interpretations and different applications of the tumor-node-metastasis system. Objectives: The objective of the study was to identify a suitable method for detecting MM and ITC in lymph nodes (LNs) of OSCC by combining SS and IHC and to compare it with conventional H&E staining. Materials and Methods: This laboratory-based, prospective study was conducted on 133 LNs harnessed from ten patients treated with radical neck dissection for primary OSCC. The LNs were subjected to SS at 100 μm intervals. The sections were stained with routine H&E staining, pan-CK and analyzed for MM and ITC according to criteria laid by Hermanek et al. Statistical Analysis: The obtained data were subjected to statistical analysis using Chi-square test. Results: The application of combination of SS and IHC using pan-CK (AE1/AE3) in our study revealed the presence of MM and ITC in 2.25% of the LNs diagnosed as negative on routine H&E examination. The detection of these occult metastatic deposits resulted in upstaging of 33.33% of the patients. Conclusion: In the view of crucial role of occult LN metastasis in prognosis and survival of OSCC patients with N0 neck, diagnostic tools such as IHC staining, particularly with pan-CK (AE1/AE3), combined with SS should be preferred over conventional methods as they

  4. Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Development and Progression of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Khaled Waleed; Chantiri, Mansour; Bassit, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), belonging to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, regulate many cellular activities including cell migration, differentiation, adhesion, proliferation and apoptosis. Use of recombinant human bone morphogenic protein?2 (rhBMP?2) in oral and maxillofacial surgery has seen a tremendous increase. Due to its role in many cellular pathways, the influence of this protein on carcinogenesis in different organs has been intensively studied over the past decade. BMPs also have been detected to have a role in the development and progression of many tumors, particularly disease-specific bone metastasis. In oral squamous cell carcinoma - the tumor type accounting for more than 90% of head and neck malignancies- aberrations of both BMP expression and associated signaling pathways have a certain relation with the development and progression of the disease by regulating a range of biological functions in the altered cells. In the current review, we discuss the influence of BMPs -especially rhBMP-2- in the development and progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27039814

  5. Diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of human skin by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Riziene d. M. F.; Martin, Airton A.; Tierra-Criollo, Carlos J.; Santos, Ivan D.

    2004-07-01

    The development of a technique that gives early diagnosis and is non-invasive is of crucial importance for public health. Raman spectroscopy is a technique that can full fill these requirements. The main goal of this work was to use the FT-Raman spectroscopy to differentiate between normal skin and the squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tissues in vitro. The samples used in this study were collected by traditional human biopsy of skin tissue. The samples removed from the patients were washed in physiologic serum and frozen in liquid nitrogen. The FT-Raman device used was the RFS 100- Bruker, with a 1064nm from the Nd:YAG as an excitation source. After the Raman measurement the samples were submitted for histopathological study for comparation. The Raman spectra in the normal tissue showed the presence of vibrational bands in 860 cm-1 and 939 cm-1 with higher intensity than in the carcinoma spectra. These modes were assigned to the vibration of proline and hydroxiproline. The shift region of 1555 to 1560 cm-1 showed a difference of intensity to the samples of squamous cell carcinoma, which were attributed to the nucleic acid.

  6. DETECTION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS IN HEAD AND NECK SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMAS: A LITERATURE REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Jelihovschi, I; Bidescu, Aida Corina; Tucaliuc, Simona Elena; Iancu, Luminiţa Smaranda

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are the most common sexually transmitted viruses. There is mounting evidence that incriminates HPV as a risk factor for malignant transformation of oropharyngeal epithelium. In 2011 the International Research Agency of Cancer and National Cancer Institute (USA) declared HPV-16 as an independent risk factor for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Leaders in the field of HPV research admit that this subtype of head and neck cancer is a sexually transmitted entity and its global incidence is on the rise. In the 1980s, clinicians observed a new group of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) independent of tobacco smoking or alcohol use. The new HNSCC patient is a middle-aged man, non-smoker, non-drinker with higher social status and the suspected risk factors for HNSCC being related to sexual practices (oral sex, multiple sexual partners, unprotected sex and drug use). Routine HPV testing of HNSCC patients is seriously considered as HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers comprise a distinct molecular, clinical and pathologic entity that has a markedly better prognosis than HPV-negative oropharyngeal cancers. The current treatment protocols for OPSCC include radiation, chemotherapy and surgery alone or in combination, involving high toxicity levels. Future therapeutic concepts for OPSCC may be personalized in relation to HPV-status to avoid unnecessary toxicity. The current review summarizes the contemporary trends in the diagnosis of HPV-related head and neck cancers, presenting the advantages and disadvantages of the main methods.

  7. The detective, prognostic, and predictive value of DNA methylation in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Cao, Baoping; Guo, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world. Squamous cell carcinoma accounts for approximately 90 % of esophageal cancer cases. Genetic and epigenetic changes have been found to accumulate during the development of various cancers, including esophageal squamous carcinoma (ESCC). Tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are two major risk factors for ESCC, and both tobacco and alcohol were found to induce methylation changes in ESCC. Growing evidence demonstrates that aberrant epigenetic changes play important roles in the multiple-step processes of carcinogenesis and tumor progression. DNA methylation may occur in the key components of cancer-related signaling pathways. Aberrant DNA methylation affects genes involved in cell cycle, DNA damage repair, Wnt, TGF-β, and NF-κB signaling pathways, including P16, MGMT, SFRP2, DACH1, and ZNF382. Certain genes methylated in precursor lesions of the esophagus demonstrate that DNA methylation may serve as esophageal cancer early detection marker, such as methylation of HIN1, TFPI-2, DACH1, and SOX17. CHFR methylation is a late stage event in ESCC and is a sensitive marker for taxanes in human ESCC. FHIT methylation is associated with poor prognosis in ESCC. Aberrant DNA methylation changes may serve as diagnostic, prognostic, and chemo-sensitive markers. Characterization of the DNA methylome in ESCC will help to better understand its mechanisms and develop improved therapies. PMID:27110300

  8. Analysis of human serum from women affected by cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Barba de la Rosa, Ana P; Lugo-Melchor, Ofelia Y; Briones-Cerecero, Erika P; Chagolla-López, Alicia; De León-Rodríguez, Antonio; Santos, Leticia; Vázquez-Ortiz, Guelaguetza; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the first causes of death in Mexican women population. The plasma proteome has a wide dynamic range concentrations of different protein and their alterations reflect the physiological state of the individual's health. The aim of this study was to characterize the 2D-PAGE serum patterns from healthy women and with different levels of cervical lesions. Changes in haptoglobin, apolipoproteins, and transthyretin, when comparing the serum from healthy women and serum from patients with different levels of cervical lesion were found. The Western blot analysis showed increasing concentrations of metalloproteinases (MMP's), proteins with important biological roles in tumor development and metastasis. Protein profiles in conjunction with MS, bioinformatics, and Western blot analysis, allow us to compile information for the acquisition of results to proposed candidates biomarkers of cervical cancer among Mexican women population.

  9. Notch1 is a 5-fluorouracil resistant and poor survival marker in human esophagus squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Fan, Huijie; Ma, Yuanyuan; Liang, Dongming; Huang, Ruixia; Wang, Junsheng; Zhou, Fuyou; Kan, Quancheng; Ming, Liang; Li, Huixiang; Giercksky, Karl-Erik; Nesland, Jahn Martin; Suo, Zhenhe

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling involves the processes that govern cell proliferation, cell fate decision, cell differentiation and stem cell maintenance. Due to its fundamental role in stem cells, it has been speculated during the recent years that Notch family may have critical functions in cancer stem cells or cancer cells with a stem cell phenotype, therefore playing an important role in the process of oncogenesis. In this study, expression of Notch family in KYSE70, KYSE140 and KYSE450 squamous esophageal cancer cell lines and virus transformed squamous esophageal epithelial cell line Het-1A was examined by quantitative RT-PCR. Compared to the Het-1A cells, higher levels of Nocth1 and Notch3 expression in the cancer cell lines were identified. Due to the finding that NOTCH3 mainly mediates squamous cell differentiation, NOTCH1 expression was further studied in these cell lines. By Western blot analyses, the KYSE70 cell line which derived from a poorly differentiated tumor highly expressed Notch1, and the Notch1 expression in this cell line was hypoxia inducible, while the KYSE450 cell line which derived from a well differentiated tumor was always negative for Notch1, even in hypoxia. Additional studies demonstrated that the KYSE70 cell line was more 5-FU resistant than the KYSE450 cell line and such 5-FU resistance is correlated to Notch1 expression verified by Notch1 knockdown experiments. In clinical samples, Notch1 protein expression was detected in the basal cells of human esophagus epithelia, and its expression in squamous cell carcinomas was significantly associated with higher pathological grade and shorter overall survival. We conclude that Notch1 expression is associated with cell aggressiveness and 5-FU drug resistance in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines in vitro and is significantly associated with a poor survival in human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas.

  10. Distribution of human papillomavirus genotypes among cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cancers in Macao.

    PubMed

    Hlaing, Thazin; Yip, Yuk-Ching; Ngai, Karry L K; Vong, Heong-Ting; Wong, Sio-In; Ho, Wendy C S; Batalha, Sellma L S C; Chan, Paul K S

    2010-09-01

    Macao is a densely populated city situated in East Asia where a relatively high prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 52 and 58 has been reported in women with invasive cervical cancer. To provide data for a population-specific estimation on the impact of HPV vaccines, paraffin-embedded tissues collected from women with invasive cervical cancer or cervical intrapeitheilal neoplasia grade 2 or 3 confirmed histologically were examined for HPV using the INNO-LiPa kit. Of the 35 HPV-positive patients with invasive cancer, one HPV type was detected in 68.6%, and 31.4% were co-infected with more than one HPV type. Overall, HPV 16, HPV 18, HPV 52, and HPV 54 were the most common types found respectively in 57.1%, 17%, 11.4%, and 8.5% of patients with invasive cervical cancer. Among the 59 HPV-positive patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3, 55.9% hardbored one HPV type, and 44.1% had co-infections. The common HPV types found included HPV 16 (52.5%), HPV 52 (23.7%), HPV 58 (18.7%), and HPV 33 (17%). Although HPV 11 (a low-risk type) was also found commonly in invasive cervical cancers (14.3%) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (15.3%), the fact that they all existed as co-infections with another high-risk type suggested HPV 11 was not the cause of the lesion. The current vaccines targeting HPV 16/18 are expected to cover 62.9-74.3% of invasive cervical cancers and 32.2-55.9% of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3 in Macao. Widespread HPV vaccination is expected to reduce substantially the disease burden associated with cervical neoplasia in Macao.

  11. DEPTOR promotes survival of cervical squamous cell carcinoma cells and its silencing induces apoptosis through downregulating PI3K/AKT and by up-regulating p38 MAP kinase

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Kalanghad Puthankalam; Viji, Remadevi; Dan, Vipin Mohan; Sajitha, Indira Sukumaran; Prakash, Rajappan; Rahul, Puthan Valappil; Santhoshkumar, Thankayyan R.; Lakshmi, Subhadra; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna

    2016-01-01

    DEPTOR is an endogenous inhibitor of mTOR complexes, de-regulated in cancers. The present study reveals a vital role for DEPTOR in survival of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). DEPTOR was found to be overexpressed in both cervical SCC cells and tissues and it's silencing in cervical SCC cells induced apoptosis, mainly by up-regulation of p38 MAPK and by inhibiting PI3K/AKT pathway via a feed-back inhibition from mTORC1-S6K. DEPTOR silencing resulted in reduced expression of the nitric oxide synthases iNOS and eNOS, as well as increased activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinases. Activation of AKT signaling by overexpression of constitutively active-AKT (CA-AKT) failed to overcome the apoptosis caused by DEPTOR silencing. Similarly pharmacological inhibition of ERK also failed to control apoptosis. However pharmacological inhibition of p38 MAPK rescued the cells from apoptosis, indicating the major role of p38 MAPK in cell death induced by DEPTOR silencing. DEPTOR was also found to regulate ERK1/2 in an AKT dependent manner. DEPTOR knockdown induced cell death in SiHa cells overexpressing the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, indicating strong survival role of DEPTOR in these cells. DEPTOR overexpression activated PI3K/AKT by relieving the negative feed-back inhibition from mTORC1-S6K. DEPTOR regulation was also observed to be independent of HPV E6/E7 oncoproteins, but it might be a molecular co-factor contributing to cervical carcinogenesis. In summary, DEPTOR is found to promote survival of cervical SCC cells and its reduction induced apoptosis via differential effects on PI3K/AKT and p38 MAPK and can be a potential target in cervical SCC. PMID:26992219

  12. Cytological screening for cervical cancer and human papillomavirus in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Hiscock, E.; Reece, G.

    1988-01-01

    In a retrospective study of cervical screening in a general practice in Birmingham 156 out of 1913 smears taken over three years showed some abnormality. Smears from 65 women showed severe non-specific inflammation, and 91 women had various grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, of whom 53 were aged under 30 and 13 over 40. Of 35 women with clinical evidence of human papillomavirus, 21 had normal results on cervical testing and 14 abnormal results. The incidence of genital warts among sexually active young people is growing, but the association of human papillomavirus with abnormal cervical smears is not clear. The efficacy of screening in the United Kingdom must be improved by actively encouraging younger patients to attend for regular screening. PMID:2852515

  13. Correlation between koilocytes and human papillomavirus detection by PCR in oral and oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma biopsies.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Glauco Issamu; Simonato, Luciana Estevam; Mattar, Neivio José; Camilo Jr, Deolino João; Biasoli, Eder Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the histopathological analysis with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods to predict the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in oral squamous cell carcinoma biopsies. Eighty-three paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from patients with oropharynx and mouth floor squamous cell carcinoma were submitted to histopathological analysis under light microscopy, specifically for the determination of the presence of koilocytes. Subsequently, DNA was purified from the same paraffin-embedded specimens and submitted to PCR. Fisher's exact test showed no statistically significant correlation between the two methods. The results suggest that the presence of koilocytes is unreliable for the detection of HPV presence in oral and oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma.

  14. Bile salts disrupt human esophageal squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2012-07-15

    Reflux of acid and bile acids contributes to epithelial tissue injury in gastro-esophageal reflux disease. However, the influence of refluxed material on human esophageal stratified epithelial barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of acid and bile acids on barrier function and TJ protein distribution using a newly developed air-liquid interface (ALI) in vitro culture model of stratified squamous epithelium based on primary human esophageal epithelial cells (HEECs). Under ALI conditions, HEECs formed distinct epithelial layers on Transwell inserts after 7 days of culture. The epithelial layers formed TJ, and the presence of claudin-1, claudin-4, and occludin were detected by immunofluorescent staining. The NP-40-insoluble fraction of these TJ proteins was significantly higher by day 7 of ALI culture. Exposure of HEECs to pH 2, and taurocholic acid (TCA) and glycocholic acid (GCA) at pH 3, but not pH 4, for 1 h decreased transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and increased paracellular permeability. Exposure of cell layers to GCA (pH 3) and TCA (pH 3) for 1 h also markedly reduced the insoluble fractions of claudin-1 and -4. We found that deoxycholic acid (pH 7.4 or 6, 1 h) and pepsin (pH 3, 24 h) significantly decreased TEER and increased permeability. Based on these findings, ALI-cultured HEECs represent a new in vitro model of human esophageal stratified epithelium and are suitable for studying esophageal epithelial barrier functions. Using this model, we demonstrated that acid, bile acids, and pepsin disrupt squamous epithelial barrier function partly by modulating TJ proteins. These results provide new insights into understanding the role of TJ proteins in esophagitis.

  15. [Study on molecular hybridization with biotin-labelled HPV 16 DNA probe in human cervical carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Huang, G Q; Mao, T; Huang, Y F; Xiao, H Y; Liu, B L

    1989-09-01

    Biotin-labelled human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 type DNA probe was prepared by the techniques of molecular biology. And dot hybridization technique was used to detect the HPV 16 homologous sequences in the tissues DNA of human cervical carcinoma. The results indicated that 16 cases out of 28 of the human cervical carcinoma tissues were positive. The positive rate was 57%. The other 4 cases of normal uterine cervix tissues were negative. Only 1 in 4 chronic cervicitis tissues showed positive. The HPV 16 plasmid DNA, as the positive control group, showed strong positive, while lambda-phage DNA was negative. The results have shown that the genome of the HPV actually exists in the tissue of the cervical carcinoma and that there is a close relationship between the cervical carcinoma and HPV infection. This experiment adopted the Biotin-labelled HPV 16 DNA probe. And it may provide us with a quick and sensitive method for investigation of the infection of HPV and its role in the carcinogenesis of cervical carcinoma. PMID:2560458

  16. Risk factors for and prevention of human papillomaviruses (HPV), genital warts and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chelimo, Carol; Wouldes, Trecia A; Cameron, Linda D; Elwood, J Mark

    2013-03-01

    Genital HPV infection is associated with development of cervical cancer, cervical neoplasia, anogenital warts, and other anogenital cancers. A number of reviews have primarily addressed the role of HPV infection in cervical carcinogenesis, and differences in human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes found in cervical cancer cases by histology and geographical region. This review provides an informative summary of the broad body of literature on the burden of HPV, the risk factors for HPV infection, genital warts and cervical cancer, and preventive measures against these conditions in females. Studies have identified the main risk factors for genital HPV infection in females as follows: acquisition of new male partners; an increasing number of lifetime sexual partners both in females and their male partners; and having non-monogamous male partners. Cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination are the primary measures currently recommended to prevent cervical cancer. There is also an ongoing debate and conflicting findings on whether male circumcision and condom use protect against HPV infection and subsequent development of HPV-related illnesses in females.

  17. Changes in knowledge of cervical cancer following introduction of human papillomavirus vaccine among women at high risk for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart Massad, L.; Evans, Charlesnika T.; Weber, Kathleen M.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Hessol, Nancy A.; Wright, Rodney L.; Colie, Christine; Strickler, Howard D.; Wilson, Tracey E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe changes in knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccination among women at high risk for cervical cancer in the first five years after introduction of HPV vaccination. Methods In 2007, 2008–9, and 2011, women in a multicenter U.S. cohort study completed 44-item self-report questionnaires assessing knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, HPV, and HPV vaccination. Results across time were assessed for individuals, and three study enrollment cohorts were compared. Knowledge scores were correlated with demographic variables, measures of education and attention, and medical factors. Associations were assessed in multivariable models. Results In all, 974 women completed three serial questionnaires; most were minority, low income, and current or former smokers. The group included 652 (67%) HIV infected and 322 (33%) uninfected. Summary knowledge scores (possible range 0–24) increased from 2007 (12.8, S.D. 5.8) to 2008–9 (13.9, S.D. 5.3, P < 0.001) and to 2011 (14.3, S.D. 5.2, P < 0.0001 vs 2007 and < 0.04 vs 2008–9). Higher knowledge scores at first and follow-up administration of questionnaires, higher income, and higher education level were associated with improved knowledge score at third administration. Women not previously surveyed had scores similar to those of the longitudinal group at baseline. Conclusion Substantial gaps in understanding of HPV and cervical cancer prevention exist despite years of health education. While more effective educational interventions may help, optimal cancer prevention may require opt-out vaccination programs that do not require nuanced understanding. PMID:25870859

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Progesterone on Cervical Tissue Formation in a Three-Dimensional Culture System with Human Cervical Fibroblasts1

    PubMed Central

    House, Michael; Tadesse-Telila, Serkalem; Norwitz, Errol R.; Socrate, Simona; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Progesterone supplementation is recommended to prevent preterm birth in women with a short cervix, but the mechanism is unclear. We hypothesize that progesterone acts by altering the composition of the cervical extracellular matrix (ECM). We tested this hypothesis using human cervical fibroblasts in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cultures. For 2D culture, cells were seeded in 6-well plates and cultured with media supplemented with estradiol (10−8 M), progesterone (10−7 or 10−6 M), and vehicle. For 3D culture, the cells were cultured on a porous silk protein scaffold system. Progesterone and estrogen receptors were documented by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. In both 2D and 3D cultures, decreased collagen synthesis was seen with increased progesterone concentration. Three-dimensional cultures could be maintained significantly longer than 2D cultures, and the morphology of 3D cultures appeared similar to native cervical tissue. Thus, further studies were performed in 3D culture. To determine the effect of progesterone concentration, the 3D scaffolds were cultured with estradiol (10−8 M) and five conditions: vehicle; 10−9, 10−8, or 10−7 M progesterone; or 10−7 M progesterone plus 10−6 M mifepristone. The highest progesterone concentration correlated with the least amount of collagen synthesis. Collagen synthesis progressively increased as progesterone concentration decreased. This effect was partially antagonized by mifepristone, suggesting the mechanism is mediated by the progesterone receptor. This hormonally responsive 3D culture system supports the hypothesis that progesterone has a direct effect on remodeling cervical ECM during pregnancy. The 3D culture system could be useful for studying the mechanism of progesterone effects on the cervix. PMID:24285720

  19. Metastasis occurring eleven years after diagnosis of human papilloma virus-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Jessica; Wildes, Tanya; El-Mofty, Samir; Adkins, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is associated with a favourable prognosis, although approximately 20–25% of patients ultimately develop recurrent cancer. Most disease recurrence events appear within 3 years; however, long-term follow-up of reported studies are limited, and the risk of late recurrence is unknown. We present a case report of a patient who developed distant metastases of HPV-related SCC 11 years after initial diagnosis and treatment of HPV-related OPSCC. Late disease recurrence may occur after initial diagnosis of HPV-related OPSCC. This observation has implications on the appropriate duration of follow-up and surveillance of these patients. PMID:25435908

  20. Do high-risk human papillomaviruses cause oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Mirghani, H; Amen, F; Moreau, F; Lacau St Guily, J

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are an established etiologic factor for a growing number of oropharyngeal cancers. However, their potential role in other upper aerodigestive tract locations is still a matter of debate, particularly in the oral cavity. This is of paramount importance as in the future diagnosis, treatment and follow up in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma may vary according to HPV status. This article reviews the recent published data and highlights some of the pitfalls that have hampered the accurate assessment of HR-HPV oncological role outside the oropharynx. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the oropharynx, only a small fraction of cancers located in the oral cavity seem to be HPV-related even in young non-smoking non-drinking patients. We emphasize several relevant factors to consider in assumed HPV-induced oral cavity cancers and discuss the current theories that explain why HPV-induced cancers arise preferentially in the oropharynx.

  1. The complex relationship between human papillomavirus and cervical adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Molijn, Anco; Jenkins, David; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Xun; Pirog, Edyta; Enqi, Wu; Liu, Bin; Schmidt, Johannes; Cui, Jiangfeng; Qiao, Youlin; Quint, Wim

    2016-01-15

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is reported in 60-100% of cervical adenocarcinoma (CADC) globally. We investigated this relationship in a hospital-based survey in China. 718 CADC samples from nine Chinese regions were analysed. Expert pathologists reviewed cases with p16 and progesterone receptor immunostaining. Cases were tested for HPV using whole-tissue sections (WTS) and laser-capture microdissection. All cases were HPV-tested by L1 based broad-spectrum SPF10 -DEIA-LiPA25 PCR. Negative cases were tested for DNA adequacy and with E6 oncogene, type-specific HPV PCRs. Using WTS-PCR CADC showed overall 75% HPV-positivity (33-100% for different histological types). LCM-PCR showed that none of minimal deviation or serous CADC, and <10% of all clear cell and endometrioid CADC were HPV-positive in tumour cells. Usual and adenosquamous CADC showed a single HPV genotype in 60 and 78% cases. In some cases, HPV was found in adjacent cervix but not in tumour. HPV 16, 18 and 45 accounted for 90% of HPV in tumour cells. Patients with HPV-positive tumours were on average 6 years younger and presented at a lower clinicopathological stage as compared to patients with HPV-negative cancers. CADC is diverse pathologically and in HPV status. Special histopathological tumor subtypes may develop through different cellular and molecular pathways. Between 20 and 40% usual and adenosquamous types, in particular these diagnosed in older women and at advanced FIGO stages, are not driven by oncogenic HPV. In these cases HPV may not be involved in carcinogenisis or maybe lost during tumour progression.

  2. Human Papilloma Virus prevalence and type-specific relative contribution in invasive cervical cancer specimens from Italy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer represents an important global public health problem. It is the 2nd most common cancer among women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is now well-established as a necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) development. Only a few studies on HPV prevalence and type-specific distribution in ICC have been conducted in Italy. Aim To describe the prevalence of HPV and the HPV type-specific distribution in ICC cases identified in Rome, Italy. Methods 140 paraffin embedded tissue blocks of primary ICC diagnosed between 2001 and 2006 were identified at the Regina Elena Cancer Institute in Rome (Italy). HPV was detected through amplification of HPV DNA using SPF-10 HPV broad-spectrum primers followed by DEIA and then genotyping by LiPA25 (version 1). Results 134 cases were considered suitable for HPV DNA detection after histological evaluation; and overall, 90.3% (121/134) HPV prevalence was detected. 111 cases had a single HPV type, 4 cases had an uncharacterized type (HPVX) and 6 cases had multiple HPV infections. The five most common single HPV types among positive cases were: HPV16 (71/121; 58.7%), HPV18 (12/121; 9.9%), HPV31, HPV45 and HPV58 (5/121; 4.1% each). 2 (1.5%) of the single infections and 2 (1.5%) of the multiple infections contained low risk types. Statistically significant differences in the relative contribution of HPV18 were found when comparing squamous cell carcinomas with adenocarcinomas. Conclusions HPV16 and HPV18 accounted for almost 70% of all the HPV positive ICC cases. The study provides baseline information for further evaluation on the impact of recently introduced HPV vaccines in Italy. PMID:20525370

  3. Human papillomavirus type 16-specific T cell responses and their association with recurrence of cervical disease following treatment.

    PubMed

    Luxton, Jenny C; Nath, Rahul; Derias, Nawal; Herbert, Amanda; Shepherd, Philip S

    2003-05-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) L1- and E7-specific T cell responses were measured in 58 women with abnormal cervical cytology in a prospective study. On recruitment, patients responded most frequently and with the highest numbers of responding cells to the L1 region aa 311-345 and this response was significantly associated with the presence of cervical disease (P=0.041). Responses to the L1 peptide aa 281-295 were significantly higher in patients with CIN III than in those with HPV/CIN I or CIN II lesions (P=0.027). The E7 region aa 70-98 was the most immunogenic in patients with squamous intraepithelial lesions of the cervix (SIL) but the responses detected were not significantly higher than in patients without SIL. Following treatment, the T cell response profiles of patient groups did not change significantly. However, on analysis of the responses of individual patients with and without recurrent disease on follow-up, significant differences were found. Recurrence of disease was associated with T cell responses to the E7 region aa 70-98 at the patient's first clinic visit (P=0.017). Recurrence of disease was also accompanied by an increase in the total number of L1-specific short-term T cell lines (STLs) at follow-up, whereas absence of disease was accompanied by a decrease in L1-specific STLs. The data also suggested a possible link between E7 70-98-specific responses and acquisition of disease by patients who were previously disease-free. Further studies are warranted to determine whether this response could be useful as a marker of recurrent disease in some patients.

  4. VEGF165 antisense RNA suppresses oncogenic properties of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhong-Ping; Wang, Yun-Jie; Li, Jin-Ge; Zhou, Yong-An

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of antisense RNA to vascular endothelial growth factor165 (VEGF165) on human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line EC109 and the feasibility of gene therapy for esophageal carcinoma. METHODS: By using subclone technique, the full length of VEGF165 amino acid cDNA, which was cut from pGEM-3Zf(+), was cloned inversely into the eukaryotic expression vector pCEP4.The recombinant plasmid pCEP-AVEGF165 was transfected into EC109 cell with lipofectamine. After a stable transfection, dot blot, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), laser confocal imaging system analysis, transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry were performed to determine the biological characteristics of EC109 cell line before and after transfection in vitro and whether there was a reversion in the tumorigenic properties of the EC109 cell in vivo. RESULTS: The eukaryotic expression vector pCEP-AVEGF165 was successfully constructed and transfected into EC109 cells. The expression of VEGF165 was significantly decreased in the transfected cells while the biological characteristics of the cells were not influenced by the expression of antisense gene. The tumorigenic and angiogenic capabilities were greatly reduced in nude mice, as demonstrated by reduced tumor end volume (820 ± 112.5) mm3 vs (7930 ± 1035) mm3 and (7850 ± 950) mm3,P£¼0.01£½ and microvessel density(8.5 ± 1.2) mm-2 vs (44.3 ± 9.4) mm-2 and (46.4 ± 12.6) mm-2,P < 0.01) in comparison between experimental groups empty vector transfected group and control group. CONCLUSION: The angiogenesis and tumorigenicity of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were effectively inhibited by VEGF165 antisense RNA. Antisense RNA to VEGF165 can potentially be used as an adjuvant therapy for solid tumors. PMID:11833069

  5. Human papilloma virus early proteins E6 (HPV16/18-E6) and the cell cycle marker P16 (INK4a) are useful prognostic markers in uterine cervical carcinomas in Qassim Region--Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Omran, O M; AlSheeha, M

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a common and an important public health problem for adult women in developing countries. In contrast, cervical cancer incidence is low in Saudi Arabia. High-risk types of human papilloma viruses (HPV16 and HPV18) are the most significant risk factors for cervical cancer. HPV16/18-E6 oncoprotein is associated with HPV etiology, viral persistence and epithelial transformation. Cell cycle protein p16 INK4a (p16) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cervical carcinomas. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of HPV16/18-E6 and p16 in uterine cervical carcinomas in Qassim Region--Saudi Arabia, and to relate the results to the established clinicopathological prognostic parameters (age of the patient, educational level, birth control methods, number of pregnancy, smoking status, degree of histological differentiation, clinical stage, and lymph node metastasis) The study included 40 specimens of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinomas diagnosed and confirmed by biopsy. Histopathological classification of cervical tumors cases was performed according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). Immunohistochemical analysis for HPV16/18-E6 and p16 were carried out on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of cervical tissues using avidin-biotin peroxidase method. There was a significant statistical correlation between HPV16/18-E6 expression in cervical carcinoma and nationality, smoking status and size of the tumor. HPV16/18-E6 oncoprotein expression in normal lymphocytes and endothelial cells in the tumor tissues and the adjacent normal cervical tissues suggest the possibility that HPV infection might spread to other organs through blood circulation. P16 expression has been correlated with high grade, stage of cervical SCC and HPV16/18-E6 expression. The current study supports the critical function of p16 and HPV16/18-E6 as specific markers for cervical carcinoma. However the potential for usage

  6. The role of MALAT1 correlates with HPV in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Li, Yuehui; Fang, Shujuan; Jiang, Binyuan; Qin, Changfei; Xie, Pingli; Zhou, Guohua; Li, Guancheng

    2014-06-01

    Cervical cancer, the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, is responsible for >275,100 mortalities each year and is associated with high-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV). HPVs have two important oncogenes, E6 and E7, which have crucial roles in malignant transformation in cervical cancer. Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a long non-coding RNA originally identified in non-small cell lung cancer. Previous studies have revealed that MALAT1 is expressed in numerous tissue types, and is significant in maintaining the normal function of the body. However, it also appeared to be notably upregulated in numerous carcinoma types compared with adjacent non-cancerous tissues. In the present study, it was identified that MALAT1 expression was upregulated in cervical cancer cell lines compared with normal cervical squamous cell samples. Further study into the effect of MALAT1 on cellular phenotype revealed that MALAT1 was able to promote cell migration and proliferation. Of note, it was revealed that the expression of MALAT1 was decreased with the knockdown of HPV16 E6/E7 in CaSki cells. Furthermore, the investigations in clinical samples also revealed that MALAT1 was expressed in HPV-positive cervical squamous cells, but not in HPV-negative normal cervical squamous cells. These results indicate that HPV correlates with MALAT1 deregulation in cervical cancer.

  7. Hsp90 Inhibitor AT13387 in Treating Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Receiving Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-05

    Human Papillomavirus Infection; Stage III Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  8. Antibodies to human papillomavirus and to other genital infectious agents and invasive cervical cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Jha, P K; Beral, V; Peto, J; Hack, S; Hermon, C; Deacon, J; Mant, D; Chilvers, C; Vessey, M P; Pike, M C

    1993-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) play an important part in the development of cervical cancer, but the role of other infectious agents, such as herpes simplex virus (HSV), is not clear. We assayed serum samples collected from 219 women with cervical cancer and from 387 controls for antibody to infectious agents. HPV 16-E7 and/or HPV 18-E7 antibodies were significantly related to cervical cancer risk (RR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.2). Antibodies to HSV types 1 and 2, Chlamydia trachomatis, and to multiple infectious agents were associated with cervical cancer when seroprevalence rates in all cases and controls were compared, but when HPV-seropositive cases and controls were compared these associations were weaker and non-significant. This finding suggests that past infections with sexually transmitted infections other than HPV may be surrogate markers of exposure to HPV, and of no separate aetiological significance.

  9. Fludeoxyglucose F 18 PET Scan, CT Scan, and Ferumoxtran-10 MRI Scan Before Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Finding Lymph Node Metastasis in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer or High-Risk Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-19

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  10. A DNA methylation classifier of cervical precancer based on human papillomavirus and human genes.

    PubMed

    Brentnall, Adam R; Vasiljević, Nataša; Scibior-Bentkowska, Dorota; Cadman, Louise; Austin, Janet; Szarewski, Anne; Cuzick, Jack; Lorincz, Attila T

    2014-09-15

    Testing for high-risk (hr) types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is highly sensitive as a screening test of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplastic (CIN2/3) disease, the precursor of cervical cancer. However, it has a relatively low specificity. Our objective was to develop a prediction rule with a higher specificity, using combinations of human and HPV DNA methylation. Exfoliated cervical specimens from colposcopy-referral cohorts in London were analyzed for DNA methylation levels by pyrosequencing in the L1 and L2 regions of HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and human genes EPB41L3, DPYS and MAL. Samples from 1,493 hrHPV-positive women were assessed and of these 556 were found to have CIN2/3 at biopsy; 556 tested positive for HPV16 (323 CIN2/3), 201 for HPV18 (73 CIN2/3) and 202 for HPV31 (98 CIN2/3). The prediction rule included EPB41L3 and HPV and had area under curve 0.80 (95% CI 0.78-0.82). For 90% sensitivity, specificity was 36% (33-40) and positive predictive value (PPV) was 46% (43-48). By HPV type, 90% sensitivity corresponded to the following specificities and PPV, respectively: HPV16, 38% (32-45) and 67% (63-71); HPV18, 53% (45-62) and 52% (45-59); HPV31, 39% (31-49) and 58% (51-65); HPV16, 18 or 31, 44% (40-49) and 62% (59-65) and other hrHPV 17% (14-21) and 21% (18-24). We conclude that a methylation assay in hrHPV-positive women might improve PPV with minimal sensitivity loss.

  11. The impact of glucocorticoids and anti-cd20 therapy on cervical human papillomavirus infection risk in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Garcia-Carrasco, Mario; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Taboada-Cole, Alejandro; Muñoz-Guarneros, Margarita; Solis-Poblano, Juan Carlos; Pezzat-Said, Elias; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; de Lara, Luis Vazquez; Ramos-Alvarez, Gloria; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Lopez-Colombo, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and factors associated with cervical human papillomavirus infection in women with systemic lupus erythematosus METHODS: This cross-sectional study collected traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus-related disease risk factors, including conventional and biologic therapies. A gynecological evaluation and cervical cytology screen were performed. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were undertaken by PCR and linear array assay. RESULTS: A total of 148 patients were included, with a mean age and disease duration of 42.5±11.8 years and 9.7±5.3 years, respectively. The prevalence of squamous intraepithelial lesions was 6.8%. The prevalence of human papillomavirus infection was 29%, with human papillomavirus subtype 59 being the most frequent. Patients with human papillomavirus were younger than those without the infection (38.2±11.2 vs. 44.2±11.5 years, respectively; p = 0.05), and patients with the virus had higher daily prednisone doses (12.8±6.8 vs. 9.7±6.7 mg, respectively; p = 0.01) and cumulative glucocorticoid doses (14.2±9.8 vs. 9.7±7.3 g, respectively; p = 0.005) compared with patients without. Patients with human papillomavirus infection more frequently received rituximab than those without (20.9% vs. 8.5%, respectively; p = 0.03). In the multivariate analysis, only the cumulative glucocorticoid dose was associated with human papillomavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative glucocorticoid dose may increase the risk of human papillomavirus infection. Although rituximab administration was more frequent in patients with human papillomavirus infection, no association was found. Screening for human papillomavirus infection is recommended in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24473503

  12. Inhibition of autophagy augments apoptosis in human oral squamous cell carcinoma under nutrient depletion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-Cheng; Xin, Zhi-Yuan; Deborah, Baremberg; Zhang, Jun-Sheng; Yuan, Dao-Ying; Xu, Kai; Liu, Xian-Bin; Jiang, Hu-Quan; Fan, Qing-Chun; Zhang, Bin; Li, Ke-Yi

    2015-05-01

    There has been little research conducted regarding autophagy in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Given the prevalence of oral cancers which are OSCC and the severe side effects of current treatments, there is a pressing need to develop effective alternative therapies. In this study, we have endeavored to explore the biological characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line KB cells, in particular with regard to the role played by autophagy in their survival. Autophagy was activated by nutrient depletion via culturing cells in Earle's balanced salts (EBSS) and was measured via indices relating to Beclin 1, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (MAPLC3, LC3), p62, and Green fluorescent protein-light chain 3 plasmid transfection (GFP-LC3). Cell death and apoptosis induced by nutrient depletion was measured using both MTT assay and flow cytometry (FCM). Compared to initial levels at 0 h, Beclin 1 density in EBSS-treated cells was found to have increased at 6, 12, and 18 h in a time-dependent manner and was found to have subsequently declined at 24 and 48 h. p62 levels, LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, and GFP-LC3 levels increased at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h in a time-dependent manner. 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was found to inhibit autophagy and the expression of Beclin 1 and significantly enhanced nutrient depletion-induced apoptosis and death. We concluded that nutrient depletion enhances OSCC cell autophagy in time-course patterns and that the inhibition of autophagy augments apoptosis in OSCC cells. We also deduced that Beclin 1 takes part in the development and progression of autophagy, potentially playing an important role in the crosstalk between apoptosis and autophagy in OSCC cells. These findings suggest that nutrient depletion may be an effective way to explore autophagy and that autophagy inhibitors should be investigated as a potential novel agent for the adjuvant treatment of human OSCC.

  13. Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus Infection, Cervical Cancer and Willingness to pay for Cervical Cancer Vaccination among Ethnically Diverse Medical Students in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Num, Kelly Sze Fang; Yong, Ng Jin

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of medical students and determine variation between different cultural groups. A secondary aim was to find out the willingness to pay for cervical cancer vaccination and the relationships between knowledge and attitudes towards Human Papillomavirus vaccination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a private medical university between June 2014 and November 2014 using a convenient sampling method. A total of 305 respondents were recruited and interviewed with standard questionnaires for assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practice towards human papilloma virus and their willingness to pay for HPV vaccination. Knowledge regarding human papilloma virus, human papilloma virus vaccination, cervical cancer screening and cervical cancer risk factors was good. Across the sample, a majority (90%) of the pupils demonstrated a high degree of knowledge about cervical cancer and its vaccination. There were no significant differences between ethnicity and the participants' overall knowledge of HPV infection, Pap smear and cervical cancer vaccination. Some 88% of participants answered that HPV vaccine can prevent cervical cancer, while 81.5% of medical students said they would recommend HPV vaccination to the public although fewer expressed an intention to receive vaccination for themselves. PMID:26320444

  14. Evaluation of an Array-Based Method for Human Papillomavirus Detection and Genotyping in Comparison with Conventional Methods Used in Cervical Cancer Screening▿

    PubMed Central

    García-Sierra, Nerea; Martró, Elisa; Castellà, Eva; Llatjós, Mariona; Tarrats, Antoni; Bascuñana, Elisabet; Díaz, Rosana; Carrasco, María; Sirera, Guillem; Matas, Lurdes; Ausina, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second-most prevalent cancer in young women around the world. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), especially high-risk HPV types (HR-HPV), is necessary for the development of this cancer. HPV-DNA detection is increasingly being used in cervical cancer screening programs, together with the Papanicolau smear test. We evaluated the usefulness of introducing this new array-based HPV genotyping method (i.e., Clinical Arrays Papillomavirus Humano) in the cervical cancer screening algorithm in our center. The results obtained using this method were compared to those obtained by the hybrid capture II high-risk HPV DNA test (HC-II) and Papanicolau in a selected group of 408 women. The array-based assay was performed in women that were HC-II positive or presented cytological alterations. Among 246 array-positive patients, 123 (50%) presented infection with ≥2 types, and HR-HPV types were detected in 206 (83.7%), mainly HPV-16 (24.0%). Up to 132 (33.2%) specimens were classified as ASCUS (for atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance), and only 48 (36.4%) of them were HPV-DNA positive by either assay; however, 78.7% of these cases were caused by HR-HPV types. The agreement between both HPV-DNA detection techniques was fairly good (n = 367). Screening with Papanicolau smear and HC-II tests, followed by HPV detection and genotyping, provided an optimal identification of women at risk for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, with the identification of specific genotypes, either in single or multiple infections, a better prediction of disease progression was achieved. The array method also made allowed us to determine the possible contribution of the available vaccines in our setting. PMID:19439534

  15. Evaluation of an array-based method for human papillomavirus detection and genotyping in comparison with conventional methods used in cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    García-Sierra, Nerea; Martró, Elisa; Castellà, Eva; Llatjós, Mariona; Tarrats, Antoni; Bascuñana, Elisabet; Díaz, Rosana; Carrasco, María; Sirera, Guillem; Matas, Lurdes; Ausina, Vicente

    2009-07-01

    Cervical cancer is the second-most prevalent cancer in young women around the world. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), especially high-risk HPV types (HR-HPV), is necessary for the development of this cancer. HPV-DNA detection is increasingly being used in cervical cancer screening programs, together with the Papanicolau smear test. We evaluated the usefulness of introducing this new array-based HPV genotyping method (i.e., Clinical Arrays Papillomavirus Humano) in the cervical cancer screening algorithm in our center. The results obtained using this method were compared to those obtained by the hybrid capture II high-risk HPV DNA test (HC-II) and Papanicolau in a selected group of 408 women. The array-based assay was performed in women that were HC-II positive or presented cytological alterations. Among 246 array-positive patients, 123 (50%) presented infection with >or=2 types, and HR-HPV types were detected in 206 (83.7%), mainly HPV-16 (24.0%). Up to 132 (33.2%) specimens were classified as ASCUS (for atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance), and only 48 (36.4%) of them were HPV-DNA positive by either assay; however, 78.7% of these cases were caused by HR-HPV types. The agreement between both HPV-DNA detection techniques was fairly good (n = 367). Screening with Papanicolau smear and HC-II tests, followed by HPV detection and genotyping, provided an optimal identification of women at risk for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, with the identification of specific genotypes, either in single or multiple infections, a better prediction of disease progression was achieved. The array method also made allowed us to determine the possible contribution of the available vaccines in our setting.

  16. Human papillomavirus multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification assay for the assessment of viral load, integration, and gain of telomerase-related genes in cervical malignancies.

    PubMed

    Theelen, Wendy; Litjens, Rogier J N T M; Vinokurova, Svetlana; Haesevoets, Annick; Reijans, Martin; Simons, Guus; Smedts, Frank; Herrington, C Simon; Ramaekers, Frans C S; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Hopman, Anton H N

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the reliability of a novel multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assay in detecting integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) based on the viral E2/E6 copy number ratio in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cervical lesions. The MLPA results were compared with those of amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts for RNA, detection of integrated papillomavirus sequences for DNA, and HPV fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). DNA was isolated from 41 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded HPV-positive cervical lesions (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 lesions, squamous cell carcinomas, and adenocarcinomas) for MLPA analysis. From 13 matching frozen samples, DNA and RNA were isolated for the detection of integrated papillomavirus sequences and/or the amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts, respectively. Integrated HPV16, HPV18, or both were identified. The MLPA assay detected viral integration in 12 of these 13 cases, and episomal copies also were detected in 7 cases. In 20 of the 24 cases with exclusive viral integration or episomal viral copies as detected by FISH, MLPA confirmed the physical status of the virus. In the cases classified as mixed by FISH, the presence of excess episomal copies complicated the recognition of viral integration by MLPA. Furthermore, the feasibility of detecting gain of the telomerase genes with the HPV MLPA assay was evaluated. The MLPA confirmed the FISH data in 12 of 13 cases in which the status of copy number gain for telomerase RNA component was known. In conclusion, the HPV MLPA assay can be performed on routinely processed cervical lesions for the detection of viral load and HPV integration.

  17. Role of papillomavirus oncogenes in human cervical cancer: Transgenic animal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Griep, A.E.; Lambert, P.F.

    1994-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses are believed to be etiologic agents for the majority of human cervical carcinoma, a common cancer that is a leading cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. In cervical carcinoma, a subset of papillomaviral genes, namely E6 and E7, are expressed. In vitro tissue culture studies indicate that HPV E6 and E7 are oncogenes, and that their oncogenicity is due in part to their capacity to inactivate cellular tumor suppressor genes. The behavior of E6 and E7 in vitro and the genetic evidence from analysis of human cancers suggest that the E6 and E7 genes play a significant role in the development of cervical cancer. This hypothesis is now being tested using animal models. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the oncogenicity of papillomavirus genes that has been generated through their study in transgenic mice. 82 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Antitumor potential of three herbal extracts against human oral squamous cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chu, Qing; Satoh, Kazue; Kanamoto, Taisei; Terakubo, Shigemi; Nakashima, Hideki; Wang, Qintao; Sakagami, Hiroshi

    2009-08-01

    Three Chinese herbal extracts of Drynaria baronii, Angelica sinensis and Cornus officinalis Sieb. et Zucc (referred to as DB, AS, CO, respectively) were investigated for their antitumor potential. These extracts showed very weak cytotoxicity against all nine cultured human cells (normal and tumor cells), but with some tumor-specific cytotoxicity displayed by DB and CO. These extracts showed little or no growth stimulation effects at lower concentrations (so-called 'hormetic effect'). Human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HSC-2, NA) were relatively resistant to committing apoptosis, as compared with human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells. Electron-spin resonance spectroscopy shows that DB and CO scavenged superoxide anion (generated by hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase reaction) and hydroxyl radical (generated by Fenton reaction) more efficiently than AS. DB and CO, but not AS, produced broad radical peak(s) and enhanced the superoxide scavenging activity of vitamin C. However, none of the extracts clearly enhanced the cytotoxicity of mitoxantrone, an anthracycline antitumor antibiotic. DB, but not CO and AS, showed weak anti-HIV activity. These data demonstrate several unique antitumor properties of DB. PMID:19661337

  19. Carvacrol suppresses proliferation and invasion in human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Sun, Changfu; Huang, Shaohui; Zhou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, as a novel antitumor agent, has been implicated in several types of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of carvacrol in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain unclear. Here, we report that carvacrol significantly inhibits tumor cell proliferation, metastasis and invasion, and induces apoptosis in OSCC. Our results demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of the effect of carvacrol in Tca-8113 induces G1/S cell cycle arrest through downregulation of CDK regulator CCND1 and CDK4, and upregulation of CDK inhibitor P21. Further analysis demonstrated that carvacrol also inhibited Tca-8113 cells’ clone formation in clonogenic cell survival assay. Student’s t-test (two-tailed) was used to compare differences between groups, and the significance level was P<0.01. Then, treatment of Tca-8113 cells with carvacrol resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2, Cox2, and upregulation of Bax. Carvacrol significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of human OSCC cells by blocking the phosphorylation of FAK and MMP-9 and MMP-2, transcription factor ZEB1, and β-catenin proteins’ expression. Taken together, these results provide novel insights into the mechanism of carvacrol and suggest potential therapeutic strategies for human OSCC. PMID:27143925

  20. Carvacrol suppresses proliferation and invasion in human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Sun, Changfu; Huang, Shaohui; Zhou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, as a novel antitumor agent, has been implicated in several types of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of carvacrol in human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remain unclear. Here, we report that carvacrol significantly inhibits tumor cell proliferation, metastasis and invasion, and induces apoptosis in OSCC. Our results demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms of the effect of carvacrol in Tca-8113 induces G1/S cell cycle arrest through downregulation of CDK regulator CCND1 and CDK4, and upregulation of CDK inhibitor P21. Further analysis demonstrated that carvacrol also inhibited Tca-8113 cells' clone formation in clonogenic cell survival assay. Student's t-test (two-tailed) was used to compare differences between groups, and the significance level was P<0.01. Then, treatment of Tca-8113 cells with carvacrol resulted in downregulation of Bcl-2, Cox2, and upregulation of Bax. Carvacrol significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of human OSCC cells by blocking the phosphorylation of FAK and MMP-9 and MMP-2, transcription factor ZEB1, and β-catenin proteins' expression. Taken together, these results provide novel insights into the mechanism of carvacrol and suggest potential therapeutic strategies for human OSCC. PMID:27143925

  1. Knowledge and acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Martha P; Dune, Tanaka; Shetty, Prasanna K; Shetty, Avinash K

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in India; however, participation in prevention and screening is low and the reasons for this are not well understood. In a cross-sectional survey in August 2008, 202 healthy women in Karnataka, India completed a questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Factors associated with vaccination and Papanicolau (Pap) smear screening acceptance were explored. Thirty-six percent of women had heard of HPV while 15% had heard of cervical cancer. Five percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, and 4% of women felt at risk of HPV infection. Forty-six percent of women were accepting of vaccination, but fewer (21%) were willing to have a Pap smear. Overall, knowledge related to HPV and cervical cancer topics was low. Women with negative attitudes toward HPV infection were 5.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-10) times more likely to accept vaccination but were not significantly more likely to accept Pap smear (odds ratio 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.0). Cost and a low level of perceived risk were the most frequent factors cited as potential barriers. Improving awareness of HPV and cervical cancer through health care providers in addition to increasing access to vaccination and screening through government-sponsored programs may be feasible and effective methods to reduce cervical cancer burden in India.

  2. Perceptions of Nigerian Women about Human Papilloma Virus, Cervical Cancer, and HPV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Akanbi, Olusola Anuoluwapo; Iyanda, Abiodun; Osundare, Folakemi; Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cervical cancer caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) though preventable has claimed the lives of many women worldwide. This study was embarked upon to evaluate the general knowledge and perceptions of Nigerian women on HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine. Methods. Structured questionnaires were administered to a cross section of 737 women randomly selected from the general population in two southwestern States of Nigeria. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 16. A P value >0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. One hundred and seventy-six (23.9%) of the respondents had knowledge of HPV; 474 (64.3%) are aware of cervical cancer but only 136 (18.5%) know that HPV causes cervical cancer. 200 (27.1%) are aware that there is an HPV vaccine while 300 (40.7%) had knowledge of Pap smear test. Two hundred and sixty (35.3%) of the respondents know that early detection of HPV can prevent cervical cancer and in spite of this, only 110 (14.9%) have taken the Pap smear test before while 151 (20.5%) are not willing to go for the test at all. Conclusions. There is therefore the need to create proper awareness on the HPV and its possible consequence of cervical carcinoma. PMID:26550522

  3. A comprehensive review on host genetic susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection and progression to cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Koushik

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. This is caused by oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Although large numbers of young sexually active women get HPV-infected, only a small fraction develop cervical cancer. This points to different co-factors for regression of HPV infection or progression to cervical cancer. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases such as cervical cancer and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. The aim of this review is to compile the advances in the field of host genetics of cervical cancer. MEDLINE database was searched using the terms, ‘HPV’, ‘cervical’, ‘CIN’, ‘polymorphism(s)’, ‘cervical’+ *the name of the gene* and ‘HPV’+ *the name of the gene*. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to cervical cancer in HPV infected individuals. PMID:22345983

  4. Perceptions of Nigerian Women about Human Papilloma Virus, Cervical Cancer, and HPV Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Akanbi, Olusola Anuoluwapo; Iyanda, Abiodun; Osundare, Folakemi; Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cervical cancer caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) though preventable has claimed the lives of many women worldwide. This study was embarked upon to evaluate the general knowledge and perceptions of Nigerian women on HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine. Methods. Structured questionnaires were administered to a cross section of 737 women randomly selected from the general population in two southwestern States of Nigeria. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 16. A P value >0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. One hundred and seventy-six (23.9%) of the respondents had knowledge of HPV; 474 (64.3%) are aware of cervical cancer but only 136 (18.5%) know that HPV causes cervical cancer. 200 (27.1%) are aware that there is an HPV vaccine while 300 (40.7%) had knowledge of Pap smear test. Two hundred and sixty (35.3%) of the respondents know that early detection of HPV can prevent cervical cancer and in spite of this, only 110 (14.9%) have taken the Pap smear test before while 151 (20.5%) are not willing to go for the test at all. Conclusions. There is therefore the need to create proper awareness on the HPV and its possible consequence of cervical carcinoma.

  5. Activation of miR-9 by human papillomavirus in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weijun; Gao, Ge; Hu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yuhui; Schwarz, Julie K; Chen, Jason J; Grigsby, Perry W; Wang, Xiaowei

    2014-11-30

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, leading to about 300,000 deaths each year. Most cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, persistent transcriptional activity of HPV oncogenes, which indicates active roles of HPV in cervical cancer maintenance and progression, has not been well characterized. Using our recently developed assays for comprehensive profiling of HPV E6/E7 transcripts, we have detected transcriptional activities of 10 high-risk HPV strains from 87 of the 101 cervical tumors included in the analysis. These HPV-positive patients had significantly better survival outcome compared with HPV-negative patients, indicating HPV transcriptional activity as a favorable prognostic marker for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we have determined microRNA (miRNA) expression changes that were correlated with tumor HPV status. Our profiling and functional analyses identified miR-9 as the most activated miRNA by HPV E6 in a p53-independent manner. Further target validation and functional studies showed that HPV-induced miR-9 activation led to significantly increased cell motility by downregulating multiple gene targets involved in cell migration. Thus, our work helps to understand the molecular mechanisms as well as identify potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancer and other HPV-induced cancers.

  6. To analyze the concomitant expression of human papillomavirus-16 in the pathogenetic model of p53-dependant pathway in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Ajit Singh; Gulati, Nikita; Shetty, Devi Charan; Jain, Anshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) accounts for 90% of all primary oral malignancies. Association between human papillomavirus (HPV) as a risk factor of cervical cancer is well known; there is a need to widen the knowledge for its role in oral cancer development. The viral E6 protein of HPV binds to p53 making it nonfunctional. Aims and Objective: To study mutated/wild type p53 expression using immunohistochemistry and detect HPV-16 presence using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in OSCC and correlating their expression. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining for p53 molecule in 24 sections of OSCC followed by DNA extraction of the cases using qiagen extraction kit and subsequent HPV-16 detection using PCR technique. Statistical Analysis: The data were analysed using SPSS software version 19. Results: Out of 24 cases of OSCC, twenty cases were positive for P 53 expression and four cases were negative for P 53 expression. Out of the four negative cases, one case was detected positive for HPV-16. Conclusion: HPV infection along with p53 expression helps in understanding its exact pathogenesis which further helps in expanding our spectrum of therapeutic modalities PMID:27721595

  7. Association between FOXM1 and hedgehog signaling pathway in human cervical carcinoma by tissue microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Wang, Jingjing; Yang, Hong; Chen, Dan; Li, Panpan

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) and hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway are implicated in the formation and development of human tumors, including cervical cancer. Previous studies have indicated that FOXM1 may be a downstream target gene of the Hh signaling pathway, but their association in cervical cancer is largely unknown. In the present study, the expression of FOXM1 and Hh signaling molecules was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis in a tissue microarray that contained 70 cervical cancer tissues and 10 normal cervical tissues. In addition, the association of these molecules with clinicopathological parameters, and the association between FOXM1 and various molecules involved in the Hh signaling pathway was investigated. The results indicated that FOXM1 and Hh signaling molecules were overexpressed in cervical cancer tissues. The protein expression levels of FOXM1, glioma-associated oncogene 1 (GLI1) and smoothened (SMO) correlated with the clinical stage of the tumors, while the protein expression levels of Sonic Hh (SHh), patched 1 (PTCH1) and GLI1 correlated with the pathological grade of the tumors. The expression levels of GLI1 were lower in tissues without lymph node metastasis than in tissues with lymph node metastasis. In addition, FOXM1 expression correlated with GLI1, SHh and PTCH1 expression in cancer tissues. These findings confirmed the participation of FOXM1 and the Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer. Furthermore, the finding that FOXM1 may be a downstream target gene of the Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer provides a potential novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for cervical cancer.

  8. Association between FOXM1 and hedgehog signaling pathway in human cervical carcinoma by tissue microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Wang, Jingjing; Yang, Hong; Chen, Dan; Li, Panpan

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) and hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway are implicated in the formation and development of human tumors, including cervical cancer. Previous studies have indicated that FOXM1 may be a downstream target gene of the Hh signaling pathway, but their association in cervical cancer is largely unknown. In the present study, the expression of FOXM1 and Hh signaling molecules was evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis in a tissue microarray that contained 70 cervical cancer tissues and 10 normal cervical tissues. In addition, the association of these molecules with clinicopathological parameters, and the association between FOXM1 and various molecules involved in the Hh signaling pathway was investigated. The results indicated that FOXM1 and Hh signaling molecules were overexpressed in cervical cancer tissues. The protein expression levels of FOXM1, glioma-associated oncogene 1 (GLI1) and smoothened (SMO) correlated with the clinical stage of the tumors, while the protein expression levels of Sonic Hh (SHh), patched 1 (PTCH1) and GLI1 correlated with the pathological grade of the tumors. The expression levels of GLI1 were lower in tissues without lymph node metastasis than in tissues with lymph node metastasis. In addition, FOXM1 expression correlated with GLI1, SHh and PTCH1 expression in cancer tissues. These findings confirmed the participation of FOXM1 and the Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer. Furthermore, the finding that FOXM1 may be a downstream target gene of the Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer provides a potential novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for cervical cancer. PMID:27698840

  9. Type-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus by cervical cytology among women in Brasov, Romania.

    PubMed

    Moga, Marius Alexandru; Irimie, Marius; Oanta, Alexandru; Pascu, Alina; Burtea, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The oncogenic role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in triggering cervical cancer, the second most common cancer in women worldwide, is well established. Romania ranks in first place in Europe in terms of the incidence of cervical cancer. Geographical widespread data on HPV type-distribution are essential for estimating the impact of HPV vaccines and cervical cancer screening programmes. In this study we aimed to identify the prevalence of HPV genotypes and to establish correlations with abnormal cervical cytology among the female population of Brasov County, Romania. A total of 1,000 women aged 17.3-57 years, attending routine cervical examination in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Brasov, Romania, and undergoing both cytological examination and HPV genotyping were screened. Infection with 35 different HPV genotypes was detected in 39.6% of cytological specimens. Overall HPV infections were highest in young women under 25 years (p<0.0001), in which cervical cytological abnormalities also reached the highest prevalence. Patients infected by HPV-16 or HPV-18 showed the highest prevalence of cervical cytological abnormalities. Some 48.2% of women with abnormal cytology were infected with high-risk HPV types whereas less than 3% of them were infected only with low-risk HPV types. Our study showed that the prevalence of high-risk HPV infection among Romanian women is higher compared to other studies in other geographic areas. Thus, we consider that in areas where there is an increased prevalence of high-risk HPV infections, HPV genotyping should be performed in all women aged between 18 and 45 years, and Pap test should be performed every 6 months in women with high-risk HPV infection, even those with previous normal cervical cytology.

  10. [Detection of human papillomavirus types 16, 18 and 33 in exfoliated cervical cells by polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Onoe, T; Chiba, T; Nakamura, T; Hayashi, Y; Hirose, M; Wakuda, K; Yamade, I; Yamamoto, Y; Ishiguro, T

    1991-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16, 18 and 33 were identified by means of the polymerase chain reaction using exfoliated cells from the uterine cervix in 361 patients. Of 261 patients without cervical lesions, 10(3.8%) patients had HPV DNA whereas 7(70.0%) of 10 patients with invasive cervical carcinomas had HPV DNA. The younger patients' group (29 year-old or less) without cervical lesions had a 6.5% HPV positive rate which was distinctly higher than the older patients' groups. No menopausal patient without cervical lesions had HPV DNA. In the cervical dysplasia group, the HPV DNA positive rate tended to be higher in the older patients. Type 16 was detected more often than types 18 or 33. However, the detectable incidence of type 16 in the follow up group was lower than in the cervical carcinoma groups. The younger patients without cervical lesions had a higher incidence of type 16 than the older patients. The younger patients with cervical neoplastic lesions had a lower incidence of type 16 than the older patients. These results suggest that type 16 has a higher frequency of cervical HPV infections than types 18 and 33. In addition, human papillomavirus is not the only causative factor in cervical carcinomas. PMID:1660508

  11. Productive Lifecycle of Human Papillomaviruses that Depends Upon Squamous Epithelial Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kajitani, Naoko; Satsuka, Ayano; Kawate, Akifumi; Sakai, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) target the stratified epidermis, and can causes diseases ranging from benign condylomas to malignant tumors. Infections of HPVs in the genital tract are among the most common sexually transmitted diseases, and a major risk factor for cervical cancer. The virus targets epithelial cells in the basal layer of the epithelium, while progeny virions egress from terminally differentiated cells in the cornified layer, the surface layer of the epithelium. In infected basal cells, the virus maintains its genomic DNA at low-copy numbers, at which the viral productive lifecycle cannot proceed. Progression of the productive lifecycle requires differentiation of the host cell, indicating that there is tight crosstalk between viral replication and host differentiation programs. In this review, we discuss the regulation of the HPV lifecycle controlled by the differentiation program of the host cells. PMID:22536200

  12. Endothelin receptor blockade inhibits the growth of human papillomavirus-associated cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Venuti, Aldo; Salani, Debora; Cirilli, Alessia; Simeone, Paola; Muller, Antonio; Flamini, Silvio; Padley, Robert; Bagnato, Anna

    2002-08-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with cervical cancer and interact with growth factors that may enhance malignant transformation of cervical carcinoma cells. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is released from HPV-transfected keratinocytes and induces increased growth response in these cell lines in comparison with normal cells. HPV-positive cancer cells secrete ET-1 and express mRNA for ET-1 and its receptors, whereas HPV-negative carcinoma cell lines express only the ET(B) receptor (ET(B)R) mRNA and do not secrete ET-1. In HPV-positive cancer cells, ET(A)R mediates the ET-1-induced mitogenic effect and sustains the basal growth rate of unstimulated cervical tumour cells. Therefore, ET-1 may be involved in the neoplastic growth of HPV-associated cervical carcinoma, where the increased ET-1 autocrine loop can be targeted for antitumour therapy. In the present work, the action of specific antagonists of ET(A)R (BQ-123 and ABT-627), was analysed in CaSki and C33A cells that are derived from human cervical carcinoma. CaSki cells are HPV-16-positive, produce ET-1 and possess ET(A)R and ET(B)R, whereas the C33A line is HPV-negative, does not secrete ET-1 and has no ET(A)R. In HPV-positive cancer cells ABT-627 strongly inhibited the proliferation induced by ET-1 and substantially reduced the basal growth rate of unstimulated cervical tumour cells, whereas the ET(B)R antagonist had no effect. These results demonstrate that ET-1 participates in the progression of neoplastic growth in HPV-associated carcinoma, in which ET(A)R expression is increased and could be targeted for antitumour therapy. In conclusion, an ET-1 autocrine loop is involved in tumour cell proliferation via ET(A)R, and ABT-627 is effective in controlling proliferation of cervical carcinoma cells.

  13. Acquired immune response to oncogenic human papillomavirus associated with prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H

    2008-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common infection among women and a necessary cause of cervical cancer. Oncogenic HPV types infecting the anogenital tract have the potential to induce natural immunity, but at present we do not clearly understand the natural history of infection in humans and the mechanisms by which the virus can evade the host immune response. Natural acquired immune responses against HPV may be involved in the clearance of infection, but persistent infection with oncogenic virus types leads to the development of precancerous lesions and cancer. B cell responses are important for viral neutralization, but antibody responses in patients with cervical cancer are poor. Prophylactic vaccines targeting oncogenic virus types associated with cervical cancer have the potential to prevent up to 80% of cervical cancers by targeting HPV types 16 and 18. Clinical data show that prophylactic vaccines are effective in inducing antibody responses and in preventing persistent infection with HPV, as well as the subsequent development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. This article reviews the known data regarding natural immune responses to HPV and those developed by prophylactic vaccination.

  14. Knockdown of Pentraxin 3 suppresses tumorigenicity and metastasis of human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Chiou, Hui-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chu-Liang; Hung, Chia-Hung; Tsai, Jen-Pi; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) as an inflammatory molecule has been shown to be involved in immune response, inflammation, and cancer. However, the effects of PTX3 on the biological features of cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo have not been delineated. Immunohistochemical staining showed that increased PTX3 expression was significantly associated with tumor grade (P < 0.011) and differentiation (P < 0.019). Knocking down PTX3 with lentivirus-mediated small hairpin RNA (shRNA) in cervical cancer cell lines resulted in inhibited cell viability, diminished colony-forming ability, and induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, along with downregulated expression of cyclin B1, cdc2, and cdc25c, and upregulated expression of p-cdc2, p-cdc25c, p21, and p27. Furthermore, knockdown of PTX3 significantly decreased the potential of migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells by inhibiting matrix metalloproteidase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Moreover, in vivo functional studies showed PTX3-knockdown in mice suppressed tumorigenicity and lung metastatic potential. Conversely, overexpression of PTX3 enhanced proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PTX3 contributes to tumorigenesis and metastasis of human cervical cancer cells. Further studies are warranted to demonstrate PTX3 as a novel therapeutic biomarker for human cervical cancer. PMID:27377307

  15. Knockdown of Pentraxin 3 suppresses tumorigenicity and metastasis of human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Chiou, Hui-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chu-Liang; Hung, Chia-Hung; Tsai, Jen-Pi; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) as an inflammatory molecule has been shown to be involved in immune response, inflammation, and cancer. However, the effects of PTX3 on the biological features of cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo have not been delineated. Immunohistochemical staining showed that increased PTX3 expression was significantly associated with tumor grade (P < 0.011) and differentiation (P < 0.019). Knocking down PTX3 with lentivirus-mediated small hairpin RNA (shRNA) in cervical cancer cell lines resulted in inhibited cell viability, diminished colony-forming ability, and induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, along with downregulated expression of cyclin B1, cdc2, and cdc25c, and upregulated expression of p-cdc2, p-cdc25c, p21, and p27. Furthermore, knockdown of PTX3 significantly decreased the potential of migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells by inhibiting matrix metalloproteidase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Moreover, in vivo functional studies showed PTX3-knockdown in mice suppressed tumorigenicity and lung metastatic potential. Conversely, overexpression of PTX3 enhanced proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PTX3 contributes to tumorigenesis and metastasis of human cervical cancer cells. Further studies are warranted to demonstrate PTX3 as a novel therapeutic biomarker for human cervical cancer.

  16. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  17. Screening for squamous cervical cancer: duration of low risk after negative results of cervical cytology and its implication for screening policies. IARC Working Group on evaluation of cervical cancer screening programmes.

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A collaborative study of screening programmes in eight countries was performed to estimate the risks of cervical cancer associated with different screening policies. Most of the data came from centrally organised screening programmes. Relative protection was higher in women who had had two or more negative results of screening tests than in those who had had only one negative smear, particularly in the first five years after the last test. There was little difference in the protection afforded by screening every year compared with every three years, but screening only once every five or 10 years offered appreciably less protection. The age of the women did not affect the sensitivity of the test or the sojourn time of the disease (the length of the detectable preclinical phase during which abnormal cytology could be picked up if a smear were taken); invasive cancer in women under 25 was rare. Centrally organised screening programmes were more effective than uncoordinated screening. Screening programmes should be aimed principally at women aged 35-60 but should start some years before the age of 35, and the intervals between screening should be three years or less. PMID:3092971

  18. Loss of Dependence on Continued Expression of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Oncogene in Cervical Cancers and Precancerous Lesions Arising in Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soyeong; Park, Jung Wook; Pitot, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defects in DNA damage repair. FA patients often develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause cancer, including the cervix. However, SCCs found in human FA patients are often HPV negative, even though the majority of female FA patients with anogenital cancers had preexisting HPV-positive dysplasia. We hypothesize that HPVs contribute to the development of SCCs in FA patients but that the continued expression of HPV oncogenes is not required for the maintenance of the cancer state because FA deficiency leads to an accumulation of mutations in cellular genes that render the cancer no longer dependent upon viral oncogenes. We tested this hypothesis, making use of Bi-L E7 transgenic mice in which we temporally controlled expression of HPV16 E7, the dominant viral oncogene in HPV-associated cancers. As seen before, the persistence of cervical neoplastic disease was highly dependent upon the continued expression of HPV16 E7 in FA-sufficient mice. However, in mice with FA deficiency, cervical cancers persisted in a large fraction of the mice after HPV16 E7 expression was turned off, indicating that these cancers had escaped from their dependency on E7. Furthermore, the severity of precancerous lesions also failed to be reduced significantly in the mice with FA deficiency upon turning off expression of E7. These findings confirm our hypothesis and may explain the fact that, while FA patients have a high frequency of infections by HPVs and HPV-induced precancerous lesions, the cancers are frequently HPV negative. Importance   Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are at high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) frequently cause cancer. Yet these SCCs are often HPV negative. FA patients have a genetic defect in their capacity to repair damaged DNA. HPV oncogenes cause an

  19. Loss of Dependence on Continued Expression of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Oncogene in Cervical Cancers and Precancerous Lesions Arising in Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyeong; Park, Jung Wook; Pitot, Henry C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defects in DNA damage repair. FA patients often develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause cancer, including the cervix. However, SCCs found in human FA patients are often HPV negative, even though the majority of female FA patients with anogenital cancers had preexisting HPV-positive dysplasia. We hypothesize that HPVs contribute to the development of SCCs in FA patients but that the continued expression of HPV oncogenes is not required for the maintenance of the cancer state because FA deficiency leads to an accumulation of mutations in cellular genes that render the cancer no longer dependent upon viral oncogenes. We tested this hypothesis, making use of Bi-L E7 transgenic mice in which we temporally controlled expression of HPV16 E7, the dominant viral oncogene in HPV-associated cancers. As seen before, the persistence of cervical neoplastic disease was highly dependent upon the continued expression of HPV16 E7 in FA-sufficient mice. However, in mice with FA deficiency, cervical cancers persisted in a large fraction of the mice after HPV16 E7 expression was turned off, indicating that these cancers had escaped from their dependency on E7. Furthermore, the severity of precancerous lesions also failed to be reduced significantly in the mice with FA deficiency upon turning off expression of E7. These findings confirm our hypothesis and may explain the fact that, while FA patients have a high frequency of infections by HPVs and HPV-induced precancerous lesions, the cancers are frequently HPV negative. IMPORTANCE  : Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are at high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) frequently cause cancer. Yet these SCCs are often HPV negative. FA patients have a genetic defect in their capacity to repair damaged DNA. HPV oncogenes cause an accumulation of DNA

  20. Comparison of the prevalence and distribution of human papillomavirus infection and cervical lesions between urban and native habitants of an Amazonian region of Peru.

    PubMed

    Martorell, M; Garcia-Garcia, J A; Gomez-Cabrero, D; Del Aguila, A

    2012-01-01

    We made a study of the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervix lesions in an Amazonian Bora native population (Bn) and compared it with the prevalence in an urban population in Iquitos (Iq). We also examined the distribution of HPV types among abnormal cervical smears in the Iq population. Swabs and cytologies were collected from 472 females. DNA consensus PCR, followed by direct sequencing, were used to determinate the HPV types in the swabs. Cytologies were classified based on the lesion grade. HPV prevalence was 43.9% in Iq and 35.4% in Bn. Cervix lesion prevalence was 20.0% in Iq and 0.3% in Bn. The frequency of high-risk HPV types among HPV+ females was 71.9% in Iq and 56.3% in Bn. The frequencies of low-risk and undetermined risk HPV types were 19.3/6.3% (Iq/ Bn) and 12.3/37.5% (Iq/Bn), respectively. In lesIq (women seeking cytological services with a previous cervix lesion diagnosis) the prevalence of HPV, was 72.9%. The incidence of carcinoma and high-grade squamous intraepithelial cervix lesions in lesIq were 31.2 and 18.8%, respectively. The Bn population had a lower incidence of high-risk HPV and cervix lesions. The high-risk strain HPV16 was significantly more frequent in Iq compared with Bn. lesIq high-risk HPVs were more frequent in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and carcinoma. High-risk HPV16 prevalence was significantly higher than the prevalence of the other high-risk HPVs, especially in the high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and carcinoma. PMID:22911594

  1. Primary human cervical carcinoma cells require human papillomavirus E6 and E7 expression for ongoing proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Almstead, Laura L.; Bellone, Stefania; Prevatt, Edward G.; Santin, Alessandro D.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2012-01-05

    Repression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in established cervical carcinoma cell lines causes senescence due to reactivation of cellular tumor suppressor pathways. Here, we determined whether ongoing expression of HPV16 or HPV18 oncogenes is required for the proliferation of primary human cervical carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions at low passage number after isolation from patients. We used an SV40 viral vector expressing the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein to repress E6 and E7 in these cells. To enable efficient SV40 infection and E2 gene delivery, we first incubated the primary cervical cancer cells with the ganglioside GM1, a cell-surface receptor for SV40 that is limiting in these cells. Repression of HPV in primary cervical carcinoma cells caused them to undergo senescence, but the E2 protein had little effect on HPV-negative primary cells. These data suggest that E6 and E7 dependence is an inherent property of human cervical cancer cells.

  2. Differential effects of human papillomavirus type 6, 16, and 18 DNAs on immortalization and transformation of human cervical epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, G.; Morgan, D.; Defendi, V. )

    1989-01-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with specific benign and malignant lesions of the skin and mucosal epithelia. Cloned viral DNAs from HPV types 6b, 16, and 18 associated with different pathological manifestations of genital neoplasia in vivo were introduced into primary human cervical epithelial cells by electroporation. Cells transfected with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA acquired indefinite lifespans, distinct morphological alterations, and anchorage-independent growth (HPV18), and contain integrated transcriptionally active viral genomes. HPV6b or plasmid electroporated cells senesced at low passage. The alterations in growth and differentiation of the cells appear to reflect the progressive oncogenic processes that result in cervical carcinoma in vivo.

  3. Prolactin and prolactin receptor expression in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ascencio-Cedillo, Rafael; López-Pulido, Edgar Ivan; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Del Toro-Arreola, Susana; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Franco-Topete, Ramón; Pérez-Montiel, Delia; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura

    2015-04-01

    Prolactin receptor (PRLR) overexpression could play a role in tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to determine prolactin (PRL) and PRLR expression in biopsies from patients with precursor lesions and uterine cervical cancer. PRLR expression was analyzed in 63 paraffin-embedded biopsies of uterine cervical tissue. In total, eleven low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 23 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), 21 uterine cervical cancers (UCC) and 8 normal epithelium (NE) were examined using immunoperoxidase staining and Western blot analysis. Additionally, PRL expression was identified in human cervical cancer serum and tissues. The PRLR expression was found to be significantly increased in cervical cancer in comparison with normal tissue and precursor lesions (P < 0.0003). The presence of the long isoform of the PRLR was observed only in cervical cancer tissues. Serum PRL levels were normal in all samples and local prolactin expression was similar in precursor lesions and cervical cancer by Western blot analysis. Our data suggest a possible role for PRLR in the progression of cervical cancer.

  4. The relationship between p16 expression and high-risk human papillomavirus infection in squamous cell carcinomas from sites other than uterine cervix: a study of 137 cases.

    PubMed

    Doxtader, Erika E; Katzenstein, Anna-Luise A

    2012-03-01

    p16 is known to be an excellent surrogate marker of human papillomavirus infection in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Recent studies have demonstrated a link between human papillomavirus infection and a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, especially from the oropharynx. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence of p16 expression in squamous cell carcinomas of noncervical origin and to assess its utility as a surrogate marker of human papillomavirus infection in various noncervical primary sites. One hundred thirty-seven squamous cell carcinomas from 5 primary sites, including 34 from the oropharynx (tonsil and base of tongue), 43 cases from nonoropharyngeal head and neck sites, and 20 cases each from the lung, esophagus, and skin, were retrieved from our surgical pathology archives. Immunohistochemistry for p16 was performed on each case. All p16-positive cases and 21 p16-negative cases were further tested for both high-risk and low-risk human papillomavirus by in situ hybridization. p16 expression was detected in 54 cases overall, including 25 (74%) of 34 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas, 8 (19%) of 43 nonoropharyngeal head and neck squamous cell carcinomas including 3 of 4 from the sinonasal cavity, 6 (30%) of 20 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, 7 (35%) of 20 lung squamous cell carcinomas, and 8 (40%) of 20 skin squamous cell carcinomas. Of the 54 p16-positive cases, 30 were positive for high-risk human papillomavirus, including 24 (96%) of 25 from the oropharynx, 5 (63%) of 8 from nonoropharyngeal head and neck sites, and 1 (17%) of 6 from the esophagus. All 7 lung and 8 skin cases tested were negative. All p16-positive cases were negative for low-risk human papillomavirus. In selected head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, mainly from the oropharynx and sinonasal cavity, p16 positivity correlates well with high-risk human papillomavirus infection. p16 is not a reliable indicator of high-risk human papillomavirus

  5. Human Papillomavirus Genotype-Specific Prevalence Across the Continuum of Cervical Neoplasia and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Joste, Nancy E.; Ronnett, Brigitte M.; Hunt, William C.; Pearse, Amanda; Langsfeld, Erika; Leete, Thomas; Jaramillo, MaryAnn; Stoler, Mark H.; Castle, Philip E.; Wheeler, Cosette M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The New Mexico HPV Pap Registry was established to measure the impact of cervical cancer prevention strategies in the United States. Prior to widespread HPV vaccine implementation, we established the baseline prevalence for a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes across the continuum of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cancer. Methods A population-based sample of 6,272 tissue specimens were tested for 37 HPV genotypes. The number of specimens tested within each diagnostic category was: 541 negative, 1,411 CIN grade 1 (CIN1), 2,226 CIN grade 2 (CIN2), and 2,094 CIN grade 3 (CIN3) or greater. Age-specific HPV prevalence was estimated within categories for HPV genotypes targeted by HPV vaccines. Results The combined prevalence of HPV genotypes included in the quadrivalent and nonavalent vaccines increased from 15.3% and 29.3% in CIN1 to 58.4% and 83.7% in CIN3, respectively. The prevalence of HPV types included in both vaccines tended to decrease with increasing age for CIN1, CIN2, CIN3, and squamous cell carcinoma, most notably for CIN3 and SCC. The six most common HPV types in descending order of prevalence were HPV-16, −31, −52, −58, −33, and −39 for CIN3 and HPV-16, −18, −31, −45, −52, and −33 for invasive cancers. Conclusions Health economic modeling of HPV vaccine impact should consider age-specific differences in HPV prevalence. Impact Population-based HPV prevalence in CIN is not well described but is requisite for longitudinal assessment of vaccine impact and to understand the effectiveness and performance of various cervical screening strategies in vaccinated and unvaccinated women. PMID:25363635

  6. Gallic acid reduces cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, BING; HU, MENGCAI

    2013-01-01

    Gallic acid is a trihydroxybenzoic acid, also known as 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, which is present in plants worldwide, including Chinese medicinal herbs. Gallic acid has been shown to have cytotoxic effects in certain cancer cells, without damaging normal cells. The objective of the present study was to determine whether gallic acid is able to inhibit human cervical cancer cell viability, proliferation and invasion and suppress cervical cancer cell-mediated angiogenesis. Treatment of HeLa and HTB-35 human cancer cells with gallic acid decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. BrdU proliferation and tube formation assays indicated that gallic acid significantly decreased human cervical cancer cell proliferation and tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, respectively. Additionally, gallic acid decreased HeLa and HTB-35 cell invasion in vitro. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression of ADAM17, EGFR, p-Akt and p-Erk was suppressed by gallic acid in the HeLa and HTB-35 cell lines. These data indicate that the suppression of ADAM17 and the downregulation of the EGFR, Akt/p-Akt and Erk/p-Erk signaling pathways may contribute to the suppression of cancer progression by Gallic acid. Gallic acid may be a valuable candidate for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:24843386

  7. Evaluation of Human Papilloma Virus Communicative Education Strategies: A Pilot Screening Study for Cervical Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera-Clavijo, Lizeth K.; Wiesner-Ceballos, Carolina; Rincón-Martínez, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) is highly prevalent in sexually active men and women; HR-HPV has been classified as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and as a necessary, but not sufficient, causal agent for cervical cancer. Women who test positive for HPV often experience serious psychosocial consequences such as fear,…

  8. The state of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes in human cervical carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffner, M.; Muenger, K.; Byrne, J.C.; Howley, P.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Human cervical carcinoma cell lines that were either positive or negative for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences were analyzed for evidence of mutation of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes. Each of five HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines expressed normal pRB and low levels of wild-type p53 proteins, which are presumed to be altered in function as a consequence of association with HPV E7 and E6 oncoproteins, respectively. In contrast, mutations were identified in the p53 and RB genes expressed in the C-33A and HT-3 cervical cancer cell lines, which lack HPV DNA sequences. Mutations in the p53 genes mapped to codon 273 and codon 245 in the C33-A and HT-3 cell lines, respectively, located in the highly conserved regions of p53, where mutations appear in a variety of human cancers. Mutations in RB occurred at splice junctions, resulting in in-frame deletions, affecting exons 13 and 20 in the HT-3 and C-33A cell lines, respectively. These mutations resulted in aberrant proteins that were not phosphorylated and were unable to complex with the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein. These results support the hypothesis that the inactivation of the normal functions of the tumor-suppressor proteins pRB and p53 are important steps in human cervical carcinogenesis, either by mutation or from complex formation with the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins.

  9. NR2F6 Expression Correlates with Pelvic Lymph Node Metastasis and Poor Prognosis in Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chunhao; Sun, Xiaoying; Zhang, Weijing; Li, Han; Xu, Liqun; Li, Jun; Xu, Benke; Zhang, Yanna

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an abnormal expression of nuclear receptor subfamily 2 group F member 6 (NR2F6) in human cancers such as breast cancer, colon cancer, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, its clinical significance in cervical cancer has not been established. We explored NR2F6 expression and its clinicopathological significance in early-stage cervical cancer. Methods: NR2F6 expression in cervical cancer cell lines and cervical cancer tissues was determined by Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunochemistry (IHC). NR2F6 expression in 189 human early-stage cervical cancer tissue samples was evaluated using IHC. The relevance between NR2F6 expression and early-stage cervical cancer prognosis and clinicopathological features was determined. Results: There was marked NR2F6 mRNA and protein overexpression in the cervical cancer cells and clinical tissues compared with an immortalized squamous cell line and adjacent noncancerous cervical tissues, respectively. In the 189 cervical cancer samples, NR2F6 expression was positively related to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (p = 0.006), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (p = 0.006), vital status (p < 0.001), tumor recurrence (p = 0.001), chemotherapy (p = 0.039), and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001). Overall and disease-free survival was shorter in patients with early-stage cervical cancer and higher NR2F6 levels than in patients with lower levels of NR2F6. Univariate and multivariate analysis determined that NR2F6 was an independent prognostic factor of survival in early-stage cervical cancer. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings suggest that high NR2F6 expression predicts pelvic lymph node metastasis, tumor recurrence and poor prognosis in early-stage cervical cancer. NR2F6 might be a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cervical cancer. PMID:27775588

  10. Characterization of human cervical remodeling throughout pregnancy using in vivo Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Vargis, Elizabeth; Slaughter, Chris; Rudin, Amy P.; Herington, Jennifer L.; Bennett, Kelly A.; Reese, Jeff; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-02-01

    Globally, fifteen million babies are born preterm each year, affecting 1 in 8 pregnancies in the US alone. Cervical remodeling includes a biochemical cascade of changes that ultimately result in the thinning and dilation of the cervix for passage of a fetus. This process is poorly understood and is the focus of this study. Our group is utilizing Raman spectroscopy to evaluate biochemical changes occurring in the human cervix throughout pregnancy. This technique has high molecular specificity and can be performed in vivo, with the potential to unveil new molecular dynamics essential for cervical remodeling.

  11. miRNAs in human papilloma virus associated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Carolina; Calvopiña, Diego; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2014-11-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer in the world with 600,000 new cases diagnosed annually. Tobacco and alcohol use have been associated as the principal etiological factors of this pathogenesis. The incidence of smoking-associated HNSCC has declined, while human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated HNSCC is on the rise. There are currently no clinically validated biomarkers to detect this cancer at an early stage (cancers independent of HPV status). It is well-established that the aberrant expression of miRNAs can lead to tumorigenesis. miRNA expression differences have also been demonstrated in HPV-positive and HPV-negative HNSCC tumor tissues as well as in body fluids. Therefore, miRNAs have the potential to provide an unprecedented insight into the pathogenesis of HNSCC and serve as potential biomarkers. This review addresses HNSCC disease burden and the regulation of miRNA by HPV viral oncoproteins, potential miRNA biomarkers and future perspectives. miRNA provides an unique opportunity to fulfill the current clinical challenge in HNSCC patient management by enabling early detection followed by targeted interventions, leading to a significant reduction in mortality and morbidity.

  12. Antitumoral Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa on Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Malacrida, Alessio; Maggioni, Daniele; Cassetti, Arianna; Nicolini, Gabriella; Cavaletti, Guido; Miloso, Mariarosaria

    2016-10-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite therapeutic improvements, some cancers are still untreatable. Recently there has been an increasing interest in the use of natural substances for cancer prevention and treatment. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) is a plant, belonging to Malvaceae family, widespread in South Asia and Central Africa. HS extract (HSE) used in folk medicine, gained researchers' interest thanks to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties. In the present study, we initially assessed HSE effect on a panel of human tumor cell lines. Then we focused our study on the following that are most sensitive to HSE action cell lines: Multiple Myeloma (MM) cells (RPMI 8226) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC-25). In both RPMI 8226 and SCC-25 cells, HSE impaired cell growth, exerted a reversible cytostatic effect, and reduced cell motility and invasiveness. We evaluated the involvement of MAPKs ERK1/2 and p38 in HSE effects by using specific inhibitors, U0126 and SB203580, respectively. For both SCC-25 and RPMI 8226, HSE cytostatic effect depends on p38 activation, whereas ERK1/2 modulation is crucial for cell motility and invasiveness. Our results suggest that HSE may be a potential therapeutic agent against MM and OSCC.

  13. Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry for rapid recognition of human lung squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yiping; Chen, Liru; Zhou, Wei; Chingin, Konstantin; Ouyang, Yongzhong; Zhu, Tenggao; Wen, Hua; Ding, Jianhua; Xu, Jianjun; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    Tissue spray ionization mass spectrometry (TSI-MS) directly on small tissue samples has been shown to provide highly specific molecular information. In this study, we apply this method to the analysis of 38 pairs of human lung squamous cell carcinoma tissue (cancer) and adjacent normal lung tissue (normal). The main components of pulmonary surfactants, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC, m/z 757.47), phosphatidylcholine (POPC, m/z 782.52), oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC, m/z 808.49), and arachidonic acid stearoyl phosphatidylcholine (SAPC, m/z 832.43), were identified using high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Monte Carlo sampling partial least squares linear discriminant analysis (PLS-LDA) was used to distinguish full-mass-range mass spectra of cancer samples from the mass spectra of normal tissues. With 5 principal components and 30 – 40 Monte Carlo samplings, the accuracy of cancer identification in matched tissue samples reached 94.42%. Classification of a tissue sample required less than 1 min, which is much faster than the analysis of frozen sections. The rapid, in situ diagnosis with minimal sample consumption provided by TSI-MS is advantageous for surgeons. TSI-MS allows them to make more informed decisions during surgery. PMID:25961911

  14. Two Cases of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Arising in Immunosuppressed Patients with Chronic Human Papillomavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Kuma, Yuki; Ito, Takamichi; Nagae, Konosuke; Mizote, Yukihiro; Nakahara, Takeshi; Uchi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yuichi; Okura, Masae; Oda, Yoshinao; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Furue, Masutaka

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are linked to a large subset of numerous malignant tumors, including mucosal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); however, its involvement in cutaneous SCC has not fully been elucidated. Cutaneous SCC is the second most common type of skin cancer and is increasing in frequency every year. Since we have no satisfactory treatment for advanced SCC, it is important to provide a definitive diagnosis and appropriate therapeutic intervention at an early stage. Here, we present two cases of SCC arising in immunosuppressed patients. In these cases, we suspected the association between SCC and HPV infection histopathologically and succeeded in proving the presence of high-risk type HPV by PCR analysis (HPV 14 in case 1 and HPV 23 and 38 in case 2). Although it is unclear whether HPV actually induced SCC in our cases, our cases showed rapid progression comparing to typical courses of actinic keratosis (AK)/SCC. SCC and AK are common diseases; in daily practice, dermatologists examine many patients with immunosuppression of various causes. We should apply increased oncological vigilance to these patients to prevent an aggressive course of SCC/AK. PMID:26351427

  15. Antitumoral Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa on Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Multiple Myeloma Cells.

    PubMed

    Malacrida, Alessio; Maggioni, Daniele; Cassetti, Arianna; Nicolini, Gabriella; Cavaletti, Guido; Miloso, Mariarosaria

    2016-10-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Despite therapeutic improvements, some cancers are still untreatable. Recently there has been an increasing interest in the use of natural substances for cancer prevention and treatment. Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) is a plant, belonging to Malvaceae family, widespread in South Asia and Central Africa. HS extract (HSE) used in folk medicine, gained researchers' interest thanks to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties. In the present study, we initially assessed HSE effect on a panel of human tumor cell lines. Then we focused our study on the following that are most sensitive to HSE action cell lines: Multiple Myeloma (MM) cells (RPMI 8226) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) cells (SCC-25). In both RPMI 8226 and SCC-25 cells, HSE impaired cell growth, exerted a reversible cytostatic effect, and reduced cell motility and invasiveness. We evaluated the involvement of MAPKs ERK1/2 and p38 in HSE effects by using specific inhibitors, U0126 and SB203580, respectively. For both SCC-25 and RPMI 8226, HSE cytostatic effect depends on p38 activation, whereas ERK1/2 modulation is crucial for cell motility and invasiveness. Our results suggest that HSE may be a potential therapeutic agent against MM and OSCC. PMID:27618152

  16. Lycopene inhibits the cell proliferation and invasion of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Min; Wu, Qundan; Zhang, Min; Huang, Jinbei

    2016-01-01

    Lycopene has been shown to be associated with anticancer effects in numerous tumor types. However, the underlying mechanisms of lycopene in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remain to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of lycopene overload and the cytotoxic effects of lycopene on HNSCC cells, and to determine the possible mechanisms involved. Treatment with lycopene at a dose of >10 µM for >24 h inhibited the growth of FaDu and Cal27 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The clearest increase in growth inhibition was due to the apoptotic population being significantly increased. The invasion abilities decreased with 25 µM lycopene exerting significant inhibitory effects (P<0.01). Mechanistic studies revealed that lycopene induced the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein, B-cell lymphoma-associated X protein, and therefore, resulted in the inhibition of the protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. These data provided insights into the antitumor activity of lycopene in HNSCC cells. PMID:27510325

  17. p53 mutations and human papillomavirus DNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma: correlation with apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Koh, J. Y.; Cho, N. P.; Kong, G.; Lee, J. D.; Yoon, K.

    1998-01-01

    Forty-two oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were analysed for p53 mutations and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to examine the prevalency of these factors and correlation with apoptotic index (AI; number of apoptotic cells per 100 tumour cells) of the tumour tissue. In polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-Southern blot analysis, HPV DNAs were detected from 22 out of 42 SCCs (52%) with predominance of HPV-16 (68%). p53 mutations in exons 5-8, screened by nested PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis, were observed in 16 of 42 tumours (38%). The state of the p53 gene did not show any correlation with HPV infection. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labelling (TUNEL) method was used for detection of apoptotic cells. The mean AI was 2.35, ranging from 0.31 to 6.63. SCCs associated with p53 mutation had significantly lower AI than those without p53 mutation (P < 0.01), whereas no difference in AI was found between SCCs with and without HPV infection. The results of this study confirmed that HPV infection and/or p53 mutations are implicated, but are not mutually exclusive events, in carcinogenesis of oral SCC and also showed that decrease in apoptosis is more closely related to p53 mutation than HPV infection. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9703282

  18. Retinoid-mediated transcriptional regulaton of keratin genes in human epidermal and squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stellmach, V.; Leask, A.; Fuchs, E. )

    1991-06-01

    Vitamin A and other retinoids profoundly inhibit morphological and biochemical heatures of epidermal differentiation in vivo and in vitro. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the differential expression of epidermal keratins and their regulation by retinoids, the authors retinoid-mediated changes in total protein expression, protein synthesis, mRNA expression, and transcription in cultured human keratinocytes and in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC-13) cells of epidermal origin. The studies revealed that the epidermal keratins, K5, K6, K14, and K16, their mRNAs, and their transcripts were diminished relative to actin as a consequence of retinoic acid (RA) treatment. The effects were most pronounced in SCC-13 and were detected as early as 6 hr post-RA treatment, with enhancement over an additional 24-48 hr. Repression was also observed when 5{prime} upstream sequences of K14 or K5 genes were used to drive expression of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene in SCC-13 keratinocytes. Both cell types were found to express mRNAs for the RA receptors {alpha} and {gamma}, which may be involved in the RA-mediated transcriptional changes in these cells. The rapid transcriptional changes in epidermal keratin genes were in striking contrast to the previously reported slow transcriptional changes in simple epithelial keratin genes.

  19. Human papillomavirus in anal squamous cell carcinoma: an angel rather than a devil?

    PubMed

    Ravenda, Paola Simona; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Nicola; Barberis, Massimo; Bottiglieri, Luca; Chiocca, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancer is a rare disease with an increasing incidence worldwide but, unfortunately, even today the scientific community still has a limited knowledge and limited options of treatment. More than 50% of patients with anal cancer presenting at diagnosis with locoregional disease have good chances of cure with chemoradiotherapy (CT-RT). However, once patients develop metastatic spread, the prognosis is very poor. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is present in more than 80% of anal cancers and while multiple etiologic connections between HPV infection and anal cancer have already been well elucidated, its prognostic and/or predictive role is currently under investigation, especially among immunocompetent patients affected by this disease. In a single-institutional set, we have retrospectively analysed clinical data of 50 consecutive cases homogeneously treated with CT-RT for stage I-III anal squamous cell carcinoma. We found that HPV-positive anal cancers had a statistically significant improved five-year disease-free survival (DFS) compared to HPV-negative group. These findings could be explained by an increased chemo/radiosensitivity of HPV-positive tumours. Further efforts should be directed towards a better understanding of HPV-related oncogenesis and towards designing novel tailored strategies for the management of this disease both in terms of prevention and treatment. PMID:25987898

  20. Induction of lymphomas on implantation of human oral squamous cell carcinomas in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Teni, T R; Saranath, D; Mahale, A M; Pai, S A; Ahire, S D; Ingle, A D

    2001-02-01

    Cancer cells from five oral cancer patients and pleomorphic adenoma cells from one individual were inoculated as single cell suspension into subcutis of 30 Swiss nude mice and tail vein of additional 30 mice. Further, tumor tissue pieces from three oral cancer patients were xenografted s.c. in 18 nude mice, and 10 mice were kept as controls. In animals implanted with tumor pieces, 7/18 (39%) mice, developed squamous cell carcinoma at the site of inoculation within 8-15 days, while tumors were not observed in mice inoculated with single cell suspension, up to 60/90 days. In 8/68 (12%) mice, white foci were observed in several tissues, with hepatomegaly and splenomegaly noted in 27/68 (39%) mice. Histopathological examination of various tissues revealed presence of large cell lymphoma in several organs in 14/68 (21%) mice. No regional or distant metastasis of the implanted oral tumor cells was detected. Mice injected with cells from pleomorphic adenoma, also demonstrated large cell lymphoma in 2/10 (20%) mice, whereas none of the 10 control animals showed any gross abnormalities or microscopic abnormalities in several organs. 2/16 (12%) lymphomas exhibited positive reaction with mouse B cell antibodies illustrating the murine origin of the lymphomas, and these were immunophenotyed as B cell lymphomas. The lymphomas were also examined with mouse T cell antibodies and none reacted positively with the mouse T cell antibodies. The lymphomas also failed to react with human T cell, B cell and human Leucocyte common antigen (LCA) antibodies, indicating that the induced lymphomas were not of human origin. The tumor specimens from seven of eight oral cancer patients and the pleomorphic adenoma patient induced lymphomas in nude mice. Thus it appears that xenografting oral tumor cells into nude mice may cause induction of the murine lymphomas, and this needs further investigation.

  1. Isolation of a hemidesmosome-rich fraction from a human squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Hirako, Yoshiaki; Yonemoto, Yuki; Yamauchi, Tomoe; Nishizawa, Yuji; Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki; Owaribe, Katsushi

    2014-06-10

    Hemidesmosomes are cell-to-matrix adhesion complexes anchoring keratinocytes to basement membranes. For the first time, we present a method to prepare a fraction from human cultured cells that are highly enriched in hemidesmosomal proteins. Using DJM-1 cells derived from human squamous cell carcinoma, accumulation of hemidesmosomes was observed when these cells were cultured for more than 10 days in a commercial serum-free medium without supplemental calcium. Electron microscopy demonstrated that numerous electron-dense adhesion structures were present along the basal cell membranes of DJM-1 cells cultured under the aforementioned conditions. After removing cellular materials using an ammonia solution, hemidesmosomal proteins and deposited extracellular matrix were collected and separated by electrophoresis. There were eight major polypeptides, which were determined to be plectin, BP230, BP180, integrin α6 and β4 subunits, and laminin-332 by immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. Therefore, we designated this preparation as a hemidesmosome-rich fraction. This fraction contained laminin-332 exclusively in its unprocessed form, which may account for the promotion of laminin deposition, and minimal amounts of Lutheran blood group protein, a nonhemidesmosomal transmembrane protein. This hemidesmosome-rich fraction would be useful not only for biological research on hemidesmosomes but also for developing a serum test for patients with blistering skin diseases. - Highlights: • A defined condition promoted accumulation of hemidesmosomes in human cultured cells. • A fraction isolated from the cells contained eight major polypeptides. • The polypeptides were the five major hemidesmosome proteins and laminin-332. • The cultured cells deposited laminin-332 in its unprocessed form under the condition. • We report a method to prepare a fraction highly enriched in hemidesmosome proteins.

  2. Immortalization of human foreskin keratinocytes by various human papillomavirus DNAs corresponds to their association with cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, C.D.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Normal human foreskin keratinocytes cotransfected with the neomycin resistance gene and recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs (types 16, 18, 31, and 33) that have a high or moderate association with cervical malignancy acquired immortality and contained integrated and transcriptionally active viral genomes. Only transcripts from the intact E6 and E7 genes were detected in at least one cell line, suggesting that one or both of these genes are responsible for immortalization. Recombinant HPV DNAs with low or no oncogenic potential for cervical cancer (HPV1a, -5, -6b, and -11) induced small G418-resistant colonies that senesced as did the nontransfected cells. These colonies contained only episomal virus DNA; therefore, integration of HPV sequences is important for immortalization of keratinocytes. This study suggests that the virus-encoded immortalization function contributes to the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma.

  3. Clinical Implication of p16, Ki-67, and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Expression in Cervical Neoplasia: Improvement of Diagnostic Accuracy for High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion and Prediction of Resection Margin Involvement on Conization Specimen

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hun; Han, Jee Hye; Shin, Eun; Noh, Jae Hong; Kim, Hee Seung; Song, Yong Sang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grading is subjective and affected by substantial rates of discordance among pathologists. Although the use of p16INK4a (p16) staining has been proven to improve diagnostic accuracy for high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), the clinical evidence for use of Ki-67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is insufficient to make an independent recommendation for use, alone or in combination. The primary objective was to evaluate clinical utility of Ki-67 and PCNA in combination with p16 in diagnosing HSIL. Also, we assessed the correlation between expressions of three biomarkers and resection margin status of conization specimen. Methods: The expressions of p16, Ki-67, and PCNA were evaluated by immunohistochemical methods in 149 cervical tissues encompassing 17 negative lesion, 31 CIN 1, 25 CIN 2, 41 CIN 3, and 35 invasive squamous cell carcinoma. The immunohistochemical staining results were classified into four grades: 0, 1+, 2+ and 3+. Results: The expression of three biomarkers was positively associated with CIN grade. Ki-67 immunostaining did not increase the accuracy of HSIL diagnosis when combined with p16 immunostaining compared with p16 immunostaining alone. In contrast, combining the staining results for p16 and PCNA (p16 = 3+ and PCNA ≥2+) increased its specificity (66.7% vs. 75.0%, P = 0.031) without decrease of its sensitivity (98.7% vs. 98.7%) for diagnosis of CIN 3 and more sever lesion. Subgroup analysis for conization specimen with CIN 2 and CIN 3 showed that positive Ki-67 immunostaining was an independent risk factor for predicting resection margin positivity (odds ratio = 6.52, 95% confidence interval 1.07–39.64). Conclusions: We found that the combined use of p16 and PCNA immunostaining enhanced diagnostic accuracy for HSIL. Positive Ki-67 immunostaining was associated with incomplete excision. PMID:25853106

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Node Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastases From Unknown Head-and-Neck Primary Site: M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Petsuksiri, Janjira; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H.; Weber, Randal S.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Garden, Adam S.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional therapy for cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from an unknown primary can cause considerable toxicity owing to the volume of tissues to be irradiated. In the present study, hypothesizing that using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) would provide effective treatment with minimal toxicity, we reviewed the outcomes and patterns of failure for head-and-neck unknown primary cancer at a single tertiary cancer center. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 52 patients who had undergone IMRT for an unknown primary at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1998 and 2005. The patient and treatment characteristics were extracted and the survival rates calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Of the 52 patients, 5 presented with Stage N1, 11 with Stage N2a, 23 with Stage N2b, 6 with Stage N2c, 4 with Stage N3, and 3 with Stage Nx disease. A total of 26 patients had undergone neck dissection, 13 before and 13 after IMRT; 14 patients had undergone excisional biopsy and presented for IMRT without evidence of disease. Finally, 14 patients had received systemic chemotherapy. All patients underwent IMRT to targets on both sides of the neck and pharyngeal axis. The median follow-up time for the surviving patients was 3.7 years. The 5-year actuarial rate of primary mucosal tumor control and regional control was 98% and 94%, respectively. Only 3 patients developed distant metastasis with locoregional control. The 5-year actuarial disease-free and overall survival rate was 88% and 89%, respectively. The most severe toxicity was Grade 3 dysphagia/esophageal stricture, experienced by 2 patients. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that IMRT can produce excellent outcomes for patients who present with cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from an unknown head-and-neck primary tumor. Severe late complications were uncommon.

  5. Human papillomavirus 33 worldwide genetic variation and associated risk of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alyce A.; Heideman, Daniëlle A.M.; Boon, Debby; Chen, Zigui; Burk, Robert D.; De Vuyst, Hugo; Gheit, Tarik; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia; Clifford, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 33, a member of the HPV16-related alpha-9 species group, is found in approximately 5% of cervical cancers worldwide. The current study aimed to characterize the genetic diversity of HPV33 and to explore the association of HPV33 variants with the risk for cervical cancer. Taking advantage of the International Agency for Research on Cancer biobank, we sequenced the entire E6 and E7 open reading frames of 213 HPV33-positive cervical samples from 30 countries. We identified 28 HPV33 variants that formed 5 phylogenetic groups: the previously identified A1, A2, and B (sub) lineages and the novel A3 and C (sub)lineages. The A1 sublineage was strongly over-represented in cervical cases compared to controls in both Africa and Europe. In conclusion, we provide a classification system for HPV33 variants based on the sequence of E6 and E7 and suggest that the association of HPV33 with cervical cancer may differ by variant (sub)lineage. PMID:24314666

  6. Hyperthermia Selectively Targets Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Tumors via p53-Dependent Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Oei, Arlene L; van Leeuwen, Caspar M; ten Cate, Rosemarie; Rodermond, Hans M; Buist, Marrije R; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Crezee, Johannes; Kok, H Petra; Medema, Jan Paul; Franken, Nicolaas A P

    2015-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with cervical cancer, the third most common cancer in women. The high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 are found in over 70% of cervical cancers and produce the oncoprotein, early protein 6 (E6), which binds to p53 and mediates its ubiquitination and degradation. Targeting E6 has been shown to be a promising treatment option to eliminate HPV-positive tumor cells. In addition, combined hyperthermia with radiation is a very effective treatment strategy for cervical cancer. In this study, we examined the effect of hyperthermia on HPV-positive cells using cervical cancer cell lines infected with HPV 16 and 18, in vivo tumor models, and ex vivo-treated patient biopsies. Strikingly, we demonstrate that a clinically relevant hyperthermia temperature of 42 °C for 1 hour resulted in E6 degradation, thereby preventing the formation of the E6-p53 complex and enabling p53-dependent apoptosis and G2-phase arrest. Moreover, hyperthermia combined with p53 depletion restored both the cell-cycle distribution and apoptosis to control levels. Collectively, our findings provide new insights into the treatment of HPV-positive cervical cancer and suggest that hyperthermia therapy could improve patient outcomes.

  7. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Jong; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien Fu

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer.

  8. Evidence of disrupted high-risk human papillomavirus DNA in morphologically normal cervices of older women

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Sarah M.; Pereira, Merlin; Roberts, Sally; Cuschieri, Kate; Nuovo, Gerard; Athavale, Ramanand; Young, Lawrence; Ganesan, Raji; Woodman, Ciarán B.

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) causes nearly 100% of cervical carcinoma. However, it remains unclear whether HPV can establish a latent infection, one which may be responsible for the second peak in incidence of cervical carcinoma seen in older women. Therefore, using Ventana in situ hybridisation (ISH), quantitative PCR assays and biomarkers of productive and transforming viral infection, we set out to provide the first robust estimate of the prevalence and characteristics of HPV genomes in FFPE tissue from the cervices of 99 women undergoing hysterectomy for reasons unrelated to epithelial abnormality. Our ISH assay detected HR-HPV in 42% of our study population. The majority of ISH positive samples also tested HPV16 positive using sensitive PCR based assays and were more likely to have a history of preceding cytological abnormality. Analysis of subsets of this population revealed HR-HPV to be transcriptionally inactive as there was no evidence of a productive or transforming infection. Critically, the E2 gene was always disrupted in those HPV16 positive cases which were assessed. These findings point to a reservoir of transcriptionally silent, disrupted HPV16 DNA in morphologically normal cervices, re-expression of which could explain the increase in incidence of cervical cancer observed in later life. PMID:26875676

  9. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:27329199

  10. Evidence of disrupted high-risk human papillomavirus DNA in morphologically normal cervices of older women.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Sarah M; Pereira, Merlin; Roberts, Sally; Cuschieri, Kate; Nuovo, Gerard; Athavale, Ramanand; Young, Lawrence; Ganesan, Raji; Woodman, Ciarán B

    2016-02-15

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) causes nearly 100% of cervical carcinoma. However, it remains unclear whether HPV can establish a latent infection, one which may be responsible for the second peak in incidence of cervical carcinoma seen in older women. Therefore, using Ventana in situ hybridisation (ISH), quantitative PCR assays and biomarkers of productive and transforming viral infection, we set out to provide the first robust estimate of the prevalence and characteristics of HPV genomes in FFPE tissue from the cervices of 99 women undergoing hysterectomy for reasons unrelated to epithelial abnormality. Our ISH assay detected HR-HPV in 42% of our study population. The majority of ISH positive samples also tested HPV16 positive using sensitive PCR based assays and were more likely to have a history of preceding cytological abnormality. Analysis of subsets of this population revealed HR-HPV to be transcriptionally inactive as there was no evidence of a productive or transforming infection. Critically, the E2 gene was always disrupted in those HPV16 positive cases which were assessed. These findings point to a reservoir of transcriptionally silent, disrupted HPV16 DNA in morphologically normal cervices, re-expression of which could explain the increase in incidence of cervical cancer observed in later life.

  11. Protective effects of green tea extracts (polyphenon E and EGCG) on human cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Ahn, W-S; Yoo, J; Huh, S-W; Kim, C-K; Lee, J-M; Namkoong, S-E; Bae, S-M; Lee, I P

    2003-10-01

    We investigated clinical efficacy of green tea extracts (polyphenon E; poly E and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate [EGCG]) delivered in a form of ointment or capsule in patients with human papilloma virus (HPV) infected cervical lesions. Fifty-one patients with cervical lesions (chronic cervicitis, mild dysplasia, moderate dysplasia and severe dysplasia) were divided into four groups, as compared with 39 untreated patients as a control. Poly E ointment was applied locally to 27 patients twice a week. For oral delivery, a 200 mg of poly E or EGCG capsule was taken orally every day for eight to 12 weeks. In the study, 20 out of 27 patients (74%) under poly E ointment therapy showed a response. Six out of eight patients under poly E ointment plus poly E capsule therapy (75%) showed a response, and three out of six patients (50%) under poly E capsule therapy showed a response. Six out of 10 patients (60%) under EGCG capsule therapy showed a response. Overall, a 69% response rate (35/51) was noted for treatment with green tea extracts, as compared with a 10% response rate (4/39) in untreated controls (P<0.05). Thus, the data collected here demonstrated that green tea extracts in a form of ointment and capsule are effective for treating cervical lesions, suggesting that green tea extracts can be a potential therapy regimen for patients with HPV infected cervical lesions.

  12. Evidence of disrupted high-risk human papillomavirus DNA in morphologically normal cervices of older women.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Sarah M; Pereira, Merlin; Roberts, Sally; Cuschieri, Kate; Nuovo, Gerard; Athavale, Ramanand; Young, Lawrence; Ganesan, Raji; Woodman, Ciarán B

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) causes nearly 100% of cervical carcinoma. However, it remains unclear whether HPV can establish a latent infection, one which may be responsible for the second peak in incidence of cervical carcinoma seen in older women. Therefore, using Ventana in situ hybridisation (ISH), quantitative PCR assays and biomarkers of productive and transforming viral infection, we set out to provide the first robust estimate of the prevalence and characteristics of HPV genomes in FFPE tissue from the cervices of 99 women undergoing hysterectomy for reasons unrelated to epithelial abnormality. Our ISH assay detected HR-HPV in 42% of our study population. The majority of ISH positive samples also tested HPV16 positive using sensitive PCR based assays and were more likely to have a history of preceding cytological abnormality. Analysis of subsets of this population revealed HR-HPV to be transcriptionally inactive as there was no evidence of a productive or transforming infection. Critically, the E2 gene was always disrupted in those HPV16 positive cases which were assessed. These findings point to a reservoir of transcriptionally silent, disrupted HPV16 DNA in morphologically normal cervices, re-expression of which could explain the increase in incidence of cervical cancer observed in later life. PMID:26875676

  13. Does human papillomavirus cause cervical cancer? The state of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, N.; Bosch, X.; Kaldor, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The human papillomavirus has emerged over the past decade as the leading candidate to be the sexually transmitted aetiological factor in cervical cancer. Although it appears that papillomavirus types 16 and 18 are associated with a higher risk of advanced cervical neoplasia, most of the evidence comes from studies which do not satisfy basic epidemiological requirements, and are therefore difficult to interpret. The most significant problems are the small sample size, potentially biased selection of study subjects, the difficulties in cytologically distinguishing precancerous lesions from papilloma infection of the cervix, the unknown specificity and sensitivity of the various hybridisation methods for determining papillomavirus infection status, and the statistical analyses and presentation of results. On the basis of the existing studies, one is forced to conclude that, while experimental data suggest an oncogenic potential for HPV, the epidemiological evidence implicating it as a cause of cervical neoplasia is still rather limited. PMID:2831924

  14. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and its relation with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, teenage pregnancies, smoking, use of oral contraceptives, having multiple sex partners, hormone replacement therapies and various other unknown factors lead to the onset of the disease. Awareness for various diagnostic procedures such as Pap smears screening prove to be an effective way in eradicating the oncogenic potential of HPV. PMID:21635792

  15. Cumulative Impact of HIV and Multiple Concurrent Human Papillomavirus Infections on the Risk of Cervical Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Adler, David H; Wallace, Melissa; Bennie, Thola; Abar, Beau; Meiring, Tracy L; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV is known to increase the risk of cervical cancer. In addition, evidence suggests that concurrent infection with multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes increases the risk of cervical dysplasia more than infection with a single HPV genotype. However, the impact of the combination of HIV coinfection and presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections on the risk of cervical dysplasia is uncertain. We compared the results of HPV testing and Pap smears between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected young women to assess the cumulative impact of these two conditions. We found that both HIV and the presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections are associated with increased risk of associated Pap smear abnormality and that the impact of these two risk factors may be additive. PMID:26997954

  16. Human Papillomavirus Genotyping and p16INK4a Expression in Cervical Lesions: A Combined Test to Avoid Cervical Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Zouheir, Yassine; Fechtali, Taoufiq; Elgnaoui, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major public health problem in Morocco. The cervical cancer has a long precancerous period that provides an opportunity for the screening and treatment. Improving screening tests is a priority goal for the early diagnosis of cervical cancer. This study was conducted to evaluate the combination of p16INK4a protein expression, human papillomavirus (HPV) typing, and histopathology for the identification of cervical lesions with high risk to progress to cervical cancer among Moroccan women. A total of 96 cervical biopsies were included in this study. Signal amplification in situ hybridization with biotinylated probes was used to detect HPV. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of p16INK4a protein. HPV DNA was detected in 74.0% of the biopsies (71/96). Of the seventy-one positive HPV cases, we detected 67.6% (48/71) of high risk (HR)-HPV (HPV 16 and 18), 24% of low risk-HPV (HPV 6 and 11), 1.4% intermediate risk-HPV (HPV 31, 33, and 35), and 7% coinfections (HPV 6/11 and 16/18). Overexpression of p16INK4a protein was observed in 72.9% (70/96) of the biopsies. In addition, p16INK4a protein detection was closely correlated with recovery of HR HPV. Our result showed that p16INK4a expression level is correlated with HR-HPV status. PMID:27390742

  17. Synthesis and characterization of a new retinoic acid ECPIRM as potential chemotherapeutic agent for human cutaneous squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengli; Tao, Yue; Ma, Pengcheng; Wang, Dechuan; He, Chundi; Cao, Yuping; Wei, Jun; Li, Lingjun; Tao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, requiring effective therapeutic interventions. Retinoids are important chemopreventive and therapeutic agents for a variety of human cancers including CSCC. In this study we synthesized a novel retinoic derivative N-(4-ethoxycarbonylphenyl) isoretinamide (ECPIRM) and evaluated its biological activities and possible mechanisms in human cutaneous squamous cell lines. ECPIRM had better inhibitory effect on the proliferation of squamous carcinoma cells SCL-1 and colo-16, compared with All-trans retinoic acid and 13-cis retinoic acid. ECPIRM had less toxicity to normal keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. Mechanistically, ECPIRM induced G1 cell cycle arrest in SCL-1 cells, via the downregulation of CDK2, CDK4, cycling D1 and cyclin E expression and upregulation of p21. In addition, these effects were at least partially due to the inhibition of JNK/ ERK-AP-1 signaling pathway by ECPIRM. Importantly, these effects of ECPIRM are independent of the classical retinoid receptor pathway, suggesting that the novel compound will have less side-effects in chemotherapy. These findings demonstrate that ECPIRM is a potential inhibitor of MPAK-AP-1 pathway, and is a potential therapeutic agent against CSCC.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of a new retinoic acid ECPIRM as potential chemotherapeutic agent for human cutaneous squamous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengli; Tao, Yue; Ma, Pengcheng; Wang, Dechuan; He, Chundi; Cao, Yuping; Wei, Jun; Li, Lingjun; Tao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, requiring effective therapeutic interventions. Retinoids are important chemopreventive and therapeutic agents for a variety of human cancers including CSCC. In this study we synthesized a novel retinoic derivative N-(4-ethoxycarbonylphenyl) isoretinamide (ECPIRM) and evaluated its biological activities and possible mechanisms in human cutaneous squamous cell lines. ECPIRM had better inhibitory effect on the proliferation of squamous carcinoma cells SCL-1 and colo-16, compared with All-trans retinoic acid and 13-cis retinoic acid. ECPIRM had less toxicity to normal keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. Mechanistically, ECPIRM induced G1 cell cycle arrest in SCL-1 cells, via the downregulation of CDK2, CDK4, cycling D1 and cyclin E expression and upregulation of p21. In addition, these effects were at least partially due to the inhibition of JNK/ ERK-AP-1 signaling pathway by ECPIRM. Importantly, these effects of ECPIRM are independent of the classical retinoid receptor pathway, suggesting that the novel compound will have less side-effects in chemotherapy. These findings demonstrate that ECPIRM is a potential inhibitor of MPAK-AP-1 pathway, and is a potential therapeutic agent against CSCC. PMID:25991427

  19. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  20. The SNP at −592 of human IL-10 gene is associated with serum IL-10 levels and increased risk for human papillomavirus cervical lesion development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Women with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) persistence are characterized by high levels of IL-10 at cervix. We have determined whether polymorphisms of IL-10 gene promoter might be associated with increased risk of squamous intraepithelial cervical lesions (SICL) and whether exist significative differences of IL-10 mRNA expression at cervix and systemic and serum IL-10 protein between SICL cases and non-Cervical Lesions (NCL). Methods Peripheral blood samples from SICL (n = 204) and NCL (n = 166) were used to detect IL-10 promoter polymorphisms at loci -592A/C (rs1800872), -819C/T (rs1800871), -1082A/G (rs1800896), -1352A/G (rs1800893), by allelic discrimination and to evaluate serum IL-10 protein. Cervical epithelial scrapings from NCL and biopsies from SICLs were used for HPV-typing and to evaluate IL-10 mRNA expression level. The systemic and local IL-10 mRNA expression levels were measured by real time-PCR. Genotypic and allelic frequencies of the selected polymorphisms were analyzed by logistic regression, adjusting by age and HPV-genotype, to determine the association with SICL. Results No significant differences were found between genotype frequencies at loci −819, -1082, and −1352. Individuals carrying at least one copy of risk allele A of polymorphism −592 had a two-fold increased risk of developing SICL [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.02 (95% CI, 1.26-3.25), p = 0.003], compared to NCL. The IL-10 mRNA expression and serum IL-10 protein, were significantly higher in SICL cases (p < 0.01), being higher in patients carrying the risk allele A. Conclusions The −592 polymorphism is associated with increased risk of SICL and can serve as a marker of genetic susceptibility to SICL among Mexican women. According to IL-10 levels found in SICL, IL-10 can be relevant factor for viral persistence and progression disease. PMID:23148667

  1. Oncogenic human papilloma virus and cervical pre-cancerous lesions in brothel-based sex workers in India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Kamalesh; Bhattacharya, Swati; Bhattacharyya, Subhasish; Chatterjee, Soma; Mallick, Aiyel Haque; Chakraborti, Sekhar; Chatterjee, Debashree; Bal, Baishali

    2008-01-01

    prevalence of 30% (n=34) and those with one or less clients had a prevalence of 10% (n=9) (statistically significant differences, P=0.00003). Multivariate analysis showed a statistical association only with a duration of sex work of or=101 (OR=2.5; 95% CI 1.3-5). Regarding pre-cancerous lesions, 2 of 229 sex workers showed the presence of a low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion along with high-risk HPV. Thus, 1% of the studied population suffer from a pre-cancerous lesion caused by high-risk HPV. This study concludes that young sex workers are particularly vulnerable to high-risk HPV, similar to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The observation of older sex workers relatively free from HPV supports the view of acquired immunity against HPV, which needs to be studied in-depth further. There is a need for a suitable community-based intervention programme targeted towards sex workers, with special reference to younger sex workers, for control and prevention of HPV and cervical cancer. Vaccination against HPV for newly entrant sex workers may be an important component for a successful intervention programme.

  2. Scaling up cervical cancer screening in the midst of human papillomavirus vaccination advocacy in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Screening tests for cervical cancer are effective in reducing the disease burden. In Thailand, a Pap smear program has been implemented throughout the country for 40 years. In 2008 the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) unexpectedly decided to scale up the coverage of free cervical cancer screening services, to meet an ambitious target. This study analyzes the processes and factors that drove this policy innovation in the area of cervical cancer control in Thailand. Methods In-depth interviews with key policy actors and review of relevant documents were conducted in 2009. Data analysis was guided by a framework, developed on public policy models and existing literature on scaling-up health care interventions. Results Between 2006 and 2008 international organizations and the vaccine industry advocated the introduction of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for the primary prevention of cervical cancer. Meanwhile, a local study suggested that the vaccine was considerably less cost-effective than cervical cancer screening in the Thai context. Then, from August to December 2008, the MoPH carried out a campaign to expand the coverage of its cervical cancer screening program, targeting one million women. The study reveals that several factors were influential in focusing the attention of policymakers on strengthening the screening services. These included the high burden of cervical cancer in Thailand, the launch of the HPV vaccine onto the global and domestic markets, the country’s political instability, and the dissemination of scientific evidence regarding the appropriateness of different options for cervical cancer prevention. Influenced by the country’s political crisis, the MoPH’s campaign was devised in a very short time. In the view of the responsible health officials, the campaign was not successful and indeed, did not achieve its ambitious target. Conclusion The Thai case study suggests that the political crisis was a crucial factor that drew the

  3. Monitoring PAI-1 and VEGF Levels in 6 Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Xenografts During Fractionated Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, Christine; Kielow, Achim; Schilling, Daniela; Maftei, Constantin-Alin; Zips, Daniel; Yaromina, Ala; Baumann, Michael; Molls, Michael; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that the plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are regulated by hypoxia and irradiation and are involved in neoangiogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo whether changes in PAI-1 and VEGF during fractionated irradiation could predict for radiation resistance. Methods and Materials: Six xenografted tumor lines from human squamous cell carcinomas (HSCC) of the head and neck were irradiated with 0, 3, 5, 10, and 15 daily fractions of 2 Gy. The PAI-1 and VEGF antigen levels in tumor lysates were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The amounts of PAI-1 and VEGF were compared with the dose to cure 50% of tumors (TCD{sub 50}). Colocalization of PAI-1, pimonidazole (hypoxia), CD31 (endothelium), and Hoechst 33342 (perfusion) was examined by immunofluorescence. Results: Human PAI-1 and VEGF (hVEGF) expression levels were induced by fractionated irradiation in UT-SCC-15, UT-SCC-14, and UT-SCC-5 tumors, and mouse VEGF (msVEGF) was induced only in UT-SCC-5 tumors. High hVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation sensitivity after 5 fractions (P=.021), and high msVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation resistance after 10 fractions (P=.007). PAI-1 staining was observed in the extracellular matrix, the cytoplasm of fibroblast-like stroma cells, and individual tumor cells at all doses of irradiation. Colocalization studies showed PAI-1 staining close to microvessels. Conclusions: These results indicate that the concentration of tumor-specific and host-specific VEGF during fractionated irradiation could provide considerably divergent information for the outcome of radiation therapy.

  4. Epigenetic inactivation of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Song-Hua; Li, Sheng-Lei; Dong, Zi-Ming; Kan, Quan-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF1), as one of most important Wnt antagonists, has been detected frequently silenced by promoter hypermethylation in various types of cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate the promoter methylation profiles of WIF1 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues and cell lines, as well as the functional roles of WIF1 in the human ESCC metastatic behavior. WIF1 mRNA levels and promoter methylation status in ESCC tissues and cell lines were detected using RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR), respectively. WIF1 protein levels were assessed by Western blot. Stable ESCC cell line with restoration of WIF1 was generated in EC109 cells, which naturally do not express detectable WIF1 mRNA. The effects of reexpressed WIF1 on EC109 cell proliferation and migration were investigated using crystal violet and wound healing assay, respectively. Also the effects of WIF1 reexpression on the beta-catenin/T-cell factor-dependent transcription activity was measured by luciferase assay. WIF1 promoter methylation was frequently observed in ESCC tissues (46%, 23/50) and cell lines (50%, 2/4). Treatment with demethylating agent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), increased or restored WIF1 expression in these ESCC cell lines. Restoration of the WIF1 in EC109 cells resulted in a significant inhibition on both cell proliferation and migration. Moreover, reexpression of WIF1 caused significant decrease of beta-catenin/T-cell factor-dependent transcription activity. These findings demonstrated that WIF1 silencing due to promoter hypermethylation is a major mechanism during carcinogenesis of ESCC. This would be an opportunity to prevent the development and progression of HCC through modulation of WIF1.

  5. Performance of Self-Collected Cervical Samples in Screening for Future Precancer Using Human Papillomavirus DNA Testing

    PubMed Central

    Hildesheim, Allan; González, Paula; Schiffman, Mark; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Wacholder, Sholom; Jiménez, Silvia; Quint, Wim; Guillen, Diego; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Herrero, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-collected human papillomavirus (HPV) testing could reduce barriers to cervical cancer screening, with performance comparable to clinician-collected specimens. The ability of self-collected specimens to cross-sectionally and prospectively detect precursor lesions was investigated in an HPV vaccine randomized trial in Costa Rica. Methods: In the trial, 7466 women age 18 to 25 years received an HPV16/18 or control vaccine and were followed at least annually for four years. In this secondary analysis, we included all women who provided a self-collected cervicovaginal specimen six months after enrollment (5109 women = full analytical cohort). A subset (615 women = restricted cohort) also had clinician-collected specimens at the six-month postenrollment visit. High-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion or repeat low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion prompted colposcopic referral throughout the study. HPV testing was performed with SPF10PCR/DEIA/LiPA25. Cross-sectional and prospective sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were estimated. Results: In the full cohort, one-time HPV testing on self-collected samples detected prevalent CIN2+ with a sensitivity of 88.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] =77.0% to 95.7%) and a specificity of 68.9% (95% CI = 67.6% to 70.1%). For predicting incident CIN2+ in the subsequent four years, sensitivity was 73.9% (95% CI = 65.8% to 81.0%) and specificity 69.4% (95% CI = 68.1% to 70.7%). In the restricted cohort, for incident CIN2+, self-collected HPV was much more sensitive than cytology (80.0% vs 10.0%); relative sensitivity was 0.1 (95% CI = 0.03% to 0.5%). Furthermore, three times more women with normal baseline cytology developed incident CIN2+ than those with negative self-collected HPV. Self-collected and clinician-collected HPV testing had comparable performance. Agreement between self- and clinician-collected samples was 89.7% (kappa = 0.78, McNemar χ2 = 0.62) for carcinogenic HPV types. Conclusions

  6. “Groundsubstance” Resembling Amyloid Extracted from the Cervical Portion of Human Cervix Uteri

    PubMed Central

    Gröschel-Stewart, U.; Hermann, U.; Schwalm, H.

    1973-01-01

    A groundsubstance glycoprotein has been isolated from normal human cervix uteri that has a remarkable resemblance in its primary structure to a protein found in amyloid disease and to other acidic fibrous proteins found in mammalian tissue. Cervical groundsubstance, acidic fibrous protein from human uterus and the cardiac groundsubstance, which is significantly increased in amyloid disease, are immunologically identical or closely related. ImagesFigs. 1-4 PMID:4633712

  7. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  8. Molecular variants of human papilloma virus 16 E2, E4, E5, E6 and E7 genes associated with cervical neoplasia in Romanian patients.

    PubMed

    Plesa, Adriana; Anton, Gabriela; Iancu, Iulia V; Diaconu, Carmen C; Huica, Irina; Stanescu, Anca D; Socolov, Demetra; Nistor, Elena; Popa, Elena; Stoian, Mihai; Botezatu, Anca

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and associate the sequence variations of human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) genes from women who live in two different areas of Romania and associate them with malignant progression. One hundred twenty-four HPV16-positive cervical isolates were collected, and the E2, E4, E5, E6 and E7 viral genes were sequenced. Two new missense mutations in the E6 gene (C279G and A305C) were found (together or alone, in association with other mutations) in 44 of 124 cases. The most frequently simultaneously mutated genes were E4/E2 hinge, E5 and E6 (p = 0.0004) in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) samples. Also, for SCC patients, the best-correlated mutation patterns were obtained for E4/E2 hinge-E5 (r = 0.7984; p < 0.0001). No sample was found to have all of the investigated viral genes concurrently mutated. Phylogenetic analysis was performed to characterize the viral variants. Similar results were found for SCC and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III (CINIII) cases. After all of the target gene sequences were assembled, all patients were found to be infected with viruses of the HPV16- European-German (EG) lineage, and two clusters were identified, the first (55/96 variants) from Moldavia and the second (41/96 variants) from Bucharest. The distinct cluster derived from EG in Moldavia could partially explain the increased frequency of SCC in this area. This study has generated a comprehensive set of sequence variation data on HPV16 circulating in Romania to join the existing data and highlight the important role of HPV16 variants during cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:25143263

  9. KLF4 is downregulated but not mutated during human esophageal squamous cell carcinogenesis and has tumor stage-specific functions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yizeng; Katz, Jonathan P

    2016-04-01

    The transcriptional regulator Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is decreased in human esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC), and Klf4 deletion in mice produces squamous cell dysplasia. Nonetheless the mechanisms of KLF4 downregulation in ESCC and the functions of KLF4 during ESCC development and progression are not well understood. Here, we sought to define the regulation of KLF4 and delineate the stage-specific effects of KLF4 in ESCC. We found that KLF4 expression was decreased in human ESCC and in 8 of 9 human ESCC cell lines. However, by genomic sequencing, we observed no KLF4 mutations or copy number changes in any of 52 human ESCC, suggesting other mechanisms for KLF4 silencing. In fact, KLF4 expression in human ESCC cell lines was increased by the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine, suggesting an epigenetic mechanism for KLF4 silencing. Surprisingly, while KLF4 decreased in high-grade dysplasia and early stage tumors, KLF4 increased with advanced cancer stage, and KLF4 expression in ESCC was inversely correlated with survival. Interestingly, KLF4 promoted invasion of human ESCC cells, providing a functional link to the stage-specific expression of KLF4. Taken together, these findings suggest that KLF4 loss is necessary for esophageal tumorigenesis but that restored KLF4 expression in ESCC promotes tumor spread. Thus, the use of KLF4 as a diagnostic and therapeutic target in cancer requires careful consideration of context. PMID:26934576

  10. Human cervical mucus. V. Oral contraceptives and mucus rheologic properties.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Blasco, L; Khan, M A; Litt, M

    1979-08-01

    Mucus viscoelasticity on individual samples obtained from patients using combination oral contraceptives was quantitated by microrheometry. These results, in conjunction with mucus chemical characterization, indicate that combination oral contraceptive use eliminates the cyclic variations in mucus chemical, physicochemical, and rheologic properties associated with the ovulatory menstrual cycle. A correlation was demonstrated between the mucus elastic modulus and mucus nondialyzable dry weight, and the mucins produced during oral contraceptive therapy were shown to be similar to those recovered from ovulatory donors. Differences in mucus properties were noted when donors using estrogenic contraceptives were contrasted with those using androgenic contraceptives. On the basis of established relationships between sperm penetrability and mucus solids content, it was concluded that the use of contraceptives, as examined in this study, provided a secondary degree of fertility control at the cervical level.

  11. Adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, H.M.; Niloff, J.M.; Buttlar, C.A.; Welch, W.R.; Marck, A.; Feuer, E.J.; Lahman, E.A.; Jenison, E.; Knapp, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Sixteen women with adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump were treated over a 15-year period. The median survivals of 40 months for stage IB and 17 months for stages II and III were significantly worse compared with those for patients treated for cervical adenocarcinoma of the intact uterus or squamous carcinoma of the cervical stump. The poor results were due to both local and distant failure. Implications regarding tumor radiosensitivity and adjuvant therapy in these high-risk patients are discussed.

  12. Distinct Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Methylomes in Cervical Cells at Different Stages of Premalignancy

    PubMed Central

    Brandsma, Janet L.; Sun, Ying; Lizardi, Paul M.; Tuck, David P.; Zelterman, Daniel; Haines, G. Kenneth; Martel, Maritza; Harigopal, Malini; Schofield, Kevin; Neapolitano, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) gene expression is dramatically altered during cervical carcinogenesis. Because dysregulated genes frequently show abnormal patterns of DNA methylation, we hypothesized that comprehensive mapping of the HPV methylomes in cervical samples at different stages of progression would reveal patterns of clinical significance. To test this hypothesis, thirteen HPV16-positive samples were obtained from women undergoing routine cervical cancer screening. Complete methylation data were obtained for 98.7% of the HPV16 CpGs in all samples by bisulfite-sequencing. Most HPV16 CpGs were unmethylated or methylated in only one sample. The other CpGs were methylated at levels ranging from 11% to 100% of the HPV16 copies per sample. The results showed three major patterns and two variants of one pattern. The patterns showed minimal or no methylation (A), low level methylation in the E1 and E6 genes (B), and high level methylation at many CpGs in the E5/L2/L1 region (C). Generally, pattern A was associated with negative cytology, pattern B with low-grade lesions, and pattern C with high-grade lesions. The severity of the cervical lesions was then ranked by the HPV16 DNA methylation patterns and, independently, by the pathologic diagnoses. Statistical analysis of the two rating methods showed highly significant agreement. In conclusion, analysis of the HPV16 DNA methylomes in clinical samples of cervical cells led to the identification of distinct methylation patterns which, after validation in larger studies, could have potential utility as biomarkers of neoplastic cervical progression. PMID:19443004

  13. Analysis of the dose-response relationship between high-risk human papillomavirus viral load and cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Zhu; Li, Hong-Bo; Nie, Xin-Min; Jiang, Xiao-Man; Ming, Hui; Li, Deng-Qing; Wu, Xin-Yin

    2009-08-01

    The aims of this study were to explore the dose-response relationship between high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) load and cervical lesions; the relationship between hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions; and the clinical application of the hybrid capture II (HC-II) system in the secondary prevention of cervical cancer. HrHPV viral load was detected by the HC-II system and cervical lesions were diagnosed from biopsied tissue. Curve estimation and Mantel trend analysis were used to explore the dose-response relationship between hrHPV viral load and cervical lesions. Spearman's rank correlation analysis and ordinal regression model were used for the analysis of hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions. Curve estimation showed good correlation between cervical lesion rates and hrHPV viral load (r=0.775, P=0.008); the rate of cervical lesions increased with hrHPV viral load (chi(trend)=8.000, P<0.001). Medium intensity rank correlation was found between hrHPV viral load grades and the severity of cervical lesions (r(s)=0.321, P<0.001); a correlation appeared between hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions (P<0.001). These results suggest a dose-response relationship between hrHPV viral load and the severity of cervical lesions. This dependence has important clinical applications and shows the potential value of the HC-II system in cervical cancer prevention.

  14. HPV immunohistochemical testing and cervical dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    MUREŞAN, DANIEL; ROTAR, IOANA CRISTINA; APOSTOL, SILVANA; COROIU, GEORGIANA; STAMATIAN, FLORIN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) infection represents a necessary condition for cervical carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of HPV testing using an immunohistochemical staining kit with implications upon both diagnosis and treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Methods Seventy-nine patients and eighty-six controls were enrolled in the study. Each patient had completed a physical examination, gynecological examination with cervical sampling using a liquid-based cytology system and also colposcopy. The cervical samples were analyzed according to Bethesda terminology and HPV-HR immunohistochemical staining was performed. In all the patients with high-grade lesion a surgical excision procedure was performed followed by pathological examination of the specimen. The collected data were analyzed using statistical software. Results The colposcopic examination has detected acetowhite modifications of the cervical epithelium in 47% of patients with ASC-US (Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance) in 71% of patients with LSIL (Low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion) and in 100% of patients with HSIL ( High grade squamous intraepithelial lesion). The biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of LSIL in 27% of biopsy specimens in patients with ASC-US and in 79.99% of patients with LSIL respectively. In all patients with HSIL the diagnosis was CIN II or higher. The percentage of HPV-HR (Human Papilloma Virus – High Risk) positivity porportionaly increased with the severity of cytological diagnosis: 30% in ASC-US, 42.86% in LSIL and 75% in HSIL patients. The sensitivity of detection of HPV-HR was 50% with CI 95% [17.45;82.55] for ASC-US, 77.77% with CI 95% [51.91;92.62] for LSIL and 81.81% with CI 95% [58.99;94.00] for HSIL. Conclusion HPV testing can be an important screening tool for cervical dysplasia. The HPV testing targeting high risk types is indicated for ASC-US and LSIL triage. The present work

  15. [Chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    de Los Santos-Munive, Victoria; Alonso-Avelino, Juan Angel

    2013-01-01

    In order to spot common chromosomal imbalances in early and late lesions of cervical cancer that might be used as progression biomarkers, we made a search of literature in PubMed from 1996 to 2011. The medical subject headings employed were chromosomal alterations, loss of heterozygosis, cervical cancer, cervical tumorigenesis, chromosomal aberrations, cervical intraepithelial neoplasm and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. The common chromosomal imbalances were gains in 8q24 (77.7 %), 20q13 (66.9 %), 3q26 (47.1 %), Xp22 (43.8 %), and 5p15 (60 %), principally. On the other hand, integration of the high-risk human papillomavirus genome into the host chromosome has been associated with the development of neoplasia, but the chromosomal imbalances seem to precede and promote such integration. Chromosomal imbalances in 8q24, 20q13, 3q21-26 and 5p15-Xp22, determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization assay or comparative genomic hybridization assay for early detection of the presence of high-risk human papillomavirus, are promising markers of cervical cancer progression.

  16. Barium inhibits arsenic-mediated apoptotic cell death in human squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ichiro; Uemura, Noriyuki; Nizam, Saika; Khalequzzaman, Md; Thang, Nguyen D; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y; Akhand, Anwarul A; Shekhar, Hossain U; Nakajima, Tamie; Kato, Masashi

    2012-06-01

    Our fieldwork showed more than 1 μM (145.1 μg/L) barium in about 3 μM (210.7 μg/L) arsenic-polluted drinking well water (n = 72) in cancer-prone areas in Bangladesh, while the mean concentrations of nine other elements in the water were less than 3 μg/L. The types of cancer include squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We hypothesized that barium modulates arsenic-mediated biological effects, and we examined the effect of barium (1 μM) on arsenic (3 μM)-mediated apoptotic cell death of human HSC-5 and A431 SCC cells in vitro. Arsenic promoted SCC apoptosis with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and JNK1/2 and caspase-3 activation (apoptotic pathway). In contrast, arsenic also inhibited SCC apoptosis with increased NF-κB activity and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) expression level and decreased JNK activity (antiapoptotic pathway). These results suggest that arsenic bidirectionally promotes apoptotic and antiapoptotic pathways in SCC cells. Interestingly, barium in the presence of arsenic increased NF-κB activity and XIAP expression and decreased JNK activity without affecting ROS production, resulting in the inhibition of the arsenic-mediated apoptotic pathway. Since the anticancer effect of arsenic is mainly dependent on cancer apoptosis, barium-mediated inhibition of arsenic-induced apoptosis may promote progression of SCC in patients in Bangladesh who keep drinking barium and arsenic-polluted water after the development of cancer. Thus, we newly showed that barium in the presence of arsenic might inhibit arsenic-mediated cancer apoptosis with the modulation of the balance between arsenic-mediated promotive and suppressive apoptotic pathways.

  17. Human papillomavirus in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Colombia and Chile

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Andres; Aguayo, Francisco; Koriyama, Chihaya; Torres, Miyerlandi; Carrascal, Edwin; Corvalan, Alejandro; Roblero, Juan P; Naquira, Cecilia; Palma, Mariana; Backhouse, Claudia; Argandona, Jorge; Itoh, Tetsuhiko; Shuyama, Karem; Eizuru, Yoshito; Akiba, Suminori

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) specimens collected from Colombia and Chile located in the northern and southern ends of the continent, respectively. METHODS: We examined 47 and 26 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded ESCC specimens from Colombia and Chile, respectively. HPV was detected using GP5+/GP6+ primer pair for PCR, and confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Sequencing analysis of L1 region fragment was used to identify HPV genotype. In addition, P16INK4A protein immunostaining of all the specimens was conducted. RESULTS: HPV was detected in 21 ESCC specimens (29%). Sequencing analysis of L1 region fragment identified HPV-16 genome in 6 Colombian cases (13%) and in 5 Chilean cases (19%). HPV-18 was detected in 10 cases (21%) in Colombia but not in any Chilean case. Since Chilean ESCC cases had a higher prevalence of HPV-16 (without statistical significance), but a significantly lower prevalence of HPV-18 than in Colombian cases (P = 0.011) even though the two countries have similar ESCC incidence rates, the frequency of HPV-related ESCC may not be strongly affected by risk factors affecting the incidence of ESCC. HPV-16 genome was more frequently detected in p16 positive carcinomas, although the difference was not statistically significant. HPV-18 detection rate did not show any association with p16 expression. Well-differentiated tumors tended to have either HPV-16 or HPV-18 but the association was not statistically significant. HPV genotypes other than HPV-16 or 18 were not detected in either country. CONCLUSION: HPV-16 and HPV-18 genotypes can be found in ESCC specimens collected from two South American countries. Further studies on the relationship between HPV-16 presence and p16 expression in ESCC would aid understanding of the mechanism underlying the presence of HPV in ESCC. PMID:17036393

  18. No role for human papillomavirus in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in China.

    PubMed

    Koshiol, Jill; Wei, Wen-Qiang; Kreimer, Aimee R; Chen, Wen; Gravitt, Patti; Ren, Jian-Song; Abnet, Christian C; Wang, Jian-Bing; Kamangar, Farin; Lin, Dong-Mei; von Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus; Zhang, Yu; Viscidi, Raphael; Wang, Guo-Qing; Gillison, Maura L; Roth, Mark J; Dong, Zhi-Wei; Kim, Esther; Taylor, Philip R; Qiao, You-Lin; Dawsey, Sanford M

    2010-07-01

    Certain regions of China have high rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Previous studies of human papillomavirus (HPV), a proposed causal factor, have produced highly variable results. We attempted to evaluate HPV and ESCC more definitively using extreme care to prevent DNA contamination. We collected tissue and serum in China from 272 histopathologically-confirmed ESCC cases with rigorous attention to good molecular biology technique. We tested for HPV DNA in fresh-frozen tumor tissue using PCR with PGMY L1 consensus primers and HPV16 and 18 type-specific E6 and E7 primers, and in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue using SPF(10) L1 primers. In HPV-positive cases, we evaluated p16(INK4a) overexpression and HPV E6/E7 seropositivity as evidence of carcinogenic HPV activity. beta-globin, and thus DNA, was adequate in 98.2% of the frozen tumor tissues (267/272). Of these, 99.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 97.9-100.0%) were negative for HPV DNA by PGMY, and 100% (95% CI = 98.6-100%) were negative by HPV16/18 E6/E7 PCR. In the corresponding formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor specimens, 99.3% (95% CI = 97.3-99.9%) were HPV negative by SPF(10). By PGMY, 1 case tested weakly positive for HPV89, a noncancer causing HPV type. By SPF(10), 2 cases tested weakly positive: 1 for HPV16 and 1 for HPV31. No HPV DNA-positive case had evidence of HPV oncogene activity as measured by p16(INK4a) overexpression or E6/E7 seropositivity. This study provides the most definitive evidence to date that HPV is not involved in ESCC carcinogenesis in China. HPV DNA contamination cannot be ruled out as an explanation for high HPV prevalence in ESCC tissue studies with less stringent tissue procurement and processing protocols.

  19. Expression and function of NET-1 in human skin squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    zhang, Jie; Wang, Jianli; Chen, Li; Wang, Guilan; Qin, Jing; Xu, Yuyin; Li, Xingyu

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the clinicopathological significance of NET-1 in human skin squamous cell carcinoma (SSCC). The expression of NET-1 and Ki67 protein was detected using immunostaining from 60 SSCC cases, 50 SIN samples and ten normal skin tissues. The vectors expressing NET-1, siRNA NET-1 and shRNA NET-1 were constructed, as well as negative controls (target-off). In transfected A431 cells, the expression of NET-1 was detected by qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence staining; the proliferation and migration of cells was evaluated by MTT, flow cytometry, wound healing and transwell chamber assays. The stable cell lines transfected with shRNANET-1 was inoculated in nude mice for in vivo study. (1) The levels of NET-1 were significantly higher in SSCC (96.67 %) and SIN III (93.75 %) than that in SIN I and II (41.18 %), (P < 0.05). NET-1 expression was significantly enhanced in spindle-cell SSCC (75 %) versus other histological types (P < 0.05). (2) The expression of NET-1 in A431 cells transfected with siRNANET-1 or shRNANET-1 was significantly decreased; the proliferation and migration of these cells were obviously inhibited as compared to controls (P < 0.05). (3) The growth of subcutaneous tumors was significantly inhibited associated with reduction in the expression of NET-1 vs. the negative control or untreated group (P < 0.05). The overexpression of NET-1 in tumor cells may be closely related to the malignant phenotype of SSCC. NET-1 RNAi used in this study can specifically and effectively downregulate NET-1 gene expression; thus SSCC proliferation, invasion and tumor growth were attenuated. NET-1 might be one of the potential targets for SSCC therapy.

  20. Radiosensitivity of human squamous carcinoma cell lines is associated with amount of spontaneous DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Polischouk, A G; Grénman, R; Granath, F; Lewensohn, R

    2001-01-01

    We asked whether the constitutive level of DNA strand breaks (SBs) in four human squamous carcinoma cell lines is associated with their radiosensitivity, measured by the clonogenic assay. Because impairment in DNA replication and the action of endogenous deoxyribonucleases are two major sources of DNA strand breaks under normal cell metabolism, we also analyzed DNA polymerase and DNA ligase activities as well as the functional status of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and nucleolytic degradation of genomic DNA. We showed that the two relatively radioresistant cell lines, UM-SCC-1 and UT-SCC-5, had a statistically significant lower constitutive level of DNA SBs, as measured by DNA precipitation technique, compared with the two relatively radiosensitive cell lines, UM-SCC-14A and UT-SCC-9. We found that cell lines with a higher level of broken DNA tended to have a higher constitutive level of DNA polymerase alpha activity, measured by incorporation of [(3)H]dTTP in DNase I-activated DNA. UM-SCC-1, UT-SCC-5, and UM-SCC-14A did not show any difference in DNA ligase activity when a nicked oligonucleotide was used as substrate. The most radiosensitive cell line, UT-SCC-9, had a significantly lower ligation efficiency compared to the other three cell lines. The functional status of the PARP was the same in the four cell lines. Although none of the four cell lines showed a characteristic apoptotic or necrotic degradation of genomic DNA, when tested with the "plasmid rejoining assay," a significant degradation of the plasmid DNA in UT-SCC-9 was detected. We conclude that the high fraction of DNA SBs for UT-SCC-9, the most radiosensitive cell line, is most likely a consequence of low ligation efficiency combined with a relatively high DNA polymerase alpha activity and the nuclease degradation of DNA. PMID:11992385

  1. The inhibition of resveratrol to human skin squamous cell carcinoma A431 xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuqin; Huang, Weixing; Liao, Mingmei; Zhu, Yude; Liu, Hong; Hao, Chunguang; Liu, Guodong; Zhang, Guohui; Feng, Hongxia; Ning, Xiaohong; Li, Henggui; Li, Zhehai

    2013-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is one of the commonest dermatological malignancies. Resveratrol (Res) is one type of polyphenolic compound which was first identified from the roots of Veratrum grandinorum in 1940. The previous studies found that Res can promote apoptosis of a variety of tumor cell, especially SCC cells. However it is rare to study the inhibition mechanism of Res in the animal model. In this study, through the establishment of human cutaneous SCC A431 xenografts in nude mice, we observed Res inhibition effect and investigated the inhibition mechanism by checking the expression of apoptosis-related factors, p53, ERK and survivin. The results showed that the xenograft volume and weight of Res groups were less than those of the control groups (P<0.05), but the net body mass of nude mice of Res groups was not significantly different from the control groups (P>0.05). The apoptotic index of Res groups were significantly higher than the control groups (P<0.05). The protein and mRNA expression of p53 and ERK were statistically positively correlated (P<0.05) and significantly increased in Res high- and medium-dose groups compared with the control groups (P<0.05). Moreover, the protein and mRNA expression of SVV were negatively correlated with p53 (P<0.05) and lower than the control groups (P<0.05). The results demonstrate Res inhibitory effect and indicate that the inhibition mechanism of Res is to upgrade the protein and mRNA expression of p53 and to downgrade the protein and mRNA expression of SVV, thus inducing the apoptosis of tumor cells.

  2. Radiosensitization of Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoprotein E6*I

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Ervinna; Delic, Naomi C.; Hong, Angela; Zhang Mei; Rose, Barbara R.; Lyons, J. Guy

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) whose disease is associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have a significantly better outcome than those with HPV-negative disease, but the reasons for the better outcome are not known. We postulated that they might relate to an ability of HPV proteins to confer a better response to radiotherapy, a commonly used treatment for OSCC. Methods and Materials: We stably expressed the specific splicing-derived isoforms, E6*I and E6*II, or the entire E6 open reading frame (E6total), which gives rise to both full length and E6*I isoforms, in OSCC cell lines. Radiation resistance was measured in clonogenicity assays, p53 activity was measured using transfected reporter genes, and flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle and apoptosis. Results: E6*I and E6total sensitized the OSCC cells to irradiation, E6*I giving the greatest degree of radiosensitization (approximately eightfold lower surviving cell fraction at 10 Gy), whereas E6*II had no effect. In contrast to radiosensitivity, E6*I was a weaker inhibitor than E6total of tumor suppressor p53 transactivator activity in the same cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that irradiated E6*I expressing cells had a much higher G2M:G1 ratio than control cells, indicating that, after G2, cells were diverted from the cell cycle to programmed cell death. Conclusion: This study supports a role for E6*I in the enhanced responsiveness of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas to p53-independent radiation-induced death.

  3. Human Papillomavirus as an Independent Predictor in Oral Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dan; Xu, Qin-gan; Chen, Xin-ming; Fan, Ming-wen

    2009-01-01

    Aim There is an increasing evidence for the role of high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relevance of HPV infection to the survival and prognosis of OSCC. Methodology Fifty-two patients with OSCC were followed from 4 to 88 months with a median of 50.7 months. HPV DNA was identified in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens by nested PCR with MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+ primer pairs and the HPV genotype was determined by direct DNA sequencing. Association between the HPV status and risk factors for cancer as well as tumor-host characteristics were analyzed. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed using the log-rank test. Results HPV was found in 40.4% of the tumors with HPV16 accounting for 63.5%, HPV18 for 30.8%, HPV6 for 3.9% and HPV11 for 1.8%. No infection with more than one HPV genotype was detected. HPV infection was significantly associated with poor histological grade, TNM stage I–II, alcohol usage and no smoking status. Multi-variate analysis showed that HPV had an independent prognostic effect on the overall survival after adjusting other confounding factors such as histological grade, TNM stage and tobacco usage. The presence of HPV was significantly correlated with a better survival in patients with OSCC. Conclusion HPV infection can act as an independent predictor for the survival and prognosis of OSCC. PMID:20695077

  4. [The identification of viruses of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk and evaluation of physical status of viral DNA using technique of polymerase-chain reaction under affection of cervical epithelium].

    PubMed

    Viazovaia, A A; Kuevda, D A; Trofimova, O B; Shipulina, O Iu; Ershov, V A; Lialina, L V; Narvskaia, O V

    2013-08-01

    The DNA of virus of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk was detected in 116 cervical samples. At that, the morphological symptoms of background processes are detected in 19 samples, CIN 1 in 9, CIN 2 in 23, CIN 3 in 54 (and out of them carcinoma in situ in 13), epidermoid cancer (squamous cell carcinoma) in 11 cases. The viral load of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk in all samples of DNA exceeded threshold of clinical value (3 lg copies of DNA of human papilloma/105 cells). The genetic typing of human papilloma of high carcinogenic risk revealed the dominance of human papilloma of type 16 in 49.7%, type 33 in 15.3%, type 31 in 12.3% and type 45 in 5.5%. In women with background processes in cervix of the uterus DNA of human papilloma type 16 was detected more often in episome form. In case of dysplastic alterations of epithelium and cervical cancer DNA of human papilloma type 16 is detected in mixt form with different degree of integration into cell genome.

  5. MicroRNA-125a-5p modulates human cervical carcinoma proliferation and migration by targeting ABL2

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xian; Wan, Yajun; Wang, Saiying; Xue, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we intended to understand the regulatory mechanisms of microRNA-125a-5p (miR-125a-5p) in human cervical carcinoma. Methods The gene expressions of miR-125a-5p in seven cervical carcinoma cell lines and 12 human cervical carcinoma samples were evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Ca-Ski and HeLa cells were transduced with lentivirus carrying miR-125a-5p mimics, and the effects of lentivirus-induced miR-125a-5p upregulation on cervical carcinoma proliferation and migration were examined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and transwell assays, respectively. In additional, HeLa cells were inoculated into null mice to evaluate the effect of miR-125a-5p upregulation on in vivo cervical carcinoma growth. The direct regulation of miR-125a-5p on its target gene, ABL proto-oncogene 2 (ABL2), in cervical carcinoma was evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and luciferase reporter assays, respectively. ABL2 was then downregulated by small interfering RNA to examine its effect on cervical carcinoma proliferation and migration. Results miR-125a-5p was downregulated in both cervical carcinoma cell lines and human cervical carcinomas. In Ca-Ski and HeLa cells, lentivirus-mediated miR-125a-5p upregulation inhibited cancer proliferation and migration in vitro and cervical carcinoma transplantation in vivo. ABL2 was shown to be directly targeted by miR-125a-5p. In cervical carcinoma, ABL2 gene and protein levels were both downregulated by miR-125a-5p. Small interfering RNA-mediated ABL2 downregulation also had tumor-suppressive effects on cervical carcinoma proliferation and migration. Conclusion The molecular pathway of miR-125a-5p/ABL2 plays an important role in human cervical carcinoma. Targeting miR-125a-5p/ABL2 pathway may provide a new treatment strategy for patients with cervical carcinoma. PMID:26766902

  6. Prevalence and Genotyping of High Risk Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Cancer Samples from Punjab, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqa, Abida; Zainab, Maidah; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Parish, Joanna L.

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is established as the cause of cervical carcinoma, therefore, high risk HPV detection may have prognostic significance for the women who are at increased risk of disease progression. The paucity of data on the incidence of cervical cancer in Pakistan makes it difficult to determine disease burden. Even less information is available regarding the prevalent HPV strains in cervical specimens collected from this region. Cervical cancer is a neglected disease in Pakistan in terms of screening, prevention, and vaccination. Identification and accurate genotyping of the virus burden in cancer specimens is important to inform intervention policies for future management of HPV associated disease and to potentially stratify patients dependent on HPV status. In this study, detection and genotyping of HPV types 16 and 18 from 77 cervical specimens were carried out. Consensus primers GP5+/GP6+, which detect 44 genital HPV types, and type specific primers (TS16 and TS18) were used in conjunction with newly designed type specific primers. Using a combination of these methods of detection, a total of 94.81% (95% CI ±4.95) of cervical lesions were positive for HPV. Single infections of HPV16 were detected in 24.68% (95% CI ±9.63) of total samples and HPV18 was found in 25.97% (95% CI ±9.79) samples. Interestingly, a high proportion of samples (40.26%, 95% CI ±10.95) was positive for both HPV16 and 18, indicating a higher incidence of co-infection than previously reported for similar ethnic regions. The HPV genotype of 3.90% of HPV positive samples remained undetected, although these samples were positive with the GP5+/GP6+ primer set indicating infection with an HPV type other than 16 or 18. These data indicate that the overall incidence of high risk HPV infection in cervical cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia specimens in Punjab

  7. Prevalence and genotyping of high risk human papillomavirus in cervical cancer samples from Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Siddiqa, Abida; Zainab, Maidah; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Parish, Joanna L

    2014-07-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is established as the cause of cervical carcinoma, therefore, high risk HPV detection may have prognostic significance for the women who are at increased risk of disease progression. The paucity of data on the incidence of cervical cancer in Pakistan makes it difficult to determine disease burden. Even less information is available regarding the prevalent HPV strains in cervical specimens collected from this region. Cervical cancer is a neglected disease in Pakistan in terms of screening, prevention, and vaccination. Identification and accurate genotyping of the virus burden in cancer specimens is important to inform intervention policies for future management of HPV associated disease and to potentially stratify patients dependent on HPV status. In this study, detection and genotyping of HPV types 16 and 18 from 77 cervical specimens were carried out. Consensus primers GP5+/GP6+, which detect 44 genital HPV types, and type specific primers (TS16 and TS18) were used in conjunction with newly designed type specific primers. Using a combination of these methods of detection, a total of 94.81% (95% CI ±4.95) of cervical lesions were positive for HPV. Single infections of HPV16 were detected in 24.68% (95% CI ±9.63) of total samples and HPV18 was found in 25.97% (95% CI ±9.79) samples. Interestingly, a high proportion of samples (40.26%, 95% CI ±10.95) was positive for both HPV16 and 18, indicating a higher incidence of co-infection than previously reported for similar ethnic regions. The HPV genotype of 3.90% of HPV positive samples remained undetected, although these samples were positive with the GP5+/GP6+ primer set indicating infection with an HPV type other than 16 or 18. These data indicate that the overall incidence of high risk HPV infection in cervical cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia specimens in Punjab

  8. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA Triage of Women with Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance with cobas 4800 HPV and Hybrid Capture 2 Tests for Detection of High-Grade Lesions of the Uterine Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Lapierre, Simon Grandjean; Sauthier, Philippe; Mayrand, Marie-Hélène; Dufresne, Simon; Petignat, Patrick; Provencher, Diane; Drouin, Pierre; Gauthier, Philippe; Dupuis, Marie-Josée; Michon, Bertrand; Ouellet, Stéphan; Hadjeres, Rachid; Ferenczy, Alex; Franco, Eduardo L.

    2012-01-01

    The triage of women with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive smears for atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) to colposcopy is now an integrated option in clinical guidelines. The performance of cobas 4800 HPV and that of Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) for HR HPV DNA detection in cervical samples in PreservCyt were compared in 396 women referred to colposcopy for ASC-US. Of these, 316 did not have cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), 47 had CIN1, 29 had CIN2 or CIN3 (CIN2+), and 4 had CIN of unknown grade. HR HPV was detected in 129 (32.6%) and 149 (37.6%) samples with HC2 and cobas 4800 HPV, respectively (P = 0.15). The clinical sensitivities and specificities for detecting CIN2+ were 89.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 72.8 to 97.2%) and 66.7% (95% CI, 61.7 to 71.3%) with cobas 4800 HPV and 93.1% (95% CI, 77.0 to 99.2%) and 72.2% (95% CI 67.4 to 76.5%) with HC2. The performance of cobas 4800 HPV was similar to that of HC2 for identifying women with ASC-US who would benefit the most from colposcopy. PMID:22301023

  9. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain types ...

  10. Biomarkers in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Eun-Kyoung; Park, Jong-Sup

    2006-01-01

    Cervical cancer, a potentially preventable disease, remains the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the single most important etiological agent in cervical cancer, contributing to neoplastic progression through the action of viral oncoproteins, mainly E6 and E7. Cervical screening programs using Pap smear testing have dramatically improved cervical cancer incidence and reduced deaths, but cervical cancer still remains a global health burden. The biomarker discovery for accurate detection and diagnosis of cervical carcinoma and its malignant precursors (collectively referred to as high-grade cervical disease) represents one of the current challenges in clinical medicine and cytopathology. PMID:19690652

  11. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  12. Transcriptomic and Functional Pathway Analysis of Human Cervical Carcinoma Cancer Cells Response to Microtubule Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Yan, Bin; Liu, Song-Mei; Sun, Huanhuan; Pan, Yonglong; Guan, Daogang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Ma, Haiqing

    2015-01-01

    Background: There clearly is a need for effective chemotherapy for early-stage, high-risk patients with human cervical carcinoma. Vinblastine (VBL) is a key microtubule inhibitor, but unproven in its mechanisms as an important antitumor agent in cervical carcinoma. Methods: We selected the concentration of vinblastine inducing 30% cell death for analyses assessing the DNA content, gene expression and transcriptional gene regulation of VBL-treated KB-3 cells. Results: Transcriptomic and hierarchical clustering analysis demonstrated that treatment of KB-3 cells with VBL altered the expression of a diverse group of genes with G2/M arrest, which regulated by four oncogenic or tumor suppresser transcription factors (AP1, NFKB1, RELA, and TP53). Functional pathway analysis revealed the disease response to the biological effects of vinblastine in cervical carcinoma chemotherapy including protein ubiquitination pathway, RhoGDI signaling, integrin signaling, agranulocyte adhesion and biapedesis, and actin nucleation pathways. Northern blots also confirmed that KRT-7, FN14, IER3, and ID1 were deregulated in VBL-treated KB-3 cells. Conclusion: Transcriptional time series profiles and a functional pathway analysis of VBL-treated KB-3 cells will provide a new strategy for improving microtubule inhibitor chemotherapy for cervical carcinoma. PMID:26316889

  13. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer in Australasia and Oceania: risk-factors, epidemiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Garland, Suzanne M; Brotherton, Julia M L; Skinner, S Rachel; Pitts, Marian; Saville, Marion; Mola, Glen; Jones, Ronald W

    2008-08-19

    The region encompassing Australasia and Oceania, including Australia, New Zealand, Fiji and Papua New Guinea, is a diverse one with respect to ethnicities, cultures and behaviours. It includes countries with comprehensive cervical cytology screening programmes which can be credited with significant reductions in cervical cancer incidence and mortality, and countries with no prevention programmes and significantly higher incidence and mortality. As elsewhere in the world, human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 and 18 are the commonest high-risk types, with the highest rates in women under 25 years of age. These two high-risk HPV types are found most frequently in cervical cancers and high-grade dysplasias, although there are minimal data for many countries in Oceania. In April 2007, Australia became the first country worldwide to commence a government funded universal HPV vaccine programme. The school-based programme targets 12-year old females in an ongoing schedule, with a catch-up programme up to 26 years of age, to be completed in mid-2009. Vaccine introduction has been comprehensively rolled out, with around 75% uptake of the complete vaccine schedule among school-girls in the first year of this initiative. This represents a successful model for other countries. We present data on cervical cancer, risk factors and prevention strategies, including epidemiology of HPV and HPV vaccine strategies.

  14. Distribution of Carcinogenic Human Papillomavirus Genotypes and Association to Cervical Lesions among Women in Fez (Morocco)

    PubMed Central

    Souho, Tiatou; El Fatemi, Hinde; Karim, Safae; El Rhazi, Karima; Bouchikhi, Chahrazed; Banani, Abdelaziz; Melhouf, Moulay Abdelilah; Benlemlih, Mohamed; Bennani, Bahia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the distribution of cervical high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes and their association to cellular abnormalities in women from Fez and its neighborhood. Methods Women attending the Hassan II University Hospital for cervical pap smears were recruited after an informed consent. Interviews and two cervical samples were performed for each woman. Cervical samples were used for cytological analysis and HPV DNA detection. HPV was typed using a method based on multiplex PCR with fluorescently labeled specific primers followed by capillary electrophoresis. The study was approved by the ethics committee of the Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Fez. Results The HPV prevalence in the studied population was 43.1% and the most prevalent types were HPV 53 (23 cases); HPV 16 (20 cases); HPV 35 (18 cases); HPV 51 (10 cases) and HPV 56 (7 cases). From the 619 confirmed pap smears, 20% were abnormal. The cytological abnormalities were significantly associated to HPV infection, women age, number of pregnancies and parity (p < 0.05). Conclusion More attention should be given to HPV in Morocco because it represents an important public health concern. The distribution of carcinogenic HPV types in the studied population is different from the data in other regions but epidemiological studies in other Moroccan regions are required. PMID:26731415

  15. From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S.; Vigliotti, Veronica S.; Jones, William

    2014-01-01

    The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm. PMID:25279452

  16. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  17. High risk human papillomavirus in oral squamous carcinoma: evidence of risk factors in a Venezuelan rural population. Preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Premoli-De-Percoco, G; Ramirez, J L

    2001-07-01

    In a search for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and some etiologic cofactors in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), 50 women diagnosed as OSCC were analyzed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay specific for HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18. This study revealed that 60% (30/50) of the OSCC patients were positive for HPV-DNA sequences. This group was analyzed according to smoking, alcohol consumption, number of pregnancies, poor oral health and low social economic status. The current results indicate an increased incidence of HPV malignant types in the oral cavity in women with OSCC. Also, they support a multifactorial model of oral cancer causation.

  18. An adult case of multiple squamous papillomas of the trachea associated with human papilloma virus type 6.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Hideki; Kutomi, Tomoko; Kujime, Kosei; Hara, Kei; Hisada, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman with primary biliary cirrhosis complained of dry cough and wheezing. Chest computed tomography showed a tumor arising from the posterior wall of the trachea. Bronchoscopic examination revealed that the tumor was cauliflower-like, with two small polypoid tumors. They were diagnosed as multiple squamous papillomas. The main tumor was recurrent and removed by repeated microwave coagulation therapy (MCT) through bronchoscopy, whereas the two polypoid tumors were likely to disappear spontaneously. Human papilloma virus (HPV) type 6 DNA was detected in the tumor by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, suggesting that this virus was the cause of her papillomas.

  19. [Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer in México: a constant struggle].

    PubMed

    Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Given that human papillomavirus and cervical cancer are a health problem in México, since they affect women of reproductive age and have a negative impact on our society, it is crucial to prevent those diseases and to raise awareness among physicians who deal with their clinical and therapeutic management. That is the reason why we show three Original contributions and 13 Current themes in this supplement of the Revista Médica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social.

  20. Human papillomavirus type-specific prevalence in women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasm in Western China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinke; Mei, Jie; Wang, Xuedong; Hu, Lina; Lin, Yong; Yang, Pei

    2012-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) type-specific prevalence was studied in 600 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasm in western China by GenoArray test. HPV-16 and -58 were the most prevalent types, with prevalences of 37.8% and 21.8%, respectively. HPV-18 and -45 were uncommon types. The results show different type distributions from that of other regions, which is important evidence for the selection of future genotypes in HPV vaccines in western China.

  1. Global Inequalities in Cervical Cancer Incidence and Mortality are Linked to Deprivation, Low Socioeconomic Status, and Human Development

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gopal K.; Azuine, Romuladus E.; Siahpush, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study examined global inequalities in cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates as a function of cross-national variations in the Human Development Index (HDI), socioeconomic factors, Gender Inequality Index (GII), and healthcare expenditure. Methods Age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates were calculated for women in 184 countries using the 2008 GLOBOCAN database, and incidence and mortality trends were analyzed using the WHO cancer mortality database. Log-linear regression was used to model annual trends, while OLS and Poisson regression models were used to estimate the impact of socioeconomic and human development factors on incidence and mortality rates. Results Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates varied widely, with many African countries such as Guinea, Zambia, Comoros, Tanzania, and Malawi having at least 10-to-20-fold higher rates than several West Asian, Middle East, and European countries, including Iran, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Egypt, and Switzerland. HDI, GII, poverty rate, health expenditure per capita, urbanization, and literacy rate were all significantly related to cervical cancer incidence and mortality, with HDI and poverty rate each explaining >52% of the global variance in mortality. Both incidence and mortality rates increased in relation to lower human development and higher gender inequality levels. A 0.2 unit increase in HDI was associated with a 20% decrease in cervical cancer risk and a 33% decrease in cervical cancer mortality risk. The risk of a cervical cancer diagnosis increased by 24% and of cervical cancer death by 42% for a 0.2 unit increase in GII. Higher health expenditure levels were independently associated with decreased incidence and mortality risks. Conclusions and Public Health Implications Global inequalities in cervical cancer are clearly linked to disparities in human development, social inequality, and living standards. Reductions in cervical cancer rates are achievable by reducing

  2. Comparison of Human Papillomavirus Detection by Aptima HPV and cobas HPV Tests in a Population of Women Referred for Colposcopy following Detection of Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance by Pap Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Philip E.; Eaton, Barbara; Reid, Jennifer; Dockter, Janel

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have compared the cobas HPV test to the Aptima HPV assay (AHPV) and the Aptima HPV 16 18/45 genotype assay (AHPV GT) for high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) detection, clinical performance in detecting cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 (CIN2) or more severe (CIN2+) diagnoses, and risk stratification by partial HPV genotyping. The cobas HPV test is a DNA test that separately and concurrently detects HPV16, HPV18, and a pool of 12 other hrHPV types. AHPV is an RNA test for a pool of 14 hrHPV genotypes, and AHPV GT is an RNA test run on AHPV-positive results to detect HPV16 separately from HPV18 and HPV45, which are detected together. In a population of patients (n = 988) referred for colposcopy because of a cervical Pap cytology result of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US), a cervical scrape specimen was taken, placed into a ThinPrep Pap test vial containing PreservCyt liquid cytology medium, and tested in a blinded fashion with cobas and AHPV and with AHPV GT for AHPV-positive results. The final diagnoses were based on a consensus panel review of the biopsy specimen histology. AHPV and cobas were equally sensitive for CIN2+ diagnoses (89.4% each; P = 1.000), and AHPV was more specific than cobas (63.1% versus 59.3%; P ≤ 0.001). The percent total agreement, percent positive agreement, and kappa value were 90.9%, 81.1%, and 0.815, respectively. Risk stratification using partial HPV genotyping was similar for the two assays. AHPV and AHPV GT had similar sensitivity and risk stratification to cobas HPV, but they were more specific than cobas HPV. PMID:25653409

  3. The impact of human papillomavirus information on perceived risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Marlow, Laura A V; Waller, Jo; Wardle, Jane

    2009-02-01

    There is a need to develop public education about the link between human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Explaining that a sexually transmitted virus causes cervical cancer may affect perceived risk of cervical cancer. We hypothesized that presenting HPV information would have differential effects depending on age and screening attendance. Data were collected during face-to-face interviews with a sample of British women age 16 to 75 years who had not heard of HPV before (n = 965). A repeated measures design was used, assessing perceived risk of cervical cancer before and after providing information about HPV. Perceived risk was assessed using a comparative risk measure with a five-point response scale. Preinformation, the mean perceived risk score was 2.64 (SE, 0.03). Overall, presentation of HPV information did not have an effect on perceived risk of cervical cancer [chi(2)(1) = .72; P = 0.396], but as expected, there was a significant time by age interaction for the change in perceived risk [chi(2)(5) = 33.56; P < 0.001], which increased in the youngest age group (16-25 years) and decreased in the oldest age group (65-75 years). In a separate analysis with women in the screening age range (25-64 years; n = 709), there was a significant time by screening attendance interaction [chi(2)(1) = 5.25; P = 0.022], with an increase in perceived risk among women who did not regularly attend screening. This is the first study to examine the effect of HPV information on perceived risk across different population groups. Interventions to increase awareness of HPV could benefit from tailoring information to prescreening age, screening age, and postscreening age women.

  4. Expression and Prognostic Value of Aquaporin 1, 3 in Cervical Carcinoma in Women of Uygur Ethnicity from Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Shi, Yonghua; Amiduo, Reshalaity; Tuokan, Talaf; Suzuk, Lalai

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of several aquaporins has been reported in different types of human cancer but the role of aquaporins in carcinogenesis has not yet been clearly defined. There is few report concerning role of aquaporins in human cervical carcinogenesis so far. Here, we determined the expression and prognostic value of aquaporin 1, 3 in cervical carcinoma in Chinese women of Uygur ethnicity. Methods and Results Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated aquaporin 1, 3 mRNA were differentially expressed in cervical carcinoma, CIN 2-3 and mild cervicitis. Immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated aquaporin 1 was predominantly localized to stromal endothelial cells in cervical lesions. Aquaporin 3 was localized to the membrane of normal squamous epithelium, CIN and carcinoma cells. Aquaporin 1 and 3 were upregulated in cervical cancer compared to mild cervicitis and CIN2-3 (P<0.05); Tumor expression of aquaporin 1, 3 significantly increased in advanced stage disease, and patients with deeper tumor infiltration, lymph node metastases or larger tumor volume (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that aquaporin 1, 3 were not independent prognostic factors in cervical carcinoma. Conclusion Aquaporins may participate in the initiation and progression of cervical carcinoma by promoting tumor growth, invasion or lymph node metastasis. Further study is required to determine whether aquaporins have potential as prognostic factors in cervical cancer. PMID:24918928

  5. Photodynamic therapy activated STAT3 associated pathways: Targeting intrinsic apoptotic pathways to increase PDT efficacy in human squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Li; Xu, Chengshan; Li, Qiang; Mei, Zhusong; Li, Xinji; Cai, Hong; Liu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    5-Aminolaevulinic acid-based photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) has been used for part of squamous cell carcinoma (premalignant conditions or in situ cutaneous SCC-Bowen disease). However, mechanism of ALA-PDT is not fully understood yet on the cell apoptosis pathway. The aim of this study was to further investigate the effect and mechanism of 5-ALA-PDT on human squamous carcinoma A431cells. Apoptosis and cell viability after PDT were evaluated using Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection kit and MTT assay. The mRNA and protein levels were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. Our data showed that 5-ALA-PDT significantly inhibited cell proliferation (p<0.05), but there was no significant difference when the photosensitizer reached to 4.8mM. The inhibition in cell proliferation after 5-ALA-PDT treatment was correlated to more cells being arrested in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle (p<0.01). Immunocytochemical observations using anti-active caspase-3 antibodies showed active caspase-3 was translocated from cytoplasm to nuclear during apoptosis. STAT3 and its downstream gene Bax and BCL-2 were changed after 5-ALA-PDT treatment for the mRNA and protein expression. Our studies confirmed that 5-ALA-PDT might be an effective treatment for human squamous carcinoma by inhibiting the tumor cell A431growth and for the first time demonstrated that the expression of STAT3 was significantly reduced at 24h after 5-ALA-PDT treatment. PMID:26607555

  6. Macrophages Modulate Migration and Invasion of Human Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pirilä, Emma; Väyrynen, Otto; Sundquist, Elias; Päkkilä, Kaisa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Pääkkönen, Virve; Pesonen, Paula; Dayan, Dan; Vered, Marilena; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Salo, Tuula

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) has a high mortality rate and the incidence is rising worldwide. Despite advances in treatment, the disease lacks specific prognostic markers and treatment modality. The spreading of OTSCC is dependent on the tumor microenvironment and involves tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Although the presence of TAMs is associated with poor prognosis in OTSCC, the specific mechanisms underlying this are still unknown. The aim here was to investigate the effect of macrophages (Mfs) on HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells and NF-kappaB activity. We polarized THP-1 cells to M1 (inflammatory), M2 (TAM-like) and R848 (imidazoquinoline-treated) type Mfs. We then investigated the effect of Mfs on HSC-3 cell migration and NF-kappaB activity, cytokine production and invasion using several different in vitro migration models, a human 3D tissue invasion model, antibody arrays, confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry and a mouse invasion model. We found that in co-culture studies all types of Mfs fused with HSC-3 cells, a process which was partially due to efferocytosis. HSC-3 cells induced expression of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta in co-cultures with M2 Mfs. Direct cell-cell contact between M2 Mfs and HSC-3 cells induced migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells while M1 Mfs reduced HSC-3 cell invasion. M2 Mfs had an excess of NF-kappaB p50 subunit and a lack of p65 subunits both in the presence and absence of HSC-3 cells, indicating dysregulation and pro-tumorigenic NF-kappaB activation. TAM-like cells were abundantly present in close vicinity to carcinoma cells in OTSCC patient samples. We conclude that M2 Mfs/TAMs have an important role in OTSCC regulating adhesion, migration, invasion and cytokine production of carcinoma cells favouring tumor growth. These results demonstrate that OTSCC patients could benefit from therapies targeting TAMs, polarizing TAM-like M2 Mfs to inflammatory macrophages and modulating NF

  7. No role for human papillomavirus in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in China.

    PubMed

    Koshiol, Jill; Wei, Wen-Qiang; Kreimer, Aimee R; Chen, Wen; Gravitt, Patti; Ren, Jian-Song; Abnet, Christian C; Wang, Jian-Bing; Kamangar, Farin; Lin, Dong-Mei; von Knebel-Doeberitz, Magnus; Zhang, Yu; Viscidi, Raphael; Wang, Guo-Qing; Gillison, Maura L; Roth, Mark J; Dong, Zhi-Wei; Kim, Esther; Taylor, Philip R; Qiao, You-Lin; Dawsey, Sanford M

    2010-07-01

    Certain regions of China have high rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Previous studies of human papillomavirus (HPV), a proposed causal factor, have produced highly variable results. We attempted to evaluate HPV and ESCC more definitively using extreme care to prevent DNA contamination. We collected tissue and serum in China from 272 histopathologically-confirmed ESCC cases with rigorous attention to good molecular biology technique. We tested for HPV DNA in fresh-frozen tumor tissue using PCR with PGMY L1 consensus primers and HPV16 and 18 type-specific E6 and E7 primers, and in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue using SPF(10) L1 primers. In HPV-positive cases, we evaluated p16(INK4a) overexpression and HPV E6/E7 seropositivity as evidence of carcinogenic HPV activity. beta-globin, and thus DNA, was adequate in 98.2% of the frozen tumor tissues (267/272). Of these, 99.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 97.9-100.0%) were negative for HPV DNA by PGMY, and 100% (95% CI = 98.6-100%) were negative by HPV16/18 E6/E7 PCR. In the corresponding formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor specimens, 99.3% (95% CI = 97.3-99.9%) were HPV negative by SPF(10). By PGMY, 1 case tested weakly positive for HPV89, a noncancer causing HPV type. By SPF(10), 2 cases tested weakly positive: 1 for HPV16 and 1 for HPV31. No HPV DNA-positive case had evidence of HPV oncogene activity as measured by p16(INK4a) overexpression or E6/E7 seropositivity. This study provides the most definitive evidence to date that HPV is not involved in ESCC carcinogenesis in China. HPV DNA contamination cannot be ruled out as an explanation for high HPV prevalence in ESCC tissue studies with less stringent tissue procurement and processing protocols. PMID:19918949

  8. Loss of transcription factor KLF5 in the context of p53 ablation drives invasive progression of human squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yizeng; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Tetreault, Marie-Pier; Billig, Janelle; Victor, Noel; Goyal, Abha; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Katz, Jonathan P

    2011-10-15

    Squamous cell cancers account for more than half of all human cancers, and esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The majority of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas have identifiable p53 mutations, yet the same p53 mutations are found at comparable frequencies in precancerous dysplasia, indicating that transformation requires additional somatic changes yet to be defined. Here, we show that the zinc finger transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) transactivates NOTCH1 in the context of p53 mutation or loss. KLF5 loss limited NOTCH1 activity and was sufficient on its own to transform primary human keratinocytes harboring mutant p53, leading to the formation of invasive tumors. Restoration of NOTCH1 blocked transformation of KLF5-deficient and p53-mutant keratinocytes. Although human dysplastic epithelia accumulated KLF5, KLF5 expression was lost concurrently with NOTCH1 in squamous cell cancers. Taken together, these results define KLF5 loss as a critical event in squamous cell transformation and invasion. Our findings suggest that KLF5 may be a useful diagnostic and therapeutic target in esophageal squamous carcinomas and possibly more generally in other cancers associated with p53 loss of function.

  9. The assessment of the prognostic value of tumor markers and cytokines as SCCAg, CYFRA 21.1, IL-6, VEGF and sTNF receptors in patients with squamous cell cervical cancer, particularly with early stage of the disease.

    PubMed

    Kotowicz, Beata; Fuksiewicz, Malgorzata; Jonska-Gmyrek, Joanna; Bidzinski, Mariusz; Kowalska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the prognostic value of tumor markers, as squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCAg) and cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21.1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor I (sTNF RI), and sTNF RII in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. The subjects of analysis were 138 patients with stage I-IVA according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification. The collected research material comes from one oncology center. During the 10 years of follow-up, 56 relapses and 53 deaths were observed, and recurrent disease in early stage was confirmed in 45 % of patients. The pretreatment serum levels of SCCAg and CYFRA 21.1, and cytokines IL-6, VEGF, sTNF RI, and sTNF RII were determined in all patients. The probability of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was evaluated using the log-rank test and the Cox regression model. Based on the ROC curve analysis for patients with recurrence, the largest area under the curve was demonstrated for SCCAg and IL-6 and for patients who died, for SCCAg and VEGF. Cox analysis demonstrated that independent prognostic factor for DFS was only SCCAg and for OS cytokine IL-6 and SCCAg, but in patients with early stage the prognostic value for DFS was VEGF, whereas IL-6 and CYFRA 21.1 for OS. Serum level of VEGF, CYFRA 21.1 and IL-6 before treatment in patients with early stage cervical cancer appears to be an important prognostic factor. PMID:26289850

  10. [The impact of natural history and genital tract distribution of human papillomavirus on technology for cervical cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Wu, Z N; Chen, W

    2016-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the necessary cause of cervical cancer. There is a close relationship between the amount of DNA, mRNA and protein expression in the natural history of virus and the cervical lesion. This article is aimed to elaborate the natural history and genital tract distribution of high risk HPV, and also evaluate the HPV based cervical cancer screening technology from the perspective of the natural history of HPV, which is meaningful for screening and clinical practice in devising and utilizing different detection technology.

  11. Stat3 induces oncogenic Skp2 expression in human cervical carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hanhui; Zhao, Wenrong; Yang, Dan

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of Skp2 by IL-6 or Stat3 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stat3 activates Skp2 expression through bound to its promoter region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stat3 activates Skp2 expression through recruitment of P300. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stat3 activation decreases the P27 stability. -- Abstract: Dysregulated Skp2 function promotes cell proliferation, which is consistent with observations of Skp2 over-expression in many types of human cancers, including cervical carcinoma (CC). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying elevated Skp2 expression have not been fully explored. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) induced Stat3 activation is viewed as crucial for multiple tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that Skp2 is a direct transcriptional target of Stat3 in the human cervical carcinoma cells. Our data show that IL-6 administration or transfection of a constitutively activated Stat3 in HeLa cells activates Skp2 mRNA transcription. Using luciferase reporter and ChIP assays, we show that Stat3 binds to the promoter region of Skp2 and promotes its activity through recruiting P300. As a result of the increase of Skp2 expression, endogenous p27 protein levels are markedly decreased. Thus, our results suggest a previously unknown Stat3-Skp2 molecular network controlling cervical carcinoma development.

  12. Cucurbitacin E as inducer of cell death and apoptosis in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line SAS.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chao-Ming; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Chen-Wei; Ko, Shun-Yao; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2013-08-20

    Human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a common form of malignant cancer, for which radiotherapy or chemotherapy are the main treatment methods. Cucurbitacin E (CuE) is a natural compound previously shown to be an antifeedant as well as a potent chemopreventive agent against several types of cancer. The present study investigates anti-proliferation (using MTT assay, CuE demonstrated cytotoxic activity against SAS cell with IC50 values at 3.69 µM) and induced apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells after 24 h treatment with CuE. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and caspase activity were studied and our results indicate that CuE inhibits cell proliferation as well as the activation of apoptois in SAS cells. Both effects increased in proportion to the dosage of CuE and apoptosis was induced via mitochondria- and caspase-dependent pathways. CuE can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not dependent on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of OSCC.

  13. New Approaches to Prophylactic Human Papillomavirus Vaccines for Cervical Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gersch, Elizabeth D.; Gissmann, Lutz; Garcea, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The currently licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are safe and highly effective at preventing HPV infection for a select number of papillomavirus types, thus decreasing the incidence of precursors to cervical cancer. It is expected that vaccination will also ultimately reduce the incidence of this cancer. However, the licensed HPV vaccines are type-restricted and expensive, and also require refrigeration, multiple doses, and intramuscular injection. Second generation vaccines are currently being developed to address these shortcomings. New expression systems, viral and bacterial vectors for HPV L1 capsid protein delivery, and use of the HPV L2 capsid protein will hopefully aid in decreasing cost and increasing ease of use and breadth of protection. These second generation vaccines also could allow affordable immunization of women in developing countries, where the incidence of cervical cancer is high. PMID:22293302

  14. New approaches to prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines for cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Gersch, Elizabeth D; Gissmann, Lutz; Garcea, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    The currently licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are safe and highly effective at preventing HPV infection for a select number of papillomavirus types, thus decreasing the incidence of precursors to cervical cancer. It is expected that vaccination will also ultimately reduce the incidence of this cancer. The licensed HPV vaccines are, however, type restricted and expensive, and also require refrigeration, multiple doses and intramuscular injection. Second-generation vaccines are currently being developed to address these shortcomings. New expression systems, viral and bacterial vectors for HPV L1 capsid protein delivery, and use of the HPV L2 capsid protein will hopefully aid in decreasing cost and increasing ease of use and breadth of protection. These second-generation vaccines could also allow affordable immunization of women in developing countries, where the incidence of cervical cancer is high.

  15. American Cancer Society Guideline for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine use to prevent cervical cancer and its precursors.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Castle, Philip E; Cox, J Thomas; Davey, Diane D; Einstein, Mark H; Ferris, Daron G; Goldie, Sue J; Harper, Diane M; Kinney, Walter; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Noller, Kenneth L; Wheeler, Cosette M; Ades, Terri; Andrews, Kimberly S; Doroshenk, Mary K; Kahn, Kelly Green; Schmidt, Christy; Shafey, Omar; Smith, Robert A; Partridge, Edward E; Garcia, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) has developed guidelines for the use of the prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for the prevention of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer. These recommendations are based on a formal review of the available evidence. They address the use of prophylactic HPV vaccines, including who should be vaccinated and at what age, as well as a summary of policy and implementation issues. Implications for screening are also discussed.

  16. Cervical Microbiome and Cytokine Profile at Various Stages of Cervical Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Audirac-Chalifour, Astride; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bahena-Román, Margarita; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; López-Estrada, Guillermina; Delgado-Romero, Karina; Burguete-García, Ana I; Cantú, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus persistence due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines. Vaginal microbiota determines the presence of certain cytokines locally. We assessed the association between cervical microbiota diversity and the histopathological diagnosis of each stage of CC, and we evaluated mRNA cervical expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α and IFN-γ across the histopathological diagnosis and specific bacterial clusters. We determined the cervical microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons and classified it in community state types (CST). Mean difference analyses between alpha-diversity and histopathological diagnosis were carried out, as well as a β-diversity analysis within the histological diagnosis. Cervical cytokine mRNA expression was analyzed across the CSTs and the histopathological diagnoses. We found a significant difference in microbiota's diversity in NCL-HPV negative women vs those with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and CC(p = 0.006, p = 0.036).When β-diversity was evaluated, the CC samples showed the highest variation within groups (p<0.0006) and the largest distance compared to NCL-HPV negative ones (p<0.00001). The predominant bacteria in women with normal cytology were L. crispatus and L. iners, whereas for SIL, it was Sneathia spp. and for CC, Fusobacterium spp. We found higher median cervical levels of IL-4 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the CST dominated by Fusobacterium spp. These results suggest that the cervical microbiota may be implicated in cervical cancer pathology. Further cohort studies are needed to validate these findings.

  17. Cervical Microbiome and Cytokine Profile at Various Stages of Cervical Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bahena-Román, Margarita; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; López-Estrada, Guillermina; Delgado-Romero, Karina; Burguete-García, Ana I.; Cantú, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus persistence due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines. Vaginal microbiota determines the presence of certain cytokines locally. We assessed the association between cervical microbiota diversity and the histopathological diagnosis of each stage of CC, and we evaluated mRNA cervical expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α and IFN-γ across the histopathological diagnosis and specific bacterial clusters. We determined the cervical microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons and classified it in community state types (CST). Mean difference analyses between alpha-diversity and histopathological diagnosis were carried out, as well as a β-diversity analysis within the histological diagnosis. Cervical cytokine mRNA expression was analyzed across the CSTs and the histopathological diagnoses. We found a significant difference in microbiota's diversity in NCL-HPV negative women vs those with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and CC(p = 0.006, p = 0.036).When β-diversity was evaluated, the CC samples showed the highest variation within groups (p<0.0006) and the largest distance compared to NCL-HPV negative ones (p<0.00001). The predominant bacteria in women with normal cytology were L. crispatus and L. iners, whereas for SIL, it was Sneathia spp. and for CC, Fusobacterium spp. We found higher median cervical levels of IL-4 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the CST dominated by Fusobacterium spp. These results suggest that the cervical microbiota may be implicated in cervical cancer pathology. Further cohort studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:27115350

  18. Lack of association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and cervical human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    García-Carrasco, M; Mendoza-Pinto, C; Munguía-Realpozo, P; Rodríguez-Gallegos, A; Vallejo-Ruiz, V; Muñoz-Guarneros, M; Méndez-Martínez, S; Soto-Santillán, P; Pezzat-Said, E; Reyes-Leyva, J; López-Colombo, A; Ruiz-Argüelles, A; Cervera, R

    2015-05-01

    Our objective was to evaluate whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with cervical human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in women with SLE. This is a cross-sectional study of 67 women with SLE. A structured questionnaire was administered to ascertain the possible risk factors associated with cervical HPV infection. A gynaecological evaluation and cervical cytology screening were made. HPV detection and genotyping was made by PCR and linear array assay. Serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D levels were quantified by chemiluminescence immunoassay. Mean age and disease duration were 44.8 ± 10.6 and 42.5 ± 11.8 years, respectively. Demographic characteristics were similar in patients with and without deficiency (<20 ng/ml and ≥20 ng/ml). There were 28.4% of women with cervical HPV infection and 68.4% had high-risk HPV infections. Patients with 25 hydroxyvitamin D levels <20 ng/ml had a higher prevalence of cervical HPV infection than those with levels ≥20 ng/ml (30.7% vs. 25.8%; p = 0.72). We found no significant difference when high-risk HPV infection was evaluated (36.8% vs. 31.5%; p = 0.73). In conclusion, women with SLE have a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and cervical HPV infection. However, we found no association between vitamin D deficiency and cervical HPV.

  19. Critical roles for non-pRb targets of human papillomavirus type 16 E7 in cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Balsitis, Scott; Dick, Fred; Dyson, Nicholas; Lambert, Paul F

    2006-10-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) encode two oncogenes, E6 and E7, expressed in nearly all cervical cancers. In vivo, HPV-16 E7 has been shown to induce multiple phenotypes in the context of transgenic mice, including cervical cancer. E7 is a multifunctional protein known best for its ability to inactivate the tumor suppressor pRb. To determine the importance of pRb inactivation by E7 in cervical cancer, we pursued studies with genetically engineered mice. E7 expression in estrogen-treated murine cervix induced dysplasia and invasive cancers as reported previously, but targeted Rb inactivation in cervical epithelium was not sufficient to induce any cervical dysplasia or neoplasia. Furthermore, E7 induced cervical cancer formation even when the E7-pRb interaction was disrupted by the use of a knock-in mouse carrying an E7-resistant mutant Rb allele. pRb inactivation was necessary but not sufficient for E7 to overcome differentiation-induced or DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, and expression patterns of the E2F-responsive genes Mcm7 and cyclin E indicate that other E2F regulators besides pRb are important targets of E7. Together, these data indicate that non-pRb targets of E7 play critical roles in cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:17018593

  20. The caspase 3-dependent apoptotic effect of pycnogenol in human oral squamous cell carcinoma HSC-3 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, In-Hyoung; Shin, Ji-Ae; Kim, Lee-Han; Kwon, Ki Han; Cho, Sung-Dae

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the apoptotic effect of pycnogenol and its molecular mechanism in human oral squamous cell carcinoma HSC-3 cells were investigated. Pycnogenol significantly inhibited the viability of HSC-3 cells and suppressed neoplastic cell transformation in HSC-3 cells and TPA-treated JB6 cells. It caused caspase-dependent apoptosis evidenced by the increase in cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and caspase 3 in a dose-dependent manner. Pycnogenol increased Bak protein by enhancing its protein stability whereas other Bcl-2 family members were not altered. In addition, the treatment with pycnogenol led to the production of reactive oxygen species and N-acetyl-l-cysteine almost blocked pycnogenol-induced reactive oxygen species generation. Taken together, these findings suggest that pycnogenol may be a potential candidate for the chemoprevention or chemotherapy of human oral cancer. PMID:26798196

  1. Myelin water fraction in human cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yijing; Alexander, Andrew L; Fleming, John O; Duncan, Ian D; Field, Aaron S

    2006-01-01

    The noninvasive discrimination of myelin disease from axonal loss and other pathologic confounds remains an unsolved problem in multiple sclerosis but may be possible through magnetic resonance quantitation of the intramyelinic water compartment. Technical challenges have limited the study of this approach in the spinal cord, a common site of involvement in multiple sclerosis. This technical note reports the test-retest reproducibility of a short T2-based estimate of myelin content in human spinal cord in vivo.

  2. Transcriptome signature of irreversible senescence in human papillomavirus-positive cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Susanne I.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Wise, Trisha M.; Williams, Sarah S.; Couget, Jennifer A.; Howley, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    A frequent characteristic of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive cervical cancers is the loss of viral E2 gene expression in HPV-infected cervical epithelial cells as a consequence of viral DNA integration into the cellular genome. The expression of E2 in HPV-positive cancer cells results in the repression of the viral E6/E7 oncogenes, activation of the p53 and pRB pathways, and a G1 cell cycle arrest, followed by induction of cellular senescence. The transcriptional consequences of E2-mediated cell cycle arrest that lead to senescence currently are unknown. Using conditional senescence induction in HeLa cells and microarray analysis, we describe here the expression profile of cells irreversibly committed to senescence. Our results provide insight into the molecular anatomy of senescence pathways and its regulation by HPV on-coproteins. These include the induction of the RAB vesicular transport machinery and a general down-regulation of chromatin regulatory molecules. The repression of tumor-specific G antigens during E2 senescence supports a reversal of the tumorigenic phenotype by E2 and the potential approach of tumor-specific G antigen-specific immunotherapy for cervical cancer. PMID:12756294

  3. Human papillomavirus prevalence, cervical abnormalities and risk factors among female sex workers in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Cabral, A; Byraiah, G; Guerra-Giraldez, C; Sarabia-Vega, V; Carcamo, C; Gravitt, P E; Halsey, N A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Female sex workers (FSWs) are at high risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Questionnaires were administered to 200 FSWs aged 18–26 years in Lima, Peru, to gather risk behaviours, and cervical swab samples were collected for Pap smears and HPV DNA testing as part of a longitudinal study. Participants reported a median of 120 clients in the past month, and 99.2% reported using condoms with clients. The prevalence of any HPV in cervical samples was 66.8%; 34 (17.1%) participants had prevalent HPV 16 or 18, and 92 (46.2%) had one or more oncogenic types. Fifteen women had abnormal Pap smears, 13 of which were HPV DNA positive. Fewer years since first sex was associated with oncogenic HPV prevalence in a model adjusted for previous sexually transmitted infection (STI) status and condom use with partners (prevalence ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.60–0.97). Our data confirm the high rates of HPV transmission among FSWs in Peru, highlighting the need for early and effective strategies to prevent cervical cancer. PMID:22581946

  4. Human papillomavirus prevalence, cervical abnormalities and risk factors among female sex workers in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Cabral, A; Byraiah, G; Guerra-Giraldez, C; Sarabia-Vega, V; Carcamo, C; Gravitt, P E; Halsey, N A

    2012-04-01

    Female sex workers (FSWs) are at high risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Questionnaires were administered to 200 FSWs aged 18-26 years in Lima, Peru, to gather risk behaviours, and cervical swab samples were collected for Pap smears and HPV DNA testing as part of a longitudinal study. Participants reported a median of 120 clients in the past month, and 99.2% reported using condoms with clients. The prevalence of any HPV in cervical samples was 66.8%; 34 (17.1%) participants had prevalent HPV 16 or 18, and 92 (46.2%) had one or more oncogenic types. Fifteen women had abnormal Pap smears, 13 of which were HPV DNA positive. Fewer years since first sex was associated with oncogenic HPV prevalence in a model adjusted for previous sexually transmitted infection (STI) status and condom use with partners (prevalence ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.60-0.97). Our data confirm the high rates of HPV transmission among FSWs in Peru, highlighting the need for early and effective strategies to prevent cervical cancer. PMID:22581946

  5. Relationship between estradiol 16 alpha-hydroxylation and human papillomavirus infection in cervical cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Salazar, E L; Mercado, E; Sojo, I; Salcedo, M

    2001-10-01

    The ovarian steroid hormone estradiol and its metabolite estrone were examined in 45 normal women and 127 premenopausal women with precancerous cervical lesions. Interviews, colposcopy and cervical scrapings were performed. The mean +/- SD values for estradiol and estrone were 0.07 +/- 0.08 ng/ml and 0.06 +/- 0.02 ng/ml, respectively in normal subjects. Corresponding data in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia alone or in association with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection were 0.074 +/- 0.03 ng/ml and 0.076 +/- 0.03 ng/ml or 0.080 +/- 0.03 ng/ml and 0.148 +/- 0.02 ng/ml, respectively, which revealed a significantly greater extent of estrogenic action in the latter population (p < 0.05). We considered that the presence of HPV infection probably increased 16 alpha-hydroxylation of estradiol, providing a possible link between the viral and hormonal elements, possibly having a bearing on the etiology of the disease.

  6. Cervical vertebrae, cranial base, and mandibular retrognathia in human triploid fetuses.

    PubMed

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Nolting, Dorrit; Engel, Ulla; Kjaer, Inger

    2009-02-01

    On profile radiographs of adults, an association between fusions of cervical vertebrae, deviations in the cranial base and mandibular retrognathia has been documented radiographically. An elaboration of this association on a histological level is needed. In human triploid fetuses severe mandibular retrognathia and deviations in the cranial base have previously been described radiographically (without cephalometry) and cervical column fusions radiographically as well as histologically. Therefore, triploid fetuses were chosen to elucidate the cranial base cephalomterically and histologically. In the present study, eight triploid fetuses were analyzed radiographically and histologically focusing especially on the cranial base, which borders to the spine and to which the jaws are attached. A histological analysis of the cranial base has not previously been performed in triploid cases. An enlarged cranial base angle and a retrognathic position of the mandible were documented cephalometrically on radiographs of all cases. Histologically, malformations were observed in the cranial base as well as in the spine. These are new findings indicating the association between the occipital bone and the uppermost vertebra in the body axis. As the notochord connects the cervical column and the cranial base in early prenatal life, molecular signaling from the notochord may in future studies support the notochord as the developmental link between abnormal development in the spine and the cranial base.

  7. T-cell proliferative response to human papillomavirus type 16 peptides: relationship to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, M; Stites, D P; Farhat, S; Judd, A; Moscicki, A B; Canchola, A J; Hilton, J F; Palefsky, J M

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer is increased with immunodeficiency, but the role of immune response, including cell-mediated immunity, in disease prevention is not well understood. In this study, T-cell proliferative responses to six synthetic peptides with predicted immunogenic determinants from the HPV-16 E4, E6, E7, and L1 open reading frames were analyzed in 22 sexually active women with new-onset CIN and 65 sexually active women without cervical disease, characterized by cytology, colposcopy, and HPV testing. T-cell proliferative responses were demonstrated to all six HPV-16 peptides. Although not statistically significant, rates of reactivity to E6 (24-45) were higher among sexually active women without disease (26%) than among women with current CIN (7%), as was the overall number of peptides stimulating a response. Women with CIN may not respond to selected HPV antigens as well as women without disease do. PMID:8991637

  8. Human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 and the prognosis of patients with stage I cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo Catão Zampronha, Rossana; Freitas-Junior, Ruffo; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido; Michelin, Márcia Antoniazi; Barbaresco, Aline Almeida; Adad, Sheila Jorge; de Oliveira, Amaurillo Monteiro; Rassi, Amanda B.; Oton, Glória Jabur Bittar

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study sought to evaluate the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 in women with clinical stage IB cervical cancer treated by radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy as well as to establish a correlation between HPV type and cancer prognosis. METHODS: A single-center cohort study was conducted with 86 patients who had undergone radical hysterectomy for stage I cervical cancer. Prognostic factors and the presence of HPV 16 and 18 were analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction assay. A univariate analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves was conducted to estimate survival. RESULTS: The prevalence of HPV 16 in the study group was 65.3%, and the prevalence of HPV 18 was 33.3%. The prevalence of infection with both viruses was 26.9%. Overall survival at 5 years was 91% among women with HPV 18 and 96% among those without this virus type (p = 0.133). Among the women with HPV 16, the overall survival was 94%, whereas this rate was 96% among those without this virus type (p = 0.663). Disease-free survival was unaffected by the presence of HPV type 16 or 18. CONCLUSION: In the present study, despite the high prevalence of HPV types 16 and 18, the presence of these virus types did not affect the prognosis of patients with stage I cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomy. PMID:23778490

  9. Recent progress in vaccination against human papillomavirus-mediated cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    McKee, Sara J; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Leggatt, Graham R

    2015-03-01

    It has been more than 7 years since the commercial introduction of highly successful vaccines protecting against high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes and the development of cervical cancer. From an immune standpoint, the dependence of cervical cancer on viral infection has meant that HPV proteins can be targeted as strong tumour antigens leading to clearance of the infection and the subsequent protection from cancer. Commercially available vaccines consisting of the L1 capsid protein assembled as virus-like particles (VLPs) induce neutralising antibodies that deny access of the virus to cervical epithelial cells. While greater than 90% efficacy has been demonstrated at the completion of large phase III trials in young women, vaccine developers are now addressing broader issues such as efficacy in boys, longevity of the protection and inducing cross-reactive antibody for oncogenic, non-vaccine HPV strains. For women with existing HPV infection, the prophylactic vaccines provide little protection, and consequently, the need for therapeutic vaccines will continue into the future. Therapeutic vaccines targeting HPVE6 and E7 proteins are actively being pursued with new adjuvants and delivery vectors, combined with an improved knowledge of the tumour microenvironment, showing great promise. This review will focus on recent progress in prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine development and implementation since the publication of end of study data from phase III clinical trials between 2010 and 2012.

  10. Decrease of miR-146a is associated with the aggressiveness of human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zonggao; Johnson, Jeffrey J.; Jiang, Rong; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to identify microRNAs that may contribute to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) progression, we compared the microRNA expression profiles of two related cell lines that form tumors with differential aggressiveness. A panel of 28 microRNAs was found to be more than 1.5-fold altered, among which miR-146a was the most significantly changed (-4.6-fold). Loss of miR-146a expression was validated in human high-grade tumors, while normal oral mucosa retained expression, using fluorescence in situ hybridization on a tissue microarray. Restoration of miR-146a in SCC25 and UMSCC1 cells decreased in vitro invasive activity, suppressed tumor growth in vivo, and decreased the incidence of UMSCC1 lung metastasis. The transcription factor Sox2 was found to be a putative target of miR-146a. In conclusion, the loss or decrease of miR-146a is a new feature that is associated with more aggressive behavior in oral squamous carcinoma. PMID:26159827

  11. Overexpression of JARID1B promotes differentiation via SHIP1/AKT signaling in human hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jisheng; An, Xiaofei; Han, Yafei; Ma, Rui; Yang, Kun; Zhang, Lu; Chi, Jingwei; Li, Wei; Llobet-Navas, David; Xu, Yan; Jiang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Histone H3 (H3K4) demethylase JARID1B is aberrantly upregulated in many types of tumor and has been proposed to function as oncogene. Here we show that JARID1B is elevated in moderate and high-differentiated human hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HPSCC) compared with low-differentiated HPSCC. Overexpression of JARID1B in FaDu cells increased epithelial differentiation marker K10 expression and inhibited cell proliferation. JARID1B and K10 mRNA expression is high correlated in HPSCC patients. Mechanistically, we found JARID1B directly bound to PI3K/AKT signaling inhibitor SHIP1 gene promoter and decreased SHIP1 gene expression. Activation of downstream AKT resulted in increased β-catenin signaling, by which promoted target genes Fra-1 and Jun, together with other AP-1 transcription factors, leading to K10 expression. Forced expression of SHIP1 rescued JARID1B-induced phenotypes on FaDu cell differentiation and proliferation. Taken together, our findings provide first evidence that elevated expression of JARID1B has a critical role in promoting HPSCC differentiation and inhibiting proliferation, suggesting JARID1B may function as a tumor suppressor in squamous cell cancers and implying a novel important therapeutic strategy of HPSCC. PMID:27584795

  12. Effect and mechanism of RUNX3 gene on biological characteristics of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).

    PubMed

    Chen, Huaxia; Wang, Zhou; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhiping; Shi, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RUNX3 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells biological behavior and the relationship between the expression of RUNX3 and MMP-9, TIMP-1, ICAM-1. RUNX3 levels in 90 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma specimens using immunohistochemical staining to examine the correlation between RUNX3 expression and clinical stage of ESCC. Furthermore, the role of RUNX3 in ESCC progression was evaluated in vitro by siRNA-mediated knockdown of RUNX3 or lentivirus-mediated over-expression of RUNX3 in ESCC cell lines. The expression and activities of MMP-9, TIMP-1, and ICAM-1 were analyzed. We found decreased expression of RUNX3 in ESCC tissue to be significantly related to T stage of tumor (p < 0.01). In vitro, knockdown of RUNX3 in Eca9706 cells resulted in promoting cell growth, migration, and invasion. Additionally, MMP-9 and ICAM-1 were upregulated in RUNX3-knockdown cells. Notably, RUNX3 over-expression in Kyse150 cells could significantly decrease MMP-9 and ICAM-1. Tumorigenesis in vivo was significantly determined. The study indicates that low expression of RUNX3 in human ESCC tissue is significantly correlated with progression. Restoration of RUNX3 expression significantly inhibits ESCC cells migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis, which may be caused by RUNX3's interaction with MMP-9 and ICAM-1; RUNX3 may be a potential therapeutic target for ESCC.

  13. Silencing STAT3 with short hairpin RNA enhances radiosensitivity of human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma xenografts in vivo

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIAOMING; WANG, HAIRU; LU, XIUYING; DI, BIN

    2010-01-01

    Short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) potentiate the radiosensitivity of human laryngeal squamous carcinoma cells in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of STAT3 shRNA plus radiotherapy on nude mouse laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma xenografts. The xenotransplanted tumors were treated with STAT3 shRNA, with or without radiation, following a planned scheme. The inhibition rate for tumor growth was calculated and the tumor growth curve was plotted. In addition, the expression of p-STAT3, B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), p53, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein and intratumoral microvessel density (MVD) was determined by immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometry was used to detect the rate of cell apoptosis. The results revealed that STAT3 shRNA transfection plus radiotherapy significantly minimized tumor volume and increased the rate of tumor inhibition. p-STAT3 protein expression and intratumoral MVD were observed to be down-regulated, whereas apoptosis was increased. There was a positive correlation between the expression of p-STAT3 and Bcl-2, and also between the expression of p53 and VEGF, and MVD. These findings indicate that STAT3 shRNA potentiate the radiosensitivity of laryngeal carcinoma xenografts in vivo by regulating downstream signaling proteins in the STAT3 pathway. PMID:22993624

  14. Overexpression of JARID1B promotes differentiation via SHIP1/AKT signaling in human hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jisheng; An, Xiaofei; Han, Yafei; Ma, Rui; Yang, Kun; Zhang, Lu; Chi, Jingwei; Li, Wei; Llobet-Navas, David; Xu, Yan; Jiang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Histone H3 (H3K4) demethylase JARID1B is aberrantly upregulated in many types of tumor and has been proposed to function as oncogene. Here we show that JARID1B is elevated in moderate and high-differentiated human hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HPSCC) compared with low-differentiated HPSCC. Overexpression of JARID1B in FaDu cells increased epithelial differentiation marker K10 expression and inhibited cell proliferation. JARID1B and K10 mRNA expression is high correlated in HPSCC patients. Mechanistically, we found JARID1B directly bound to PI3K/AKT signaling inhibitor SHIP1 gene promoter and decreased SHIP1 gene expression. Activation of downstream AKT resulted in increased β-catenin signaling, by which promoted target genes Fra-1 and Jun, together with other AP-1 transcription factors, leading to K10 expression. Forced expression of SHIP1 rescued JARID1B-induced phenotypes on FaDu cell differentiation and proliferation. Taken together, our findings provide first evidence that elevated expression of JARID1B has a critical role in promoting HPSCC differentiation and inhibiting proliferation, suggesting JARID1B may function as a tumor suppressor in squamous cell cancers and implying a novel important therapeutic strategy of HPSCC. PMID:27584795

  15. Use of primary high-risk human papillomavirus testing for cervical cancer screening: interim clinical guidance.

    PubMed

    Huh, Warner K; Ault, Kevin A; Chelmow, David; Davey, Diane D; Goulart, Robert A; Garcia, Francisco A R; Kinney, Walter K; Massad, L Stewart; Mayeaux, Edward J; Saslow, Debbie; Schiffman, Mark; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Lawson, Herschel W; Einstein, Mark H

    2015-02-01

    In 2011, the American Cancer Society, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and the American Society for Clinical Pathology updated screening guidelines for the early detection of cervical cancer and its precursors. Recommended screening strategies were cytology or cotesting (cytology in combination with high-risk human papillomavirus [hrHPV] testing). These guidelines also addressed the use of hrHPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, which was not recommended for use at that time. There is now a growing body of evidence for screening with primary hrHPV testing, including a prospective U.S.-based registration study. Thirteen experts, including representatives from the Society of Gynecologic Oncology, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Cancer Society, the American Society of Cytopathology, the College of American Pathologists, and the American Society for Clinical Pathology, convened to provide interim guidance for primary hrHPV screening. This guidance panel was specifically triggered by an application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a currently marketed HPV test to be labeled for the additional indication of primary cervical cancer screening. Guidance was based on literature review and review of data from the FDA registration study, supplemented by expert opinion. This document aims to provide information for health care providers who are interested in primary hrHPV testing and an overview of the potential advantages and disadvantages of this strategy for screening as well as to highlight areas in need of further investigation.

  16. Aminopeptidase N (APN)/CD13 inhibitor, Ubenimex, enhances radiation sensitivity in human cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Hirohisa; Shibata, Kiyosumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Terauchi, Mikio; Nawa, Akihiro; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2008-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy can be used to treat all stages of cervical cancer. For improving local control via radiotherapy, it is important to use additional antitumor agents. Aminopeptidase N (APN)/CD13, a 150-kDa metalloproteinase, is a multifunctional cell surface aminopeptidase with ubiquitous expression. Recent studies have suggested that APN/CD13 plays an important role in tumor progression in several human malignancies. Methods We investigated whether the suppression of APN/CD13 using Ubenimex, an inhibitor of APN/CD13 activity, may affect tumor radiosensitivity in cervical cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Cell surface APN/CD13 activity in HeLa cells was calculated using alanine-p-nitroanilido as a substrate. For colony formation assays, single-dose radiation and/or Ubenimex were administered to each dish of HeLa cells, and these dishes were cultured for 14 days. Molecular changes of apoptosis were determined by Western blot. Apoptosis was evaluated by Annexin-V PI staining (flow cytometry analysis) and the Tunel method. Moreover, we investigated the effect of combining Ubenimex and low-dose radiation on tumor growth using nude mice. Results We demonstrated that Ubenimex enhanced the effectiveness of radiotherapy, acting as a radiosensitizer both in vitro and in vivo. In colony formation assays, a significant decline in clonogenic survival was observed in Ubenimex-treated cells. Mice treated with a combination of radiation and Ubenimex showed a significant prolongation of the tumor-doubling time compared with the control, Ubenimex, or radiation-alone groups. We also showed that ubenimex enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion Although further studies are needed, this report suggests that Ubeniemx acts as a radiosensitizer in cervical cancer treatment, and that the inhibition of APN/CD13 activity may represent a new approach for improving the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. PMID:18366676

  17. RBBP6: a potential biomarker of apoptosis induction in human cervical cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Moela, Pontsho; Motadi, Lesetja Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of RBBP6 in cancers of the colon, lung, and esophagus makes it a potential target in anticancer therapy. This is especially important because RBBP6 associates with the tumor suppressor gene p53, the inactivation of which has been linked to over 50% of all cancer types. However, the expression of RBBP6 in cancer and its interaction with p53 are yet to be understood in order to determine whether or not RBBP6 is cancer promoting and therefore a potential biomarker. In this study, we manipulated RBBP6 expression levels followed by treatment with either camptothecin or γ-aminobutyric acid in cervical cancer cells to induce apoptosis or cell cycle arrest. We began by staining human cervical cancer tissue sections with anti-RBBP6 monoclonal antibody to evaluate the extent of expression of RBBP6 in patients’ specimens. We followed on with silencing the overexpression of RBBP6 and treatment with anticancer agents to evaluate how the specimens respond to combinational therapy. Apoptosis induction was evaluated through confocal microscope, and flow cytometry using annexin V staining, and also by checking the mitochondrial and caspase-3/7 activity. Cell cycle arrest was evaluated using flow cytometry through staining with propidium iodide. RBBP6 was highly expressed in cervical cancer tissue sections that were in stage II or III of development. Silencing RBBP6 followed by treatment with γ-aminobutyric acid and camptothecin seems to sensitize cells to apoptosis induction rather than cell cycle arrest. Overexpression of RBBP6 seems to promote S-phase in cell cycle and cell proliferation. These results predict a proliferative role of RBBP6 in cancer progression rather than as a cancer-causing gene. Furthermore, sensitization of cells to camptothecin-induced apoptosis by RBBP6 targeting suggests a promising tool for halting cervical cancer progression. PMID:27536134

  18. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genome status & cervical cancer outcome - A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Poulami; Thomas, Asha; Kannan, Sadhana; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Mulherkar, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Persistent infections with high-risk (HR) human papillomaviruses such as HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 have been identified as the major aetiological factor for cervical cancer. The clinical outcome of the disease is often determined by viral factors such as viral load, physical status and oncogene expression. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of such factors on clinical outcome in HPV16 positive, locally advanced cervical cancer cases. Methods: One hundred and thirty two pretreatment cervical tumour biopsies were selected from patients undergoing radiotherapy alone (n=63) or concomitant chemo-radiation (n=69). All the samples were positive for HPV 16. Quantitative real time-PCR was carried out to determine viral load and oncogene expression. Physical status of the virus was determined for all the samples by the ratio of E2copies/E7copies; while in 73 cases, the status was reanalyzed by more sensitive APOT (amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts) assay. Univariate analysis of recurrence free survival was carried out using Kaplan-Meier method and for multivariate analysis the Cox proportional hazard model was used. Results: The median viral load was 19.4 (IQR, 1.9- 69.3), with viral integration observed in 86 per cent cases by combination of the two methodologies. Both univariate and multivariate analyses identified viral physical status as a good predictor of clinical outcome following radiation treatment, with episomal form being associated with increased recurrence free survival. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study results showed that viral physical status might act as an important prognostic factor in cervical cancer. PMID:26658585

  19. Seminal plasma induces the expression of IL-1α in normal and neoplastic cervical cells via EP2/EGFR/PI3K/AKT pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is a chronic inflammatory disease of multifactorial etiology usually presenting in sexually active women. Exposure of neoplastic cervical epithelial cells to seminal plasma (SP) has been shown to promote the growth of cancer cells in vitro and tumors in vivo by inducing the expression of inflammatory mediators including pro-inflammatory cytokines. IL-1α is a pleotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine induced in several human cancers and has been associated with virulent tumor phenotype and poorer prognosis. Here we investigated the expression of IL-1α in cervical cancer, the role of SP in the regulation of IL-1α in neoplastic cervical epithelial cells and the molecular mechanism underlying this regulation. Methods and results Real-time quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the elevated expression of IL-1α mRNA in cervical squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma tissue explants, compared with normal cervix. Using immunohistochemistry, IL-1α was localized to the neoplastically transformed squamous, columnar and glandular epithelium in all cases of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinomas explants studied. We found that SP induced the expression of IL-α in both normal and neoplastic cervical tissue explants. Employing HeLa (adenocarcinoma) cell line as a model system we identified PGE2 and EGF as possible ligands responsible for SP-mediated induction of IL-1α in these neoplastic cells. In addition, we showed that SP activates EP2/EGFR/PI3kinase-Akt signaling to induce IL-1α mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in normal cervical tissue explants the induction of IL-1α by SP is via the activation of EP2/EGFR/PI3 kinase-Akt signaling. Conclusion SP-mediated induction of IL-1α in normal and neoplastic cervical epithelial cells suggests that SP may promote cervical inflammation as well as progression of cervical cancer in sexually active women. PMID:25237386

  20. Anticancer Effect of Ursodeoxycholic Acid in Human Oral Squamous Carcinoma HSC-3 Cells through the Caspases.

    PubMed

    Pang, Liang; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Weiwei; Deng, Jiang; Tan, Xiaotong; Qiu, Lihua

    2015-05-05

    Bear bile was used as a traditional medicine or tonic in East Asia, and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the most important compound in bear bile. Further, synthetic UDCA is also used in modern medicine and nutrition; therefore, its further functional effects warrant research, in vitro methods could be used for the fundamental research of its anticancer effects. In this study, the apoptotic effects of UDCA in human oral squamous carcinoma HSC-3 cells through the activation of caspases were observed by the experimental methods of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) assay, DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, flow cytometry analysis, RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) assay and Western blot assay after HSC-3 cells were treated by different concentrations of UDCA. With 0 to 400 μg/mL UDCA treatment, UDCA had strong growth inhibitory effects in HSC-3 cells, but had almost no effect in HOK normal oral cells. At concentrations of 100, 200 and 400 μg/mL, UDCA could induce apoptosis compared to untreated control HSC-3 cells. Treatment of 400 μg/mL UDCA could induce more apoptotic cancer cells than 100 and 200 μg/mL treatment; the sub-G1 DNA content of 400 μg/mL UDCA treated cancer cells was 41.3% versus 10.6% (100 μg/mL) and 22.4% (200 μg/mL). After different concentrations of UDCA treatment, the mRNA and protein expressions of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, Bax, Fas/FasL (Fas ligand), TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), DR4 (death receptor 4) and DR5 (death receptor 5) were increased in HSC-3 cells, and mRNA and protein expressions of Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2), Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large), XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein), cIAP-1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1), cIAP-2 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2) and survival were decreased. Meanwhile, at the highest concentration of 400 μg/mL, caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, Bax, Fas/FasL, TRAIL, DR4, DR5, and Iκ

  1. Anticancer Effect of Ursodeoxycholic Acid in Human Oral Squamous Carcinoma HSC-3 Cells through the Caspases

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Liang; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Weiwei; Deng, Jiang; Tan, Xiaotong; Qiu, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Bear bile was used as a traditional medicine or tonic in East Asia, and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the most important compound in bear bile. Further, synthetic UDCA is also used in modern medicine and nutrition; therefore, its further functional effects warrant research, in vitro methods could be used for the fundamental research of its anticancer effects. In this study, the apoptotic effects of UDCA in human oral squamous carcinoma HSC-3 cells through the activation of caspases were observed by the experimental methods of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) assay, DAPI (4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining, flow cytometry analysis, RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) assay and Western blot assay after HSC-3 cells were treated by different concentrations of UDCA. With 0 to 400 μg/mL UDCA treatment, UDCA had strong growth inhibitory effects in HSC-3 cells, but had almost no effect in HOK normal oral cells. At concentrations of 100, 200 and 400 μg/mL, UDCA could induce apoptosis compared to untreated control HSC-3 cells. Treatment of 400 μg/mL UDCA could induce more apoptotic cancer cells than 100 and 200 μg/mL treatment; the sub-G1 DNA content of 400 μg/mL UDCA treated cancer cells was 41.3% versus 10.6% (100 μg/mL) and 22.4% (200 μg/mL). After different concentrations of UDCA treatment, the mRNA and protein expressions of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, Bax, Fas/FasL (Fas ligand), TRAIL (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), DR4 (death receptor 4) and DR5 (death receptor 5) were increased in HSC-3 cells, and mRNA and protein expressions of Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2), Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large), XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein), cIAP-1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1), cIAP-2 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2) and survival were decreased. Meanwhile, at the highest concentration of 400 μg/mL, caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, Bax, Fas/FasL, TRAIL, DR4, DR5, and Iκ

  2. Association Study between Cervical Lesions and Single or Multiple Vaccine-Target and Non-Vaccine Target Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Women from Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, Bárbara Simas; Comar, Manola; Gurgel, Ana Pavla Almeida Diniz; Paiva, Sérgio; Seraceni, Silva; de Freitas, Antonio Carlos; Crovella, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    We performed an association between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and single or multiple vaccine-target as well as non-vaccine target Human papillomavirus (HPV) types. Using bead-based HPV genotyping, 594 gynecological samples were genotyped. An association between squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) and presence of HPV16, 18, 31, 58 and 56 types were calculated. The risk was estimated by using odds ratio (OR) and 95% of confidence intervals (CI). A total of 370 (62.3%) women were HPV positive. Among these, 157 (42.7%) presented a single HPV infection, and 212 (57.3%) were infected by more than one HPV type. HPV31 was the most prevalent genotype, regardless single and multiple HPV infections. Single infection with HPV31 was associated with LSIL (OR=2.32; 95%CI: 1.01 to 5.32; p=0.04); HPV31 was also associated with LSIL (OR=3.28; 95%CI: 1.74 to 6.19; p= 0.0002) and HSIL (OR=3.82; 95%CI: 2.10 to 6.97; p<0.001) in multiple HPV infections. Risk to harbor cervical lesions was observed in multiple HPV infections with regard to the HPV56 (OR=5.39; 95%CI: 2.44 to 11.90; p<0.001for LSIL; OR=5.37; 95%CI: 2.71 to 10.69; p<0.001) and HPV58 (OR=3.29; 95%CI: 1.34 to 8.09; p=0.0091 for LSIL; OR=3.55; 95%CI: 1.56 to 8.11; p=0.0026) genotypes. In addition, women coinfected with HPV16/31/56 types had 6 and 5-fold increased risk of HSIL (OR=6.46; 95%CI: 1.89 to 22.09; p=0.002) and LSIL (OR=5.22; 95%CI: 1.10 to 24.70; p=0.03), respectively. Multiple HPV infections without HPV16/18 has 2-fold increased risk of HSIL (OR=2.57; 95%CI: 1.41 to 4.70; p=0.002) and LSIL OR=2.03; 95%CI: 1.08 to 3.79; p=0.02). The results of this study suggest that single and multiple vaccine target as well as non-vaccine target HPV types are associated with LSIL and HSIL. These finding should be taken into consideration in the design of HPV vaccination strategies. PMID:26176537

  3. Trials and projects on cervical cancer and human papillomavirus prevention in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Adefuye, Peter O; Broutet, Nathalie J; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Denny, Lynette A

    2013-12-29

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality in women in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), accounting for about 50,000 deaths annually. Until recently, cytology was the gold standard for screening and prevention of cervical cancer. This method of screening has not been successful in SSA due to a lack of human, financial and material resources and poor health care infrastructure. It is estimated that less than 5% of at risk women have ever being screened. In the past two decades alternative approaches to cytology for cervical cancer screening have been evaluated in low- and medium-income countries. Visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) and/or Lugol's iodine (VILI) have been shown to have adequate sensitivity, although low specificity, in a number of cross-sectional research and demonstration projects. Visual inspection methods require minimal resources, are technologically accessible, and are feasible for screening for precancerous lesions. Linking screening with VIA/VILI to treatment with cryotherapy may enable screening and treatment to take place in one visit, but this is likely to result in large numbers of women being subjected to unnecessary treatment. A number of studies have shown that cryotherapy is not associated with significant side effects or complications and is well tolerated. Creating the infrastructure for screening of older women is considered desirable, despite the limitations of visual inspection methods as screening tests. Understanding the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the etiology of cervical cancer and the discovery of HPV rapid test kits, as well as the development of vaccines against the HPV oncogenic types, have created new opportunities for prevention of cervical cancer. Trials and projects have established (and are still ongoing) the feasibility of using these molecular tests for screening. The ultimate in prevention method is primary prevention, offered by the advent of prophylactic vaccines

  4. Impact of cervical disease and its definitive radiotherapeutic management on survival: Experience in 2013 patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx and pharyngolarynx

    SciTech Connect

    Bataini, J.P.; Bernier, J.; Jaulerry, C.; Brunin, F.; Pontvert, D. )

    1990-07-01

    Two thousand thirteen patients with squamous cell carcinoma of oropharynx and pharyngolarynx were reviewed with regard to neck disease presentation and disease-free survival after radical radiotherapy. All patients were staged according to both the AJCC 1976 and the UICC 1978 classifications. Causes of failure, disease-free survival, and complication rates were assessed. Sixty percent had a clinically positive neck. The 3-year disease-free survival rates were 58%, 44%, 38%, and 25% for AJCC N0, N1, N2, and N3 cases, respectively. Corresponding UICC figures were 58%, 46%, 26%, and 29%. Analyzed parameters were nodal stage, size, site and fixity, and location of primary. Complications attributed to neck disease did not exceed 3%. A critical appraisal of the nodal staging systems is derived from these sets of data.

  5. A prospective study of the relationship between prediagnostic human papillomavirus seropositivity and HPV DNA in subsequent cervical carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sigstad, E; Lie, A K; Luostarinen, T; Dillner, J; Jellum, E; Lehtinen, M; Thoresen, S; Abeler, V

    2002-07-15

    Several prospective studies with invasive carcinoma as endpoint have supported Human Papillomavirus as a cause of cervical carcinoma. However, the largest study used seroepidemiology and did not analyse presence of Human Papillomavirus DNA in the subsequent tumour. Linkage of serum bank registries and cancer registries had identified 196 women with a registered cervical carcinoma after donation of a serum sample. For the present study, biopsies for 127 cases could be located, verified to contain invasive carcinoma and be amplified by PCR. Three control women who had remained alive and without cervical carcinoma during an equal length of follow-up had been matched to each of the case women and tested for HPV antibodies. Presence of Human Papillomavirus DNA in the tumours was analysed by general primer and type specific PCR. HPV16-seropositive women had a relative risk of 4.4 (95% CI: 2.2-8.8) to develop cervical carcinoma carrying HPV16 DNA. By contrast, there was no excess risk for Human Papillomavirus 16-seropositive women to develop cervical carcinoma devoid of HPV16 DNA. Prediagnostic HPV16 seropositivity was strongly correlated with later HPV16 DNA positivity of the tumour (P<0.001) and prediagnostic HPV18 seropositivity correlated with HPV18 DNA in the tumour (P<0.03). The link between prediagnostic seropositivity and type of viral DNA in the cancer implies that the carcinogenic effect of infection with these viruses is dependent on persistent presence of type-specific viral DNA.

  6. Neurochemical profile of the human cervical spinal cord determined by MRS.

    PubMed

    Hock, Andreas; Wilm, Bertram; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Franckenberg, Sabine; Zoelch, Niklaus; Wyss, Patrik Oliver; De Zanche, Nicola; Nordmeyer-Maßner, Jurek; Kraemer, Thomas; Thali, Michael; Ernst, Matthias; Kollias, Spyros; Henning, Anke

    2016-10-01

    MRS enables insight into the chemical composition of central nervous system tissue. However, technical challenges degrade the data quality when applied to the human spinal cord. Therefore, to date detection of only the most prominent metabolite resonances has been reported in the healthy human spinal cord. The aim of this investigation is to provide an extended metabolic profile including neurotransmitters and antioxidants in addition to metabolites involved in the energy and membrane metabolism of the human cervical spinal cord in vivo. To achieve this, data quality was improved by using a custom-made, cervical detector array together with constructive averaging of a high number of echo signals, which is enabled by the metabolite cycling technique at 3T. In addition, the improved spinal cord spectra were extensively cross-validated, in vivo, post-mortem in situ and ex vivo. Reliable identification of up to nine metabolites was achieved in group analyses for the first time. Distinct features of the spinal cord neurochemical profile, in comparison with the brain neurotransmission system, include decreased concentrations of the sum of glutamate and glutamate and increased concentrations of aspartate, γ-amino-butyric acid, scyllo-inositol and the sum of myo-inositol and glycine. PMID:27580498

  7. Cervical cancer pathogenesis is associated with one-carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Sujata; Bhatla, Neerja; Singh, Neeta

    2012-10-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women in India and a leading cause of death in these women. Most cases of cervical cancer are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the high-risk type. It has been reported that aberrant DNA methylation can be associated with HPV infection and cervical cancer, and folate is directly involved in DNA methylation via one-carbon metabolism. We aimed to study the importance of one-carbon metabolism in the progression of cervical carcinogenesis by examining serum levels of vitamin B(12) (cobalamin), homocysteine, and folate and DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes CDH1, HIC1, and Retinoic acid receptor beta (RARβ) amid these women ranging from normal to squamous intraepithelial neoplastic lesions (SIL) to cervical cancer. Blood and tissue samples were collected from normal (n = 35), SILs (n = 27), and cervical cancer patients (n = 38) in the age group of 26-70 years. Measurement of serum vitamin B(12), folate, and homocysteine were done using kits (Immulite). Promoter methylation was examined using methylation-specific PCR. The frequency of promoter hypermethylation for all the three tumor suppressor genes CDH1, HIC1, and RARβ showed an increasing trend from normal to dysplastic to invasive cervical cancer (p < 0.05). We observed that lower folate and vitamin B(12) status were associated with HPV infection. Taken together, our findings suggest a role of folate and vitamin B(12) in modulating the risk of cervical cancer and HPV infection. CDH1, HIC1, and RARβ genes can be used as potential biomarkers of cervical cancer risk assessment.

  8. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR.

  9. The transmembrane channel-like protein family and human papillomaviruses: Insights into epidermodysplasia verruciformis and progression to squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jaime S; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by increased sensitivity to infection by the β-subtype of human papillomaviruses (β-HPVs), causing persistent, tinea versicolor-like dermal lesions. In a majority of affected individuals, these macular lesions progress to invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in sun-exposed areas. While mutations in transmembrane channel-like 6 (TMC6 / EVER1) and 8 (TMC8 / EVER2) have been causally linked to EV, their molecular functions are unclear. It is likely that their protective effects involve regulation of the β-HPV life cycle, host keratinocyte apoptosis vs. survival balance and/or T-cell interaction with infected host cells.

  10. Loss of CRABP-II Characterizes Human Skin Poorly Differentiated Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Favors DMBA/TPA-Induced Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Passeri, Daniela; Doldo, Elena; Tarquini, Chiara; Costanza, Gaetana; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Agostinelli, Sara; Campione, Elena; Di Stefani, Alessandro; Giunta, Alessandro; Bianchi, Luca; Orlandi, Augusto

    2016-06-01

    Retinol and its derivatives play an important role in epidermal growth and differentiation and represent chemopreventive agents in nonmelanoma skin cancer. Retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABP-II) is a cytoplasmic receptor that critically regulates all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) trafficking. We documented the marked reduced expression of CRABP-II and its promoter methylation in human poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas. To investigate the role of CRABP-II in skin carcinogenesis we used skin lesion induction by dimethylbenz[a]anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate in CRABP-II-knockout C57BL/6 mice. We observed earlier and more diffuse epidermal dysplasia, greater incidence and severity of tumors, reduced expression of cytokeratin 1/cytokeratin 10 and involucrin, increased proliferation, and impaired ATRA inhibition of tumor promotion compared with wild-type animals. CRABP-II-transfected HaCaT, FaDu, and A431 cells showed expression of differentiation markers, retinoic acid receptor-β/-γ signaling, ATRA sensitivity, and suppression of EGFR/v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT) pathways in a fatty acid binding protein 5/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/-δ-independent manner. The opposite was true in keratinocytes isolated from CRABP-II-knockout mice. Finally, CRABP-II accumulation induced ubiquitination-associated reduction of EGFR. Our results showed reduced CRABP-II expression in human poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, and its gene deletion favored experimental skin carcinogenesis and impaired ATRA antitumor efficacy, likely modulating EGFR/AKT pathways and retinoic acid receptor-β/-γ signaling. Therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring CRABP-II-mediated signaling may amplify therapeutic retinoid efficacy in nonmelanoma skin cancer. PMID:26945879

  11. Complications of Anterior Cervical Fusion using a Low-dose Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Kukreja, Sunil; Ahmed, Osama I; Haydel, Justin; Nanda, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Objective There are several reports, which documented a high incidence of complications following the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in anterior cervical fusions (ACFs). The objective of this study is to share our experience with low-dose rhBMP-2 in anterior cervical spine. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 197 patients who underwent anterior cervical fusion (ACF) with the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) during 2007-2012. A low-dose rhBMP-2 (0.7mg/level) sponge was placed exclusively within the cage. In 102 patients demineralized bone matrix (DBM) was filled around the BMP sponge. Incidence and severity of dysphagia was determined by 5 points SWAL-QOL scale. Results Two patients had prolonged hospitalization due to BMP unrelated causes. Following the discharge, 13.2%(n=26) patients developed dysphagia and 8.6%(n=17) patients complained of neck swelling. More than half of the patients (52.9%, n=9) with neck swelling also had associated dysphagia; however, only 2 of these patients necessitated readmission. Both of these patients responded well to the intravenous dexamethasone. The use of DBM did not affect the incidence and severity of complications (p>0.05). Clinico-radiological evidence of fusion was not observed in 2 patients. Conclusion A low-dose rhBMP-2 in ACFs is not without risk. However, the incidence and severity of complications seem to be lower with low-dose BMP placed exclusively inside the cage. Packing DBM putty around the BMP sponge does not affect the safety profile of rhBMP-2 in ACFs. PMID:26217385

  12. Cloning of monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA integrated within cell DNA from a cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, T.; Kanda, T.; Furuno, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kawana, T.; Yoshiike, K.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have molecularly cloned and characterized monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA with flanking cell DNA sequences from a cervical carcinoma. Determination of nucleotide sequence around the junctions of human papillomavirus and cell DNAs revealed that at the site of integration within cell DNA the cloned viral DNA had a deletion between nucleotides 1284 and 4471 (numbering system from K. Seedorf, G. Kraemmer, M. Duerst, S. Suhai, and W.G. Roewkamp), which includes the greater part of E1 gene and the entire E2 gene. In the remaining part of the E1 gene, three guanines were found at the location where two guanines at nucleotides 1137 and 1138 have been recorded. This additional guanine shifted the reading frame and erased an interruption in the E1 gene. The data strongly suggest that, like other papillomaviruses, human papillomavirus type 16 has an uninterrupted E1 gene.

  13. Nuclear expression of Rac1 in cervical premalignant lesions and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal expression of Rho-GTPases has been reported in several human cancers. However, the expression of these proteins in cervical cancer has been poorly investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of the GTPases Rac1, RhoA, Cdc42, and the Rho-GEFs, Tiam1 and beta-Pix, in cervical pre-malignant lesions and cervical cancer cell lines. Methods Protein expression was analyzed by immunochemistry on 102 cervical paraffin-embedded biopsies: 20 without Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (SIL), 51 Low- grade SIL, and 31 High-grade SIL; and in cervical cancer cell lines C33A and SiHa, and non-tumorigenic HaCat cells. Nuclear localization of Rac1 in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells was assessed by cellular fractionation and Western blotting, in the presence or not of a chemical Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Results Immunoreacivity for Rac1, RhoA, Tiam1 and beta-Pix was stronger in L-SIL and H-SIL, compared to samples without SIL, and it was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis. Nuclear expression of Rac1 was observed in 52.9% L-SIL and 48.4% H-SIL, but not in samples without SIL. Rac1 was found in the nucleus of C33A and SiHa cells but not in HaCat cells. Chemical inhibition of Rac1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells. Conclusion Rac1 is expressed in the nucleus of epithelial cells in SILs and cervical cancer cell lines, and chemical inhibition of Rac1 reduces cellular proliferation. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Rho-GTPases in cervical cancer progression. PMID:22443139

  14. Overexpression of Ribosomal RNA in the Development of Human Cervical Cancer Is Associated with rDNA Promoter Hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Wang, Yapei; Lv, Qiongying; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Qing; Gao, Fei; Hou, Haoli; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Li, Lijia

    2016-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene encodes rRNA for protein synthesis. Aberrant expression of the rRNA gene has been generally observed in tumor cells and levels of its promoter methylation as an epigenetic regulator affect rRNA gene transcription. The possible relationship between expression and promoter methylation of rDNA has not been examined in human clinical cervical cancer. Here we investigate rRNA gene expression by quantitative real time PCR, and promoter methylation levels by HpaII/MspI digestion and sodium bisulfite sequencing in the development of human cervical cancer. We find that indeed rRNA levels are elevated in most of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) specimens as compared with non-cancer tissues. The rDNA promoter region in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) tissues reveals significant hypomethylation at cytosines in the context of CpG dinucleotides, accompanied with rDNA chromatin decondensation. Furthermore treatment of HeLa cells with the methylation inhibitor drug 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (DAC) demonstrates the negative correlation between the expression of 45S rDNA and the methylation level in the rDNA promoter region. These data suggest that a decrease in rDNA promoter methylation levels can result in an increase of rRNA synthesis in the development of human cervical cancer. PMID:27695092

  15. Analyzing three-dimensional ultrastructure of human cervical tissue using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Yu; Yao, Wang; Myers, Kristin. M; Vink, Joy Y.; Wapner, Ronald. J.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, the uterine cervix is the mechanical barrier that prevents delivery of a fetus. The underlying cervical collagen ultrastructure, which influences the overall mechanical properties of the cervix, plays a role in maintaining a successful pregnancy until term. Yet, not much is known about this collagen ultrastructure in pregnant and nonpregnant human tissue. We used optical coherence tomography to investigate the directionality and dispersion of collagen fiber bundles in the human cervix. An image analy