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Sample records for human checkpoint kinase

  1. Structure and Substrate Recruitment of the Human Spindle Checkpoint Kinase Bub1

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Jungseog; Yang, Maojun; Li, Bing; Qi, Wei; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Machius, Mischa; Yu, Hongtao

    2009-11-10

    In mitosis, the spindle checkpoint detects a single unattached kinetochore, inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C), and prevents premature sister chromatid separation. The checkpoint kinase Bub1 contributes to checkpoint sensitivity through phosphorylating the APC/C activator, Cdc20, and inhibiting APC/C catalytically. We report here the crystal structure of the kinase domain of Bub1, revealing the requirement of an N-terminal extension for its kinase activity. Though the activation segment of Bub1 is ordered and has structural features indicative of active kinases, the C-terminal portion of this segment sterically restricts substrate access to the active site. Bub1 uses docking motifs, so-called KEN boxes, outside its kinase domain to recruit Cdc20, one of two known KEN box receptors. The KEN boxes of Bub1 are required for the spindle checkpoint in human cells. Therefore, its unusual active-site conformation and mode of substrate recruitment suggest that Bub1 has an exquisitely tuned specificity for Cdc20.

  2. Kinase signaling in the spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jungseog; Yu, Hongtao

    2009-06-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a cell cycle surveillance system that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation. In mitosis, it elicits the "wait anaphase" signal to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome until all chromosomes achieve bipolar microtubule attachment and align at the metaphase plate. Because a single kinetochore unattached to microtubules activates the checkpoint, the wait anaphase signal is thought to be generated by this kinetochore and is then amplified and distributed throughout the cell to inhibit the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Several spindle checkpoint kinases participate in the generation and amplification of this signal. Recent studies have begun to reveal the activation mechanisms of these checkpoint kinases. Increasing evidence also indicates that the checkpoint kinases not only help to generate the wait anaphase signal but also actively correct kinetochore-microtubule attachment defects. PMID:19228686

  3. Protein kinase C controls activation of the DNA integrity checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Carot, María; Quilis, Inma; Bañó, M. Carmen; Igual, J. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) superfamily plays key regulatory roles in numerous cellular processes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a single PKC, Pkc1, whose main function is cell wall integrity maintenance. In this work, we connect the Pkc1 protein to the maintenance of genome integrity in response to genotoxic stresses. Pkc1 and its kinase activity are necessary for the phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase Rad53, histone H2A and Xrs2 protein after deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, indicating that Pkc1 is required for activation of checkpoint kinases Mec1 and Tel1. Furthermore, Pkc1 electrophoretic mobility is delayed after inducing DNA damage, which reflects that Pkc1 is post-translationally modified. This modification is a phosphorylation event mediated by Tel1. The expression of different mammalian PKC isoforms at the endogenous level in yeast pkc1 mutant cells revealed that PKCδ is able to activate the DNA integrity checkpoint. Finally, downregulation of PKCδ activity in HeLa cells caused a defective activation of checkpoint kinase Chk2 when DNA damage was induced. Our results indicate that the control of the DNA integrity checkpoint by PKC is a mechanism conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:24792164

  4. Human Bubr1 Is a Mitotic Checkpoint Kinase That Monitors Cenp-E Functions at Kinetochores and Binds the Cyclosome/APC

    PubMed Central

    Chan, G.K.T.; Jablonski, S.A.; Sudakin, V.; Hittle, J.C.; Yen, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    Human cells express two kinases that are related to the yeast mitotic checkpoint kinase BUB1. hBUB1 and hBUBR1 bind to kinetochores where they are postulated to be components of the mitotic checkpoint that monitors kinetochore activities to determine if chromosomes have achieved alignment at the spindle equator (Jablonski, S.A., G.K.T. Chan, C.A. Cooke, W.C. Earnshaw, and T.J. Yen. 1998. Chromosoma. 107:386–396). In support of this, hBUB1 and the homologous mouse BUB1 have been shown to be important for the mitotic checkpoint (Cahill, D.P., C. Lengauer, J. Yu, G.J. Riggins, J.K. Willson, S.D. Markowitz, K.W. Kinzler, and B. Vogelstein. 1998. Nature. 392:300–303; Taylor, S.S., and F. McKeon. 1997. Cell. 89:727–735). We now demonstrate that hBUBR1 is also an essential component of the mitotic checkpoint. hBUBR1 is required by cells that are exposed to microtubule inhibitors to arrest in mitosis. Additionally, hBUBR1 is essential for normal mitotic progression as it prevents cells from prematurely entering anaphase. We establish that one of hBUBR1's checkpoint functions is to monitor kinetochore activities that depend on the kinetochore motor CENP-E. hBUBR1 is expressed throughout the cell cycle, but its kinase activity is detected after cells have entered mitosis. hBUBR1 kinase activity was rapidly stimulated when the spindle was disrupted in mitotic cells. Finally, hBUBR1 was associated with the cyclosome/anaphase-promoting complex (APC) in mitotically arrested cells but not in interphase cells. The combined data indicate that hBUBR1 can potentially provide two checkpoint functions by monitoring CENP-E–dependent activities at the kinetochore and regulating cyclosome/APC activity. PMID:10477750

  5. Clamping the Mec1/ATR checkpoint kinase into action.

    PubMed

    Majka, Jerzy; Burgers, Peter M J

    2007-05-15

    The yeast checkpoint protein kinase Mec1, the ortholog of human ATR, is the essential upstream regulator of the cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage and to stalling of DNA replication forks. The activity of Mec1/ATR is not directly regulated by the DNA substrates that signal checkpoint activation. Rather the signal appears to be transduced to Mec1 by factors that interact with the signaling DNA substrates. One of these factors, the DNA damage checkpoint clamp Rad17-Mec3-Ddc1 (human 9-1-1) is loaded onto gapped DNA resulting from the partial repair of DNA damage, and the Ddc1 subunit of this complex activates Mec1. In vertebrate cells, the TopBP1 protein (Cut5 in S. pombe and Dpb11 in S. cervisiae) that is also required for establishment of the replication fork, functions during replication fork dysfunction to activate ATR. Both mechanisms of activation generally upregulate the kinase activity towards all downstream targets. PMID:17495536

  6. DNA damage control: regulation and functions of checkpoint kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Smits, Veronique A J; Gillespie, David A

    2015-10-01

    Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is a master regulator of the DNA damage and replication checkpoints in vertebrate cells. When activated via phosphorylation by its upstream regulatory kinase, ATR, Chk1 prevents cells with damaged or incompletely replicated DNA from entering mitosis, and acts to stabilize stalled replication forks and suppress replication origin firing when DNA synthesis is inhibited. Chk1 blocks mitosis by maintaining high levels of inhibitory tyrosine phosphorylation of the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase 1; however, the mechanisms that underlie replication fork stabilization and suppression of origin firing are less well defined. Although Chk1 function is evidently acutely regulated during these responses, how this occurs at the molecular level is incompletely understood. Recent evidence that Chk1 contains a 'kinase-associated 1' domain within its regulatory C-terminal region promises new insights. Additional modifications catalysed by other protein kinases, such as cyclin-dependent kinase 1, Akt, and RSK, can combine with ubiquitylation to regulate Chk1 subcellular localization and protein stability. Interestingly, it is clear that Chk1 has less well-defined functions in homologous recombination, chromatin modification, gene expression, spindle checkpoint proficiency, and cytokinesis. Here, we provide an overview of Chk1 regulation and functions, with an emphasis on unresolved questions that merit further research. PMID:26216057

  7. Targeting lung cancer through inhibition of checkpoint kinases

    PubMed Central

    Syljuåsen, Randi G.; Hasvold, Grete; Hauge, Sissel; Helland, Åslaug

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of checkpoint kinases ATR, Chk1, and Wee1 are currently being tested in preclinical and clinical trials. Here, we review the basic principles behind the use of such inhibitors as anticancer agents, and particularly discuss their potential for treatment of lung cancer. As lung cancer is one of the most deadly cancers, new treatment strategies are highly needed. We discuss how checkpoint kinase inhibition in principle can lead to selective killing of lung cancer cells while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Several features of lung cancer may potentially be exploited for targeting through inhibition of checkpoint kinases, including mutated p53, low ERCC1 levels, amplified Myc, tumor hypoxia and presence of lung cancer stem cells. Synergistic effects have also been reported between inhibitors of ATR/Chk1/Wee1 and conventional lung cancer treatments, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, or radiation. Altogether, inhibitors of ATR, Chk1, and Wee1 are emerging as new cancer treatment agents, likely to be useful in lung cancer treatment. However, as lung tumors are very diverse, the inhibitors are unlikely to be effective in all patients, and more work is needed to determine how such inhibitors can be utilized in the most optimal ways. PMID:25774168

  8. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Aaron R.; Bekier, Michael E.; Taylor, William R.; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  9. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenbin; Arnst, Christopher; Tipton, Aaron R; Bekier, Michael E; Taylor, William R; Yen, Tim J; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  10. Loss of the Greatwall Kinase Weakens the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Diril, M Kasim; Bisteau, Xavier; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Caldez, Matias J; Wee, Sheena; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kaldis, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    The Greatwall kinase/Mastl is an essential gene that indirectly inhibits the phosphatase activity toward mitotic Cdk1 substrates. Here we show that although Mastl knockout (MastlNULL) MEFs enter mitosis, they progress through mitosis without completing cytokinesis despite the presence of misaligned chromosomes, which causes chromosome segregation defects. Furthermore, we uncover the requirement of Mastl for robust spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) maintenance since the duration of mitotic arrest caused by microtubule poisons in MastlNULL MEFs is shortened, which correlates with premature disappearance of the essential SAC protein Mad1 at the kinetochores. Notably, MastlNULL MEFs display reduced phosphorylation of a number of proteins in mitosis, which include the essential SAC kinase MPS1. We further demonstrate that Mastl is required for multi-site phosphorylation of MPS1 as well as robust MPS1 kinase activity in mitosis. In contrast, treatment of MastlNULL cells with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA) rescues the defects in MPS1 kinase activity, mislocalization of phospho-MPS1 as well as Mad1 at the kinetochore, and premature SAC silencing. Moreover, using in vitro dephosphorylation assays, we demonstrate that Mastl promotes persistent MPS1 phosphorylation by inhibiting PP2A/B55-mediated MPS1 dephosphorylation rather than affecting Cdk1 kinase activity. Our findings establish a key regulatory function of the Greatwall kinase/Mastl->PP2A/B55 pathway in preventing premature SAC silencing. PMID:27631493

  11. Loss of the Greatwall Kinase Weakens the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Mayumi; Caldez, Matias J.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The Greatwall kinase/Mastl is an essential gene that indirectly inhibits the phosphatase activity toward mitotic Cdk1 substrates. Here we show that although Mastl knockout (MastlNULL) MEFs enter mitosis, they progress through mitosis without completing cytokinesis despite the presence of misaligned chromosomes, which causes chromosome segregation defects. Furthermore, we uncover the requirement of Mastl for robust spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) maintenance since the duration of mitotic arrest caused by microtubule poisons in MastlNULL MEFs is shortened, which correlates with premature disappearance of the essential SAC protein Mad1 at the kinetochores. Notably, MastlNULL MEFs display reduced phosphorylation of a number of proteins in mitosis, which include the essential SAC kinase MPS1. We further demonstrate that Mastl is required for multi-site phosphorylation of MPS1 as well as robust MPS1 kinase activity in mitosis. In contrast, treatment of MastlNULL cells with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA) rescues the defects in MPS1 kinase activity, mislocalization of phospho-MPS1 as well as Mad1 at the kinetochore, and premature SAC silencing. Moreover, using in vitro dephosphorylation assays, we demonstrate that Mastl promotes persistent MPS1 phosphorylation by inhibiting PP2A/B55-mediated MPS1 dephosphorylation rather than affecting Cdk1 kinase activity. Our findings establish a key regulatory function of the Greatwall kinase/Mastl->PP2A/B55 pathway in preventing premature SAC silencing. PMID:27631493

  12. Ethanol Metabolism Activates Cell Cycle Checkpoint Kinase, Chk2

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Dahn L.; Mahan Schneider, Katrina J.; Nuss, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse results in hepatocyte injury and impairs hepatocyte replication. We have previously shown that ethanol metabolism results in cell cycle arrest at the G2/M transition, which is partially mediated by inhibitory phosphorylation of the cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2. To further delineate the mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism mediates this G2/M arrest, we investigated the involvement of upstream regulators of Cdc2 activity. Cdc2 is activated by the phosphatase Cdc25C. The activity of Cdc25C can, in turn, be regulated by the checkpoint kinase, Chk2, which is regulated by the kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). To investigate the involvement of these regulators of Cdc2 activity, VA-13 cells, which are Hep G2 cells modified to efficiently express alcohol dehydrogenase, were cultured in the presence or absence of 25 mM ethanol. Immunoblots were performed to determine the effects of ethanol metabolism on the activation of Cdc25C, Chk2, and ATM. Ethanol metabolism increased the active forms of ATM, and Chk2, as well as the phosphorylated form of Cdc25C. Additionally, inhibition of ATM resulted in approximately 50% of the cells being rescued from the G2/M cell cycle arrest, and ameliorated the inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2. Our findings demonstrate that ethanol metabolism activates ATM. ATM can activate the checkpoint kinase Chk2, resulting in phosphorylation of Cdc25C, and ultimately in the accumulation of inactive Cdc2. This may, in part, explain the ethanol metabolism-mediated impairment in hepatocyte replication, which may be important in the initiation and progression of alcoholic liver injury. PMID:21924579

  13. Characterization of Spindle Checkpoint Kinase Mps1 Reveals Domain with Functional and Structural Similarities to Tetratricopeptide Repeat Motifs of Bub1 and BubR1 Checkpoint Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Semin; Thebault, Philippe; Freschi, Luca; Beaufils, Sylvie; Blundell, Tom L.; Landry, Christian R.; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Elowe, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Kinetochore targeting of the mitotic kinases Bub1, BubR1, and Mps1 has been implicated in efficient execution of their functions in the spindle checkpoint, the self-monitoring system of the eukaryotic cell cycle that ensures chromosome segregation occurs with high fidelity. In all three kinases, kinetochore docking is mediated by the N-terminal region of the protein. Deletions within this region result in checkpoint failure and chromosome segregation defects. Here, we use an interdisciplinary approach that includes biophysical, biochemical, cell biological, and bioinformatics methods to study the N-terminal region of human Mps1. We report the identification of a tandem repeat of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif in the N-terminal kinetochore binding region of Mps1, with close homology to the tandem TPR motif of Bub1 and BubR1. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that TPR Mps1 was acquired after the split between deutorostomes and protostomes, as it is distinguishable in chordates and echinoderms. Overexpression of TPR Mps1 resulted in decreased efficiency of both chromosome alignment and mitotic arrest, likely through displacement of endogenous Mps1 from the kinetochore and decreased Mps1 catalytic activity. Taken together, our multidisciplinary strategy provides new insights into the evolution, structural organization, and function of Mps1 N-terminal region. PMID:22187426

  14. The Bub1–Plk1 kinase complex promotes spindle checkpoint signalling through Cdc20 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Luying; Li, Bing; Yu, Hongtao

    2016-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint senses unattached kinetochores and inhibits the Cdc20-bound anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C), to delay anaphase, thereby preventing aneuploidy. A critical checkpoint inhibitor of APC/CCdc20 is the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). It is unclear whether MCC suffices to inhibit all cellular APC/C. Here we show that human checkpoint kinase Bub1 not only directly phosphorylates Cdc20, but also scaffolds Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of Cdc20 by Bub1–Plk1 inhibits APC/CCdc20 in vitro and is required for checkpoint signalling in human cells. Bub1–Plk1-dependent Cdc20 phosphorylation is regulated by upstream checkpoint signals and is dispensable for MCC assembly. A phospho-mimicking Cdc20 mutant restores nocodazole-induced mitotic arrest in cells depleted of Mad2 or BubR1. Thus, Bub1–Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc20 constitutes an APC/C-inhibitory mechanism that is parallel, but not redundant, to MCC formation. Both mechanisms are required to sustain mitotic arrest in response to spindle defects. PMID:26912231

  15. Mitotic Checkpoint Kinase Mps1 Has a Role in Normal Physiology which Impacts Clinical Utility.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ricardo; Blasina, Alessandra; Hallin, Jill F; Hu, Wenyue; Rymer, Isha; Fan, Jeffery; Hoffman, Robert L; Murphy, Sean; Marx, Matthew; Yanochko, Gina; Trajkovic, Dusko; Dinh, Dac; Timofeevski, Sergei; Zhu, Zhou; Sun, Peiquing; Lappin, Patrick B; Murray, Brion W

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint intervention is an effective therapeutic strategy for cancer when applied to patients predisposed to respond and the treatment is well-tolerated. A critical cell cycle process that could be targeted is the mitotic checkpoint (spindle assembly checkpoint) which governs the metaphase-to-anaphase transition and insures proper chromosomal segregation. The mitotic checkpoint kinase Mps1 was selected to explore whether enhancement in genomic instability is a viable therapeutic strategy. The basal-a subset of triple-negative breast cancer was chosen as a model system because it has a higher incidence of chromosomal instability and Mps1 expression is up-regulated. Depletion of Mps1 reduces tumor cell viability relative to normal cells. Highly selective, extremely potent Mps1 kinase inhibitors were created to investigate the roles of Mps1 catalytic activity in tumor cells and normal physiology (PF-7006, PF-3837; Ki<0.5 nM; cellular IC50 2-6 nM). Treatment of tumor cells in vitro with PF-7006 modulates expected Mps1-dependent biology as demonstrated by molecular and phenotypic measures (reduced pHH3-Ser10 levels, shorter duration of mitosis, micro-nucleation, and apoptosis). Tumor-bearing mice treated with PF-7006 exhibit tumor growth inhibition concomitant with pharmacodynamic modulation of a downstream biomarker (pHH3-Ser10). Unfortunately, efficacy only occurs at drug exposures that cause dose-limiting body weight loss, gastrointestinal toxicities, and neutropenia. Mps1 inhibitor toxicities may be mitigated by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest in Rb1-competent cells with the cyclin-dependent kinase-4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Using an isogenic cellular model system, PF-7006 is shown to be selectively cytotoxic to Rb1-deficient cells relative to Rb1-competent cells (also a measure of kinase selectivity). Human bone marrow cells pretreated with palbociclib have decreased PF-7006-dependent apoptosis relative to cells without palbociclib pretreatment

  16. Mitotic Checkpoint Kinase Mps1 Has a Role in Normal Physiology which Impacts Clinical Utility

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ricardo; Blasina, Alessandra; Hallin, Jill F.; Hu, Wenyue; Rymer, Isha; Fan, Jeffery; Hoffman, Robert L.; Murphy, Sean; Marx, Matthew; Yanochko, Gina; Trajkovic, Dusko; Dinh, Dac; Timofeevski, Sergei; Zhu, Zhou; Sun, Peiquing; Lappin, Patrick B.; Murray, Brion W.

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint intervention is an effective therapeutic strategy for cancer when applied to patients predisposed to respond and the treatment is well-tolerated. A critical cell cycle process that could be targeted is the mitotic checkpoint (spindle assembly checkpoint) which governs the metaphase-to-anaphase transition and insures proper chromosomal segregation. The mitotic checkpoint kinase Mps1 was selected to explore whether enhancement in genomic instability is a viable therapeutic strategy. The basal-a subset of triple-negative breast cancer was chosen as a model system because it has a higher incidence of chromosomal instability and Mps1 expression is up-regulated. Depletion of Mps1 reduces tumor cell viability relative to normal cells. Highly selective, extremely potent Mps1 kinase inhibitors were created to investigate the roles of Mps1 catalytic activity in tumor cells and normal physiology (PF-7006, PF-3837; Ki<0.5 nM; cellular IC50 2–6 nM). Treatment of tumor cells in vitro with PF-7006 modulates expected Mps1-dependent biology as demonstrated by molecular and phenotypic measures (reduced pHH3-Ser10 levels, shorter duration of mitosis, micro-nucleation, and apoptosis). Tumor-bearing mice treated with PF-7006 exhibit tumor growth inhibition concomitant with pharmacodynamic modulation of a downstream biomarker (pHH3-Ser10). Unfortunately, efficacy only occurs at drug exposures that cause dose-limiting body weight loss, gastrointestinal toxicities, and neutropenia. Mps1 inhibitor toxicities may be mitigated by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest in Rb1-competent cells with the cyclin-dependent kinase-4/6 inhibitor palbociclib. Using an isogenic cellular model system, PF-7006 is shown to be selectively cytotoxic to Rb1-deficient cells relative to Rb1-competent cells (also a measure of kinase selectivity). Human bone marrow cells pretreated with palbociclib have decreased PF-7006-dependent apoptosis relative to cells without palbociclib pretreatment

  17. Human cytomegalovirus inhibits a DNA damage response by mislocalizing checkpoint proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, Miguel; Shenk, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    The DNA damage checkpoint pathway responds to DNA damage and induces a cell cycle arrest to allow time for DNA repair. Several viruses are known to activate or modulate this cellular response. Here we show that the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated checkpoint pathway, which responds to double-strand breaks in DNA, is activated in response to human cytomegalovirus DNA replication. However, this activation does not propagate through the pathway; it is blocked at the level of the effector kinase, checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2). Late after infection, several checkpoint proteins, including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Chk2, are mislocalized to a cytoplasmic virus assembly zone, where they are colocalized with virion structural proteins. This colocalization was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of virion proteins with an antibody that recognizes Chk2. Virus replication was resistant to ionizing radiation, which causes double-strand breaks in DNA. We propose that human CMV DNA replication activates the checkpoint response to DNA double-strand breaks, and the virus responds by altering the localization of checkpoint proteins to the cytoplasm and thereby inhibiting the signaling pathway. ionizing radiation | ataxia-telangiectasia mutated pathway

  18. A role for mitogen-activated protein kinase in the spindle assembly checkpoint in XTC cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X M; Zhai, Y; Ferrell, J E

    1997-04-21

    The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents cells whose spindles are defective or chromosomes are misaligned from initiating anaphase and leaving mitosis. Studies of Xenopus egg extracts have implicated the Erk2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) in this checkpoint. Other studies have suggested that MAP kinases might be important for normal mitotic progression. Here we have investigated whether MAP kinase function is required for mitotic progression or the spindle assembly checkpoint in vivo in Xenopus tadpole cells (XTC). We determined that Erk1 and/or Erk2 are present in the mitotic spindle during prometaphase and metaphase, consistent with the idea that MAP kinase might regulate or monitor the status of the spindle. Next, we microinjected purified recombinant XCL100, a Xenopus MAP kinase phosphatase, into XTC cells in various stages of mitosis to interfere with MAP kinase activation. We found that mitotic progression was unaffected by the phosphatase. However, XCL100 rendered the cells unable to remain arrested in mitosis after treatment with nocodazole. Cells injected with phosphatase at prometaphase or metaphase exited mitosis in the presence of nocodazole-the chromosomes decondensed and the nuclear envelope re-formed-whereas cells injected with buffer or a catalytically inactive XCL100 mutant protein remained arrested in mitosis. Coinjection of constitutively active MAP kinase kinase-1, which opposes XCL100's effects on MAP kinase, antagonized the effects of XCL100. Since the only known targets of MAP kinase kinase-1 are Erk1 and Erk2, these findings argue that MAP kinase function is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint in XTC cells.

  19. Kinase-independent function of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) in the replication of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Speroni, Juliana; Federico, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2012-05-01

    The checkpoint kinases Chk1 and ATR are broadly known for their role in the response to the accumulation of damaged DNA. Because Chk1 activation requires its phosphorylation by ATR, it is expected that ATR or Chk1 down-regulation should cause similar alterations in the signals triggered by DNA lesions. Intriguingly, we found that Chk1, but not ATR, promotes the progression of replication forks after UV irradiation. Strikingly, this role of Chk1 is independent of its kinase-domain and of its partnership with Claspin. Instead, we demonstrate that the ability of Chk1 to promote replication fork progression on damaged DNA templates relies on its recently identified proliferating cell nuclear antigen-interacting motif, which is required for its release from chromatin after DNA damage. Also supporting the importance of Chk1 release, a histone H2B-Chk1 chimera, which is permanently immobilized in chromatin, is unable to promote the replication of damaged DNA. Moreover, inefficient chromatin dissociation of Chk1 impairs the efficient recruitment of the specialized DNA polymerase η (pol η) to replication-associated foci after UV. Given the critical role of pol η during translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), these findings unveil an unforeseen facet of the regulation by Chk1 of DNA replication. This kinase-independent role of Chk1 is exclusively associated to the maintenance of active replication forks after UV irradiation in a manner in which Chk1 release prompts TLS to avoid replication stalling.

  20. Kinase-independent function of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) in the replication of damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Speroni, Juliana; Federico, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F.; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2012-01-01

    The checkpoint kinases Chk1 and ATR are broadly known for their role in the response to the accumulation of damaged DNA. Because Chk1 activation requires its phosphorylation by ATR, it is expected that ATR or Chk1 down-regulation should cause similar alterations in the signals triggered by DNA lesions. Intriguingly, we found that Chk1, but not ATR, promotes the progression of replication forks after UV irradiation. Strikingly, this role of Chk1 is independent of its kinase-domain and of its partnership with Claspin. Instead, we demonstrate that the ability of Chk1 to promote replication fork progression on damaged DNA templates relies on its recently identified proliferating cell nuclear antigen-interacting motif, which is required for its release from chromatin after DNA damage. Also supporting the importance of Chk1 release, a histone H2B-Chk1 chimera, which is permanently immobilized in chromatin, is unable to promote the replication of damaged DNA. Moreover, inefficient chromatin dissociation of Chk1 impairs the efficient recruitment of the specialized DNA polymerase η (pol η) to replication-associated foci after UV. Given the critical role of pol η during translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), these findings unveil an unforeseen facet of the regulation by Chk1 of DNA replication. This kinase-independent role of Chk1 is exclusively associated to the maintenance of active replication forks after UV irradiation in a manner in which Chk1 release prompts TLS to avoid replication stalling. PMID:22529391

  1. Kinase-independent function of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) in the replication of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Speroni, Juliana; Federico, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Soria, Gastón; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2012-05-01

    The checkpoint kinases Chk1 and ATR are broadly known for their role in the response to the accumulation of damaged DNA. Because Chk1 activation requires its phosphorylation by ATR, it is expected that ATR or Chk1 down-regulation should cause similar alterations in the signals triggered by DNA lesions. Intriguingly, we found that Chk1, but not ATR, promotes the progression of replication forks after UV irradiation. Strikingly, this role of Chk1 is independent of its kinase-domain and of its partnership with Claspin. Instead, we demonstrate that the ability of Chk1 to promote replication fork progression on damaged DNA templates relies on its recently identified proliferating cell nuclear antigen-interacting motif, which is required for its release from chromatin after DNA damage. Also supporting the importance of Chk1 release, a histone H2B-Chk1 chimera, which is permanently immobilized in chromatin, is unable to promote the replication of damaged DNA. Moreover, inefficient chromatin dissociation of Chk1 impairs the efficient recruitment of the specialized DNA polymerase η (pol η) to replication-associated foci after UV. Given the critical role of pol η during translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), these findings unveil an unforeseen facet of the regulation by Chk1 of DNA replication. This kinase-independent role of Chk1 is exclusively associated to the maintenance of active replication forks after UV irradiation in a manner in which Chk1 release prompts TLS to avoid replication stalling. PMID:22529391

  2. Src Family Kinases Promote Silencing of ATR-Chk1 Signaling in Termination of DNA Damage Checkpoint*

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Yasunori; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Kubota, Sho; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Honda, Takuya; Okamoto, Aya; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Iwama, Atsushi; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage checkpoint arrests cell cycle progression to allow time for repair. Once DNA repair is completed, checkpoint signaling is terminated. Currently little is known about the mechanism by which checkpoint signaling is terminated, and the disappearance of DNA lesions is considered to induce the end of checkpoint signaling; however, here we show that the termination of checkpoint signaling is an active process promoted by Src family tyrosine kinases. Inhibition of Src activity delays recovery from the G2 phase DNA damage checkpoint following DNA repair. Src activity is required for the termination of checkpoint signaling, and inhibition of Src activity induces persistent activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and Rad3-related (ATR) and Chk1 kinases. Src-dependent nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation and v-Src expression suppress the ATR-mediated Chk1 and Rad17 phosphorylation induced by DNA double strand breaks or DNA replication stress. Thus, Src family kinases promote checkpoint recovery through termination of ATR- and Chk1-dependent G2 DNA damage checkpoint. These results suggest a model according to which Src family kinases send a termination signal between the completion of DNA repair and the initiation of checkpoint termination. PMID:24634213

  3. Chemogenetic profiling identifies RAD17 as synthetically lethal with checkpoint kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shen, John Paul; Srivas, Rohith; Gross, Andrew; Li, Jianfeng; Jaehnig, Eric J; Sun, Su Ming; Bojorquez-Gomez, Ana; Licon, Katherine; Sivaganesh, Vignesh; Xu, Jia L; Klepper, Kristin; Yeerna, Huwate; Pekin, Daniel; Qiu, Chu Ping; van Attikum, Haico; Sobol, Robert W; Ideker, Trey

    2015-11-01

    Chemical inhibitors of the checkpoint kinases have shown promise in the treatment of cancer, yet their clinical utility may be limited by a lack of molecular biomarkers to identify specific patients most likely to respond to therapy. To this end, we screened 112 known tumor suppressor genes for synthetic lethal interactions with inhibitors of the CHEK1 and CHEK2 checkpoint kinases. We identified eight interactions, including the Replication Factor C (RFC)-related protein RAD17. Clonogenic assays in RAD17 knockdown cell lines identified a substantial shift in sensitivity to checkpoint kinase inhibition (3.5-fold) as compared to RAD17 wild-type. Additional evidence for this interaction was found in a large-scale functional shRNA screen of over 100 genotyped cancer cell lines, in which CHEK1/2 mutant cell lines were unexpectedly sensitive to RAD17 knockdown. This interaction was widely conserved, as we found that RAD17 interacts strongly with checkpoint kinases in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the setting of RAD17 knockdown, CHEK1/2 inhibition was found to be synergistic with inhibition of WEE1, another pharmacologically relevant checkpoint kinase. Accumulation of the DNA damage marker γH2AX following chemical inhibition or transient knockdown of CHEK1, CHEK2 or WEE1 was magnified by knockdown of RAD17. Taken together, our data suggest that CHEK1 or WEE1 inhibitors are likely to have greater clinical efficacy in tumors with RAD17 loss-of-function. PMID:26437225

  4. Re-purposing clinical kinase inhibitors to enhance chemosensitivity by overriding checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Beeharry, Neil; Banina, Eugenia; Hittle, James; Skobeleva, Natalia; Khazak, Vladimir; Deacon, Sean; Andrake, Mark; Egleston, Brian L; Peterson, Jeffrey R; Astsaturov, Igor; Yen, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase, Chk1, are highly effective as chemo- and radio-sensitizers in preclinical studies but are not well-tolerated by patients. We exploited the promiscuous nature of kinase inhibitors to screen 9 clinically relevant kinase inhibitors for their ability to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to a sub-lethal concentration of gemcitabine. Bosutinib, dovitinib, and BEZ-235 were identified as sensitizers that abrogated the DNA damage checkpoint. We further characterized bosutinib, an FDA-approved Src/Abl inhibitor approved for chronic myelogenous leukemia. Unbeknownst to us, we used an isomer (Bos-I) that was unknowingly synthesized and sold to the research community as “authentic” bosutinib. In vitro and cell-based assays showed that both the authentic bosutinib and Bos-I inhibited DNA damage checkpoint kinases Chk1 and Wee1, with Bos-I showing greater potency. Imaging data showed that Bos-I forced cells to override gemcitabine-induced DNA damage checkpoint arrest and destabilized stalled replication forks. These inhibitors enhanced sensitivity to the DNA damaging agents’ gemcitabine, cisplatin, and doxorubicin in pancreatic cancer cell lines. The in vivo efficacy of Bos-I was validated using cells derived directly from a pancreatic cancer patient’s tumor. Notably, the xenograft studies showed that the combination of gemcitabine and Bos-I was significantly more effective in suppressing tumor growth than either agent alone. Finally, we show that the gatekeeper residue in Wee1 dictates its sensitivity to the 2 compounds. Our strategy to screen clinically relevant kinase inhibitors for off-target effects on cell cycle checkpoints is a promising approach to re-purpose drugs as chemosensitizers. PMID:24955955

  5. Role of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Factors in the Regulation of the Mitotic Checkpoint Kinase Bub1

    PubMed Central

    Breit, Claudia; Bange, Tanja; Petrovic, Arsen; Weir, John R.; Müller, Franziska; Vogt, Doro; Musacchio, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors microtubule attachment to kinetochores to ensure accurate sister chromatid segregation during mitosis. The SAC members Bub1 and BubR1 are paralogs that underwent significant functional specializations during evolution. We report an in-depth characterization of the kinase domains of Bub1 and BubR1. BubR1 kinase domain binds nucleotides but is unable to deliver catalytic activity in vitro. Conversely, Bub1 is an active kinase regulated by intra-molecular phosphorylation at the P+1 loop. The crystal structure of the phosphorylated Bub1 kinase domain illustrates a hitherto unknown conformation of the P+1 loop docked into the active site of the Bub1 kinase. Both Bub1 and BubR1 bind Bub3 constitutively. A hydrodynamic characterization of Bub1:Bub3 and BubR1:Bub3 demonstrates both complexes to have 1:1 stoichiometry, with no additional oligomerization. Conversely, Bub1:Bub3 and BubR1:Bub3 combine to form a heterotetramer. Neither BubR1:Bub3 nor Knl1, the kinetochore receptor of Bub1:Bub3, modulate the kinase activity of Bub1 in vitro, suggesting autonomous regulation of the Bub1 kinase domain. We complement our study with an analysis of the Bub1 substrates. Our results contribute to the mechanistic characterization of a crucial cell cycle checkpoint. PMID:26658523

  6. The Protein Kinase Cδ Catalytic Fragment Is Critical for Maintenance of the G2/M DNA Damage Checkpoint*

    PubMed Central

    LaGory, Edward L.; Sitailo, Leonid A.; Denning, Mitchell F.

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) is an essential component of the intrinsic apoptotic program. Following DNA damage, such as exposure to UV radiation, PKCδ is cleaved in a caspase-dependent manner, generating a constitutively active catalytic fragment (PKCδ-cat), which is necessary and sufficient for keratinocyte apoptosis. We found that in addition to inducing apoptosis, expression of PKCδ-cat caused a pronounced G2/M cell cycle arrest in both primary human keratinocytes and immortalized HaCaT cells. Consistent with a G2/M arrest, PKCδ-cat induced phosphorylation of Cdk1 (Tyr15), a critical event in the G2/M checkpoint. Treatment with the ATM/ATR inhibitor caffeine was unable to prevent PKCδ-cat-induced G2/M arrest, suggesting that PKCδ-cat is functioning downstream of ATM/ATR in the G2/M checkpoint. To better understand the role of PKCδ and PKCδ-cat in the cell cycle response to DNA damage, we exposed wild-type and PKCδ null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to UV radiation. Wild-type MEFs underwent a pronounced G2/M arrest, Cdk1 phosphorylation, and induction of apoptosis following UV exposure, whereas PKCδ null MEFs were resistant to these effects. Expression of PKCδ-green fluorescent protein, but not caspase-resistant or kinase-inactive PKCδ, was able to restore G2/M checkpoint integrity in PKCδ null MEFs. The function of PKCδ in the DNA damage-induced G2/M cell cycle checkpoint may be a critical component of its tumor suppressor function. PMID:19917613

  7. SUMOylation regulates polo-like kinase 1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Vinidhra; Park, Hyewon; Ryu, Hyunju; Azuma, Yoshiaki

    2015-02-01

    Mitotic SUMOylation has an essential role in faithful chromosome segregation in eukaryotes, although its molecular consequences are not yet fully understood. In Xenopus egg extract assays, we showed that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is modified by SUMO2/3 at mitotic centromeres and that its enzymatic activity could be regulated by SUMOylation. To determine the molecular consequence of mitotic SUMOylation, we analyzed SUMOylated PARP1-specific binding proteins. We identified Polo-like kinase 1-interacting checkpoint helicase (PICH) as an interaction partner of SUMOylated PARP1 in Xenopus egg extract. Interestingly, PICH also bound to SUMOylated topoisomerase IIα (TopoIIα), a major centromeric small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) substrate. Purified recombinant human PICH interacted with SUMOylated substrates, indicating that PICH directly interacts with SUMO, and this interaction is conserved among species. Further analysis of mitotic chromosomes revealed that PICH localized to the centromere independent of mitotic SUMOylation. Additionally, we found that PICH is modified by SUMO2/3 on mitotic chromosomes and in vitro. PICH SUMOylation is highly dependent on protein inhibitor of activated STAT, PIASy, consistent with other mitotic chromosomal SUMO substrates. Finally, the SUMOylation of PICH significantly reduced its DNA binding capability, indicating that SUMOylation might regulate its DNA-dependent ATPase activity. Collectively, our findings suggest a novel SUMO-mediated regulation of the function of PICH at mitotic centromeres. PMID:25564610

  8. Regulation of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis by the Morphogenesis Checkpoint Kinase Swe1*

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Neha; Han, Gongshe; Somashekarappa, Niranjanakumari; Gable, Kenneth; Dunn, Teresa; Kohlwein, Sepp D.

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipid (SL) biosynthesis is negatively regulated by the highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-localized Orm family proteins. Defective SL synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to increased phosphorylation and inhibition of Orm proteins by the kinase Ypk1. Here we present evidence that the yeast morphogenesis checkpoint kinase, Swe1, regulates SL biosynthesis independent of the Ypk1 pathway. Deletion of the Swe1 kinase renders mutant cells sensitive to serine palmitoyltransferase inhibition due to impaired sphingoid long-chain base synthesis. Based on these data and previous results, we suggest that Swe1 kinase perceives alterations in SL homeostasis, activates SL synthesis, and may thus represent the missing regulatory link that controls the SL rheostat during the cell cycle. PMID:26634277

  9. The role of Dbf4/Drf1-dependent kinase Cdc7 (Ddk) in DNA damage checkpoint control

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Toshiya; Lau, Eric; Chiang, Gary G.; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Dbf4/Drf1-dependent S-phase promoting kinase Cdc7 (Ddk) is thought to be an essential target inactivated by the S-phase checkpoint machinery that inhibits DNA replication. However, we show here that the complex formation, chromatin-association, and kinase activity of Ddk are not inhibited during the DNA damage-induced S-phase checkpoint response in Xenopus egg extracts and mammalian cells. Instead, we find that Ddk plays an active role in regulating S-phase checkpoint signaling. Addition of purified Ddk to Xenopus egg extracts or overexpression of Dbf4 in HeLa cells downregulates ATR-Chk1 checkpoint signaling and overrides the inhibition of DNA replication and cell cycle progression induced by DNA damaging agents. These results indicate that Ddk functions as an upstream regulator to monitor S-phase checkpoint signaling. We propose that Ddk modulates the S-phase checkpoint control by attenuating checkpoint signaling and triggering DNA replication re-initiation during the S-phase checkpoint recovery. PMID:19111665

  10. Bub1 kinase activity drives error correction and mitotic checkpoint control but not tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ricke, Robin M.; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Malureanu, Liviu; Harrison, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint protein Bub1 is essential for embryogenesis and survival of proliferating cells, and bidirectional deviations from its normal level of expression cause chromosome missegregation, aneuploidy, and cancer predisposition in mice. To provide insight into the physiological significance of this critical mitotic regulator at a modular level, we generated Bub1 mutant mice that lack kinase activity using a knockin gene-targeting approach that preserves normal protein abundance. In this paper, we uncover that Bub1 kinase activity integrates attachment error correction and mitotic checkpoint signaling by controlling the localization and activity of Aurora B kinase through phosphorylation of histone H2A at threonine 121. Strikingly, despite substantial chromosome segregation errors and aneuploidization, mice deficient for Bub1 kinase activity do not exhibit increased susceptibility to spontaneous or carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. These findings provide a unique example of a modular mitotic activity orchestrating two distinct networks that safeguard against whole chromosome instability and reveal the differential importance of distinct aneuploidy-causing Bub1 defects in tumor suppression. PMID:23209306

  11. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Yasunori Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint.

  12. The effect of the intra-S-phase checkpoint on origins of replication in human cells.

    PubMed

    Karnani, Neerja; Dutta, Anindya

    2011-03-15

    Although many chemotherapy drugs activate the intra-S-phase checkpoint pathway to block S-phase progression, not much is known about how and where the intra-S-phase checkpoint regulates origins of replication in human chromosomes. A genomic analysis of replication in human cells in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU) revealed that only the earliest origins fire, but the forks stall within 2 kb and neighboring clusters of dormant origins are activated. The initiation events are located near expressed genes with a preference for transcription start and end sites, and when they are located in intergenic regions they are located near regulatory factor-binding regions (RFBR). The activation of clustered neo-origins by HU suggests that there are many potential replication initiation sites in permissive parts of the genome, most of which are not used in a normal S phase. Consistent with this redundancy, we see multiple sites bound to MCM3 (representative of the helicase) in the region flanking three out of three origins studied in detail. Bypass of the intra-S-phase checkpoint by caffeine activates many new origins in mid- and late-replicating parts of the genome. The intra-S-phase checkpoint suppresses origin firing after the loading of Mcm10, but before the recruitment of Cdc45 and AND-1/CTF4; i.e., after helicase loading but before helicase activation and polymerase loading. Interestingly, Cdc45 recruitment upon checkpoint bypass was accompanied by the restoration of global Cdk2 kinase activity and decrease in both global and origin-bound histone H3 Lys 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), consistent with the suggestion that both of these factors are important for Cdc45 recruitment.

  13. Modulating Mek1 kinase alters outcomes of meiotic recombination and the stringency of the recombination checkpoint response

    PubMed Central

    Hsin-Yen, Wu; Hsuan-Chung, Ho; Burgess, Sean M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background During meiosis, recombination between homologous chromosomes promotes their proper segregation. In budding yeast, programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) promote recombination between homologs versus sister chromatids by dimerizing and activating Mek1, a chromosome axis-associated kinase. Mek1 is also a proposed effector kinase in the recombination checkpoint that arrests exit from pachytene in response to aberrant DNA/axis structures. Elucidating a role for Mek1 in the recombination checkpoint has been difficult since in mek1 loss-of-function mutants DSBs are rapidly repaired using a sister chromatid thereby bypassing formation of checkpoint-activating lesions. Here we tested the hypothesis that a MEK1 gain-of-function allele would enhance interhomolog bias and the recombination checkpoint response. Results When Mek1 activation was artificially maintained through GST-mediated dimerization, there was an enhanced skew toward interhomolog recombination and reduction of intersister events including multi-chromatid joint molecules. Increased interhomolog events were specifically repaired as noncrossovers rather than crossovers. Ectopic Mek1 dimerization was also sufficient to impose interhomolog bias in the absence of recombination checkpoint functions, thereby uncoupling these two processes. Finally, the stringency of the recombination checkpoint was enhanced in weak meiotic recombination mutants by blocking prophase exit in a subset of cells where arrest is not absolute. Conclusions We propose that Mek1 plays dual roles during meiotic prophase I by phosphorylating targets directly involved in the recombination checkpoint as well as targets involved in sister chromatid recombination. We discuss how regulation of pachytene exit by Mek1 or similar kinases could influence checkpoint stringency, which may differ among species and between sexes. PMID:20888230

  14. Crystal Structure of Checkpoint Kinase 2 in Complex with Nsc 109555, a Potent and Selective Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Zhang, Di; Jobson, Andrew G.; Pommier, Yves; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Waugh, David S.

    2009-03-05

    Checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), a ser/thr kinase involved in the ATM-Chk2 checkpoint pathway, is activated by genomic instability and DNA damage and results in either arrest of the cell cycle to allow DNA repair to occur or apoptosis if the DNA damage is severe. Drugs that specifically target Chk2 could be beneficial when administered in combination with current DNA-damaging agents used in cancer therapy. Recently, a novel inhibitor of Chk2, NSC 109555, was identified that exhibited high potency (IC{sub 50} = 240 nM) and selectivity. This compound represents a new chemotype and lead for the development of novel Chk2 inhibitors that could be used as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer. To facilitate the discovery of new analogs of NSC 109555 with even greater potency and selectivity, we have solved the crystal structure of this inhibitor in complex with the catalytic domain of Chk2. The structure confirms that the compound is an ATP-competitive inhibitor, as the electron density clearly reveals that it occupies the ATP-binding pocket. However, the mode of inhibition differs from that of the previously studied structure of Chk2 in complex with debromohymenialdisine, a compound that inhibits both Chk1 and Chk2. A unique hydrophobic pocket in Chk2, located very close to the bound inhibitor, presents an opportunity for the rational design of compounds with higher binding affinity and greater selectivity.

  15. Targeting the mitotic checkpoint for cancer therapy with NMS-P715, an inhibitor of MPS1 kinase.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Riccardo; Caldarelli, Marina; Mennecozzi, Milena; Giorgini, Maria Laura; Sola, Francesco; Cappella, Paolo; Perrera, Claudia; Depaolini, Stefania Re; Rusconi, Luisa; Cucchi, Ulisse; Avanzi, Nilla; Bertrand, Jay Aaron; Bossi, Roberto Tiberio; Pesenti, Enrico; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella; Colotta, Francesco; Donati, Daniele; Moll, Jürgen

    2010-12-15

    MPS1 kinase is a key regulator of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a mitotic mechanism specifically required for proper chromosomal alignment and segregation. It has been found aberrantly overexpressed in a wide range of human tumors and is necessary for tumoral cell proliferation. Here we report the identification and characterization of NMS-P715, a selective and orally bioavailable MPS1 small-molecule inhibitor, which selectively reduces cancer cell proliferation, leaving normal cells almost unaffected. NMS-P715 accelerates mitosis and affects kinetochore components localization causing massive aneuploidy and cell death in a variety of tumoral cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in preclinical cancer models. Inhibiting the SAC could represent a promising new approach to selectively target cancer cells.

  16. Casein kinase II is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint by regulating Mad2p in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Midori; Yamamoto, Ayumu; Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Nakanishi, Makoto; Yoshida, Takashi; Aiba, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2009-10-23

    The spindle checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Here we show that fission yeast casein kinase II (CK2) is required for this checkpoint function. In the CK2 mutants mitosis occurs in the presence of a spindle defect, and the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2p fails to localize to unattached kinetochores. The CK2 mutants are sensitive to the microtubule depolymerising drug thiabendazole, which is counteracted by ectopic expression of mad2{sup +}. The level of Mad2p is low in the CK2 mutants. These results suggest that CK2 has a role in the spindle checkpoint by regulating Mad2p.

  17. Monopolar Spindle 1 (MPS1) Kinase Promotes Production of Closed MAD2 (C-MAD2) Conformer and Assembly of the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Aaron R.; Ji, Wenbin; Sturt-Gillespie, Brianne; Bekier, Michael E.; Wang, Kexi; Taylor, William R.; Liu, Song-Tao

    2013-01-01

    MPS1 kinase is an essential component of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), but its functioning mechanisms are not fully understood. We have shown recently that direct interaction between BUBR1 and MAD2 is critical for assembly and function of the human mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), the SAC effector. Here we report that inhibition of MPS1 kinase activity by reversine disrupts BUBR1-MAD2 as well as CDC20-MAD2 interactions, causing premature activation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. The effect of MPS1 inhibition is likely due to reduction of closed MAD2 (C-MAD2), as expressing a MAD2 mutant (MAD2L13A) that is locked in the C conformation rescued the checkpoint defects. In the presence of reversine, exogenous C-MAD2 does not localize to unattached kinetochores but is still incorporated into the MCC. Contrary to a previous report, we found that sustained MPS1 activity is required for maintaining both the MAD1·C-MAD2 complex and open MAD2 (O-MAD2) at unattached kinetochores to facilitate C-MAD2 production. Additionally, mitotic phosphorylation of BUBR1 is also affected by MPS1 inhibition but seems dispensable for MCC assembly. Our results support the notion that MPS1 kinase promotes C-MAD2 production and subsequent MCC assembly to activate the SAC. PMID:24151075

  18. 2-Aryl benzimidazoles featuring alkyl-linked pendant alcohols and amines as inhibitors of checkpoint kinase Chk2.

    PubMed

    Neff, Danielle K; Lee-Dutra, Alice; Blevitt, Jonathan M; Axe, Frank U; Hack, Michael D; Buma, Johnathan C; Rynberg, Raymond; Brunmark, Anders; Karlsson, Lars; Breitenbucher, J Guy

    2007-12-01

    A series of benzimidazole compounds containing pendant alcohol and amine moieties was found to be active against checkpoint kinase Chk2. These compounds were prepared to examine a potential hydrogen bond interaction with an active site residue and to investigate replacement of a biaryl linker with an aliphatic system in an effort to improve solubility.

  19. DNA-dependent protein kinase and checkpoint kinase 2 synergistically activate a latent population of p53 upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Jack, Melissa T; Woo, Richard A; Motoyama, Noboru; Takai, Hitoyuki; Lee, Patrick W K

    2004-04-01

    The role of the checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) as an upstream activator of p53 following DNA damage has been controversial. We have recently shown that Chk2 and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) are both involved in DNA damage-induced apoptosis but not G(1) arrest in mouse embryo fibroblasts. Here we demonstrate that Chk2 is required to activate p53 in vitro as measured by its ability to bind its consensus DNA target sequence following DNA damage and is in fact the previously unidentified factor working synergistically with DNA-PK to activate p53. The gene mutated in ataxia telangiectasia is not involved in this p53 activation. Using wortmannin, serine 15 mutants of p53, DNA-PK null cells and Chk2 null cells, we demonstrate that DNA-PK and Chk2 act independently and sequentially on p53. Furthermore, the p53 target of these two kinases represents a latent (preexisting) population of p53. Taken together, the results from these studies are consistent with a model in which DNA damage causes an immediate and sequential modification of latent p53 by DNA-PK and Chk2, which under appropriate conditions can lead to apoptosis. PMID:14752107

  20. DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM regulates germination and maintains genome stability in seeds.

    PubMed

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Footitt, Steven; Bray, Clifford M; Finch-Savage, William E; West, Christopher E

    2016-08-23

    Genome integrity is crucial for cellular survival and the faithful transmission of genetic information. The eukaryotic cellular response to DNA damage is orchestrated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinases ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED (ATM) and ATM AND RAD3-RELATED (ATR). Here we identify important physiological roles for these sensor kinases in control of seed germination. We demonstrate that double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rate-limiting for germination. We identify that desiccation tolerant seeds exhibit a striking transcriptional DSB damage response during germination, indicative of high levels of genotoxic stress, which is induced following maturation drying and quiescence. Mutant atr and atm seeds are highly resistant to aging, establishing ATM and ATR as determinants of seed viability. In response to aging, ATM delays germination, whereas atm mutant seeds germinate with extensive chromosomal abnormalities. This identifies ATM as a major factor that controls germination in aged seeds, integrating progression through germination with surveillance of genome integrity. Mechanistically, ATM functions through control of DNA replication in imbibing seeds. ATM signaling is mediated by transcriptional control of the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED 5, an essential factor required for the aging-induced delay to germination. In the soil seed bank, seeds exhibit increased transcript levels of ATM and ATR, with changes in dormancy and germination potential modulated by environmental signals, including temperature and soil moisture. Collectively, our findings reveal physiological functions for these sensor kinases in linking genome integrity to germination, thereby influencing seed quality, crucial for plant survival in the natural environment and sustainable crop production. PMID:27503884

  1. DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM regulates germination and maintains genome stability in seeds.

    PubMed

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Footitt, Steven; Bray, Clifford M; Finch-Savage, William E; West, Christopher E

    2016-08-23

    Genome integrity is crucial for cellular survival and the faithful transmission of genetic information. The eukaryotic cellular response to DNA damage is orchestrated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinases ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED (ATM) and ATM AND RAD3-RELATED (ATR). Here we identify important physiological roles for these sensor kinases in control of seed germination. We demonstrate that double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rate-limiting for germination. We identify that desiccation tolerant seeds exhibit a striking transcriptional DSB damage response during germination, indicative of high levels of genotoxic stress, which is induced following maturation drying and quiescence. Mutant atr and atm seeds are highly resistant to aging, establishing ATM and ATR as determinants of seed viability. In response to aging, ATM delays germination, whereas atm mutant seeds germinate with extensive chromosomal abnormalities. This identifies ATM as a major factor that controls germination in aged seeds, integrating progression through germination with surveillance of genome integrity. Mechanistically, ATM functions through control of DNA replication in imbibing seeds. ATM signaling is mediated by transcriptional control of the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED 5, an essential factor required for the aging-induced delay to germination. In the soil seed bank, seeds exhibit increased transcript levels of ATM and ATR, with changes in dormancy and germination potential modulated by environmental signals, including temperature and soil moisture. Collectively, our findings reveal physiological functions for these sensor kinases in linking genome integrity to germination, thereby influencing seed quality, crucial for plant survival in the natural environment and sustainable crop production.

  2. DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM regulates germination and maintains genome stability in seeds

    PubMed Central

    Waterworth, Wanda M.; Footitt, Steven; Bray, Clifford M.; Finch-Savage, William E.; West, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    Genome integrity is crucial for cellular survival and the faithful transmission of genetic information. The eukaryotic cellular response to DNA damage is orchestrated by the DNA damage checkpoint kinases ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED (ATM) and ATM AND RAD3-RELATED (ATR). Here we identify important physiological roles for these sensor kinases in control of seed germination. We demonstrate that double-strand breaks (DSBs) are rate-limiting for germination. We identify that desiccation tolerant seeds exhibit a striking transcriptional DSB damage response during germination, indicative of high levels of genotoxic stress, which is induced following maturation drying and quiescence. Mutant atr and atm seeds are highly resistant to aging, establishing ATM and ATR as determinants of seed viability. In response to aging, ATM delays germination, whereas atm mutant seeds germinate with extensive chromosomal abnormalities. This identifies ATM as a major factor that controls germination in aged seeds, integrating progression through germination with surveillance of genome integrity. Mechanistically, ATM functions through control of DNA replication in imbibing seeds. ATM signaling is mediated by transcriptional control of the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED 5, an essential factor required for the aging-induced delay to germination. In the soil seed bank, seeds exhibit increased transcript levels of ATM and ATR, with changes in dormancy and germination potential modulated by environmental signals, including temperature and soil moisture. Collectively, our findings reveal physiological functions for these sensor kinases in linking genome integrity to germination, thereby influencing seed quality, crucial for plant survival in the natural environment and sustainable crop production. PMID:27503884

  3. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates mitotic checkpoint protein levels in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hualong; Zhu, Songcheng; Song, Chenlin; Liu, Naifa; Kang, Jiuhong

    2012-04-01

    Aberrant expression of mitotic checkpoint genes compromises mitotic checkpoint, leads to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis. However, the cell signals that control mitotic checkpoint gene expression have not been reported so far. In the present study we show that, in human breast cancer cells, chemical inhibition of Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), but not Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β), abrogates the mitotic arrest induced by nocodazole. Protein expression analysis reveals that inhibition of BMP signaling dramatically down regulates protein levels of mitotic checkpoint components BUB3, Hec1, TTK and MAD2, but inhibition of TGF-β has relatively minor effect on the expression of these proteins. Activation of BMP signaling specifically up regulates BUB3, and activation of Activin A signaling globally down regulates these proteins level. Furthermore, overexpressing MAD2, TTK, BUB3 or Hec1 significantly rescues the mitotic arrest defect caused by BMP inhibition. Our results demonstrated for the first time that TGF-β family cytokines are cellular signals regulating mitotic checkpoint and perturbations in intrinsic BMP signaling could lead to suppression of mitotic checkpoint signaling by downregulating key checkpoint proteins. The results suggest a possible mechanism by which dysregulation of TGF-β signaling causes mitotic checkpoint defects and drives tumorigenesis. The finding also provides a potential and more specific strategy for cancer prevention by targeting BMP and mitotic checkpoint connection. PMID:22234345

  4. Novel design strategy for checkpoint kinase 2 inhibitors using pharmacophore modeling, combinatorial fusion, and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yuan; Wang, Yen-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) has a great effect on DNA-damage and plays an important role in response to DNA double-strand breaks and related lesions. In this study, we will concentrate on Chk2 and the purpose is to find the potential inhibitors by the pharmacophore hypotheses (PhModels), combinatorial fusion, and virtual screening techniques. Applying combinatorial fusion into PhModels and virtual screening techniques is a novel design strategy for drug design. We used combinatorial fusion to analyze the prediction results and then obtained the best correlation coefficient of the testing set (r test) with the value 0.816 by combining the Best(train)Best(test) and Fast(train)Fast(test) prediction results. The potential inhibitors were selected from NCI database by screening according to Best(train)Best(test) + Fast(train)Fast(test) prediction results and molecular docking with CDOCKER docking program. Finally, the selected compounds have high interaction energy between a ligand and a receptor. Through these approaches, 23 potential inhibitors for Chk2 are retrieved for further study.

  5. VISTA is an immune checkpoint molecule for human T cells.

    PubMed

    Lines, J Louise; Pantazi, Eirini; Mak, Justin; Sempere, Lorenzo F; Wang, Li; O'Connell, Samuel; Ceeraz, Sabrina; Suriawinata, Arief A; Yan, Shaofeng; Ernstoff, Marc S; Noelle, Randolph

    2014-04-01

    V-domain Ig suppressor of T cell activation (VISTA) is a potent negative regulator of T-cell function that is expressed on hematopoietic cells. VISTA levels are heightened within the tumor microenvironment, in which its blockade can enhance antitumor immune responses in mice. In humans, blockade of the related programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) pathway has shown great potential in clinical immunotherapy trials. Here, we report the structure of human VISTA and examine its function in lymphocyte negative regulation in cancer. VISTA is expressed predominantly within the hematopoietic compartment with highest expression within the myeloid lineage. VISTA-Ig suppressed proliferation of T cells but not B cells and blunted the production of T-cell cytokines and activation markers. Our results establish VISTA as a negative checkpoint regulator that suppresses T-cell activation, induces Foxp3 expression, and is highly expressed within the tumor microenvironment. By analogy to PD-1 and PD-L1 blockade, VISTA blockade may offer an immunotherapeutic strategy for human cancer.

  6. Structure-based design, discovery and development of checkpoint kinase inhibitors as potential anti-cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Thomas P; Jones, Alan M; Collins, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Checkpoint kinase inhibitors offer the promise of enhancing the effectiveness of widely prescribed cancer chemotherapies and radiotherapy by inhibiting the DNA damage response, as well as the potential for single agent efficacy. Areas covered This article surveys structural insights into the checkpoint kinases CHK1 and CHK2 that have been exploited to enhance the selectivity and potency of small molecule inhibitors. The use of mechanistic cellular assays to guide the optimisation of inhibitors is reviewed. The status of the current clinical candidates and emerging new clinical contexts for CHK1 and CHK2 inhibitors are discussed, including the prospects for single agent efficacy. Expert opinion Protein bound water molecules play key roles in structural features that can be targeted to gain high selectivity for either enzyme. The results of early phase clinical trials of checkpoint inhibitors have been mixed, but significant progress has been made in testing the combination of CHK1 inhibitors with genotoxic chemotherapy. Second generation CHK1 inhibitors are likely to benefit from increased selectivity and oral bioavailability. While the optimum therapeutic context for CHK2 inhibition remains unclear, the emergence of single agent preclinical efficacy for CHK1 inhibitors in specific tumour types exhibiting constitutive replication stress represents exciting progress in exploring the therapeutic potential of these agents. PMID:23594139

  7. Checkpoint Kinase 2 Negatively Regulates Androgen Sensitivity and Prostate Cancer Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Ta, Huy Q; Ivey, Melissa L; Frierson, Henry F; Conaway, Mark R; Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw; Larner, James M; Gioeli, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men, and curing metastatic disease remains a significant challenge. Nearly all patients with disseminated prostate cancer initially respond to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), but virtually all patients will relapse and develop incurable castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). A high-throughput RNAi screen to identify signaling pathways regulating prostate cancer cell growth led to our discovery that checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) knockdown dramatically increased prostate cancer growth and hypersensitized cells to low androgen levels. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the effects of CHK2 were dependent on the downstream signaling proteins CDC25C and CDK1. Moreover, CHK2 depletion increased androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity on androgen-regulated genes, substantiating the finding that CHK2 affects prostate cancer proliferation, partly, through the AR. Remarkably, we further show that CHK2 is a novel AR-repressed gene, suggestive of a negative feedback loop between CHK2 and AR. In addition, we provide evidence that CHK2 physically associates with the AR and that cell-cycle inhibition increased this association. Finally, IHC analysis of CHK2 in prostate cancer patient samples demonstrated a decrease in CHK2 expression in high-grade tumors. In conclusion, we propose that CHK2 is a negative regulator of androgen sensitivity and prostate cancer growth, and that CHK2 signaling is lost during prostate cancer progression to castration resistance. Thus, perturbing CHK2 signaling may offer a new therapeutic approach for sensitizing CRPC to ADT and radiation. PMID:26573794

  8. SIRT2 induces the checkpoint kinase BubR1 to increase lifespan

    PubMed Central

    North, Brian J; Rosenberg, Michael A; Jeganathan, Karthik B; Hafner, Angela V; Michan, Shaday; Dai, Jing; Baker, Darren J; Cen, Yana; Wu, Lindsay E; Sauve, Anthony A; van Deursen, Jan M; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Sinclair, David A

    2014-01-01

    Mice overexpressing the mitotic checkpoint kinase gene BubR1 live longer, whereas mice hypomorphic for BubR1 (BubR1H/H) live shorter and show signs of accelerated aging. As wild-type mice age, BubR1 levels decline in many tissues, a process that is proposed to underlie normal aging and age-related diseases. Understanding why BubR1 declines with age and how to slow this process is therefore of considerable interest. The sirtuins (SIRT1-7) are a family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases that can delay age-related diseases. Here, we show that the loss of BubR1 levels with age is due to a decline in NAD+ and the ability of SIRT2 to maintain lysine-668 of BubR1 in a deacetylated state, which is counteracted by the acetyltransferase CBP. Overexpression of SIRT2 or treatment of mice with the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) increases BubR1 abundance in vivo. Overexpression of SIRT2 in BubR1H/H animals increases median lifespan, with a greater effect in male mice. Together, these data indicate that further exploration of the potential of SIRT2 and NAD+ to delay diseases of aging in mammals is warranted. PMID:24825348

  9. Fragment-Based Screening Maps Inhibitor Interactions in the ATP-Binding Site of Checkpoint Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Santisteban, M. Cris; Westwood, Isaac M.; Boxall, Kathy; Brown, Nathan; Peacock, Sam; McAndrew, Craig; Barrie, Elaine; Richards, Meirion; Mirza, Amin; Oliver, Antony W.; Burke, Rosemary; Hoelder, Swen; Jones, Keith; Aherne, G. Wynne; Blagg, Julian; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.; van Montfort, Rob L. M.

    2013-01-01

    Checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) is an important serine/threonine kinase in the cellular response to DNA damage. A fragment-based screening campaign using a combination of a high-concentration AlphaScreen™ kinase assay and a biophysical thermal shift assay, followed by X-ray crystallography, identified a number of chemically different ligand-efficient CHK2 hinge-binding scaffolds that have not been exploited in known CHK2 inhibitors. In addition, it showed that the use of these orthogonal techniques allowed efficient discrimination between genuine hit matter and false positives from each individual assay technology. Furthermore, the CHK2 crystal structures with a quinoxaline-based fragment and its follow-up compound highlight a hydrophobic area above the hinge region not previously explored in rational CHK2 inhibitor design, but which might be exploited to enhance both potency and selectivity of CHK2 inhibitors. PMID:23776527

  10. Is activation of the intra-S checkpoint in human fibroblasts an important factor in protection against UV-induced mutagenesis?

    PubMed

    Sproul, Christopher D; Rao, Shangbang; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Kaufmann, William K; Cordeiro-Stone, Marila

    2013-11-15

    The ATR/CHK1-dependent intra-S checkpoint inhibits replicon initiation and replication fork progression in response to DNA damage caused by UV (UV) radiation. It has been proposed that this signaling cascade protects against UV-induced mutations by reducing the probability that damaged DNA will be replicated before it can be repaired. Normal human fibroblasts (NHF) were depleted of ATR or CHK1, or treated with the CHK1 kinase inhibitor TCS2312, and the UV-induced mutation frequency at the HPRT locus was measured. Despite clear evidence of S-phase checkpoint abrogation, neither ATR/CHK1 depletion nor CHK1 inhibition caused an increase in the UV-induced HPRT mutation frequency. These results question the premise that the UV-induced intra-S checkpoint plays a prominent role in protecting against UV-induced mutagenesis.

  11. Mps1Mph1 Kinase Phosphorylates Mad3 to Inhibit Cdc20Slp1-APC/C and Maintain Spindle Checkpoint Arrests

    PubMed Central

    Syred, Heather M.; van der Sar, Sjaak; Patel, Hitesh; Moresco, James J.; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Rappsilber, Juri; Hardwick, Kevin G.

    2016-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a mitotic surveillance system which ensures equal segregation of sister chromatids. It delays anaphase onset by inhibiting the action of the E3 ubiquitin ligase known as the anaphase promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C). Mad3/BubR1 is a key component of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) which binds and inhibits the APC/C early in mitosis. Mps1Mph1 kinase is critical for checkpoint signalling and MCC-APC/C inhibition, yet few substrates have been identified. Here we identify Mad3 as a substrate of fission yeast Mps1Mph1 kinase. We map and mutate phosphorylation sites in Mad3, producing mutants that are targeted to kinetochores and assembled into MCC, yet display reduced APC/C binding and are unable to maintain checkpoint arrests. We show biochemically that Mad3 phospho-mimics are potent APC/C inhibitors in vitro, demonstrating that Mad3p modification can directly influence Cdc20Slp1-APC/C activity. This genetic dissection of APC/C inhibition demonstrates that Mps1Mph1 kinase-dependent modifications of Mad3 and Mad2 act in a concerted manner to maintain spindle checkpoint arrests. PMID:26882497

  12. Aurora B Kinase Regulates the Postmitotic Endoreduplication Checkpoint via Phosphorylation of the Retinoblastoma Protein at Serine 780

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Jayasree S.; Ho, Alan L.; Tse, Archie N.; Coward, Jesse; Cheema, Haider; Ambrosini, Grazia; Keen, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The phenotypic change characteristic of Aurora B inhibition is the induction of polyploidy. Utilizing specific siRNA duplexes and a selective small molecule inhibitor (AZD1152) to inhibit Aurora B activity in tumor cells, we sought to elucidate the mechanism by which Aurora B inhibition results in polyploidy. Cells treated with AZD1152 progressed through mitosis with misaligned chromosomes and exited without cytokinesis and subsequently underwent endoreduplication of DNA despite activation of a p53-dependent pseudo G1 checkpoint. Concomitant with polyploid cell formation, we observed the appearance of Rb hypophosphorylation, an event that occurred independently of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition. We went on to discover that Aurora B directly phosphorylates Rb at serine 780 both in vitro and in vivo. This novel interaction plays a critical role in regulating the postmitotic checkpoint to prevent endoreduplication after an aberrant mitosis. Thus, we propose for the first time that Aurora B determines cellular fate after an aberrant mitosis by directly regulating the Rb tumor suppressor protein. PMID:19225156

  13. Engineered Covalent Inactivation of TFIIH-Kinase Reveals an Elongation Checkpoint and Results in Widespread mRNA Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Molina, Juan B; Tseng, Sandra C; Simonett, Shane P; Taunton, Jack; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2016-08-01

    During transcription initiation, the TFIIH-kinase Kin28/Cdk7 marks RNA polymerase II (Pol II) by phosphorylating the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Here we describe a structure-guided chemical approach to covalently and specifically inactivate Kin28 kinase activity in vivo. This method of irreversible inactivation recapitulates both the lethal phenotype and the key molecular signatures that result from genetically disrupting Kin28 function in vivo. Inactivating Kin28 impacts promoter release to differing degrees and reveals a "checkpoint" during the transition to productive elongation. While promoter-proximal pausing is not observed in budding yeast, inhibition of Kin28 attenuates elongation-licensing signals, resulting in Pol II accumulation at the +2 nucleosome and reduced transition to productive elongation. Furthermore, upon inhibition, global stabilization of mRNA masks different degrees of reduction in nascent transcription. This study resolves long-standing controversies on the role of Kin28 in transcription and provides a rational approach to irreversibly inhibit other kinases in vivo. PMID:27477907

  14. Chronic exposure to particulate chromate induces spindle assembly checkpoint bypass in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Xie, Hong; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2006-11-01

    One of the hallmarks of lung cancer is chromosome instability (CIN), particularly a tetraploid phenotype, which is normally prevented by the spindle assembly checkpoint. Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is an established human lung carcinogen, and Cr(VI) induces tumors at lung bifurcation sites where Cr(VI) particles impact and persist. However, the effects of Cr(VI) on the spindle assembly checkpoint are unknown and little is known about prolonged exposure to particulate Cr(VI). Accordingly, we investigated particulate Cr(VI)-induced bypass of the spindle assembly checkpoint after several days of exposure in WHTBF-6 cells. We found that lead chromate indeed induces spindle assembly checkpoint bypass in human lung cells, as 72, 96, and 120 h treatments with 0.5 or 1 microg/cm2 lead chromate induced significant increases in the percentage of cells with aberrant mitotic figures. For example, treatment with 1 microg/cm2 lead chromate for 96 h induced 11, 12.3, and 14% of cells with premature anaphase, centromere spreading and premature centromere division, respectively. In addition, we found a disruption of mitosis with more cells accumulating in anaphase; cells treated for 96 h increased from 18% in controls to 31% in cells treated with lead chromate. To confirm involvement of the spindle assembly checkpoint, Mad2 expression was used as a marker. Mad2 expression was decreased in cells exposed to chronic treatments of lead chromate, consistent with disruption of the checkpoint. We also found concentration- and time-dependent increases in tetraploid cells, which continued to grow and form colonies. When cells were treated with chronic lead alone there was no increase in aberrant mitotic cells or polyploidy; however, chronic exposure to a soluble Cr(VI) showed an increase in aberrant mitotic cells and polyploidy. These data suggest that lead chromate does induce CIN and may be one mechanism in the development of Cr(VI)-induced lung cancer. PMID:17112237

  15. Structural characterization of inhibitor complexes with checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), a drug target for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lountos, George T.; Jobson, Andrew G.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Self, Christopher R.; Zhang, Guangtao; Pommier, Yves; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Waugh, David S.

    2012-01-20

    Chk2 (checkpoint kinase 2) is a serine/threonine kinase that participates in a series of signaling networks responsible for maintaining genomic integrity and responding to DNA damage. The development of selective Chk2 inhibitors has recently attracted much interest as a means of sensitizing cancer cells to current DNA-damaging agents used in the treatment of cancer. Additionally, selective Chk2 inhibitors may reduce p53-mediated apoptosis in normal tissues, thereby helping to mitigate adverse side effects from chemotherapy and radiation. Thus far, relatively few selective inhibitors of Chk2 have been described and none have yet progressed into clinical trials. Here, we report crystal structures of the catalytic domain of Chk2 in complex with a novel series of potent and selective small molecule inhibitors. These compounds exhibit nanomolar potencies and are selective for Chk2 over Chk1. The structures reported here elucidate the binding modes of these inhibitors to Chk2 and provide information that can be exploited for the structure-assisted design of novel chemotherapeutics.

  16. The Arabidopsis thaliana Checkpoint Kinase WEE1 Protects against Premature Vascular Differentiation during Replication Stress[W

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Toon; Iantcheva, Anelia; Weimer, Annika K.; Boens, Shannah; Takahashi, Naoki; Maes, Sara; Van den Daele, Hilde; Van Isterdael, Gert; Schnittger, Arp; De Veylder, Lieven

    2011-01-01

    A sessile lifestyle forces plants to respond promptly to factors that affect their genomic integrity. Therefore, plants have developed checkpoint mechanisms to arrest cell cycle progression upon the occurrence of DNA stress, allowing the DNA to be repaired before onset of division. Previously, the WEE1 kinase had been demonstrated to be essential for delaying progression through the cell cycle in the presence of replication-inhibitory drugs, such as hydroxyurea. To understand the severe growth arrest of WEE1-deficient plants treated with hydroxyurea, a transcriptomics analysis was performed, indicating prolonged S-phase duration. A role for WEE1 during S phase was substantiated by its specific accumulation in replicating nuclei that suffered from DNA stress. Besides an extended replication phase, WEE1 knockout plants accumulated dead cells that were associated with premature vascular differentiation. Correspondingly, plants without functional WEE1 ectopically expressed the vascular differentiation marker VND7, and their vascular development was aberrant. We conclude that the growth arrest of WEE1-deficient plants is due to an extended cell cycle duration in combination with a premature onset of vascular cell differentiation. The latter implies that the plant WEE1 kinase acquired an indirect developmental function that is important for meristem maintenance upon replication stress. PMID:21498679

  17. Checkpointing filesystem

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D.

    2005-05-17

    The present in invention is directed to a checkpointing filesystem of a distributed-memory parallel supercomputer comprising a node that accesses user data on the filesystem, the filesystem comprising an interface that is associated with a disk for storing the user data. The checkpointing filesystem provides for taking and checkpoint of the filesystem and rolling back to a previously taken checkpoint, as well as for writing user data to and deleting user data from the checkpointing filesystem. The checkpointing filesystem provides a recently written file allocation table (WFAT) for maintaining information regarding the user data written since a previously taken checkpoint and a recently deleted file allocation table (DFAT) for maintaining information regarding user data deleted from since the previously taken checkpoint, both of which are utilized by the checkpointing filesystem to take a checkpoint of the filesystem and rollback the filesystem to a previously taken checkpoint, as well as to write and delete user data from the checkpointing filesystem.

  18. SCFFBXW7α modulates the intra-S-phase DNA-damage checkpoint by regulating Polo like kinase-1 stability

    PubMed Central

    Giráldez, Servando; Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Mora-Santos, Mar; Japón, Miguel Á.; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The intra-S-checkpoint is essential to control cell progression through S phase under normal conditions and in response to replication stress. When DNA lesions are detected, replication fork progression is blocked allowing time for repair to avoid genomic instability and the risk of cancer. DNA replication initiates at many origins of replication in eukaryotic cells, where a series of proteins form pre-replicative complexes (pre-RCs) that are activated to become pre-initiation complexes and ensure a single round of replication in each cell cycle. PLK1 plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication, contributing to the regulation of pre-RCs formation by phosphorylating several proteins, under both normal and stress conditions. Here we report that PLK1 is ubiquitinated and degraded by SCFFBXW7α/proteasome. Moreover, we identified a new Cdc4 phosphodegron in PLK1, conserved from yeast to humans, whose mutation prevents PLK1 destruction. We established that endogenous SCFFBXW7α degrades PLK1 in the G1 and S phases of an unperturbed cell cycle and in S phase following UV irradiation. Furthermore, we showed that FBXW7α overexpression or UV irradiation prevented the loading of proteins onto chromatin to form pre-RCs and, accordingly, reduced cell proliferation. We conclude that PLK1 degradation mediated by SCFFBXW7α modulates the intra-S-phase checkpoint. PMID:24970797

  19. Inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 sensitizes lung cancer brain metastases to radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Heekyoung; Yoon, Su Jin; Jin, Juyoun; Choi, Seung Ho; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; and others

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. {yields} Radiosensitivity of cancer cells was enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor. {yields} Depletion of Chk1 in cancer cells showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation. {yields} Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. However, resistance to radiation is a possible cause of recurrence or treatment failure. Recently, signal pathways about DNA damage checkpoints after irradiation have been noticed. We investigated the radiosensitivity can be enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor, AZD7762 in lung cancer cell lines and xenograft models of lung cancer brain metastasis. Clonogenic survival assays showed enhancement of radiosensitivity with AZD7762 after irradiation of various doses. AZD7762 increased ATR/ATM-mediated Chk1 phosphorylation and stabilized Cdc25A, suppressed cyclin A expression in lung cancer cell lines. In xenograft models of lung cancer (PC14PE6) brain metastasis, AZD7762 significantly prolonged the median survival time in response to radiation. Depletion of Chk1 using shRNA also showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation in PC14PE6 cells. The results of this study support that Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity.

  20. The Dimeric Architecture of Checkpoint Kinases Mec1ATR and Tel1ATM Reveal a Common Structural Organization*

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka, Marta; Wanrooij, Paulina H.; Darbari, Vidya C.; Tannous, Elias; Hailemariam, Sarem; Bose, Daniel; Makarova, Alena V.; Burgers, Peter M.; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinases are key regulators controlling a wide range of cellular events. The yeast Tel1 and Mec1·Ddc2 complex (ATM and ATR-ATRIP in humans) play pivotal roles in DNA replication, DNA damage signaling, and repair. Here, we present the first structural insight for dimers of Mec1·Ddc2 and Tel1 using single-particle electron microscopy. Both kinases reveal a head to head dimer with one major dimeric interface through the N-terminal HEAT (named after Huntingtin, elongation factor 3, protein phosphatase 2A, and yeast kinase TOR1) repeat. Their dimeric interface is significantly distinct from the interface of mTOR complex 1 dimer, which oligomerizes through two spatially separate interfaces. We also observe different structural organizations of kinase domains of Mec1 and Tel1. The kinase domains in the Mec1·Ddc2 dimer are located in close proximity to each other. However, in the Tel1 dimer they are fully separated, providing potential access of substrates to this kinase, even in its dimeric form. PMID:27129217

  1. [Preparation and identification of monoclonal antibodies against chicken cell cycle checkpoint kinase 2 (cChk2)].

    PubMed

    Gao, Junna; Lian, Xue; Sun, Haiwei; Lu, Zejun; Zhang, Xunhai; Jung, Yong-Sam; Chen, Hongjun; Qian, Yingjuan

    2016-09-01

    Objective To prepare monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against chicken cell cycle checkpoint kinase 2 (cChk2). Methods The cChk2 gene was amplified by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and subcloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-3. After induced by IPTG, cChk2 was expressed in BL21 (DE3) E.coli cells and analyzed by SDS-PAGE to determine its soluability. BALB/c mice were immunized with cChk2 protein peritoneally. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blotting were used to detect anti-serum; if the detection result was positive, IFA and limited dilution was performed to screen hybridoma clones that produced antibodies against cChk2. Results cChk2 was mainly expressed in inclusion bodies. The anti-sera were able to recognize Chk2. Nine positive hybridoma clones were obtained and identified as 1F4, 2D9, 2G1, 3D9, 3E3, 4B5, 4E2, 5C9 and 5F7. Conclusion The study has prepared mAbs against cChk2 with a good specificity and a high titer. PMID:27609583

  2. Mismatch repair-dependent G2 checkpoint induced by low doses of SN1 type methylating agents requires the ATR kinase.

    PubMed

    Stojic, Lovorka; Mojas, Nina; Cejka, Petr; Di Pietro, Massimiliano; Ferrari, Stefano; Marra, Giancarlo; Jiricny, Josef

    2004-06-01

    S(N)1-type alkylating agents represent an important class of chemotherapeutics, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their cytotoxicity are unknown. Thus, although these substances modify predominantly purine nitrogen atoms, their toxicity appears to result from the processing of O(6)-methylguanine ((6Me)G)-containing mispairs by the mismatch repair (MMR) system, because cells with defective MMR are highly resistant to killing by these agents. In an attempt to understand the role of the MMR system in the molecular transactions underlying the toxicity of alkylating agents, we studied the response of human MMR-proficient and MMR-deficient cells to low concentrations of the prototypic methylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We now show that MNNG treatment induced a cell cycle arrest that was absolutely dependent on functional MMR. Unusually, the cells arrested only in the second G(2) phase after treatment. Downstream targets of both ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) kinases were modified, but only the ablation of ATR, or the inhibition of CHK1, attenuated the arrest. The checkpoint activation was accompanied by the formation of nuclear foci containing the signaling and repair proteins ATR, the S(*)/T(*)Q substrate, gamma-H2AX, and replication protein A (RPA). The persistence of these foci implied that they may represent sites of irreparable damage. PMID:15175264

  3. Turning off the G2 DNA damage checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Calonge, Teresa M.; O'Connell, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, cells activate checkpoints to delay cell cycle progression and allow time for completion of DNA repair before commitment to S-phase or mitosis. During G2, many proteins collaborate to activate Chk1, an effector protein kinase that ensures the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase remains in an inactive state. This checkpoint is ancient in origin and highly conserved from fission yeast to humans. Work from many groups has led to a detailed description of the spatiotemporal control of signaling events leading to Chk1 activation. However, to survive DNA damage in G2, the checkpoint must be inactivated to allow resumption of cell cycling and entry into mitosis. Though only beginning to be understood, here we review current data regarding checkpoint termination signals acting on Chk1 and its' upstream regulators. PMID:17851138

  4. Centromere-tethered Mps1 pombe homolog (Mph1) kinase is a sufficient marker for recruitment of the spindle checkpoint protein Bub1, but not Mad1.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daisuke; Saito, Yu; Matsumoto, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint delays the onset of anaphase until all of the chromosomes properly achieve bipolar attachment to the spindle. It has been shown that unattached kinetochores are the site that emits a signal for activation of the checkpoint. Although the components of the checkpoint such as Bub1, Mad1 and Mad2 selectively accumulate at unattached kinetochores, the answer to how they recognize unattached kinetochores has remained elusive. Mps1 pombe homolog (Mph1) kinase has been shown to function upstream of most of the components of the checkpoint and thus it is thought to recognize unattached kinetochores by itself and recruit other components. In this study we have expressed a fusion protein of Mph1 and Ndc80 (a kinetochore protein of the outer plate) and shown that the fusion protein arrests cell cycle progression in a spindle-checkpoint\\x{2013}dependent manner in fission yeast. When expression of Mad2 is turned off, the cells grow normally with Mph1 constitutively localized at centromeres/kinetochores. Under this condition, Bub1 can be found with Mph1 throughout the cell cycle, indicating that localization of Mph1 at centromeres/kinetochores is sufficient to recruit Bub1. In contrast, Mad1 is found to transiently localize at kinetochores, which are presumably unattached to the spindle, but soon it dissociates from kinetochores. We propose that Mph1 is a sufficient marker for recruitment of Bub1. Mad1, in contrast, requires an additional condition/component for stable association with kinetochores. PMID:22184248

  5. A Bioinformatics Approach Identifies Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 and Checkpoint Kinase 1 as Upstream Regulators of Kidney Injury Molecule-1 after Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ajay, Amrendra Kumar; Kim, Tae-Min; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Victoria; Park, Peter J.; Frank, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1)/T cell Ig and mucin domain-containing protein-1 (TIM-1) is upregulated more than other proteins after AKI, and it is highly expressed in renal damage of various etiologies. In this capacity, KIM-1/TIM-1 acts as a phosphatidylserine receptor on the surface of injured proximal tubular epithelial cells, mediating phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, and it may also act as a costimulatory molecule for immune cells. Despite recognition of KIM-1 as an important therapeutic target for kidney disease, the regulators of KIM-1 transcription in the kidney remain unknown. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified upstream regulators of KIM-1 after AKI. In response to tubular injury in rat and human kidneys or oxidant stress in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (HPTECs), KIM-1 expression increased significantly in a manner that corresponded temporally and regionally with increased phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and STAT3. Both ischemic and oxidant stress resulted in a dramatic increase in reactive oxygen species that phosphorylated and activated Chk1, which subsequently bound to STAT3, phosphorylating it at S727. Furthermore, STAT3 bound to the KIM-1 promoter after ischemic and oxidant stress, and pharmacological or genetic induction of STAT3 in HPTECs increased KIM-1 mRNA and protein levels. Conversely, inhibition of STAT3 using siRNAs or dominant negative mutants reduced KIM-1 expression in a kidney cancer cell line (769-P) that expresses high basal levels of KIM-1. These observations highlight Chk1 and STAT3 as critical upstream regulators of KIM-1 expression after AKI and may suggest novel approaches for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24158981

  6. Checkpoint Kinase 1 Activation Enhances Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Function via Regulation of Claudin-5 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Watari, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Maki; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2016-01-01

    Several stressors are known to influence epithelial tight junction (TJ) integrity, but the association between DNA damage and TJ integrity remains unclear. Here we examined the effects of daunorubicin and rebeccamycin, two anti-tumor chemicals that induce DNA damage, on TJ integrity in human intestinal epithelial cells. Daunorubicin and rebeccamycin dose-dependently enhanced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and decreased flux of the 4 kDa FITC-dextran in Caco-2 cell monolayer. Daunorubicin- or rebeccamycin-induced enhancement of the TJ barrier function partly rescued attenuation of the barrier function by the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IFN-γ. Daunorubicin and rebeccamycin increased claudin-5 expression and the product was distributed in the actin cytoskeleton fraction, which was enriched with TJ proteins. Caffeine, which is an inhibitor of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related protein (ATR), and the Chk1 inhibitor inhibited the TER increases induced by daunorubicin and rebeccamycin, whereas a Chk2 inhibitor did not. Treatment with Chk1 siRNA also significantly inhibited the TER increases. Induction of claudin-5 expression was inhibited by Chk1 inhibitor and by siRNA treatment. Our results suggest that Chk1 activation by daunorubicin and rebeccamycin induced claudin-5 expression and enhanced TJ barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayer, which suggests a link between DNA damage and TJ integrity in the human intestine. PMID:26727128

  7. Cell cycle checkpoint regulators reach a zillion

    PubMed Central

    Yasutis, Kimberly M.; Kozminski, Keith G.

    2013-01-01

    Entry into mitosis is regulated by a checkpoint at the boundary between the G2 and M phases of the cell cycle (G2/M). In many organisms, this checkpoint surveys DNA damage and cell size and is controlled by both the activation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and the inhibition of an opposing phosphatase, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Misregulation of mitotic entry can often lead to oncogenesis or cell death. Recent research has focused on discovering the signaling pathways that feed into the core checkpoint control mechanisms dependent on Cdk and PP2A. Herein, we review the conserved mechanisms of the G2/M transition, including recently discovered upstream signaling pathways that link cell growth and DNA replication to cell cycle progression. Critical consideration of the human, frog and yeast models of mitotic entry frame unresolved and emerging questions in this field, providing a prediction of signaling molecules and pathways yet to be discovered. PMID:23598718

  8. PNAS-4, an Early DNA Damage Response Gene, Induces S Phase Arrest and Apoptosis by Activating Checkpoint Kinases in Lung Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhu; Guo, Wenhao; Yang, Jun; Li, Lei; Wang, Meiliang; Lei, Yi; Wan, Yang; Zhao, Xinyu; Luo, Na; Cheng, Ping; Liu, Xinyu; Nie, Chunlai; Peng, Yong; Tong, Aiping; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-01-01

    PNAS-4, a novel pro-apoptotic gene, was activated during the early response to DNA damage. Our previous study has shown that PNAS-4 induces S phase arrest and apoptosis when overexpressed in A549 lung cancer cells. However, the underlying action mechanism remains far from clear. In this work, we found that PNAS-4 expression in lung tumor tissues is significantly lower than that in adjacent lung tissues; its expression is significantly increased in A549 cells after exposure to cisplatin, methyl methane sulfonate, and mitomycin; and its overexpression induces S phase arrest and apoptosis in A549 (p53 WT), NCI-H460 (p53 WT), H526 (p53 mutation), and Calu-1 (p53−/−) lung cancer cells, leading to proliferation inhibition irrespective of their p53 status. The S phase arrest is associated with up-regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 and inhibition of the Cdc25A-CDK2-cyclin E/A pathway. Up-regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 is p53-independent and correlates with activation of ERK. We further showed that the intra-S phase checkpoint, which occurs via DNA-dependent protein kinase-mediated activation of Chk1 and Chk2, is involved in the S phase arrest and apoptosis. Gene silencing of Chk1/2 rescues, whereas that of ATM or ATR does not affect, S phase arrest and apoptosis. Furthermore, human PNAS-4 induces DNA breaks in comet assays and γ-H2AX staining. Intriguingly, caspase-dependent cleavage of Chk1 has an additional role in enhancing apoptosis. Taken together, our findings suggest a novel mechanism by which elevated PNAS-4 first causes DNA-dependent protein kinase-mediated Chk1/2 activation and then results in inhibition of the Cdc25A-CDK2-cyclin E/A pathway, ultimately causing S phase arrest and apoptosis in lung cancer cells. PMID:25918161

  9. Study of the DNA damage checkpoint using Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jeremy; DeStephanis, Darla; Patel, Yogin; Gowda, Vrushab; Yan, Shan

    2012-01-01

    On a daily basis, cells are subjected to a variety of endogenous and environmental insults. To combat these insults, cells have evolved DNA damage checkpoint signaling as a surveillance mechanism to sense DNA damage and direct cellular responses to DNA damage. There are several groups of proteins called sensors, transducers and effectors involved in DNA damage checkpoint signaling (Figure 1). In this complex signaling pathway, ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) is one of the major kinases that can respond to DNA damage and replication stress. Activated ATR can phosphorylate its downstream substrates such as Chk1 (Checkpoint kinase 1). Consequently, phosphorylated and activated Chk1 leads to many downstream effects in the DNA damage checkpoint including cell cycle arrest, transcription activation, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis or senescence (Figure 1). When DNA is damaged, failing to activate the DNA damage checkpoint results in unrepaired damage and, subsequently, genomic instability. The study of the DNA damage checkpoint will elucidate how cells maintain genomic integrity and provide a better understanding of how human diseases, such as cancer, develop. Xenopus laevis egg extracts are emerging as a powerful cell-free extract model system in DNA damage checkpoint research. Low-speed extract (LSE) was initially described by the Masui group. The addition of demembranated sperm chromatin to LSE results in nuclei formation where DNA is replicated in a semiconservative fashion once per cell cycle. The ATR/Chk1-mediated checkpoint signaling pathway is triggered by DNA damage or replication stress. Two methods are currently used to induce the DNA damage checkpoint: DNA damaging approaches and DNA damage-mimicking structures. DNA damage can be induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, γ-irradiation, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), mitomycin C (MMC), 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO), or aphidicolin. MMS is an alkylating agent that inhibits DNA replication and activates the ATR

  10. Full activation of p34CDC28 histone H1 kinase activity is unable to promote entry into mitosis in checkpoint-arrested cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Stueland, C S; Lew, D J; Cismowski, M J; Reed, S I

    1993-01-01

    In most cells, mitosis is dependent upon completion of DNA replication. The feedback mechanisms that prevent entry into mitosis by cells with damaged or incompletely replicated DNA have been termed checkpoint controls. Studies with the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Xenopus egg extracts have shown that checkpoint controls prevent activation of the master regulatory protein kinase, p34cdc2, that normally triggers entry into mitosis. This is achieved through inhibitory phosphorylation of the Tyr-15 residue of p34cdc2. However, studies with the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that phosphorylation of this residue is not essential for checkpoint controls to prevent mitosis. We have investigated the basis for checkpoint controls in this organism and show that these controls can prevent entry into mitosis even in cells which have fully activated the cyclin B (Clb)-associated forms of the budding yeast homolog of p34cdc2, p34CDC28, as assayed by histone H1 kinase activity. However, the active complexes in checkpoint-arrested cells are smaller than those in cycling cells, suggesting that assembly of mitosis-inducing complexes requires additional steps following histone H1 kinase activation. Images PMID:8388545

  11. Coordinate action of distinct sequence elements localizes checkpoint kinase Hsl1 to the septin collar at the bud neck in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Finnigan, Gregory C.; Sterling, Sarah M.; Duvalyan, Angela; Liao, Elizabeth N.; Sargsyan, Aspram; Garcia, Galo; Nogales, Eva; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Passage through the eukaryotic cell cycle requires processes that are tightly regulated both spatially and temporally. Surveillance mechanisms (checkpoints) exert quality control and impose order on the timing and organization of downstream events by impeding cell cycle progression until the necessary components are available and undamaged and have acted in the proper sequence. In budding yeast, a checkpoint exists that does not allow timely execution of the G2/M transition unless and until a collar of septin filaments has properly assembled at the bud neck, which is the site where subsequent cytokinesis will occur. An essential component of this checkpoint is the large (1518-residue) protein kinase Hsl1, which localizes to the bud neck only if the septin collar has been correctly formed. Hsl1 reportedly interacts with particular septins; however, the precise molecular determinants in Hsl1 responsible for its recruitment to this cellular location during G2 have not been elucidated. We performed a comprehensive mutational dissection and accompanying image analysis to identify the sequence elements within Hsl1 responsible for its localization to the septins at the bud neck. Unexpectedly, we found that this targeting is multipartite. A segment of the central region of Hsl1 (residues 611–950), composed of two tandem, semiredundant but distinct septin-associating elements, is necessary and sufficient for binding to septin filaments both in vitro and in vivo. However, in addition to 611–950, efficient localization of Hsl1 to the septin collar in the cell obligatorily requires generalized targeting to the cytosolic face of the plasma membrane, a function normally provided by the C-terminal phosphatidylserine-binding KA1 domain (residues 1379–1518) in Hsl1 but that can be replaced by other, heterologous phosphatidylserine-binding sequences. PMID:27193302

  12. A humanized antibody for imaging immune checkpoint ligand PD-L1 expression in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielson, Matthew; Lisok, Ala; Wharram, Bryan; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Azad, Babak Behnam; Pomper, Martin G.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint lead to tumor regression and improved survival in several cancers. PD-L1 expression in tumors may be predictive of response to checkpoint blockade therapy. Because tissue samples might not always be available to guide therapy, we developed and evaluated a humanized antibody for non-invasive imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors. Radiolabeled [111In]PD-L1-mAb and near-infrared dye conjugated NIR-PD-L1-mAb imaging agents were developed using the mouse and human cross-reactive PD-L1 antibody MPDL3280A. We tested specificity of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb in cell lines and in tumors with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. We performed SPECT/CT imaging, biodistribution and blocking studies in NSG mice bearing tumors with constitutive PD-L1 expression (CHO-PDL1) and in controls (CHO). Results were confirmed in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (MDAMB231 and SUM149) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (H2444 and H1155) xenografts with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. There was specific binding of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb to tumor cells in vitro, correlating with PD-L1 expression levels. In mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors, there was specific and persistent high accumulation of signal intensity in PD-L1 positive tumors (CHO-PDL1, MDAMB231, H2444) but not in controls. These results demonstrate that [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb can detect graded levels of PD-L1 expression in human tumor xenografts in vivo. As a humanized antibody, these findings suggest clinical translation of radiolabeled versions of MPDL3280A for imaging. Specificity of NIR-PD-L1-mAb indicates the potential for optical imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors in relevant pre-clinical as well as clinical settings. PMID:26848870

  13. Tousled-Like Kinase-Dependent Phosphorylation of Rad9 Plays a Role in Cell Cycle Progression and G2/M Checkpoint Exit

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan; Davey, Scott K.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic integrity is preserved by checkpoints, which act to delay cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA damage or replication stress. The heterotrimeric Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex is a PCNA-like clamp that is loaded onto DNA at structures resulting from damage and is important for initiating and maintaining the checkpoint response. Rad9 possesses a C-terminal tail that is phosphorylated constitutively and in response to cell cycle position and DNA damage. Previous studies have identified tousled-like kinase 1 (TLK1) as a kinase that may modify Rad9. Here we show that Rad9 is phosphorylated in a TLK-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo, and that T355 within the C-terminal tail is the primary targeted residue. Phosphorylation of Rad9 at T355 is quickly reduced upon exposure to ionizing radiation before returning to baseline later in the damage response. We also show that TLK1 and Rad9 interact constitutively, and that this interaction is enhanced in chromatin-bound Rad9 at later stages of the damage response. Furthermore, we demonstrate via siRNA-mediated depletion that TLK1 is required for progression through S-phase in normally cycling cells, and that cells lacking TLK1 display a prolonged G2/M arrest upon exposure to ionizing radiation, a phenotype that is mimicked by over-expression of a Rad9-T355A mutant. Given that TLK1 has previously been shown to be transiently inactivated upon phosphorylation by Chk1 in response to DNA damage, we propose that TLK1 and Chk1 act in concert to modulate the phosphorylation status of Rad9, which in turn serves to regulate the DNA damage response. PMID:24376897

  14. Stable kinetochore–microtubule attachment is sufficient to silence the spindle assembly checkpoint in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tauchman, Eric C.; Boehm, Frederick J.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.

    2015-01-01

    During mitosis, duplicated sister chromatids attach to microtubules emanating from opposing sides of the bipolar spindle through large protein complexes called kinetochores. In the absence of stable kinetochore–microtubule attachments, a cell surveillance mechanism known as the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) produces an inhibitory signal that prevents anaphase onset. Precisely how the inhibitory SAC signal is extinguished in response to microtubule attachment remains unresolved. To address this, we induced formation of hyper-stable kinetochore–microtubule attachments in human cells using a non-phosphorylatable version of the protein Hec1, a core component of the attachment machinery. We find that stable attachments are sufficient to silence the SAC in the absence of sister kinetochore bi-orientation and strikingly in the absence of detectable microtubule pulling forces or tension. Furthermore, we find that SAC satisfaction occurs despite the absence of large changes in intra-kinetochore distance, suggesting that substantial kinetochore stretching is not required for quenching the SAC signal. PMID:26620470

  15. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kuijt, Timo E F; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome-spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore-microtubule attachment or the force generated by dynamic microtubules that signals stable biorientation of chromosomes? To answer this, we uncoupled these two processes by expressing a non-phosphorylatable version of the main microtubule-binding protein at kinetochores (HEC1-9A), causing stabilization of incorrect kinetochore-microtubule attachments despite persistent activity of the error-correction machinery. The SAC is fully functional in HEC1-9A-expressing cells, yet cells in which chromosomes cannot biorient but are stably attached to microtubules satisfy the SAC and exit mitosis. SAC satisfaction requires neither intra-kinetochore stretching nor dynamic microtubules. Our findings support the hypothesis that in human cells the end-on interactions of microtubules with kinetochores are sufficient to satisfy the SAC without the need for microtubule-based pulling forces. PMID:26621779

  16. Kinetochore–microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kuijt, Timo E. F.; Kops, Geert J. P. L.

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome–spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore–microtubule attachment or the force generated by dynamic microtubules that signals stable biorientation of chromosomes? To answer this, we uncoupled these two processes by expressing a non-phosphorylatable version of the main microtubule-binding protein at kinetochores (HEC1-9A), causing stabilization of incorrect kinetochore–microtubule attachments despite persistent activity of the error-correction machinery. The SAC is fully functional in HEC1-9A-expressing cells, yet cells in which chromosomes cannot biorient but are stably attached to microtubules satisfy the SAC and exit mitosis. SAC satisfaction requires neither intra-kinetochore stretching nor dynamic microtubules. Our findings support the hypothesis that in human cells the end-on interactions of microtubules with kinetochores are sufficient to satisfy the SAC without the need for microtubule-based pulling forces. PMID:26621779

  17. In Silico Exploration of 1,7-Diazacarbazole Analogs as Checkpoint Kinase 1 Inhibitors by Using 3D QSAR, Molecular Docking Study, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaodong; Han, Liping; Ren, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is an important serine/threonine kinase with a self-protection function. The combination of Chk1 inhibitors and anti-cancer drugs can enhance the selectivity of tumor therapy. In this work, a set of 1,7-diazacarbazole analogs were identified as potent Chk1 inhibitors through a series of computer-aided drug design processes, including three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulations. The optimal QSAR models showed significant cross-validated correlation q² values (0.531, 0.726), fitted correlation r² coefficients (higher than 0.90), and standard error of prediction (less than 0.250). These results suggested that the developed models possess good predictive ability. Moreover, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were applied to highlight the important interactions between the ligand and the Chk1 receptor protein. This study shows that hydrogen bonding and electrostatic forces are key interactions that confer bioactivity. PMID:27164065

  18. Attenuation of DNA damage checkpoint by PBK, a novel mitotic kinase, involves protein-protein interaction with tumor suppressor p53.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Asit K; Ford, Tamara; Fleksher, Daniel; Neuman, Brian; Rapoport, Aaron P

    2007-06-22

    Pathways adopted by developing cancer cells for evasion of cellular surveillance mechanism deserve attention for therapeutic exploitation as well as for better prognosis. A novel mitotic kinase, PDZ-binding kinase or PBK, which is upregulated in a variety of neoplasms including hematological malignancies, has been the focus of our attention with a goal to understand its role in malignant conversion and to examine as a possible new therapeutic target in disparate types of cancer. Earlier, we reported that PBK expression was downregulated during macrophage differentiation of HL60 promyelocytic leukemia cells, during doxorubicin-induced growth arrest in G2/M phase and that PBK was regulated by cell cycle-specific transcription factors E2F and CREB/ATF. Here, we demonstrate that HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells become adapted to doxorubicin-induced DNA damage checkpoint upon ectopic expression of a phosphomimetic mutant of PBK as indicated by the accumulation of polyploid cells. Aberrant entry into the mitotic phase by these cells is suggested by the appearance of a mitotic phase-specific marker, MPM-2. We propose that the effect is due to downregulation of p53 caused by direct physical interaction with PBK as detected by both a biochemical means as well as by yeast two-hybrid analysis. Together, our studies provide a plausible explanation for the role of PBK augmenting tumor cell growth following transient appearance in different types of progenitor cells in vivo as reported. PMID:17482142

  19. Surviving the breakup: the DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jacob C; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    In response to even a single chromosomal double-strand DNA break, cells enact the DNA damage checkpoint. This checkpoint triggers cell cycle arrest, providing time for the cell to repair damaged chromosomes before entering mitosis. This mechanism helps prevent the segregation of damaged or mutated chromosomes and thus promotes genomic stability. Recent work has elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying several critical steps in checkpoint activation, notably the recruitment of the upstream checkpoint kinases of the ATM and ATR families to different damaged DNA structures and the molecular events through which these kinases activate their effectors. Chromatin modification has emerged as one important component of checkpoint activation and maintenance. Following DNA repair, the checkpoint pathway is inactivated in a process termed recovery. A related but genetically distinct process, adaptation, controls cell cycle re-entry in the face of unrepairable damage.

  20. Cell cycle control, checkpoint mechanisms, and genotoxic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, R E; Kaufmann, W K; Paules, R S

    1999-01-01

    The ability of cells to maintain genomic integrity is vital for cell survival and proliferation. Lack of fidelity in DNA replication and maintenance can result in deleterious mutations leading to cell death or, in multicellular organisms, cancer. The purpose of this review is to discuss the known signal transduction pathways that regulate cell cycle progression and the mechanisms cells employ to insure DNA stability in the face of genotoxic stress. In particular, we focus on mammalian cell cycle checkpoint functions, their role in maintaining DNA stability during the cell cycle following exposure to genotoxic agents, and the gene products that act in checkpoint function signal transduction cascades. Key transitions in the cell cycle are regulated by the activities of various protein kinase complexes composed of cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) molecules. Surveillance control mechanisms that check to ensure proper completion of early events and cellular integrity before initiation of subsequent events in cell cycle progression are referred to as cell cycle checkpoints and can generate a transient delay that provides the cell more time to repair damage before progressing to the next phase of the cycle. A variety of cellular responses are elicited that function in checkpoint signaling to inhibit cyclin/Cdk activities. These responses include the p53-dependent and p53-independent induction of Cdk inhibitors and the p53-independent inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk molecules themselves. Eliciting proper G1, S, and G2 checkpoint responses to double-strand DNA breaks requires the function of the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene product. Several human heritable cancer-prone syndromes known to alter DNA stability have been found to have defects in checkpoint surveillance pathways. Exposures to several common sources of genotoxic stress, including oxidative stress, ionizing radiation, UV radiation, and the genotoxic compound benzo[a]pyrene, elicit cell cycle

  1. Targeting the Checkpoint to Kill Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Benada, Jan; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and most of the chemotherapies act by damaging DNA of cancer cells. Upon DNA damage, cells stop proliferation at cell cycle checkpoints, which provides them time for DNA repair. Inhibiting the checkpoint allows entry to mitosis despite the presence of DNA damage and can lead to cell death. Importantly, as cancer cells exhibit increased levels of endogenous DNA damage due to an excessive replication stress, inhibiting the checkpoint kinases alone could act as a directed anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the current status of inhibitors targeted towards the checkpoint effectors and discuss mechanisms of their actions in killing of cancer cells. PMID:26295265

  2. Targeting the Checkpoint to Kill Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Benada, Jan; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatments such as radiotherapy and most of the chemotherapies act by damaging DNA of cancer cells. Upon DNA damage, cells stop proliferation at cell cycle checkpoints, which provides them time for DNA repair. Inhibiting the checkpoint allows entry to mitosis despite the presence of DNA damage and can lead to cell death. Importantly, as cancer cells exhibit increased levels of endogenous DNA damage due to an excessive replication stress, inhibiting the checkpoint kinases alone could act as a directed anti-cancer therapy. Here, we review the current status of inhibitors targeted towards the checkpoint effectors and discuss mechanisms of their actions in killing of cancer cells. PMID:26295265

  3. Mediator kinase module and human tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Alison D.; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Boyer, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-subunit signal processor through which regulatory informatiosn conveyed by gene-specific transcription factors is transduced to RNA Polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, MED13, MED12, CDK8 and Cyclin C (CycC) comprise a four-subunit “kinase” module that exists in variable association with a 26-subunit Mediator core. Genetic and biochemical studies have established the Mediator kinase module as a major ingress of developmental and oncogenic signaling through Mediator, and much of its function in signal-dependent gene regulation derives from its resident CDK8 kinase activity. For example, CDK8-targeted substrate phosphorylation impacts transcription factor half-life, Pol II activity and chromatin chemistry and functional status. Recent structural and biochemical studies have revealed a precise network of physical and functional subunit interactions required for proper kinase module activity. Accordingly, pathologic change in this activity through altered expression or mutation of constituent kinase module subunits can have profound consequences for altered signaling and tumor formation. Herein, we review the structural organization, biological function and oncogenic potential of the Mediator kinase module. We focus principally on tumor-associated alterations in kinase module subunits for which mechanistic relationships as opposed to strictly correlative associations are established. These considerations point to an emerging picture of the Mediator kinase module as an oncogenic unit, one in which pathogenic activation/deactivation through component change drives tumor formation through perturbation of signal-dependent gene regulation. It follows that therapeutic strategies to combat CDK8-driven tumors will involve targeted modulation of CDK8 activity or pharmacologic manipulation of dysregulated CDK8-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:26182352

  4. Crystal structure of human nicotinamide riboside kinase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed A; Xiang, Song; Tong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD(+) as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 A resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 A resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel beta sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations. PMID:17698003

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Nicotinamide Riboside Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Xiang, S.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel {beta} sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  6. Phosphorylation of microtubule-binding protein Hec1 by mitotic kinase Aurora B specifies spindle checkpoint kinase Mps1 signaling at the kinetochore.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tongge; Dou, Zhen; Qin, Bo; Jin, Changjiang; Wang, Xinghui; Xu, Leilei; Wang, Zhaoyang; Zhu, Lijuan; Liu, Fusheng; Gao, Xinjiao; Ke, Yuwen; Wang, Zhiyong; Aikhionbare, Felix; Fu, Chuanhai; Ding, Xia; Yao, Xuebiao

    2013-12-13

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a quality control device to ensure accurate chromosome attachment to spindle microtubule for equal segregation of sister chromatid. Aurora B is essential for SAC function by sensing chromosome bi-orientation via spatial regulation of kinetochore substrates. However, it has remained elusive as to how Aurora B couples kinetochore-microtubule attachment to SAC signaling. Here, we show that Hec1 interacts with Mps1 and specifies its kinetochore localization via its calponin homology (CH) domain and N-terminal 80 amino acids. Interestingly, phosphorylation of the Hec1 by Aurora B weakens its interaction with microtubules but promotes Hec1 binding to Mps1. Significantly, the temporal regulation of Hec1 phosphorylation orchestrates kinetochore-microtubule attachment and Mps1 loading to the kinetochore. Persistent expression of phosphomimetic Hec1 mutant induces a hyperactivation of SAC, suggesting that phosphorylation-elicited Hec1 conformational change is used as a switch to orchestrate SAC activation to concurrent destabilization of aberrant kinetochore attachment. Taken together, these results define a novel role for Aurora B-Hec1-Mps1 signaling axis in governing accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis.

  7. Cellular Inhibition of Checkpoint Kinase 2 (Chk2) and Potentiation of Camptothecins and Radiation by the Novel Chk2 Inhibitor PV1019 [7-Nitro-1H-indole-2-carboxylic acid {4-[1-(guanidinohydrazone)-ethyl]-phenyl}-amide

    SciTech Connect

    Jobson, Andrew G.; Lountos, George T.; Lorenzi, Philip L.; Llamas, Jenny; Connelly, John; Cerna, David; Tropea, Joseph E.; Onda, Akikazu; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Kondapaka, Sudhir; Zhang, Guangtao; Caplen, Natasha J.; Cardellina, II, John H.; Yoo, Stephen S.; Monks, Anne; Self, Christopher; Waugh, David S.; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Pommier, Yves

    2010-04-05

    Chk2 is a checkpoint kinase involved in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated pathway, which is activated by genomic instability and DNA damage, leading to either cell death (apoptosis) or cell cycle arrest. Chk2 provides an unexplored therapeutic target against cancer cells. We recently reported 4,4'-diacetyldiphenylurea-bis(guanylhydrazone) (NSC 109555) as a novel chemotype Chk2 inhibitor. We have now synthesized a derivative of NSC 109555, PV1019 (NSC 744039) [7-nitro-1H-indole-2-carboxylic acid {l_brace}4-[1-(guanidinohydrazone)-ethyl]-phenyl{r_brace}-amide], which is a selective submicromolar inhibitor of Chk2 in vitro. The cocrystal structure of PV1019 bound in the ATP binding pocket of Chk2 confirmed enzymatic/biochemical observations that PV1019 acts as a competitive inhibitor of Chk2 with respect to ATP. PV1019 was found to inhibit Chk2 in cells. It inhibits Chk2 autophosphorylation (which represents the cellular kinase activation of Chk2), Cdc25C phosphorylation, and HDMX degradation in response to DNA damage. PV1019 also protects normal mouse thymocytes against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis, and it shows synergistic antiproliferative activity with topotecan, camptothecin, and radiation in human tumor cell lines. We also show that PV1019 and Chk2 small interfering RNAs can exert antiproliferative activity themselves in the cancer cells with high Chk2 expression in the NCI-60 screen. These data indicate that PV1019 is a potent and selective inhibitor of Chk2 with chemotherapeutic and radiosensitization potential.

  8. Dependence of Human Colorectal Cells Lacking the FBW7 Tumor Suppressor on the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Melanie L.; Singh, Tejomayee; Mero, Patricia; Moffat, Jason; Hieter, Philip

    2015-01-01

    FBW7 (F-box and WD repeat domain containing 7), also known as FBXW7 or hCDC4, is a tumor suppressor gene mutated in a broad spectrum of cancer cell types. As a component of the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase, FBW7 is responsible for specifically recognizing phosphorylated substrates, many important for tumor progression, and targeting them for ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Although the role of FBW7 as a tumor suppressor is well established, less well studied is how FBW7-mutated cancer cells might be targeted for selective killing. To explore this further, we undertook a genome-wide RNAi screen using WT and FBW7 knockout colorectal cell lines and identified the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protein BUBR1, as a candidate synthetic lethal target. We show here that asynchronous FBW7 knockout cells have increased levels of mitotic APC/C substrates and are sensitive to knockdown of not just BUBR1 but BUB1 and MPS1, other known SAC components, suggesting a dependence of these cells on the mitotic checkpoint. Consistent with this dependence, knockdown of BUBR1 in cells lacking FBW7 results in significant cell aneuploidy and increases in p53 levels. The FBW7 substrate cyclin E was necessary for the genetic interaction with BUBR1. In contrast, the establishment of this dependence on the SAC requires the deregulation of multiple substrates of FBW7. Our work suggests that FBW7 knockout cells are vulnerable in their dependence on the mitotic checkpoint and that this may be a good potential target to exploit in FBW7-mutated cancer cells. PMID:26354767

  9. DNA damage checkpoints in mammals.

    PubMed

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    DNA damage is a common event and probably leads to mutation or deletion within chromosomal DNA, which may cause cancer or premature aging. DNA damage induces several cellular responses including DNA repair, checkpoint activity and the triggering of apoptotic pathways. DNA damage checkpoints are associated with biochemical pathways that end delay or arrest of cell-cycle progression. These checkpoints engage damage sensor proteins, such as the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, and the Rad17-RFC complex, in the detection of DNA damage and transduction of signals to ATM, ATR, Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. Chk1 and Chk2 kinases regulate Cdc25, Wee1 and p53 that ultimately inactivate cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) which inhibit cell-cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which DNA damage is recognized by sensor proteins and signals are transmitted to Cdks. We classify the genes involved in checkpoint signaling into four categories, namely sensors, mediators, transducers and effectors, although their proteins have the broad activity, and thus this classification is for convenience and is not definitive. PMID:16314342

  10. Stranglehold on the spindle assembly checkpoint: the human papillomavirus E2 protein provokes BUBR1-dependent aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chye Ling; Teissier, Sébastien; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Quek, Ling Shih; Bellanger, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein, which inhibits the E6 and E7 viral oncogenes, is believed to have anti-oncogenic properties. Here, we challenge this view and show that HPV-18 E2 over-activates the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) and induces DNA breaks in mitosis followed by aneuploidy. This phenotype is associated with interaction of E2 with the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC) proteins Cdc20, MAD2 and BUBR1. While BUBR1 silencing rescues the mitotic phenotype induced by E2, p53 silencing or presence of E6/E7 (inactivating p53 and increasing BUBR1 levels respectively) both amplify it. This work pinpoints E2 as a key protein in the initiation of HPV-induced cervical cancer and identifies the SAC as a target for oncogenic pathogens. Moreover, our results suggest a role of p53 in regulating the mitotic process itself and highlight SAC over-activation in a p53-negative context as a highly pathogenic event. PMID:25789401

  11. Stranglehold on the spindle assembly checkpoint: the human papillomavirus E2 protein provokes BUBR1-dependent aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chye Ling; Teissier, Sébastien; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Quek, Ling Shih; Bellanger, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein, which inhibits the E6 and E7 viral oncogenes, is believed to have anti-oncogenic properties. Here, we challenge this view and show that HPV-18 E2 over-activates the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) and induces DNA breaks in mitosis followed by aneuploidy. This phenotype is associated with interaction of E2 with the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex (MCC) proteins Cdc20, MAD2 and BUBR1. While BUBR1 silencing rescues the mitotic phenotype induced by E2, p53 silencing or presence of E6/E7 (inactivating p53 and increasing BUBR1 levels respectively) both amplify it. This work pinpoints E2 as a key protein in the initiation of HPV-induced cervical cancer and identifies the SAC as a target for oncogenic pathogens. Moreover, our results suggest a role of p53 in regulating the mitotic process itself and highlight SAC over-activation in a p53-negative context as a highly pathogenic event. PMID:25789401

  12. The human papillomavirus type 58 E7 oncoprotein modulates cell cycle regulatory proteins and abrogates cell cycle checkpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Weifang; Li Jing; Kanginakudru, Sriramana; Zhao Weiming; Yu Xiuping; Chen, Jason J.

    2010-02-05

    HPV type 58 (HPV-58) is the third most common HPV type in cervical cancer from Eastern Asia, yet little is known about how it promotes carcinogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate that HPV-58 E7 significantly promoted the proliferation and extended the lifespan of primary human keratinocytes (PHKs). HPV-58 E7 abrogated the G1 and the postmitotic checkpoints, although less efficiently than HPV-16 E7. Consistent with these observations, HPV-58 E7 down-regulated the cellular tumor suppressor pRb to a lesser extent than HPV-16 E7. Similar to HPV-16 E7 expressing PHKs, Cdk2 remained active in HPV-58 E7 expressing PHKs despite the presence of elevated levels of p53 and p21. Interestingly, HPV-58 E7 down-regulated p130 more efficiently than HPV-16 E7. Our study demonstrates a correlation between the ability of down-regulating pRb/p130 and abrogating cell cycle checkpoints by HPV-58 E7, which also correlates with the biological risks of cervical cancer progression associated with HPV-58 infection.

  13. Study of the DNA Damage Checkpoint using Xenopus Egg Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Yogin; Gowda, Vrushab; Yan, Shan

    2012-01-01

    On a daily basis, cells are subjected to a variety of endogenous and environmental insults. To combat these insults, cells have evolved DNA damage checkpoint signaling as a surveillance mechanism to sense DNA damage and direct cellular responses to DNA damage. There are several groups of proteins called sensors, transducers and effectors involved in DNA damage checkpoint signaling (Figure 1). In this complex signaling pathway, ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) is one of the major kinases that can respond to DNA damage and replication stress. Activated ATR can phosphorylate its downstream substrates such as Chk1 (Checkpoint kinase 1). Consequently, phosphorylated and activated Chk1 leads to many downstream effects in the DNA damage checkpoint including cell cycle arrest, transcription activation, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis or senescence (Figure 1). When DNA is damaged, failing to activate the DNA damage checkpoint results in unrepaired damage and, subsequently, genomic instability. The study of the DNA damage checkpoint will elucidate how cells maintain genomic integrity and provide a better understanding of how human diseases, such as cancer, develop. Xenopus laevis egg extracts are emerging as a powerful cell-free extract model system in DNA damage checkpoint research. Low-speed extract (LSE) was initially described by the Masui group1. The addition of demembranated sperm chromatin to LSE results in nuclei formation where DNA is replicated in a semiconservative fashion once per cell cycle. The ATR/Chk1-mediated checkpoint signaling pathway is triggered by DNA damage or replication stress 2. Two methods are currently used to induce the DNA damage checkpoint: DNA damaging approaches and DNA damage-mimicking structures 3. DNA damage can be induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, γ-irradiation, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), mitomycin C (MMC), 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO), or aphidicolin3, 4. MMS is an alkylating agent that inhibits DNA replication and activates

  14. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphA5 Is a Functional Molecular Target in Human Lung Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. Finally, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications. PMID:25623065

  15. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.

  16. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; et al

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lungmore » cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.« less

  17. Immune checkpoint inhibitors enhance cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against human myeloid leukaemic blasts.

    PubMed

    Poh, Su Li; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2016-05-01

    We studied whether blockade of inhibitory receptors on cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells by immune checkpoint inhibitors could increase its anti-tumour potency against haematological malignancies. CIK cultures were generated from seven normal donors and nine patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or multiple myeloma (MM). The inhibitory receptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator, CD200 receptor, lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3) and T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-containing-3 (TIM-3) were present at variable percentages in most CIK cultures, while cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR2DL1/2/3) were expressed at low level in most cultures. Without blockade, myeloid leukaemia cells were susceptible to autologous and allogeneic CIK-mediated cytotoxicity. Blockade of KIR, LAG-3, PD-1 and TIM-3 but not CTLA-4 resulted in remarkable increase in killing against these targets, even in those with poor baseline cytotoxicity. ALL and MM targets were resistant to CIK-mediated cytotoxicity, and blockade of receptors did not increase cytotoxicity to a meaningful extent. Combination of inhibitors against two receptors did not further increase cytotoxicity. Interestingly, potentiation of CIK killing by blocking antibodies was not predicted by expression of receptors on CIK and their respective ligands on the targets. Compared to un-activated T and NK cells, blockade potentiated the cytotoxicity of CIK cells to a greater degree and at a lower E:T ratio, but without significant increase in cytotoxicity against normal white cell. Our findings provide the basis for clinical trial combining autologous CIK cells with checkpoint inhibitors for patients with AML.

  18. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiyong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Teng, Lisong; Legerski, Randy J.

    2015-06-10

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  19. Obtusilactone A and (-)-sesamin induce apoptosis in human lung cancer cells by inhibiting mitochondrial Lon protease and activating DNA damage checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Jung; Hsu, Shu-Wei; Fang, Wei-Cheng; Hsu, Tai-Feng; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen

    2010-12-01

    Several compounds from Cinnamomum kotoense show anticancer activities. However, the detailed mechanisms of most compounds from C. kotoense remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of obtusilactone A (OA) and (-)-sesamin in lung cancer. Our results show that human Lon is upregulated in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, and downregulation of Lon triggers caspase-3 mediated apoptosis. Through enzyme-based screening, we identified two small-molecule compounds, obtusilactone A (OA) and (-)-sesamin from C. kotoense, as potent Lon protease inhibitors. Obtusilactone A and (-)-sesamin interact with Ser855 and Lys898 residues in the active site of the Lon protease according to molecular docking analysis. Thus, we suggest that cancer cytotoxicity of the compounds is partly due to the inhibitory effects on Lon protease. In addition, the compounds are able to cause DNA double-strand breaks and activate checkpoints. Treatment with OA and (-)-sesamin induced p53-independent DNA damage responses in NSCLC cells, including G(1) /S checkpoint activation and apoptosis, as evidenced by phosphorylation of checkpoint proteins (H2AX, Nbs1, and Chk2), caspase-3 cleavage, and sub-G(1) accumulation. In conclusion, OA and (-)-sesamin act as both inhibitors of human mitochondrial Lon protease and DNA damage agents to activate the DNA damage checkpoints as well induce apoptosis in NSCLC cells. These dual functions open a bright avenue to develop more selective chemotherapy agents to overcome chemoresistance and sensitize cancer cells to other chemotherapeutics.

  20. The energy sensor AMPK regulates Hedgehog signaling in human cells through a unique Gli1 metabolic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Di Magno, Laura; Basile, Alessio; Coni, Sonia; Manni, Simona; Sdruscia, Giulia; D'Amico, Davide; Antonucci, Laura; Infante, Paola; De Smaele, Enrico; Cucchi, Danilo; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Screpanti, Isabella; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling controls proliferation of cerebellar granule cell precursors (GCPs) and its aberrant activation is a leading cause of Medulloblastoma, the most frequent pediatric brain tumor. We show here that the energy sensor AMPK inhibits Hh signaling by phosphorylating a single residue of human Gli1 that is not conserved in other species. Studies with selective agonists and genetic deletion have revealed that AMPK activation inhibits canonical Hh signaling in human, but not in mouse cells. Indeed we show that AMPK phosphorylates Gli1 at the unique residue Ser408, which is conserved only in primates but not in other species. Once phosphorylated, Gli1 is targeted for proteasomal degradation. Notably, we show that selective AMPK activation inhibits Gli1-driven proliferation and that this effect is linked to Ser408 phosphorylation, which represents a key metabolic checkpoint for Hh signaling. Collectively, this data unveil a novel mechanism of inhibition of Gli1 function, which is exclusive for human cells and may be exploited for the treatment of Medulloblastoma or other Gli1 driven tumors. PMID:26843621

  1. Functional and Structural Characterization of Bub3·BubR1 Interactions Required for Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Signaling in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Florian; Puetter, Vera; Holton, Simon J; Andres, Dorothee; Stegmann, Christian M; Kwiatkowski, Dennis; Prechtl, Stefan; Petersen, Kirstin; Beckmann, Georg; Kreft, Bertolt; Mumberg, Dominik; Montalván, Amaury Fernández-

    2016-05-20

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is an essential safeguarding mechanism devised to ensure equal chromosome distribution in daughter cells upon mitosis. The proteins Bub3 and BubR1 are key components of the mitotic checkpoint complex, an essential part of the molecular machinery on which the SAC relies. In the present work we have performed a detailed functional and biochemical characterization of the interaction between human Bub3 and BubR1 in cells and in vitro Our results demonstrate that genetic knockdown of Bub3 abrogates the SAC, promotes apoptosis, and inhibits the proliferation of human cancer cells. We also show that the integrity of the human mitotic checkpoint complex depends on the specific recognition between BubR1 and Bub3, for which the BubR1 Gle2 binding sequence motif is essential. This 1:1 binding event is high affinity, enthalpy-driven and with slow dissociation kinetics. The affinity, kinetics, and thermodynamic parameters of the interaction are differentially modulated by small regions in the N and C termini of the Gle2 binding domain sequence, suggesting the existence of "hotspots" for this protein-protein interaction. Furthermore, we show that specific disruption of endogenous BubR1·Bub3 complexes in human cancer cells phenocopies the effects observed in gene targeting experiments. Our work enhances the current understanding of key members of the SAC and paves the road for the pursuit of novel targeted cancer therapies based on SAC inhibition.

  2. The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Is Not Essential for Viability of Human Cells with Genetically Lowered APC/C Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Thomas; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Narita, Takeo; Schou, Julie; Nilsson, Jakob; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2016-01-01

    Summary The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which inhibits the APC/C, are essential determinants of mitotic timing and faithful division of genetic material. Activation of the APC/C is known to depend on two APC/C-interacting E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes—UBE2C and UBE2S. We show that APC/C activity in human cells is tuned by the combinatorial use of three E2s, namely UBE2C, UBE2S, and UBE2D. Genetic deletion of UBE2C and UBE2S, individually or in combination, leads to discriminative reduction in APC/C function and sensitizes cells to UBE2D depletion. Reduction of APC/C activity results in loss of switch-like metaphase-to-anaphase transition and, strikingly, renders cells insensitive to chemical inhibition of MPS1 and genetic ablation of MAD2, both of which are essential for the SAC. These results provide insights into the regulation of APC/C activity and demonstrate that the essentiality of the SAC is imposed by the strength of the APC/C. PMID:26904940

  3. ATR checkpoint kinase and CRL1βTRCP collaborate to degrade ASF1a and thus repress genes overlapping with clusters of stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Im, Jun-Sub; Keaton, Mignon; Lee, Kyung Yong; Kumar, Pankaj; Park, Jonghoon; Dutta, Anindya

    2014-04-15

    Many agents used for chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, interfere with DNA replication, but the effect of this interference on transcription is largely unknown. Here we show that doxorubicin induces the firing of dense clusters of neoreplication origins that lead to clusters of stalled replication forks in gene-rich parts of the genome, particularly on expressed genes. Genes that overlap with these clusters of stalled forks are actively dechromatinized, unwound, and repressed by an ATR-dependent checkpoint pathway. The ATR checkpoint pathway causes a histone chaperone normally associated with the replication fork, ASF1a, to degrade through a CRL1(βTRCP)-dependent ubiquitination/proteasome pathway, leading to the localized dechromatinization and gene repression. Therefore, a globally active checkpoint pathway interacts with local clusters of stalled forks to specifically repress genes in the vicinity of the stalled forks, providing a new mechanism of action of chemotherapy drugs like doxorubicin. Finally, ASF1a-depleted cancer cells are more sensitive to doxorubicin, suggesting that the 7%-10% of prostate adenocarcinomas and adenoid cystic carcinomas reported to have homozygous deletion or significant underexpression of ASF1a should be tested for high sensitivity to doxorubicin.

  4. The decatenation checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Damelin, M; Bestor, T H

    2007-01-01

    The decatenation checkpoint delays entry into mitosis until the chromosomes have been disentangled. Deficiency in or bypass of the decatenation checkpoint can cause chromosome breakage and nondisjunction during mitosis, which results in aneuploidy and chromosome rearrangements in the daughter cells. A deficiency in the decatenation checkpoint has been reported in lung and bladder cancer cell lines and may contribute to the accumulation of chromosome aberrations that commonly occur during tumour progression. A checkpoint deficiency has also been documented in cultured stem and progenitor cells, and cancer stem cells are likely to be derived from stem and progenitor cells that lack an effective decatenation checkpoint. An inefficient decatenation checkpoint is likely to be a source of the chromosome aberrations that are common features of most tumours, but an inefficient decatenation checkpoint in cancer stem cells could also provide a potential target for chemotherapy. PMID:17211475

  5. Disruption of the p53-mediated G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint results in elevated rates of spontaneous genetic recombination in human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Strasfeld, L.; Brainerd, E.; Meyn, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    A key feature of the cancer-prone inherited disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is genetic instability. We recently demonstrated that one aspect of genetic instability in A-T is a marked elevation in the spontaneous rates of intrachromosomal mitotic recombination. We have proposed a model for A-T that attributes these high recombination rates to a lack of DNA damage-sensitive cell cycle checkpoints. One prediction of this model is that disrupting p53 function in normal cells should increase their spontaneous rates of recombination by interfering with their p53-dependent G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint. To test this prediction, we transfected control and A-T fibroblast lines that each harbor a single integrated copy of lacZ-based recombination vector (pLrec) with derivatives of a eukaryotic expression vector (pRep5) that contain either a dominant-negative p53 mutant (143{sup val{yields}ala}) or a human papilloma virus E6 gene (HPV18 E6). Expression of either of these genes results in loss of p53 function and abolition of the G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint. Four independent p53{sup 143ala} transformants of the control line showed 25-80 fold elevations in spontaneous recombination rates when compared to their parent cell line. Elevations in spontaneous recombination rates were also detected following transfection with the HPV18 E6 gene. In contrast, four independent p53{sup 143ala} transformants of the A-T cell line showed no significant changes in their already high spontaneous recombination rates. We are now extending these observations to additional normal human fibroblast lines and carrying out molecular analyses of the products of these recombinational events. Our results support our hypothesis that the lack of a p53-dependent G{sub 1}/S cell cycle checkpoint contributes to the hyperrecombination seen in A-T.

  6. Melanoma therapy: Check the checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Furue, Masutaka; Kadono, Takafumi

    2016-02-01

    Recent mutational and translational studies have revealed that the Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway plays a key role in melanomagenesis. Mutations in NRAS and BRAF are found in the majority of melanomas resulting in the formation of constitutively active NRAS and BRAF molecules, which leads to the proliferation and survival of melanoma cells through the activation of MEK/ERK signals. Inhibitors of BRAF or MEK significantly extend the progression-free survival and overall survival of melanoma patients compared with conventional chemotherapies. Combining BRAF and MEK inhibitors further enhances the clinical effectiveness. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) is an immune checkpoint molecule that downregulates T-cell activation by binding to B7 (CD80/CD86) molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Programmed death receptor ligand 1 on melanoma cells negatively regulates T-cell function by binding to the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor on T cells. Antibodies against CTLA-4 and PD-1 also enhance the survival of melanoma patients. In this review, we summarize the clinical effectiveness and adverse events of the BRAF inhibitors, MEK inhibitors and anti-immune checkpoint antibodies in melanoma treatment.

  7. Human securin proteolysis is controlled by the spindle checkpoint and reveals when the APC/C switches from activation by Cdc20 to Cdh1

    PubMed Central

    Hagting, Anja; den Elzen, Nicole; Vodermaier, Hartmut C.; Waizenegger, Irene C.; Peters, Jan-Michael; Pines, Jonathon

    2002-01-01

    Progress through mitosis is controlled by the sequential destruction of key regulators including the mitotic cyclins and securin, an inhibitor of anaphase whose destruction is required for sister chromatid separation. Here we have used live cell imaging to determine the exact time when human securin is degraded in mitosis. We show that the timing of securin destruction is set by the spindle checkpoint; securin destruction begins at metaphase once the checkpoint is satisfied. Furthermore, reimposing the checkpoint rapidly inactivates securin destruction. Thus, securin and cyclin B1 destruction have very similar properties. Moreover, we find that both cyclin B1 and securin have to be degraded before sister chromatids can separate. A mutant form of securin that lacks its destruction box (D-box) is still degraded in mitosis, but now this is in anaphase. This destruction requires a KEN box in the NH2 terminus of securin and may indicate the time in mitosis when ubiquitination switches from APCCdc20 to APCCdh1. Lastly, a D-box mutant of securin that cannot be degraded in metaphase inhibits sister chromatid separation, generating a cut phenotype where one cell can inherit both copies of the genome. Thus, defects in securin destruction alter chromosome segregation and may be relevant to the development of aneuploidy in cancer. PMID:12070128

  8. Mutation analysis of hBUB1, human mitotic checkpoint gene in multiple carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Mimori, K; Inoue, H; Alder, H; Ueo, H; Tanaka, Y; Mori, M

    2001-01-01

    hBUB1 is a human homolog of yeast mitotic check point gene that plays an important role in chromosome segregation. Recently mutations of hBUB1 were reported in colorectal cancer cell lines, indicating that inactivation of this gene could be directly involved in aneuploidy in human carcinoma cells. To obtain information of the magnitude of hBUB1 inactivation in multiple carcinomas, we examined mutations in 59 multiple carcinoma cell lines showing single base alteration, however, there was no mutation of hBUB1 with amino acid change in these carcinomas. There were four silent mutations at codon 93, codon 735, codon 430 and codon 98 in KYSE190, TE8 esophageal carcinoma cells, KATOIII gastric carcinoma cells and 697 B cell leukemia cells, respectively. Two candidates of mutation were identified in TE3 esophageal carcinoma cells and 697 B cell leukemia cell line at codon 9 and codon 285, respectively. This result suggests that the inactivation of hBUB1 may be very rare in human carcinomas, or restricted to certain cell lines of colorectal carcinomas. PMID:11115566

  9. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies.

  10. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-08-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1-mediated (PD-1-mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB-based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  11. Human CAR T cells with cell-intrinsic PD-1 checkpoint blockade resist tumor-mediated inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cherkassky, Leonid; Morello, Aurore; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Jones, David R.; Sadelain, Michel; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Following immune attack, solid tumors upregulate coinhibitory ligands that bind to inhibitory receptors on T cells. This adaptive resistance compromises the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies, which redirect T cells to solid tumors. Here, we investigated whether programmed death-1–mediated (PD-1–mediated) T cell exhaustion affects mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells and explored cell-intrinsic strategies to overcome inhibition of CAR T cells. Using an orthotopic mouse model of pleural mesothelioma, we determined that relatively high doses of both CD28- and 4-1BB–based second-generation CAR T cells achieved tumor eradication. CAR-mediated CD28 and 4-1BB costimulation resulted in similar levels of T cell persistence in animals treated with low T cell doses; however, PD-1 upregulation within the tumor microenvironment inhibited T cell function. At lower doses, 4-1BB CAR T cells retained their cytotoxic and cytokine secretion functions longer than CD28 CAR T cells. The prolonged function of 4-1BB CAR T cells correlated with improved survival. PD-1/PD-1 ligand [PD-L1] pathway interference, through PD-1 antibody checkpoint blockade, cell-intrinsic PD-1 shRNA blockade, or a PD-1 dominant negative receptor, restored the effector function of CD28 CAR T cells. These findings provide mechanistic insights into human CAR T cell exhaustion in solid tumors and suggest that PD-1/PD-L1 blockade may be an effective strategy for improving the potency of CAR T cell therapies. PMID:27454297

  12. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wilson C. Y.; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  13. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wilson C Y; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S Y

    2016-01-01

    DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  14. Identification and characterization of a human mitochondrial NAD kinase.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuto; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Murata, Kousaku

    2012-01-01

    NAD kinase is the sole NADP(+) biosynthetic enzyme. Despite the great significance of NADP(+), to date no mitochondrial NAD kinase has been identified in human, and the source of human mitochondrial NADP(+) remains elusive. Here we present evidence demonstrating that a human protein of unknown function, C5orf33, is a human mitochondrial NAD kinase; this protein likely represents the missing source of human mitochondrial NADP(+). The C5orf33 protein exhibits NAD kinase activity, utilizing ATP or inorganic polyphosphate, and is localized in the mitochondria of human HEK293A cells. C5orf33 mRNA is more abundant than human cytosolic NAD kinase mRNA in almost all tissues examined. We further show by database searches that some animals and protists carry C5orf33 homologues as their sole NADP(+) biosynthetic enzyme, whereas plants and fungi possess no C5orf33 homologue. These observations provide insights into eukaryotic NADP(+) biosynthesis, which has pivotal roles in cells and organelles.

  15. The spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Gorbsky, Gary J

    2015-07-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Its function is to prevent precocious anaphase onset before chromosomes have achieved bipolar attachment to the spindle. The spindle checkpoint comprises a complex set of signaling pathways that integrate microtubule dynamics, biomechanical forces at the kinetochores, and intricate regulation of protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Historically, many key observations that gave rise to the initial concepts of the spindle checkpoint were made in meiotic systems. In contrast with mitosis, the two distinct chromosome segregation events of meiosis present a special challenge for the regulation of checkpoint signaling. Preservation of fidelity in chromosome segregation in meiosis, controlled by the spindle checkpoint, also has a significant impact in human health. This review highlights the contributions from meiotic systems in understanding the spindle checkpoint as well as the role of checkpoint signaling in controlling the complex divisions of meiosis.

  16. The spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation in meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gorbsky, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Its function is to prevent precocious anaphase onset before chromosomes have achieved bipolar attachment to the spindle. The spindle checkpoint comprises a complex set of signaling pathways that integrate microtubule dynamics, biomechanical forces at the kinetochores, and intricate regulation of protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Historically, many key observations that gave rise to the initial concepts of the spindle checkpoint were carried out in meiotic systems. In contrast with mitosis, the two distinct chromosome segregation events of meiosis present a special challenge for the regulation of checkpoint signaling. Preservation of fidelity in chromosome segregation in meiosis, controlled by the spindle checkpoint, also has significant impact in human health. This review highlights the contributions from meiotic systems in understanding the spindle checkpoint as well as the role of checkpoint signaling in controlling the complex divisions of meiosis. PMID:25470754

  17. Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Latent Membrane Protein 1 Impairs G2 Checkpoint in Human Nasopharyngeal Epithelial Cells through Defective Chk1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wen; Pang, Pei Shin; Tsang, Chi Man; Hau, Pok Man; Yip, Yim Ling; Cheung, Annie L. M.; Tsao, Sai Wah

    2012-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a common cancer in Southeast Asia, particularly in southern regions of China. EBV infection is closely associated with NPC and has long been postulated to play an etiological role in the development of NPC. However, the role of EBV in malignant transformation of nasopharyngeal epithelial cells remains enigmatic. The current hypothesis of NPC development is that premalignant nasopharyngeal epithelial cells harboring genetic alterations support EBV infection and expression of EBV genes induces further genomic instability to facilitate the development of NPC. The latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) is a well-documented EBV-encoded oncogene. The involvement of LMP1 in human epithelial malignancies has been implicated, but the mechanisms of oncogenic actions of LMP1, particularly in nasopharyngeal cells, are unclear. Here we observed that LMP1 expression in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells impaired G2 checkpoint, leading to formation of unrepaired chromatid breaks in metaphases after γ-ray irradiation. We further found that defective Chk1 activation was involved in the induction of G2 checkpoint defect in LMP1-expressing nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Impairment of G2 checkpoint could result in loss of the acentrically broken chromatids and propagation of broken centric chromatids in daughter cells exiting mitosis, which facilitates chromosome instability. Our findings suggest that LMP1 expression facilitates genomic instability in cells under genotoxic stress. Elucidation of the mechanisms involved in LMP1-induced genomic instability in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells will shed lights on the understanding of role of EBV infection in NPC development. PMID:22761726

  18. Checkpoint Kinase ATR Promotes Nucleotide Excision Repair of UV-induced DNA Damage via Physical Interaction with Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A*

    PubMed Central

    Shell, Steven M.; Li, Zhengke; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Brosey, Chris; Serrano, Moises A.; Chazin, Walter J.; Musich, Phillip R.; Zou, Yue

    2009-01-01

    In response to DNA damage, eukaryotic cells activate a series of DNA damage-dependent pathways that serve to arrest cell cycle progression and remove DNA damage. Coordination of cell cycle arrest and damage repair is critical for maintenance of genomic stability. However, this process is still poorly understood. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) and the ATR-dependent cell cycle checkpoint are the major pathways responsible for repair of UV-induced DNA damage. Here we show that ATR physically interacts with the NER factor Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). Using a mass spectrometry-based protein footprinting method, we found that ATR interacts with a helix-turn-helix motif in the minimal DNA-binding domain of XPA where an ATR phosphorylation site (serine 196) is located. XPA-deficient cells complemented with XPA containing a point mutation of S196A displayed a reduced repair efficiency of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers as compared with cells complemented with wild-type XPA, although no effect was observed for repair of (6-4) photoproducts. This suggests that the ATR-dependent phosphorylation of XPA may promote NER repair of persistent DNA damage. In addition, a K188A point mutation of XPA that disrupts the ATR-XPA interaction inhibits the nuclear import of XPA after UV irradiation and, thus, significantly reduced DNA repair efficiency. By contrast, the S196A mutation has no effect on XPA nuclear translocation. Taken together, our results suggest that the ATR-XPA interaction mediated by the helix-turn-helix motif of XPA plays an important role in DNA-damage responses to promote cell survival and genomic stability after UV irradiation. PMID:19586908

  19. The MCM helicase: linking checkpoints to the replication fork.

    PubMed

    Forsburg, Susan L

    2008-02-01

    The MCM (minichromosome maintenance) complex is a helicase which is essential for DNA replication. Recent results suggest that the MCM helicase is important for replication fork integrity, and may function as a target of the replication checkpoint. Interactions between MCM proteins, checkpoint kinases, and repair and recovery proteins suggest that MCMs are proximal effectors of replication fork stability in the cell and are likely to play an important role in maintaining genome integrity. PMID:18208397

  20. Aberrant expression of the CHFR prophase checkpoint gene in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Aiqin; Ye, Junli; Zhang, Kunpeng; Yu, Hongsheng; Gao, Yanhua; Wang, Hongfang; Sun, Lirong; Xing, Xiaoming; Yang, Kun; Zhao, Min

    2015-05-01

    Checkpoint with FHA and Ring Finger (CHFR) is a checkpoint protein that reportedly initiates a cell cycle delay in response to microtubule stress during prophase in mitosis, which has become an interesting target for understanding cancer pathogenesis. Recently, aberrant methylation of the CHFR gene associated with gene silencing has been reported in several cancers. In the present study, we examined the expression of CHFR in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that the expression level of CHFR mRNA and protein was reduced in B-NHL tissue samples and B cell lines. Furthermore, CHFR methylation was detected in 39 of 122 B-NHL patients, which was not found in noncancerous reactive hyperplasia of lymph node (RH) tissues. CHFR methylation correlated with the reduced expression of CHFR, high International Prognostic Index (IPI) scores and later pathologic Ann Arbor stages of B-NHL. Treatment with demethylation reagent, 5-Aza-dC, could eliminate the hypermethylation of CHFR, enhance CHFR expression and cell apoptosis and inhibit the cell proliferation of Raji cells, which could be induced by high expression of CHFR in Raji cells. Our results indicated that aberrant methylation of CHFR may be associated with the pathogenesis, progression for B-NHL, which might be a novel molecular marker as prognosis and treatment for B-NHL. PMID:25798877

  1. Prokaryotic expression cloning of a novel human tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Beeler, J.F.; LaRochelle, W.J.; Chedid, M.

    1994-02-01

    Screening of a human embryonic lung fibroblast cDNA expression library with antiphosphotyrosine antibodies led to isolation of a novel protein kinase. A clone, designated A6, contained a 3-kb cDNA insert with a predicted open reading frame of 350 amino acids. DNA sequence analysis failed to reveal any detectable similarity with previously known genes, and the predicted A6 protein lacked any of the motifs commonly conserved in the catalytic domains of protein kinases. However, the bacterially expressed {beta}-galactosidase-A6 fusion protein demonstrated both tyrosine and serine phosphorylation in an in vitro kinase assay and phosphorylated exogenous substrates including myelin basic protein specifically on tyrosine residues. The enzyme also displayed biochemical properties analogous to those of other protein tyrosine kinases. The A6 gene was found to be expressed widely at the transcript level in normal tissues and was evolutionarily conserved. Thus, A6 represents a novel tyrosine kinase which is highly divergent from previously described members of this important class of regulatory molecules. 29 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Structure and functional characterization of the atypical human kinase haspin

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Patnaik, Debasis; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Wang, Fangwei; Stein, Ross L.; Murray, James W.; Higgins, Jonathan M. G.; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The protein kinase haspin/Gsg2 plays an important role in mitosis, where it specifically phosphorylates Thr-3 in histone H3 (H3T3). Its protein sequence is only weakly homologous to other protein kinases and lacks the highly conserved motifs normally required for kinase activity. Here we report structures of human haspin in complex with ATP and the inhibitor iodotubercidin. These structures reveal a constitutively active kinase conformation, stabilized by haspin-specific inserts. Haspin also has a highly atypical activation segment well adapted for specific recognition of the basic histone tail. Despite the lack of a DFG motif, ATP binding to haspin is similar to that in classical kinases; however, the ATP γ-phosphate forms hydrogen bonds with the conserved catalytic loop residues Asp-649 and His-651, and a His651Ala haspin mutant is inactive, suggesting a direct role for the catalytic loop in ATP recognition. Enzyme kinetic data show that haspin phosphorylates substrate peptides through a rapid equilibrium random mechanism. A detailed analysis of histone modifications in the neighborhood of H3T3 reveals that increasing methylation at Lys-4 (H3K4) strongly decreases substrate recognition, suggesting a key role of H3K4 methylation in the regulation of haspin activity. PMID:19918057

  3. Structure and functional characterization of the atypical human kinase haspin.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Patnaik, Debasis; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Wang, Fangwei; Stein, Ross L; Murray, James W; Higgins, Jonathan M G; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The protein kinase haspin/Gsg2 plays an important role in mitosis, where it specifically phosphorylates Thr-3 in histone H3 (H3T3). Its protein sequence is only weakly homologous to other protein kinases and lacks the highly conserved motifs normally required for kinase activity. Here we report structures of human haspin in complex with ATP and the inhibitor iodotubercidin. These structures reveal a constitutively active kinase conformation, stabilized by haspin-specific inserts. Haspin also has a highly atypical activation segment well adapted for specific recognition of the basic histone tail. Despite the lack of a DFG motif, ATP binding to haspin is similar to that in classical kinases; however, the ATP gamma-phosphate forms hydrogen bonds with the conserved catalytic loop residues Asp-649 and His-651, and a His651Ala haspin mutant is inactive, suggesting a direct role for the catalytic loop in ATP recognition. Enzyme kinetic data show that haspin phosphorylates substrate peptides through a rapid equilibrium random mechanism. A detailed analysis of histone modifications in the neighborhood of H3T3 reveals that increasing methylation at Lys-4 (H3K4) strongly decreases substrate recognition, suggesting a key role of H3K4 methylation in the regulation of haspin activity. PMID:19918057

  4. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein engages but does not abrogate the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yueyang; Munger, Karl

    2012-10-10

    The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis by censoring kinetochore-microtubule interactions. It is frequently rendered dysfunctional during carcinogenesis causing chromosome missegregation and genomic instability. There are conflicting reports whether the HPV16 E7 oncoprotein drives chromosomal instability by abolishing the SAC. Here we report that degradation of mitotic cyclins is impaired in cells with HPV16 E7 expression. RNAi-mediated depletion of Mad2 or BubR1 indicated the involvement of the SAC, suggesting that HPV16 E7 expression causes sustained SAC engagement. Mutational analyses revealed that HPV16 E7 sequences that are necessary for retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein binding as well as sequences previously implicated in binding the nuclear and mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein and in delocalizing dynein from the mitotic spindle contribute to SAC engagement. Importantly, however, HPV16 E7 does not markedly compromise the SAC response to microtubule poisons.

  5. Identification of human cyclin-dependent kinase 8, a putative protein kinase partner for cyclin C.

    PubMed

    Tassan, J P; Jaquenoud, M; Léopold, P; Schultz, S J; Nigg, E A

    1995-09-12

    Metazoan cyclin C was originally isolated by virtue of its ability to rescue Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient in G1 cyclin function. This suggested that cyclin C might play a role in cell cycle control, but progress toward understanding the function of this cyclin has been hampered by the lack of information on a potential kinase partner. Here we report the identification of a human protein kinase, K35 [cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8)], that is likely to be a physiological partner of cyclin C. A specific interaction between K35 and cyclin C could be demonstrated after translation of CDKs and cyclins in vitro. Furthermore, cyclin C could be detected in K35 immunoprecipitates prepared from HeLa cells, indicating that the two proteins form a complex also in vivo. The K35-cyclin C complex is structurally related to SRB10-SRB11, a CDK-cyclin pair recently shown to be part of the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme of S. cerevisiae. Hence, we propose that human K35(CDK8)-cyclin C might be functionally associated with the mammalian transcription apparatus, perhaps involved in relaying growth-regulatory signals.

  6. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  7. Mad1 kinetochore recruitment by Mps1-mediated phosphorylation of Bub1 signals the spindle checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    London, Nitobe; Biggins, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a conserved signaling pathway that ensures genomic integrity by preventing cell division when chromosomes are not correctly attached to the spindle. Checkpoint activation depends on the hierarchical recruitment of checkpoint proteins to generate a catalytic platform at the kinetochore. Although Mad1 kinetochore localization is the key regulatory downstream event in this cascade, its receptor and mechanism of recruitment have not been conclusively identified. Here, we demonstrate that Mad1 kinetochore association in budding yeast is mediated by phosphorylation of a region within the Bub1 checkpoint protein by the conserved protein kinase Mps1. Tethering this region of Bub1 to kinetochores bypasses the checkpoint requirement for Mps1-mediated kinetochore recruitment of upstream checkpoint proteins. The Mad1 interaction with Bub1 and kinetochores can be reconstituted in the presence of Mps1 and Mad2. Together, this work reveals a critical mechanism that determines kinetochore activation of the spindle checkpoint. PMID:24402315

  8. The crystal structure of human adenylate kinase 6: An adenylate kinase localized to the cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hui; Wang, Liya; Bennett, Matthew; Liang, Yuhe; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Lu, Fei; Li, Lanfen; Nan, Jie; Luo, Ming; Eriksson, Staffan; Zhang, Chuanmao; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2005-01-11

    Adenylate kinases (AKs) play important roles in nucleotide metabolism in all organisms and in cellular energetics by means of phosphotransfer networks in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of a human AK named AK6 was determined by in-house sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing methods and refined to 2.0-A resolution with a free R factor of 21.8%. Sequence analyses revealed that human AK6 belongs to a distinct subfamily of AKs present in all eukaryotic organisms sequenced so far. Enzymatic assays show that human AK6 has properties similar with other AKs, particularly with AK5. Fluorescence microscopy showed that human AK6 is localized predominantly to the nucleus of HeLa cells. The identification of a nuclear-localized AK sheds light on nucleotide metabolism in the nucleus and the energetic communication between mitochondria and nucleus by means of phosphotransfer networks.

  9. Development of cell-cycle checkpoint therapy for solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Cellular proliferation is tightly controlled by several cell-cycle checkpoint proteins. In cancer, the genes encoding these proteins are often disrupted and cause unrestrained cancer growth. The proteins are over-expressed in many malignancies; thus, they are potential targets for anti-cancer therapies. These proteins include cyclin-dependent kinase, checkpoint kinase, WEE1 kinase, aurora kinase and polo-like kinase. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors are the most advanced cell-cycle checkpoint therapeutics available. For instance, palbociclib (PD0332991) is a first-in-class, oral, highly selective inhibitor of CDK4/6 and, in combination with letrozole (Phase II; PALOMA-1) or with fulvestrant (Phase III; PALOMA-3), it has significantly prolonged progression-free survival, in patients with metastatic estrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, in comparison with that observed in patients using letrozole, or fulvestrant alone, respectively. In this review, we provide an overview of the current compounds available for cell-cycle checkpoint protein-directed therapy for solid tumors. PMID:26486823

  10. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  11. Probing the Mec1ATR Checkpoint Activation Mechanism with Small Peptides.

    PubMed

    Wanrooij, Paulina H; Tannous, Elias; Kumar, Sandeep; Navadgi-Patil, Vasundhara M; Burgers, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Mec1, the ortholog of human ATR, is the apical protein kinase that initiates the cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage and replication stress. The basal activity of Mec1 kinase is activated by cell cycle phase-specific activators. Three distinct activators stimulate Mec1 kinase using an intrinsically disordered domain of the protein. These are the Ddc1 subunit of the 9-1-1 checkpoint clamp (ortholog of human and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rad9), the replication initiator Dpb11 (ortholog of human TopBP1 and S. pombe Cut5), and the multifunctional nuclease/helicase Dna2. Here, we use small peptides to determine the requirements for Mec1 activation. For Ddc1, we identify two essential aromatic amino acids in a hydrophobic environment that when fused together are proficient activators. Using this increased insight, we have been able to identify homologous motifs in S. pombe Rad9 that can activate Mec1. Furthermore, we show that a 9-amino acid Dna2-based peptide is sufficient for Mec1 activation. Studies with mutant activators suggest that binding of an activator to Mec1 is a two-step process, the first step involving the obligatory binding of essential aromatic amino acids to Mec1, followed by an enhancement in binding energy through interactions with neighboring sequences.

  12. Structures of human Bruton's tyrosine kinase in active and inactive conformations suggest a mechanism of activation for TEC family kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, Douglas J.; Liu, Yu-Ting; Arduini, Robert M.; Hession, Catherine A.; Miatkowski, Konrad; Wildes, Craig P.; Cullen, Patrick F.; Hong, Victor; Hopkins, Brian T.; Mertsching, Elisabeth; Jenkins, Tracy J.; Romanowski, Michael J.; Baker, Darren P.; Silvian, Laura F.

    2010-11-15

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the TEC family of kinases, plays a crucial role in B-cell maturation and mast cell activation. Although the structures of the unphosphorylated mouse BTK kinase domain and the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated kinase domains of human ITK are known, understanding the kinase selectivity profiles of BTK inhibitors has been hampered by the lack of availability of a high resolution, ligand-bound BTK structure. Here, we report the crystal structures of the human BTK kinase domain bound to either Dasatinib (BMS-354825) at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution or to 4-amino-5-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-7H-pyrrolospyrimidin- 7-yl-cyclopentane at 1.6 {angstrom} resolution. This data provides information relevant to the development of small molecule inhibitors targeting BTK and the TEC family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Analysis of the structural differences between the TEC and Src families of kinases near the Trp-Glu-Ile motif in the N-terminal region of the kinase domain suggests a mechanism of regulation of the TEC family members.

  13. Distribution and prognostic relevance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoints in human brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Harter, Patrick N; Bernatz, Simon; Scholz, Alexander; Zeiner, Pia S; Zinke, Jenny; Kiyose, Makoto; Blasel, Stella; Beschorner, Rudi; Senft, Christian; Bender, Benjamin; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W; Wikman, Harriet; Glatzel, Markus; Meinhardt, Matthias; Juratli, Tareq A; Steinbach, Joachim P; Plate, Karl H; Wischhusen, Jörg; Weide, Benjamin; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2015-12-01

    The activation of immune cells by targeting checkpoint inhibitors showed promising results with increased patient survival in distinct primary cancers. Since only limited data exist for human brain metastases, we aimed at characterizing tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and expression of immune checkpoints in the respective tumors. Two brain metastases cohorts, a mixed entity cohort (n = 252) and a breast carcinoma validation cohort (n = 96) were analyzed for CD3+, CD8+, FOXP3+, PD-1+ lymphocytes and PD-L1+ tumor cells by immunohistochemistry. Analyses for association with clinico-epidemiological and neuroradiological parameters such as patient survival or tumor size were performed. TILs infiltrated brain metastases in three different patterns (stromal, peritumoral, diffuse). While carcinomas often show a strong stromal infiltration, TILs in melanomas often diffusely infiltrate the tumors. Highest levels of CD3+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were seen in renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and strongest PD-1 levels on RCCs and melanomas. High amounts of TILs, high ratios of PD-1+/CD8+ cells and high levels of PD-L1 were negatively correlated with brain metastases size, indicating that in smaller brain metastases CD8+ immune response might get blocked. PD-L1 expression strongly correlated with TILs and FOXP3 expression. No significant association of patient survival with TILs was observed, while high levels of PD-L1 showed a strong trend towards better survival in melanoma brain metastases (Log-Rank p = 0.0537). In summary, melanomas and RCCs seem to be the most immunogenic entities. Differences in immunotherapeutic response between tumor entities regarding brain metastases might be attributable to this finding and need further investigation in larger patient cohorts.

  14. Distribution and prognostic relevance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoints in human brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Harter, Patrick N; Bernatz, Simon; Scholz, Alexander; Zeiner, Pia S; Zinke, Jenny; Kiyose, Makoto; Blasel, Stella; Beschorner, Rudi; Senft, Christian; Bender, Benjamin; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W; Wikman, Harriet; Glatzel, Markus; Meinhardt, Matthias; Juratli, Tareq A; Steinbach, Joachim P; Plate, Karl H; Wischhusen, Jörg; Weide, Benjamin; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2015-12-01

    The activation of immune cells by targeting checkpoint inhibitors showed promising results with increased patient survival in distinct primary cancers. Since only limited data exist for human brain metastases, we aimed at characterizing tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and expression of immune checkpoints in the respective tumors. Two brain metastases cohorts, a mixed entity cohort (n = 252) and a breast carcinoma validation cohort (n = 96) were analyzed for CD3+, CD8+, FOXP3+, PD-1+ lymphocytes and PD-L1+ tumor cells by immunohistochemistry. Analyses for association with clinico-epidemiological and neuroradiological parameters such as patient survival or tumor size were performed. TILs infiltrated brain metastases in three different patterns (stromal, peritumoral, diffuse). While carcinomas often show a strong stromal infiltration, TILs in melanomas often diffusely infiltrate the tumors. Highest levels of CD3+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were seen in renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and strongest PD-1 levels on RCCs and melanomas. High amounts of TILs, high ratios of PD-1+/CD8+ cells and high levels of PD-L1 were negatively correlated with brain metastases size, indicating that in smaller brain metastases CD8+ immune response might get blocked. PD-L1 expression strongly correlated with TILs and FOXP3 expression. No significant association of patient survival with TILs was observed, while high levels of PD-L1 showed a strong trend towards better survival in melanoma brain metastases (Log-Rank p = 0.0537). In summary, melanomas and RCCs seem to be the most immunogenic entities. Differences in immunotherapeutic response between tumor entities regarding brain metastases might be attributable to this finding and need further investigation in larger patient cohorts. PMID:26517811

  15. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  16. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  17. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  18. Extending Thymidine Kinase Activity to the Catalytic Repertoire of Human Deoxycytidine Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Saugata; Sabini, Eliszbetta; Ort, Stephan; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2009-03-04

    Salvage of nucleosides in the cytosol of human cells is carried out by deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Whereas TK1 is only responsible for thymidine phosphorylation, dCK is capable of converting dC, dA, and dG into their monophosphate forms. Using structural data on dCK, we predicted that select mutations at the active site would, in addition to making the enzyme faster, expand the catalytic repertoire of dCK to include thymidine. Specifically, we hypothesized that steric repulsion between the methyl group of the thymine base and Arg104 is the main factor preventing the phosphorylation of thymidine by wild-type dCK. Here we present kinetic data on several dCK variants where Arg104 has been replaced by select residues, all performed in combination with the mutation of Asp133 to an alanine. We show that several hydrophobic residues at position 104 endow dCK with thymidine kinase activity. Depending on the exact nature of the mutations, the enzyme's substrate preference is modified. The R104M-D133A double mutant is a pyrimidine-specific enzyme due to large K{sub m} values with purines. The crystal structure of the double mutant R104M-D133A in complex with the L-form of thymidine supplies a structural explanation for the ability of this variant to phosphorylate thymidine and thymidine analogs. The replacement of Arg104 by a smaller residue allows L-dT to bind deeper into the active site, making space for the C5-methyl group of the thymine base. The unique catalytic properties of several of the mutants make them good candidates for suicide-gene/protein-therapy applications.

  19. Human acylphosphatase cannot replace phosphoglycerate kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Van Hoek, P; Modesti, A; Ramponi, G; Kötter, P; van Dijken, J P; Pron, J T

    2001-10-01

    Human acylphosphatase (h-AP, EC 3.6.1.7) has been reported to catalyse the hydrolysis of the 1-phosphate group of 1,3-diphosphoglycerate. In vivo operation of this reaction in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae would bypass phosphoglycerate kinase and thus reduce the ATP yield from glycolysis. To investigate whether h-AP can indeed replace the S. cerevisiae phosphoglycerate kinase, a multi-copy plasmid carrying the h-AP gene under control of the yeast TDH3 promoter was introduced into a pgk1 delta mutant of S. cerevisiae. A strain carrying the expression vector without the h-AP cassette was used as a reference. For both strains, steady-state carbon- and energy-limited chemostat cultures were obtained at a dilution rate of 0.10 h(-1) on a medium containing a mixture of glucose and ethanol (15% and 85% on a carbon basis, respectively). Although the h-AP strain exhibited a high acylphosphatase activity in cell extracts, switching to glucose as sole carbon and energy source resulted in a complete arrest of glucose consumption and growth. The lack of a functional glycolytic pathway was further evident from the absence of ethanol formation in the presence of excess glucose in the culture. As h-AP cannot replace yeast phosphoglycerate kinase in vivo, the enzyme is not a useful tool to modify the ATP yield of glycolysis in S. cerevisiae.

  20. Sustaining the spindle assembly checkpoint to improve cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Visconti, Roberta; Della Monica, Rosa; Grieco, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    To prevent chromosome segregation errors, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until proper spindle assembly. We found that the FCP1 phosphatase and its downstream target WEE1 kinase oppose the SAC, promoting mitosis exit despite malformed spindles. We further showed that targeting this pathway might be useful for cancer therapy. PMID:27308561

  1. Role for casein kinase 1 in the phosphorylation of Claspin on critical residues necessary for the activation of Chk1.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zheng; Capalbo, Luisa; Glover, David M; Dunphy, William G

    2011-08-15

    The mediator protein Claspin is critical for the activation of the checkpoint kinase Chk1 during checkpoint responses to stalled replication forks. This function involves the Chk1-activating domain (CKAD) of Claspin, which undergoes phosphorylation on multiple conserved sites. These phosphorylations promote binding of Chk1 to Claspin and ensuing activation of Chk1 by ATR. However, despite the importance of this regulatory process, the kinase responsible for these phosphorylations has remained unknown. By using a multifaceted approach, we have found that casein kinase 1 gamma 1 (CK1γ1) carries out this function. CK1γ1 phosphorylates the CKAD of Claspin efficiently in vitro, and depletion of CK1γ1 from human cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) results in dramatically diminished phosphorylation of Claspin. Consequently, the siRNA-treated cells display impaired activation of Chk1 and resultant checkpoint defects. These results indicate that CK1γ1 is a novel component of checkpoint responses that controls the interaction of a key checkpoint effector kinase with its cognate mediator protein. PMID:21680713

  2. Role for casein kinase 1 in the phosphorylation of Claspin on critical residues necessary for the activation of Chk1

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zheng; Capalbo, Luisa; Glover, David M.; Dunphy, William G.

    2011-01-01

    The mediator protein Claspin is critical for the activation of the checkpoint kinase Chk1 during checkpoint responses to stalled replication forks. This function involves the Chk1-activating domain (CKAD) of Claspin, which undergoes phosphorylation on multiple conserved sites. These phosphorylations promote binding of Chk1 to Claspin and ensuing activation of Chk1 by ATR. However, despite the importance of this regulatory process, the kinase responsible for these phosphorylations has remained unknown. By using a multifaceted approach, we have found that casein kinase 1 gamma 1 (CK1γ1) carries out this function. CK1γ1 phosphorylates the CKAD of Claspin efficiently in vitro, and depletion of CK1γ1 from human cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) results in dramatically diminished phosphorylation of Claspin. Consequently, the siRNA-treated cells display impaired activation of Chk1 and resultant checkpoint defects. These results indicate that CK1γ1 is a novel component of checkpoint responses that controls the interaction of a key checkpoint effector kinase with its cognate mediator protein. PMID:21680713

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of human JNKK2, a novel Jun NH2-terminal kinase-specific kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z; Wu, J; Jacinto, E; Karin, M

    1997-01-01

    At least three mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades were identified in mammals, each consisting of a well-defined three-kinase module composed of a MAPK, a MAPK kinase (MAPKK), and a MAPKK kinase (MAPKKK). These cascades play key roles in relaying various physiological, environmental, or pathological signals from the environment to the transcriptional machinery in the nucleus. One of these MAPKs, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), stimulates the transcriptional activity of c-Jun in response to growth factors, proinflammatory cytokines, and certain environmental stresses, such as short wavelength UV light or osmotic shock. The JNKs are directly activated by the MAPKK JNKK1/SEK1/MKK4. However, inactivation of the gene encoding this MAPKK by homologous recombination suggested the existence of at least one more JNK-activating kinase. Recently, the JNK cascade was found to be structurally and functionally conserved in Drosophila, where DJNK is activated by the MAPKK DJNKK (hep). By a database search, we identified an expressed sequence tag (EST) encoding a portion of human MAPKK that is highly related to DJNKK (hep). We used this EST to isolate a full-length cDNA clone encoding a human JNKK2. We show that JNKK2 is a highly specific JNK kinase. Unlike JNKK1, it does not activate the related MAPK, p38. Although the regulation of JNKK1 activities and that of JNKK2 activities could be very similar, the two kinases may play somewhat different regulatory roles in a cell-type-dependent manner. PMID:9372971

  4. Trans-activation of the DNA-damage signalling protein kinase Chk2 by T-loop exchange.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Antony W; Paul, Angela; Boxall, Katherine J; Barrie, S Elaine; Aherne, G Wynne; Garrett, Michelle D; Mittnacht, Sibylle; Pearl, Laurence H

    2006-07-12

    The protein kinase Chk2 (checkpoint kinase 2) is a major effector of the replication checkpoint. Chk2 activation is initiated by phosphorylation of Thr68, in the serine-glutamine/threonine-glutamine cluster domain (SCD), by ATM. The phosphorylated SCD-segment binds to the FHA domain of a second Chk2 molecule, promoting dimerisation of the protein and triggering phosphorylation of the activation segment/T-loop in the kinase domain. We have now determined the structure of the kinase domain of human Chk2 in complexes with ADP and a small-molecule inhibitor debromohymenialdisine. The structure reveals a remarkable dimeric arrangement in which T-loops are exchanged between protomers, to form an active kinase conformation in trans. Biochemical data suggest that this dimer is the biologically active state promoted by ATM-phosphorylation, and also suggests a mechanism for dimerisation-driven activation of Chk2 by trans-phosphorylation.

  5. Construction of protein phosphorylation networks by data mining, text mining and ontology integration: analysis of the spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Ross, Karen E; Arighi, Cecilia N; Ren, Jia; Huang, Hongzhan; Wu, Cathy H

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge representation of the role of phosphorylation is essential for the meaningful understanding of many biological processes. However, such a representation is challenging because proteins can exist in numerous phosphorylated forms with each one having its own characteristic protein-protein interactions (PPIs), functions and subcellular localization. In this article, we evaluate the current state of phosphorylation event curation and then present a bioinformatics framework for the annotation and representation of phosphorylated proteins and construction of phosphorylation networks that addresses some of the gaps in current curation efforts. The integrated approach involves (i) text mining guided by RLIMS-P, a tool that identifies phosphorylation-related information in scientific literature; (ii) data mining from curated PPI databases; (iii) protein form and complex representation using the Protein Ontology (PRO); (iv) functional annotation using the Gene Ontology (GO); and (v) network visualization and analysis with Cytoscape. We use this framework to study the spindle checkpoint, the process that monitors the assembly of the mitotic spindle and blocks cell cycle progression at metaphase until all chromosomes have made bipolar spindle attachments. The phosphorylation networks we construct, centered on the human checkpoint kinase BUB1B (BubR1) and its yeast counterpart MAD3, offer a unique view of the spindle checkpoint that emphasizes biologically relevant phosphorylated forms, phosphorylation-state-specific PPIs and kinase-substrate relationships. Our approach for constructing protein phosphorylation networks can be applied to any biological process that is affected by phosphorylation. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/

  6. Attenuation of G{sub 2} cell cycle checkpoint control in human tumor cells is associated with increased frequencies of unrejoined chromosome breaks but not increased cytotoxicity following radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L.; Cowan, J.; Grdina, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    The contribution of G{sub 2} cell cycle checkpoint control to ionizing radiation responses was examined in ten human tumor cell lines. Most of the delay in cell cycle progression seen in the first cell cycle following radiation exposure was due to blocks in G{sub 2} and there were large cell line-to-cell line variations in the length of the G{sub 2} block. Longer delays were seen in cell lines that had mutations in p53. There was a highly significant inverse correlation between the length of G{sub 2} delay and the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks seen as chromosome terminal deletions in mitosis, and observation that supports the hypothesis that the signal for G{sub 2} delay in mammalian cells is an unrejoined chromosome break. There were also an inverse correlation between the length of G{sub 2} delay and the level of chromosome aneuploidy in each cell line, suggesting that the G{sub 2} and mitotic spindel checkpoints may be linked to each other. Attenuation in G{sub 2} checkpoint control was not associated with alterations in either the frequency of induced chromosome rearrangements or cell survival following radiation exposure suggesting that chromosome rearrangements, the major radiation-induced lethal lesion in tumor cells, form before cells enters G{sub 2}. Thus, agents that act solely to override G{sub 2} arrest should produce little radiosensitization in human tumor cells.

  7. Loss of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes and chromosome 9 karyotypic abnormalities in human bladder cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, J.; Proffitt, J.; Roberts, P.; Smith, B.; Selby, P.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of cell cycle control through the structural or functional aberration of checkpoint genes and their products is a potentially important process in carcinogenesis. In this study, a panel of well-characterised established human bladder cancer cell lines was screened by the polymerase chain reaction for homozygous loss of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes p15, p16 and p27. The results demonstrate that, whereas there was no genetic loss of p27, homozygous deletion of both p15 and p16 genes occurred in seven of 13 (54%) independent bladder cell lines tested. Differential loss of either the p15 or p16 gene was not seen. The p15 and p16 genes are known to be juxtaposed on chromosome 9p21 at the locus of a putative tumour-suppressor gene involved in the initiation of bladder cancer. Cytogenetic analysis of the cell lines revealed karyotypes ranging from near diploid to near pentaploid with complex rearrangements of some chromosomes and a high prevalence of chromosome 9p rearrangements, although all cell lines contained at least one cytogenetically normal 9p21 region. These observations support a role for p15/p16 gene inactivation in bladder carcinogenesis and/or the promotion of cell growth in vitro and lend support to the hypothesis that homozygous deletion centred on 9p21 is a mechanism by which both p15 and p16 genes are co-inactivated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7577470

  8. Protein interaction domain mapping of human kinetochore protein Blinkin reveals a consensus motif for binding of spindle assembly checkpoint proteins Bub1 and BubR1.

    PubMed

    Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Murakami, Hiroaki; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2011-03-01

    The kinetochore is a supramolecular structure essential for microtubule attachment and the mitotic checkpoint. Human blinkin/human Spc105 (hSpc105)/hKNL1 was identified originally as a mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion partner and later as a kinetochore component. Blinkin directly binds to several structural and regulatory proteins, but the precise binding sites have not been defined. Here, we report distinct and essential binding domains for Bub1 and BubR1 (here designated Bubs) at the N terminus of blinkin and for Zwint-1 and hMis14/hNsl1 at the C terminus. The minimal binding sites for Bub1 and BubR1 are separate but contain a consensus KI motif, KI(D/N)XXXF(L/I)XXLK. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated replacement with mutant blinkin reveals that the Bubs-binding domain is functionally important for chromosome alignment and segregation. We also provide evidence that hMis14 mediates hNdc80 binding to blinkin at the kinetochore. The C-terminal fragment of blinkin locates at kinetochores in a dominant-negative fashion by displacing endogenous blinkin from kinetochores. This negative dominance is relieved by mutations of the hMis14 binding PPSS motif on the C terminus of blinkin or by fusion of the N sequence that binds to Bub1 and BubR1. Taken together, these results indicate that blinkin functions to connect Bub1 and BubR1 with the hMis12, Ndc80, and Zwint-1 complexes, and disruption of this connection may lead to tumorigenesis. PMID:21199919

  9. HPLC-DAD protein kinase inhibitor analysis in human serum.

    PubMed

    Dziadosz, Marek; Lessig, Rüdiger; Bartels, Heidemarie

    2012-04-15

    We here describe an HPLC-DAD method to analyse different protein kinase inhibitors. Potential applications of this method are pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic drug monitoring. Optimised chromatography conditions resulted in a very good separation of seven inhibitors (vatalanib, bosutinib, canertinib, tandutinib, pazopanib, dasatinib - internal standard and erlotinib). The good sensitivity makes this method competitive with LC/MS/MS. The separation was performed with a Lichrospher 100-5 RP8, 250 mm × 4 mm column maintained at 30 ± 1 °C, and with a mobile phase of 0.05 M H(3)PO(4)/KH(2)PO(4) (pH=2.3)-acetonitrile (7:3, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min. A simple and fast sample preparation sequence with liquid-liquid extraction led to good recoveries (73-90%) of all analytes. The recovery hardly reached 50% only for pazopanib. This method can also be used for targeted protein kinase inhibitor quantification. A perfect linearity in the validated range (20-10,000 ng/mL) and an LOQ of 20 ng/mL were achieved. The relative standard deviations and accuracies of all examined drug concentrations gave values much lower than 15% both for between- and within-batch calculations. All analysed PKIs were stable for 6 months in a 1mg/mL dimethyl sulfoxide stock solution. Vatalanib, bosutinib and erlotinib were also stable in human serum in the whole examined concentration range. PMID:22425385

  10. Protein kinase C translocation in human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hoauyan; Friedman, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) activity and translocation in response to the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), serotonin (5-HT) and thrombin was assessed in human platelets. Stimulation with PMA and 5-HT for 10 minutes or thrombin for 1 minute elicited platelet PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. The catecholamines, norepinephrine or epinephrine at 10 {mu}M concentrations did not induce redistribution of platelet PKC. Serotonin and the specific 5-HT{sub 2} receptor agonist, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-amino-propane (DOI) but not the 5-HT{sub 1A} or 5-HT{sub 1B} agonists, ({plus minus}) 8-hydroxy-dipropylamino-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) or 5-methoxy-3-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridin) 1H-indole succinate (RU 24969) induced dose-dependent PKC translocations. Serotonin-evoked PKC translocation was blocked by selective 5-HT{sub 2} receptor antagonists, ketanserin and spiroperidol. These results suggest that, in human platelets, PMA, thrombin and 5-HT can elicit PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. Serotonin-induced PKC translocation in platelets is mediated via 5-HT{sub 2} receptors.

  11. ARHGEF17 is an essential spindle assembly checkpoint factor that targets Mps1 to kinetochores

    PubMed Central

    Isokane, Mayumi; Walter, Thomas; Mahen, Robert; Nijmeijer, Bianca; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Miura, Kota; Maffini, Stefano; Ivanov, Miroslav Penchev; Kitajima, Tomoya S.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-01-01

    To prevent genome instability, mitotic exit is delayed until all chromosomes are properly attached to the mitotic spindle by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). In this study, we characterized the function of ARHGEF17, identified in a genome-wide RNA interference screen for human mitosis genes. Through a series of quantitative imaging, biochemical, and biophysical experiments, we showed that ARHGEF17 is essential for SAC activity, because it is the major targeting factor that controls localization of the checkpoint kinase Mps1 to the kinetochore. This mitotic function is mediated by direct interaction of the central domain of ARHGEF17 with Mps1, which is autoregulated by the activity of Mps1 kinase, for which ARHGEF17 is a substrate. This mitosis-specific role is independent of ARHGEF17’s RhoGEF activity in interphase. Our study thus assigns a new mitotic function to ARHGEF17 and reveals the molecular mechanism for a key step in SAC establishment. PMID:26953350

  12. Checkpoint inhibition in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wenya Linda; Wu, Winona W; Santagata, Sandro; Reardon, David A; Dunn, Ian F

    2016-06-01

    Meningiomas are increasingly appreciated to share similar features with other intra-axial central nervous system neoplasms as well as systemic cancers. Immune checkpoint inhibition has emerged as a promising therapy in a number of cancers, with durable responses of years in a subset of patients. Several lines of evidence support a role for immune-based therapeutic strategies in the management of meningiomas, especially high-grade subtypes. Meningiomas frequently originate juxtaposed to venous sinuses, where an anatomic conduit for lymphatic drainage resides. Multiple populations of immune cells have been observed in meningiomas. PD-1/PD-L1 mediated immunosuppression has been implicated in high-grade meningiomas, with association between PD-L1 expression with negative prognostic outcome. These data point to the promise of future combinatorial therapeutic strategies in meningioma. PMID:27197540

  13. Requirements for Linux Checkpoint/Restart

    SciTech Connect

    Duell, Jason; Hargrove, Paul H.; Roman, Eric S.

    2002-02-26

    This document has 4 main objectives: (1) Describe data to be saved and restored during checkpoint/restart; (2) Describe how checkpoint/restart is used within the context of the Scalable Systems environment, and MPI applications; (3) Identify issues for a checkpoint/restart implementation; and (4) Sketch the architecture of a checkpoint/restart implementation.

  14. A novel human STE20-related protein kinase, HGK, that specifically activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Z; Zhou, G; Wang, X S; Brown, A; Diener, K; Gan, H; Tan, T H

    1999-01-22

    The yeast serine/threonine kinase STE20 activates a signaling cascade that includes STE11 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase), STE7 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase), and FUS3/KSS1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in response to signals from both Cdc42 and the heterotrimeric G proteins associated with transmembrane pheromone receptors. Using degenerate polymerase chain reaction, we have isolated a human cDNA encoding a protein kinase homologous to STE20. This protein kinase, designated HPK/GCK-like kinase (HGK), has nucleotide sequences that encode an open reading frame of 1165 amino acids with 11 kinase subdomains. HGK was a serine/threonine protein kinase that specifically activated the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway when transfected into 293T cells, but it did not stimulate either the extracellular signal-regulated kinase or p38 kinase pathway. HGK also increased AP-1-mediated transcriptional activity in vivo. HGK-induced JNK activation was inhibited by the dominant-negative MKK4 and MKK7 mutants. The dominant-negative mutant of TAK1, but not MEKK1 or MAPK upstream kinase (MUK), strongly inhibited HGK-induced JNK activation. TNF-alpha activated HGK in 293T cells, as well as the dominant-negative HGK mutants, inhibited TNF-alpha-induced JNK activation. These results indicate that HGK, a novel activator of the JNK pathway, may function through TAK1, and that the HGK --> TAK1 --> MKK4, MKK7 --> JNK kinase cascade may mediate the TNF-alpha signaling pathway. PMID:9890973

  15. Checkpointing in speculative versioning caches

    DOEpatents

    Eichenberger, Alexandre E; Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Ohmacht, Martin

    2013-08-27

    Mechanisms for generating checkpoints in a speculative versioning cache of a data processing system are provided. The mechanisms execute code within the data processing system, wherein the code accesses cache lines in the speculative versioning cache. The mechanisms further determine whether a first condition occurs indicating a need to generate a checkpoint in the speculative versioning cache. The checkpoint is a speculative cache line which is made non-speculative in response to a second condition occurring that requires a roll-back of changes to a cache line corresponding to the speculative cache line. The mechanisms also generate the checkpoint in the speculative versioning cache in response to a determination that the first condition has occurred.

  16. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human Pim-1 kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Kevin C.; Studts, Joey; Wang, Lian; Barringer, Kevin; Kronkaitis, Anthony; Peng, Charline; Baptiste, Alistair; LaFrance, Roger; Mische, Sheenah; Farmer, Bennett

    2005-01-01

    Pim kinases, belong to a distinctive serine/threonine protein-kinase family and are involved in cytokine-induced signal transduction and the development of lymphoid malignancies. Human Pim-1 kinase has been cloned, expressed and crystallized Pim kinases, including Pim-1, Pim-2 and Pim-3, belong to a distinctive serine/threonine protein-kinase family. They are involved in cytokine-induced signal transduction and the development of lymphoid malignancies. Their kinase domains are highly homologous to one another, but share low sequence identity to other kinases. Specifically, there are two proline residues in the conserved hinge-region sequence ERPXPX separated by a residue that is non-conserved among Pim kinases. Full-length human Pim-1 kinase (1–313) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a GST-fusion protein and truncated to Pim-1 (14–313) by thrombin digestion during purification. The Pim-1 (14–313) protein was purified to high homogeneity and monodispersity. This protein preparation yielded small crystals in the initial screening and large crystals after optimization. The large crystals of apo Pim-1 enzyme diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution and belong to space group P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 95.9, c = 80.0 Å, β = 120° and one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the kinase domain of human tousled-like kinase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Garrote, Ana M.; Redondo, Pilar; Montoya, Guillermo; Muñoz, Inés G.

    2014-02-19

    The C-terminal kinase domain of TLK2 (a human tousled-like kinase) has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli followed by purification to homogeneity. Crystallization experiments in the presence of ATP-γ-S yielded crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis belonging to two different space groups: tetragonal I4{sub 1}22 and cubic P2{sub 1}3. Tousled-like kinases (TLKs) are an evolutionarily conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in chromatin dynamics, including DNA replication and repair, transcription and chromosome segregation. The two members of the family reported in humans, namely TLK1 and TLK2, localize to the cell nucleus and are capable of forming homo- or hetero-oligomers by themselves. To characterize the role of TLK2, its C-terminal kinase domain was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli followed by purification to homogeneity. Crystallization experiments in the presence of ATP-γ-S yielded crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis belonging to two different space groups: tetragonal I4{sub 1}22 and cubic P2{sub 1}3. The latter produced the best diffracting crystal (3.4 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation), with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 126.05 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The asymmetric unit contained one protein molecule, with a Matthews coefficient of 4.59 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 73.23%.

  18. Multiparameter Lead Optimization to Give an Oral Checkpoint Kinase 1 (CHK1) Inhibitor Clinical Candidate: (R)-5-((4-((Morpholin-2-ylmethyl)amino)-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-2-yl)amino)pyrazine-2-carbonitrile (CCT245737).

    PubMed

    Osborne, James D; Matthews, Thomas P; McHardy, Tatiana; Proisy, Nicolas; Cheung, Kwai-Ming J; Lainchbury, Michael; Brown, Nathan; Walton, Michael I; Eve, Paul D; Boxall, Katherine J; Hayes, Angela; Henley, Alan T; Valenti, Melanie R; De Haven Brandon, Alexis K; Box, Gary; Jamin, Yann; Robinson, Simon P; Westwood, Isaac M; van Montfort, Rob L M; Leonard, Philip M; Lamers, Marieke B A C; Reader, John C; Aherne, G Wynne; Raynaud, Florence I; Eccles, Suzanne A; Garrett, Michelle D; Collins, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Multiparameter optimization of a series of 5-((4-aminopyridin-2-yl)amino)pyrazine-2-carbonitriles resulted in the identification of a potent and selective oral CHK1 preclinical development candidate with in vivo efficacy as a potentiator of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damaging chemotherapy and as a single agent. Cellular mechanism of action assays were used to give an integrated assessment of compound selectivity during optimization resulting in a highly CHK1 selective adenosine triphosphate (ATP) competitive inhibitor. A single substituent vector directed away from the CHK1 kinase active site was unexpectedly found to drive the selective cellular efficacy of the compounds. Both CHK1 potency and off-target human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) ion channel inhibition were dependent on lipophilicity and basicity in this series. Optimization of CHK1 cellular potency and in vivo pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) properties gave a compound with low predicted doses and exposures in humans which mitigated the residual weak in vitro hERG inhibition. PMID:27167172

  19. Inhibitor-bound structures of human pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Tokmakov, Alexander; Terada, Takaho; Ohbayashi, Naomi; Fujimoto, Takako; Gomi, Sumiko; Shiromizu, Ikuya; Kawamoto, Masaki; Matsusue, Tomokazu; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-09-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. PDC activity is tightly regulated by four members of a family of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoforms (PDK1-4), which phosphorylate and inactivate PDC. Recently, the development of specific inhibitors of PDK4 has become an especially important focus for the pharmaceutical management of diabetes and obesity. In this study, crystal structures of human PDK4 complexed with either AMPPNP, ADP or the inhibitor M77976 were determined. ADP-bound PDK4 has a slightly wider active-site cleft and a more disordered ATP lid compared with AMPPNP-bound PDK4, although both forms of PDK4 assume open conformations with a wider active-site cleft than that in the closed conformation of the previously reported ADP-bound PDK2 structure. M77976 binds to the ATP-binding pocket of PDK4 and causes local conformational changes with complete disordering of the ATP lid. M77976 binding also leads to a large domain rearrangement that further expands the active-site cleft of PDK4 compared with the ADP- and AMPPNP-bound forms. Biochemical analyses revealed that M77976 inhibits PDK4 with increased potency compared with the previously characterized PDK inhibitor radicicol. Thus, the present structures demonstrate for the first time the flexible and dynamic aspects of PDK4 in the open conformation and provide a basis for the development of novel inhibitors targeting the nucleotide-binding pocket of PDK4. PMID:21904029

  20. Construction of protein phosphorylation networks by data mining, text mining and ontology integration: analysis of the spindle checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Karen E.; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Ren, Jia; Huang, Hongzhan; Wu, Cathy H.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge representation of the role of phosphorylation is essential for the meaningful understanding of many biological processes. However, such a representation is challenging because proteins can exist in numerous phosphorylated forms with each one having its own characteristic protein–protein interactions (PPIs), functions and subcellular localization. In this article, we evaluate the current state of phosphorylation event curation and then present a bioinformatics framework for the annotation and representation of phosphorylated proteins and construction of phosphorylation networks that addresses some of the gaps in current curation efforts. The integrated approach involves (i) text mining guided by RLIMS-P, a tool that identifies phosphorylation-related information in scientific literature; (ii) data mining from curated PPI databases; (iii) protein form and complex representation using the Protein Ontology (PRO); (iv) functional annotation using the Gene Ontology (GO); and (v) network visualization and analysis with Cytoscape. We use this framework to study the spindle checkpoint, the process that monitors the assembly of the mitotic spindle and blocks cell cycle progression at metaphase until all chromosomes have made bipolar spindle attachments. The phosphorylation networks we construct, centered on the human checkpoint kinase BUB1B (BubR1) and its yeast counterpart MAD3, offer a unique view of the spindle checkpoint that emphasizes biologically relevant phosphorylated forms, phosphorylation-state–specific PPIs and kinase–substrate relationships. Our approach for constructing protein phosphorylation networks can be applied to any biological process that is affected by phosphorylation. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/ PMID:23749465

  1. Targeting of Carbon Ion-Induced G2 Checkpoint Activation in Lung Cancer Cells Using Wee-1 Inhibitor MK-1775.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongyu; Takahashi, Akihisa; Sejimo, Yukihiko; Adachi, Akiko; Kubo, Nobuteru; Isono, Mayu; Yoshida, Yukari; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    The potent inhibitor of the cell cycle checkpoint regulatory factor Wee-1, MK-1775, has been reported to enhance non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell sensitivity to photon radiation by abrogating radiation-induced G2 arrest. However, little is known about the effects of this sensitizer after exposure to carbon (C)-ion radiation. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the effects of C ions in combination with MK-1775 on the killing of NSCLC cells. Human NSCLC H1299 cells were exposed to X rays or C ions (290 MeV/n, 50 keV/μm at the center of a 6 cm spread-out Bragg peak) in the presence of MK-1775. The cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometry and Western blotting. Radiosensitivity was determined using clonogenic survival assays. The mechanisms underlying MK-1775 radiosensitization were studied by observing H2AX phosphorylation and mitotic catastrophe. G2 checkpoint arrest was enhanced 2.3-fold by C-ion exposure compared with X-ray exposure. Radiation-induced G2 checkpoint arrest was abrogated by MK-1775. Exposure to radiation resulted in a significant reduction in the mitotic ratio and increased phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), the primary downstream mediator of Wee-1-induced G2 arrest. The Wee-1 inhibitor, MK-1775 restored the mitotic ratio and suppressed Cdk1 phosphorylation. In addition, MK-1775 increased H1299 cell sensitivity to C ions and X rays independent of TP53 status. MK-1775 also significantly increased H2AX phosphorylation and mitotic catastrophe in irradiated cells. These results suggest that the G2 checkpoint inhibitor MK-1775 can enhance the sensitivity of human NSCLC cells to C ions as well as X rays. PMID:26645158

  2. Analysis of Substrates of Protein Kinase C Isoforms in Human Breast Cells By The Traceable Kinase Method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangyu; Zhao, Xin; Abeyweera, Thushara P.; Rotenberg, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    A previous report (Biochemistry 46: 2364–2370, 2007) described the application of The Traceable Kinase Method to identify substrates of PKCα in non-transformed human breast MCF-10A cells. Here, a non-radioactive variation of this method compared the phospho-protein profiles of three traceable PKC isoforms (α, δ and ζ) for the purpose of identifying novel, isoform-selective substrates. Each FLAG-tagged traceable kinase was expressed and co-immunoprecipitated along with high affinity substrates. The isolated kinase and its associated substrates were subjected to an in vitro phosphorylation reaction with traceable kinase-specific N6-phenyl-ATP, and the resulting phospho-proteins were analyzed by Western blot with an antibody that recognizes the phosphorylated PKC consensus site. Phospho-protein profiles generated by PKC-α and -δ were similar and differed markedly from that of PKC-ζ. Mass spectrometry of selected bands revealed known PKC substrates and several potential substrates that included the small GTPase-associated effector protein Cdc42 effector protein-4 (CEP4). Of those potential substrates tested, only CEP4 was phosphorylated by pure PKC-α, –δ, and −ζ isoforms in vitro, and by endogenous PKC isoforms in MCF-10A cells treated with DAG-lactone, a membrane permeable PKC activator. Under these conditions, the stoichiometry of CEP4 phosphorylation was 3.2 ± 0.5 (mol phospho-CEP4/mol CEP4). Following knock-down with isoform-specific shRNA-encoding plasmids, phosphorylation of CEP4 was substantially decreased in response to silencing of each of the three isoforms (PKC–α, –δ, or –ζ), whereas testing of kinase-dead mutants supported a role for only PKC-α and –δ in CEP4 phosphorylation. These findings identify CEP4 as a novel intracellular PKC substrate that is phosphorylated by multiple PKC isoforms. PMID:22897107

  3. Universal quantitative kinase assay based on diagonal SCX chromatography and stable isotope dimethyl labeling provides high-definition kinase consensus motifs for PKA and human Mps1.

    PubMed

    Hennrich, Marco L; Marino, Fabio; Groenewold, Vincent; Kops, Geert J P L; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R

    2013-05-01

    In order to understand cellular signaling, a clear understanding of kinase-substrate relationships is essential. Some of these relationships are defined by consensus recognition motifs present in substrates making them amendable for phosphorylation by designated kinases. Here, we explore a method that is based on two sequential steps of strong cation exchange chromatography combined with differential stable isotope labeling, to define kinase consensus motifs with high accuracy. We demonstrate the value of our method by evaluating the motifs of two very distinct kinases: cAMP regulated protein kinase A (PKA) and human monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) kinase, also known as TTK. PKA is a well-studied basophilic kinase with a relatively well-defined motif and numerous known substrates in vitro and in vivo. Mps1, a kinase involved in chromosome segregation, has been less well characterized. Its substrate specificity is unclear and here we show that Mps1 is an acidophilic kinase with a striking tendency for phosphorylation of threonines. The final outcomes of our work are high-definition kinase consensus motifs for PKA and Mps1. Our generic method, which makes use of proteolytic cell lysates as a source for peptide-substrate libraries, can be implemented for any kinase present in the kinome.

  4. Compiler-assisted static checkpoint insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Junsheng; Fuchs, W. K.; Abraham, Jacob A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a compiler-assisted approach for static checkpoint insertion. Instead of fixing the checkpoint location before program execution, a compiler enhanced polling mechanism is utilized to maintain both the desired checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint 1ocations. The technique has been implemented in a GNU CC compiler for Sun 3 and Sun 4 (Sparc) processors. Experiments demonstrate that the approach provides for stable checkpoint intervals and reproducible checkpoint placements with performance overhead comparable to a previously presented compiler assisted dynamic scheme (CATCH) utilizing the system clock.

  5. Characterization and chromosomal localization of the gene for human rhodopsin kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Khani, S.C.; Yamamoto, S.; Dryja, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    G-protein-dependent receptor kinases (GRKs) play a key role in the adapatation of receptors to persistent stimuli. In rod photoreceptors rhodopsin kinase (RK) mediates rapid densensitization of rod photoreceptors to light by catalyzing phosphorylation of the visual pigment rhodopsin. To study the structure and mechanism of FRKs in human photoreceptors, we have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones derived from the human RK locus using a bovine rhodopsin kinase cDNA fragment as a probe. The RK locus, assigned to chromosome 13 band q34, is composed of seven exons that encode a protein 92% identical in amino acid sequence to bovine rhodopsin kinase. The marked difference between the structure of this gene and that of another recently clone human GRK gene suggests the existence of a wide evolutionary gap between members of the GRK gene family. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Expression, purification and crystallization of a human tau-tubulin kinase 2 that phosphorylates tau protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano-Takahashi, Michiko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Shin; Tomizawa, Kayoko; Kato, Ryohei; Tanio, Michikazu; Shirota, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2007-07-01

    The kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human tau-tubulin kinase 2 was expressed in insect cells, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Tau-tubulin kinase 2 (TTBK2) is a Ser/Thr kinase that putatively phosphorylates residues Ser208 and Ser210 (numbered according to a 441-residue human tau isoform) in tau protein. Functional analyses revealed that a recombinant kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human TTBK2 expressed in insect cells with a baculovirus overexpression system retains kinase activity for tau protein. The kinase domain of TTBK2 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.6, b = 113.7, c = 117.3 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8.

  7. Constitutive Mad1 targeting to kinetochores uncouples checkpoint signalling from chromosome biorientation.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Maria; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2011-04-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation depends on biorientation, whereby sister chromatids attach to microtubules from opposite spindle poles. The spindle-assembly checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that inhibits anaphase until all chromosomes have bioriented. In present models, the recruitment of the spindle-assembly checkpoint protein Mad2, through Mad1, to non-bioriented kinetochores is needed to stop cell-cycle progression. However, it is unknown whether Mad1-Mad2 targeting to kinetochores is sufficient to block anaphase. Furthermore, it is unclear whether regulators of biorientation (for example, Aurora kinases) have checkpoint functions downstream of Mad1-Mad2 recruitment or whether they act upstream to quench the primary error signal. Here, we engineered a Mad1 construct that localizes to bioriented kinetochores. We show that the kinetochore localization of Mad1 is sufficient for a metaphase arrest that depends on Mad1-Mad2 binding. By uncoupling the checkpoint from its primary error signal, we show that Aurora, Mps1 and BubR1 kinases, but not Polo-like kinase, are needed to maintain checkpoint arrest when Mad1 is present on kinetochores. Together, our data suggest a model in which the biorientation errors, which recruit Mad1-Mad2 to kinetochores, may be signalled not only through Mad2 template dynamics, but also through the activity of widely conserved kinases, to ensure the fidelity of cell division.

  8. Identification of a novel EGF-sensitive cell cycle checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Francesca . E-mail: francesca.walker@ludwig.edu.au; Zhang Huihua; Burgess, Antony W.

    2007-02-01

    The site of action of growth factors on mammalian cell cycle has been assigned to the boundary between the G1 and S phases. We show here that Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) is also required for mitosis. BaF/3 cells expressing the EGFR (BaF/wtEGFR) synthesize DNA in response to EGF, but arrest in S-phase. We have generated a cell line (BaF/ERX) with defective downregulation of the EGFR and sustained activation of EGFR signalling pathways: these cells undergo mitosis in an EGF-dependent manner. The transit of BaF/ERX cells through G2/M strictly requires activation of EGFR and is abolished by AG1478. This phenotype is mimicked by co-expression of ErbB2 in BaF/wtEGFR cells, and abolished by inhibition of the EGFR kinase, suggesting that sustained signalling of the EGFR, through impaired downregulation of the EGFR or heterodimerization, is required for completion of the cycle. We have confirmed the role of EGFR signalling in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle using a human tumor cell line which overexpresses the EGFR and is dependent on EGFR signalling for growth. These findings unmask an EGF-sensitive checkpoint, helping to understand the link between sustained EGFR signalling, proliferation and the acquisition of a radioresistant phenotype in cancer cells.

  9. Function of human cytomegalovirus UL97 kinase in viral infection and its inhibition by maribavir

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Mark N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The serine/threonine kinase expressed by human cytomegalovirus from gene UL97 phosphorylates the antiviral drug ganciclovir, but its biological function is the phosphorylation of its natural viral and cellular protein substrates which affect viral replication at many levels. The UL97 kinase null phenotype is therefore complex, as is the mechanism of action of maribavir, a highly specific inhibitor of its enzymatic activity. Studies that utilise the drug corroborate results from genetic approaches and together have elucidated many functions of the UL97 kinase that are critical for viral replication. The kinase phosphorylates eukaryotic elongation factor 1delta, the carboxyl terminal domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II, the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor and lamins A and C. Each of these is also phosphorylated and regulated by cdc2/cyclin-dependent kinase 1, suggesting that the viral kinase may perform a similar function. These and other activities of the UL97 kinase appear to stimulate the cell cycle to support viral DNA synthesis, enhance the expression of viral genes, promote virion morphogenesis and facilitate the egress of mature capsids from the nucleus. In the absence of UL97 kinase activity, viral DNA synthesis is inefficient and structural proteins are sequestered in nuclear aggresomes, reducing the efficiency of virion morphogenesis. Mature capsids that do form fail to egress the nucleus as the nuclear lamina are not dispersed by the kinase. The critical functions performed by the UL97 kinase illustrate its importance in viral replication and confirm that the kinase is a target for the development of antiviral therapies. PMID:19434630

  10. Activation of protein kinase C in permeabilized human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Larsson, C; Saermark, T; Mau, S; Simonsson, P

    1992-08-01

    The activation of protein kinase C was investigated in digitonin-permeabilized human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells by measuring the phosphorylation of the specific protein kinase C substrate myelin basic protein4-14. The phosphorylation was inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitory peptide PKC19-36 and was associated to a translocation of the enzyme to the membrane fractions of the SH-SY5Y cells. 1,2-Dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol had no effect on protein kinase C activity unless the calcium concentration was raised to concentrations found in stimulated cells (above 100 nM). Calcium in the absence of other activators did not stimulate protein kinase C. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was not dependent on calcium for the activation or the translocation of protein kinase C. The induced activation was sustained for 10 min, and thereafter only a small net phosphorylation of the substrate could be detected. Calcium or dioctanoylglycerol, when applied alone, only caused a minor translocation, whereas in combination a marked translocation was observed. Arachidonic acid (10 microM) enhanced protein kinase C activity in the presence of submaximal concentrations of calcium and dioctanoylglycerol. Quinacrine and p-bromophenacyl bromide did not inhibit calcium- and dioctanoylglycerol-induced protein kinase C activity at concentrations which are considered to be sufficient for phospholipase A2 inhibition.

  11. Disease severity in a mouse model of ataxia telangiectasia is modulated by the DNA damage checkpoint gene Hus1

    PubMed Central

    Balmus, Gabriel; Zhu, Min; Mukherjee, Sucheta; Lyndaker, Amy M.; Hume, Kelly R.; Lee, Jaesung; Riccio, Mark L.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Sutter, Nathan B.; Noden, Drew M.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    The human genomic instability syndrome ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), caused by mutations in the gene encoding the DNA damage checkpoint kinase ATM, is characterized by multisystem defects including neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency and increased cancer predisposition. ATM is central to a pathway that responds to double-strand DNA breaks, whereas the related kinase ATR leads a parallel signaling cascade that is activated by replication stress. To dissect the physiological relationship between the ATM and ATR pathways, we generated mice defective for both. Because complete ATR pathway inactivation causes embryonic lethality, we weakened the ATR mechanism to different degrees by impairing HUS1, a member of the 911 complex that is required for efficient ATR signaling. Notably, simultaneous ATM and HUS1 defects caused synthetic lethality. Atm/Hus1 double-mutant embryos showed widespread apoptosis and died mid-gestationally. Despite the underlying DNA damage checkpoint defects, increased DNA damage signaling was observed, as evidenced by H2AX phosphorylation and p53 accumulation. A less severe Hus1 defect together with Atm loss resulted in partial embryonic lethality, with the surviving double-mutant mice showing synergistic increases in genomic instability and specific developmental defects, including dwarfism, craniofacial abnormalities and brachymesophalangy, phenotypes that are observed in several human genomic instability disorders. In addition to identifying tissue-specific consequences of checkpoint dysfunction, these data highlight a robust, cooperative configuration for the mammalian DNA damage response network and further suggest HUS1 and related genes in the ATR pathway as candidate modifiers of disease severity in A-T patients. PMID:22575700

  12. Structural and functional insights into the role of the N-terminal Mps1 TPR domain in the SAC (spindle assembly checkpoint).

    PubMed

    Thebault, Philippe; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Dou, Zhen; Blundell, Tom L; Elowe, Sabine; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M

    2012-12-15

    The SAC (spindle assembly checkpoint) is a surveillance system that ensures the timely and accurate transmission of the genetic material to offspring. The process implies kinetochore targeting of the mitotic kinases Bub1 (budding uninhibited by benzamidine 1), BubR1 (Bub1 related) and Mps1 (monopolar spindle 1), which is mediated by the N-terminus of each kinase. In the present study we report the 1.8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) crystal structure of the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain in the N-terminal region of human Mps1. The structure reveals an overall high similarity to the TPR motif of the mitotic checkpoint kinases Bub1 and BubR1, and a number of unique features that include the absence of the binding site for the kinetochore structural component KNL1 (kinetochore-null 1; blinkin), and determinants of dimerization. Moreover, we show that a stretch of amino acids at the very N-terminus of Mps1 is required for dimer formation, and that interfering with dimerization results in mislocalization and misregulation of kinase activity. The results of the present study provide an important insight into the molecular details of the mitotic functions of Mps1 including features that dictate substrate selectivity and kinetochore docking.

  13. Inhibition of Chk1 by the G[subscript 2] DNA damage checkpoint inhibitor isogranulatimide

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiuxian; Zhao, Baoguang; Britton, Robert; Lim, Lynette Y.; Leong, Dan; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Zhou, Bin-Bing S.; Piers, Edward; Andersen, Raymond J.; Roberge, Michel

    2008-07-01

    Inhibitors of the G{sub 2} DNA damage checkpoint can selectively sensitize cancer cells with mutated p53 to killing by DNA-damaging agents. Isogranulatimide is a G{sub 2} checkpoint inhibitor containing a unique indole/maleimide/imidazole skeleton identified in a phenotypic cell-based screen; however, the mechanism of action of isogranulatimide is unknown. Using natural and synthetic isogranulatimide analogues, we show that the imide nitrogen and a basic nitrogen at position 14 or 15 in the imidazole ring are important for checkpoint inhibition. Isogranulatimide shows structural resemblance to the aglycon of UCN-01, a potent bisindolemaleimide inhibitor of protein kinase C{beta} (IC{sub 50}, 0.001 micromol/L) and of the checkpoint kinase Chk1 (IC{sub 50}, 0.007 micromol/L). In vitro kinase assays show that isogranulatimide inhibits Chk1 (IC{sub 50}, 0.1 {micro}mol/L) but not protein kinase C{beta}. Of 13 additional protein kinases tested, isogranulatimide significantly inhibits only glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (IC{sub 50}, 0.5 {micro}mol/L). We determined the crystal structure of the Chk1 catalytic domain complexed with isogranulatimide. Like UCN-01, isogranulatimide binds in the ATP-binding pocket of Chk1 and hydrogen bonds with the backbone carbonyl oxygen of Glu{sup 85} and the amide nitrogen of Cys{sup 87}. Unlike UCN-01, the basic N15 of isogranulatimide interacts with Glu{sub 17}, causing a conformation change in the kinase glycine-rich loop that may contribute importantly to inhibition. The mechanism by which isogranulatimide inhibits Chk1 and its favorable kinase selectivity profile make it a promising candidate for modulating checkpoint responses in tumors for therapeutic benefit.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef binds directly to Lck and mitogen-activated protein kinase, inhibiting kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, A; Azad, A; Mills, J; McPhee, D

    1996-01-01

    It is now well established that human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) Nef contributes substantially to disease pathogenesis by augmenting virus replication and markedly perturbing T-cell function. The effect of Nef on host cell activation could be explained in part by its interaction with specific cellular proteins involved in signal transduction, including at least a member of the src family kinase, Lck, and the serine/threonine kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Recombinant Nef directly interacted with purified Lck and MAPK in coprecipitation experiments and binding assays. A proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] in Nef occurring between amino acid residues 69 to 78 is highly conserved and bears strong resemblance to a defined consensus sequence identified as an SH3 binding domain present in several proteins which can interact with the SH3 domain of various signalling and cytoskeletal proteins. Binding and coprecipitation assays with short synthetic peptides corresponding to the proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] of Nef and the SH2, SH3, or SH2 and SH3 domains of Lck revealed that the interaction between these two proteins is at least in part mediated by the proline repeat sequence of Nef and the SH3 domain of Lck. In addition to direct binding to full-length Nef, MAPK was also shown to bind the same proline repeat motif. Nef protein significantly decreased the in vitro kinase activity of Lck and MAPK. Inhibition of key members of signalling cascades, including those emanating from the T-cell receptor, by the HIV-1 Nef protein undoubtedly alters the ability of the infected T cell to respond to antigens or cytokines, facilitating HIV-1 replication and contributing to HIV-1-induced disease pathogenesis. PMID:8794306

  15. Network support for system initiated checkpoints

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip

    2013-01-29

    A system, method and computer program product for supporting system initiated checkpoints in parallel computing systems. The system and method generates selective control signals to perform checkpointing of system related data in presence of messaging activity associated with a user application running at the node. The checkpointing is initiated by the system such that checkpoint data of a plurality of network nodes may be obtained even in the presence of user applications running on highly parallel computers that include ongoing user messaging activity.

  16. Recovery from DNA damage checkpoint arrest by PP1-mediated inhibition of Chk1

    PubMed Central

    den Elzen, Nicole R; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2004-01-01

    The G2 DNA damage checkpoint delays mitotic entry via the upregulation of Wee1 kinase and the downregulation of Cdc25 phosphatase by Chk1 kinase, and resultant inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2. While checkpoint activation is well understood, little is known about how the checkpoint is switched off to allow cell cycle re-entry. To identify proteins required for checkpoint release, we screened for genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that, when overexpressed, result in precocious mitotic entry in the presence of DNA damage. We show that overexpression of the type I protein phosphatase Dis2 sensitises S. pombe cells to DNA damage, causing aberrant mitoses. Dis2 abrogates Chk1 phosphorylation and activation in vivo, and dephosphorylates Chk1 and a phospho-S345 Chk1 peptide in vitro. dis2Δ cells have a prolonged chk1-dependent arrest and a compromised ability to downregulate Chk1 activity for checkpoint release. These effects are specific for the DNA damage checkpoint, because Dis2 has no effect on the chk1-independent response to stalled replication forks. We propose that inactivation of Chk1 by Dis2 allows mitotic entry following repair of DNA damage in the G2-phase. PMID:14765108

  17. DNA replication and damage checkpoints and meiotic cell cycle controls in the fission and budding yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, H; Nurse, P

    2000-01-01

    The cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms ensure the order of cell cycle events to preserve genomic integrity. Among these, the DNA-replication and DNA-damage checkpoints prevent chromosome segregation when DNA replication is inhibited or DNA is damaged. Recent studies have identified an outline of the regulatory networks for both of these controls, which apparently operate in all eukaryotes. In addition, it appears that these checkpoints have two arrest points, one is just before entry into mitosis and the other is prior to chromosome separation. The former point requires the central cell-cycle regulator Cdc2 kinase, whereas the latter involves several key regulators and substrates of the ubiquitin ligase called the anaphase promoting complex. Linkages between these cell-cycle regulators and several key checkpoint proteins are beginning to emerge. Recent findings on post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions of the checkpoint proteins provide new insights into the checkpoint responses, although the functional significance of these biochemical properties often remains unclear. We have reviewed the molecular mechanisms acting at the DNA-replication and DNA-damage checkpoints in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the modifications of these controls during the meiotic cell cycle. We have made comparisons with the controls in fission yeast and other organisms, mainly the distantly related budding yeast. PMID:10861204

  18. NcoI and TaqI RFLPs for human M creatine kinase (CKM)

    SciTech Connect

    Perryman, M.B.; Hejtmancik, J.F.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Armstrong, R.; Lin, Sunchiang; Roberts, R.; Epstein, H.F. )

    1988-09-12

    Probe pHMCKUT contains a 135 bp cDNA fragment inserted into pGEM 3. The probe corresponds to nucleotides 1,201 to 1,336 located in the 3{prime} untranslated region of human M creatine kinase. The probe is specific for human M creatine kinase and does not hybridize to human B cretine kinase sequences. NcoI identifies a two allele polymorphism of a band at either 2.5 kb or 3.6 kb. TaqI identifies a two allele polymorphism at either 3.8 kb or 4.5 kb. Human M creatine has been localized to chromosome 19q. Autosomal co-dominant inheritance was shown in six informative Caucasian families.

  19. HIV-1 incorporates and proteolytically processes human NDR1 and NDR2 serine-threonine kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Devroe, Eric; Silver, Pamela A.; Engelman, Alan . E-mail: alan_engelman@dfci.harvard.edu

    2005-01-05

    Mammalian genomes encode two related serine-threonine kinases, nuclear Dbf2 related (NDR)1 and NDR2, which are homologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dbf2 kinase. Recently, a yeast genetic screen implicated the Dbf2 kinase in Ty1 retrotransposition. Since several virion-incorporated kinases regulate the infectivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), we speculated that the human NDR1 and NDR2 kinases might play a role in the HIV-1 life cycle. Here we show that the NDR1 and NDR2 kinases were incorporated into HIV-1 particles. Furthermore, NDR1 and NDR2 were cleaved by the HIV-1 protease (PR), both within virions and within producer cells. Truncation at the PR cleavage site altered NDR2 subcellular localization and inhibited NDR1 and NDR2 enzymatic activity. These studies identify two new virion-associated host cell enzymes and suggest a novel mechanism by which HIV-1 alters the intracellular environment of human cells.

  20. FMLP activates Ras and Raf in human neutrophils. Potential role in activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Buhl, A M; Suzuki, N; Johnson, G L

    1994-01-01

    Chemoattractants bind to seven transmembrane-spanning, G-protein-linked receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and induce a variety of functional responses, including activation of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase. Although the pathways by which MAP kinases are activated in neutrophils are unknown, we hypothesized that activation of the Ras/Raf pathway leading to activation of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) would be induced by the chemoattractant f-met-leu-phe. Human neutrophils exposed to 10 nM FMLP for 30 s exhibited an MAP kinase kinase activity coeluting with MEK-1. Immunoprecipitation of Raf-1 kinase after stimulation with FMLP revealed an activity that phosphorylated MEK, was detectable at 30 s, and peaked at 2-3 min. Immunoprecipitation of Ras from both intact neutrophils labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and electropermeabilized neutrophils incubated with [32P]GTP was used to determine that FMLP treatment was associated with activation of Ras. Activation of both Ras and Raf was inhibited by treatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin, indicating predominant linkage to the Gi2 protein. Although phorbol esters activated Raf, activation induced by FMLP appeared independent of protein kinase C, further suggesting that Gi2 was linked to Ras and Raf independent of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Dibutyryl cAMP, which inhibits many neutrophil functional responses, blocked the activation of Raf by FMLP, suggesting that interruption of the Raf/MAP kinase pathway influences neutrophil responses to chemoattractants. These data suggest that Gi2-mediated receptor regulation of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway is a primary response to chemoattractants. Images PMID:8040337

  1. Association of protein kinase FA/GSK-3alpha (a proline-directed kinase and a regulator of protooncogenes) with human cervical carcinoma dedifferentiation/progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, S D; Yu, J S; Lee, T T; Ni, M H; Yang, C C; Ho, Y S; Tsen, T Z

    1995-10-01

    Computer analysis of protein phosphorylation-sites sequence revealed that most transcriptional factors and viral oncoproteins are prime targets for regulation of proline-directed protein phosphorylation, suggesting an association of proline-directed protein kinase (PDPK) family with neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis. In this report, an immunoprecipitate activity assay of protein kinase FA/glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha (kinase FA/GSK-3alpha) (a particular member of PDPK family) has been optimized for human cervical tissue and used to demonstrate for the first time significantly increased (P < 0.001) activity in poorly differentiated cervical carcinoma (82.8 +/- 6.6 U/mg of protein), moderately differentiated carcinoma (36.2 +/- 3.4 U/mg of protein), and well-differentiated carcinoma (18.3 +/- 2.4 U/mg of protein) from 36 human cervical carcinoma samples when compared to 12 normal controls (4.9 +/- 0.6 U/mg of protein). Immunoblotting analysis further revealed that increased activity of kinase FA/GSK-3alpha in cervical carcinoma is due to overexpression of protein synthesis of the kinase. Taken together, the results provide initial evidence that overexpression of protein synthesis and cellular activity of kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may be involved in human cervical carcinoma dedifferentiation/progression, supporting an association of proline-directed protein kinase with neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis. Since protein kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may function as a possible regulator of transcription factors/proto-oncogenes, the results further suggest that kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may play a potential role in human cervical carcinogenesis, especially in its dedifferentiation and progression.

  2. An ATM-independent S-phase checkpoint response involves CHK1 pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiang; Hu, Baocheng; Guan, Jun; Iliakis, George; Wang, Ya

    2002-01-01

    After exposure to genotoxic stress, proliferating cells actively slow down the DNA replication through a S-phase checkpoint to provide time for repair. We report that in addition to the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent pathway that controls the fast response, there is an ATM-independent pathway that controls the slow response to regulate the S-phase checkpoint after ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. The slow response of S-phase checkpoint, which is resistant to wortmannin, sensitive to caffeine and UCN-01, and related to cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation, is much stronger in CHK1 overexpressed cells, and it could be abolished by Chk1 antisense oligonucleotides. These results provide evidence that the ATM-independent slow response of S-phase checkpoint involves CHK1 pathway.

  3. Identification of “Preferred” Human Kinase Inhibitors for Sleeping Sickness Lead Discovery. Are Some Kinases Better than Others for Inhibitor Repurposing?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A kinase-targeting cell-based high-throughput screen (HTS) against Trypanosoma brucei was recently reported, and this screening set included the Published Kinase Inhibitor Set (PKIS). From the PKIS was identified 53 compounds with pEC50 ≥ 6. Utilizing the published data available for the PKIS, a statistical analysis of these active antiparasitic compounds was performed, allowing identification of a set of human kinases having inhibitors that show a high likelihood for blocking T. brucei cellular proliferation in vitro. This observation was confirmed by testing other established inhibitors of these human kinases and by mining past screening campaigns at GlaxoSmithKline. Overall, although the parasite targets of action are not known, inhibitors of this set of human kinases displayed an enhanced hit rate relative to a random kinase-targeting HTS campaign, suggesting that repurposing efforts should focus primarily on inhibitors of these specific human kinases. We therefore term this statistical analysis-driven approach “preferred lead repurposing”. PMID:26998514

  4. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peyressatre, Marion; Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins) form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported. PMID:25625291

  5. Synthetic Physical Interactions Map Kinetochore-Checkpoint Activation Regions

    PubMed Central

    Ólafsson, Guðjón; Thorpe, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a key mechanism to regulate the timing of mitosis and ensure that chromosomes are correctly segregated to daughter cells. The recruitment of the Mad1 and Mad2 proteins to the kinetochore is normally necessary for SAC activation. This recruitment is coordinated by the SAC kinase Mps1, which phosphorylates residues at the kinetochore to facilitate binding of Bub1, Bub3, Mad1, and Mad2. There is evidence that the essential function of Mps1 is to direct recruitment of Mad1/2. To test this model, we have systematically recruited Mad1, Mad2, and Mps1 to most proteins in the yeast kinetochore, and find that, while Mps1 is sufficient for checkpoint activation, recruitment of either Mad1 or Mad2 is not. These data indicate an important role for Mps1 phosphorylation in SAC activation, beyond the direct recruitment of Mad1 and Mad2. PMID:27280788

  6. Non-volatile memory for checkpoint storage

    SciTech Connect

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Cipolla, Thomas M.; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Ohmacht, Martin; Takken, Todd E.

    2014-07-22

    A system, method and computer program product for supporting system initiated checkpoints in high performance parallel computing systems and storing of checkpoint data to a non-volatile memory storage device. The system and method generates selective control signals to perform checkpointing of system related data in presence of messaging activity associated with a user application running at the node. The checkpointing is initiated by the system such that checkpoint data of a plurality of network nodes may be obtained even in the presence of user applications running on highly parallel computers that include ongoing user messaging activity. In one embodiment, the non-volatile memory is a pluggable flash memory card.

  7. Checkpointing for a hybrid computing node

    DOEpatents

    Cher, Chen-Yong

    2016-03-08

    According to an aspect, a method for checkpointing in a hybrid computing node includes executing a task in a processing accelerator of the hybrid computing node. A checkpoint is created in a local memory of the processing accelerator. The checkpoint includes state data to restart execution of the task in the processing accelerator upon a restart operation. Execution of the task is resumed in the processing accelerator after creating the checkpoint. The state data of the checkpoint are transferred from the processing accelerator to a main processor of the hybrid computing node while the processing accelerator is executing the task.

  8. Inhibition of Src family kinases with dasatinib blocks migration and invasion of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Ralf; Mesa, Tania; Vultur, Adina; Lee, Frank; Jove, Richard

    2008-11-01

    Src family kinases (SFK) are involved in regulating a multitude of biological processes, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and survival, depending on the cellular context. Therefore, although SFKs are currently being investigated as potential targets for treatment strategies in various cancers, the biological responses to inhibition of SFK signaling in any given tumor type are not predictable. Dasatinib (BMS-354825) is a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor with potent antiproliferative activity against hematologic malignancies harboring activated BCR-ABL. In this study, we show that dasatinib blocks migration and invasion of human melanoma cells without affecting proliferation and survival. Moreover, dasatinib completely inhibits SFK kinase activity at low nanomolar concentrations in all eight human melanoma cell lines investigated. In addition, two known downstream targets of SFKs, focal adhesion kinase and Crk-associated substrate (p130(CAS)), are inhibited with similar concentrations and kinetics. Consistent with inhibition of these signaling pathways and invasion, dasatinib down-regulates expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9. We also provide evidence that dasatinib directly inhibits kinase activity of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, which is overexpressed and/or overactive in many solid tumors, including melanoma. Thus, SFKs and downstream signaling are implicated as having key roles in migration and invasion of melanoma cells.

  9. Antibody microinjection reveals an essential role for human polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) in the functional maturation of mitotic centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Mammalian polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is structurally related to the polo gene product of Drosophila melanogaster, Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and plo1+ of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a newly emerging family of serine-threonine kinases implicated in cell cycle regulation. Based on data obtained for its putative homologues in invertebrates and yeasts, human Plk1 is suspected to regulate some fundamental aspect(s) of mitosis, but no direct experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis has previously been reported. In this study, we have used a cell duplication, microinjection assay to investigate the in vivo function of Plk1 in both immortalized (HeLa) and nonimmortalized (Hs68) human cells. Injection of anti-Plk1 antibodies (Plk1+) at various stages of the cell cycle had no effect on the kinetics of DNA replication but severely impaired the ability of cells to divide. Analysis of Plk1(+)-injected, mitotically arrested HeLa cells by fluorescence microscopy revealed abnormal distributions of condensed chromatin and monoastral microtubule arrays that were nucleated from duplicated but unseparated centrosomes. Most strikingly, centrosomes in Plk1(+)-injected cells were drastically reduced in size, and the accumulation of both gamma-tubulin and MPM-2 immunoreactivity was impaired. These data indicate that Plk1 activity is necessary for the functional maturation of centrosomes in late G2/early prophase and, consequently, for the establishment of a bipolar spindle. Additional roles for Plk1 at later stages of mitosis are not excluded, although injection of Plk1+ after the completion of spindle formation did not interfere with cytokinesis. Injection of Plk1+ into nonimmortalized Hs68 cells produced qualitatively similar phenotypes, but the vast majority of the injected Hs68 cells arrested as single, mononucleated cells in G2. This latter observation hints at the existence, in nonimmortalized cells, of a centrosome-maturation checkpoint sensitive to the impairment

  10. Spindle assembly checkpoint: the third decade

    PubMed Central

    Musacchio, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint controls cell cycle progression during mitosis, synchronizing it with the attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules. After the discovery of the mitotic arrest deficient (MAD) and budding uninhibited by benzymidazole (BUB) genes as crucial checkpoint components in 1991, the second decade of checkpoint studies (2001–2010) witnessed crucial advances in the elucidation of the mechanism through which the checkpoint effector, the mitotic checkpoint complex, targets the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) to prevent progression into anaphase. Concomitantly, the discovery that the Ndc80 complex and other components of the microtubule-binding interface of kinetochores are essential for the checkpoint response finally asserted that kinetochores are crucial for the checkpoint response. Nevertheless, the relationship between kinetochores and checkpoint control remains poorly understood. Crucial advances in this area in the third decade of checkpoint studies (2011–2020) are likely to be brought about by the characterization of the mechanism of kinetochore recruitment, activation and inactivation of checkpoint proteins, which remains elusive for the majority of checkpoint components. Here, we take a molecular view on the main challenges hampering this task. PMID:22084386

  11. REMEM: REmote MEMory as Checkpointing Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Hui; Sun, Xian-He; Chen, Yong; Ke, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Checkpointing is a widely used mechanism for supporting fault tolerance, but notorious in its high-cost disk access. The idea of memory-based checkpointing has been extensively studied in research but made little success in practice due to its complexity and potential reliability concerns. In this study we present the design and implementation of REMEM, a REmote MEMory checkpointing system to extend the checkpointing storage from disk to remote memory. A unique feature of REMEM is that it can be integrated into existing disk-based checkpointing systems seamlessly. A user can flexibly switch between REMEM and disk as checkpointing storage to balance the efficiency and reliability. The implementation of REMEM on Open MPI is also introduced. The experimental results confirm that REMEM and the proposed adaptive checkpointing storage selection are promising in both performance, reliability and scalability.

  12. Completing the structural family portrait of the human EphB tyrosine kinase domains

    PubMed Central

    Overman, Ross C; Debreczeni, Judit E; Truman, Caroline M; McAlister, Mark S; Attwood, Teresa K

    2014-01-01

    The EphB receptors have key roles in cell morphology, adhesion, migration and invasion, and their aberrant action has been linked with the development and progression of many different tumor types. Their conflicting expression patterns in cancer tissues, combined with their high sequence and structural identity, present interesting challenges to those seeking to develop selective therapeutic molecules targeting this large receptor family. Here, we present the first structure of the EphB1 tyrosine kinase domain determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.5Å. Our comparative crystalisation analysis of the human EphB family kinases has also yielded new crystal forms of the human EphB2 and EphB4 catalytic domains. Unable to crystallize the wild-type EphB3 kinase domain, we used rational engineering (based on our new structures of EphB1, EphB2, and EphB4) to identify a single point mutation which facilitated its crystallization and structure determination to 2.2 Å. This mutation also improved the soluble recombinant yield of this kinase within Escherichia coli, and increased both its intrinsic stability and catalytic turnover, without affecting its ligand-binding profile. The partial ordering of the activation loop in the EphB3 structure alludes to a potential cis-phosphorylation mechanism for the EphB kinases. With the kinase domain structures of all four catalytically competent human EphB receptors now determined, a picture begins to emerge of possible opportunities to produce EphB isozyme-selective kinase inhibitors for mechanistic studies and therapeutic applications. PMID:24677421

  13. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae spindle pole body duplication gene MPS1 is part of a mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    M-phase checkpoints inhibit cell division when mitotic spindle function is perturbed. Here we show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPS1 gene product, an essential protein kinase required for spindle pole body (SPB) duplication (Winey et al., 1991; Lauze et al., 1995), is also required for M-phase check-point function. In cdc31-2 and mps2-1 mutants, conditional failure of SPB duplication results in cell cycle arrest with high p34CDC28 kinase activity that depends on the presence of the wild-type MAD1 checkpoint gene, consistent with checkpoint arrest of mitosis. In contrast, mps1 mutant cells fail to duplicate their SPBs and do not arrest division at 37 degrees C, exhibiting a normal cycle of p34CDC28 kinase activity despite the presence of a monopolar spindle. Double mutant cdc31-2, mps1-1 cells also fail to arrest mitosis at 37 degrees C, despite having SPB structures similar to cdc31-2 single mutants as determined by EM analysis. Arrest of mitosis upon microtubule depolymerization by nocodazole is also conditionally absent in mps1 strains. This is observed in mps1 cells synchronized in S phase with hydroxyurea before exposure to nocodazole, indicating that failure of checkpoint function in mps1 cells is independent of SPB duplication failure. In contrast, hydroxyurea arrest and a number of other cdc mutant arrest phenotypes are unaffected by mps1 alleles. We propose that the essential MPS1 protein kinase functions both in SPB duplication and in a mitotic checkpoint monitoring spindle integrity. PMID:8567717

  14. Kinase requirements in human cells: V. Synthetic lethal interactions between p53 and the protein kinases SGK2 and PAK3.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Amy; Grueneberg, Dorre A; Hellner, Karin; Sawyer, Jacqueline; Grace, Miranda; Li, Wenliang; Harlow, Ed; Munger, Karl

    2010-07-13

    Cervical carcinomas are initiated through a series of well-defined stages that rely on the expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes. A panel of 100 small hairpin RNAs that target essential kinases in many tumor types was used to study the stepwise appearance of kinase requirements during cervical tumor development. Twenty-six kinases were commonly required in three cell lines derived from frank carcinomas, and each kinase requirement was traced to the specific stage in which the requirement emerged. Six kinases became required following HPV-induced immortalization, and the requirement for two kinases, SGK2 and PAK3, was mapped to the inactivation of p53 in primary human epithelial cells. Loss of the p53 tumor suppressor in other primary epithelial cells also induced dependence on SGK2 and PAK3. Hence, SGK2 and PAK3 provide important cellular functions following p53 inactivation, fulfilling the classical definition of synthetic lethality; loss of p53, SGK2, or PAK3 alone has little effect on cell viability, whereas loss of p53 together with either SGK2 or PAK3 loss leads to cell death. Whereas tumor suppressor gene mutations are not directly druggable, other proteins or pathways that become obligatory to cell viability following tumor suppressor loss provide theoretical targets for tumor suppressor-specific drug discovery efforts. The kinases SGK2 and PAK3 may thus represent such targets for p53-specific drug development.

  15. Structural changes in human cytomegalovirus cytoplasmic assembly sites in the absence of UL97 kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Azzeh, Maysa; Honigman, Alik; Taraboulos, Albert; Rouvinski, Alexander; Wolf, Dana G. . E-mail: wolfd@md.huji.ac.il

    2006-10-10

    Studies of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL97 kinase deletion mutant ({delta}UL97) indicated a multi-step role for this kinase in early and late phases of the viral life cycle, namely, in DNA replication, capsid maturation and nuclear egress. Here, we addressed its possible involvement in cytoplasmic steps of HCMV assembly. Using the {delta}UL97 and the UL97 kinase inhibitor NGIC-I, we demonstrate that the absence of UL97 kinase activity results in a modified subcellular distribution of the viral structural protein assembly sites, from compact structures impacting upon the nucleus to diffuse perinuclear structures punctuated by large vacuoles. Infection by either wild type or {delta}UL97 viruses induced a profound reorganization of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-positive Golgi-related structures. Importantly, the viral-induced Golgi remodeling along with the reorganization of the nuclear architecture was substantially altered in the absence of UL97 kinase activity. These findings suggest that UL97 kinase activity might contribute to organization of the viral cytoplasmic assembly sites.

  16. Transcriptional co-factor Transducin beta-like (TBL) 1 acts as a checkpoint in pancreatic cancer malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Stoy, Christian; Sundaram, Aishwarya; Rios Garcia, Marcos; Wang, Xiaoyue; Seibert, Oksana; Zota, Annika; Wendler, Susann; Männle, David; Hinz, Ulf; Sticht, Carsten; Muciek, Maria; Gretz, Norbert; Rose, Adam J; Greiner, Vera; Hofmann, Thomas G; Bauer, Andrea; Hoheisel, Jörg; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Gaida, Matthias M; Werner, Jens; Schafmeier, Tobias; Strobel, Oliver; Herzig, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer fatalities in Western societies, characterized by high metastatic potential and resistance to chemotherapy. Critical molecular mechanisms of these phenotypical features still remain unknown, thus hampering the development of effective prognostic and therapeutic measures in PDAC. Here, we show that transcriptional co-factor Transducin beta-like (TBL) 1 was over-expressed in both human and murine PDAC. Inactivation of TBL1 in human and mouse pancreatic cancer cells reduced cellular proliferation and invasiveness, correlating with diminished glucose uptake, glycolytic flux, and oncogenic PI3 kinase signaling which in turn could rescue TBL1 deficiency-dependent phenotypes. TBL1 deficiency both prevented and reversed pancreatic tumor growth, mediated transcriptional PI3 kinase inhibition, and increased chemosensitivity of PDAC cells in vivo. As TBL1 mRNA levels were also found to correlate with PI3 kinase levels and overall survival in a cohort of human PDAC patients, TBL1 was identified as a checkpoint in the malignant behavior of pancreatic cancer and its expression may serve as a novel molecular target in the treatment of human PDAC. PMID:26070712

  17. Human pyruvate kinase M2: a multifunctional protein.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vibhor; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2010-11-01

    Glycolysis, a central metabolic pathway, harbors evolutionary conserved enzymes that modulate and potentially shift the cellular metabolism on requirement. Pyruvate kinase, which catalyzes the last but rate-limiting step of glycolysis, is expressed in four isozymic forms, depending on the tissue requirement. M2 isoform (PKM2) is exclusively expressed in embryonic and adult dividing/tumor cells. This tetrameric allosterically regulated isoform is intrinsically designed to downregulate its activity by subunit dissociation (into dimer), which results in partial inhibition of glycolysis at the last step. This accumulates all upstream glycolytic intermediates as an anabolic feed for synthesis of lipids and nucleic acids, whereas reassociation of PKM2 into active tetramer replenishes the normal catabolism as a feedback after cell division. In addition, involvement of this enzyme in a variety of pathways, protein-protein interactions, and nuclear transport suggests its potential to perform multiple nonglycolytic functions with diverse implications, although multidimensional role of this protein is as yet not fully explored. This review aims to provide an overview of the involvement of PKM2 in various physiological pathways with possible functional implications. PMID:20857498

  18. Microtubule attachment and spindle assembly checkpoint signaling at the kinetochore

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Emily A.; Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, chromosome segregation during cell division is facilitated by the kinetochore, an assembly of proteins built on centromeric DNA. The kinetochore attaches chromosomes to spindle microtubules, modulates the stability of these attachments, and relays microtubule-binding status to the spindle assembly checkpoint, a cell cycle surveillance pathway that delays chromosome segregation in response to unattached kinetochores. Here, we discuss recent results that guide current thinking on how each of these kinetochore-centered processes is achieved, and how their integration ensures faithful chromosome segregation, focusing on the essential roles of kinase-phosphatase signaling and the microtubule-binding KMN protein network. PMID:23258294

  19. Salinomycin causes migration and invasion of human fibrosarcoma cells by inducing MMP-2 expression via PI3-kinase, ERK-1/2 and p38 kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seon-Mi; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-06-01

    Salinomycin (SAL) is a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to regulate a variety of cellular responses in various human cancer cells. However, the effects of SAL on metastatic capacity of HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells have not been elucidated. We investigated the effect of SAL on migration and invasion, with emphasis on the expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. Treatment of SAL promoted the expression and activation of MMP-2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as detected by western blot analysis, gelatin zymography, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. SAL also increased metastatic capacities, as determined by an increase in the migration and invasion of cells using the wound healing assay and the invasion assay, respectively. To confirm the detailed molecular mechanisms of these effects, we measured the activation of phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3-kinase) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)s (ERK-1/2 and p38 kinase), as detected by the phosphorylated proteins through western blot analysis. SAL treatment increased the phosphorylation of Akt and MAPKs. Inhibition of PI3-kinase, ERK-1/2, and p38 kinase with LY294002, PD98059, and SB203580, respectively, in the presence of SAL suppressed the metastatic capacity by reducing MMP-2 expression, as determined by gelatin zymography. Our results indicate that the PI3-kinase and MAPK signaling pathways are involved in migration and invasion of HT1080 through induction of MMP-2 expression and activation. In conclusion, SAL significantly increases the metastatic capacity of HT1080 cells by inducing MMP-2 expression via PI3-kinase and MAPK pathways. Our results suggest that SAL may be a potential agent for the study of cancer metastatic capacities.

  20. Reducing space overhead for independendent checkpointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yi-Min; Chung, Pi-Yu; Lin, In-Jen; Fuchs, W. Kent

    1992-01-01

    The main disadvantages of independent checkpointing are the possible domino effect and the associated storage space overhead for maintaining multiple checkpoints. In most previous work, it has been assumed that only the checkpoints older than the current global recovery line can be discarded. Here, we generalize a notion of recovery line to potential recovery line. Only the checkpoints belonging to at least one of the potential recovery lines cannot be discarded. By using the model of maximum-sized antichains on a partially ordered set, an efficient algorithm is developed for finding all non-discardable checkpoints, and we show that the number of non-discardable checkpoints cannot exceed N(N+1)/2, where N is the number of processors. Communication trace driven simulation for several hypercube programs is performed to show the benefit of the proposed algorithm for real applications.

  1. Human thrombopoiesis depends on Protein kinase Cδ/protein kinase Cε functional couple

    PubMed Central

    Carubbi, Cecilia; Masselli, Elena; Martini, Silvia; Galli, Daniela; Aversa, Franco; Mirandola, Prisco; Italiano, Joseph E.; Gobbi, Giuliana; Vitale, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A deeper understanding of the molecular events driving megakaryocytopoiesis and thrombopoiesis is essential to regulate in vitro and in vivo platelet production for clinical applications. We previously documented the crucial role of PKCε in the regulation of human and mouse megakaryocyte maturation and platelet release. However, since several data show that different PKC isoforms fulfill complementary functions, we targeted PKCε and PKCδ, which show functional and phenotypical reciprocity, at the same time as boosting platelet production in vitro. Results show that PKCδ, contrary to PKCε, is persistently expressed during megakaryocytic differentiation, and a forced PKCδ down-modulation impairs megakaryocyte maturation and platelet production. PKCδ and PKCε work as a functional couple with opposite roles on thrombopoiesis, and the modulation of their balance strongly impacts platelet production. Indeed, we show an imbalance of PKCδ/PKCε ratio both in primary myelofibrosis and essential thrombocythemia, featured by impaired megakaryocyte differentiation and increased platelet production, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate that concurrent molecular targeting of both PKCδ and PKCε represents a strategy for in vitro platelet factories. PMID:27081176

  2. The Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Pathway in Human Cancer: Genetic Alterations and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Arcaro, Alexandre; Guerreiro, Ana S

    2007-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is frequently activated in human cancer and represents an attractive target for therapies based on small molecule inhibitors. PI3K isoforms play an essential role in the signal transduction events activated by cell surface receptors including receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). There are eight known PI3K isoforms in humans, which have been subdivided into three classes (I-III). Therefore PI3Ks show considerable diversity and it remains unclear which kinases in this family should be targeted in cancer. The class IA of PI3K comprises the p110α, p110β and p110δ isoforms, which associate with activated RTKs. In human cancer, recent reports have described activating mutations in the PIK3CA gene encoding p110α, and inactivating mutations in the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) gene, a tumour suppressor and antagonist of the PI3K pathway. The PIK3CA mutations described in cancer constitutively activate p110α and, when expressed in cells drive oncogenic transformation. Moreover, these mutations cause the constitutive activation of downstream signaling molecules such as Akt/protein kinase B (PKB), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K) that is commonly observed in cancer cells. In addition to p110α, the other isoforms of the PI3K family may also play a role in human cancer, although their individual functions remain to be precisely identified. In this review we will discuss the evidence implicating individual PI3K isoforms in human cancer and their potential as drug targets in this context. PMID:19384426

  3. [Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors for Advanced Melanoma - Evidences and Future Perspectives].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Teramoto, Yukiko; Asami, Yuri; Matsuya, Taisuke; Yamamoto, Akifumi

    2016-09-01

    Recently developed immune checkpoint inhibitors, such as anti-PD-1 antibodies, have shown a clear improvement in clinical efficacy compared with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced melanoma. Treatment with anti-PD-1 antibodies has resulted in improved objective response rates, longer durations of response, and longer overall survival rates. Although the incidence rate of adverse events associated with anti-PD-1 antibodies is lower than that associated with cytotoxic agents, characteristic severe adverse events such as pneumonia, endocrinopathy, and colitis can occur. A recent clinical trial that evaluated the utility of an anti-PD-1 antibody in combination with an anti-CTLA-4 antibody reported that the treatment enhanced clinical efficacy in terms of response rate and progression-free survival. However, the incidence of adverse events and treatment discontinuation also increased. For optimal selection of immune checkpoint inhibitors for treating patients with advanced melanoma, biomarkers capable of predicting clinical efficacy, prognosis, and adverse events in each patient need to be identified. In addition, novel combination therapies, including immune checkpoint inhibitors and MAP kinase pathway-targeting agents, should result in more favorable clinical responses and prolonged overall survival rates. PMID:27628544

  4. Human cytomegalovirus pUL97 kinase induces global changes in the infected cell phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Oberstein, Adam; Perlman, David H.; Shenk, Thomas; Terry, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    Replication of human cytomegalovirus is regulated in part by cellular kinases and the single viral Ser/Thr kinase, pUL97. The virus-coded kinase augments the replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) by enabling nuclear egress and altering cell cycle progression. These roles are accomplished through direct phosphorylation of nuclear lamins and the retinoblastoma protein, respectively. In an effort to identify additional pUL97 substrates, we analyzed the phosphoproteome of SILAC-labeled human fibroblasts during infection with either wild-type HCMV or a pUL97 kinase-dead mutant virus. Phosphopeptides were enriched over a titanium dioxide matrix and analyzed by high resolution mass spectrometry. We identified 157 unambiguous phosphosites from 106 cellular and 17 viral proteins whose phosphorylation required UL97. Analysis of peptides containing these sites allowed the identification of several candidate pUL97 phosphorylation motifs, including a completely novel phosphorylation motif, LxSP. Substrates harboring the LxSP motif were enriched in nucleocytoplasmic transport functions, including a number of components of the nuclear pore complex. These results extend the known functions of pUL97 and suggest that modulation of nuclear pore function may be important during HCMV replication. PMID:25867546

  5. Preparation and characterization of human ADCK3, a putative atypical kinase.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Brody; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-04-01

    AarF domain containing kinase 3 (ADCK3) is a mitochondrial protein known to have a role in the electron transport chain. Despite being required for the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q10, a lipid-soluble electron transporter found to be essential for aerobic cellular respiration, the precise biological function of ADCK3 remains unknown. Patients with mutations in ADCK3 experience an onset of neurological disorders from childhood, including cerebellar ataxia and exercise intolerance. After extensive screening for soluble recombinant protein expression, an N-terminal fusion of maltose-binding protein was found to facilitate the overexpression of the human ADCK3 kinase domain in Escherichia coli as a soluble and biologically active entity. For the first time our work reveals Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activity of ADCK3, providing strong support for the theoretical prediction of this protein being a functional atypical kinase.

  6. Immune Checkpoint Modulators: An Emerging Antiglioma Armamentarium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eileen S.; Kim, Jennifer E.; Patel, Mira A.; Mangraviti, Antonella; Ruzevick, Jacob; Lim, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoints have come to the forefront of cancer therapies as a powerful and promising strategy to stimulate antitumor T cell activity. Results from recent preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate how checkpoint inhibition can be utilized to prevent tumor immune evasion and both local and systemic immune suppression. This review encompasses the key immune checkpoints that have been found to play a role in tumorigenesis and, more specifically, gliomagenesis. The review will provide an overview of the existing preclinical and clinical data, antitumor efficacy, and clinical applications for each checkpoint with respect to GBM, as well as a summary of combination therapies with chemotherapy and radiation. PMID:26881264

  7. Structural insight into nucleotide recognition by human death-associated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Laurie K.; Watterson, D.M.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.

    2009-06-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a member of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-regulated family of serine/threonine protein kinases. The role of the kinase activity of DAPK in eukaryotic cell apoptosis and the ability of bioavailable DAPK inhibitors to rescue neuronal death after brain injury have made it a drug-discovery target for neurodegenerative disorders. In order to understand the recognition of nucleotides by DAPK and to gain insight into DAPK catalysis, the crystal structure of human DAPK was solved in complex with ADP and Mg{sup 2+} at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution. ADP is a product of the kinase reaction and product release is considered to be the rate-limiting step of protein kinase catalytic cycles. The structure of DAPK-ADP-Mg{sup 2+} was compared with a newly determined DAPK-AMP-PNP-Mg{sup 2+} structure and the previously determined apo DAPK structure (PDB code 1 jks). The comparison shows that nucleotide-induced changes are localized to the glycine-rich loop region of DAPK.

  8. Genome-wide inhibitory impact of the AMPK activator metformin on [kinesins, tubulins, histones, auroras and polo-like kinases] M-phase cell cycle genes in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Menendez, Javier A

    2009-05-15

    Prompted by the ever-growing scientific rationale for examining the antidiabetic drug metformin as a potential antitumor agent in breast cancer disease, we recently tested the hypothesis that the assessment of metformin-induced global changes in gene expression-as identified using 44 K (double density) Agilent's whole human genome arrays-could reveal gene-expression signatures that would allow proper selection of breast cancer patients who should be considered for metformin-based clinical trials. Using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery bioinformatics (DAVID) resources we herein reveal that, at doses that lead to activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), metformin not only downregulates genes coding for ribosomal proteins (i.e., protein and macromolecule biosynthesis) but unexpectedly suppresses numerous mitosis-related gene families including kinesins, tubulins, histones, auroras and polo-like kinases. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-scale evidence of a mitotic core component in the transcriptional response of human breast cancer cells to metformin. These findings further support a tight relationship between the activation status of AMPK and the chromosomal and cytoskeletal checkpoints of cell mitosis at the transcriptional level. PMID:19372741

  9. Genome-wide inhibitory impact of the AMPK activator metformin on [kinesins, tubulins, histones, auroras and polo-like kinases] M-phase cell cycle genes in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Menendez, Javier A

    2009-05-15

    Prompted by the ever-growing scientific rationale for examining the antidiabetic drug metformin as a potential antitumor agent in breast cancer disease, we recently tested the hypothesis that the assessment of metformin-induced global changes in gene expression-as identified using 44 K (double density) Agilent's whole human genome arrays-could reveal gene-expression signatures that would allow proper selection of breast cancer patients who should be considered for metformin-based clinical trials. Using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery bioinformatics (DAVID) resources we herein reveal that, at doses that lead to activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), metformin not only downregulates genes coding for ribosomal proteins (i.e., protein and macromolecule biosynthesis) but unexpectedly suppresses numerous mitosis-related gene families including kinesins, tubulins, histones, auroras and polo-like kinases. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-scale evidence of a mitotic core component in the transcriptional response of human breast cancer cells to metformin. These findings further support a tight relationship between the activation status of AMPK and the chromosomal and cytoskeletal checkpoints of cell mitosis at the transcriptional level.

  10. Expression of human tyrosine kinase-negative epidermal growth factor receptor amplifies signaling through endogenous murine epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Hack, N; Sue-A-Quan, A; Mills, G B; Skorecki, K L

    1993-12-15

    Recent findings have suggested that certain ligand-dependent responses to EGF may be propagated in a manner that is not dependent on the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R, Campos-Gonzalez, R., and Glenney, J. R., Jr. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 14535-14538) or, alternatively, that these responses may occur through the interaction of the human tyrosine kinase-deficient EGF-R with an as yet unidentified kinase (Selva, E., Raden, D. L., and Davis, R. J. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2250-2254). These conclusions represent a significant departure from our current understanding of signal transduction by receptor tyrosine kinases. Therefore we examined the effect of expression of tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF receptor in murine NIH-3T3-2.2 cells on the EGF-dependent phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP-2) kinase. In parental cells (NIH-3T3-2.2) that express low levels of endogenous murine EGF-R, there was no demonstrable EGF-dependent coupling to MAP-2 kinase. In NIH-3T3-2.2 cells transfected with tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R, there was unexpected EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase. Analysis of the tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R in these cells revealed significant tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGF-R. A low level of endogenous murine EGF-R present in these cells were also phosphorylated on tyrosine residues and displayed autokinase activity. Similar results were obtained using an unrelated cell line (B82L cells), in which EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase was previously attributed to signal propagation through a tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R (Campos-Gonzalez, R., and Glenney, J. R., Jr. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 14535-14538). Taken together, these results suggest that the tyrosine kinase-negative human EGF-R are able to amplify the response to activation of low levels of endogenous murine EGF-R, thus leading to EGF-dependent phosphorylation of MAP-2 kinase in cells

  11. Action of the Src family kinase inhibitor, dasatinib (BMS-354825), on human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Kim, Donghwa; Cheng, Jin Q; Zhang, Shumin; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Buettner, Ralf; Mirosevich, Janni; Lee, Francis Y; Jove, Richard

    2005-10-15

    Src family kinases (SFK) are currently being investigated as targets for treatment strategies in various cancers. The novel SFK/Abl inhibitor, dasatinib (BMS-354825), is a promising therapeutic agent with oral bioavailability. Dasatinib has been shown to inhibit growth of Bcr-Abl-dependent chronic myeloid leukemia xenografts in nude mice. Dasatinib also has been shown to have activity against cultured human prostate and breast cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism by which dasatinib acts on epithelial tumor cells remains unknown. In this study, we show that dasatinib blocks the kinase activities of the SFKs, Lyn, and Src, in human prostate cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations. Moreover, focal adhesion kinase and Crk-associated substrate (p130(CAS)) signaling downstream of SFKs are also inhibited at similar concentrations of dasatinib. Consistent with inhibition of these signaling pathways, dasatinib suppresses cell adhesion, migration, and invasion of prostate cancer cells at low nanomolar concentrations. Therefore, dasatinib has potential as a therapeutic agent for metastatic prostate cancers harboring activated SFK and focal adhesion kinase signaling.

  12. Human CDC2-like kinase 1 (CLK1): a novel target for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, Princi; Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Moorthy, N S Hari Narayana; Waiker, Digambar Kumar; Jain, Arvind Kumar; Trivedi, Piyush

    2014-05-01

    The cdc2-like kinases (CLKs) are an evolutionarily conserved group of dual specificity kinases belonging to the CMGC (cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinases), glycogen synthase kinases (GSK) and CDK-like kinases). The CLK family consists of four isoforms namely CLK1, CLK2, CLK3 and CLK4. The human CLK1 encoded protein comprises 454 amino acids and the catalytic domain of CLK1 exhibits the typical protein kinase fold. CLK1 has been shown to autophosphorylate on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues and phosphorylate exogenous substrates on serine and threonine residues. CLK1 plays an important role in the regulation of RNA splicing through phosphorylation of members of the serine and arginine-rich (SR) family of splicing factors. CLK1 is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease by phosphorylating the serine residue in SR proteins. Nuclear speckles of the nucleoplasm contain the stored form of SR proteins and are moderately responsible for the choice of splicing sites during pre-mRNA splicing. Hence, the inhibition of CLK1 can be used as a therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease. Many natural and synthetic molecules are reported to possess CLK1 inhibitory activity. Some specific examples are Marine alkaloid Leucettamine B and KH-CB19. Leucettamine B is a potent inhibitor of CLK1 (15 nM), Dyrk1A (40 nM), and Dyrk2 (35 nM) and a moderate inhibitor of CLK3 (4.5 µM) whereas KH-CB19 is a highly specific and potent inhibitor of the CLK1/CLK4. X-ray crystallographic studies have revealed the binding mode of marine sponge metabolite hymenialdisine and a dichloroindolyl enamino nitrile (KH-CB19) to CLK1. This review focuses on the role of CLKs in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease and therapeutic potential of targeting CLK1 in Alzheimer's disease drug discovery and development. In addition, the recent developments in drug discovery efforts targeting human CLK1 are also highlighted. PMID:24568585

  13. Role of the Yes and Csk tyrosine kinases in the development of a pathological state in the human retina.

    PubMed

    Baranova, Lyudmila; Emelyanova, Valentina; Volotovski, Igor

    2010-07-01

    Amplification and a cloning of fragments of genes of human retina tyrosine kinases, the nucleotide sequences of which feature a high homology to the gene families of the Yes and Csk tyrosine kinases, and a cloning of the complete coding sequence of the cDNA of the Csk tyrosine kinase gene of the human lymphocytes have been carried out. It has been established that this sequence contains 1,624 bp and encodes a protein that, with a 99% homology, corresponds to the human tyrosine kinase. A comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the full-size cDNA of the Csk tyrosine kinase of the lymphocytes of healthy donors and of patients with an eye choroidal melanoma has shown that a risk of development of an eye choroidal melanoma can be estimated by the frequency of occurrence of a mutant allele in the 10th exon.

  14. Suppression of DNA-damage checkpoint signaling by Rsk-mediated phosphorylation of Mre11

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Zhang, Liguo; Huang, Nai-Jia; Huang, Bofu; Kornbluth, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutant (ATM) is an S/T-Q–directed kinase that is critical for the cellular response to double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in DNA. Following DNA damage, ATM is activated and recruited by the MRN protein complex [meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11)/DNA repair protein Rad50/Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 proteins] to sites of DNA damage where ATM phosphorylates multiple substrates to trigger cell-cycle arrest. In cancer cells, this regulation may be faulty, and cell division may proceed even in the presence of damaged DNA. We show here that the ribosomal s6 kinase (Rsk), often elevated in cancers, can suppress DSB-induced ATM activation in both Xenopus egg extracts and human tumor cell lines. In analyzing each step in ATM activation, we have found that Rsk targets loading of MRN complex components onto DNA at DSB sites. Rsk can phosphorylate the Mre11 protein directly at S676 both in vitro and in intact cells and thereby can inhibit the binding of Mre11 to DNA with DSBs. Accordingly, mutation of S676 to Ala can reverse inhibition of the response to DSBs by Rsk. Collectively, these data point to Mre11 as an important locus of Rsk-mediated checkpoint inhibition acting upstream of ATM activation. PMID:24297933

  15. Evidence for a CDK4-dependent checkpoint in a conditional model of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Sharon; Gagrica, Sladjana; Sanij, Elaine; Rowe, Janice; Gregory, Fiona J; Hara, Eiji; Peters, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence, the stable cell cycle arrest elicited by various forms of stress, is an important facet of tumor suppression. Although much is known about the key players in the implementation of senescence, including the pRb and p53 axes and the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p16INK4a and p21CIP1, many details remain unresolved. In studying conditional senescence in human fibroblasts that express a temperature sensitive SV40 large T-antigen (T-Ag), we uncovered an unexpected role for CDK4. At the permissive temperature, where pRb and p53 are functionally compromised by T-Ag, cyclin D-CDK4 complexes are disrupted by the high p16INK4a levels and reduced expression of p21CIP1. In cells arrested at the non-permissive temperature, p21CIP1 promotes reassembly of cyclin D-CDK4 yet pRb is in a hypo-phosphorylated state, consistent with cell cycle arrest. In exploring whether the reassembled cyclin D-CDK4-p21 complexes are functional, we found that shRNA-mediated knockdown or chemical inhibition of CDK4 prevented the increase in cell size associated with the senescent phenotype by allowing the cells to arrest in G1 rather than G2/M. The data point to a role for CDK4 kinase activity in a G2 checkpoint that contributes to senescence. PMID:25695870

  16. ProNormz--an integrated approach for human proteins and protein kinases normalization.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Suresh; Raja, Kalpana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2014-02-01

    The task of recognizing and normalizing protein name mentions in biomedical literature is a challenging task and important for text mining applications such as protein-protein interactions, pathway reconstruction and many more. In this paper, we present ProNormz, an integrated approach for human proteins (HPs) tagging and normalization. In Homo sapiens, a greater number of biological processes are regulated by a large human gene family called protein kinases by post translational phosphorylation. Recognition and normalization of human protein kinases (HPKs) is considered to be important for the extraction of the underlying information on its regulatory mechanism from biomedical literature. ProNormz distinguishes HPKs from other HPs besides tagging and normalization. To our knowledge, ProNormz is the first normalization system available to distinguish HPKs from other HPs in addition to gene normalization task. ProNormz incorporates a specialized synonyms dictionary for human proteins and protein kinases, a set of 15 string matching rules and a disambiguation module to achieve the normalization. Experimental results on benchmark BioCreative II training and test datasets show that our integrated approach achieve a fairly good performance and outperforms more sophisticated semantic similarity and disambiguation systems presented in BioCreative II GN task. As a freely available web tool, ProNormz is useful to developers as extensible gene normalization implementation, to researchers as a standard for comparing their innovative techniques, and to biologists for normalization and categorization of HPs and HPKs mentions in biomedical literature. URL: http://www.biominingbu.org/pronormz.

  17. Function of a Conserved Checkpoint Recruitment Domain in ATRIP Proteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Heather L.; Ehrhardt, Mark R.; Mordes, Daniel A.; Glick, Gloria G.; Chazin, Walter J.; Cortez, David

    2007-01-01

    The ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) kinase is essential to maintain genomic integrity. ATR is recruited to DNA lesions in part through its association with ATR-interacting protein (ATRIP), which in turn interacts with the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA (replication protein A). In this study, a conserved checkpoint protein recruitment domain (CRD) in ATRIP orthologs was identified by biochemical mapping of the RPA binding site in combination with nuclear magnetic resonance, mutagenesis, and computational modeling. Mutations in the CRD of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATRIP ortholog Ddc2 disrupt the Ddc2-RPA interaction, prevent proper localization of Ddc2 to DNA breaks, sensitize yeast to DNA-damaging agents, and partially compromise checkpoint signaling. These data demonstrate that the CRD is critical for localization and optimal DNA damage responses. However, the stimulation of ATR kinase activity by binding of topoisomerase binding protein 1 (TopBP1) to ATRIP-ATR can occur independently of the interaction of ATRIP with RPA. Our results support the idea of a multistep model for ATR activation that requires separable localization and activation functions of ATRIP. PMID:17339343

  18. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  19. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  20. Intellectual property issues of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are drugs that interfere with tumor escape responses. Some members of this class are already approved, and expected to be blockbusters in the future. Many companies have developed patent activities in this field. This article focuses on the patent landscape, and discusses key players and cases related to immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:26466763

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef associates with a member of the p21-activated kinase family.

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, M F; Marsh, J W

    1996-01-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Nef is essential for the induction of AIDS, its biochemical function has remained an enigma. In this study, HIV Nef protein is shown to associate with a serine-threonine kinase that recognizes histone H4 as a substrate, is serologically related to rat p21-activated kinase (PAK), and is specifically activated by Rac and Cdc42. These characteristics define the Nef-associated kinase as belonging to the PAK family. PAKs initiate kinase cascades in response to environmental stimuli, and their identification as a target of Nef implicates these signaling molecules in HIV pathogenesis and provides a novel target for clinical intervention. PMID:8709241

  2. Unconventional Functions of Mitotic Kinases in Kidney Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hascoet, Pauline; Chesnel, Franck; Le Goff, Cathy; Le Goff, Xavier; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Human tumors exhibit a variety of genetic alterations, including point mutations, translocations, gene amplifications and deletions, as well as aneuploid chromosome numbers. For carcinomas, aneuploidy is associated with poor patient outcome for a large variety of tumor types, including breast, colon, and renal cell carcinoma. The Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous carcinoma consisting of different histologic types. The clear renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype and represents 85% of the RCC. Central to the biology of the ccRCC is the loss of function of the Von Hippel–Lindau gene, but is also associated with genetic instability that could be caused by abrogation of the cell cycle mitotic spindle checkpoint and may involve the Aurora kinases, which regulate centrosome maturation. Aneuploidy can also result from the loss of cell–cell adhesion and apical–basal cell polarity that also may be regulated by the mitotic kinases (polo-like kinase 1, casein kinase 2, doublecortin-like kinase 1, and Aurora kinases). In this review, we describe the “non-mitotic” unconventional functions of these kinases in renal tumorigenesis. PMID:26579493

  3. Overlapped checkpointing with hardware assist

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Christopher J; Nunez, James A; Wang, Jun

    2009-01-01

    We present a new approach to handling the demanding I/O workload incurred during checkpoint writes encountered in High Performance Computing. Prior efforts to improve performance have been primarily bound by mechanical limitations of the hard drive. Our research surpasses this limitation by providing a method to: (1) write checkpoint data to a high-speed, non-volatile buffer, and (2) asynchronously write this data to permanent storage while resuming computation. This removes the hard drive from the critical data path because our I/O node based buffers isolate the compute nodes from the storage servers. This solution is feasible because of industry declines in cost for high-capacity, non-volatile storage technologies. Testing was conducted on a small-scale cluster to prove the design, and then scaled at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results show a definitive speedup factor for select workloads over writing directly to a typical global parallel file system; the Panasas ActiveScale File System.

  4. Evidence for the presence of multiple forms of Sph kinase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Banno, Y; Kato, M; Hara, A; Nozawa, Y

    1998-10-15

    The intracellular distribution of sphingosine (Sph) kinase activity was examined in human platelets. A large proportion (72%) of the total activity was found to be associated with the membrane fraction, and the membrane-associated fraction had higher specific activity compared with the cytosolic enzyme. Most of the membrane-associated activity could be extracted with 1 M NaCl. The cytosolic activity was unstable upon heat treatment, with 80% of the activity being lost during incubation at 45 degreesC for 1 h, whereas the NaCl-extractable fraction was stable under the same conditions. When subjected to Mono Q column chromatography, the cytosolic fraction produced two activity peaks and the NaCl-extractable fraction gave a single peak. These three Sph kinase activities showed different responses to stimulation by beta-octylglucoside and inhibition by N, N-dimethylsphingosine and l-threo-dihydrosphingosine, suggesting the presence of multiple enzyme forms in human platelets.

  5. The human p50csk tyrosine kinase phosphorylates p56lck at Tyr-505 and down regulates its catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, M; Mustelin, T; Oetken, C; Partanen, J; Flint, N A; Amrein, K E; Autero, M; Burn, P; Alitalo, K

    1992-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases participate in the transduction and modulation of signals that regulate proliferation and differentiation of cells. Excessive or deregulated protein tyrosine kinase activity can cause malignant transformation. The catalytic activity of the T cell protein tyrosine kinase p56lck is normally suppressed by phosphorylation of a carboxyl-terminal tyrosine, Tyr-505, by another cellular protein tyrosine kinase. Here we characterize a human cytosolic 50 kDa protein tyrosine kinase, p50csk, which specifically phosphorylates Tyr-505 of p56lck and a synthetic peptide containing this site. Phosphorylation of Tyr-505 suppressed the catalytic activity of p56lck. We suggest that p50csk negatively regulates p56lck, and perhaps other cellular src family kinases. Images PMID:1639064

  6. Radiosensitization of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells via abrogating the G2 checkpoint and inhibiting DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Lai, Song-Tao; Ma, Ning-Yi; Deng, Yun; Liu, Yong; Wei, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Dong; Jiang, Guo-Liang

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidences have demonstrated the potential of metformin as a novel agent for cancer prevention and treatment. Here, we investigated its ability of radiosensitization and the underlying mechanisms in human pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, we found that metformin at 5 mM concentration enhanced the radiosensitivity of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, with sensitization enhancement ratios of 1.39 and 1.27, respectively. Mechanistically, metformin caused abrogation of the G2 checkpoint and increase of mitotic catastrophe, associated with suppression of Wee1 kinase and in turn CDK1 Tyr15 phosphorylation. Furthermore, metformin inhibited both expression and irradiation-induced foci formation of Rad51, a key player in homologous recombination repair, ultimately leading to persistent DNA damage, as reflected by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 signaling. Finally, metformin-mediated AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K was identified as a possible upstream pathway controlling translational regulation of Wee1 and Rad51. Our data suggest that metformin radiosensitizes pancreatic cancer cells in vitro via abrogation of the G2 checkpoint and inhibition of DNA damage repair. However, the in vivo study is needed to further confirm the findings from the in vitro study. PMID:26304716

  7. Radiosensitization of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells via abrogating the G2 checkpoint and inhibiting DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Lai, Song-Tao; Ma, Ning-Yi; Deng, Yun; Liu, Yong; Wei, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Jian-Dong; Jiang, Guo-Liang

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidences have demonstrated the potential of metformin as a novel agent for cancer prevention and treatment. Here, we investigated its ability of radiosensitization and the underlying mechanisms in human pancreatic cancer cells. In this study, we found that metformin at 5 mM concentration enhanced the radiosensitivity of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, with sensitization enhancement ratios of 1.39 and 1.27, respectively. Mechanistically, metformin caused abrogation of the G2 checkpoint and increase of mitotic catastrophe, associated with suppression of Wee1 kinase and in turn CDK1 Tyr15 phosphorylation. Furthermore, metformin inhibited both expression and irradiation-induced foci formation of Rad51, a key player in homologous recombination repair, ultimately leading to persistent DNA damage, as reflected by γ-H2AX and 53BP1 signaling. Finally, metformin-mediated AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K was identified as a possible upstream pathway controlling translational regulation of Wee1 and Rad51. Our data suggest that metformin radiosensitizes pancreatic cancer cells in vitro via abrogation of the G2 checkpoint and inhibition of DNA damage repair. However, the in vivo study is needed to further confirm the findings from the in vitro study.

  8. Skp2 is required for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Huang, Yu-Fan; Zhou, Xin-Ke; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Yi-Fan; Lv, Xiao-Bin; Gao, Xiu-Rong; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Jian-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora B kinase plays a critical role in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint. Here, we showed that the ubiquitin E3-ligase protein Skp2, also as a cell-cycle regulatory protein, was required for the activation of Aurora B and its downstream protein. When we restored Skp2 knockdown Hela cells with Skp2 and Skp2-LRR E3 ligase dead mutant we found that Skp2 could rescue the defect in the activation of Aurora B, but the mutant failed to do so. Furthermore, we discovered that Skp2 could interact with Aurora B and trigger Aurora B Lysine (K) 63-linked ubiquitination. Finally, we demonstrated the essential role of Skp2 in cell mitosis progression and spindle checkpoint, which was Aurora B dependent. Our results identified a novel ubiquitinated substrate of Skp2, and also indicated that Aurora B ubiquitination might serve as an important event for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

  9. Induction of Central Host Signaling Kinases during Pneumococcal Infection of Human THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Thomas P.; Scholz, Annemarie; Kiachludis, Delia; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a widespread colonizer of the mucosal epithelia of the upper respiratory tract of human. However, pneumococci are also responsible for numerous local as well as severe systemic infections, especially in children under the age of five and the elderly. Under certain conditions, pneumococci are able to conquer the epithelial barrier, which can lead to a dissemination of the bacteria into underlying tissues and the bloodstream. Here, specialized macrophages represent an essential part of the innate immune system against bacterial intruders. Recognition of the bacteria through different receptors on the surface of macrophages leads thereby to an uptake and elimination of bacteria. Accompanied cytokine release triggers the migration of leukocytes from peripheral blood to the site of infection, where monocytes differentiate into mature macrophages. The rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton during phagocytosis, resulting in the engulfment of bacteria, is thereby tightly regulated by receptor-mediated phosphorylation cascades of different protein kinases. The molecular cellular processes including the modulation of central protein kinases are only partially solved. In this study, the human monocytic THP-1 cell line was used as a model system to examine the activation of Fcγ and complement receptor-independent signal cascades during infection with S. pneumoniae. Pneumococci cultured either in chemically defined or complex medium showed no significant differences in pneumococcal phagocytosis by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) differentiated THP-1 cells. Double immuno-fluorescence microscopy and antibiotic protection assays demonstrated a time-dependent uptake and killing of S. pneumoniae 35A inside of macrophages. Infections of THP-1 cells in the presence of specific pharmacological inhibitors revealed a crucial role of actin polymerization and importance of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and Protein kinase B (Akt) as well during

  10. Isolation of the human Xp21 glycerol kinase gene by positional cloning.

    PubMed

    Walker, A P; Muscatelli, F; Monaco, A P

    1993-02-01

    The gene for human glycerol kinase deficiency (GK) maps in Xp21.3 in a critical region of about 50-250 kb located distal to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene (DMD) by analysis of patient deletions and YAC contigs. We have used a genomic exon amplification strategy to isolate potential exons from two cosmids which mapped to this interval. The genomic exons were used to isolate six overlapping cDNA clones from human fetal liver which encode the X-linked glycerol kinase gene. The cDNA clones map to cosmids, YAC clones and deletions in patients which define the GK critical region and also hybridize to several autosomal fragments and one Xq fragment in genomic DNA. The GK gene is expressed most in human liver with three transcript sizes of 1.85, 2.7, and 3.7 kb. Sequence analysis of 1.5 kb of several overlapping liver cDNA clones predicted a protein with approximately 63% similarity to the E. coli and B. subtilis glycerol kinase genes. The liver cDNA clones have sequence identity with four genomic exons and the 3' untranslated region from an Xp21.3 cosmid thus indicating that this is the expressed GK gene which when deleted in patients gives rises to GK deficiency. PMID:8499898

  11. Antibody targeting of anaplastic lymphoma kinase induces cytotoxicity of human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, E L; Haglund, E A; Mace, E M; Deng, D; Martinez, D; Wood, A C; Chow, A K; Weiser, D A; Belcastro, L T; Winter, C; Bresler, S C; Vigny, M; Mazot, P; Asgharzadeh, S; Seeger, R C; Zhao, H; Guo, R; Christensen, J G; Orange, J S; Pawel, B R; Lemmon, M A; Mossé, Y P

    2012-11-15

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase aberrantly expressed in neuroblastoma, a devastating pediatric cancer of the sympathetic nervous system. Germline and somatically acquired ALK aberrations induce increased autophosphorylation, constitutive ALK activation and increased downstream signaling. Thus, ALK is a tractable therapeutic target in neuroblastoma, likely to be susceptible to both small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors and therapeutic antibodies-as has been shown for other receptor tyrosine kinases in malignancies such as breast and lung cancer. Small-molecule inhibitors of ALK are currently being studied in the clinic, but common ALK mutations in neuroblastoma appear to show de novo insensitivity, arguing that complementary therapeutic approaches must be developed. We therefore hypothesized that antibody targeting of ALK may be a relevant strategy for the majority of neuroblastoma patients likely to have ALK-positive tumors. We show here that an antagonistic ALK antibody inhibits cell growth and induces in vitro antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of human neuroblastoma-derived cell lines. Cytotoxicity was induced in cell lines harboring either wild type or mutated forms of ALK. Treatment of neuroblastoma cells with the dual Met/ALK inhibitor crizotinib sensitized cells to antibody-induced growth inhibition by promoting cell surface accumulation of ALK and thus increasing the accessibility of antigen for antibody binding. These data support the concept of ALK-targeted immunotherapy as a highly promising therapeutic strategy for neuroblastomas with mutated or wild-type ALK.

  12. ELUCIDATION OF HUMAN CHOLINE KINASE CRYSTAL STRUCTURES IN COMPLEX WITH THE PRODUCTS ADP OR PHOSPHOCHOLINE

    PubMed Central

    Malito, Enrico; Sekulic, Nikolina; Too, Wei Cun See; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2006-01-01

    Summary Choline kinase, responsible for the phosphorylation of choline to phosphocholine as the first step of the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, has been recognized as a new target for anticancer therapy. Crystal structures of human choline kinase in its apo, ADP- and phosphocholine-bound complexes, respectively, reveal the molecular details of the substrate binding sites. ATP binds in a cavity where residues from both the N- and C-terminal lobes contribute to form a cleft, while the choline-binding site constitutes a deep hydrophobic groove in the C-terminal domain with a rim composed of negatively charged residues. Upon binding of choline, the enzyme undergoes conformational changes independently affecting the N-terminal domain and the ATP-binding loop. From this structural analysis and comparison with other kinases, and from mutagenesis data on the homologous C. elegans choline kinase, a model of the ternary ADP·Phosphocholine complex was built that reveals the molecular basis for the phosphoryl transfer activity of this enzyme. PMID:17007874

  13. Elucidation of human choline kinase crystal structures in complex with the products ADP or phosphocholine.

    PubMed

    Malito, Enrico; Sekulic, Nikolina; Too, Wei Cun See; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2006-11-24

    Choline kinase, responsible for the phosphorylation of choline to phosphocholine as the first step of the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, has been recognized as a new target for anticancer therapy. Crystal structures of human choline kinase in its apo, ADP and phosphocholine-bound complexes, respectively, reveal the molecular details of the substrate binding sites. ATP binds in a cavity where residues from both the N and C-terminal lobes contribute to form a cleft, while the choline-binding site constitutes a deep hydrophobic groove in the C-terminal domain with a rim composed of negatively charged residues. Upon binding of choline, the enzyme undergoes conformational changes independently affecting the N-terminal domain and the ATP-binding loop. From this structural analysis and comparison with other kinases, and from mutagenesis data on the homologous Caenorhabditis elegans choline kinase, a model of the ternary ADP.phosphocholine complex was built that reveals the molecular basis for the phosphoryl transfer activity of this enzyme.

  14. Crystal structure of a human cyclin-dependent kinase 6 complexwith a flavonol inhibitor, Fisetin

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Heshu; Chang, Debbie J.; Baratte, Blandine; Meijer, Laurent; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula

    2005-01-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a central role in cell cycle control, apoptosis, transcription and neuronal functions. They are important targets for the design of drugs with anti-mitotic and/or anti-neurodegenerative effects. CDK4 and CDK6 form a subfamily among the CDKs in mammalian cells, as defined by sequence similarities. Compared to CDK2 and CDK5, structural information on CDK4 and CDK6 is sparse. We describe here the crystal structure of human CDK6 in complex with a viral cyclin and a flavonol inhibitor, fisetin. Fisetin binds to the active form of CDK6, forming hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues in the binding pocket that undergo large conformational changes during CDK activation by cyclin binding. The 4-keto group and the 3-hydroxyl group of fisetin are hydrogen bonded with the backbone in the hinge region between the N-terminal and C-terminal kinase domain, as has been observed for many CDK inhibitors. However, CDK2 and HCK kinase in complex with other flavone inhibitors such as quercetin and flavopiridol showed a different binding mode with the inhibitor rotated by about 180. The structural information of the CDK6-fisetin complex is correlated with the binding affinities of different flavone inhibitors for CDK6. This complex structure is the first description of an inhibitor complex with a kinase from the CDK4/6 subfamily and can provide a basis for selecting and designing inhibitor compounds with higher affinity and specificity.

  15. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Protein Kinase Activity Is Frequently Elevated in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Supports Tumour Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    O′Flaherty, Linda; Pardo, Olivier E.; Dzien, Piotr; Phillips, Lois; Morgan, Carys; Pawade, Joya; May, Margaret T.; Sohail, Muhammad; Hetzel, Martin R.; Seckl, Michael J.; Tavaré, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a central regulator of cellular metabolism, development and growth. GSK3 activity was thought to oppose tumourigenesis, yet recent studies indicate that it may support tumour growth in some cancer types including in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). We examined the undefined role of GSK3 protein kinase activity in tissue from human NSCLC. Methods The expression and protein kinase activity of GSK3 was determined in 29 fresh frozen samples of human NSCLC and patient-matched normal lung tissue by quantitative immunoassay and western blotting for the phosphorylation of three distinct GSK3 substrates in situ (glycogen synthase, RelA and CRMP-2). The proliferation and sensitivity to the small-molecule GSK3 inhibitor; CHIR99021, of NSCLC cell lines (Hcc193, H1975, PC9 and A549) and non-neoplastic type II pneumocytes was further assessed in adherent culture. Results Expression and protein kinase activity of GSK3 was elevated in 41% of human NSCLC samples when compared to patient-matched control tissue. Phosphorylation of GSK3α/β at the inhibitory S21/9 residue was a poor biomarker for activity in tumour samples. The GSK3 inhibitor, CHIR99021 dose-dependently reduced the proliferation of three NSCLC cell lines yet was ineffective against type II pneumocytes. Conclusion NSCLC tumours with elevated GSK3 protein kinase activity may have evolved dependence on the kinase for sustained growth. Our results provide further important rationale for exploring the use of GSK3 inhibitors in treating NSCLC. PMID:25486534

  16. Kinome-wide RNAi studies in human multiple myeloma identify vulnerable kinase targets, including a lymphoid-restricted kinase, GRK6

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuan Xiao; Schmidt, Jessica; Yin, Hongwei; Shi, Chang-Xin; Que, Qiang; Basu, Gargi; Azorsa, David; Perkins, Louise M.; Braggio, Esteban; Fonseca, Rafael; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Mousses, Spyro; Stewart, A. Keith

    2010-01-01

    A paucity of validated kinase targets in human multiple myeloma has delayed clinical deployment of kinase inhibitors in treatment strategies. We therefore conducted a kinome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) lethality study in myeloma tumor lines bearing common t(4;14), t(14;16), and t(11;14) translocations to identify critically vulnerable kinases in myeloma tumor cells without regard to preconceived mechanistic notions. Fifteen kinases were repeatedly vulnerable in myeloma cells, including AKT1, AK3L1, AURKA, AURKB, CDC2L1, CDK5R2, FES, FLT4, GAK, GRK6, HK1, PKN1, PLK1, SMG1, and TNK2. Whereas several kinases (PLK1, HK1) were equally vulnerable in epithelial cells, others and particularly G protein–coupled receptor kinase, GRK6, appeared selectively vulnerable in myeloma. GRK6 inhibition was lethal to 6 of 7 myeloma tumor lines but was tolerated in 7 of 7 human cell lines. GRK6 exhibits lymphoid-restricted expression, and from coimmunoprecipitation studies we demonstrate that expression in myeloma cells is regulated via direct association with the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) chaperone. GRK6 silencing causes suppression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation associated with reduction in MCL1 levels and phosphorylation, illustrating a potent mechanism for the cytotoxicity of GRK6 inhibition in multiple myeloma (MM) tumor cells. As mice that lack GRK6 are healthy, inhibition of GRK6 represents a uniquely targeted novel therapeutic strategy in human multiple myeloma. PMID:19996089

  17. Parasite Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases as Drug Discovery Targets to Treat Human Protozoan Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Brumlik, Michael J.; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Ludwig, Sara M.; Murthy, Kruthi; Curiel, Tyler J.

    2011-01-01

    Protozoan pathogens are a highly diverse group of unicellular organisms, several of which are significant human pathogens. One group of protozoan pathogens includes obligate intracellular parasites such as agents of malaria, leishmaniasis, babesiosis, and toxoplasmosis. The other group includes extracellular pathogens such as agents of giardiasis and amebiasis. An unfortunate unifying theme for most human protozoan pathogens is that highly effective treatments for them are generally lacking. We will review targeting protozoan mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) as a novel drug discovery approach towards developing better therapies, focusing on Plasmodia, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma, about which the most is known. PMID:21637385

  18. Structural insight into nucleotide recognition by human death-associated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Laurie K.; Watterson, D. Martin; Brunzelle, Joseph S.

    2009-03-01

    The crystal structures of DAPK–ADP–Mg{sup 2+} and DAPK–AMP-PNP–Mg{sup 2+} complexes were determined at 1.85 and 2.00 Å resolution, respectively. Comparison of the two nucleotide-bound states with apo DAPK revealed localized changes in the glycine-rich loop region that were indicative of a transition from a more open state to a more closed state on binding of the nucleotide substrate and to an intermediate state with the bound nucleotide product. Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a member of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-regulated family of serine/threonine protein kinases. The role of the kinase activity of DAPK in eukaryotic cell apoptosis and the ability of bioavailable DAPK inhibitors to rescue neuronal death after brain injury have made it a drug-discovery target for neurodegenerative disorders. In order to understand the recognition of nucleotides by DAPK and to gain insight into DAPK catalysis, the crystal structure of human DAPK was solved in complex with ADP and Mg{sup 2+} at 1.85 Å resolution. ADP is a product of the kinase reaction and product release is considered to be the rate-limiting step of protein kinase catalytic cycles. The structure of DAPK–ADP–Mg{sup 2+} was compared with a newly determined DAPK–AMP-PNP–Mg{sup 2+} structure and the previously determined apo DAPK structure (PDB code http://scripts.iucr.org/cgi-bin/cr.cgi?rm). The comparison shows that nucleotide-induced changes are localized to the glycine-rich loop region of DAPK.

  19. Isoform switch of pyruvate kinase M1 indeed occurs but not to pyruvate kinase M2 in human tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Cheng; Yan, Li; Wang, Lin; Ma, Jun; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Yongxing; Shi, Yu; Wang, Qun

    2015-01-01

    Muscle type of pyruvate kinase (PKM) is one of the key mediators of the Warburg effect and tumor metabolism. Due to alternative splicing, there are at least 12 known isoforms of the PKM gene, of which PKM1 and PKM2 are two major isoforms with only a 23 amino acid sequenced difference but quite different characteristics and functions. It was previously thought the isoform switch from PKM1 to PKM2 resulted in high PKM2 expression in tumors, providing a great advantage to tumor cells. However, this traditional view was challenged by two recent studies; one study claimed that this isoform switch does not occur during the Warburg effect; the other study asserted that the isoform switch is tissue-specific. Here, we re-analyzed the RNA sequencing data of 25 types of human tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas Data Portal, and confirmed that PKM2 was the major isoform in the tumors and was highly elevated in addition to the entire PKM gene. We further demonstrated that the expression level of PKM1 significantly declined even though there was substantially increased expression of the entire PKM gene. The proportion of PKM1 in total transcript variants also significantly declined in tumors but the proportion of PKM2 did not change accordingly. Therefore, we conclude that the isoform switch of PKM1 does indeed occur, but it switches to other isoforms rather than PKM2. Considering the change in the expression levels of PKM1, PKM2 and the entire PKM gene, we propose that the upregulation of PKM2 is primarily due to elevated transcriptional levels of the entire PKM gene, instead of the isoform switch.

  20. Human Cytomegalovirus UL97 Kinase and Nonkinase Functions Mediate Viral Cytoplasmic Secondary Envelopment ▿

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Miri D.; Honigman, Alik; Weinstein, Jacob; Chou, Sunwen; Taraboulos, Albert; Rouvinski, Alexander; Shinder, Vera; Wolf, Dana G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed critical roles for the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL97 kinase in viral nuclear maturation events. We have shown recently that UL97 affects the morphology of the viral cytoplasmic assembly compartment (AC) (M. Azzeh, A. Honigman, A. Taraboulos, A. Rouvinski, and D. G. Wolf, Virology 354:69-79, 2006). Here, we employed a comprehensive ultrastructural analysis to dissect the impact of UL97 on cytoplasmic steps of HCMV assembly. Using UL97 deletion (ΔUL97) and kinase-null (K355M) mutants, as well as the UL97 kinase inhibitor NGIC-I, we demonstrated that the loss of UL97 kinase activity resulted in a unique combination of cytoplasmic features: (i) the formation of pp65-rich aberrant cytoplasmic tegument aggregates, (ii) distorted intracytoplasmic membranes, which replaced the normal architecture of the AC, and (iv) a paucity of cytoplasmic tegumented capsids and dense bodies (DBs). We further showed that these abnormal assembly intermediates did not result from impaired nuclear capsid maturation and egress per se by using 2-bromo-5,6-dichloro-1-(β-d-ribofuranosyl) benzimidizole (BDCRB) to induce the artificial inhibition of nuclear maturation and the nucleocytoplasmic translocation of capsids. The specific abrogation of UL97 kinase activity under low-multiplicity-of-infection conditions resulted in the improved release of extracellular virus compared to that of ΔUL97, despite similar rates of viral DNA accumulation and similar effects on nuclear capsid maturation and egress. The only ultrastructural correlate of the growth difference was a higher number of cytoplasmic DBs, tegumented capsids, and clustered viral particles observed upon the specific abrogation of UL97 kinase activity compared to that of ΔUL97. These combined findings reveal a novel role for UL97 in HCMV cytoplasmic secondary envelopment steps, with a further distinction of kinase-mediated function in the formation of the virus-induced AC and a nonkinase function

  1. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition promotes human iTreg differentiation and suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yongxiang; Zhuo, Han; Lu, Yunjie; Deng, Lei; Jiang, Runqiu; Zhang, Long; Zhu, Qin; Pu, Liyong; Wang, Xuehao; Lu, Ling

    2015-05-01

    Induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) are essential to maintain immunological tolerance, immune homeostasis and prevention of autoimmunity. Some studies suggest that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is involved in the mouse iTreg differentiation; however, whether GSK3β inhibits or enhances iTreg differentiation is still a matter of controversy. To address this issue, we have utilized human naïve CD4(+) T cells and investigated whether GSK3 activity changes during iTreg differentiation and whether altering GSK3 activity influences the development of iTregs and its suppressive function. As a constitutively activated kinase, during iTreg differentiation GSK3β became quickly deactivated (phosphorylated at serine 9), which is dependent on MAPK pathway rather than PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Our results indicated that inhibition of GSK3β by specific inhibitors, SB216763 or TDZD-8, promoted the differentiation of iTreg and increased their suppressive activity. In contrast, overexpression of GSK3β significantly inhibited iTreg differentiation. Furthermore, GSK3β inhibition enhanced iTreg differentiation through the TGF-β/Smad3 pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrates that inhibition of GSK3β enhances human iTreg differentiation and its suppressive activity, and provides a rationale to target GSK3β as a novel immunotherapeutic strategy.

  2. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib selectively inhibits CYP2C8 activities in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Jae-Won; Oh, Kyung-Suk; Choi, Chang-Soo; Kim, Kwang Hee; Han, Won Seok; Yoon, Chang-No; Chung, Eun Sook; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Shin, Jae-Gook

    2013-01-01

    The tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib was examined for its inhibition of cytochrome P450s (CYPs) in human liver microsomes and in human CYPs expressed in a baculovirus-insect cell system. Nilotinib demonstrated preferential inhibition of CYP2C8-mediated paclitaxel 6α-hydroxylation, rosiglitazone hydroxylation and amodiaquine N-deethylation in human liver microsomes, with IC₅₀ values of 0.4, 7.5 and 0.7 µM, respectively. The IC₅₀ value of nilotinib for paclitaxel 6α-hydroxylation was 20-fold lower than that of the other five tyrosine-kinase inhibitors tested. Nilotinib appears to display competitive inhibition against paclitaxel 6α-hydroxylation and amodiaquine N-deethylation, with estimated mean Ki values of 0.90 and 0.15 µM in human liver microsomes and 0.10 and 0.61 µM in recombinant human CYP2C8, respectively. These results are consistent with those of molecular docking simulations, where paclitaxel could not access the CYP2C8 catalytic site in the presence of nilotinib, but the binding of midazolam, a substrate of CYP3A4, to the catalytic site of CYP3A4 was not affected by nilotinib. The demonstrated inhibitory activity of nilotinib against CYP2C8 at concentrations less than those observed in patients who received nilotinib therapy is of potential clinical relevance and further in vivo exploration is warranted.

  3. Structural basis of CX-4945 binding to human protein kinase CK2

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Andrew D.; Sheth, Payal R.; Basso, Andrea D.; Paliwal, Sunil; Gray, Kimberly; Fischmann, Thierry O.; Le, Hung V.

    2012-02-07

    Protein kinase CK2 (CK2), a constitutively active serine/threonine kinase, is involved in a variety of roles essential to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Elevated levels of CK2 expression results in the dysregulation of key signaling pathways that regulate transcription, and has been implicated in cancer. The adenosine-5'-triphosphate-competitive inhibitor CX-4945 has been reported to show broad spectrum anti-proliferative activity in multiple cancer cell lines. Although the enzymatic IC{sub 50} of CX-4945 has been reported, the thermodynamics and structural basis of binding to CK2{alpha} remained elusive. Presented here are the crystal structures of human CK2{alpha} in complex with CX-4945 and adenylyl phosphoramidate at 2.7 and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. Biophysical analysis of CX-4945 binding is also described. This data provides the structural rationale for the design of more potent inhibitors against this emerging cancer target.

  4. Berkeley Lab Checkpoint/Restart for Linux

    2003-11-15

    This package implements system-level checkpointing of scientific applications mnning on Linux clusters in a manner suitable for implementing preemption, migration and fault recovery by a batch scheduler The design includes documented interfaces for a cooperating application or library to implement extensions to the checkpoint system, such as consistent checkpointing of distnbuted MPI applications Using this package with an appropnate MPI implementation, the vast majority of scientific applications which use MPI for communucation are checkpointable withoutmore » any modifications to the application source code. Extending VMAdump code used in the bproc system, the BLCR kemel modules provide three additional features necessary for useful system-level checkpointing of scientific applications(installation of bproc is not required to use BLCR) First, this package provides the bookkeeping and coordination required for checkpointing and restoring multi-threaded and multi-process applications mnning on a single node Secondly, this package provides a system call interface allowing checkpoints to be requested by any aufhonzed process, such as a batch scheduler. Thirdly, this package provides a system call interface allowing applications and/or application libraries to extend the checkpoint capabilities in user space, for instance to proide coordination of checkpoints of distritsuted MPI applications. The "Iibcr" library in this package implements a wrapper around the system call interface exported by the kemel modules, and mantains bookkeeping to allow registration of callbacks by runtime libraries This library also provides the necesary thread-saftety and signal-safety mechanisms Thus, this library provides the means for applications and run-time libranes, such as MPI, to register callback functions to be run when a checkpoint is taken or when restarting from one. This library may also be used as a LD_PRELOAD to enable checkpointing of applications with development

  5. Human cervical cancer cells use Ca2+ signalling, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase in regulatory volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Shen, M R; Chou, C Y; Browning, J A; Wilkins, R J; Ellory, J C

    2001-12-01

    1. This study was aimed at identifying the signalling pathways involved in the activation of volume-regulatory mechanisms of human cervical cancer cells. 2. Osmotic swelling of human cervical cancer cells induced a substantial increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) by the activation of Ca2+ entry across the cell membrane, as well as Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This Ca2+ signalling was critical for the normal regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response. 3. The activation of swelling-activated ion and taurine transport was significantly inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin AG 1478) and potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na3VO4. However, the Src family of tyrosine kinases was not involved in regulation of the swelling-activated Cl- channel. 4. Cell swelling triggered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades leading to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/ERK2) and p38 kinase. The volume-responsive ERK1/ERK2 signalling pathway linked with the activation of K+ and Cl- channels, and taurine transport. However, the volume-regulatory mechanism was independent of the activation of p38 MAP kinase. 5. The phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 expression following a hypotonic shock was up-regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and down-regulated by PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The response of ERK activation to hypotonicity also required Ca2+ entry and depended on tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated/ERK-activating kinase (MEK) activity. 6. Considering the results overall, osmotic swelling promotes the activation of tyrosine kinase and ERK1/ERK2 and raises intracellular Ca2+, all of which play a crucial role in the volume-regulatory mechanism of human cervical cancer cells. PMID:11731569

  6. Diverging regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform gene expression in cultured human muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Abbot, Emily L; McCormack, James G; Reynet, Christine; Hassall, David G; Buchan, Kevin W; Yeaman, Stephen J

    2005-06-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex occupies a central and strategic position in muscle intermediary metabolism and is primarily regulated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation. The identification of multiple isoforms of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK1-4) and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase (PDP1-2) has raised intriguing new possibilities for chronic pyruvate dehydrogenase complex control. Experiments to date suggest that PDK4 is the major isoenzyme responsible for changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity in response to various different metabolic conditions. Using a cultured human skeletal muscle cell model system, we found that expression of both PDK2 and PDK4 mRNA is upregulated in response to glucose deprivation and fatty acid supplementation, the effects of which are reversed by insulin treatment. In addition, insulin directly downregulates PDK2 and PDK4 mRNA transcript abundance via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathway, which may involve glycogen synthase kinase-3 but does not utilize the mammalian target of rapamycin or mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways. In order to further elucidate the regulation of PDK, the role of the peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors (PPAR) was investigated using highly potent subtype selective agonists. PPARalpha and PPARdelta agonists were found to specifically upregulate PDK4 mRNA expression, whereas PPARgamma activation selectively decreased PDK2 mRNA transcript abundance. PDP1 mRNA expression was unaffected by all conditions analysed. These results suggest that in human muscle, hormonal and nutritional conditions may control PDK2 and PDK4 mRNA expression via a common signalling mechanism. In addition, PPARs appear to independently regulate specific PDK isoform transcipt levels, which are likely to impart important metabolic mediation of fuel utilization by the muscle. PMID:15955060

  7. Elucidation of the active conformation of the APS-kinase domain of human PAPS synthetase 1.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Nikolina; Dietrich, Kristen; Paarmann, Ingo; Ort, Stephan; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2007-03-23

    Bifunctional human PAPS synthetase (PAPSS) catalyzes, in a two-step process, the formation of the activated sulfate carrier 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS). The first reaction involves the formation of the 5'-adenosine phosphosulfate (APS) intermediate from ATP and inorganic sulfate. APS is then further phosphorylated on its 3'-hydroxyl group by an additional ATP molecule to generate PAPS. The former reaction is catalyzed by the ATP-sulfurylase domain and the latter by the APS-kinase domain. Here, we report the structure of the APS-kinase domain of PAPSS isoform 1 (PAPSS1) representing the Michaelis complex with the products ADP-Mg and PAPS. This structure provides a rare glimpse of the active conformation of an enzyme catalyzing phosphoryl transfer without resorting to substrate analogs, inactivating mutations, or catalytically non-competent conditions. Our structure shows the interactions involved in the binding of the magnesium ion and PAPS, thereby revealing residues critical for catalysis. The essential magnesium ion is observed bridging the phosphate groups of the products. This function of the metal ion is made possible by the DGDN-loop changing its conformation from that previously reported, and identifies these loop residues unambiguously as a Walker B motif. Furthermore, the second aspartate residue of this motif is the likely candidate for initiating nucleophilic attack on the ATP gamma-phosphate group by abstracting the proton from the 3'-hydroxyl group of the substrate APS. We report the structure of the APS-kinase domain of human PAPSS1 in complex with two APS molecules, demonstrating the ability of the ATP/ADP-binding site to bind APS. Both structures reveal extended N termini that approach the active site of the neighboring monomer. Together, these results significantly increase our understandings of how catalysis is achieved by APS-kinase.

  8. “The Octet”: Eight Protein Kinases that Control Mammalian DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    DePamphilis, Melvin L.; de Renty, Christelle M.; Ullah, Zakir; Lee, Chrissie Y.

    2012-01-01

    Development of a fertilized human egg into an average sized adult requires about 29 trillion cell divisions, thereby producing enough DNA to stretch to the Sun and back 200 times (DePamphilis and Bell, 2011)! Even more amazing is the fact that throughout these mitotic cell cycles, the human genome is duplicated once and only once each time a cell divides. If a cell accidentally begins to re-replicate its nuclear DNA prior to cell division, checkpoint pathways trigger apoptosis. And yet, some cells are developmentally programmed to respond to environmental cues by switching from mitotic cell cycles to endocycles, a process in which multiple S phases occur in the absence of either mitosis or cytokinesis. Endocycles allow production of viable, differentiated, polyploid cells that no longer proliferate. What is surprising is that among the 516 (Manning et al., 2002) to 557 (BioMart web site) protein kinases encoded by the human genome, only eight regulate nuclear DNA replication directly. These are Cdk1, Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6, Cdk7, Cdc7, Checkpoint kinase-1 (Chk1), and Checkpoint kinase-2. Even more remarkable is the fact that only four of these enzymes (Cdk1, Cdk7, Cdc7, and Chk1) are essential for mammalian development. Here we describe how these protein kinases determine when DNA replication occurs during mitotic cell cycles, how mammalian cells switch from mitotic cell cycles to endocycles, and how cancer cells can be selectively targeted for destruction by inducing them to begin a second S phase before mitosis is complete. PMID:23055977

  9. Crystal structure of the kinase domain of human protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) at 2.33 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manish Kumar; Kumar, Amit; Birudukota, Swarnakumari; Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Tyagi, Rajiv; Gosu, Ramachandraiah

    2016-09-16

    Human Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) (EC:2.7.10.2), also known as the breast tumor kinase (BRK), is an intracellular non-receptor Src-related tyrosine kinase expressed in a majority of human breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines, but its expression is low or completely absent in normal mammary glands. In the recent past, several studies have suggested that PTK6 is a potential therapeutic target in cancer. To understand its structural and functional properties, the PTK6 kinase domain (PTK6-KD) gene was cloned, overexpressed in a baculo-insect cell system, purified and crystallized at room temperature. X-ray diffraction data to 2.33 Å resolution was collected on a single PTK6-KD crystal, which belonged to the triclinic space group P1. The Matthews coefficient calculation suggested the presence of four protein molecules per asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of ∼50%.The structure has been solved by molecular replacement and crystal structure data submitted to the protein data bank under the accession number 5D7V. This is the first report of apo PTK6-KD structure crystallized in DFG-in and αC-helix-out conformation. PMID:27480927

  10. Crystal structure of the kinase domain of human protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) at 2.33 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manish Kumar; Kumar, Amit; Birudukota, Swarnakumari; Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Tyagi, Rajiv; Gosu, Ramachandraiah

    2016-09-16

    Human Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) (EC:2.7.10.2), also known as the breast tumor kinase (BRK), is an intracellular non-receptor Src-related tyrosine kinase expressed in a majority of human breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines, but its expression is low or completely absent in normal mammary glands. In the recent past, several studies have suggested that PTK6 is a potential therapeutic target in cancer. To understand its structural and functional properties, the PTK6 kinase domain (PTK6-KD) gene was cloned, overexpressed in a baculo-insect cell system, purified and crystallized at room temperature. X-ray diffraction data to 2.33 Å resolution was collected on a single PTK6-KD crystal, which belonged to the triclinic space group P1. The Matthews coefficient calculation suggested the presence of four protein molecules per asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of ∼50%.The structure has been solved by molecular replacement and crystal structure data submitted to the protein data bank under the accession number 5D7V. This is the first report of apo PTK6-KD structure crystallized in DFG-in and αC-helix-out conformation.

  11. Proviral integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (PIM) kinases promote human T helper 1 cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tahvanainen, Johanna; Kyläniemi, Minna K; Kanduri, Kartiek; Gupta, Bhawna; Lähteenmäki, Hanna; Kallonen, Teemu; Rajavuori, Anna; Rasool, Omid; Koskinen, Päivi J; Rao, Kanury V S; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2013-02-01

    The differentiation of human primary T helper 1 (Th1) cells from naïve precursor cells is regulated by a complex, interrelated signaling network. The identification of factors regulating the early steps of Th1 cell polarization can provide important insight in the development of therapeutics for many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The serine/threonine-specific proviral integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (PIM) kinases PIM1 and PIM2 have been implicated in the cytokine-dependent proliferation and survival of lymphocytes. We have established that the third member of this family, PIM3, is also expressed in human primary Th cells and identified a new function for the entire PIM kinase family in T lymphocytes. Although PIM kinases are expressed more in Th1 than Th2 cells, we demonstrate here that these kinases positively influence Th1 cell differentiation. Our RNA interference results from human primary Th cells also suggest that PIM kinases promote the production of IFNγ, the hallmark cytokine produced by Th1 cells. Consistent with this, they also seem to be important for the up-regulation of the critical Th1-driving factor, T box expressed in T cells (T-BET), and the IL-12/STAT4 signaling pathway during the early Th1 differentiation process. In summary, we have identified PIM kinases as new regulators of human primary Th1 cell differentiation, thus providing new insights into the mechanisms controlling the selective development of human Th cell subsets. PMID:23209281

  12. Optimal message log reclamation for uncoordinated checkpointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yi-Min; Fuchs, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    Uncoordinated checkpointing for message-passing systems allows maximum process autonomy and general nondeterministic execution, but suffers from potential domino effect and the large space overhead for maintaining checkpoints and message logs. Traditionally, it has been assumed that only obsolete checkpoints and message logs before the global recovery line can be garbage-collected. Recently, an approach to identifying all garbage checkpoints based on recovery line transformation and decomposition has been developed. We show in this paper that the same approach can be applied to the problem of identifying all garbage message logs for systems requiring message logging to record in-transit messages. Communication trace-driven simulation for several parallel programs is used to evaluate the proposed algorithm.

  13. The Scalable Checkpoint/Restart Library

    2009-02-23

    The Scalable Checkpoint/Restart (SCR) library provides an interface that codes may use to worite our and read in application-level checkpoints in a scalable fashion. In the current implementation, checkpoint files are cached in local storage (hard disk or RAM disk) on the compute nodes. This technique provides scalable aggregate bandwidth and uses storage resources that are fully dedicated to the job. This approach addresses the two common drawbacks of checkpointing a large-scale application to amore » shared parallel file system, namely, limited bandwidth and file system contention. In fact, on current platforms, SCR scales linearly with the number of compute nodes. It has been benchmarked as high as 720GB/s on 1094 nodes of Atlas, which is nearly two orders of magnitude faster thanthe parallel file system.« less

  14. The Scalable Checkpoint/Restart Library

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2009-02-23

    The Scalable Checkpoint/Restart (SCR) library provides an interface that codes may use to worite our and read in application-level checkpoints in a scalable fashion. In the current implementation, checkpoint files are cached in local storage (hard disk or RAM disk) on the compute nodes. This technique provides scalable aggregate bandwidth and uses storage resources that are fully dedicated to the job. This approach addresses the two common drawbacks of checkpointing a large-scale application to a shared parallel file system, namely, limited bandwidth and file system contention. In fact, on current platforms, SCR scales linearly with the number of compute nodes. It has been benchmarked as high as 720GB/s on 1094 nodes of Atlas, which is nearly two orders of magnitude faster thanthe parallel file system.

  15. Anti-immunoglobulin M activates nuclear calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in human B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that the nuclear protein, Ets-1, is phosphorylated in a calcium-dependent manner after ligation of immunoglobulin (Ig) M on B lymphocytes. As this phosphorylation was independent of protein kinase C activity, we tested whether a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) might phosphorylate the Ets-1 protein after elevation of intracellular free calcium concentrations. The dephosphorylated form of Ets-1 has been shown to bind to chromatin, suggesting that the operative kinase should be detectable in the nucleus. We prepared nuclear extracts from two human B cell lines in which increased intracellular free calcium levels correlated with increased phosphorylation of the Ets-1 protein. Activity of the CaM kinases was determined using a synthetic peptide substrate both in the absence and presence of an inhibitor specific for the CaM kinase family, KN-62. Stimulation of cells with anti-IgM led to increased activity of a nuclear kinase that could phosphorylate the peptide, and this activity was reduced by 10 microM KN-62. Kinase activity was reduced in lysates preadsorbed using an antibody specific for CaM kinase II. Two-dimensional phosphopeptide maps of the Ets-1 protein from cells incubated with ionomycin or anti-IgM contained two unique phosphopeptides that were absent in untreated cells. Incubation of isolated Ets-1 protein with purified CaM kinase II produced phosphorylation of peptides that migrated identically to those found in cells incubated with either anti-IgM or ionomycin. These data suggest a model of signal transduction by the antigen receptor on B lymphocytes in which increased intracellular free calcium can rapidly activate nuclear CaM kinase II, potentially resulting in phosphorylation and regulation of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:7500040

  16. Understanding the Multifaceted Role of Human Down Syndrome Kinase DYRK1A.

    PubMed

    Kay, L J; Smulders-Srinivasan, T K; Soundararajan, M

    2016-01-01

    The dual-specificity tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation-regulated kinase DYRK1A, also known as Down syndrome (DS) kinase, is a dosage-dependent signaling kinase that was originally shown to be highly expressed in DS patients as a consequence of trisomy 21. Although this was evident some time ago, it is only in recent investigations that the molecular roles of DYRK1A in a wide range of cellular processes are becoming increasingly apparent. Since initial knowledge on DYRK1A became evident through minibrain mnb, the Drosophila homolog of DYRK1A, this review will first summarize the scientific reports on minibrain and further expand on the well-established neuronal functions of mammalian and human DYRK1A. Recent investigations across the current decade have provided rather interesting and compelling evidence in establishing nonneuronal functions for DYRK1A, including its role in infection, immunity, cardiomyocyte biology, cancer, and cell cycle control. The latter part of this review will therefore focus in detail on the emerging nonneuronal functions of DYRK1A and summarize the regulatory role of DYRK1A in controlling Tau and α-synuclein. Finally, the emerging role of DYRK1A in Parkinson's disease will be outlined. PMID:27567487

  17. Structure and transforming potential of the human cot oncogene encoding a putative protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, J; Higashi, T; Mukai, H; Ohuchi, T; Kakunaga, T

    1991-01-01

    A new transforming gene has been molecularly cloned from hamster SHOK cells transformed with DNA extracted from a human thyroid carcinoma cell line and named the cot (cancer Osaka thyroid) oncogene. cDNA sequencing disclosed that this oncogene codes for a protein with 415 amino acid residues, and computer matching showed 42 to 48% similarity matches with serine protein kinases. Its gene product was identified as a 52-kDa protein by transcription and translation in vitro. Expression of cot cDNA under transcriptional control by a retroviral long terminal repeat induced morphological transformation of NIH 3T3 cells as well as SHOK cells. Protein kinase activity associated with constructed p60gag-cot was detected by immune complex kinase assay with anti-gag antiserum. The cot oncogene was overexpressed in transformed SHOK cells and found to have a rearranged 3' end in the last coding exon, which probably resulted in a deletion and an altered C' terminus in the transforming protein. This DNA rearrangement appeared to have occurred during transfection of the tumor DNA into hamster SHOK cells and not in the original thyroid tumor. Images PMID:2072910

  18. Dietary flavonoid fisetin induces a forced exit from mitosis by targeting the mitotic spindle checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Pouwels, Jeroen; Varis, Asta; Kukkonen, Anu M.; Toivonen, Pauliina; Halonen, Pasi K.; Perälä, Merja; Kallioniemi, Olli; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Kallio, Marko J.

    2009-01-01

    Fisetin is a natural flavonol present in edible vegetables, fruits and wine at 2–160 μg/g concentrations and an ingredient in nutritional supplements with much higher concentrations. The compound has been reported to exert anticarcinogenic effects as well as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity via its ability to act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation and free radical scavenger, respectively. Our cell-based high-throughput screen for small molecules that override chemically induced mitotic arrest identified fisetin as an antimitotic compound. Fisetin rapidly compromised microtubule drug-induced mitotic block in a proteasome-dependent manner in several human cell lines. Moreover, in unperturbed human cancer cells fisetin caused premature initiation of chromosome segregation and exit from mitosis without normal cytokinesis. To understand the molecular mechanism behind these mitotic errors, we analyzed the consequences of fisetin treatment on the localization and phoshorylation of several mitotic proteins. Aurora B, Bub1, BubR1 and Cenp-F rapidly lost their kinetochore/centromere localization and others became dephosphorylated upon addition of fisetin to the culture medium. Finally, we identified Aurora B kinase as a novel direct target of fisetin. The activity of Aurora B was significantly reduced by fisetin in vitro and in cells, an effect that can explain the observed forced mitotic exit, failure of cytokinesis and decreased cell viability. In conclusion, our data propose that fisetin perturbs spindle checkpoint signaling, which may contribute to the antiproliferative effects of the compound. PMID:19395653

  19. In vitro binding and phosphorylation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein by serine/threonine protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Bodéus, M; Marie-Cardine, A; Bougeret, C; Ramos-Morales, F; Benarous, R

    1995-06-01

    Although the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nef gene still has no precisely defined function, in vivo studies have demonstrated that Nef is an important pathogenic determinant of HIV. In order to identify cellular proteins capable of binding to Nef, the HIV-1LAI nef gene product was expressed in the bacterial vector pGEX-2T as a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Nef fusion protein. Deletion mutants corresponding to 86 and 35 N-terminal residues of the Nef protein were prepared. The GST-Nef constructs were used to identify cellular kinases capable of interacting with Nef. After incubation with a Jurkat cell lysate, the GST-Nef constructs immobilized on glutathione-agarose beads bound to cellular kinase(s) and were phosphorylated at three sites in vitro: one on threonine at position 15, one on serine between residues 1 and 35, and one on threonine between residues 36 and 86. The Nef-phosphorylating activity was inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC)-selective inhibitors. Cell fractionation showed that this Nef-binding kinase was mainly in the membrane-associated fraction. These results suggest that kinase(s) of the PKC family are specifically bound to and phosphorylate Nef in vitro. The interaction of Nef with cellular kinases and its phosphorylation may be important in mediating the effects of Nef in HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  20. Dematin, a human erythrocyte cytoskeletal protein, is a substrate for a recombinant FIKK kinase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Gabriel S; Bailey, Scott

    2013-09-01

    P. falciparum causes the most deadly form of malaria, resulting from the adherence of infected red blood cells to blood vessels. During the blood stage of infection, the parasite secretes a large number of proteins into the host erythrocyte. The secretion of a 20-member family of protein kinases known as FIKK kinases, after a conserved Phe-Ile-Lys-Lys sequence motif, is unique to P. falciparum. Identification of physiological substrates of these kinases may provide perspective on the importance of FIKK kinase activity to P. falciparum virulence. We demonstrate, for the first time, the heterologous expression and purification of a FIKK kinase (PfFk4.1, PFD1165w). The recombinant kinase is active against general substrates and phosphorylates itself. Having demonstrated kinase activity, we incubated recombinant Fk4.1 with parasite and human erythrocyte lysates. No parasite-derived substrates were identified. However, treatment of erythrocyte ghosts shows that the FIKK kinase Fk4.1 phosphorylates dematin, a cytoskeletal protein found at the red blood cell spectrin-actin junction.

  1. Quantitative network mapping of the human kinome interactome reveals new clues for rational kinase inhibitor discovery and individualized cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Jia, Peilin; Wang, Quan; Zhao, Zhongming

    2014-06-15

    The human kinome is gaining importance through its promising cancer therapeutic targets, yet no general model to address the kinase inhibitor resistance has emerged. Here, we constructed a systems biology-based framework to catalogue the human kinome, including 538 kinase genes, in the broader context of the human interactome. Specifically, we constructed three networks: a kinase-substrate interaction network containing 7,346 pairs connecting 379 kinases to 36,576 phosphorylation sites in 1,961 substrates, a protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) containing 92,699 pairs, and an atomic resolution PPIN containing 4,278 pairs. We identified the conserved regulatory phosphorylation motifs (e.g., Ser/Thr-Pro) using a sequence logo analysis. We found the typical anticancer target selection strategy that uses network hubs as drug targets, might lead to a high adverse drug reaction risk. Furthermore, we found the distinct network centrality of kinases creates a high anticancer drug resistance risk by feedback or crosstalk mechanisms within cellular networks. This notion is supported by the systematic network and pathway analyses that anticancer drug resistance genes are significantly enriched as hubs and heavily participate in multiple signaling pathways. Collectively, this comprehensive human kinome interactome map sheds light on anticancer drug resistance mechanisms and provides an innovative resource for rational kinase inhibitor design.

  2. Tryptase Activation of Immortalized Human Urothelial Cell Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Marentette, John O.; Hauser, Paul J.; Hurst, Robert E.; Klumpp, David J.; Rickard, Alice; McHowat, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is multifactorial, but likely involves urothelial cell dysfunction and mast cell accumulation in the bladder wall. Activated mast cells in the bladder wall release several inflammatory mediators, including histamine and tryptase. We determined whether mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated in response to tryptase stimulation of urothelial cells derived from human normal and IC/PBS bladders. Tryptase stimulation of normal urothelial cells resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). A 5.5-fold increase in ERK 1/2 activity was observed in urothelial cells isolated from IC/PBS bladders. No significant change in p38 MAP kinase was observed in tryptase-stimulated normal urothelial cells but a 2.5-fold increase was observed in cells isolated from IC/PBS bladders. Inhibition of ERK 1/2 with PD98059 or inhibition of p38 MAP kinase with SB203580 did not block tryptase-stimulated iPLA2 activation. Incubation with the membrane phospholipid-derived PLA2 hydrolysis product lysoplasmenylcholine increased ERK 1/2 activity, suggesting the iPLA2 activation is upstream of ERK 1/2. Real time measurements of impedance to evaluate wound healing of cell cultures indicated increased healing rates in normal and IC/PBS urothelial cells in the presence of tryptase, with inhibition of ERK 1/2 significantly decreasing the wound healing rate of IC/PBS urothelium. We conclude that activation of ERK 1/2 in response to tryptase stimulation may facilitate wound healing or cell motility in areas of inflammation in the bladder associated with IC/PBS. PMID:23922867

  3. Regulation of the human WEE1Hu CDK tyrosine 15-kinase during the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, N; Broome, M; Hunter, T

    1995-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are negatively regulated by phosphorylation on threonine 14 (T14) and tyrosine 15 (Y15). In fission yeast, the Wee1 and mitosis inhibitory kinase 1 (Mik1) protein kinases phosphorylate Y15 in Cdc2. WEE1Hu is the only known protein kinase that can carry out this inhibitory phosphorylation on Y15 in higher eukaryotes. In the present study, we examined the endogenous products of WEE1Hu in human cells and found that the original WEE1Hu cDNA lacked 214 amino acids at the N-terminus. The predicted full-length protein has weak, but significant, similarity over its entire length with Mik1. Thus, we suggest that 'WEE1Hu' is a Mik1-related protein rather than a Wee1 homologue. When isolated in immunoprecipitates, the endogenous WEE1Hu phosphorylated several cyclin-associated CDKs on Y15. WEE1Hu activity increased during S and G2 phases in parallel with the level of protein. Its activity decreased at M phase when WEE1Hu became transiently hyperphosphorylated. In addition, a decrease in WEE1Hu protein level was observed at M/G1 phase. Apparently, the hyperphosphorylation and degradation in combination caused inactivation of WEE1Hu at M phase and the following G1 phase. These results suggest that the activity of WEE1Hu is regulated by phosphorylation and proteolytic degradation, and that WEE1Hu plays a role in inhibiting mitosis before M phase by phosphorylating cyclin B1-Cdc2. Images PMID:7743995

  4. Initiation of human astrovirus type 1 infection was blocked by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Upon initial contact with a virus, host cells activate a series of cellular signaling cascades that facilitate viral entry and viral propagation within the cell. Little is known about how the human astrovirus (HAstV) exploits signaling cascades to establish an infection in host cells. Recent studies showed that activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is important for HAstV infection, though the involvement of other signaling cascades remains unclear. Methods A panel of kinase blockers was used to search for cellular signaling pathways important for HAstV1 infection. To determine their impact on the infectious process, we examined viral gene expression, RNA replication, and viral RNA and capsid protein release from host cells. Results Inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activation interfered with the infection, independent of their effect on ERK 1/2 activation. Activation of the PI3K signaling cascade occurred at an early phase of the infection, judging from the timeframe of Akt phosphorylation. PI3K inhibition at early times, but not at later times, blocked viral gene expression. However, inhibiting the downstream targets of PI3K activation, Akt and Rac1, did not block infection. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) activation was found to block a later phase of HAstV1 production. Conclusions Our results reveal a previously unknown, essential role of PI3K in the life cycle of HAstV1. PI3K participates in the early stage of infection, possibly during the viral entry process. Our results also reveal the role of PKA in viral production. PMID:23680019

  5. Expression, purification, stability optimization and characterization of human Aurora B kinase domain from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Payal R; Ramanathan, Lata; Ranchod, Ashwin; Basso, Andrea D; Barrett, Dianah; Zhao, Jia; Gray, Kimberly; Liu, Yan-Hui; Zhang, Rumin; Le, Hung V

    2010-11-15

    Aurora B kinase plays a critical role in regulating mitotic progression, and its dysregulation has been linked to tumorigenesis. The structure of the kinase domain of human Aurora B and the complementary information of binding thermodynamics of known Aurora inhibitors is lacking. Towards that effort, we sought to identify a human Aurora B construct that would be amenable for large-scale protein production for biophysical and structural studies. Although the designed AurB(69-333) construct expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli, the purified protein was largely unstable and prone to aggregation. We employed thermal-shift assay for high-throughput screening of 192 conditions to identify optimal pH and salt conditions that increased the stability and minimized aggregation of AurB(69-333). Direct ligand binding analyses using temperature-dependent circular dichroism (TdCD) and TR-FRET-based Lanthascreen™ binding assay showed that the purified protein was folded and functional. The affinity rank-order obtained using TdCD and Lanthascreen™ binding assay correlated with enzymatic IC50 values measured using full-length Aurora B protein for all the inhibitors tested except for AZD1152. The direct binding results support the hypothesis that the purified human AurB(69-333) fragment is a good surrogate for its full-length counterpart for biophysical and structural analyses.

  6. Molecular docking and NMR binding studies to identify novel inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Boonsri, Pornthip; Neumann, Terrence S.; Olson, Andrew L.; Cai, Sheng; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Hannongbua, Supa; Sem, Daniel S.

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Natural and synthetic inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Virtual screening yielded a hit rate of 15%, with inhibitor K{sub d}'s of 10-60 {mu}M. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR studies indicate significant protein conformational changes upon binding. -- Abstract: Phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK) phosphorylates mevalonate-5-phosphate (M5P) in the mevalonate pathway, which is the sole source of isoprenoids and steroids in humans. We have identified new PMK inhibitors with virtual screening, using autodock. Promising hits were verified and their affinity measured using NMR-based {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) chemical shift perturbation and fluorescence titrations. Chemical shift changes were monitored, plotted, and fitted to obtain dissociation constants (K{sub d}). Tight binding compounds with K{sub d}'s ranging from 6-60 {mu}M were identified. These compounds tended to have significant polarity and negative charge, similar to the natural substrates (M5P and ATP). HSQC cross peak changes suggest that binding induces a global conformational change, such as domain closure. Compounds identified in this study serve as chemical genetic probes of human PMK, to explore pharmacology of the mevalonate pathway, as well as starting points for further drug development.

  7. Identification and chromosome assignment of a human gene encoding a novel phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase.

    PubMed

    Seki, N; Nimura, Y; Ohira, M; Saito, T; Ichimiya, S; Nomura, N; Nakagawara, A

    1997-10-31

    We identified a novel phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase by screening human brain cDNA libraries with probes designed from the conserved kinase-domain sequence. Analysis of cDNAs indicated that two different forms of transcripts are present: one is the full-length form composed of 1,044 amino acid residues and the other is the short form that the N-terminal 216 amino acid residues including a putative p85 binding domain has been truncated (828 amino acid residues). Database search revealed the sequence of the full-length form to be identical to that recently registered by D. Chantry et al. (Accession No. U86453 in GenBank release, August 1997). Northern blot analysis showed this mRNA to be ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, with relatively higher expression was observed in spleen, thymus and leukocytes. Based on fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR-based analyses with both human/rodent mono-chromosomal hybrid cell panels and radiation hybrid mapping panels, this gene was localized to chromosome region 1p36.2. This region is frequently lost in a variety of human malignancies, including neuroblastoma. The novel PI3K could be a candidate target of the 1p36 alteration that occurs in neuroendocrine tumors.

  8. Investigating combinatorial approaches in virtual screening on human inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (PFKFB3): a case study for small molecule kinases.

    PubMed

    Crochet, Robert B; Cavalier, Michael C; Seo, Minsuh; Kim, Jeong Do; Yim, Young-Sun; Park, Seung-Jong; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2011-11-01

    Efforts toward improving the predictiveness in tier-based approaches to virtual screening (VS) have mainly focused on protein kinases. Despite their significance as drug targets, small molecule kinases have been rarely tested with these approaches. In this paper, we investigate the efficacy of a pharmacophore screening-combined structure-based docking approach on the human inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, an emerging target for cancer chemotherapy. Six out of a total 1364 compounds from NCI's Diversity Set II were selected as true actives via throughput screening. Using a database constructed from these compounds, five programs were tested for structure-based docking (SBD) performance, the MOE of which showed the highest enrichments and second highest screening rates. Separately, using the same database, pharmacophore screening was performed, reducing 1364 compounds to 287 with no loss in true actives, yielding an enrichment of 4.75. When SBD was retested with the pharmacophore filtered database, 4 of the 5 SBD programs showed significant improvements to enrichment rates at only 2.5% of the database, with a 7-fold decrease in an average VS time. Our results altogether suggest that combinatorial approaches of VS technologies are easily applicable to small molecule kinases and, moreover, that such methods can decrease the variability associated with single-method SBD approaches.

  9. Cleavage of stalled forks by fission yeast Mus81/Eme1 in absence of DNA replication checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Froget, Benoît; Blaisonneau, Joël; Lambert, Sarah; Baldacci, Giuseppe

    2008-02-01

    During replication arrest, the DNA replication checkpoint plays a crucial role in the stabilization of the replisome at stalled forks, thus preventing the collapse of active forks and the formation of aberrant DNA structures. How this checkpoint acts to preserve the integrity of replication structures at stalled fork is poorly understood. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the DNA replication checkpoint kinase Cds1 negatively regulates the structure-specific endonuclease Mus81/Eme1 to preserve genomic integrity when replication is perturbed. Here, we report that, in response to hydroxyurea (HU) treatment, the replication checkpoint prevents S-phase-specific DNA breakage resulting from Mus81 nuclease activity. However, loss of Mus81 regulation by Cds1 is not sufficient to produce HU-induced DNA breaks. Our results suggest that unscheduled cleavage of stalled forks by Mus81 is permitted when the replisome is not stabilized by the replication checkpoint. We also show that HU-induced DNA breaks are partially dependent on the Rqh1 helicase, the fission yeast homologue of BLM, but are independent of its helicase activity. This suggests that efficient cleavage of stalled forks by Mus81 requires Rqh1. Finally, we identified an interplay between Mus81 activity at stalled forks and the Chk1-dependent DNA damage checkpoint during S-phase when replication forks have collapsed.

  10. The Late S-Phase Transcription Factor Hcm1 Is Regulated through Phosphorylation by the Cell Wall Integrity Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Takahiro; Veis, Jiri; Hollenstein, David; Sekiya, Mizuho; Ammerer, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) checkpoint in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae coordinates cell wall construction and cell cycle progression. In this study, we showed that the regulation of Hcm1, a late-S-phase transcription factor, arrests the cell cycle via the cell wall integrity checkpoint. Although the HCM1 mRNA level remained unaffected when the cell wall integrity checkpoint was induced, the protein level decreased. The overproduction of Hcm1 resulted in the failure of the cell wall integrity checkpoint. We identified 39 Hcm1 phosphorylation sites, including 26 novel sites, by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A mutational analysis revealed that phosphorylation of Hcm1 at S61, S65, and S66 is required for the proper onset of the cell wall integrity checkpoint by regulating the timely decrease in its protein level. Hyperactivation of the CWI mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway significantly reduced the Hcm1 protein level, and the deletion of CWI MAPK Slt2 resulted in a failure to decrease Hcm1 protein levels in response to stress, suggesting that phosphorylation is regulated by CWI MAPK. In conclusion, we suggest that Hcm1 is regulated negatively by the cell wall integrity checkpoint through timely phosphorylation and degradation under stress to properly control budding yeast proliferation. PMID:26729465

  11. The Late S-Phase Transcription Factor Hcm1 Is Regulated through Phosphorylation by the Cell Wall Integrity Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takahiro; Veis, Jiri; Hollenstein, David; Sekiya, Mizuho; Ammerer, Gustav; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2016-03-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) checkpoint in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae coordinates cell wall construction and cell cycle progression. In this study, we showed that the regulation of Hcm1, a late-S-phase transcription factor, arrests the cell cycle via the cell wall integrity checkpoint. Although the HCM1 mRNA level remained unaffected when the cell wall integrity checkpoint was induced, the protein level decreased. The overproduction of Hcm1 resulted in the failure of the cell wall integrity checkpoint. We identified 39 Hcm1 phosphorylation sites, including 26 novel sites, by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A mutational analysis revealed that phosphorylation of Hcm1 at S61, S65, and S66 is required for the proper onset of the cell wall integrity checkpoint by regulating the timely decrease in its protein level. Hyperactivation of the CWI mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway significantly reduced the Hcm1 protein level, and the deletion of CWI MAPK Slt2 resulted in a failure to decrease Hcm1 protein levels in response to stress, suggesting that phosphorylation is regulated by CWI MAPK. In conclusion, we suggest that Hcm1 is regulated negatively by the cell wall integrity checkpoint through timely phosphorylation and degradation under stress to properly control budding yeast proliferation.

  12. Potential mediation of prostaglandin E2 release from isolated human parietal cells by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Schepp, W; Schneider, J; Tatge, C; Schusdziarra, V; Classen, M

    1990-01-01

    Parietal cells are a major source of gastric mucosal prostaglandins in various species. We examined cholinergic stimulation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release from human parietal cells; using activators of the protein kinase C we attempted to get an indirect insight into cellular mechanisms which control PGE2 release. Gastric mucosal specimens were obtained at surgery and the cells were dispersed by collagenase and pronase E. Parietal cells were enriched to 65-80% by a Percoll gradient, and were incubated for 30 min. PGE2 release into the medium (radioimmunoassay) was 74-126 pg/10(6) cells/30 min under basal conditions and was 2.6-fold increased by carbachol (10(-5) and 10(-4) M). Similarly, PGE2 release was stimulated by phospholipase C (20-200 mU/ml, 364% above basal), 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (10(-9)-10(-5) M, 229%), 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-9)-10(-5) M, 283%) and calcium ionophore A23187 (10(-7)-10(-5) M, 219%). Simultaneous presence of A23187 and TPA synergistically induced stimulation which was slightly higher than the sum of the individual responses. N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide W-7, a putative calmodulin antagonist, inhibited TPA-induced PGE2 release at concentrations regarded specific for blocking calmodulin (IC50 = 1.5 X 0(-6) M). We conclude that in human parietal cells PGE2 is released upon cholinergic stimulation and that phospholipase C and protein kinase C are involved in the control of PGE2 release. We speculate that calmodulin might interact with a protein phosphorylated by protein kinase C to cause PGE2 release.

  13. High-throughput analysis of genome-wide receptor tyrosine kinase expression in human cancers identifies potential novel drug targets.

    PubMed

    Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Schwäble, Joachim; Steffen, Björn; Tidow, Nicola; Brandt, Burkhardt; Becker, Kerstin; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Halfter, Hartmut; Vogt, Ulf; Metzger, Ralf; Schneider, Paul M; Büchner, Thomas; Brandts, Christian; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Serve, Hubert

    2004-02-15

    Novel high-throughput analyses in molecular biology allow sensitive and rapid identification of disease-related genes and drug targets. We have used quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR reactions (n = 23000) to analyze expression of all human receptor tyrosine kinases (n = 56) in malignant tumors (n = 313) of different origins and normal control samples (n = 58). The different tumor types expressed very different numbers of receptor tyrosine kinases: whereas brain tumors and testicular cancer expressed 50 receptor tyrosine kinases, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples expressed only 20 different ones. Specimens of similar tumor origin exhibited characteristic receptor tyrosine kinase expression patterns and were grouped together in hierarchical cluster analyses. When we focused on specific tumor entities, receptor tyrosine kinases were identified that were disease and/or stage specific. Leukemic blasts from AML bone marrow samples differed significantly in receptor tyrosine kinase expression compared with normal bone marrow and purified CD34+ cells. Among the differentially expressed receptor tyrosine kinases, we found FLT3, c-kit, CSF1 receptor, EPHB6, leukocyte tyrosine kinase, and ptk7 to be highly overexpressed in AML samples. Whereas expression changes of some of these were associated with altered differentiation patterns (e.g., CSF1 receptor), others, such as FLT3, were genuinely overexpressed in leukemic blasts. These data and the associated database (http://medweb.uni-muenster.de/institute/meda/research/) provide a comprehensive view of receptor tyrosine kinase expression in human cancer. This information can assist in the definition of novel drug targets.

  14. Loss of Diacylglycerol Kinase-Ζ Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Survival in Human Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jinfu; Wu, Chunyong; Zhang, Junying; Liu, Jialin; Zhang, Xinwu; Hao, Pengcheng; Zhao, Shanmin; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2016-10-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases ζ (DGKζ) is a critical lipid kinase which is involved in phosphatidic acid (PA) generation via diacylglycerol (DAG) phosphorylation. DGKζ is highly expressed in central nervous system and essential for brain development. Studies have indicated that DGKζ is associated with colon cancer invasion and metastasis. However, the involvement of DGKζ in human glioma development remains elusive. Here, we explored the impact and possible mechanisms of DGKζ knockdown on the proliferation and survival of glioma cells. The relationship between DGKζ expression status and human glioma stages was explored in 111 specimens of human gliomas via immunohistochemistry technology. Then the impact of DGKζ on cell proliferation, cell cycle, survival, and colony formation ability was determined in U-87 MG glioma cell lines via lentiviral-mediated small interfering (shRNA) strategy. The influence of DGKζ knockdown on global gene expression in U-87 MGglioma cell lines was further analyzed by microarray platform to reveal the possible molecular mechanisms underlying DGKζ-mediated glioma development and progression. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that DGKζ expression is positively correlated with human gliomagrade. Lentiviral-mediated small interfering (shRNA) strategyefficiently reduced DGKζ expression and DGKζ knockdown impaired cell proliferation, inhibited colony formation ability, and induced cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis in U-87 MG glioma cells. Finally, microarray analysis revealed that multiple cancer-associated pathways and oncogenes were regulated by DGKζ knockdown, which provides insights into underlying mechansims of DGKζ-associated glioma development and progression. Our results established the positive correlation between DGKζ expression and gliomagrade. Furthermore, DGKζ knockdown in human glioma cell lines U-87 MG impaired cell proliferation, inhibited colony formation ability, and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

  15. Assignment of the human diacylglycerol kinase 4 (DAGK4) gene to chromosome 4p16.3

    SciTech Connect

    Endele, S.; Zabel, B.; Winterpacht, A.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes the localization of the human gene for diacylglycerol kinase 4 (DAGK4) to human chromosome 4p16.3 using an exon amplification scheme. It also discusses the possible implications of the chromosomal location of this gene in certain hereditary malignancies. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Crystal Structures of Apparent Saccharide Sensors from Histidine Kinase Receptors Prevalent in a Human Gut Symbiont

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Qun; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    The adult human gut presents a complicated ecosystem where host-bacterium symbiosis plays an important role. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is a predominant member of the gut microflora, providing the human digestive tract with a large number of glycolytic enzymes. Expression of many of these enzymes appears to be controlled by histidine kinase receptors that are fused into unusual hybrid two-component systems that share homologous periplasmic sensor domains. These sensor domains belong to the third most populated (HK3) family based on a previous bioinformatics analysis of predicted histidine kinase sensors. Here, we present crystal structures of two sensor domains representative of the HK3 family. Each sensor is folded into three domains: two seven-bladed β-propeller domains and one β-sandwich domain. Both sensors form dimers in crystals and one sensor appears to be physiologically relevant. The folding characteristics in the individual domains, the domain organization, and the oligomeric architecture are all unique to the HK3 sensors. The sequence analysis of the HK3 sensors indicates that these sensors are shared among other signaling molecules, implying a combinatorial molecular evolution. PMID:24995510

  17. Identification of novel allosteric regulators of human-erythrocyte pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Kharalkar, Shilpa S; Joshi, Gajanan S; Musayev, Faik N; Fornabaio, Micaela; Abraham, Donald J; Safo, Martin K

    2007-11-01

    Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase (PK) is an important glycolytic enzyme, and manipulation of its regulatory behavior by allosteric modifiers is of interest for medicinal purposes. Human-erythrocyte PK was expressed in Rosetta cells and purified on an Ni-NTA column. A search of the small-molecules database of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), using the UNITY software, led to the identification of several compounds with similar pharmacophores as fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), the natural allosteric activator of the human kinases. The compounds were subsequently docked into the FBP binding site using the programs FlexX and GOLD, and their interactions with the protein were analyzed with the energy-scoring function of HINT. Seven promising candidates, compounds 1-7, were obtained from the NCI, and subjected to kinetics analysis, which revealed both activators and inhibitors of the R-isozyme of PK (R-PK). The allosteric effectors discovered in this study could prove to be lead compounds for developing medications for the treatment of hemolytic anemia, sickle-cell anemia, hypoxia-related diseases, and other disorders arising from erythrocyte PK malfunction.

  18. Targeting WEE1 Kinase in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Christopher J; Backos, Donald S; Reigan, Philip

    2016-10-01

    WEE1 kinase plays a crucial role in the G2-M cell-cycle checkpoint arrest for DNA repair before mitotic entry. Normal cells repair damaged DNA during G1 arrest; however, cancer cells often have a deficient G1-S checkpoint and depend on a functional G2-M checkpoint for DNA repair. WEE1 is expressed at high levels in various cancer types including breast cancers, leukemia, melanoma, and adult and pediatric brain tumors. Many of these cancers are treated with DNA-damaging agents; therefore, targeting WEE1 for inhibition and compromising the G2-M checkpoint presents an opportunity to potentiate therapy. In this review we summarize the current WEE1 inhibitors, the potential for further inhibitor development, and the challenges in the clinic for the WEE1 inhibitor strategy. PMID:27427153

  19. Lazy Checkpointing : Exploiting Temporal Locality in Failures to Mitigate Checkpointing Overheads on Extreme-Scale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Devesh; Gupta, Saurabh; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2014-01-01

    Continuing increase in the computational power of supercomputers has enabled large-scale scientific applications in the areas of astrophysics, fusion, climate and combustion to run larger and longer-running simulations, facilitating deeper scientific insights. However, these long-running simulations are often interrupted by multiple system failures. Therefore, these applications rely on ``checkpointing'' as a resilience mechanism to store application state to permanent storage and recover from failures. \\\\ \\indent Unfortunately, checkpointing incurs excessive I/O overhead on supercomputers due to large size of checkpoints, resulting in a sub-optimal performance and resource utilization. In this paper, we devise novel mechanisms to show how checkpointing overhead can be mitigated significantly by exploiting the temporal characteristics of system failures. We provide new insights and detailed quantitative understanding of the checkpointing overheads and trade-offs on large-scale machines. Our prototype implementation shows the viability of our approach on extreme-scale machines.

  20. Asynchronous Checkpoint Migration with MRNet in the Scalable Checkpoint / Restart Library

    SciTech Connect

    Mohror, K; Moody, A; de Supinski, B R

    2012-03-20

    Applications running on today's supercomputers tolerate failures by periodically saving their state in checkpoint files on stable storage, such as a parallel file system. Although this approach is simple, the overhead of writing the checkpoints can be prohibitive, especially for large-scale jobs. In this paper, we present initial results of an enhancement to our Scalable Checkpoint/Restart Library (SCR). We employ MRNet, a tree-based overlay network library, to transfer checkpoints from the compute nodes to the parallel file system asynchronously. This enhancement increases application efficiency by removing the need for an application to block while checkpoints are transferred to the parallel file system. We show that the integration of SCR with MRNet can reduce the time spent in I/O operations by as much as 15x. However, our experiments exposed new scalability issues with our initial implementation. We discuss the sources of the scalability problems and our plans to address them.

  1. Human adenylate kinase 2 deficiency causes a profound haematopoietic defect associated with sensorineural deafness

    PubMed Central

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Six, Emmanuelle M.; Picard, Capucine; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Michel, Vincent; Ditadi, Andrea; Chappedelaine, Corinne Demerens-de; Morillon, Estelle; Valensi, Françoise; Simon-Stoos, Karen L.; Mullikin, James C.; Noroski, Lenora M.; Besse, Céline; Wulffraat, Nicolas M.; Ferster, Alina; Abecasis, Manuel M.; Calvo, Fabien; Petit, Christine; Candotti, Fabio; Abel, Laurent; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2008-01-01

    Reticular dysgenesis (RD) is an autosomal recessive form of human Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, characterized by an early differentiation arrest in the myeloid lineage and impaired lymphoid maturation. In addition, affected newborns have bilateral sensorineural deafness. We have identified biallelic mutations in the adenylate kinase 2 (AK2) gene in seven patients affected with RD. These mutations resulted in the absence or a strong decrease in protein expression. We then demonstrated that restoration of AK2 expression in the bone marrow cells of RD patients overcomes the neutrophil differentiation arrest underlining its specific requirement in the development of a restricted set of haematopoietic lineages. Lastly, we established that AK2 is specifically expressed in the stria vascularis region of the inner ear, which provides an explanation to the sensorineural deafness. These results suggest a novel mechanism regulating haematopoetic cell differentiation, and involved in one of the most severe human immunodeficiency syndromes. PMID:19043416

  2. Normal ABL1 is a tumor suppressor and therapeutic target in human and mouse leukemias expressing oncogenic ABL1 kinases.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Yashodhara; Koptyra, Mateusz; Hoser, Grazyna; Kantekure, Kanchan; Roy, Darshan; Gornicka, Barbara; Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Bolton-Gillespie, Elisabeth; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Müschen, Markus; Valent, Peter; Wasik, Mariusz A; Richardson, Christine; Hantschel, Oliver; van der Kuip, Heiko; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2016-04-28

    Leukemias expressing constitutively activated mutants of ABL1 tyrosine kinase (BCR-ABL1, TEL-ABL1, NUP214-ABL1) usually contain at least 1 normal ABL1 allele. Because oncogenic and normal ABL1 kinases may exert opposite effects on cell behavior, we examined the role of normal ABL1 in leukemias induced by oncogenic ABL1 kinases. BCR-ABL1-Abl1(-/-) cells generated highly aggressive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)-blast phase-like disease in mice compared with less malignant CML-chronic phase-like disease from BCR-ABL1-Abl1(+/+) cells. Additionally, loss of ABL1 stimulated proliferation and expansion of BCR-ABL1 murine leukemia stem cells, arrested myeloid differentiation, inhibited genotoxic stress-induced apoptosis, and facilitated accumulation of chromosomal aberrations. Conversely, allosteric stimulation of ABL1 kinase activity enhanced the antileukemia effect of ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (imatinib and ponatinib) in human and murine leukemias expressing BCR-ABL1, TEL-ABL1, and NUP214-ABL1. Therefore, we postulate that normal ABL1 kinase behaves like a tumor suppressor and therapeutic target in leukemias expressing oncogenic forms of the kinase. PMID:26864341

  3. Mechanism-Based Screen for G1/S Checkpoint Activators Identifies a Selective Activator of EIF2AK3/PERK Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Barrie, S. Elaine; Zoumpoulidou, Georgia; te Poele, Robert H.; Aherne, G. Wynne; Wilson, Stuart C.; Sheldrake, Peter; McDonald, Edward; Venet, Mathilde; Soudy, Christelle; Elustondo, Frédéric; Rigoreau, Laurent; Blagg, Julian; Workman, Paul; Garrett, Michelle D.; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2012-01-01

    Human cancers often contain genetic alterations that disable G1/S checkpoint control and loss of this checkpoint is thought to critically contribute to cancer generation by permitting inappropriate proliferation and distorting fate-driven cell cycle exit. The identification of cell permeable small molecules that activate the G1/S checkpoint may therefore represent a broadly applicable and clinically effective strategy for the treatment of cancer. Here we describe the identification of several novel small molecules that trigger G1/S checkpoint activation and characterise the mechanism of action for one, CCT020312, in detail. Transcriptional profiling by cDNA microarray combined with reverse genetics revealed phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha (EIF2A) through the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2-alpha kinase 3 (EIF2AK3/PERK) as the mechanism of action of this compound. While EIF2AK3/PERK activation classically follows endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signalling that sets off a range of different cellular responses, CCT020312 does not trigger these other cellular responses but instead selectively elicits EIF2AK3/PERK signalling. Phosphorylation of EIF2A by EIF2A kinases is a known means to block protein translation and hence restriction point transit in G1, but further supports apoptosis in specific contexts. Significantly, EIF2AK3/PERK signalling has previously been linked to the resistance of cancer cells to multiple anticancer chemotherapeutic agents, including drugs that target the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway and taxanes. Consistent with such findings CCT020312 sensitizes cancer cells with defective taxane-induced EIF2A phosphorylation to paclitaxel treatment. Our work therefore identifies CCT020312 as a novel small molecule chemical tool for the selective activation of EIF2A-mediated translation control with utility for proof-of-concept applications in EIF2A-centered therapeutic approaches, and as a chemical starting point for

  4. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication. PMID:21573113

  5. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M

    2011-05-06

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication.

  6. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Human isoenzymes of adenylate kinase: isolation and physicochemical comparison of the crystalline human ATP-AMP transphosphorylases from muscle and liver.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Frischat, A; Cress, M C; Hamada, M

    1983-02-10

    Procedures are described for the isolation, in crystalline form, of the adenylate kinases from autopsy samples of human muscle and from human liver. Weight average molecular weights were determined by sedimentation equilibrium to be 22,000 (+/- 700) and 25,450 (+/- 160) for the human muscle and liver isoenzymes, respectively. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, their molecular weights were estimated to be 21,700 and 26,500 for the muscle and liver enzymes, respectively. Both isoenzymes are accordingly monomeric proteins in their native state. Amino acid analyses are reported here for the normal human liver, calf liver, and rabbit liver adenylate kinases and compared with the normal human muscle, calf muscle, and rabbit muscle myokinases. The liver types as a group and the muscle types as a group show a great deal of homology, but some distinct differences are evident between the liver and muscle enzyme groups, especially in the number of residues of His, Pro, half-cystine, and the presence of tryptophan in the liver enzymes. The normal human liver adenylate kinase, as isolated in this report, has proved to be similar in its properties, if not identical, to the adenylate kinase isolated directly from human liver mitochondria (Hamada, M., Sumida, M., Okuda, H., Watanabe, T., Nojima, M., and Kuby, S. A. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13120-13128). Therefore, the liver-type adenylate kinase may be considered a mitochondrial type.

  7. SKI-606 (bosutinib), a novel Src kinase inhibitor, suppresses migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vultur, Adina; Buettner, Ralf; Kowolik, Claudia; Liang, Wei; Smith, David; Boschelli, Frank; Jove, Richard

    2008-05-01

    Src family kinase activity is elevated in many human tumors, including breast cancer, and is often associated with aggressive disease. We examined the effects of SKI-606 (bosutinib), a selective Src family kinase inhibitor, on human cancer cells derived from breast cancer patients to assess its potential for breast cancer treatment. Our results show that SKI-606 caused a decrease in cell motility and invasion of breast cancer cell lines with an IC50 of approximately 250 nmol/L, which was also the IC50 for inhibition of cellular Src kinase activity in intact tumor cells. These changes were accompanied by an increase in cell-to-cell adhesion and membrane localization of beta-catenin. By contrast, cell proliferation and survival were unaffected by SKI-606 at concentrations sufficient to block cell migration and invasion. Analysis of downstream effectors of Src revealed that SKI-606 inhibits the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), and Crk-associated substrate (p130Cas), with an IC50 similar to inhibition of cellular Src kinase. Our findings indicate that SKI-606 inhibits signaling pathways involved in controlling tumor cell motility and invasion, suggesting that SKI-606 is a promising therapeutic for breast cancer.

  8. Inner nuclear membrane protein Lem2 facilitates Rad3-mediated checkpoint signaling under replication stress induced by nucleotide depletion in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    DNA replication checkpoint is a highly conserved cellular signaling pathway critical for maintaining genome integrity in eukaryotes. It is activated when DNA replication is perturbed. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, perturbed replication forks activate the sensor kinase Rad3 (ATR/Mec1), which works cooperatively with mediator Mrc1 and the 9-1-1 checkpoint clamp to phosphorylate the effector kinase Cds1 (CHK2/Rad53). Phosphorylation of Cds1 promotes autoactivation of the kinase. Activated Cds1 diffuses away from the forks and stimulates most of the checkpoint responses under replication stress. Although this signaling pathway has been well understood in fission yeast, how the signaling is initiated and thus regulated remains incompletely understood. Previous studies have shown that deletion of lem2(+) sensitizes cells to the inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, hydroxyurea. However, the underlying mechanism is still not well understood. This study shows that in the presence of hydroxyurea, Lem2 facilitates Rad3-mediated checkpoint signaling for Cds1 activation. Without Lem2, all known Rad3-dependent phosphorylations critical for replication checkpoint signaling are seriously compromised, which likely causes the aberrant mitosis and drug sensitivity observed in this mutant. Interestingly, the mutant is not very sensitive to DNA damage and the DNA damage checkpoint remains largely intact, suggesting that the main function of Lem2 is to facilitate checkpoint signaling in response to replication stress. Since Lem2 is an inner nuclear membrane protein, these results also suggest that the replication checkpoint may be spatially regulated inside the nucleus, a previously unknown mechanism.

  9. Multifunctional human transcriptional coactivator protein PC4 is a substrate of Aurora kinases and activates the Aurora enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Karthigeyan; Kumari, Sujata; Boopathi, Ramachandran; Shima, Hiroki; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Bachu, Mahesh; Ranga, Udaykumar; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Kundu, Tapas K

    2016-03-01

    Positive coactivator 4 (PC4), a human transcriptional coactivator, is involved in diverse processes like chromatin organization and transcription regulation. It is hyperphosphorylated during mitosis, with unknown significance. For the first time, we demonstrate the function of PC4 outside the nucleus upon nuclear envelope breakdown. A fraction of PC4 associates with Aurora A and Aurora B and undergoes phosphorylation, following which PC4 activates both Aurora A and B to sustain optimal kinase activity to maintain the phosphorylation gradient for the proper functioning of the mitotic machinery. This mitotic role is evident in PC4 knockdown cells where the defects are rescued only by the catalytically active Aurora kinases, but not the kinase-dead mutants. Similarly, the PC4 phosphodeficient mutant failed to rescue such defects. Hence, our observations establish a novel mitotic function of PC4 that might be dependent on Aurora kinase-mediated phosphorylation.

  10. Human CD180 Transmits Signals via the PIM-1L Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Nicole; Zajonz, Alexandra; Burger, Matthew T.; Schweighoffer, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important sensors of the innate immune system that recognize conserved structural motifs and activate cells via a downstream signaling cascade. The CD180/MD1 molecular complex is an unusual member of the TLR family, since it lacks the components that are normally required for signal transduction by other TLRs. Therefore the CD180/MD 1 complex has been considered of being incapable of independently initiating cellular signals. Using chemogenetic approaches we identified specifically the membrane bound long form of PIM-1 kinase, PIM-1L as the mediator of CD180-dependent signaling. A dominant negative isoform of PIM-1L, but not of other PIM kinases, inhibited signaling elicited by cross-linking of CD180, and this effect was phenocopied by PIM inhibitors. PIM-1L was directed to the cell membrane by its N-terminal extension, where it colocalized and physically associated with CD180. Triggering CD180 also induced increased phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein BAD in a PIM kinase-dependent fashion. Also in primary human B cells, which are the main cells expressing CD180 in man, cross-linking of CD180 by monoclonal antibodies stimulated cell survival and proliferation that was abrogated by specific inhibitors. By associating with PIM-1L, CD180 can thus obtain autonomous signaling capabilities, and this complex is then channeling inflammatory signals into B cell survival programs. Pharmacological inhibition of PIM-1 should therefore provide novel therapeutic options in diseases that respond to innate immune stimulation with subsequently increased B cell activity, such as lupus erythematosus or myasthenia gravis. PMID:26555723

  11. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibition induces prosurvival autophagic signals in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Benoît; Arsenault, Dominique; Raymond-Fleury, Alexandre; Boisvert, François-Michel; Boucher, Marie-Josée

    2015-02-27

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) are ubiquitously expressed serine-threonine kinases involved in a plethora of functions ranging from the control of glycogen metabolism to transcriptional regulation. We recently demonstrated that GSK3 inhibition triggers JNK-cJUN-dependent apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells. However, the comprehensive picture of downstream GSK3-regulated pathways/functions remains elusive. Herein, counterbalancing the death signals, we show that GSK3 inhibition induces prosurvival signals through increased activity of the autophagy/lysosomal network. Our data also reveal a contribution of GSK3 in the regulation of the master transcriptional regulator of autophagy and lysosomal biogenesis, transcription factor EB (TFEB) in pancreatic cancer cells. Similarly to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition, GSK3 inhibitors promote TFEB nuclear localization and leads to TFEB dephosphorylation through endogenous serine/threonine phosphatase action. However, GSK3 and mTOR inhibition impinge differently and independently on TFEB phosphorylation suggesting that TFEB is regulated by a panel of kinases and/or phosphatases. Despite their differential impact on TFEB phosphorylation, both GSK3 and mTOR inhibitors promote 14-3-3 dissociation and TFEB nuclear localization. Quantitative mass spectrometry analyses further reveal an increased association of TFEB with nuclear proteins upon GSK3 and mTOR inhibition suggesting a positive impact on TFEB transcriptional function. Finally, a predominant nuclear localization of TFEB is unveiled in fully fed pancreatic cancer cells, whereas a reduction in TFEB expression significantly impairs their capacity for growth in an anchorage-independent manner. In addition, TFEB-restricted cells are more sensitive to apoptosis upon GSK3 inhibition. Altogether, our data uncover new functions under the control of GSK3 in pancreatic cancer cells in addition to providing key insight into TFEB regulation.

  12. Cadmium activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 in HK-2 human renal proximal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Mio; Inamura, Hisako; Matsumura, Ken-ichi; Matsuoka, Masato

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium exposure induces ERK5 phosphorylation in HK-2 renal proximal tubular cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BIX02189 treatment suppresses cadmium-induced ERK5 but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BIX02189 treatment suppresses cadmium-induced CREB and c-Fos phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ERK5 activation by cadmium exposure may play an anti-apoptotic role in HK-2 cells. -- Abstract: We examined the effects of cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) exposure on the phosphorylation and functionality of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), a recently identified member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, in HK-2 human renal proximal tubular cells. Following exposure to CdCl{sub 2}, ERK5 phosphorylation increased markedly, but the level of total ERK5 was unchanged. ERK5 phosphorylation following CdCl{sub 2} exposure was rapid and transient, similar to the time course of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Treatment of HK-2 cells with the MAPK/ERK kinase 5 inhibitor, BIX02189, suppressed CdCl{sub 2}-induced ERK5 but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The CdCl{sub 2}-induced increase of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and activating transcription factor-1 (ATF-1), as well as the accumulation of mobility-shifted c-Fos protein, were suppressed by BIX02189 treatment. Furthermore, BIX02189 treatment enhanced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and increased the level of cytoplasmic nucleosomes in HK-2 cells exposed to CdCl{sub 2}. These findings suggest that ERK5 pathway activation by CdCl{sub 2} exposure might induce the phosphorylation of cell survival-transcription factors, such as CREB, ATF-1, and c-Fos, and may exert a partial anti-apoptotic role in HK-2 cells.

  13. Human CD180 Transmits Signals via the PIM-1L Kinase.

    PubMed

    Egli, Nicole; Zajonz, Alexandra; Burger, Matthew T; Schweighoffer, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important sensors of the innate immune system that recognize conserved structural motifs and activate cells via a downstream signaling cascade. The CD180/MD1 molecular complex is an unusual member of the TLR family, since it lacks the components that are normally required for signal transduction by other TLRs. Therefore the CD180/MD 1 complex has been considered of being incapable of independently initiating cellular signals. Using chemogenetic approaches we identified specifically the membrane bound long form of PIM-1 kinase, PIM-1L as the mediator of CD180-dependent signaling. A dominant negative isoform of PIM-1L, but not of other PIM kinases, inhibited signaling elicited by cross-linking of CD180, and this effect was phenocopied by PIM inhibitors. PIM-1L was directed to the cell membrane by its N-terminal extension, where it colocalized and physically associated with CD180. Triggering CD180 also induced increased phosphorylation of the anti-apoptotic protein BAD in a PIM kinase-dependent fashion. Also in primary human B cells, which are the main cells expressing CD180 in man, cross-linking of CD180 by monoclonal antibodies stimulated cell survival and proliferation that was abrogated by specific inhibitors. By associating with PIM-1L, CD180 can thus obtain autonomous signaling capabilities, and this complex is then channeling inflammatory signals into B cell survival programs. Pharmacological inhibition of PIM-1 should therefore provide novel therapeutic options in diseases that respond to innate immune stimulation with subsequently increased B cell activity, such as lupus erythematosus or myasthenia gravis. PMID:26555723

  14. Cloning and expression of two human p70 S6 kinase polypeptides differing only at their amino termini

    SciTech Connect

    Grove, J.R.; Banerjee, P.; Balasubramanyam, A.; Price, D.J.; Avruch, J. ); Coffer, P.J.; Woodgett, J.R. )

    1991-11-01

    Two classes of human cDNA encoding the insulin/mitogen-activated p70 S6 kinase have been isolated; the two classes differ only in the 5{prime} region, such that the longer polypeptide consists of 525 amino acids, of which the last 502 longer residues are identical in sequence to the entire polypeptide encoded by the second cDNA. Both p70 S6 kinase polypeptides predicted by these cDNAs are present in p70 S6 kinase purified from rat liver, and each is thus expressed in vivo. Moreover, both polypeptides are expressed from a single mRNA transcribed from the (longer) p70 S6 kinase {alpha}I cDNA through the utilization of different translational start sites. Transient expression of p70 {alpha}I and {alpha}II S6 kinase cDNA in COA cells results in a 2.5- to 4-fold increase in overall S6 kinase activity. Transfection with the {alpha}II cDNA yields only the smaller set of bands, while transfection with the {alpha}I cDNA generates both sets of bands. Mutation of Met-24 in the {alpha}I cDNA to Leu or Thr suppresses synthesis of the {alpha}II polypeptides. Only the p70 {alpha}I and {alpha}II polypeptides of slowest mobility on SDS-PAGE comigrate with the 70-and 90-kDa proteins observed in purified rat liver S6 kinase. The recombinant p70 S6 kinase undergoes multiple phosphorylation and partial activation in COS cells. Acquisition of S6 protein kinase catalytic function, however, is apparently restricted to the most extensively phosphorylated recombinant polypeptides.

  15. Estrogen effects on human airway smooth muscle involve cAMP and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2012-11-15

    Clinically observed differences in airway reactivity and asthma exacerbations in women at different life stages suggest a role for sex steroids in modulating airway function although their targets and mechanisms of action are still being explored. We have previously shown that clinically relevant concentrations of exogenous estrogen acutely decrease intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), thereby facilitating bronchodilation. In this study, we hypothesized that estrogens modulate cyclic nucleotide regulation, resulting in decreased [Ca(2+)](i) in human ASM. In Fura-2-loaded human ASM cells, 1 nM 17β-estradiol (E(2)) potentiated the inhibitory effect of the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) agonist isoproterenol (ISO; 100 nM) on histamine-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) activity (KT5720; 100 nM) attenuated E(2) effects on [Ca(2+)](i). Acute treatment with E(2) increased cAMP levels in ASM cells comparable to that of ISO (100 pM). In acetylcholine-contracted airways from female guinea pigs or female humans, E(2) potentiated ISO-induced relaxation. These novel data suggest that, in human ASM, physiologically relevant concentrations of estrogens act via estrogen receptors (ERs) and the cAMP pathway to nongenomically reduce [Ca(2+)](i), thus promoting bronchodilation. Activation of ERs may be a novel adjunct therapeutic avenue in reactive airway diseases in combination with established cAMP-activating therapies such as β(2)-agonists.

  16. IKK and NF-kappaB-mediated regulation of Claspin impacts on ATR checkpoint function.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall Steven; Mudie, Sharon; Rocha, Sonia

    2010-09-01

    In response to replication stress, Claspin mediates the phosphorylation and activation of Chk1 by ATR. Claspin is not only necessary for the propagation of the DNA-damage signal, but its destruction by the ubiquitin-proteosome pathway is required to allow the cell to continue the cell cycle allowing checkpoint recovery. Here, we demonstrate that both the NF-kappaB family of transcription factors and their upstream kinase IKK can regulate Claspin levels by controlling its mRNA expression. Furthermore, we show that c-Rel directly controls Claspin gene transcription. Disruption of IKK and specific NF-kappaB members impairs ATR-mediated checkpoint function following DNA damage. Importantly, hyperactivation of IKK results in a failure to inactivate Chk1 and impairs the recovery from the DNA checkpoint. These results uncover a novel function for IKK and NF-kappaB modulating the DNA-damage checkpoint response, allowing the cell to integrate different signalling pathways with the DNA-damage response.

  17. Checkpoint triggering in a computer system

    DOEpatents

    Cher, Chen-Yong

    2016-09-06

    According to an aspect, a method for triggering creation of a checkpoint in a computer system includes executing a task in a processing node of the computer system and determining whether it is time to read a monitor associated with a metric of the task. The monitor is read to determine a value of the metric based on determining that it is time to read the monitor. A threshold for triggering creation of the checkpoint is determined based on the value of the metric. Based on determining that the value of the metric has crossed the threshold, the checkpoint including state data of the task is created to enable restarting execution of the task upon a restart operation.

  18. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein blocks HIV-1 infection in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Stantchev, Tzanko S; Markovic, Ingrid; Telford, William G; Clouse, Kathleen A; Broder, Christopher C

    2007-02-01

    Binding of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) to its cellular receptors elicits a variety of signaling events, including the activation of select tyrosine kinases. To evaluate the potential role of such signaling, we examined the effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, on HIV-1 entry and infection of human macrophages using a variety of assays. Without altering cell viability, cell surface expression of CD4 and CCR5 or their abilities to interact with Env, genistein inhibited infection of macrophages by reporter gene-encoding, beta-lactamase containing, or wild type virions, as well as Env-mediated cell-fusion. The observation that genistein blocked virus infection if applied before, during or immediately after the infection period, but not 24h later; coupled with a more pronounced inhibition of infection in the reporter gene assays as compared to both beta-lactamase and p24 particle entry assays, imply that genistein exerts its inhibitory effects on both entry and early post-entry steps. These findings suggest that other exploitable targets, or steps, of the HIV-1 infection process may exist and could serve as additional opportunities for the development of new therapeutics.

  19. Aurora A kinase regulates proper spindle positioning in C. elegans and in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kotak, Sachin; Afshar, Katayon; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Accurate spindle positioning is essential for error-free cell division. The one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo has proven instrumental for dissecting mechanisms governing spindle positioning. Despite important progress, how the cortical forces that act on astral microtubules to properly position the spindle are modulated is incompletely understood. Here, we report that the PP6 phosphatase PPH-6 and its associated subunit SAPS-1, which positively regulate pulling forces acting on spindle poles, associate with the Aurora A kinase AIR-1 in C. elegans embryos. We show that acute inactivation of AIR-1 during mitosis results in excess pulling forces on astral microtubules. Furthermore, we uncover that AIR-1 acts downstream of PPH-6-SAPS-1 in modulating spindle positioning, and that PPH-6-SAPS-1 negatively regulates AIR-1 localization at the cell cortex. Moreover, we show that Aurora A and the PP6 phosphatase subunit PPP6C are also necessary for spindle positioning in human cells. There, Aurora A is needed for the cortical localization of NuMA and dynein during mitosis. Overall, our work demonstrates that Aurora A kinases and PP6 phosphatases have an ancient function in modulating spindle positioning, thus contributing to faithful cell division. PMID:27335426

  20. Selective Sparing of Human Tregs by Pharmacologic Inhibitors of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and MEK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zwang, N. A.; Zhang, R.; Germana, S.; Fan, M. Y.; Hastings, W. D.; Cao, A.; Turka, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated (MEK) signaling are central to the survival and proliferation of many cell types. Multiple lines of investigation in murine models have shown that control of the PI3K pathway is particularly important for regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and function. PI3K and MEK inhibitors are being introduced into the clinic, and we hypothesized that pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K, and possibly MEK, in mixed cultures of human mononuclear cells would preferentially affect CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes compared with Tregs. We tested this hypothesis using four readouts: proliferation, activation, functional suppression, and signaling. Results showed that Tregs were less susceptible to inhibition by both δ and α isoform–specific PI3K inhibitors and by an MEK inhibitor compared with their conventional CD4+ and CD8+ counterparts. These studies suggest less functional reliance on PI3K and MEK signaling in Tregs compared with conventional CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. Therefore, the PI3K and MEK pathways are attractive pharmacologic targets for transplantation and treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:27017850

  1. Selective Sparing of Human Tregs by Pharmacologic Inhibitors of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and MEK Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zwang, N A; Zhang, R; Germana, S; Fan, M Y; Hastings, W D; Cao, A; Turka, L A

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated (MEK) signaling are central to the survival and proliferation of many cell types. Multiple lines of investigation in murine models have shown that control of the PI3K pathway is particularly important for regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and function. PI3K and MEK inhibitors are being introduced into the clinic, and we hypothesized that pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K, and possibly MEK, in mixed cultures of human mononuclear cells would preferentially affect CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes compared with Tregs. We tested this hypothesis using four readouts: proliferation, activation, functional suppression, and signaling. Results showed that Tregs were less susceptible to inhibition by both δ and α isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors and by an MEK inhibitor compared with their conventional CD4(+) and CD8(+) counterparts. These studies suggest less functional reliance on PI3K and MEK signaling in Tregs compared with conventional CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes. Therefore, the PI3K and MEK pathways are attractive pharmacologic targets for transplantation and treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:27017850

  2. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 mediates denbinobin-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chen-Tzu; Chen, Bing-Chang; Yu, Chung-Chi; Weng, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Mei-Chieh; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Shih, Chung-Hung; Lin, Chien-Huang

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we explore the role of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) in denbinobin-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. Denbinobin-induced cell apoptosis was attenuated by an ASK1 dominant-negative mutant (ASK1DN), two antioxidants (N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and glutathione (GSH)), a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor (SP600125), and an activator protein-1 (AP-1) inhibitor (curcumin). Treatment of A549 cells with denbinobin caused increases in ASK1 activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and these effects were inhibited by NAC and GSH. Stimulation of A549 cells with denbinobin caused JNK activation; this effect was markedly inhibited by NAC, GSH, and ASK1DN. Denbinobin induced c-Jun phosphorylation, the formation of an AP-1-specific DNA-protein complex, and Bim expression. Bim knockdown using a bim short interfering RNA strategy also reduced denbinobin-induced A549 cell apoptosis. The denbinobin-mediated increases in c-Jun phosphorylation and Bim expression were inhibited by NAC, GSH, SP600125, ASK1DN, JNK1DN, and JNK2DN. These results suggest that denbinobin might activate ASK1 through ROS production to cause JNK/AP-1 activation, which in turn induces Bim expression, and ultimately results in A549 cell apoptosis. PMID:19405983

  3. The Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 axis affects spindle assembly checkpoint robustness and sensitivity to antimicrotubule cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Visconti, R; Della Monica, R; Palazzo, L; D'Alessio, F; Raia, M; Improta, S; Villa, M R; Del Vecchio, L; Grieco, D

    2015-09-01

    To grant faithful chromosome segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until mitotic spindle assembly. An exceedingly prolonged mitosis, however, promotes cell death and by this means antimicrotubule cancer drugs (AMCDs), that impair spindle assembly, are believed to kill cancer cells. Despite malformed spindles, cancer cells can, however, slip through SAC, exit mitosis prematurely and resist killing. We show here that the Fcp1 phosphatase and Wee1, the cyclin B-dependent kinase (cdk) 1 inhibitory kinase, play a role for this slippage/resistance mechanism. During AMCD-induced prolonged mitosis, Fcp1-dependent Wee1 reactivation lowered cdk1 activity, weakening SAC-dependent mitotic arrest and leading to mitosis exit and survival. Conversely, genetic or chemical Wee1 inhibition strengthened the SAC, further extended mitosis, reduced antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 to a minimum and potentiated killing in several, AMCD-treated cancer cell lines and primary human adult lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Thus, the Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 (FWC) axis affects SAC robustness and AMCDs sensitivity. PMID:25744022

  4. The Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 axis affects spindle assembly checkpoint robustness and sensitivity to antimicrotubule cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Visconti, R; Della Monica, R; Palazzo, L; D'Alessio, F; Raia, M; Improta, S; Villa, M R; Del Vecchio, L; Grieco, D

    2015-09-01

    To grant faithful chromosome segregation, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays mitosis exit until mitotic spindle assembly. An exceedingly prolonged mitosis, however, promotes cell death and by this means antimicrotubule cancer drugs (AMCDs), that impair spindle assembly, are believed to kill cancer cells. Despite malformed spindles, cancer cells can, however, slip through SAC, exit mitosis prematurely and resist killing. We show here that the Fcp1 phosphatase and Wee1, the cyclin B-dependent kinase (cdk) 1 inhibitory kinase, play a role for this slippage/resistance mechanism. During AMCD-induced prolonged mitosis, Fcp1-dependent Wee1 reactivation lowered cdk1 activity, weakening SAC-dependent mitotic arrest and leading to mitosis exit and survival. Conversely, genetic or chemical Wee1 inhibition strengthened the SAC, further extended mitosis, reduced antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1 to a minimum and potentiated killing in several, AMCD-treated cancer cell lines and primary human adult lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Thus, the Fcp1-Wee1-Cdk1 (FWC) axis affects SAC robustness and AMCDs sensitivity.

  5. Frutalin, a galactose-binding lectin, induces chemotaxis and rearrangement of actin cytoskeleton in human neutrophils: involvement of tyrosine kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Brando-Lima, Aline C; Saldanha-Gama, Roberta F; Henriques, Maria das Graças M O; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C O; Moreira, Renato A; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina

    2005-10-15

    Several lectin-like molecules have been shown as potent activators of leukocytes. Galactose-binding lectins are of special interest since they could interact with several endogenous molecules involved in the innate and specific immune responses. The effects of Frutalin (FTL), an alpha-D-galactose (Gal)-binding plant lectin, on the modulation of neutrophil (PMN) functions were investigated. FTL induced a dose-dependent PMN migration in mice pleural cavity. Moreover, FTL was also a potent direct chemotactic for human PMN, in vitro, and triggered oxidative burst in these cells. These effects were accompanied by a rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton dynamic, activation of tyrosine kinase (TK) pathways, increase in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation, and its subsequent association to phosphoinositide3-kinase (PI3K). All those effects were inhibited in the presence of Gal, suggesting specific carbohydrate recognition for FTL effects. The activations of TK and PI3K pathways are essential events for FTL-induced chemotaxis, since inhibitors of these pathways, genistein and LY294002, inhibited neutrophil migration in vitro. The data indicate that sugar-protein interactions between a soluble lectin and galacto-components on neutrophil surface trigger the TK pathway, inducing FAK and PI3K activation, interfering with cell motility and oxidative response.

  6. Optimal message log reclamation for independent checkpointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yi-Min; Fuchs, W. Kent

    1993-01-01

    Independent (uncoordinated) check pointing for parallel and distributed systems allows maximum process autonomy but suffers from possible domino effects and the associated storage space overhead for maintaining multiple checkpoints and message logs. In most research on check pointing and recovery, it was assumed that only the checkpoints and message logs older than the global recovery line can be discarded. It is shown how recovery line transformation and decomposition can be applied to the problem of efficiently identifying all discardable message logs, thereby achieving optimal garbage collection. Communication trace-driven simulation for several parallel programs is used to show the benefits of the proposed algorithm for message log reclamation.

  7. Immune checkpoint blockade in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Aswin; Socinski, Mark A; Villaruz, Liza C

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy has revolutionized the therapeutic landscape of advanced lung cancer. The adaptive immune system has developed a sophisticated method of tumor growth control, but T-cell activation is regulated by various checkpoints. Blockade of the immune checkpoints with therapies targeting the PD-1 pathway, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab, has been validated as a therapeutic approach in non-small cell lung cancer. Newer therapies and novel combinations are also being evaluated, and the use of biomarkers in conjunction with these drugs is an area of active investigation. This review summarizes the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of the above approaches in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27585231

  8. Opposing Growth Regulatory Roles of Protein Kinase D Isoforms in Human Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ryvkin, Vladislav; Rashel, Mohammad; Gaddapara, Trivikram; Ghazizadeh, Soosan

    2015-01-01

    PKD is a family of three serine/threonine kinases (PKD-1, -2, and -3) involved in the regulation of diverse biological processes including proliferation, migration, secretion, and cell survival. We have previously shown that despite expression of all three isoforms in mouse epidermis, PKD1 plays a unique and critical role in wound healing, phorbol ester-induced hyperplasia, and tumor development. In translating our findings to the human, we discovered that PKD1 is not expressed in human keratinocytes (KCs) and there is a divergence in the expression and function of other PKD isoforms. Contrary to mouse KCs, treatment of cultured human KCs with pharmacological inhibitors of PKDs resulted in growth arrest. We found that PKD2 and PKD3 are expressed differentially in proliferating and differentiating human KCs, with the former uniformly present in both compartments whereas the latter is predominantly expressed in the proliferating compartment. Knockdown of individual PKD isoforms in human KCs revealed contrasting growth regulatory roles for PKD2 and PKD3. Loss of PKD2 enhanced KC proliferative potential while loss of PKD3 resulted in a progressive proliferation defect, loss of clonogenicity and diminished tissue regenerative ability. This proliferation defect was correlated with up-regulation of CDK4/6 inhibitor p15INK4B and induction of a p53-independent G1 cell cycle arrest. Simultaneous silencing of PKD isoforms resulted in a more pronounced proliferation defect consistent with a predominant role for PKD3 in proliferating KCs. These data underline the importance and complexity of PKD signaling in human epidermis and suggest a central role for PKD3 signaling in maintaining human epidermal homeostasis. PMID:25802335

  9. Human spleen tyrosine kinase p72Syk associates with the Src-family kinase p53/56Lyn and a 120-kDa phosphoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Sidorenko, S P; Law, C L; Chandran, K A; Clark, E A

    1995-01-01

    The 72-kDa spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and Src-family kinase p53/56Lyn (Lyn) contribute to signaling via the B-cell antigen receptor complex. Here we show that Syk and Lyn from human B lymphocytes can interact directly. Syk and Lyn coimmunoprecipitated from mature and activated B-cell lines, and gel-purified Syk and Lyn reassociated in vitro, demonstrating their direct interaction. This Syk-Lyn interaction may be dependent on the stage of B-cell differentiation, since Syk-Lyn associations were not detected in pre-B and myeloma cell lines and Syk from an immature B-cell line did not reassociate with Lyn in vitro. Serine/threonine kinase activity was also associated with Syk. Crosslinking of cell surface IgM led to rapid activation of both tyrosine and serine/threonine protein kinase activities that resulted in phosphorylation in vitro of proteins coprecipitating with Syk--in particular, a serine/threonine phosphorylated protein 120 kDa in size (pp120). Several phosphoproteins, including one of 72 kDa and one of 120 kDa, coprecipitated with phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1). Sequential immunoprecipitation identified the 72-kDa protein associated with PLC gamma 1 as Syk. The 120-kDa serine/threonine phosphorylated protein that coprecipitated with PLC gamma 1 resembled the Syk-associated pp120 by several criteria. Thus, pp120 may serve as a link between Syk and PLC gamma 1, coupling the B-cell antigen receptor to the phosphatidylinositol pathway. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7831290

  10. Expression of PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase (PBK/TOPK) in human urinary bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Srivastava, Anupam K; Dalela, D; Rath, S K; Goel, M M; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the expression pattern of PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase (PBK/TOPK) and its clinical significance in human bladder cancer (BC). We detected PBK/TOPK mRNA overexpression in BC and human normal testis tissues using RT-PCR. Using qRT-PCR revealed a higher expression of PBK/TOPK in BC tissues than their adjacent noncancerous tissues (ANCTs) (p<0.0001). Cytoplasmic expression of PBK/TOPK protein was found to be positive in 64.6% (42 of 65) BC patients. Expression of PBK/TOPK protein was found to be significantly higher in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) than in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (86.1% vs. 37.9%, p<0.001). The immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of PBK/TOPK was found to be significantly (p<0.001) associated with the stage of disease. Study findings suggest that the PBK/TOPK mRNA/protein expression is specific to human BC and might be used as a novel target for development of cancer immunotherapy and diagnostic biomarker.

  11. Muscarine enhances soluble amyloid precursor protein secretion in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y by a pathway dependent on protein kinase C(alpha), src-tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase but not phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Canet-Aviles, Rosa-Maria; Anderton, Mark; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J; Vaughan, Peter F T

    2002-06-15

    The signalling pathways by which muscarine and epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulate the secretion of the alpha-secretase cleavage product (sAPPalpha) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were examined in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y. Using specific inhibitors it was found that over 80% of sAPPalpha secretion, enhanced by muscarine, occurred via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and was dependent on protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and a member of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src-TK). In contrast the stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion by EGF was not affected by inhibitors of PKC nor Src-TK but was dependent on ERK1/2. In addition muscarine-enhanced sAPPalpha secretion and ERK1/2 activation were inhibited 60 and 80%, respectively, by micromolar concentrations of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI-3K) inhibitor wortmannin. In comparison wortmannin decreased EGF stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion and ERK 1/2 activation by approximately 40%. Unexpectedly, U73122, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, did not inhibit muscarine enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion. These data are discussed in relation to a pathway for the enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion by muscarine which involves the activation of a Src-TK by G-protein beta/gamma-subunits leading to activation of PKCalpha, and ERK1/2 by a mechanism not involving phospholipase C. PMID:12191495

  12. Tea catechins as inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases: Mechanistic insights and human relevance

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Christine A.; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Bisson, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play important roles in the control of fundamental cellular processes, influencing the balance between cell proliferation and death. RTKs have emerged as molecular targets for the treatment of various cancers. Green tea and its polyphenolic compounds, the catechins, exhibit chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties in many human cancer cell types, as well as in various carcinogenicity models in vivo. Epidemiological studies are somewhat less convincing, but some positive correlations have been observed. The tea catechins, including (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), have pleiotropic effects on cellular proteins and signaling pathways. This review focuses on the ability of the tea constituents to suppress RTK signaling, and summarizes the mechanisms by which EGCG and other catechins might exert their protective effects towards dysregulated RTKs in cancer cells. The findings are discussed in the context of ongoing clinical trials with RTK inhibitors, and the possibility for drug/nutrient interactions enhancing therapeutic efficacy. PMID:20691268

  13. A conserved Polϵ binding module in Ctf18-RFC is required for S-phase checkpoint activation downstream of Mec1.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Marchesi, Vanessa; Jones, Richard C; Edmondson, Ricky D; Labib, Karim

    2015-10-15

    Defects during chromosome replication in eukaryotes activate a signaling pathway called the S-phase checkpoint, which produces a multifaceted response that preserves genome integrity at stalled DNA replication forks. Work with budding yeast showed that the 'alternative clamp loader' known as Ctf18-RFC acts by an unknown mechanism to activate the checkpoint kinase Rad53, which then mediates much of the checkpoint response. Here we show that budding yeast Ctf18-RFC associates with DNA polymerase epsilon, via an evolutionarily conserved 'Pol ϵ binding module' in Ctf18-RFC that is produced by interaction of the carboxyl terminus of Ctf18 with the Ctf8 and Dcc1 subunits. Mutations at the end of Ctf18 disrupt the integrity of the Pol ϵ binding module and block the S-phase checkpoint pathway, downstream of the Mec1 kinase that is the budding yeast orthologue of mammalian ATR. Similar defects in checkpoint activation are produced by mutations that displace Pol ϵ from the replisome. These findings indicate that the association of Ctf18-RFC with Pol ϵ at defective replication forks is a key step in activation of the S-phase checkpoint. PMID:26250113

  14. A conserved Polϵ binding module in Ctf18-RFC is required for S-phase checkpoint activation downstream of Mec1

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J.; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Marchesi, Vanessa; Jones, Richard C.; Edmondson, Ricky D.; Labib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Defects during chromosome replication in eukaryotes activate a signaling pathway called the S-phase checkpoint, which produces a multifaceted response that preserves genome integrity at stalled DNA replication forks. Work with budding yeast showed that the ‘alternative clamp loader’ known as Ctf18-RFC acts by an unknown mechanism to activate the checkpoint kinase Rad53, which then mediates much of the checkpoint response. Here we show that budding yeast Ctf18-RFC associates with DNA polymerase epsilon, via an evolutionarily conserved ‘Pol ϵ binding module’ in Ctf18-RFC that is produced by interaction of the carboxyl terminus of Ctf18 with the Ctf8 and Dcc1 subunits. Mutations at the end of Ctf18 disrupt the integrity of the Pol ϵ binding module and block the S-phase checkpoint pathway, downstream of the Mec1 kinase that is the budding yeast orthologue of mammalian ATR. Similar defects in checkpoint activation are produced by mutations that displace Pol ϵ from the replisome. These findings indicate that the association of Ctf18-RFC with Pol ϵ at defective replication forks is a key step in activation of the S-phase checkpoint. PMID:26250113

  15. A conserved Polϵ binding module in Ctf18-RFC is required for S-phase checkpoint activation downstream of Mec1.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Marchesi, Vanessa; Jones, Richard C; Edmondson, Ricky D; Labib, Karim

    2015-10-15

    Defects during chromosome replication in eukaryotes activate a signaling pathway called the S-phase checkpoint, which produces a multifaceted response that preserves genome integrity at stalled DNA replication forks. Work with budding yeast showed that the 'alternative clamp loader' known as Ctf18-RFC acts by an unknown mechanism to activate the checkpoint kinase Rad53, which then mediates much of the checkpoint response. Here we show that budding yeast Ctf18-RFC associates with DNA polymerase epsilon, via an evolutionarily conserved 'Pol ϵ binding module' in Ctf18-RFC that is produced by interaction of the carboxyl terminus of Ctf18 with the Ctf8 and Dcc1 subunits. Mutations at the end of Ctf18 disrupt the integrity of the Pol ϵ binding module and block the S-phase checkpoint pathway, downstream of the Mec1 kinase that is the budding yeast orthologue of mammalian ATR. Similar defects in checkpoint activation are produced by mutations that displace Pol ϵ from the replisome. These findings indicate that the association of Ctf18-RFC with Pol ϵ at defective replication forks is a key step in activation of the S-phase checkpoint.

  16. Determination of human serum alpha1-acid glycoprotein and albumin binding of various marketed and preclinical kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zsila, Ferenc; Fitos, Ilona; Bencze, Gyula; Kéri, György; Orfi, László

    2009-01-01

    There are about 380 protein kinase inhibitors in drug development as of today and 15 drugs have been marketed already for the treatment of cancer. This time 139 validated kinase targets are in the focus of drug research of pharmaceutical companies and big efforts are made for the development of new, druglike kinase inhibitors. Plasma protein binding is an important factor of the ADME profiling of a drug compound. Human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AAG) are the most relevant drug carriers in blood plasma. Since previous literature data indicated that AAG is the principal plasma binding component of some kinase inhibitors the present work focuses on the comprehensive evaluation of AAG binding of a series of marketed and experimental kinase inhibitors by using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy approach. HSA binding was also evaluated by affinity chromatography. Protein binding interactions of twenty-six kinase inhibitors are characterized. The contribution of AAG and HSA binding data to the pharmacokinetic profiles of the investigated therapeutic agents is discussed. Structural, biological and drug binding properties of AAG as well as the applicability of the CD method in studying drug-protein binding interactions are also briefly reviewed.

  17. S-Adenosylhomocysteine toxicity in normal and adenosine kinase-deficient lymphoblasts of human origin

    PubMed Central

    Kredich, Nicholas M.; Hershfield, Michael S.

    1979-01-01

    The human lymphoblast line WI-L2 is subject to growth inhibition by a combination of the adenosine deaminase (ADA; adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4.) inhibitor erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA) and adenosine. Although adenosine-induced pyrimidine starvation appears to contribute to this effect, uridine only partially reverses adenosine toxicity in WI-L2 and not at all in strain 107, an adenosine kinase-(ATP:adenosine 5′-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.20) deficient derivative of WI-L2. Treatment of both cell lines with EHNA and adenosine leads to striking elevations in intracellular S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy), a potent inhibitor of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet)-dependent methylation reactions. The methylation in vivo of both DNA and RNA is inhibited by concentrations of EHNA and adenosine that elevate intracellular AdoHcy. Addition of 100 μM L-homocysteine thiolactone to cells treated with EHNA and adenosine enhances adenosine toxicity and further elevates AdoHcy to levels approximately 60-fold higher than those obtained in the absence of this amino acid, presumably by combining with adenosine to form AdoHcy in a reaction catalyzed by S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (EC 3.3.1.1). In the adenosine kinase-deficient strain 107, a combination of ADA inhibition and L-homocysteine thiolactone markedly increases intracellular AdoHcy and inhibits growth even in the absence of exogenous adenosine. These results demonstrate a form of toxicity from endogenously produced adenosine and support the view that AdoHcy, by inhibiting methylation, is a mediator of uridine-resistant adenosine toxicity in these human lymphoblast lines. Furthermore, they suggest that AdoHcy may play a role in the pathogenesis of the severe combined immunodeficiency disease found in most children with heritable ADA deficiency. PMID:221926

  18. Altered regulation of Src tyrosine kinase by transforming growth factor beta1 in a human hepatoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, K; Kawata, S; Tamura, S; Matsuda, Y; Inui, Y; Igura, T; Inoue, S; Kudara, T; Matsuzawa, Y

    1998-09-01

    Transforming growth factor betas (TGF-betas) are the potent growth inhibitors for various cell types. Certain transformed cells, however, show poor response to TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition, which contributes to their uncontrolled proliferation. Recently, we have reported that TGF-beta1 induces degradation of activated Src tyrosine kinase in rat fibroblasts. To elucidate the alteration in TGF-beta signaling pathway in tumor cells that cannot respond to the cytokine, we compared the effects of TGF-beta1 on Src kinase in two human hepatoma cell lines, TGF-beta1-insensitive Mahlavu cells and TGF-beta1-sensitive HepG2 cells. TGF-beta1 decreased Src kinase activity in HepG2 cells, but increased cellular Src levels and Src kinase activity in Mahlavu cells. Co-incubation of Mahlavu cells with TGF-beta1 and 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA) decreased Src protein levels and Src kinase activity, inducing TGF-beta1 sensitivity. TGF-beta1 induced tyrosine dephosphorylation of Ras guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (Ras-GAP) and Ras inactivation in HepG2 cells, but induced Ras-GAP phosphorylation and Ras activation in Mahlavu cells. The Src kinase inhibitor abolished the increase of Src kinase activity in TGF-beta1-treated Mahlavu cells, and induced TGF-beta1 sensitivity. These findings suggest that regulation of Src kinase by TGF-beta1 is altered in Mahlavu cells. The altered regulation of Src may contribute to TGF-beta1 insensitivity in this cell line, at least in part through activation of Ras.

  19. Feedback control of Swe1p degradation in the yeast morphogenesis checkpoint.

    PubMed

    King, Kindra; Kang, Hui; Jin, Michelle; Lew, Daniel J

    2013-04-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to a variety of physiological stresses transiently delay bud emergence or bud growth. To maintain coordination between bud formation and the cell cycle in such circumstances, the morphogenesis checkpoint delays nuclear division via the mitosis-inhibitory Wee1-family kinase, Swe1p. Swe1p is degraded during G2 in unstressed cells but is stabilized and accumulates following stress. Degradation of Swe1p is preceded by its recruitment to the septin scaffold at the mother-bud neck, mediated by the Swe1p-binding protein Hsl7p. Following osmotic shock or actin depolymerization, Swe1p is stabilized, and previous studies suggested that this was because Hsl7p was no longer recruited to the septin scaffold following stress. However, we now show that Hsl7p is in fact recruited to the septin scaffold in stressed cells. Using a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) mutant that is immune to checkpoint-mediated inhibition, we show that Swe1p stabilization following stress is an indirect effect of CDK inhibition. These findings demonstrate the physiological importance of a positive-feedback loop in which Swe1p activity inhibits the CDK, which then ceases to target Swe1p for degradation. They also highlight the difficulty in disentangling direct checkpoint pathways from the effects of positive-feedback loops active at the G2/M transition.

  20. Dovitinib induces mitotic defects and activates the G2 DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P Y; Poon, Randy Y C

    2014-01-01

    Dovitinib (TKI258; formerly CHIR-258) is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. Interestingly, Dovitinib triggered a G2 /M arrest in cancer cell lines from diverse origins including HeLa, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Single-cell analysis revealed that Dovitinib promoted a delay in mitotic exit in a subset of cells, causing the cells to undergo mitotic slippage. Higher concentrations of Dovitinib induced a G2 arrest similar to the G2 DNA damage checkpoint. In support of this, DNA damage was triggered by Dovitinib as revealed by γ-H2AX and comet assays. The mitotic kinase CDK1 was found to be inactivated by phosphorylation in the presence of Dovitinib. Furthermore, the G2 arrest could be overcome by abrogation of the G2 DNA damage checkpoint using small molecule inhibitors of CHK1 and WEE1. Finally, Dovitinib-mediated G2 cell cycle arrest and subsequent cell death could be promoted after DNA damage repair was disrupted by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. These results are consistent with the recent finding that Dovitinib can also target topoisomerases. Collectively, these results suggest additional directions for use of Dovitinib, in particular with agents that target the DNA damage checkpoint. PMID:24238094

  1. Dovitinib induces mitotic defects and activates the G2 DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P Y; Poon, Randy Y C

    2014-01-01

    Dovitinib (TKI258; formerly CHIR-258) is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases. Interestingly, Dovitinib triggered a G2 /M arrest in cancer cell lines from diverse origins including HeLa, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Single-cell analysis revealed that Dovitinib promoted a delay in mitotic exit in a subset of cells, causing the cells to undergo mitotic slippage. Higher concentrations of Dovitinib induced a G2 arrest similar to the G2 DNA damage checkpoint. In support of this, DNA damage was triggered by Dovitinib as revealed by γ-H2AX and comet assays. The mitotic kinase CDK1 was found to be inactivated by phosphorylation in the presence of Dovitinib. Furthermore, the G2 arrest could be overcome by abrogation of the G2 DNA damage checkpoint using small molecule inhibitors of CHK1 and WEE1. Finally, Dovitinib-mediated G2 cell cycle arrest and subsequent cell death could be promoted after DNA damage repair was disrupted by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. These results are consistent with the recent finding that Dovitinib can also target topoisomerases. Collectively, these results suggest additional directions for use of Dovitinib, in particular with agents that target the DNA damage checkpoint.

  2. Checkpointing and Recovery in Distributed and Database Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    A transaction-consistent global checkpoint of a database records a state of the database which reflects the effect of only completed transactions and not the results of any partially executed transactions. This thesis establishes the necessary and sufficient conditions for a checkpoint of a data item (or the checkpoints of a set of data items) to…

  3. Closed MAD2 (C-MAD2) is selectively incorporated into the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC)

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Aaron R; Tipton, Michael; Yen, Tim

    2011-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint is a specialized signal transduction pathway that monitors kinetochore-microtubule attachment to achieve faithful chromosome segregation. MAD2 is an evolutionarily conserved mitotic checkpoint protein that exists in open (O) and closed (C) conformations. The increase of intracellular C-MAD2 level during mitosis, through O→C-MAD2 conversion as catalyzed by unattached kinetochores, is a critical signaling event for the mitotic checkpoint. However, it remains controversial whether MAD2 is an integral component of the effector of the mitotic checkpoint—the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). We show here that endogenous human MCC is assembled by first forming a BUBR1:BUB3:CDC20 complex in G2 and then selectively incorporating C-MAD2 during mitosis. Nevertheless, MCC can be induced to form in G1/S cells by expressing a C-conformation locked MAD2 mutant, indicating intracellular level of C-MAD2 as a major limiting factor for MCC assembly. In addition, a recombinant MCC containing C-MAD2 exhibits effective inhibitory activity toward APC/C isolated from mitotic HeLa cells, while a recombinant BUBR1:BUB3:CDC20 ternary complex is ineffective at comparable concentrations despite association with APC/C. These results help establish a direct connection between a major signal transducer (C-MAD2) and the potent effector (MCC) of the mitotic checkpoint, and provide novel insights into protein-protein interactions during assembly of a functional MCC. PMID:22037211

  4. The nucleoporin Nup153 affects spindle checkpoint activity due to an association with Mad1

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    The nucleoporin Nup153 is known to play pivotal roles in nuclear import and export in interphase cells and as the cell transitions into mitosis, Nup153 is involved in nuclear envelope breakdown. In this study, we demonstrate that the interaction of Nup153 with the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad1 is important in the regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Overexpression of human Nup153 in HeLa cells leads to the appearance of multinucleated cells and induces the formation of multipolar spindles. Importantly, it causes inactivation of the spindle checkpoint due to hypophosphorylation of Mad1. Depletion of Nup153 using RNA interference results in the decline of Mad1 at nuclear pores during interphase and more significantly causes a delayed dissociation of Mad1 from kinetochores in metaphase and an increase in the number of unresolved midbodies. In the absence of Nup153 the spindle checkpoint remains active. In vitro studies indicate direct binding of Mad1 to the N-terminal domain of Nup153. Importantly, Nup153 binding to Mad1 affects Mad1's phosphorylation status, but not its ability to interact with Mad2. Our data suggest that Nup153 levels regulate the localization of Mad1 during the metaphase/anaphase transition thereby affecting its phoshorylation status and in turn spindle checkpoint activity and mitotic exit. PMID:21327106

  5. Structure and function of adenylate kinase isozymes in normal humans and muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Takenaka, H; Fukumoto, K; Fukamachi, S; Yamaguchi, T; Sumida, M; Shiosaka, T; Kurokawa, Y; Okuda, H; Kuby, S A

    1987-01-01

    Two isozymes of adenylate kinase from human Duchenne muscular dystrophy serum, one of which was an aberrant form specific to DMD patients, were separated by Blue Sepharose CL-6B affinity chromatography. The separated aberrant form possessed a molecular weight of 98,000 +/- 1,500, whereas the normal serum isozyme had a weight of 87,000 +/- 1,600, as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and sedimentation equilibrium. The sedimentation coefficients were 5.8 S and 5.6 S for the aberrant form and the normal form, respectively. Both serum isozymes are tetramers. The subunit size of the aberrant isozyme (Mr = 24,700) was very similar to that of the normal human liver isozyme, and the subunit size of the normal isozyme (Mr = 21,700) was very similar to that of the normal human muscle enzyme. The amino acid composition of the normal serum isozyme was similar to that of the muscle-type enzyme, and that of the aberrant isozyme was similar to that of the liver enzyme, with some exceptions in both cases.

  6. NADPH regulates human NAD kinase, a NADP⁺-biosynthetic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuto; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Koshimizu, Mari; Murata, Kousaku

    2011-09-01

    NAD kinase (NADK, EC 2.7.1.23) is the sole NADP(+)-biosynthetic enzyme that catalyzes phosphorylation of NAD(+) to yield NADP(+) using ATP as a phosphoryl donor, and thus, plays a vital role in the cell and represents a potentially powerful antimicrobial drug target. Although methods for expression and purification of human NADK have been previously established (Lerner et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 288:69-74, 2001), the purification procedure could be significantly improved. In this study, we improved the method for expression and purification of human NADK in Escherichia coli and obtained a purified homogeneous enzyme only through heat treatment and single column chromatography. Using the purified human NADK, we revealed a sigmoidal kinetic behavior toward ATP and the inhibitory effects of NADPH and NADH, but not of NADP(+), on the catalytic activity of the enzyme. These inhibitory effects provide insight into the regulation of intracellular NADPH synthesis. Furthermore, these attributes may provide a clue to design a novel drug against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in which this bacterial NADK is potently inhibited by NADP(+).

  7. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  8. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  9. Early events of human T lymphocyte activation are associated with type I protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed Central

    Laxminarayana, D; Berrada, A; Kammer, G M

    1993-01-01

    Human T lymphocytes possess both the type I and II isozymes of protein kinase A (PKA). The type I (PKA-I) isozyme is predominantly associated with the plasma membrane, whereas the type II (PKA-II) isozyme is primarily localized to the cytosol. Because the functions of both PKA-I and PKA-II isozymes in the biochemical events of T lymphocyte activation have not been clearly elucidated, we tested the hypothesis that very early events of normal human T lymphocyte activation are mediated by the PKA-I and/or PKA-II isozyme(s). Fresh normal human T cells and a normal human CD4+ T cell line (GK606) activated with anti-CD3-epsilon and recombinant interleukin 1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) exhibited a peak six- to sevenfold increase of PKA phosphotransferase activity at 5 min that returned to baseline by 60 min. Similarly, both fresh T cells and the T cell line activated by phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin demonstrated a peak eightfold increase of PKA activity by 15 min that returned toward baseline by 60 min. Chromatographic separation of the PKA isozymes and quantification of phosphotransferase activities after T cell activation by either agonist pair showed preferential activation of the PKA-I isozyme, resulting in a significant reduction in the ratio of PKA-I to PKA-II isozyme activity from 3.1:1-6.2:1 to 1.1:1-3.2:1. PKA-I isozyme activation resulted in the release of free catalytic (C) subunit, an increase in C subunit phosphotransferase activity, and the phosphorylation of T cell plasma membrane-associated proteins, p14, p17, p20, p21, p38, and p48. However, activation of the PKA-I isozyme did not appear to be required for the transcription of IL-2 mRNA, an event necessary for mitosis. These data indicate that ligand-induced T cell activation is associated with rapid activation of the PKA-I, but not PKA-II, isozyme that results in phosphorylation of plasma membrane-associated proteins. The involvement of the PKA-I isozyme during the very early events of T cell

  10. Protein Kinase RNA-Like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase-Mediated Bcl-2 Protein Phosphorylation Contributes to Evodiamine-Induced Apoptosis of Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Shin; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Chen, Yen-Chou; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the anticancer mechanism of evodiamine (EVO) against the viability of human A498 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro study showed that EVO decreased the viability of A498 cells with the occurrence of apoptotic characteristics such as hypodiploid cells, DNA ladders, chromatin-condensed cells, and cleaved caspase (Casp)-3/poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins. Pharmacological studies using chemical inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) indicated that phosphorylation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) protein participated in EVO-induced cell death of A498 cells, and application of the JNK inhibitor, SP600125 (SP), inhibited EVO-induced cleavage of the Casp-3/PARP proteins and chromatin condensation according to Giemsa staining. EVO disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) with increased protein levels of the phosphorylated Bcl-2 protein (p-Bcl-2) was prevented by JNK inhibitors in A498 cells. A structure-activity relationship study showed that a methyl group at position 14 in EVO was important for its apoptotic effects and increased p-Bcl-2 protein in A498 cells. Furthermore, significant increases in the phosphorylated endoplasmic reticular stress protein, protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (p-PERK at Thr980), by EVO were detected in A498 cells, and the PERK inhibitor, GSK2606414, significantly suppressed EVO-induced apoptosis, p-JNK, p-PERK, and cleaved PARP proteins. The in vivo study showed that EVO significantly reduced RCC growth elicited by a subcutaneous injection of A498 cells, and an increased protein level of p-PERK was observed according to an immunohistochemical analysis. Apoptosis by EVO was also demonstrated in other RCC cells such as 786-O, ACHN, and Caki-1 cells. This is the first study to demonstrate the anti-RCC effect of EVO via apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, and activation of JNK and PERK to induce Bcl-2

  11. Radiosensitization of p53 mutant cells by PD0166285, a novel G(2) checkpoint abrogator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Li, J; Booher, R N; Kraker, A; Lawrence, T; Leopold, W R; Sun, Y

    2001-11-15

    The lack of functional p53 in many cancer cells offers a therapeutic target for treatment. Cells lacking p53 would not be anticipated to demonstrate a G(1) checkpoint and would depend on the G(2) checkpoint to permit DNA repair prior to undergoing mitosis. We hypothesized that the G(2) checkpoint abrogator could preferentially kill p53-inactive cancer cells by removing the only checkpoint that protects these cells from premature mitosis in response to DNA damage. Because Wee1 kinase is crucial in maintaining G(2) arrest through its inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2, we developed a high-throughput mass screening assay and used it to screen chemical library for Wee1 inhibitors. A pyridopyrimidine class of molecule, PD0166285 was identified that inhibited Wee1 at a nanomolar concentration. At the cellular level, 0.5 microM PD0166285 dramatically inhibits irradiation-induced Cdc2 phosphorylation at the Tyr-15 and Thr-14 in seven of seven cancer cell lines tested. PD0166285 abrogates irradiation-induced G(2) arrest as shown by both biochemical markers and fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis and significantly increases mitotic cell populations. Biologically, PD0166285 acts as a radiosensitizer to sensitize cells to radiation-induced cell death with a sensitivity enhancement ratio of 1.23 as shown by standard clonogenic assay. This radiosensitizing activity is p53 dependent with a higher efficacy in p53-inactive cells. Thus, G(2) checkpoint abrogators represent a novel class of anticancer drugs that enhance cell killing of conventional cancer therapy through the induction of premature mitosis.

  12. DNA resection proteins Sgs1 and Exo1 are required for G1 checkpoint activation in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Balogun, Fiyinfolu O.; Truman, Andrew W.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) in budding yeast trigger activation of DNA damage checkpoints, allowing repair to occur. Although resection is necessary for initiating damage-induced cell cycle arrest in G2, no role has been assigned to it in the activation of G1 checkpoint. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the resection proteins Sgs1 and Exo1 are required for efficient G1 checkpoint activation. We find in G1 arrested cells that histone H2A phosphorylation in response to ionizing radiation is independent of Sgs1 and Exo1. In contrast, these proteins are required for damage-induced recruitment of Rfa1 to the DSB sites, phosphorylation of the Rad53 effector kinase, cell cycle arrest and RNR3 expression. Checkpoint activation in G1 requires the catalytic activity of Sgs1, suggesting that it is DNA resection mediated by Sgs1 that stimulates the damage response pathway rather than protein-protein interactions with other DDR proteins. Together, these results implicate DNA resection, which is thought to be minimal in G1, as necessary for activation of the G1 checkpoint. PMID:23835406

  13. Role of phosphorylation of Cdc20 in p31comet-stimulated disassembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex

    PubMed Central

    Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Eytan, Esther; Ganoth, Dvora; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Dumin, Elena; Hershko, Avram

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint system delays anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. When the checkpoint is turned on, it promotes the formation of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), which inhibits the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). MCC is composed of the checkpoint proteins BubR1, Bub3, and Mad2 bound to the APC/C activator Cdc20. When the checkpoint is satisfied, MCC is disassembled and APC/C becomes active. Previous studies have shown that the Mad2-binding protein p31comet promotes the dissociation of Cdc20 from BubR1 in MCC in a process that requires ATP. We now show that a part of MCC dissociation is blocked by inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and that purified Cdk1–cyclin B stimulates this process. The mutation of all eight potential Cdk phosphorylation sites of Cdc20 partially prevented its release from BubR1. Furthermore, p31comet stimulated Cdk-catalyzed phosphorylation of Cdc20 in MCC. It is suggested that the binding of p31comet to Mad2 in MCC may trigger a conformational change in Cdc20 that facilitates its phosphorylation by Cdk, and that the latter process may promote its dissociation from BubR1. PMID:22566641

  14. Aurora Kinases and Potential Medical Applications of Aurora Kinase Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gavriilidis, Paschalis; Giakoustidis, Alexandros; Giakoustidis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinases (AKs) represent a novel group of serine/threonine kinases. They were originally described in 1995 by David Glover in the course of studies of mutant alleles characterized with unusual spindle pole configuration in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus far, three AKs A, B, and C have been discovered in human healthy and neoplastic cells. Each one locates in different subcellular locations and they are all nuclear proteins. AKs are playing an essential role in mitotic events such as monitoring of the mitotic checkpoint, creation of bipolar mitotic spindle and alignment of centrosomes on it, also regulating centrosome separation, bio-orientation of chromosomes and cytokinesis. Any inactivation of them can have catastrophic consequences on mitotic events of spindle formation, alignment of centrosomes and cytokinesis, resulting in apoptosis. Overexpression of AKs has been detected in diverse solid and hematological cancers and has been linked with a dismal prognosis. After discovery and identification of the first aurora kinase inhibitor (AKI) ZM447439 as a potential drug for targeted therapy in cancer treatment, approximately 30 AKIs have been introduced in cancer treatment. PMID:26345296

  15. Phorbol ester-induced activation of protein kinase C leads to increased formation of diacylglycerol in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Faellman, M.; Stendahl, O.; Andersson, T. )

    1989-03-01

    Human neutrophils stimulated with a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate) responded with an increase in diacylglycerol, considered the natural activator of protein kinase C. The amounts of diacylglycerol formed were considerable, reaching 700-900% of basal after 20 minutes. In contrast, 4-{alpha}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate did not induce any detectable formation of diacylglycerol. Simultaneously, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate exposure caused increased breakdown of both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. These results suggest that once activated, protein kinase C can positively modulate its own activity by inducing additional formation of diacylglycerol from at least two different sources.

  16. Synthetic genes for human muscle-type adenylate kinase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Nishikawa, S; Tanaka, T; Uesugi, S; Takenaka, H; Hamada, M; Kuby, S A

    1989-01-01

    An artificial gene coding for the human muscle-type cytosolic adenylate kinase (hAK1) was chemically synthesized and directly expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of trp promoter. The DNA duplex of 596 bp was designed and constructed from 40 oligonucleotide fragments of typically 30 nucleotides in length. Twelve unique restriction sites were fairly evenly spaced in the synthetic gene to facilitate site-specific mutagenesis at any part of this recombinant protein. The genes for mutant hAK1 (Tyr 95----Phe 95, Y95F hAK1; Arg 97----Ala 97, R97A hAK1) were constructed by cassette mutagenesis and utilized restriction sites incorporated in the hAK1 gene. The recombinant hAK1 was purified to homogeneity by a two-step chromatographic procedure with a good yield, and showed the same adenylate kinase activity as that of authentic hAK1. Preliminary kinetic studies show that the enzymatic activity (Vmax app,cor/Et) of Y95F hAK1 was slightly greater than that of recombinant hAK1, whereas R97A hAK1 still possessed approximately 4% of recombinant hAK1 activity. These results suggest that the Arg-97 residue is important but not essential for catalytic activity, and that Tyr-95 can be replaced by phenylalanine without substantial effects on the enzymatic activity. Moreover, preliminary estimates of the apparent kinetic parameters suggest that these residues are not required for MgATP binding, and therefore they do not appear to be part of the MgATP binding site.

  17. Structure, physiological role, and specific inhibitors of human thymidine kinase 2 (TK2): present and future.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Priego, Eva-María; Hernández, Ana-Isabel; Familiar, Olga; Camarasa, María-José; Negri, Ana; Gago, Federico; Balzarini, Jan

    2008-09-01

    Human mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) is a pyrimidine deoxynucleoside kinase (dNK) that catalyzes the phosphorylation of pyrimidine deoxynucleosides to their corresponding deoxynucleoside 5'-monophosphates by gamma-phosphoryl transfer from ATP. In resting cells, TK2 is suggested to play a key role in the mitochondrial salvage pathway to provide pyrimidine nucleotides for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) synthesis and maintenance. However, recently the physiological role of TK2turned out to have direct clinical relevance as well. Point mutations in the gene encoding TK2 have been correlated to mtDNA disorders in a heterogeneous group of patients suffering from the so-called mtDNA depletion syndrome (MDS). TK2 activity could also be involved in mitochondrial toxicity associated to prolonged treatment with antiviral nucleoside analogues like AZT and FIAU. Therefore, TK2 inhibitors can be considered as valuable tools to unravel the role of TK2 in the maintenance and homeostasis of mitochondrial nucleotide pools and mtDNA, and to clarify the contribution of TK2 activity to mitochondrial toxicity of certain antivirals. Highly selective TK-2 inhibitors having an acyclic nucleoside structure and efficiently discriminating between TK-2 and the closely related TK-1 have already been reported. It is actually unclear whether these agents efficiently reach the inner mitochondrial compartment. In the present review article,structural features of TK2, MDS-related mutations observed in TK2 and their role in MDS will be discussed. Also, an update on novel and selective TK2 inhibitors will be provided.

  18. The mitosis-differentiation checkpoint, another guardian of the epidermal genome.

    PubMed

    Gandarillas, Alberto; Molinuevo, Rut; Freije, Ana; Alonso-Lecue, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The role of p53, the original "guardian of the genome", in skin has remained elusive. We have explored p53 function in human epidermal cells and demonstrated the importance of a mitosis-differentiation checkpoint to suppress potentially precancerous cells. This model places epidermal endoreplication as an antioncogenic mechanism in the face of irreparable genetic alterations. PMID:27308487

  19. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, DNA methyltransferase, and transforming growth factor-β promotes differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Nao; Iwao, Takahiro; Kabeya, Tomoki; Horikawa, Takashi; Niwa, Takuro; Kondo, Yuki; Nakamura, Katsunori; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that small-molecule compounds were effective in generating pharmacokinetically functional enterocytes from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In this study, to determine whether the compounds promote the differentiation of human iPS cells into enterocytes, we investigated the effects of a combination of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), DNA methyltransferase (DNMT), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inhibitors on intestinal differentiation. Human iPS cells cultured on feeder cells were differentiated into endodermal cells by activin A. These endodermal-like cells were then differentiated into intestinal stem cells by fibroblast growth factor 2. Finally, the cells were differentiated into enterocyte cells by epidermal growth factor and small-molecule compounds. After differentiation, mRNA expression levels and drug-metabolizing enzyme activities were measured. The mRNA expression levels of the enterocyte marker sucrase-isomaltase and the major drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 were increased by a combination of MEK, DNMT, and TGF-β inhibitors. The mRNA expression of CYP3A4 was markedly induced by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Metabolic activities of CYP1A1/2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4/5, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and sulfotransferase were also observed in the differentiated cells. In conclusion, MEK, DNMT, and TGF-β inhibitors can be used to promote the differentiation of human iPS cells into pharmacokinetically functional enterocytes.

  20. Detailed Modeling and Evaluation of a Scalable Multilevel Checkpointing System

    SciTech Connect

    Mohror, Kathryn; Moody, Adam; Bronevetsky, Greg; de Supinski, Bronis R.

    2014-09-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) systems are growing more powerful by utilizing more components. As the system mean time before failure correspondingly drops, applications must checkpoint frequently to make progress. But, at scale, the cost of checkpointing becomes prohibitive. A solution to this problem is multilevel checkpointing, which employs multiple types of checkpoints in a single run. Moreover, lightweight checkpoints can handle the most common failure modes, while more expensive checkpoints can handle severe failures. We designed a multilevel checkpointing library, the Scalable Checkpoint/Restart (SCR) library, that writes lightweight checkpoints to node-local storage in addition to the parallel file system. We present probabilistic Markov models of SCR's performance. We show that on future large-scale systems, SCR can lead to a gain in machine efficiency of up to 35 percent, and reduce the load on the parallel file system by a factor of two. In addition, we predict that checkpoint scavenging, or only writing checkpoints to the parallel file system on application termination, can reduce the load on the parallel file system by 20 × on today's systems and still maintain high application efficiency.

  1. Family-wide Structural Analysis of Human Numb-Associated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Sorrell, Fiona J.; Szklarz, Marta; Abdul Azeez, Kamal R.; Elkins, Jon M.; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Summary The highly diverse Numb-associated kinase (NAK) family has been linked to broad cellular functions including receptor-mediated endocytosis, Notch pathway modulation, osteoblast differentiation, and dendrite morphogenesis. Consequently, NAK kinases play a key role in a diverse range of diseases from Parkinson's and prostate cancer to HIV. Due to the plasticity of this kinase family, NAK kinases are often inhibited by approved or investigational drugs and have been associated with side effects, but they are also potential drug targets. The presence of cysteine residues in some NAK family members provides the possibility for selective targeting via covalent inhibition. Here we report the first high-resolution structures of kinases AAK1 and BIKE in complex with two drug candidates. The presented data allow a comprehensive structural characterization of the NAK kinase family and provide the basis for rational design of selective NAK inhibitors. PMID:26853940

  2. Family-wide Structural Analysis of Human Numb-Associated Protein Kinases.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Fiona J; Szklarz, Marta; Abdul Azeez, Kamal R; Elkins, Jon M; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    The highly diverse Numb-associated kinase (NAK) family has been linked to broad cellular functions including receptor-mediated endocytosis, Notch pathway modulation, osteoblast differentiation, and dendrite morphogenesis. Consequently, NAK kinases play a key role in a diverse range of diseases from Parkinson's and prostate cancer to HIV. Due to the plasticity of this kinase family, NAK kinases are often inhibited by approved or investigational drugs and have been associated with side effects, but they are also potential drug targets. The presence of cysteine residues in some NAK family members provides the possibility for selective targeting via covalent inhibition. Here we report the first high-resolution structures of kinases AAK1 and BIKE in complex with two drug candidates. The presented data allow a comprehensive structural characterization of the NAK kinase family and provide the basis for rational design of selective NAK inhibitors. PMID:26853940

  3. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, A Positive Regulator of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9

    SciTech Connect

    Baek,K.; Brown, R.; Birrane, G.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes.

  4. Structural and energetic basis of protein kinetic destabilization in human phosphoglycerate kinase 1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L; Mesa-Torres, Noel; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Valentini, Giovanna

    2013-02-19

    Protein kinetic destabilization is a common feature of many human genetic diseases. Human phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) deficiency is a rare genetic disease caused by mutations in the PGK1 protein, which often shows reduced kinetic stability. In this work, we have performed an in-depth characterization of the thermal stability of the wild type and four disease-causing mutants (I47N, L89P, E252A, and T378P) of human PGK1. PGK1 thermal denaturation is a process under kinetic control, and it is described well by a two-state irreversible denaturation model. Kinetic analysis of differential scanning calorimetry profiles shows that the disease-causing mutations decrease PGK1 kinetic stability from ~5-fold (E252A) to ~100000-fold (L89P) compared to that of wild-type PGK1, and in some cases, mutant enzymes are denatured on a time scale of a few minutes at physiological temperature. We show that changes in protein kinetic stability are associated with large differences in enthalpic and entropic contributions to denaturation free energy barriers. It is also shown that the denaturation transition state becomes more nativelike in terms of solvent exposure as the protein is destabilized by mutations (Hammond effect). Unfolding experiments with urea further suggest a scenario in which the thermodynamic stability of PGK1 at least partly determines its kinetic stability. ATP and ADP kinetically stabilize PGK1 enzymes, and kinetic stabilization is nucleotide- and mutant-selective. Overall, our data provide insight into the structural and energetic basis underlying the low kinetic stability displayed by some mutants causing human PGK1 deficiency, which may have important implications for the development of native state kinetic stabilizers for the treatment of this disease. PMID:23336698

  5. Protein kinase G II-mediated proliferative effects in human cultured prostatic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, Anna-Louise M; Haynes, John M

    2004-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of protein kinase G (PKG) activation upon proliferation of human cultured prostatic stromal cells. The PKG II activator (8-pCPT-cGMP; IC50 of 113+/-42 nM) and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, zaprinast (up to 50 microM), but not the PKG I isoform activators (APT-cGMP and PET-cGMP), reduced foetal calf serum-stimulated proliferation. The effect of 8-pCPT-cGMP (30 microM) was blocked by Rp-8-Br-cGMPS (5 microM) and Rp-8-pCPT-cGMP (5 microM), but not Rp-cAMPS (5 microM). 8-pCPT-cGMP (30 microM) and zaprinast (50 microM), but not PET-cGMP (30 microM), caused a significant increase in atypical nuclei and an increase in annexin-V staining. These data indicate that activation of PKG II induces apoptosis of human cultured prostatic stromal cells. PMID:14636895

  6. Expression and characterization of three Aurora kinase C splice variants found in human oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fellmeth, Jessica E.; Gordon, Derek; Robins, Christian E.; Scott, Richard T.; Treff, Nathan R.; Schindler, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome segregation is an extensively choreographed process yet errors still occur frequently in female meiosis, leading to implantation failure, miscarriage or offspring with developmental disorders. Aurora kinase C (AURKC) is a component of the chromosome passenger complex and is highly expressed in gametes. Studies in mouse oocytes indicate that AURKC is required to regulate chromosome segregation during meiosis I; however, little is known about the functional significance of AURKC in human oocytes. Three splice variants of AURKC exist in testis tissue. To determine which splice variants human oocytes express, we performed quantitative real-time PCR using single oocytes and found expression of all three variants. To evaluate the functional differences between the variants, we created green fluorescent protein-tagged constructs of each variant to express in oocytes from Aurkc−/− mice. By quantifying metaphase chromosome alignment, cell cycle progression, phosphorylation of INCENP and microtubule attachments to kinetochores, we found that AURKC_v1 was the most capable of the variants at supporting metaphase I chromosome segregation. AURKC_v3 localized to chromosomes properly and supported cell cycle progression to metaphase II, but its inability to correct erroneous microtubule attachments to kinetochores meant that chromosome segregation was not as accurate compared with the other two variants. Finally, when we expressed the three variants simultaneously, error correction was more robust than when they were expressed on their own. Therefore, oocytes express three variants of AURKC that are not functionally equivalent in supporting meiosis, but fully complement meiosis when expressed simultaneously. PMID:25995441

  7. Molecular basis for the lack of enantioselectivity of human 3-phosphoglycerate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Gondeau, C.; Chaloin, L.; Lallemand, P.; Roy, B.; Périgaud, C.; Barman, T.; Varga, A.; Vas, M.; Lionne, C.; Arold, S. T.

    2008-01-01

    Non-natural l-nucleoside analogues are increasingly used as therapeutic agents to treat cancer and viral infections. To be active, l-nucleosides need to be phosphorylated to their respective triphosphate metabolites. This stepwise phosphorylation relies on human enzymes capable of processing l-nucleoside enantiomers. We used crystallographic analysis to reveal the molecular basis for the low enantioselectivity and the broad specificity of human 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (hPGK), an enzyme responsible for the last step of phosphorylation of many nucleotide derivatives. Based on structures of hPGK in the absence of nucleotides, and bound to l and d forms of MgADP and MgCDP, we show that a non-specific hydrophobic clamp to the nucleotide base, as well as a water-filled cavity behind it, allows high flexibility in the interaction between PGK and the bases. This, combined with the dispensability of hydrogen bonds to the sugar moiety, and ionic interactions with the phosphate groups, results in the positioning of different nucleotides so to expose their diphosphate group in a position competent for catalysis. Since the third phosphorylation step is often rate limiting, our results are expected to alleviate in silico tailoring of l-type prodrugs to assure their efficient metabolic processing. PMID:18463139

  8. Long-term culture of human odontoma-derived cells with a Rho kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Saito, Tomoaki; Takahara, Toshikazu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Nakashima, Dai; Higo, Morihiro; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2016-09-10

    Because of cellular senescence/apoptosis, no effective culture systems are available to maintain replication of cells from odontogenic tumors especially for odontoma, and, thus, the ability to isolate human odontoma-derived cells (hODCs) for functional studies is needed. The current study was undertaken to develop an approach to isolate hODCs and fully characterize the cells in vitro. The hODCs were cultured successfully with a Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor (Y-27632) for an extended period with stabilized lengths of the telomeres to sustain a similar phenotype/property as the primary tumoral cells. While the hODCs showed stable long-term expansion with expression of major dental epithelial markers including dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) even in the three-dimensional microenvironment, they lack the specific markers for the characteristics of stem cells. Moreover, cells from dental pulp showed significant up-regulation of DSPP when co-cultured with the hODCs, while control fibroblasts with the hODCs did not. Taken together, we propose that the hODCs can be isolated and expanded over the long term with Y-27632 to investigate not only the development of the hODCs but also other types of benign human tumors.

  9. Effects of aerobic training on pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Paul J; Peters, Sandra J; Tunstall, Rebecca J; Cameron-Smith, David; Heigenhauser, George J F

    2004-06-01

    This study examined the effects of short- and long-term aerobic training on the stable up-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and PDH kinase (PDK) in human skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that 8 weeks, but not 1 week, of aerobic training would increase total PDH (PDHt) and PDK activities compared to pretraining, and this would be detectable at the level of gene transcription (mRNA) and/or gene translation (protein). Resting muscle biopsies were taken before and after 1 and 8 weeks of aerobic cycle exercise training. PDHt and PDK activities, and their respective protein and mRNA expression, did not differ after 1 week of aerobic training. PDHt activity increased 31% after 8 weeks and this may be partially due to a 1.3-fold increase in PDH-E(1)alpha protein expression. PDK activity approximately doubled after 8 weeks of aerobic training and this was attributed to a 1.3-fold increase in PDK2 isoform protein expression. Similar to 1 week, no changes were observed at the mRNA level after 8 weeks of training. These findings suggest that aerobically trained human skeletal muscle has an increased maximal capacity to utilize carbohydrates, evident by increased PDHt, but increased metabolic control sensitivity to pyruvate through increased contribution of PDK2 to total PDK activity. PMID:15020699

  10. Long-term culture of human odontoma-derived cells with a Rho kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Saito, Tomoaki; Takahara, Toshikazu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Nakashima, Dai; Higo, Morihiro; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki

    2016-09-10

    Because of cellular senescence/apoptosis, no effective culture systems are available to maintain replication of cells from odontogenic tumors especially for odontoma, and, thus, the ability to isolate human odontoma-derived cells (hODCs) for functional studies is needed. The current study was undertaken to develop an approach to isolate hODCs and fully characterize the cells in vitro. The hODCs were cultured successfully with a Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor (Y-27632) for an extended period with stabilized lengths of the telomeres to sustain a similar phenotype/property as the primary tumoral cells. While the hODCs showed stable long-term expansion with expression of major dental epithelial markers including dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) even in the three-dimensional microenvironment, they lack the specific markers for the characteristics of stem cells. Moreover, cells from dental pulp showed significant up-regulation of DSPP when co-cultured with the hODCs, while control fibroblasts with the hODCs did not. Taken together, we propose that the hODCs can be isolated and expanded over the long term with Y-27632 to investigate not only the development of the hODCs but also other types of benign human tumors. PMID:27514999

  11. Essential role of protein kinase R antagonism by TRS1 in human cytomegalovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Braggin, Jacquelyn E; Child, Stephanie J; Geballe, Adam P

    2016-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lacking TRS1 and IRS1 (HCMV[ΔI/ΔT]) cannot replicate in cell culture. Although both proteins can block the protein kinase R (PKR) pathway, they have multiple other activities and binding partners. It remains unknown which functions are essential for HCMV replication. To investigate this issue, we first identified a TRS1 mutant that is unable to bind to PKR. Like HCMV[ΔI/ΔT], a recombinant HCMV containing this mutant (HCMV[TRS1-Mut 1]) did not replicate in wild-type cells. However, HCMV[ΔI/ΔT] did replicate in cells in which PKR expression was reduced by RNA interference. Moreover, HCMV[ΔI/ΔT] and HCMV[TRS1-Mut 1] replicated to similar levels as virus containing wild-type TRS1 in cell lines in which PKR expression was knocked out by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. These results demonstrate that the sole essential function of TRS1 is to antagonize PKR and that its other activities do not substantially enhance HCMV replication, at least in cultured human fibroblasts.

  12. Elucidation of Different Binding Modes of Purine Nucleosides to Human Deoxycytidine Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Sabini, Elisabetta; Hazra, Saugata; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2008-07-30

    Purine nucleoside analogues of medicinal importance, such as cladribine, require phosphorylation by deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) for pharmacological activity. Structural studies of ternary complexes of human dCK show that the enzyme conformation adjusts to the different hydrogen-bonding properties between dA and dG and to the presence of substituent at the 2-position present in dG and cladribine. Specifically, the carbonyl group in dG elicits a previously unseen conformational adjustment of the active site residues Arg104 and Asp133. In addition, dG and cladribine adopt the anti conformation, in contrast to the syn conformation observed with dA. Kinetic analysis reveals that cladribine is phosphorylated at the highest efficiency with UTP as donor. We attribute this to the ability of cladribine to combine advantageous properties from dA (favorable hydrogen-bonding pattern) and dG (propensity to bind to the enzyme in its anti conformation), suggesting that dA analogues with a substituent at the 2-position are likely to be better activated by human dCK.

  13. Regulation of mitotic progression by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Lischetti, Tiziana; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Equal segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis requires that pairs of kinetochores establish proper attachment to microtubules emanating from opposite poles of the mitotic spindle. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protects against errors in segregation by delaying sister separation in response to improper kinetochore–microtubule interactions, and certain checkpoint proteins help to establish proper attachments. Anaphase entry is inhibited by the checkpoint through assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of the 2 checkpoint proteins, Mad2 and BubR1, bound to Cdc20. The outer kinetochore acts as a catalyst for MCC production through the recruitment and proper positioning of checkpoint proteins and recently there has been remarkable progress in understanding how this is achieved. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore–checkpoint protein interactions and inhibition of the anaphase promoting complex by the MCC. PMID:27308407

  14. Compiler-Enhanced Incremental Checkpointing for OpenMP Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bronevetsky, G; Marques, D; Pingali, K; Rugina, R; McKee, S A

    2008-01-21

    As modern supercomputing systems reach the peta-flop performance range, they grow in both size and complexity. This makes them increasingly vulnerable to failures from a variety of causes. Checkpointing is a popular technique for tolerating such failures, enabling applications to periodically save their state and restart computation after a failure. Although a variety of automated system-level checkpointing solutions are currently available to HPC users, manual application-level checkpointing remains more popular due to its superior performance. This paper improves performance of automated checkpointing via a compiler analysis for incremental checkpointing. This analysis, which works with both sequential and OpenMP applications, reduces checkpoint sizes by as much as 80% and enables asynchronous checkpointing.

  15. Compiler-Enhanced Incremental Checkpointing for OpenMP Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bronevetsky, G; Marques, D; Pingali, K; McKee, S; Rugina, R

    2009-02-18

    As modern supercomputing systems reach the peta-flop performance range, they grow in both size and complexity. This makes them increasingly vulnerable to failures from a variety of causes. Checkpointing is a popular technique for tolerating such failures, enabling applications to periodically save their state and restart computation after a failure. Although a variety of automated system-level checkpointing solutions are currently available to HPC users, manual application-level checkpointing remains more popular due to its superior performance. This paper improves performance of automated checkpointing via a compiler analysis for incremental checkpointing. This analysis, which works with both sequential and OpenMP applications, significantly reduces checkpoint sizes and enables asynchronous checkpointing.

  16. Targeting FMS-related tyrosine kinase receptor 3 with the human immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody IMC-EB10.

    PubMed

    Youssoufian, Hagop; Rowinsky, Eric K; Tonra, James; Li, Yiwen

    2010-02-15

    FMS-related tyrosine kinase receptor 3 (FLT3) is a class III receptor tyrosine kinase that holds considerable promise as a therapeutic target in hematologic malignancies. Current efforts directed toward the development of small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors of FLT3 may be limited by off-target toxicities and the development of drug resistance. Target-specific antibodies could overcome these hurdles and provide additional mechanisms to enhance the antitumor efficacy of FLT3 inhibitors. IMC-EB10 is a novel antibody directed against FLT3. The binding of IMC-EB10 to FLT3 results in antiproliferative effects in vitro and in mouse models engrafted with human leukemia cells that harbor wild-type or constitutively activated FLT3. Future clinical trials will test these notions formally and will identify the most appropriate opportunities for this member of a new generation of antileukemic therapies.

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors sensitize reduced glucocorticoid response mediated by TNF{alpha} in human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT)

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, Kenji . E-mail: knjond@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Nagashima, Masahiro; Kawakubo, Yo; Inoue, Shota; Hirano, Toshihiko; Oka, Kitaro

    2006-12-08

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential drugs administered topically or systematically for the treatment of autoimmune skin diseases such as pemphigus. However, a certain proportion of patients does not respond well to GCs. Although studies on the relationship between cytokines and GC insensitivity in local tissues have attracted attention recently, little is known about the underlying mechanism(s) for GC insensitivity in epidermal keratinocytes. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) {alpha} reduces GC-induced transactivation of endogenous genes as well as a reporter plasmid which contains GC responsive element (GRE) in human epidermal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT). The GC insensitivity by TNF{alpha} was not accompanied by changes in mRNA expressions of GR isoforms ({alpha} or {beta}). However, we observed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) significantly sensitized the GC-induced transactivation of anti-inflammatory genes (glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 gene in the presence of TNF{alpha}. Additionally, we observed that TNF{alpha} reduced prednisolone (PSL)-dependent nuclear translocation of GR, which was restored by pre-treatment of MEK-1 inhibitors. This is the first study demonstrating a role of the MEK-1/ERK cascade in TNF{alpha}-mediated GC insensitivity. Our data suggest that overexpression of TNF{alpha} leads to topical GC insensitivity by reducing GR nuclear translocation in keratinocytes, and our findings also suggest that inhibiting the MEK-1/ERK cascade may offer a therapeutic potential for increasing GC efficacy in epidermis where sufficient inflammatory suppression is required.

  18. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase A: IDENTIFICATION OF Thr455 AS A MAJOR SITE OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    CTP synthetase is an essential enzyme that generates the CTP required for the synthesis of nucleic acids and membrane phospholipids. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of the human CTPS1-encoded CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase A. CTP synthetase 1 was expressed and purified from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. Using purified CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase A activity was time- and dose-dependent. The phosphorylation, which primarily occurred on a threonine residue, was accompanied by a 50% decrease in CTP synthetase 1 activity. The synthetic peptide LGKRRTLFQT that contains the protein kinase A motif for Thr455 was a substrate for protein kinase A. A Thr455 to Ala (T455A) mutation in CTP synthetase 1 was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and was expressed and purified from the S. cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant. The T455A mutation caused a 78% decrease in protein kinase A phosphorylation, and the loss of the phosphothreonine residue and a major phosphopeptide that were present in the purified wild type enzyme phosphorylated by protein kinase A. The CTP synthetase 1 activity of the T455A mutant enzyme was 2-fold higher than the wild type enzyme. In addition, the T455A mutation caused a 44% decrease in the amount of human CTP synthetase 1 that was phosphorylated in S. cerevisiae cells, and this was accompanied by a 2.5-fold increase in the cellular concentration of CTP and a 1.5-fold increase in the choline-dependent synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. PMID:17189248

  19. Phosphoproteomic Profiling Reveals Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Kinase Integration of DNA Damage Response and Mitotic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Renfeng; Liao, Gangling; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Pinto, Sneha M; Shaw, Patrick G; Huang, Tai-Chung; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Gowda, Harsha; Wu, Xinyan; Lv, Dong-Wen; Zhang, Kun; Manda, Srikanth S; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hayward, S Diane

    2015-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically linked to infectious mononucleosis and several human cancers. EBV encodes a conserved protein kinase BGLF4 that plays a key role in the viral life cycle. To provide new insight into the host proteins regulated by BGLF4, we utilized stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics to compare site-specific phosphorylation in BGLF4-expressing Akata B cells. Our analysis revealed BGLF4-mediated hyperphosphorylation of 3,046 unique sites corresponding to 1,328 proteins. Frequency analysis of these phosphosites revealed a proline-rich motif signature downstream of BGLF4, indicating a broader substrate recognition for BGLF4 than its cellular ortholog cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Further, motif analysis of the hyperphosphorylated sites revealed enrichment in ATM, ATR and Aurora kinase substrates while functional analyses revealed significant enrichment of pathways related to the DNA damage response (DDR), mitosis and cell cycle. Phosphorylation of proteins associated with the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) indicated checkpoint activation, an event that inactivates the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGLF4 binds to and directly phosphorylates the key cellular proteins PP1, MPS1 and CDC20 that lie upstream of SAC activation and APC/C inhibition. Consistent with APC/C inactivation, we found that BGLF4 stabilizes the expression of many known APC/C substrates. We also noted hyperphosphorylation of 22 proteins associated the nuclear pore complex, which may contribute to nuclear pore disassembly and SAC activation. A drug that inhibits mitotic checkpoint activation also suppressed the accumulation of extracellular EBV virus. Taken together, our data reveal that, in addition to the DDR, manipulation of mitotic kinase signaling and SAC activation are mechanisms associated with lytic EBV replication. All MS data have been deposited in

  20. Protein kinase CK2 is involved in G2 arrest and apoptosis following spindle damage in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sayed, M; Pelech, S; Wong, C; Marotta, A; Salh, B

    2001-10-25

    p53 undergoes phosphorylation on several residues in response to cellular stresses that include UV and ionizing radiation, however the influence of spindle damage on this parameter is relatively unclear. Consequently, the effect of nocodazole on serine 392 phosphorylation was examined in two epithelial cell lines. We show that this process is dependent upon the stepwise activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and protein kinase casein kinase 2 (CK2). Furthermore, this activation correlated with the biochemical regulation of the maturation-promoting factor (MPF, cdc2/cyclin B), as both DRB and antisense depletion of CK2, as well as SB203580 were associated with an inhibition of its activation in response to nocodazole. Strikingly, when the cell cycle characteristics of nocodazole treated cells were examined, we observed that depletion or inhibition of the catalytic subunit of CK2, in the presence of microtubule inhibitors, resulted in a compromise of the G2 arrest (spindle checkpoint). Furthermore, CK2-depleted, nocodazole treated cells demonstrated a dramatic reduction in the apoptotic cell fraction, confirming that these cells had been endowed with oncogenic properties. These changes were observed in both HeLa cells and HCT116 cells. We also show that this effect is dependent on the presence of functional wild-type p53, as this phenomenon is not apparent in HCT116 p53(-/-) cells. Collectively, our results indicate two novel roles for CK2 in the spindle checkpoint arrest, in concert with p53. Firstly, to maintain increased cyclinB/cdc2 kinase activity, as a component of G2 arrest, and secondly, a role in p53-mediated apoptosis. These findings may have implications for an improved understanding of abnormalities of the spindle checkpoint in human cancers, which is a prerequisite for defining future therapies. PMID:11704824

  1. Phosphoproteomic Profiling Reveals Epstein-Barr Virus Protein Kinase Integration of DNA Damage Response and Mitotic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Renfeng; Pinto, Sneha M.; Shaw, Patrick G.; Huang, Tai-Chung; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Gowda, Harsha; Wu, Xinyan; Lv, Dong-Wen; Zhang, Kun; Manda, Srikanth S.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Hayward, S. Diane

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is etiologically linked to infectious mononucleosis and several human cancers. EBV encodes a conserved protein kinase BGLF4 that plays a key role in the viral life cycle. To provide new insight into the host proteins regulated by BGLF4, we utilized stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics to compare site-specific phosphorylation in BGLF4-expressing Akata B cells. Our analysis revealed BGLF4-mediated hyperphosphorylation of 3,046 unique sites corresponding to 1,328 proteins. Frequency analysis of these phosphosites revealed a proline-rich motif signature downstream of BGLF4, indicating a broader substrate recognition for BGLF4 than its cellular ortholog cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Further, motif analysis of the hyperphosphorylated sites revealed enrichment in ATM, ATR and Aurora kinase substrates while functional analyses revealed significant enrichment of pathways related to the DNA damage response (DDR), mitosis and cell cycle. Phosphorylation of proteins associated with the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) indicated checkpoint activation, an event that inactivates the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, APC/C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGLF4 binds to and directly phosphorylates the key cellular proteins PP1, MPS1 and CDC20 that lie upstream of SAC activation and APC/C inhibition. Consistent with APC/C inactivation, we found that BGLF4 stabilizes the expression of many known APC/C substrates. We also noted hyperphosphorylation of 22 proteins associated the nuclear pore complex, which may contribute to nuclear pore disassembly and SAC activation. A drug that inhibits mitotic checkpoint activation also suppressed the accumulation of extracellular EBV virus. Taken together, our data reveal that, in addition to the DDR, manipulation of mitotic kinase signaling and SAC activation are mechanisms associated with lytic EBV replication. All MS data have been deposited in

  2. Induction of interleukin-8 by Naegleria fowleri lysates requires activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in human astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hee; Kwon, Daeho; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba which causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in humans and experimental animals. To investigate the mechanisms of such inflammatory diseases, potential chemokine gene activation in human astroglial cells was investigated following treatment with N. fowleri lysates. We demonstrated that N. fowleri are potent inducers for the expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) genes in human astroglial cells which was preceded by activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In addition, N. fowleri lysates induces the DNA binding activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1), an important transcription factor for IL-8 induction. The specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK inhibitor, U0126, blocks N. fowleri-mediated AP-1 activation and subsequent IL-8 induction. N. fowleri-induced IL-8 expression requires activation of ERK in human astroglial cells. These findings indicate that treatment of N. fowleri on human astroglial cells leads to the activation of AP-1 and subsequent expression of IL-8 which are dependent on ERK activation. These results may help understand the N. fowleri-mediated upregulation of chemokine and cytokine expression in the astroglial cells.

  3. α-Galactosidase/sucrose kinase (AgaSK), a novel bifunctional enzyme from the human microbiome coupling galactosidase and kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Bruel, Laëtitia; Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Cervera Tison, Marine; Pujol, Ange; Nicoletti, Cendrine; Perrier, Josette; Galinier, Anne; Ropartz, David; Fons, Michel; Pompeo, Frédérique; Giardina, Thierry

    2011-11-25

    α-Galactosides are non-digestible carbohydrates widely distributed in plants. They are a potential source of energy in our daily food, and their assimilation by microbiota may play a role in obesity. In the intestinal tract, they are degraded by microbial glycosidases, which are often modular enzymes with catalytic domains linked to carbohydrate-binding modules. Here we introduce a bifunctional enzyme from the human intestinal bacterium Ruminococcus gnavus E1, α-galactosidase/sucrose kinase (AgaSK). Sequence analysis showed that AgaSK is composed of two domains: one closely related to α-galactosidases from glycoside hydrolase family GH36 and the other containing a nucleotide-binding motif. Its biochemical characterization showed that AgaSK is able to hydrolyze melibiose and raffinose to galactose and either glucose or sucrose, respectively, and to specifically phosphorylate sucrose on the C6 position of glucose in the presence of ATP. The production of sucrose-6-P directly from raffinose points toward a glycolytic pathway in bacteria, not described so far. The crystal structures of the galactosidase domain in the apo form and in complex with the product shed light onto the reaction and substrate recognition mechanisms and highlight an oligomeric state necessary for efficient substrate binding and suggesting a cross-talk between the galactose and kinase domains.

  4. Protein kinase Cα protects against multidrug resistance in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se-Kyoung; Shehzad, Adeeb; Jung, Jae-Chang; Sonn, Jong-Kyung; Lee, Jae-Tae; Park, Jeen-Woo; Lee, Young-Sup

    2012-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is the phenomenon by which, after exposure to a single chemotherapeutic agent, cancer cells evade the agent's cytotoxic effects as well as become resistant to several classes of diverse drugs. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that contribute to drug resistance via a n ATP - dependent drug efflux pump. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a prominent ABC superfamily protein encoded by the mdr gene which has the ability to mediate the cellular extrusion of xenobiotics and anticancer drugs from tumor cells. Exclusively expressed P-gp cells from the human colon cancer HCT15/DOX line showed resistance to doxorubicin while parental HCT15 cells treated with doxorubicin displayed typical signs of apoptosis. In order to verify the hypothesis that expression of MDR is controlled in part, by protein kinase C (PKC), expression patterns of different PKC isoforms were examined in both cell lines. Of the PKC isoforms evaluated, the membrane translocation and expression levels of PKCα were strikingly increased in HCT15/DOX cells. PKCα reversed doxorubicin-induced apoptosis through the scavenging of ROS as well as inhibition of PARP cleavage. In addition, inhibition of PKCα with Go6976, a specific inhibitor of classical PKC, led to reduced MDR expression and increased doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Knockdown of PKCα by siRNA diminished the protective effects of PKCα for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that over-expression and activity of PKCα is closely associated with the regulation of the MDR phenotype in human colon cancer HCT15 cells and provided insight into a new strategy for inhibiting doxorubicin resistance in human cancers. PMID:22639047

  5. MNADK, a Long-Awaited Human Mitochondrion-Localized NAD Kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ren

    2015-08-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its phosphorylated form, NADP, play essential roles in numerous cellular processes in all organisms. NADP maintains a pool of its reducing equivalent, NADPH, which regenerates cellular oxidative defense systems to counteract oxidative damages. Mitochondria represent a major source of oxidative stress, because the majority of superoxide, a reactive oxygen species, is generated from the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Therefore, as universal electron carriers in cellular electron transfer reactions, the pyridine nucleotides are required by mitochondria for both antioxidant protection and biosynthetic pathways. The NAD kinase (NADK) is the sole NADP biosynthetic enzyme. Because NADP is membrane-impermeable, eukaryotes need compartment-specific NADKs for different organelles. Consistently, in both yeast and plants, three compartment-specific NADKs have been identified. In contrast, even though the first human NADK, a cytosolic one, was identified in 2001, the identity of a hypothesized mitochondrial NADK remained elusive, until a recent discovery that the uncharacterized human gene C5ORF33 encodes a mitochondrion-localized NADK, referred to as MNADK. Three groups have characterized MNADK functions based on distinct systems involving yeast, mouse, and human studies, from aspects of both in vitro and in vivo evidence. MNADK is a mitochondrial NADK that is enriched and nutritionally-regulated in mouse liver, and a MNADK-deficient patient exhibits symptoms characteristic of mitochondrial disease. The identification of MNADK provides a key clue to the mechanism involved in mitochondrial NADPH production and the maintenance of redox balance in mammalian cells. The roles of MNADK in physiological and pathological processes have yet to be discovered.

  6. Effects of modulation of glycerol kinase expression on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in human muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Montell, Eulàlia; Lerín, Carlos; Newgard, Christopher B; Gómez-Foix, Anna M

    2002-01-25

    Glycerol is taken up by human muscle in vivo and incorporated into lipids, but little is known about regulation of glycerol metabolism in this tissue. In this study, we have analyzed the role of glycerol kinase (GlK) in the regulation of glycerol metabolism in primary cultured human muscle cells. Isolated human muscle cells exhibited lower GlK activity than fresh muscle explants, but the activity in cultured cells was increased by exposure to insulin. [U-(14)C]Glycerol was incorporated into cellular phospholipids and triacylglycerides (TAGs), but little or no increase in TAG content or lactate release was observed in response to changes in the medium glycerol concentration. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of the Escherichia coli GlK gene (AdCMV-GlK) into muscle cells caused a 30-fold increase in GlK activity, which was associated with a marked rise in the labeling of phospholipid or TAG from [U-(14)C]glycerol compared with controls. Moreover, GlK overexpression caused [U-(14)C]glycerol to be incorporated into glycogen, which was dependent on the activation of glycogen synthase. Co-incubation of AdCMV-GlK-treated muscle cells with glycerol and oleate resulted in a large accumulation of TAG and an increase in lactate production. We conclude that GlK is the limiting step in muscle cell glycerol metabolism. Glycerol 3-phosphate is readily used for TAG synthesis but can also be diverted to form glycolytic intermediates that are in turn converted to glycogen or lactate. Given the high levels of glycerol in muscle interstitial fluid, these finding suggest that changes in GlK activity in muscle can exert important influences on fuel deposition in this tissue. PMID:11714702

  7. Rho kinase polymorphism influences blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance in human twins: role of heredity.

    PubMed

    Seasholtz, Tammy M; Wessel, Jennifer; Rao, Fangwen; Rana, Brinda K; Khandrika, Srikrishna; Kennedy, Brian P; Lillie, Elizabeth O; Ziegler, Michael G; Smith, Douglas W; Schork, Nicholas J; Brown, Joan Heller; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2006-05-01

    The Rho/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway is implicated in experimental hypertension. We, therefore, explored the role of ROCK2 genetic variation in human blood pressure (BP) regulation, exploiting the advantages of a human twin sample to probe heritability. The focus of this work is the common nonsynonymous variant at ROCK2: Thr431Asn. Cardiovascular and autonomic traits displayed substantial heritability (from approximately 33% to 71%; P<0.05). The Asn/Asn genotype (compared with Asn/Thr or Thr/Thr) was associated with greater resting systolic (P<0.001), diastolic (P<0.0001), and mean BP (P<0.0001); allelic variation at ROCK2 accounted for up to approximately 5% of BP variation (P<0.0001). Systemic vascular resistance was higher in Asn/Asn individuals (P=0.049), whereas cardiac output, large artery compliance, and vasoactive hormone secretion were not different. Coupling of the renin-angiotensin system to systemic resistance and BP was diminished in Asn/Asn homozygotes, suggesting genetic pleiotropy of Thr431Asn, confirmed by bivariate genetic analyses. The Asn/Asn genotype also predicted higher BP after environmental (cold) stress. The rise in heart rate after cold was less pronounced in Asn/Asn individuals, consistent with intact baroreceptor function, and baroreceptor slope was not influenced by genotype. Common genetic variation (Thr431Asn) at ROCK2 predicts increased BP, systemic vascular resistance (although not large artery compliance), and resistance in response to the endogenous renin-angiotensin system, indicating a resistance vessel-based effect on elevated BP. The results suggest that common variation in ROCK2 exerts systemic resistance-mediated changes in BP, documenting a novel mechanism for human circulatory control, and suggesting new possibilities for diagnostic profiling and treatment of subjects at risk of developing hypertension.

  8. Contribution of growth and cell cycle checkpoints to radiation survival in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jaklevic, Burnley; Uyetake, Lyle; Lemstra, Willy; Chang, Julia; Leary, William; Edwards, Anthony; Vidwans, Smruti; Sibon, Ody; Tin Su, Tin

    2006-12-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints contribute to survival after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) by arresting the cell cycle and permitting repair. As such, yeast and mammalian cells lacking checkpoints are more sensitive to killing by IR. We reported previously that Drosophila larvae mutant for grp (encoding a homolog of Chk1) survive IR as well as wild type despite being deficient in cell cycle checkpoints. This discrepancy could be due to differences either among species or between unicellular and multicellular systems. Here, we provide evidence that Grapes is needed for survival of Drosophila S2 cells after exposure to similar doses of IR, suggesting that multicellular organisms may utilize checkpoint-independent mechanisms to survive irradiation. The dispensability of checkpoints in multicellular organisms could be due to replacement of damaged cells by regeneration through increased nutritional uptake and compensatory proliferation. In support of this idea, we find that inhibition of nutritional uptake (by starvation or onset of pupariation) or inhibition of growth factor signaling and downstream targets (by mutations in cdk4, chico, or dmyc) reduced the radiation survival of larvae. Further, some of these treatments are more detrimental for grp mutants, suggesting that the need for compensatory proliferation is greater for checkpoint mutants. The difference in survival of grp and wild-type larvae allowed us to screen for small molecules that act as genotype-specific radiation sensitizers in a multicellular context. A pilot screen of a small molecule library from the National Cancer Institute yielded known and approved radio-sensitizing anticancer drugs. Since radiation is a common treatment option for human cancers, we propose that Drosophila may be used as an in vivo screening tool for genotype-specific drugs that enhance the effect of radiation therapy. PMID:17028317

  9. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein functions as a protein kinase C substrate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Coates, K; Harris, M

    1995-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein was expressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminal fusion with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The ability of GST-Nef to act as a substrate for cellular kinases in vitro was examined by incubation of purified GST-Nef fusion proteins, immobilized on glutathione-agarose beads, with cytoplasmic extracts from a number of human cell lines. In the presence of [gamma32P]ATP, phosphorylation of Nef occurred predominantly on serine residues. Studies with protein kinase inhibitors suggested that protein kinase C (PKC) was involved in Nef phosphorylation. This was supported further by the demonstration that purified PKC was also able to phosphorylate Nef in the absence of cell extract. Serine/threonine phosphorylation of Nef was also observed in vivo when Nef was expressed with a C-terminal GST or 6-histidine tag in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells by recombinant baculoviruses. In extracts from Jurkat T cells and U937 monocyte/macrophages Nef also associated with a 57 kDa cellular protein that was itself phosphorylated in vitro. Phosphorylation of this Nef-associated protein was inhibited by heparin and is thus likely to be mediated by casein kinase II. The observation that PKC can phosphorylate Nef in vitro raises the possibility that PKC might play a role in regulating both Nef function and the physical interactions between Nef and cellular components.

  10. PSEA: Kinase-specific prediction and analysis of human phosphorylation substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Sheng-Bao; Qiu, Jian-Ding; Shi, Shao-Ping; Chen, Xiang; Liang, Ru-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation catalysed by kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in intracellular signal transduction. With the increasing number of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites and disease-related phosphorylation substrates that have been identified, the desire to explore the regulatory relationship between protein kinases and disease-related phosphorylation substrates is motivated. In this work, we analysed the kinases' characteristic of all disease-related phosphorylation substrates by using our developed Phosphorylation Set Enrichment Analysis (PSEA) method. We evaluated the efficiency of our method with independent test and concluded that our approach is reliable for identifying kinases responsible for phosphorylated substrates. In addition, we found that Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) families are more associated with abnormal phosphorylation. It can be anticipated that our method might be helpful to identify the mechanism of phosphorylation and the relationship between kinase and phosphorylation related diseases. A user-friendly web interface is now freely available at http://bioinfo.ncu.edu.cn/PKPred_Home.aspx.

  11. PSEA: Kinase-specific prediction and analysis of human phosphorylation substrates.

    PubMed

    Suo, Sheng-Bao; Qiu, Jian-Ding; Shi, Shao-Ping; Chen, Xiang; Liang, Ru-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation catalysed by kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in intracellular signal transduction. With the increasing number of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites and disease-related phosphorylation substrates that have been identified, the desire to explore the regulatory relationship between protein kinases and disease-related phosphorylation substrates is motivated. In this work, we analysed the kinases' characteristic of all disease-related phosphorylation substrates by using our developed Phosphorylation Set Enrichment Analysis (PSEA) method. We evaluated the efficiency of our method with independent test and concluded that our approach is reliable for identifying kinases responsible for phosphorylated substrates. In addition, we found that Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) families are more associated with abnormal phosphorylation. It can be anticipated that our method might be helpful to identify the mechanism of phosphorylation and the relationship between kinase and phosphorylation related diseases. A user-friendly web interface is now freely available at http://bioinfo.ncu.edu.cn/PKPred_Home.aspx. PMID:24681538

  12. PSEA: Kinase-specific prediction and analysis of human phosphorylation substrates

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Sheng-Bao; Qiu, Jian-Ding; Shi, Shao-Ping; Chen, Xiang; Liang, Ru-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation catalysed by kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in intracellular signal transduction. With the increasing number of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites and disease-related phosphorylation substrates that have been identified, the desire to explore the regulatory relationship between protein kinases and disease-related phosphorylation substrates is motivated. In this work, we analysed the kinases' characteristic of all disease-related phosphorylation substrates by using our developed Phosphorylation Set Enrichment Analysis (PSEA) method. We evaluated the efficiency of our method with independent test and concluded that our approach is reliable for identifying kinases responsible for phosphorylated substrates. In addition, we found that Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) families are more associated with abnormal phosphorylation. It can be anticipated that our method might be helpful to identify the mechanism of phosphorylation and the relationship between kinase and phosphorylation related diseases. A user-friendly web interface is now freely available at http://bioinfo.ncu.edu.cn/PKPred_Home.aspx. PMID:24681538

  13. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5′- and 3′-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  14. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA by the Microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunsun; Seong, Youngmo; Seo, Jae Hong; Kwon, Young-Soo; Song, Hoseok

    2014-03-28

    Aurora kinase B regulates the segregation of chromosomes and the spindle checkpoint during mitosis. In this study, we showed that the Microprocessor complex, which is responsible for the processing of the primary transcripts during the generation of microRNAs, destabilizes the mRNA of Aurora kinase B in human cells. The Microprocessor-mediated cleavage kept Aurora kinase B at a low level and prevented premature entrance into mitosis. The cleavage was reduced during mitosis leading to the accumulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA and protein. In addition to Aurora kinase B mRNA, the processing of other primary transcripts of miRNAs were also decreased during mitosis. We found that the cleavage was dependent on an RNA helicase, DDX5, and the association of DDX5 and DDX17 with the Microprocessor was reduced during mitosis. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism by which the Microprocessor complex regulates stability of Aurora kinase B mRNA and cell cycle progression.

  15. Chromosomal location of the Syk and ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase genes in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, G.; Malissen, B.; Mattei, M.G.

    1994-12-31

    Several protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), which may be grouped into two structurally different families, have been implicated in antigen receptor proximal signaling. Blk, Fyn, Lck, Lyn, and Yes belong to the Src-family kinases, whereas the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and the CD3-{zeta}-associated PTK (ZAP-70) define a new one, the Syk family. These kinases differ from the Src-family kinases in that they are non-myristylated cytoplasmic polypeptides composed of two N-terminal Src homology-2 (SH2) domains and a C-terminal catalytic domain. ZAP-70 appears to be expressed exclusively in T cells and NK cells, whereas Syk is preferentially expressed in B cells, T cells, and myeloid cells. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  16. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress.

  17. DTL/CDT2 is essential for both CDT1 regulation and the early G2/M checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Sansam, Christopher L; Shepard, Jennifer L; Lai, Kevin; Ianari, Alessandra; Danielian, Paul S; Amsterdam, Adam; Hopkins, Nancy; Lees, Jacqueline A

    2006-11-15

    Checkpoint genes maintain genomic stability by arresting cells after DNA damage. Many of these genes also control cell cycle events in unperturbed cells. By conducting a screen for checkpoint genes in zebrafish, we found that dtl/cdt2 is an essential component of the early, radiation-induced G2/M checkpoint. We subsequently found that dtl/cdt2 is required for normal cell cycle control, primarily to prevent rereplication. Both the checkpoint and replication roles are conserved in human DTL. Our data indicate that the rereplication reflects a requirement for DTL in regulating CDT1, a protein required for prereplication complex formation. CDT1 is degraded in S phase to prevent rereplication, and following DNA damage to prevent origin firing. We show that DTL associates with the CUL4-DDB1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and is required for CDT1 down-regulation in unperturbed cells and following DNA damage. The cell cycle defects of Dtl-deficient zebrafish are suppressed by reducing Cdt1 levels. In contrast, the early G2/M checkpoint defect appears to be Cdt1-independent. Thus, DTL promotes genomic stability through two distinct mechanisms. First, it is an essential component of the CUL4-DDB1 complex that controls CDT1 levels, thereby preventing rereplication. Second, it is required for the early G2/M checkpoint.

  18. Role for zinc in a cellular response mediated by protein kinase C in human B lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, I.J.; Zalewski, P.D.; Giannakis, C. )

    1991-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested a role for Zn{sup 2+}, distinct from that of CA{sup 2+}, in the subcellular distribution and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Here the author show that Zn{sup 2+} is required for a cellular response mediated by PKC, the rapid loss of expression of a human B cell receptor MER, detected by resetting with mouse erythrocytes. Zn{sup 2+}, in the presence of the Zn{sup 2+} ionophore pyrithione, caused rapid inhibition of MER rosetting at concentrations which induce the translocation and activation of PKC. This required cellular uptake of Zn{sup 2+} and was blocked by 1,10-phenanthroline and TPEN which chelate Zn{sup 2+} but not Ca{sup 2+}. Gold, a metal with similar properties, also induced translocation of PKC and inhibition of MER. Phenanthroline and TPEN also blocked the inhibition of MER induced by the PKC activators phorbol ester and sodium fluoride, suggesting that endogenous cellular Zn{sup 2+} is required. They propose that some cellular actions of PKC require a Zn{sup 2+}-dependent event and that these may be a target for gold during chrysotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Sphingosine kinase-1 is a hypoxia-regulated gene that stimulates migration of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalm, Stephanie; Doell, Frauke; Roemer, Isolde; Bubnova, Svetlana

    2008-04-18

    Sphingosine kinases (SK) catalyze the production of sphingosine-1-phosphate which in turn regulates cell responses such as proliferation and migration. Here, we show that exposure of the human endothelial cell line EA.hy 926 to hypoxia stimulates a increased SK-1, but not SK-2, mRNA, protein expression, and activity. This effect was due to stimulated SK-1 promoter activity which contains two putative hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive-elements (HRE). By deletion of one of the two HREs, hypoxia-induced promoter activation was abrogated. Furthermore, hypoxia upregulated the expression of HIF-1{alpha} and HIF-2{alpha}, and both contributed to SK-1 gene transcription as shown by selective depletion of HIF-1{alpha} or HIF-2{alpha} by siRNA. The hypoxia-stimulated SK-1 upregulation was functionally coupled to increased migration since the selective depletion of SK-1, but not of SK-2, by siRNAs abolished the migratory response. In summary, these data show that hypoxia upregulates SK-1 activity and results in an accelerated migratory capacity of endothelial cells. SK-1 may thus serve as an attractive therapeutic target to treat diseases associated with increased endothelial migration and angiogenesis such as cancer growth and progression.

  20. Antitumour effects of Yangzheng Xiaoji in human osteosarcoma: the pivotal role of focal adhesion kinase signalling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen G; Ye, Lin; Ji, Ke; Ruge, Fiona; Wu, Yiling; Gao, Yong; Ji, Jiafu; Mason, Malcolm D

    2013-09-01

    The present study examined, in vitro and in vivo, the potential antitumour effects of Yangzheng Xiaoji (YZXJ), a traditional Chinese medical formula used in cancer treatment, on osteosarcoma, a tumour type recently found to be sensitive to YZXJ. The human osteosarcoma cell line MG63 was used in cell-matrix adhesion and cell growth assays. The same cell line was used in an in vivo tumour model by establishing subcutaneous osteosarcoma xenografts. Oral and intraperitoneal routes were used to deliver the YZXJ extract. The effect of YZXJ on the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin was evaluated by immunofluorescence methods. It was found that YZXJ exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on cell-matrix adhesion as demonstrated by a cell-based assay and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) analysis. The effect was observed together with a reduction in phospho-FAK and phospho-paxillin in the cells when treated with YZXJ. In the in vivo tumour model, YZXJ was found to significantly inhibit the growth of osteosarcoma with a sustained effect observed when YZXJ was delivered intraperitoneally. YZXJ sensitized cells to the effect of FAK inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. It is concluded that Yangzheng Xiaoji plays a significant role in cell-matrix adhesion and tumour growth, likely by inhibiting the activation of the FAK pathway. The therapeutic role of Yangzheng Xiaoji in osteosarcoma warrants further investigation. PMID:23828123

  1. Pharmacophore-Based Virtual Screening to Discover New Active Compounds for Human Choline Kinase α1.

    PubMed

    Serrán-Aguilera, Lucía; Nuti, Roberto; López-Cara, Luisa C; Mezo, Miguel Á Gallo; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Entrena, Antonio; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón

    2015-06-01

    Choline kinase (CK) catalyses the transfer of the ATP γ-phosphate to choline to generate phosphocholine and ADP in the presence of magnesium leading to the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. Of the three isoforms of CK described in humans, only the α isoforms (HsCKα) are strongly associated with cancer and have been validated as drug targets to treat this disease. Over the years, a large number of Hemicholinium-3 (HC-3)-based HsCKα biscationic inhibitors have been developed though the relevant common features important for the biological function have not been defined. Here, selecting a large number of previous HC-3-based inhibitors, we discover through computational studies a pharmacophore model formed by five moieties that are included in the 1-benzyl-4-(N-methylaniline)pyridinium fragment. Using a pharmacophore-guided virtual screening, we then identified 6 molecules that showed binding affinities in the low μM range to HsCKα1. Finally, protein crystallization studies suggested that one of these molecules is bound to the choline and ATP-binding sites. In conclusion, we have developed a pharmacophore model that not only allowed us to dissect the structural important features of the previous HC-3 derivatives, but also enabled the identification of novel chemical tools with good ligand efficiencies to investigate the biological functions of HsCKα1. PMID:27490389

  2. Protein Kinase C Regulation of 12-Lipoxygenase-Mediated Human Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Jennifer; Apopa, Patrick L.; Vesci, Joanne; Kenyon, Victor; Rai, Ganesha; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Holman, Theodore R.; Maloney, David J.; Boutaud, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation is important in the regulation of hemostasis and thrombosis. Uncontrolled activation of platelets may lead to arterial thrombosis, which is a major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke. After activation, metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) by 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) may play a significant role in regulating the degree and stability of platelet activation because inhibition of 12-LOX significantly attenuates platelet aggregation in response to various agonists. Protein kinase C (PKC) activation is also known to be an important regulator of platelet activity. Using a newly developed selective inhibitor for 12-LOX and a pan-PKC inhibitor, we investigated the role of PKC in 12-LOX-mediated regulation of agonist signaling in the platelet. To determine the role of PKC within the 12-LOX pathway, a number of biochemical endpoints were measured, including platelet aggregation, calcium mobilization, and integrin activation. Inhibition of 12-LOX or PKC resulted in inhibition of dense granule secretion and attenuation of both aggregation and αIIbβ3 activation. However, activation of PKC downstream of 12-LOX inhibition rescued agonist-induced aggregation and integrin activation. Furthermore, inhibition of 12-LOX had no effect on PKC-mediated aggregation, indicating that 12-LOX is upstream of PKC. These studies support an essential role for PKC downstream of 12-LOX activation in human platelets and suggest 12-LOX as a possible target for antiplatelet therapy. PMID:22155783

  3. The human DNA-activated protein kinase, DNA-PK: Substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Connelly, M.A.; Zhang, H.; Sipley, J.A.; Lees-Miller, S.P.; Lintott, L.G.; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, E.

    1994-11-05

    Although much has been learned about the structure and function of p53 and the probable sequence of subsequent events that lead to cell cycle arrest, little is known about how DNA damage is detected and the nature of the signal that is generated by DNA damage. Circumstantial evidence suggests that protein kinases may be involved. In vitro, human DNA-PK phosphorylates a variety of nuclear DNA-binding, regulatory proteins including the tumor suppressor protein p53, the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, the heat shock protein hsp90, the large tumor antigen (TAg) of simian virus 40, a variety of transcription factors including Fos, Jun, serum response factor (SRF), Myc, Sp1, Oct-1, TFIID, E2F, the estrogen receptor, and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (reviewed in Anderson, 1993; Jackson et al., 1993). However, for most of these proteins, the sites that are phosphorylated by DNA-PK are not known. To determine if the sites that were phosphorylated in vitro also were phosphorylated in vivo and if DNA-PK recognized a preferred protein sequence, the authors identified the sites phosphorylated by DNA-PK in several substrates by direct protein sequence analysis. Each phosphorylated serine or threonine is followed immediately by glutamine in the polypeptide chain; at no other positions are the amino acid residues obviously constrained.

  4. A system for assaying homologous recombination at the endogenous human thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, M.B.; Little, J.B. ); Potter, H. ); Yandell, D.W. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1991-08-01

    A system for assaying human interchromosomal recombination in vitro was developed, using a cell line containing two different mutant thymidine kinase genes (TK) on chromosomes 17. Heteroalleles were generated in the TK{sup +/+} parent B-lymphoblast cell line WIL-2 by repeated exposure to the alkylating nitrogen mustard ICR-191, which preferentially causes +1 or {minus}1 frameshifts. Resulting TK{sup {minus}/{minus}} mutants were selected in medium containing the toxic thymidine analog trifluorothymidine. In two lines, heterozygous frameshifts were located in exons 4 and 7 of the TK gene separated by {approx}8 kilobases. These lines undergo spontaneous reversion to TK{sup +} at a frequency of < 10{sup {minus}7}, and revertants can be selected in cytidine/hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine medium. The nature and location of these heteroallelic mutations make large deletions, rearrangements, nondisjunction, and reduplication unlikely mechanisms for reversion to TK{sup +}. The mode of reversion to TK{sup +} was specifically assessed by DNA sequencing, use of single-strand conformation polymorphisms, and analysis of various restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) linked to the TK gene on chromosome 17. The data suggest that a proportion of revertants has undergone recombination and gene conversion at the TK locus, with concomitant loss of frameshifts and allele loss at linked RFLPs. Models are presented for the origin of two recombinants.

  5. A Dual Role for the Nonreceptor Tyrosine Kinase Pyk2 during the Intracellular Trafficking of Human Papillomavirus 16

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Elinor Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The infectious process of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) has been studied considerably, and many cellular components required for viral entry and trafficking continue to be revealed. In this study, we investigated the role of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Pyk2 during HPV16 pseudovirion infection of human keratinocytes. We found that Pyk2 is necessary for infection and appears to be involved in the intracellular trafficking of the virus. Small interfering RNA-mediated reduction of Pyk2 resulted in a significant decrease in infection but did not prevent viral entry at the plasma membrane. Pyk2 depletion resulted in altered endolysosomal trafficking of HPV16 and accelerated unfolding of the viral capsid. Furthermore, we observed retention of the HPV16 pseudogenome in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) in Pyk2-depleted cells, suggesting that the kinase could be required for the viral DNA to exit the TGN. While Pyk2 has previously been shown to function during the entry of enveloped viruses at the plasma membrane, the kinase has not yet been implicated in the intracellular trafficking of a nonenveloped virus such as HPV. Additionally, these data enrich the current literature on Pyk2's function in human keratinocytes. IMPORTANCE In this study, we investigated the role of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Pyk2 during human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of human skin cells. Infections with high-risk types of HPV such as HPV16 are the leading cause of cervical cancer and a major cause of genital and oropharyngeal cancer. As a nonenveloped virus, HPV enters cells by interacting with cellular receptors and established cellular trafficking routes to ensure that the viral DNA reaches the nucleus for productive infection. This study identified Pyk2 as a cellular component required for the intracellular trafficking of HPV16 during infection. Understanding the infectious pathways of HPVs is critical for developing additional preventive therapies. Furthermore, this study

  6. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Elias, Rawad; Morales, Joshua; Rehman, Yasser; Khurshid, Humera

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is primarily a disease of older adults. The treatment of advanced stage tumors usually involves the use of systemic agents that may be associated with significant risk of toxicity, especially in older patients. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are newcomers to the oncology world with improved efficacy and better safety profiles when compared to traditional cytotoxic drugs. This makes them an attractive treatment option. While there are no elderly specific trials, this review attempts to look at the current available data from a geriatric oncology perspective. We reviewed data from phase III studies that led to newly approved indications of checkpoint inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and renal cell cancer. Data were reviewed with respect to response, survival, and toxicity according to three groups: <65 years, 65-75 years, and >75 years. Current literature does not allow one to draw definitive conclusions regarding the role of immune checkpoint inhibitors in older adults. However, they may offer a potentially less toxic but equally efficacious treatment option for the senior adult oncology patient. PMID:27287329

  7. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Elias, Rawad; Morales, Joshua; Rehman, Yasser; Khurshid, Humera

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is primarily a disease of older adults. The treatment of advanced stage tumors usually involves the use of systemic agents that may be associated with significant risk of toxicity, especially in older patients. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are newcomers to the oncology world with improved efficacy and better safety profiles when compared to traditional cytotoxic drugs. This makes them an attractive treatment option. While there are no elderly specific trials, this review attempts to look at the current available data from a geriatric oncology perspective. We reviewed data from phase III studies that led to newly approved indications of checkpoint inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and renal cell cancer. Data were reviewed with respect to response, survival, and toxicity according to three groups: <65 years, 65-75 years, and >75 years. Current literature does not allow one to draw definitive conclusions regarding the role of immune checkpoint inhibitors in older adults. However, they may offer a potentially less toxic but equally efficacious treatment option for the senior adult oncology patient.

  8. Sequence analysis of the cDNA for the human casein kinase I {delta} (CSNK1D) gene and its chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kusuda, Jun; Hidari, Nobuko; Hirai, Momoki; Hashimoto, Katsuyuki

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the genetic mapping of a cDNA clone encoding human casein kinase I (CK1) using fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction analysis of human-rodent hybrid cell panels. When compared to the amino acid sequence in the kinase domain of the rat, this cDNA seems to be a human homologue of the CK1 {delta} isoform. Sequence similarity to the kinase domains and function in DNA repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces pombe are discussed. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Different approaches of teaching in chemistry. Membrane targeting mechanism of human sphingosine kinase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jeong-Hye

    Part 1. Biochemistry research involves elucidating the mechanism of membrane targeting of human sphingosine kinase 1 (hSK1). Sphingosine kinase (SK) is an enzyme that catalyzes phosphorylation of sphingosine to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S-1-P). hSK1 can be activated by its agonists resulting in rapid and transient increased production of S-1-P, resulting in enhancement of apoptosis. Upon activation by PMA, SK translocates to the plasma membrane. In vitro measurement demonstrated hSK1 selectively bound phosphatidylserine over anionic lipids and showed strong preference for the plasma membrane-mimetics. Mutational analysis of conserved Thr54 and Asn89 on putative membrane-binding surface from the model structure showed both in vivo and in vitro that these two residues are important for the membrane selectivity of hSK1. Part 2. Chemical education research focuses on three different ways of scientific learning and teaching. First, inquiry teaching that involves a writing method called the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) is analyzed using grounded theory. This is done in a general education course for pre-service teachers. As a result, (1) students experience understanding of concept through mastery of their own methods and experience different aspects of inquiry processes; (2) SWH method allows instructors to detect misconceptions generated by students' incorrect, but logical interpretations of their data, and helps instructors to make changes to guide students; (3) as students experience meta-cognition, students gain understanding of concepts by relating mathematical progression to different parts of the experiments and also by applying what they learn into other situations. Second, statistical analysis on the long term effects of a combined math/chemistry program is analyzed through multiple linear regression and discriminant function analysis. The results demonstrate the program was beneficial to the underrepresented students when the college success was measured

  10. Amplification and overexpression of aurora kinase A (AURKA) in immortalized human ovarian epithelial (HOSE) cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, C M; Man, C; Jin, Y; Jin, C; Guan, X Y; Wang, Q; Wan, T S K; Cheung, A L M; Tsao, S W

    2005-07-01

    Immortalization is an early and essential step of human carcinogenesis. Amplification of chromosome 20q has been shown to be a common event in immortalized cells and cancers. We have previously reported that gain and amplification of chromosome 20q is a non-random and common event in immortalized human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cells. The chromosome 20q harbors genes including TGIF2 (20q11.2-q12), AIB1 (20q12), PTPN1 (20q13.1), ZNF217 (20q13.2), and AURKA (20q13.2-q13.3), which were previously reported to be amplified and overexpressed in ovarian cancers. Some of these genes may be involved in immortalization of HOSE cells and represent crucial premalignant changes in ovarian surface epithelium. Investigation of the involvement of these genes was examined in four pairs of pre-crisis (preimmortalized) and post-crisis (immortalized) HOSE cells. Overexpression of AURKA (Aurora kinase A), also known as BTAK and STK15, by both real time-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-QPCR) and Western blotting was detected in all the four immortalized HOSE cells examined while overexpression of AIB1 and ZNF217 was observed in two of four immortalized HOSE cells examined. Overexpression of TGIF2 and PTPN1 was not significant in our immortalized HOSE cell systems. The degree of overexpression of AURKA was shown to be closely associated with the amplification of chromosome 20q in immortalized HOSE cells. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with labeled P1 artificial clone (PAC) confirmed the amplification of the chromosomal region (20q13.2-13.3) where AURKA resides. DNA amplification of AURKA was also confirmed using semi-quantitative PCR. Our study showed that amplification and overexpression of AURKA is a common and significant event during immortalization of HOSE cells and may represent an important premalignant change in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  11. MITF mediates cAMP-induced protein kinase C-β expression in human melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Young; Wu, Christina; Yonemoto, Laurie; Murphy-Smith, Melissa; Wu, Heng; Stachur, Christina M.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.

    2006-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent pathway up-regulates MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), important for key melanogenic proteins such as tyrosinase, TRP-1 (tyrosinase-related protein 1) and TRP-2. We asked whether MITF is also a key transcription factor for PKC-β (protein kinase C-β), required to phosphorylate otherwise inactive tyrosinase. When paired cultures of human melanocytes were treated with isobutylmethylxanthine, known to increase intracellular cAMP, both protein and mRNA levels of PKC-β were induced by 24 h. To determine whether MITF modulates PKC-β expression, paired cultures of human melanocytes were transfected with dn-MITF (dominant-negative MITF) or empty control vector. By immunoblotting, PKC-β protein was reduced by 63±3.7% within 48 h. Co-transfection of an expression vector for MITF-M, the MITF isoform specific for pigment cells, or empty control vector with a full-length PKC-β promoter–CAT (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) reporter construct (PKC-β/CAT) into Cos-7 cells showed >60-fold increase in CAT activity. Melanocytes abundantly also expressed MITF-A, as well as the MITF-B and MITF-H isoforms. However, in contrast with MITF-M, MITF-A failed to transactivate co-expressed PKC-β/CAT or CAT constructs under the control of a full-length tyrosinase promoter. Together, these results demonstrate that MITF, specifically MITF-M, is a key transcription factor for PKC-β, linking the PKC- and cAMP-dependent pathways in regulation of melanogenesis. PMID:16411896

  12. Leukocyte Pyruvate Kinase Expression is Reduced in Normal Human Pregnancy but not in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A.; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia; Mittal, Pooja; Elfline, Megan; Zhu, Aiping; Petty, Howard R.

    2010-01-01

    Problem Emerging evidence suggests that metabolism influences immune cell signaling and immunoregulation. To examine the immunoregulatory role of glycolysis in pregnancy, we evaluated the properties of pyruvate kinase in leukocytes from non-pregnant women and those with normal pregnancy and pre-eclampsia. Method of study We evaluated pyruvate kinase expression in lymphocytes and neutrophils from non-pregnant, pregnant, and pre-eclampsia patients using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Leukocyte pyruvate kinase activity and pyruvate concentrations were also evaluated. To study pyruvate’s effect on signaling, we labeled Jurkat T cells with Ca2+ dyes and measured cell responses in the presence of agents influencing intracellular pyruvate. Results The expression of pyruvate kinase is reduced in lymphocytes and neutrophils from normal pregnant women in comparison to those of non-pregnant women and pre-eclampsia patients. Similarly, the activity of pyruvate kinase and the intracellular pyruvate concentration are reduced in leukocytes of normal pregnant women in comparison to non-pregnant women and women with pre-eclampsia. Using Jurkat cells as a model of leukocyte signaling, we have shown that perturbations of intracellular pyruvate influence Ca2+ signals. Conclusion Normal pregnancy is characterized by reduced pyruvate kinase expression within lymphocytes and neutrophils. We speculate that reduced pyruvate kinase expression modifies immune cell responses due to reduced pyruvate concentrations. PMID:20560913

  13. DNA replication checkpoint signaling depends on a Rad53-Dbf4 N-terminal interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chou; Kenworthy, Jessica; Gabrielse, Carrie; Hänni, Christine; Zegerman, Philip; Weinreich, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are essential to initiate DNA replication at individual origins. During replication stress, the S-phase checkpoint inhibits the DDK- and CDK-dependent activation of late replication origins. Rad53 kinase is a central effector of the replication checkpoint and both binds to and phosphorylates Dbf4 to prevent late-origin firing. The molecular basis for the Rad53-Dbf4 physical interaction is not clear but occurs through the Dbf4 N terminus. Here we found that both Rad53 FHA1 and FHA2 domains, which specifically recognize phospho-threonine (pT), interacted with Dbf4 through an N-terminal sequence and an adjacent BRCT domain. Purified Rad53 FHA1 domain (but not FHA2) bound to a pT Dbf4 peptide in vitro, suggesting a possible phospho-threonine-dependent interaction between FHA1 and Dbf4. The Dbf4-Rad53 interaction is governed by multiple contacts that are separable from the Cdc5- and Msa1-binding sites in the Dbf4 N terminus. Importantly, abrogation of the Rad53-Dbf4 physical interaction blocked Dbf4 phosphorylation and allowed late-origin firing during replication checkpoint activation. This indicated that Rad53 must stably bind to Dbf4 to regulate its activity.

  14. Template based parallel checkpointing in a massively parallel computer system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Inglett, Todd Alan

    2009-01-13

    A method and apparatus for a template based parallel checkpoint save for a massively parallel super computer system using a parallel variation of the rsync protocol, and network broadcast. In preferred embodiments, the checkpoint data for each node is compared to a template checkpoint file that resides in the storage and that was previously produced. Embodiments herein greatly decrease the amount of data that must be transmitted and stored for faster checkpointing and increased efficiency of the computer system. Embodiments are directed to a parallel computer system with nodes arranged in a cluster with a high speed interconnect that can perform broadcast communication. The checkpoint contains a set of actual small data blocks with their corresponding checksums from all nodes in the system. The data blocks may be compressed using conventional non-lossy data compression algorithms to further reduce the overall checkpoint size.

  15. ATP is required for the release of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome from inhibition by the mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Miniowitz-Shemtov, Shirly; Teichner, Adar; Sitry-Shevah, Danielle; Hershko, Avram

    2010-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system ensures accurate segregation of chromosomes by delaying anaphase until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. This system acts by inhibiting the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase to target securin for degradation. APC/C is inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of BubR1, Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20. The molecular mechanisms of the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint, including the release of APC/C from inhibition, remain obscure. It has been reported that polyubiquitylation by the APC/C is required for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint [Reddy SK, Rape M, Margansky WA, Kirschner MW (2007) Nature, 446:921–924]. We confirmed the involvement of polyubiquitylation, but found that another process, which requires ATP cleavage at the β–γ position (as opposed to α–β bond scission involved in ubiquitylation), is essential for the release of APC/C from checkpoint inhibition. ATP (β–γ) cleavage is required both for the dissociation of MCC components from APC/C and for the disassembly of free MCC, whereas polyubiquitylation is involved only in the former process. We find that the requirement for ATP (β–γ) cleavage is not due to the involvement of the 26S proteasome and that the phenomena observed are not due to sustained activity of protein kinase Cdk1/cyclin B, caused by inhibition of the degradation of cyclin B. Thus, some other energy-consuming process is needed for the inactivation of the mitotic checkpoint. PMID:20212161

  16. Quantitative proteome profiling of human myoma and myometrium tissue reveals kinase expression signatures with potential for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Lemeer, Simone; Gholami, Amin Moghaddas; Wu, Zhixiang; Kuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are benign tumors affecting a large proportion of the female population. Despite the very high prevalence, the molecular basis for understanding the onset and development of the disease are still poorly understood. In this study, we profiled the proteomes and kinomes of leiomyoma as well as myometrium samples from patients to a depth of >7000 proteins including 200 kinases. Statistical analysis identified a number of molecular signatures distinguishing healthy from diseased tissue. Among these, nine kinases (ADCK4, CDK5, CSNK2B, DDR1, EPHB1, MAP2K2, PRKCB, PRKG1, and RPS6KA5) representing a number of cellular signaling pathways showed particularly strong discrimination potential. Preliminary statistical analysis by receiver operator characteristics plots revealed very good performance for individual kinases (area under the curve, AUC of 0.70-0.94) as well as binary combinations thereof (AUC 0.70-1.00) that might be used to assess the activity of signaling pathways in myomas. Of note, the receptor tyrosine kinase DDR1 holds future potential as a drug target owing to its strong links to collagen signaling and the excessive formation of extracellular matrix typical for leiomyomas in humans. PMID:25327614

  17. CHK2 kinase in the DNA damage response and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zannini, Laura; Delia, Domenico; Buscemi, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase CHK2 is a key component of the DNA damage response. In human cells, following genotoxic stress, CHK2 is activated and phosphorylates >20 proteins to induce the appropriate cellular response, which, depending on the extent of damage, the cell type, and other factors, could be cell cycle checkpoint activation, induction of apoptosis or senescence, DNA repair, or tolerance of the damage. Recently, CHK2 has also been found to have cellular functions independent of the presence of nuclear DNA lesions. In particular, CHK2 participates in several molecular processes involved in DNA structure modification and cell cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the activity of CHK2 in response to DNA damage and in the maintenance of the biological functions in unstressed cells. These activities are also considered in relation to a possible role of CHK2 in tumorigenesis and, as a consequence, as a target of cancer therapy. PMID:25404613

  18. EX VIVIO DETECTION OF KINASE AND PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITIES IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL BIOPSIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protein phosphorylation is a posttranslational modification involved in every aspect cellular function. Levels of protein phosphotyrosine, phosphoserine and phosphothreonine are regulated by the opposing activities of kinases and phosphatases, the expression of which can be alt...

  19. The effects of knockdown of rho-associated kinase 1 and zipper-interacting protein kinase on gene expression and function in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jing-Ti; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Chen, Yong-Xiang; O'Brien, Edward R; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) have been implicated in diverse physiological functions. ROCK1 phosphorylates and activates ZIPK suggesting that at least some of these physiological functions may require both enzymes. To test the hypothesis that sequential activation of ROCK1 and ZIPK is commonly involved in regulatory pathways, we utilized siRNA to knock down ROCK1 and ZIPK in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC). Microarray analysis using a whole-transcript expression chip identified changes in gene expression induced by ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. ROCK1 knockdown affected the expression of 553 genes, while ZIPK knockdown affected the expression of 390 genes. A high incidence of regulation of transcription regulator genes was observed in both knockdowns. Other affected groups included transporters, kinases, peptidases, transmembrane and G protein-coupled receptors, growth factors, phosphatases and ion channels. Only 76 differentially expressed genes were common to ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified five pathways shared between the two knockdowns. We focused on cytokine signaling pathways since ROCK1 knockdown up-regulated 5 and down-regulated 4 cytokine genes, in contrast to ZIPK knockdown, which affected the expression of only two cytokine genes (both down-regulated). IL-6 gene expression and secretion of IL-6 protein were up-regulated by ROCK1 knockdown, whereas ZIPK knockdown reduced IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion and increased ROCK1 protein expression, suggesting that ROCK1 may inhibit IL-6 secretion. IL-1β mRNA and protein levels were increased in response to ROCK1 knockdown. Differences in the effects of ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown on cell cycle regulatory genes suggested that ROCK1 and ZIPK regulate the cell cycle by different mechanisms. ROCK1, but not ZIPK knockdown reduced the viability and inhibited proliferation of vascular SMC. We conclude that ROCK1 and

  20. The Role of Misshapen NCK-related kinase (MINK), a Novel Ste20 Family Kinase, in the IRES-Mediated Protein Translation of Human Enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Shi Yun; Ong, Bryan Kit Teck; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2015-01-01

    Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71) commonly causes Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in young children, and occasional occurrences of neurological complications can be fatal. In this study, a high-throughput cell-based screening on the serine/threonine kinase siRNA library was performed to identify potential antiviral agents against EV71 replication. Among the hits, Misshapen/NIKs-related kinase (MINK) was selected for detailed analysis due to its strong inhibitory profile and novelty. In the investigation of the stage at which MINK is involved in EV71 replication, virus RNA transfection in MINK siRNA-treated cells continued to cause virus inhibition despite bypassing the normal entry pathway, suggesting its involvement at the post-entry stage. We have also shown that viral RNA and protein expression level was significantly reduced upon MINK silencing, suggesting its involvement in viral protein synthesis which feeds into viral RNA replication process. Through proteomic analysis and infection inhibition assay, we found that the activation of MINK was triggered by early replication events, instead of the binding and entry of the virus. Proteomic analysis on the activation profile of p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) indicated that the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was stimulated by EV71 infection upon MINK activation. Luciferase reporter assay further revealed that the translation efficiency of the EV71 internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) was reduced after blocking the MINK/p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation on the effect of MINK silencing on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) localisation demonstrated that cytoplasmic relocalisation of hnRNP A1 upon EV71 infection may be facilitated via the MINK/p38 MAPK pathway which then positively regulates the translation of viral RNA transcripts. These novel findings hence suggest that MINK plays a functional role in the IRES-mediated translation of EV71 viral RNA and may provide a potential target for the

  1. The effects of knockdown of rho-associated kinase 1 and zipper-interacting protein kinase on gene expression and function in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jing-Ti; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Chen, Yong-Xiang; O'Brien, Edward R; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) have been implicated in diverse physiological functions. ROCK1 phosphorylates and activates ZIPK suggesting that at least some of these physiological functions may require both enzymes. To test the hypothesis that sequential activation of ROCK1 and ZIPK is commonly involved in regulatory pathways, we utilized siRNA to knock down ROCK1 and ZIPK in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC). Microarray analysis using a whole-transcript expression chip identified changes in gene expression induced by ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. ROCK1 knockdown affected the expression of 553 genes, while ZIPK knockdown affected the expression of 390 genes. A high incidence of regulation of transcription regulator genes was observed in both knockdowns. Other affected groups included transporters, kinases, peptidases, transmembrane and G protein-coupled receptors, growth factors, phosphatases and ion channels. Only 76 differentially expressed genes were common to ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified five pathways shared between the two knockdowns. We focused on cytokine signaling pathways since ROCK1 knockdown up-regulated 5 and down-regulated 4 cytokine genes, in contrast to ZIPK knockdown, which affected the expression of only two cytokine genes (both down-regulated). IL-6 gene expression and secretion of IL-6 protein were up-regulated by ROCK1 knockdown, whereas ZIPK knockdown reduced IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion and increased ROCK1 protein expression, suggesting that ROCK1 may inhibit IL-6 secretion. IL-1β mRNA and protein levels were increased in response to ROCK1 knockdown. Differences in the effects of ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown on cell cycle regulatory genes suggested that ROCK1 and ZIPK regulate the cell cycle by different mechanisms. ROCK1, but not ZIPK knockdown reduced the viability and inhibited proliferation of vascular SMC. We conclude that ROCK1 and

  2. Tyrosine phosphorylation is a mandatory proximal step in radiation-induced activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway in human B-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, F M; Schieven, G L; Tuel-Ahlgren, L M; Dibirdik, I; Myers, D E; Ledbetter, J A; Song, C W

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation triggers a signal in human B-lymphocyte precursors that is intimately linked to an active protein-tyrosine kinase regulatory pathway. We show that in B-lymphocyte precursors, irradiation with gamma-rays leads to (i) stimulation of phosphatidylinositol turnover; (ii) downstream activation by covalent modification of multiple serine-specific protein kinases, including protein kinase C; and (iii) activation of nuclear factor kappa B. All of the radiation-induced signals were effectively prevented by the protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation is an important and perhaps mandatory proximal step in the activation of the protein kinase C signaling cascade in human B-lymphocyte precursors. Our report expands current knowledge of the radiation-induced signaling cascade by clarifying the chronological sequence of biochemical events that follow irradiation. Images PMID:8419931

  3. Protein kinase C activates non-capacitative calcium entry in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Juan A; Sage, Stewart O

    2000-01-01

    In many non-excitable cells Ca2+ influx is mainly controlled by the filling state of the intracellular Ca2+ stores. It has been suggested that this store-mediated or capacitative Ca2+ entry is brought about by a physical and reversible coupling of the endoplasmic reticulum with the plasma membrane. Here we provide evidence for an additional, non-capacitative Ca2+ entry mechanism in human platelets. Changes in cytosolic Ca2+ and Sr2+ were measured in human platelets loaded with the fluorescent indicator fura-2. Depletion of the internal Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin plus a low concentration of ionomycin stimulated store-mediated cation entry, as demonstrated upon Ca2+ or Sr2+ addition. Subsequent treatment with thrombin stimulated further divalent cation entry in a concentration-dependent manner. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol also stimulated divalent cation entry, without evoking the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Cation entry evoked by thrombin or activators of PKC was abolished by the PKC inhibitor Ro-31-8220. Unlike store-mediated Ca2+ entry, jasplakinolide, which reorganises actin filaments into a tight cortical layer adjacent to the plasma membrane, did not inhibit divalent cation influx evoked by thrombin when applied after Ca2+ store depletion, or by activators of PKC. Thrombin also activated Ca2+ entry in platelets in which the release from intracellular stores and store-mediated Ca2+ entry were blocked by xestospongin C. These results indicate that the non-capacitative divalent cation entry pathway is regulated independently of store-mediated entry and does not require coupling of the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane. These results support the existence of a mechanism for receptor-evoked Ca2+ entry in human platelets that is independent of Ca2+ store depletion. This Ca2+ entry mechanism may be activated by occupation of G-protein-coupled receptors

  4. Thrombin produces phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 by a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-independent mechanism in the human astrocytoma cell line 1321N1.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, M; Bayón, Y; Sánchez Crespo, M; Nieto, M L

    1997-01-01

    The release of [3H]arachidonic acid was studied in the 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line upon stimulation with thrombin. The effect of thrombin was antagonized by hirudin only when both compounds were added simultaneously, which suggests activation of thrombin receptor. Evidence that the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) takes part in thrombin-induced arachidonate release was provided by the finding that thrombin induced retardation of the mobility of cPLA2 in SDS/polyacrylamide gels, which is a feature of the activation of cPLA2 by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Thrombin induced activation of two members of the MAP kinase family whose consensus primary sequence appears in cPLA2, namely p42-MAP kinase and c-Jun kinase. However, the activation of c-Jun kinase preceded the phosphorylation of cPLA2 more clearly than the activation of p42-MAK kinase did. Both cPLA2 and c-Jun kinase activation were not affected by PD-98059, a specific inhibitor of MAP kinase kinases, which indeed completely blocked p42-MAP kinase shift. Heat shock, a well-known activator of c-Jun kinase, also phosphorylated cPLA2 but not p42-MAP kinase. These data indicate the existence in astrocytoma cells of a signalling pathway triggered by thrombin receptor stimulation that activates a kinase cascade acting on the Pro-Leu-Ser-Pro consensus primary sequence, activates cPLA2, and associates the release of arachidonate with nuclear signalling pathways. PMID:9359863

  5. Cloning of a human cDNA encoding a CDC2-related kinase by complementation of a budding yeast cdc28 mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Ninomiya-Tsuji, Jun ); Nomoto, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Kunihiro ); Yasuda, Hideyo ); Reed, S.I. )

    1991-10-15

    The authors have cloned two different human cDNAs that can complement cdc28 mutations of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One corresponds to a gene encoding human p34{sup CDC2} kinase, and the other to a gene (CDK2; cell division kinase) that has not been characterized previously. The CDK2 protein is highly homologous to p34{sup CDC2} kinase and more significantly is homologous to Xenopus Eg1 kinase, suggesting that CDK2 is the human homolog of Eg1. The human CDC2 and CDK2 genes were both able to complement the inviability of a null allele of S. cerevisiae CDC28. This result indicates that the CDK2 protein has a biological activity closely related to the CDC28 and p34{sup CDC2} kinases. However, CDK2 was unable to complement cdc2 mutants in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe under the condition where the human CDC2 gene could complement them. CDK2 mRNA appeared late in G{sub 1} or in early S phase, slightly before CDC2 mRNA, after growth stimulation in normal human fibroblast cells. These results suggest that in human cells, two different CDC2-like kinases may regulate the cell cycle at distinct stages.

  6. Efficient Checkpointing of Virtual Machines using Virtual Machine Introspection

    SciTech Connect

    Aderholdt, Ferrol; Han, Fang; Scott, Stephen L; Naughton, III, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Cloud Computing environments rely heavily on system-level virtualization. This is due to the inherent benefits of virtualization including fault tolerance through checkpoint/restart (C/R) mechanisms. Because clouds are the abstraction of large data centers and large data centers have a higher potential for failure, it is imperative that a C/R mechanism for such an environment provide minimal latency as well as a small checkpoint file size. Recently, there has been much research into C/R with respect to virtual machines (VM) providing excellent solutions to reduce either checkpoint latency or checkpoint file size. However, these approaches do not provide both. This paper presents a method of checkpointing VMs by utilizing virtual machine introspection (VMI). Through the usage of VMI, we are able to determine which pages of memory within the guest are used or free and are better able to reduce the amount of pages written to disk during a checkpoint. We have validated this work by using various benchmarks to measure the latency along with the checkpoint size. With respect to checkpoint file size, our approach results in file sizes within 24% or less of the actual used memory within the guest. Additionally, the checkpoint latency of our approach is up to 52% faster than KVM s default method.

  7. Checkpoint Activation of an Unconventional DNA Replication Program in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Pamela Y; Lee, Po-Hsuen; Meng, Xiangzhou; Kapler, Geoffrey M

    2015-07-01

    The intra-S phase checkpoint kinase of metazoa and yeast, ATR/MEC1, protects chromosomes from DNA damage and replication stress by phosphorylating subunits of the replicative helicase, MCM2-7. Here we describe an unprecedented ATR-dependent pathway in Tetrahymena thermophila in which the essential pre-replicative complex proteins, Orc1p, Orc2p and Mcm6p are degraded in hydroxyurea-treated S phase cells. Chromosomes undergo global changes during HU-arrest, including phosphorylation of histone H2A.X, deacetylation of histone H3, and an apparent diminution in DNA content that can be blocked by the deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate. Most remarkably, the cell cycle rapidly resumes upon hydroxyurea removal, and the entire genome is replicated prior to replenishment of ORC and MCMs. While stalled replication forks are elongated under these conditions, DNA fiber imaging revealed that most replicating molecules are produced by new initiation events. Furthermore, the sole origin in the ribosomal DNA minichromosome is inactive and replication appears to initiate near the rRNA promoter. The collective data raise the possibility that replication initiation occurs by an ORC-independent mechanism during the recovery from HU-induced replication stress.

  8. Modeled microgravity-induced protein kinase C isoform expression in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, A; Risin, D; Pellis, N R

    2004-06-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited in both microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected by diminished DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type I collagen. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas the calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 1 g and MMG culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and serial samples were assessed for locomotion by using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were downregulated by >50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 1-g controls. Events upstream of PKC, such as phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than PKC, but after ligand-receptor interaction.

  9. The Nonspecific Binding of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors to Human Liver Microsomes.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kushari; Nair, Pramod C; Rowland, Andrew; Mackenzie, Peter I; Knights, Kathleen M; Miners, John O

    2015-12-01

    Drugs and other chemicals frequently bind nonspecifically to the constituents of an in vitro incubation mixture, particularly the enzyme source [e.g., human liver microsomes (HLM)]. Correction for nonspecific binding (NSB) is essential for the accurate calculation of the kinetic parameters Km, Clint, and Ki. Many tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are lipophilic organic bases that are nonionized at physiologic pH. Attempts to measure the NSB of several TKIs to HLM by equilibrium dialysis proved unsuccessful, presumably due to the limited aqueous solubility of these compounds. Thus, the addition of detergents to equilibrium dialysis samples was investigated as an approach to measure the NSB of TKIs. The binding of six validation set nonionized lipophilic bases (felodipine, isradipine, loratidine, midazolam, nifedipine, and pazopanib) to HLM (0.25 mg/ml) was shown to be unaffected by the addition of CHAPS (6 mM) to the dialysis medium. This approach was subsequently applied to measurement of the binding of axitinib, dabrafenib, erlotinib, gefitinib, ibrutinib, lapatinib, nilotinib, nintedanib, regorafenib, sorafenib, and trametinib to HLM (0.25 mg/ml). As with the validation set drugs, attainment of equilibrium was demonstrated in HLM-HLM and buffer-buffer control dialysis experiments. Values of the fraction unbound to HLM ranged from 0.14 (regorafenib and sorafenib) to 0.93 (nintedanib), and were generally consistent with the known physicochemical determinants of drug NSB. The extensive NSB of many TKIs to HLM underscores the importance of correction for TKI binding to HLM and, presumably, other enzyme sources present in in vitro incubation mixtures.

  10. Modeled Microgravity-Induced Protein Kinase C Isoform Expression in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2003-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited both in microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected in diminished DNA synthess in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type 1 collagen. Direct activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 19 and MMG-culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours and serial samples assessed for locomotion using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were down-regulated by more than 50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 19 controls. Events upstream of PKC such as phosphorylation of Phospholipase C(gamma) (PLC-gamma) in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed Ca++ -independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than, but after ligand-receptor interaction. Keywords: Signal transduction, locomotion, immunity

  11. Modeled microgravity-induced protein kinase C isoform expression in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2004-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited in both microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected by diminished DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type I collagen. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas the calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 1 g and MMG culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and serial samples were assessed for locomotion by using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were downregulated by >50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 1-g controls. Events upstream of PKC, such as phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than PKC, but after ligand-receptor interaction.

  12. Crystal Structures of Human Choline Kinase Isoforms in Complex with Hemicholinium-3

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bum Soo; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Tempel, Wolfram; Finerty, Patrick J.; MacKenzie, Farrell; Dimov, Svetoslav; Vedadi, Masoud; Park, Hee-Won

    2010-01-01

    Human choline kinase (ChoK) catalyzes the first reaction in phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis and exists as ChoKα (α1 and α2) and ChoKβ isoforms. Recent studies suggest that ChoK is implicated in tumorigenesis and emerging as an attractive target for anticancer chemotherapy. To extend our understanding of the molecular mechanism of ChoK inhibition, we have determined the high resolution x-ray structures of the ChoKα1 and ChoKβ isoforms in complex with hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), a known inhibitor of ChoK. In both structures, HC-3 bound at the conserved hydrophobic groove on the C-terminal lobe. One of the HC-3 oxazinium rings complexed with ChoKα1 occupied the choline-binding pocket, providing a structural explanation for its inhibitory action. Interestingly, the HC-3 molecule co-crystallized with ChoKβ was phosphorylated in the choline binding site. This phosphorylation, albeit occurring at a very slow rate, was confirmed experimentally by mass spectroscopy and radioactive assays. Detailed kinetic studies revealed that HC-3 is a much more potent inhibitor for ChoKα isoforms (α1 and α2) compared with ChoKβ. Mutational studies based on the structures of both inhibitor-bound ChoK complexes demonstrated that Leu-401 of ChoKα2 (equivalent to Leu-419 of ChoKα1), or the corresponding residue Phe-352 of ChoKβ, which is one of the hydrophobic residues neighboring the active site, influences the plasticity of the HC-3-binding groove, thereby playing a key role in HC-3 sensitivity and phosphorylation. PMID:20299452

  13. Sphingosine kinase 1 is upregulated with lysophosphatidic acid receptor 2 in human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shida, Dai; Inoue, Satoru; Yoshida, Yuki; Kodaka, Atsushi; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Tsuiji, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the expression of SphK1, an oncogenic kinase that produces sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and its correlation with the expression of LPAR2, a major lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor overexpressed in various cancers, in human colorectal cancer. METHODS: Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the mRNA expression of SphK1, LPAR2, and the three major S1P receptors in 27 colorectal cancer samples and corresponding normal tissue samples. We also examined the correlation between the expression of SphK1 and LPAR2. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer tissue in 22 of 27 patients had higher levels of SphK1 mRNA than in normal tissue. In two-thirds of the samples, SphK1 mRNA expression was more than two-fold higher than in normal tissue. Consistent with previous reports, LPAR2 mRNA expression in 20 of 27 colorectal cancer tissue samples was higher compared to normal tissue samples. Expression profiles of all three major S1P receptors, S1PR1, S1PR2, and S1PR3, varied without any trend, with no significant difference in expression between cancer and normal tissues. A highly significant positive correlation was found between SphK1 and LPAR2 expression [Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) = 0.784 and P < 0.01]. The mRNA levels of SphK1 and LPAR2 did not correlate with TNM stage. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that S1P and LPA may play important roles in the development of colorectal cancer via the upregulation of SphK1 and LPAR2, both of which could serve as new therapeutic targets in the treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:26937138

  14. Activin-Like Kinase 2 Functions in Peri-implantation Uterine Signaling in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Clementi, Caterina; Tripurani, Swamy K.; Large, Michael J.; Edson, Mark A.; Creighton, Chad J.; Hawkins, Shannon M.; Kovanci, Ertug; Kaartinen, Vesa; Lydon, John P.; Pangas, Stephanie A.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2013-01-01

    Implantation of a blastocyst in the uterus is a multistep process tightly controlled by an intricate regulatory network of interconnected ovarian, uterine, and embryonic factors. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) ligands and receptors are expressed in the uterus of pregnant mice, and BMP2 has been shown to be a key regulator of implantation. In this study, we investigated the roles of the BMP type 1 receptor, activin-like kinase 2 (ALK2), during mouse pregnancy by producing mice carrying a conditional ablation of Alk2 in the uterus (Alk2 cKO mice). In the absence of ALK2, embryos demonstrate delayed invasion into the uterine epithelium and stroma, and upon implantation, stromal cells fail to undergo uterine decidualization, resulting in sterility. Mechanistically, microarray analysis revealed that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (Cebpb) expression is suppressed during decidualization in Alk2 cKO females. These findings and the similar phenotypes of Cebpb cKO and Alk2 cKO mice lead to the hypothesis that BMPs act upstream of CEBPB in the stroma to regulate decidualization. To test this hypothesis, we knocked down ALK2 in human uterine stromal cells (hESC) and discovered that ablation of ALK2 alters hESC decidualization and suppresses CEBPB mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of decidualizing hESC confirmed that BMP signaling proteins, SMAD1/5, directly regulate expression of CEBPB by binding a distinct regulatory sequence in the 3′ UTR of this gene; CEBPB, in turn, regulates the expression of progesterone receptor (PGR). Our work clarifies the conserved mechanisms through which BMPs regulate peri-implantation in rodents and primates and, for the first time, uncovers a linear pathway of BMP signaling through ALK2 to regulate CEBPB and, subsequently, PGR during decidualization. PMID:24244176

  15. Upregulation of adenosine kinase in astrocytes in experimental and human temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Aronica, Eleonora; Zurolo, Emanuele; Iyer, Anand; de Groot, Marjolein; Anink, Jasper; Carbonell, Caterina; van Vliet, Erwin A.; Baayen, Johannes C.; Boison, Detlev; Gorter, Jan A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Adenosine kinase (ADK) represents the key metabolic enzyme for the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels in the brain. In adult brain, ADK is primarily present in astrocytes. Several lines of experimental evidence support a critical role of ADK in different types of brain injury associated with astrogliosis, which is also a prominent morphological feature of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We hypothesized that dysregulation of ADK is an ubiquitous pathological hallmark of TLE. Methods Using immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis, we investigated ADK protein expression in a rat model of TLE during epileptogenesis and the chronic epileptic phase and compared those findings with tissue resected from TLE patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Key findings In rat control hippocampus and cortex, a low baseline expression of ADK was found with mainly nuclear localization. One week after the electrical induction of status epilepticus (SE), prominent up-regulation of ADK became evident in astrocytes with a characteristic cytoplasmic localization. This increase in ADK persisted at least for 3-4 months after SE in rats developing a progressive form of epilepsy. In line with the findings from the rat model, expression of astrocytic ADK was also found to be increased in the hippocampus and temporal cortex of TLE patients. In addition, in vitro experiments in human astrocyte cultures showed that ADK expression was increased by several pro-inflammatory molecules (interleukin-1β and LPS). Significance These results suggest that dysregulation of ADK in astrocytes is a common pathological hallmark of TLE. Moreover, in vitro data suggest the existence of an additional layer of modulatory crosstalk between the astrocyte-based adenosine cycle and inflammation. Whether this interaction also can play role in vivo needs to be further investigated. PMID:21635241

  16. The Nonspecific Binding of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors to Human Liver Microsomes.

    PubMed

    Burns, Kushari; Nair, Pramod C; Rowland, Andrew; Mackenzie, Peter I; Knights, Kathleen M; Miners, John O

    2015-12-01

    Drugs and other chemicals frequently bind nonspecifically to the constituents of an in vitro incubation mixture, particularly the enzyme source [e.g., human liver microsomes (HLM)]. Correction for nonspecific binding (NSB) is essential for the accurate calculation of the kinetic parameters Km, Clint, and Ki. Many tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are lipophilic organic bases that are nonionized at physiologic pH. Attempts to measure the NSB of several TKIs to HLM by equilibrium dialysis proved unsuccessful, presumably due to the limited aqueous solubility of these compounds. Thus, the addition of detergents to equilibrium dialysis samples was investigated as an approach to measure the NSB of TKIs. The binding of six validation set nonionized lipophilic bases (felodipine, isradipine, loratidine, midazolam, nifedipine, and pazopanib) to HLM (0.25 mg/ml) was shown to be unaffected by the addition of CHAPS (6 mM) to the dialysis medium. This approach was subsequently applied to measurement of the binding of axitinib, dabrafenib, erlotinib, gefitinib, ibrutinib, lapatinib, nilotinib, nintedanib, regorafenib, sorafenib, and trametinib to HLM (0.25 mg/ml). As with the validation set drugs, attainment of equilibrium was demonstrated in HLM-HLM and buffer-buffer control dialysis experiments. Values of the fraction unbound to HLM ranged from 0.14 (regorafenib and sorafenib) to 0.93 (nintedanib), and were generally consistent with the known physicochemical determinants of drug NSB. The extensive NSB of many TKIs to HLM underscores the importance of correction for TKI binding to HLM and, presumably, other enzyme sources present in in vitro incubation mixtures. PMID:26443648

  17. Thermodynamics parameters for binding of halogenated benzotriazole inhibitors of human protein kinase CK2α.

    PubMed

    Winiewska, Maria; Kucińska, Katarzyna; Makowska, Małgorzata; Poznański, Jarosław; Shugar, David

    2015-10-01

    The interaction of human CK2α (hCK2α) with nine halogenated benzotriazoles, TBBt and its analogues representing all possible patterns of halogenation on the benzene ring of benzotriazole, was studied by biophysical methods. Thermal stability of protein-ligand complexes, monitored by calorimetric (DSC) and optical (DSF) methods, showed that the increase in the mid-point temperature for unfolding of protein-ligand complexes (i.e. potency of ligand binding to hCK2α) follow the inhibitory activities determined by biochemical assays. The dissociation constant for the ATP-hCK2α complex was estimated with the aid of microscale thermophoresis (MST) as 4.3±1.8 μM, and MST-derived dissociation constants determined for halogenated benzotriazoles, when converted according to known ATP concentrations, perfectly reconstruct IC50 values determined by the biochemical assays. Ligand-dependent quenching of tyrosine fluorescence, together with molecular modeling and DSC-derived heats of unfolding, support the hypothesis that halogenated benzotriazoles bind in at least two alternative orientations, and those that are efficient hCK2α inhibitors bind in the orientation which TBBt adopts in its complex with maize CK2α. DSC-derived apparent heat for ligand binding (ΔΔHbind) is driven by intermolecular electrostatic interactions between Lys68 and the triazole ring of the ligand, as indicated by a good correlation between ΔΔHbind and ligand pKa. Overall results, additionally supported by molecular modeling, confirm that a balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contribute predominantly (~40 kJ/mol), relative to possible intermolecular halogen/hydrogen bonding (less than 10 kJ/mol), in binding of halogenated benzotriazoles to the ATP-binding site of hCK2α. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases.

  18. E6 variants of human papillomavirus 18 differentially modulate the protein kinase B/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (akt/PI3K) signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Paredes, Adriana

    2009-01-05

    Intra-type genome variations of high risk Human papillomavirus (HPV) have been associated with a differential threat for cervical cancer development. In this work, the effect of HPV18 E6 isolates in Akt/PKB and Mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPKs) signaling pathways and its implication in cell proliferation were analyzed. E6 from HPV types 16 and 18 are able to bind and promote degradation of Human disc large (hDlg). Our results show that E6 variants differentially modulate hDlg degradation, rebounding in levels of activated PTEN and PKB. HPV18 E6 variants are also able to upregulate phospho-PI3K protein, strongly correlating with activated MAPKs and cell proliferation. Data was supported by the effect of E6 silencing in HPV18-containing HeLa cells, as well as hDlg silencing in the tested cells. Results suggest that HPV18 intra-type variations may derive in differential abilities to activate cell-signaling pathways such as Akt/PKB and MAPKs, directly involved in cell survival and proliferation.

  19. New potent and selective inhibitor of Pim-1/3 protein kinases sensitizes human colon carcinoma cells to doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Pascale; Dezhenkova, Lyubov G; Anizon, Fabrice; Nauton, Lionel; Thery, Vincent; Liang, Shuguang; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N; Shtil, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    The Pim protein kinases (provirus insertion site of Moloney murine leukemia virus) have been identified as important actors involved in tumor cell survival, proliferation, migration and invasion. Therefore, inhibition of Pim activity by low molecular weight compounds is under investigation as a part of anticancer therapeutic strategies. We have synthesized a series of pyrrolo[2,3-a]carbazole derivatives that significantly inhibited Pim protein kinases at submicromolar concentrations. Particularly, benzodiazocine derivative 1 potently inhibited Pim-1 and -3 isoforms in in vitro kinase assays (IC50 8 nM and 13 nM, respectively), whereas Pim-2 activity was less affected (IC50 350 nM). We show here that no inhibitory effect of 1 was detectable at 1 µM against other 22 serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. In addition, 1, possessing a planar pyrrolocarbazole scaffold, demonstrated no significant binding to DNA, nor was it a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor, suggesting that 1 is likely to be highly selective for Pim-1 and -3. Importantly, whereas 1 exerted a negligible cytotoxicity for human colon carcinoma HCT116 cell line at concentrations >10 µM within 72 h of cell exposure, it synergized at nontoxic concentrations with the antitumor drug doxorubicin (Dox) in killing HCT116 cells: IC50 of Dox alone and Dox+1 were ~200 nM and ~25 nM, respectively. These data strongly suggest that 1 emerges as a prospective antitumor drug candidate due to its selectivity to individual Pim protein kinases and the ability to potentiate the efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutics. PMID:25175798

  20. MASTL(Greatwall) regulates DNA damage responses by coordinating mitotic entry after checkpoint recovery and APC/C activation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Po Yee; Ma, Hoi Tang; Lee, Hyun-jung; Poon, Randy Y. C.

    2016-01-01

    The G2 DNA damage checkpoint is one of the most important mechanisms controlling G2–mitosis transition. The kinase Greatwall (MASTL in human) promotes normal G2–mitosis transition by inhibiting PP2A via ARPP19 and ENSA. In this study, we demonstrate that MASTL is critical for maintaining genome integrity after DNA damage. Although MASTL did not affect the activation of DNA damage responses and subsequent repair, it determined the timing of entry into mitosis and the subsequent fate of the recovering cells. Constitutively active MASTL promoted dephosphorylation of CDK1Tyr15 and accelerated mitotic entry after DNA damage. Conversely, downregulation of MASTL or ARPP19/ENSA delayed mitotic entry. Remarkably, APC/C was activated precociously, resulting in the damaged cells progressing from G2 directly to G1 and skipping mitosis all together. Collectively, these results established that precise control of MASTL is essential to couple DNA damage to mitosis through the rate of mitotic entry and APC/C activation. PMID:26923777

  1. Dehydroglyasperin D Inhibits the Proliferation of HT-29 Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Through Direct Interaction With Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Keun; Jeong, Chul-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite recent advances in therapy, colorectal cancer still has a grim prognosis. Although licorice has been used in East Asian traditional medicine, the molecular properties of its constituents including dehydroglyasperin D (DHGA-D) remain unknown. We sought to evaluate the inhibitory effect of DHGA-D on colorectal cancer cell proliferation and identify the primary signaling molecule targeted by DHGA-D. Methods: We evaluated anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. The target protein of DHGA-D was identified by Western blot analysis with a specific antibody, and direct interaction between DHGA-D and the target protein was confirmed by kinase and pull-down assays. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry and further Western blot analysis was performed to identify the signaling pathway involved. Results: DHGA-D significantly suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent HT-29 colorectal cancer cell proliferation. DHGA-D directly suppressed phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity and subsequent Akt phosphorylation and bound to the p110 subunit of PI3K. DHGA-D also significantly induced G1 cell cycle arrest, together with the suppression of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and retinoblastoma phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression. Conclusions: DHGA-D has potent anticancer activity and targets PI3K in human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29 cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report to detail the molecular basis of DHGA-D in suppressing colorectal cancer cell growth. PMID:27051646

  2. Cloning of the cDNA of the heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF-2 alpha) kinase of rabbit reticulocytes: homology to yeast GCN2 protein kinase and human double-stranded-RNA-dependent eIF-2 alpha kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J J; Throop, M S; Gehrke, L; Kuo, I; Pal, J K; Brodsky, M; London, I M

    1991-01-01

    We have cloned the cDNA of the heme-regulated eIF-2 alpha kinase (HRI) of rabbit reticulocytes. In vitro translation of mRNA transcribed from the HRI cDNA yields a 90-kDa polypeptide that exhibits eIF-2 alpha kinase activity and is recognized by a monoclonal antibody directed against authentic HRI. The open reading frame sequence of the HRI cDNA contains all 11 catalytic domains of protein kinases with consensus sequences of protein-serine/threonine kinases in conserved catalytic domains VI and VIII. The HRI cDNA also contains an insert of approximately 140 amino acids between catalytic domains V and VI. The HRI cDNA coding sequence has extensive homology to GCN2 protein kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to human double-stranded-RNA-dependent eIF-2 alpha kinase. This observation suggests that GCN2 protein kinase may be an eIF-2 alpha kinase in yeast. In addition, HRI has an unusually high degree of homology to three protein kinases (NimA, Wee1, and CDC2) that are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle. Images PMID:1679235

  3. Anti-inflammatory effects of Perilla frutescens in activated human neutrophils through two independent pathways: Src family kinases and Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Yu; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Sung, Wei-Che; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chung, Pei-Jen; Lee, Ming-Chung; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Yang, Hsuan-Wu; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-01-01

    The leaves of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. have been traditionally used as an herbal medicine in East Asian countries to treat a variety diseases. In this present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of P. frutescens extract (PFE) on N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated human neutrophils and the underlying mechanisms. PFE (1, 3, and 10 μg/ml) inhibited superoxide anion production, elastase release, reactive oxygen species formation, CD11b expression, and cell migration in fMLF-activated human neutrophils in dose-dependent manners. PFE inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of the Src family kinases (SFKs), Src (Tyr416) and Lyn (Tyr396), and reduced their enzymatic activities. Both PFE and PP2 (a selective inhibitor of SFKs) reduced the phosphorylation of Burton’s tyrosine kinases (Tyr223) and Vav (Tyr174) in fMLF-activated human neutrophils. Additionally, PFE decreased intracellular Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i), whereas PP2 prolonged the time required for [Ca2+]i to return to its basal level. Our findings indicated that PFE effectively regulated the inflammatory activities of fMLF-activated human neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effects of PFE on activated human neutrophils were mediated through two independent signaling pathways involving SFKs (Src and Lyn) and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:26659126

  4. Analysis of the c-src gene product structure, abundance, and protein kinase activity in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, J; Deseau, V; Amini, S; Rosen, N; Bolen, J B

    1987-01-01

    We have compared in different human neuroblastoma cell lines and human glioblastoma cells the expression level, structure, and tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity of pp60c-src. Our results show that not all human neuroblastoma cell lines express pp60c-src molecules with amino-terminal structural alterations. In neuroblastoma cells which possess pp60c-src with altered gel migration, the diminished polyacrylamide gel mobility of pp60c-src was found not to be dependent upon amino-terminal phosphorylations since extensive treatment of these molecules with phosphatase did not significantly change their gel migration properties. Similar differences in gel migration were observed when RNA from the various neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells was translated in vitro using either rabbit reticulocyte or wheat germ lysates. White the level of c-src mRNA in the different cells analyzed was found to be similar, the abundance of pp60c-src in these same cells was found to vary by as much as 12-fold. This suggests that the abundance of pp60c-src in human neuroendocrine tumors is regulated through post-transcriptional and/or post-translational events which may be related to the stage of neuronal differentiation of the cells. Based upon determination of pp60c-src abundance by immunoblot analysis, we demonstrate that pp60c-src molecules derived from human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells have very similar in vitro protein kinase activities.

  5. Construction of a differentiated human hepatocyte cell line expressing the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Miyazaki, M; Westerman, K A; Noguchi, H; Sakaguchi, M; Totsugawa, T; Watanabe, T; Matsumura, T; Fujiwara, T; Leboulch, P; Tanaka, N; Namba, M

    2001-01-01

    Transient support using a hybrid artificial liver (HAL) device is a promising treatment for the patients with acute liver failure. Primary human hepatocytes are an ideal source for HAL therapy; however, the number of human livers available for hepatocyte isolation is limited by competition for use in whole organ transplantation. To overcome this problem, we previously established a highly differentiated human fetal hepatocyte cell line OUMS-29. Considering the potential risk when using these genetically engineered cells in humans, additional safeguards should be added to make the cells more clinically useful. In this work, the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene was retrovirally introduced into OUMS-29 cells. One of the HSVtk-expressed clones, OUMS-29/thymidine kinase (TK), grew in chemically defined serum free medium and expressed the genes of albumin, asialoglycoprotein receptor, glutamine synthetase, glutathione-S-transferase pi, and blood coagulation factor X. In vitro sensitivity of the cells to ganciclovir was evaluated. Intrasplenic transplantation of 50 x 10(6) OUMS-29/TK cells prolonged the survival of 90% hepatectomized rats compared with medium injection alone (control). In the present study, we have established highly differentiated immortalized human hepatocytes with tight regulation. The cells may be clinically useful for HAL treatment. PMID:11575821

  6. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  7. The meiotic recombination checkpoint is regulated by checkpoint rad+ genes in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Midori; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Tougan, Takahiro; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    During the course of meiotic prophase, intrinsic double-strand breaks (DSBs) must be repaired before the cell can engage in meiotic nuclear division. Here we investigate the mechanism that controls the meiotic progression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that have accumulated excess meiotic DSBs. A meiotic recombination-defective mutant, meu13Δ, shows a delay in meiotic progression. This delay is dependent on rec12+, namely on DSB formation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that meiotic DSB repair in meu13Δ was retarded. We also found that the delay in entering nuclear division was dependent on the checkpoint rad+, cds1+ and mek1+ (the meiotic paralog of Cds1/Chk2). This implies that these genes are involved in a checkpoint that provides time to repair DSBs. Consistently, the induction of an excess of extrinsic DSBs by ionizing radiation delayed meiotic progression in a rad17+-dependent manner. dmc1Δ also shows meiotic delay, however, this delay is independent of rec12+ and checkpoint rad+. We propose that checkpoint monitoring of the status of meiotic DSB repair exists in fission yeast and that defects other than DSB accumulation can cause delays in meiotic progression. PMID:12032093

  8. The meiotic recombination checkpoint is regulated by checkpoint rad+ genes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Midori; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Tougan, Takahiro; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2002-06-01

    During the course of meiotic prophase, intrinsic double-strand breaks (DSBs) must be repaired before the cell can engage in meiotic nuclear division. Here we investigate the mechanism that controls the meiotic progression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that have accumulated excess meiotic DSBs. A meiotic recombination-defective mutant, meu13Delta, shows a delay in meiotic progression. This delay is dependent on rec12+, namely on DSB formation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that meiotic DSB repair in meu13Delta was retarded. We also found that the delay in entering nuclear division was dependent on the checkpoint rad+, cds1+ and mek1+ (the meiotic paralog of Cds1/Chk2). This implies that these genes are involved in a checkpoint that provides time to repair DSBs. Consistently, the induction of an excess of extrinsic DSBs by ionizing radiation delayed meiotic progression in a rad17(+)-dependent manner. dmc1Delta also shows meiotic delay, however, this delay is independent of rec12+ and checkpoint rad+. We propose that checkpoint monitoring of the status of meiotic DSB repair exists in fission yeast and that defects other than DSB accumulation can cause delays in meiotic progression. PMID:12032093

  9. Rac regulates collagen-induced HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Yasunari; Doi, Tomoaki; Akamatsu, Shigeru; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Kondo, Akira; Mizutani, Jun; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Ogura, Shinji

    2013-10-01

    We previously reported that the collagen-induced phosphorylation of heat shock protein (HSP) 27 via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is sufficient to induce the secretion of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB and the release of soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) from human platelets. It has been shown that Rac, which belongs to the Rho family of small GTPases, is involved in the collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In this study, we investigated the role of Rac in the collagen-stimulated release of PDGF-AB and sCD40L in human platelets. Human blood was donated from healthy volunteers and platelet-rich plasma was obtained from the blood samples. The samples were then treated with 1.0 µg/ml collagen for 0, 1, 3, or 5 min and Rac1 activity was determined using the Rac1 Activation Assay kit. We found that collagen stimulated the activation of Rac in human platelets in a time-dependent manner. However, pre-treatment with NSC23766, a selective inhibitor of Rac-guanine nucleotide exchange factor interaction, reduced the collagen-induced platelet aggregation. NSC23766 markedly attenuated not only the collagen-induced p44/p42 MAP kinase phosphorylation, but also the phosphorylation of HSP27 at three serine residues (Ser-15, Ser-78 and Ser-82). In addition, the collagen‑induced release of PDGF-AB and sCD40L was significantly suppressed by NSC23766 in a dose-dependent manner. These results strongly suggest that Rac regulates the collagen-induced HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase in human platelets, resulting in the stimulation of PDGF-AB secretion and the release of sCD40L.

  10. Characterization of protein tyrosine kinases from human breast cancer: involvement of the c-src oncogene product.

    PubMed

    Ottenhoff-Kalff, A E; Rijksen, G; van Beurden, E A; Hennipman, A; Michels, A A; Staal, G E

    1992-09-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an important regulatory mechanism in response to the action of growth factors and oncogenes. Since many oncogenes code for tyrosine kinases, increased or altered oncogene expression may be reflected in increased tyrosine kinase activity. In a recent study (Hennipman et al., Cancer Res., 49: 516-521, 1989), we found that the tyrosine kinase activity of the cytosolic and membrane fractions of malignant human breast tissue was significantly higher compared to the benign or the normal breast tissue. Moreover, the increase in the cytosolic fractions was found to be of prognostic value. In the present study we determined the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity of another 72 breast cancer specimens, and it could be shown again that the PTK activity in all 72 of these tumors was elevated compared to normal controls. We characterized these cytosolic PTKs by anion exchange chromatography using fast protein liquid chromatography, and it could be shown that at least two different forms of PTK exist. Using antibodies against a number of known oncogene products, we could determine that at least 70% of the PTK activity in the cytosol originated from the presence of the c-src oncogene product. Both of the PTK activity peaks seen in the fast protein liquid chromatography patterns could be precipitated with the anti-Src antibody. Furthermore, using the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, it could be shown that the antibody against c-src also precipitated a part of the cytosolic PTK activity. In normal human peripheral lymphocytes, no precipitation of the cytosolic and membrane PTK activity could be achieved using the anti-Src antibody. Inasmuch as the cytosolic PTK activity parallels the malignancy in breast tumors (Hennipman et al., Cancer Res., 49: 516-521, 1989), and the majority of this activity is precipitated by anti-Src antibodies, the c-src protooncogene may play a key role in the manifestation of breast cancer.

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates the insulin-induced activation of the nitric oxide synthase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Schulz, Christian; Fichtlscherer, Birgit; Kemp, Bruce E; Fisslthaler, Beate; Busse, Rudi

    2003-11-01

    Little is known about the signaling cascades that eventually regulate the activity of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in platelets. Here, we investigated the effects of insulin on the phosphorylation and activation of eNOS in washed human platelets and in endothelial cells. Insulin activated the protein kinase Akt in cultured endothelial cells and increased the phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser(1177) but failed to increase endothelial cyclic GMP levels or to elicit the relaxation of endothelium-intact porcine coronary arteries. In platelets, insulin also elicited the activation of Akt as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS and initiated NO production which was associated with increased cyclic GMP levels and the inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation. The insulin-induced inhibition of aggregation was accompanied by a decreased Ca(2+) response to thrombin and was also prevented by N(omega) nitro-L-arginine. In platelets, but not in endothelial cells, insulin induced the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic stress-sensing kinase which was sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor wortmannin and the AMPK inhibitor iodotubercidin. Moreover, the insulin-mediated inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation was prevented by iodotubercidin. Insulin-independent activation of the AMPK using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, increased platelet eNOS phosphorylation, increased cyclic GMP levels and attenuated platelet aggregation. These results highlight the differences in the signal transduction cascade activated by insulin in endothelial cells and platelets, and demonstrate that insulin stimulates the formation of NO in human platelets, in the absence of an increase in Ca(2+), by acti-vating PI3-K and AMPK which phosphorylates eNOS on Ser(1177).

  12. A collagen-related peptide regulates phospholipase Cgamma2 via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Pasquet, J M; Bobe, R; Gross, B; Gratacap, M P; Tomlinson, M G; Payrastre, B; Watson, S P

    1999-01-01

    The collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI) induces platelet activation through a similar pathway to that used by immune receptors. In the present study we have investigated the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) in GPVI signalling. Our results show that collagen-related peptide ¿CRP: [GCP*(GPP*)(10)GCP*G](n); P*=hydroxyproline¿, which is selective to GPVI, induces formation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PI(3,4,5)P(3)] and phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate [PI(3, 4)P(2)] in platelets. The increase in the two 3-phosphorylated lipids is inhibited completely by wortmannin and by LY294002, two structurally unrelated inhibitors of PI 3-kinase. The formation of inositol phosphates and phosphatidic acid (PA), two markers of phospholipase C (PLC) activation, by CRP are inhibited by between 50 and 85% in the presence of wortmannin and LY294002. This is associated with inhibition of elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) and aggregation. Wortmannin and LY294002 also partially inhibit elevation of Ca(2+) by CRP in murine megakaryocytes. Microinjection of the pleckstrin-homology PH domain of Bruton's tyrosine kinase, which binds selectively to PI(3,4, 5)P(3), but not the R28C (Arg(28)-->Cys) mutant which binds to PI(3, 4,5)P(3) with low affinity, also inhibits elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) in megakaryocytes, suggesting that it is this lipid species which mediates the action of the PI 3-kinase pathway. Studies in platelets show that the action of wortmannin and LY294002 is not mediated through an alteration in tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma2. These results demonstrate that PI 3-kinase is required for full activation of PLCgamma2 by GPVI in platelets and megakaryocytes. PMID:10432314

  13. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 enhances the differentiation and reduces the proliferation of adult human olfactory epithelium neural precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Manceur, Aziza P.; Tseng, Michael; Holowacz, Tamara; Witterick, Ian; Weksberg, Rosanna; McCurdy, Richard D.; Warsh, Jerry J.; Audet, Julie

    2011-09-10

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) contains neural precursor cells which can be easily harvested from a minimally invasive nasal biopsy, making them a valuable cell source to study human neural cell lineages in health and disease. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the etiology and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in the regulation of murine neural precursor cell fate in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the impact of decreased GSK-3 activity on the fate of adult human OE neural precursors in vitro. GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using ATP-competitive (6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime and CHIR99021) or substrate-competitive (TAT-eIF2B) inhibitors to eliminate potential confounding effects on cell fate due to off-target kinase inhibition. GSK-3 inhibitors decreased the number of neural precursor cells in OE cell cultures through a reduction in proliferation. Decreased proliferation was not associated with a reduction in cell survival but was accompanied by a reduction in nestin expression and a substantial increase in the expression of the neuronal differentiation markers MAP1B and neurofilament (NF-M) after 10 days in culture. Taken together, these results suggest that GSK-3 inhibition promotes the early stages of neuronal differentiation in cultures of adult human neural precursors and provide insights into the mechanisms by which alterations in GSK-3 signaling affect adult human neurogenesis, a cellular process strongly suspected to play a role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  15. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5′-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl− channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  16. Mammalian oocyte development: checkpoints for competence.

    PubMed

    Fair, Trudee

    2010-01-01

    During the lifespan of the female, biochemical changes occur in the ovarian environment. These changes are brought about by numerous endogenous and exogenous factors, including husbandry practices, production demands and disease, and can have a profound effect on ovarian oocyte quality and subsequent embryo development. Despite many investigations, there is no consensus regarding the time or period of follicular oocyte development that is particularly sensitive to insult. Here, the key molecular and morphological events that occur during oocyte and follicle growth are reviewed, with a specific focus on identifying critical checkpoints in oocyte development. The secondary follicle stage appears to be a key phase in follicular oocyte development because major events such as activation of the oocyte transcriptome, sequestration of the zona pellucida, establishment of bidirectional communication between the granulosa cells and the oocyte and cortical granule synthesis occur during this period of development. Several months later, the periovulatory period is also characterised by the occurrence of critical events, including appropriate degradation or polyadenylation of mRNA transcripts, resumption of meiosis, spindle formation, chromosome alignment and segregation, and so should also be considered as a potential checkpoint of oocyte development.

  17. Identification of a novel human kinase supporter of Ras (hKSR-2) that functions as a negative regulator of Cot (Tpl2) signaling.

    PubMed

    Channavajhala, Padma L; Wu, Leeying; Cuozzo, John W; Hall, J Perry; Liu, Wei; Lin, Lih-Ling; Zhang, Yuhua

    2003-11-21

    Kinase suppressor of Ras (KSR) is an integral and conserved component of the Ras signaling pathway. Although KSR is a positive regulator of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway, the role of KSR in Cot-mediated MAPK activation has not been identified. The serine/threonine kinase Cot (also known as Tpl2) is a member of the MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) family that is known to regulate oncogenic and inflammatory pathways; however, the mechanism(s) of its regulation are not precisely known. In this report, we identify an 830-amino acid novel human KSR, designated hKSR-2, using predictions from genomic data base mining based on the structural profile of the KSR kinase domain. We show that, similar to the known human KSR, hKSR-2 co-immunoprecipitates with many signaling components of the Ras/MAPK pathway, including Ras, Raf, MEK-1, and ERK-1/2. In addition, we demonstrate that hKSR-2 co-immunoprecipitates with Cot and that co-expression of hKSR-2 with Cot significantly reduces Cot-mediated MAPK and NF-kappaB activation. This inhibition is specific to Cot, because Ras-induced ERK and IkappaB kinase-induced NF-kappaB activation are not significantly affected by hKSR-2 co-expression. Moreover, Cot-induced interleukin-8 production in HeLa cells is almost completely inhibited by the concurrent expression of hKSR-2, whereas transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1)/TAK1-binding protein 1 (TAB1)-induced interleukin-8 production is not affected by hKSR-2 co-expression. Taken together, these results indicate that hKSR-2, a new member of the KSR family, negatively regulates Cot-mediated MAP kinase and NF-kappaB pathway signaling. PMID:12975377

  18. Checkpoint regulation of replication forks: global or local?

    PubMed

    Iyer, Divya Ramalingam; Rhind, Nicholas

    2013-12-01

    Cell-cycle checkpoints are generally global in nature: one unattached kinetochore prevents the segregation of all chromosomes; stalled replication forks inhibit late origin firing throughout the genome. A potential exception to this rule is the regulation of replication fork progression by the S-phase DNA damage checkpoint. In this case, it is possible that the checkpoint is global, and it slows all replication forks in the genome. However, it is also possible that the checkpoint acts locally at sites of DNA damage, and only slows those forks that encounter DNA damage. Whether the checkpoint regulates forks globally or locally has important mechanistic implications for how replication forks deal with damaged DNA during S-phase.

  19. Beta 2 integrin-dependent protein tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the FGR protein tyrosine kinase in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Stimulation of adherent human neutrophils (PMN) with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) triggers protein tyrosine phosphorylation (Fuortes, M., W. W. Jin, and C. Nathan. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 120:777-784). We investigated the dependence of this response on beta 2 integrins by using PMN isolated from a leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) patient, which do not express beta 2 integrins, and by plating PMN on surface bound anti-beta 2 (CD18) antibodies. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation increased in PMN plated on fibrinogen and this phosphorylation was enhanced by TNF. Triggering of protein tyrosine phosphorylation did not occur in LAD PMN plated on fibrinogen either in the absence or the presence of TNF. Surface bound anti-CD18, but not isotype-matched anti- Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens, antibodies triggered tyrosine phosphorylation in normal, but not in LAD PMN. As the major tyrosine phosphorylated proteins we found in our assay conditions migrated with an apparent molecular mass of 56-60 kD, we investigated whether beta 2 integrins are implicated in activation of members of the src family of intracellular protein-tyrosine kinases. We found that the fgr protein-tyrosine kinase (p58fgr) activity, and its extent of phosphorylation in tyrosine, in PMN adherent to fibrinogen, was enhanced by TNF. Activation of p58fgr in response to TNF was evident within 10 min of treatment and increased with times up to 30 min. Also other activators of beta 2 integrins such as phorbol-12- myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced activation of p58fgr kinase activity. Activation of p58fgr kinase activity, and phosphorylation in tyrosine, did not occur in PMN of a LAD patient in response to TNF. Soluble anti-CD18, but not anti-Class I MHC antigens, antibodies inhibited activation of p58fgr kinase activity in PMN adherent to fibrinogen in response to TNF, PMA, and FMLP. These findings demonstrate that, in PMN, beta 2 integrins

  20. The casein kinase 2 inhibitor, CX-4945, as an anti-cancer drug in treatment of human hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chon, Hae J; Bae, Kyoung J; Lee, Yura; Kim, Jiyeon

    2015-01-01

    The casein kinase 2 (CK2) protein kinase is a pro-survival kinase and therapeutic target in treatment of various human cancers. CK2 overexpression has been demonstrated in hematological malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and multiple myeloma. CX-4945, also known as Silmitasertib, is an orally administered, highly specific, ATP-competitive inhibitor of CK2. CX-4945 induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis and is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for treatment of many cancer types. In the past 2 years, the focus on the therapeutic potential of CX-4945 has shifted from solid tumors to hematological malignancies. CX-4945 exerts anti-proliferative effects in hematological tumors by downregulating CK2 expression and suppressing activation of CK2-mediated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, combination of CX-4945 with other inhibitors yielded synergistic effects in cell death induction. These new findings demonstrate that CK2 overexpression contributes to blood cancer cell survival and resistance to chemotherapy. Combinatorial use of CX-4945 is a promising therapeutic tool for treatment of hematological malignancies.

  1. Type II PI4-kinases control Weibel-Palade body biogenesis and von Willebrand factor structure in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; O'Connor, Marie N.; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; White, Ian J.; Al-Shawi, Raya; Simons, J. Paul; Mössinger, Julia; Haucke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are endothelial storage organelles that mediate the release of molecules involved in thrombosis, inflammation and angiogenesis, including the pro-thrombotic glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Although many protein components required for WPB formation and function have been identified, the role of lipids is almost unknown. We examined two key phosphatidylinositol kinases that control phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate levels at the trans-Golgi network, the site of WPB biogenesis. RNA interference of the type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases PI4KIIα and PI4KIIβ in primary human endothelial cells leads to formation of an increased proportion of short WPB with perturbed packing of VWF, as exemplified by increased exposure of antibody-binding sites. When stimulated with histamine, these cells release normal levels of VWF yet, under flow, form very few platelet-catching VWF strings. In PI4KIIα-deficient mice, immuno-microscopy revealed that VWF packaging is also perturbed and these mice exhibit increased blood loss after tail cut compared to controls. This is the first demonstration that lipid kinases can control the biosynthesis of VWF and the formation of WPBs that are capable of full haemostatic function. PMID:27068535

  2. Activation of the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Is Critical for Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Shuang; Zheng, Zhong; Su, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Fei; Ling, Michelle; Zou, Min; Zhou, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) are recognized as candidate progenitor cells for bone regeneration. However, the mechanism of hUCMSC osteogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling is involved in hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Particularly, the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and p38 signaling pathways maintained a consistent level in hUCMSCs through the entire 21-day osteogenic differentiation period. At the same time, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) signaling significantly increased from day 5, peaked at day 9, and declined thereafter. Moreover, gene profiling of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity measurement, and alizarin red staining demonstrated that the application of U0126, a specific inhibitor for ERK activation, completely prohibited hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation. However, when U0126 was removed from the culture at day 9, ERK activation and osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs were partially recovered. Together, these findings demonstrate that the activation of ERK signaling is essential for hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation, which points out the significance of ERK signaling pathway to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs as an alternative cell source for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26989682

  3. Type II PI4-kinases control Weibel-Palade body biogenesis and von Willebrand factor structure in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; O'Connor, Marie N; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; White, Ian J; Al-Shawi, Raya; Simons, J Paul; Mössinger, Julia; Haucke, Volker; Cutler, Daniel F

    2016-05-15

    Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) are endothelial storage organelles that mediate the release of molecules involved in thrombosis, inflammation and angiogenesis, including the pro-thrombotic glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Although many protein components required for WPB formation and function have been identified, the role of lipids is almost unknown. We examined two key phosphatidylinositol kinases that control phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate levels at the trans-Golgi network, the site of WPB biogenesis. RNA interference of the type II phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases PI4KIIα and PI4KIIβ in primary human endothelial cells leads to formation of an increased proportion of short WPB with perturbed packing of VWF, as exemplified by increased exposure of antibody-binding sites. When stimulated with histamine, these cells release normal levels of VWF yet, under flow, form very few platelet-catching VWF strings. In PI4KIIα-deficient mice, immuno-microscopy revealed that VWF packaging is also perturbed and these mice exhibit increased blood loss after tail cut compared to controls. This is the first demonstration that lipid kinases can control the biosynthesis of VWF and the formation of WPBs that are capable of full haemostatic function. PMID:27068535

  4. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities.

  5. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  6. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  7. Monosodium urate activates Src/Pyk2/PI3 kinase and cathepsin dependent unconventional protein secretion from human primary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Välimäki, Elina; Miettinen, Juho J; Lietzén, Niina; Matikainen, Sampsa; Nyman, Tuula A

    2013-03-01

    Monosodium urate (MSU) is an endogenous danger signal that is crystallized from uric acid released from injured cells. MSU is known to activate inflammatory response in macrophages but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained uncharacterized. Activated macrophages start to secrete proteins to activate immune response and to recruit other immune cells to the site of infection and/or tissue damage. Secretome characterization after activation of innate immune system is essential to unravel the details of early phases of defense responses. Here, we have analyzed the secretome of human primary macrophages stimulated with MSU using quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomics as well as high-throughput qualitative GeLC-MS/MS approach combining protein separation by SDS-PAGE and protein identification by liquid chromatography-MS/MS. Both methods showed that MSU stimulation induced robust protein secretion from lipopolysaccharide-primed human macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis of the secretome data showed that MSU stimulation strongly activates unconventional, vesicle mediated protein secretion. The unconventionally secreted proteins included pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18, interferon-induced proteins, and danger signal proteins. Also active forms of lysosomal proteases cathepsins were secreted on MSU stimulation, and cathepsin activity was essential for MSU-induced unconventional protein secretion. Additionally, proteins associated to phosphorylation events including Src family tyrosine kinases were increased in the secretome of MSU-stimulated cells. Our functional studies demonstrated that Src, Pyk2, and PI3 kinases act upstream of cathepsins to activate the overall protein secretion from macrophages. In conclusion, we provide the first comprehensive characterization of protein secretion pathways activated by MSU in human macrophages, and reveal a novel role for cathepsins and Src, Pyk2, PI3 kinases in the activation of

  8. Protein kinase C phosphorylates a recently identified membrane skeleton-associated calmodulin-binding protein in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ling, E; Gardner, K; Bennett, V

    1986-10-25

    A membrane skeleton-associated protein with calmodulin-binding activity recently has been purified and characterized from human erythrocytes (Gardner, K. and Bennett, V. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 1339-1348). This new protein (CaM-BP103/97) has now been identified as a major substrate for protein kinase C in erythrocytes since phosphorylation of both of its subunits (Mr = 103,000 and 97,000) is elevated 3-15-fold in the presence of the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol beta-acetate (TPA), under the following conditions: ghost membranes incubated with protein kinase C purified from rat brain, ghost membranes from erythrocytes pretreated with TPA, and intact erythrocytes metabolically labeled with 32PO4 and stimulated by TPA. The sites of phosphorylation of this protein by exogenous and endogenous protein kinase C are identical since two-dimensional 32P-peptide maps of both subunits labeled by either endogenous or exogenous enzyme are indistinguishable. Each subunit of CaM-BP103/97 accepts up to 3 mol of phosphate/polypeptide chain. In the presence of low calcium concentrations and in the absence of cytosol, the phosphorylation of CaM-BP103/97 is, on a molar basis, equal to or greater than that of proteins 4.1 and 4.9. As a target for both calmodulin and protein kinase C, CaM-BP103/97 is likely to play a key role in the effect of calcium on erythrocyte membrane shape and stability.

  9. Fenretinide Perturbs Focal Adhesion Kinase in Premalignant and Malignant Human Oral Keratinocytes. Fenretinide’s chemopreventive mechanisms include ECM interactions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Byungdo B.; Li, Suyang; Tong, Meng; Holpuch, Andrew S.; Spinney, Richard; Wang, Daren; Border, Michael B.; Liu, Zhongfa; Sarode, Sachin; Pei, Ping; Schwendeman, Steven; Mallery, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane-associated protein, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), modulates cell-extracellular matrix interactions and also conveys pro-survival and proliferative signals. Notably, increased intraepithelial FAK levels accompany transformation of premalignant oral intraepithelial neoplasia (OIN) to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). OIN chemoprevention is a patient-centric, optimal strategy to prevent OSCC’s co-morbidities and mortality. The cancer chemopreventive and synthetic vitamin A derivative, fenretinide, has demonstrated protein-binding capacities e.g. mTOR and retinol binding protein interactions. These studies employed a continuum of human oral keratinocytes (normal-HPV E6/E7-transduced-OSCC) to assess potential fenretinide-FAK drug protein interactions and functional consequences on cellular growth regulation and motility. Molecular modeling studies demonstrated fenretinide has ~200-fold greater binding affinity relative to the natural ligand (ATP) at FAK’s kinase domain. Fenretinide also shows intermediate binding at FAK’s FERM domain and interacts at the ATP-binding site of the closest FAK analogue, Pyk2. Fenretinide significantly suppressed proliferation via induction of apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle blockade. Fenretinide-treated cells also demonstrated F-actin disruption, significant inhibition of both directed migration and invasion of a synthetic basement membrane, and decreased phosphorylation of growth-promoting kinases. A commercially available FAK inhibitor did not suppress cell invasion. Notably, while FAK’s FERM domain directs cell invasion, FAK inhibitors target the kinase domain. In addition, FAK-specific siRNA treated cells showed an intermediate cell migration capacity; data which suggest co-contribution of the established migrating-enhancing Pyk2. Our data imply that fenretinide is uniquely capable of disrupting FAK’s and Pyk2’s pro-survival and mobility-enhancing effects and further extend fenretinide’s chemopreventive

  10. Involvement of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 5 in Kinin B1 Receptor Upregulation in Isolated Human Umbilical Veins.

    PubMed

    Kilstein, Yael; Nowak, Wanda; Errasti, Andrea Emilse; Feás, Antía Andrea Barcia; Armesto, Arnaldo Raúl; Pelorosso, Facundo Germán; Rothlin, Rodolfo Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The upregulated kinin B1 receptors exert a pivotal role in modulating inflammatory processes. In isolated human umbilical veins (HUVs), kinin B1 receptor is upregulated as a function of in vitro incubation time and proinflammatory stimuli. The aim of this study was to evaluate, using functional and biochemical methods, the involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) on the kinin B1 receptor upregulation process in HUV. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed for the first time that kinin B1 receptor mRNA expression closely parallels the functional sensitization to kinin B1 receptor selective agonist des-Arg(10)-kallidin (DAKD) in HUV. Moreover, the selective inhibition of ERK5, p38 MAPK, and JNK, but not ERK1/2, produced a dose-dependent rightward shift of the concentration-response curves to DAKD after 5-hour incubation and a reduction in kinin B1 receptor mRNA expression. Biochemical analyses showed that ERK5, p38 MAPK, and JNK phosphorylation is maximal during the first 2 hours postisolation, followed by a significant reduction in the last 3 hours. None of the treatments modified the responses to serotonin, an unrelated agonist, suggesting a specific effect on kinin B1 receptor upregulation. The present work provides for the first time pharmacologic evidence indicating that ERK5 plays a significant role on kinin B1 receptor upregulation. Furthermore, we confirm the relevance of p38 MAPK and JNK as well as the lack of effect of ERK1/2 in this process. This study may contribute to a better understanding of MAPK involvement in inflammatory and immunologic diseases.

  11. Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2 Attenuation of Protein Kinase C-Induced Inflammation in Human Ovarian Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yi-Ning; Sun, David; Peng, Yen-Chun; Wu, Yuh-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are two important inflammatory mediators in ovulation. Ghrelin may modulate inflammatory signaling via growth hormone secretagogue receptors. We investigated the role of ghrelin in KGN human ovarian granulosa cells using protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (PDD) and synthetic ghrelin analog growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2). GHRP-2 attenuated PDD-induced expression of protein and mRNA, the promoter activity of COX-2 and IL-8 genes, and the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-8. GHRP-2 promoted the degradation of PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 proteins with the involvement of proteasomal and lysosomal pathways. PDD-mediated COX-2 production acts via the p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways; PDD-mediated IL-8 production acts via the p38, JNK and ERK pathways. GHRP-2 reduced the PDD-induced phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and activator protein 1 (AP-1) reporter activation and PDD-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and reporter activation. The inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) reduced the inhibitory effect of GHRP-2 on PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 expression. Our findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory role for ghrelin (GHRP-2) in PKC-mediated inflammation of granulosa cells, at least in part, due to its inhibitory effect on PKC-induced activation of p38, JNK and NF-κB, possibly by targeting to MKP-1 and PP2A. PMID:27548147

  12. Overexpression of human insulin receptor substrate 1 induces cellular transformation with activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, T; Sasaki, Y; Wands, J R

    1996-01-01

    The receptor insulin substrate 1 protein (IRS-1) is a specific substrate for insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Expression and tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 play an important role during normal hepatocyte growth, and the gene is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. We determined if IRS-1 overexpression directly contributes to cellular transformation. The human IRS-1 gene was subcloned into a mammalian expression vector driven by the cytomegalovirus early promoter. NIH 3T3 cells transiently transfected with this vector subsequently developed transformed foci. Several stably transfected cell lines were established, and they grew efficiently under low-serum conditions and formed colonies when plated in soft agar. Cell lines overexpressing IRS-1 displayed increased tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 and association with Grb2 but not with the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase. Since Grb2 is a component of the son-of-sevenless-Ras pathway and upstream in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, enzymatic activities of the major components of this cascade, such as MAPK kinase and MAPK were evaluated and found to be substantially increased in three independent cell lines with IRS-1 protein overexpression. Such cells, when injected into nude mice, were highly tumorigenic, and there may be a correlation between the degree of MAPK activation and tumor growth rate. This report describes the generation of a transformed phenotype by overexpression of a molecule without a catalytic domain far upstream in the signal transduction cascade and suggests that prolonged activation of MAPKs by this mechanism may be one of the molecular events related to hepatocellular transformation. PMID:8622697

  13. Histamine induces activation of protein kinase D that mediates tissue factor expression and activity in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Feng; Wu, Daniel Dongwei; Xu, Xuemin; Cui, Mei-Zhen

    2012-12-01

    Histamine, an inflammatory mediator, has been shown to influence the pathogenesis of vascular wall cells. However, the molecular basis of its influence is not well understood. Our data reveal that histamine markedly induces protein kinase D (PKD) activation in human aortic smooth muscle cells. PKD belongs to a family of serine/threonine protein kinases, and its function in vascular disease is largely unknown. Our data show that histamine-induced PKD phosphorylation is dependent on the activation of histamine receptor 1 and protein kinase C (PKC). To determine the role of PKD in the histamine pathway, we employed a small-interfering RNA approach to downregulate PKD expression and found that PKD1 and PKD2 are key mediators for expression of tissue factor (TF), which is the key initiator of blood coagulation and is important for thrombosis. Our results show that PKD2 predominantly mediates histamine-induced TF expression via the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, whereas PKD1 mediates histamine-induced TF expression through a p38 MAPK-independent pathway. We demonstrate that histamine induces TF expression via the PKC-dependent PKD activation. Our data provide the first evidence that PKD is a new component in histamine signaling in live cells and that PKD has a novel function in the histamine signaling pathway leading to gene expression, as evidenced by TF expression. Importantly, our data reveal a regulatory link from histamine to PKD and TF, providing new insights into the mechanisms of coagulation and the development of atherothrombosis.

  14. Human protein kinase inhibitor screening by capillary electrophoresis using transverse diffusion of laminar flow profiles for reactant mixing.

    PubMed

    Nehmé, Hala; Nehmé, Reine; Lafite, Pierre; Routier, Sylvain; Morin, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE)-based enzyme assay method has been developed to screen protein kinase inhibitors. Four human kinases GSK3β, DYRK1A, CDK5/p25 and CDK1/cyclin B were chosen to test this novel method. These enzymes have been identified as very promising targets to develop treatments against cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. The efficiency of drugs against these relevant biological targets has never been carried out by CE. For this proposal, the capillary was used as a nanoreactor in which four reactants (the enzyme, its two substrates and its potential inhibitor) were successively injected, mixed by using transverse diffusion of laminar flow profiles and incubated. The adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) formed during the enzymatic reaction was detected by UV and quantified. The efficiency of the developed CE method was validated by determining the IC50 values of a wide variety of inhibitors covering a large domain of affinity toward kinases and containing representative and chemically divergent skeletons. Excellent agreement was found between the results obtained by CE and those reported in the literature when using conventional radiometric enzyme assays. Moreover, CE was successfully used to determine the inhibitory effect of several potential inhibitors that was not yet assessed by conventional methods and is crucial for structure activity relation studies. This novel CE method is simple, rapid, very economic (few tens of nanoliters per IC50) and eco-friendly since no radioactivity was required. It could be extended to high-throughput screening of kinase inhibitors, which is of great interest for biomedical and pharmaceutical research fields. PMID:24075461

  15. The UL97 protein kinase of human cytomegalovirus and homologues in other herpesviruses: impact on virus and host.

    PubMed

    Michel, Detlef; Mertens, Thomas

    2004-03-11

    The human herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, varicella zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A), HHV-6B, HHV-7 and HHV-8, establish persistent infections with possible recurrence during immunosuppression. HCMV replication is inhibited by the nucleoside analogue ganciclovir (GCV), the compound of choice for the treatment of HCMV diseases and preemptive treatment of infections. The viral UL97 protein (pUL97) which shares homologies with protein kinases and bacterial phosphotransferases is able to monophosphorylate GCV. Homologues of pUL97 are found in HSV (UL13), VZV (ORF47), EBV (BGLF4), HHV-6 (U69), HHV-8 (ORF36) as well as in murine CMV (M97) or rat CMV (R97). Several indolocarbazoles have been reported to be specific inhibitors of pUL97. The protein is important for efficient replication of the virus. Autophosphorylation of pUL97 was observed using different experimental systems. Most recently, it has been shown that pUL97 interacts with the DNA polymerase processivity factor pUL44. Indolocarbazole protein kinase inhibitors are promising lead compounds for the development of more specific inhibitors of HCMV. PMID:15023359

  16. EMODnet MedSea Checkpoint for sustainable Blue Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussat, Eric; Pinardi, Nadia; Manzella, Giuseppe; Blanc, Frederique

    2016-04-01

    The EMODNET checkpoint is a wide monitoring system assessment activity aiming to support the sustainable Blue Growth at the scale of the European Sea Basins by: 1) Clarifying the observation landscape of all compartments of the marine environment including Air, Water, Seabed, Biota and Human activities, pointing out to the existing programs, national, European and international 2) Evaluating fitness for use indicators that will show the accessibility and usability of observation and modeling data sets and their roles and synergies based upon selected applications by the European Marine Environment Strategy 3) Prioritizing the needs to optimize the overall monitoring Infrastructure (in situ and satellite data collection and assembling, data management and networking, modeling and forecasting, geo-infrastructure) and release recommendations for evolutions to better meet the application requirements in view of sustainable Blue Growth The assessment is designed for : - Institutional stakeholders for decision making on observation and monitoring systems - Data providers and producers to know how their data collected once for a given purpose could fit other user needs - End-users interested in a regional status and possible uses of existing monitoring data Selected end-user applications are of paramount importance for: (i) the blue economy sector (offshore industries, fisheries); (ii) marine environment variability and change (eutrophication, river inputs and ocean climate change impacts); (iii) emergency management (oil spills); and (iv) preservation of natural resources and biodiversity (Marine Protected Areas). End-user applications generate innovative products based on the existing observation landscape. The fitness for use assessment is made thanks to the comparison of the expected product specifications with the quality of the product derived from the selected data. This involves the development of checkpoint information and indicators based on Data quality and

  17. The Regulatory and Kinase Domains but Not the Interdomain Linker Determine Human Double-stranded RNA-activated Kinase (PKR) Sensitivity to Inhibition by Viral Non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Sunita, S; Schwartz, Samantha L; Conn, Graeme L

    2015-11-20

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) is an important component of the innate immune system that presents a crucial first line of defense against viral infection. PKR has a modular architecture comprising a regulatory N-terminal dsRNA binding domain and a C-terminal kinase domain interposed by an unstructured ∼80-residue interdomain linker (IDL). Guided by sequence alignment, we created IDL deletions in human PKR (hPKR) and regulatory/kinase domain swap human-rat chimeric PKRs to assess the contributions of each domain and the IDL to regulation of the kinase activity by RNA. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy, limited proteolysis, kinase assays, and isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that each PKR protein is properly folded with similar domain boundaries and that each exhibits comparable polyinosinic-cytidylic (poly(rI:rC)) dsRNA activation profiles and binding affinities for adenoviral virus-associated RNA I (VA RNAI) and HIV-1 trans-activation response (TAR) RNA. From these results we conclude that the IDL of PKR is not required for RNA binding or mediating changes in protein conformation or domain interactions necessary for PKR regulation by RNA. In contrast, inhibition of rat PKR by VA RNAI and TAR RNA was found to be weaker than for hPKR by 7- and >300-fold, respectively, and each human-rat chimeric domain-swapped protein showed intermediate levels of inhibition. These findings indicate that PKR sequence or structural elements in the kinase domain, present in hPKR but absent in rat PKR, are exploited by viral non-coding RNAs to accomplish efficient inhibition of PKR.

  18. MicroRNA-224 Induces G1/S Checkpoint Release in Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    An, Fangmei; Olaru, Alexandru V.; Mezey, Esteban; Xie, Qing; Li, Ling; Piontek, Klaus B.; Selaru, Florin M.

    2015-01-01

    Profound changes in microRNA (miR) expression levels are frequently found in liver cancers compared to the normal liver. In this study, we evaluate the expression of miR-224 in human HCC and CCA, as well as its downstream targets and affected pathways. We show that miR-224 is upregulated in a large cohort of human CCA, similar to its upregulation in human HCC. For the purpose of studying the roles of miR-224 in HCC and CCA, we enforced miR-224 expression in cells. mRNA arrays followed by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA)-identified putative molecules and pathways downstream of miR-224. Phenotypically, we report that enforced expression of miR-224 increases the growth rate of normal cholangiocytes, CCA cell lines, and HCC cell lines. In addition, we identified, in an unbiased fashion, that one of the major biologic processes affected by miR-224 is Gap1 (G1) to Synthesis (S) transition checkpoint release. We next identified p21, p15, and CCNE1 as downstream targets of miR-224 and confirmed the coordinated downregulation results in the increased phosphorylation of Retinoblastoma (Rb) with resulting G1/S checkpoint release. Our data suggest that miR-224 is a master regulator of cell cycle progression, and that its overexpression results in G1/S checkpoint release followed by accelerated cell growth. PMID:26343737

  19. Defective control of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1(-/-) fibroblasts after mitotic spindle disruption.

    PubMed

    Halappanavar, Sabina S; Shah, Girish M

    2004-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP), a DNA damage-responsive nuclear enzyme present in higher eukaryotes, is well-known for its roles in protecting the genome after DNA damage. However, even without exogenous DNA damage, PARP may play a role in stabilizing the genome because cells or mice deficient in PARP exhibit various signs of genomic instability, such as tetraploidy, aneuploidy, chromosomal abnormalities and susceptibility to spontaneous carcinogenesis. Normally, cell cycle checkpoints ensure elimination of cells with genomic abnormalities. Therefore, we examined efficiency of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in PARP-/- and PARP+/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts treated with mitotic spindle disrupting agent colcemid. PARP+/+ cells, like most mammalian cells, eventually escaped from spindle disruption-induced mitotic checkpoint arrest by 60 h. In contrast, PARP-/- cells rapidly escaped from mitotic arrest within 24 h by downregulation of cyclin B1/CDK-1 kinase activity. After escaping from mitotic arrest; both the PARP genotypes arrive in G1 tetraploid state, where they face post-mitotic checkpoints which either induce apoptosis or prevent DNA endoreduplication. While all the G1 tetraploid PARP+/+ cells were eliminated by apoptosis, the majority of the G1 tetraploid PARP-/- cells became polyploid by resisting apoptosis and carrying out DNA endoreduplication. Introduction of PARP in PARP-/- fibroblasts partially increased the stringency of mitotic checkpoint arrest and fully restored susceptibility to G1 tetraploidy checkpoint-induced apoptosis; and thus prevented formation of polyploid cells. Our results suggest that PARP may serve as a guardian angel of the genome even without exogenous DNA damage through its role in mitotic and post-mitotic G1 tetraploidy checkpoints. PMID:14726664

  20. Identification and characterization of metabolites of ASP015K, a novel oral Janus kinase inhibitor, in rats, chimeric mice with humanized liver, and humans.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Naoyuki; Oda, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    1. Here, we elucidated the structure of metabolites of novel oral Janus kinase inhibitor ASP015K in rats and humans and evaluated the predictability of human metabolites using chimeric mice with humanized liver (PXB mice). 2. Rat biological samples collected after oral dosing of (14)C-labelled ASP015K were examined using a liquid chromatography-radiometric detector and mass spectrometer (LC-RAD/MS). The molecular weight of metabolites in human and the liver chimeric mouse biological samples collected after oral dosing of non-labelled ASP015K was also investigated via LC-MS. Metabolites were also isolated from rat bile samples and analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance. 3. Metabolic pathways of ASP015K in rats and humans were found to be glucuronide conjugation, methyl conjugation, sulfate conjugation, glutathione conjugation, hydroxylation of the adamantane ring and N-oxidation of the 1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridine ring. The main metabolite of ASP015K in rats was the glucuronide conjugate, while the main metabolite in humans was the sulfate conjugate. Given that human metabolites were produced by human hepatocytes in chimeric mice with humanized liver, this human model mouse was believed to be useful in predicting the human metabolic profile of various drug candidates.

  1. Cdk-activating kinase complex is a component of human transcription factor TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Shiekhattar, R; Mermelstein, F; Fisher, R P; Drapkin, R; Dynlacht, B; Wessling, H C; Morgan, D O; Reinberg, D

    1995-03-16

    Transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) contains a kinase capable of phosphorylating the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here we report the identification of the Cdk-activating kinase (Cak) complex (Cdk7 and cyclin H) as a component of TFIIH after extensive purification of TFIIH by chromatography. We find that affinity-purified antibodies directed against cyclin H inhibit TFIIH-dependent transcription and that both cyclin H and Cdk7 antibodies inhibit phosphorylation of the CTD of the largest subunit of the RNAPII in the preinitiation complex. Cak is present in at least two distinct complexes, TFIIH and a smaller complex that is unable to phosphorylate RNAPII in the preinitiation complex. Both Cak complexes, as well as recombinant Cak, phosphorylate a CTD peptide. Finally, TFIIH was shown to phosphorylate both Cdc2 and Cdk2, suggesting that there could be a link between transcription and the cell cycle machinery.

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel substituted pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline derivatives as inhibitors of the human protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Jean; Le Borgne, Marc; Rimbault, Charlotte; Moreau, Stéphane; Savrimoutou, Solène; Pinaud, Noël; Baratin, Sophie; Marchivie, Mathieu; Roche, Séverine; Bollacke, Andre; Pecci, Adali; Alvarez, Lautaro; Desplat, Vanessa; Jose, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    Herein we describe the synthesis and properties of substituted phenylaminopyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline-carboxylic acid derivatives as a novel class of potent inhibitors of the human protein kinase CK2. A set of 15 compounds was designed and synthesized using convenient and straightforward synthesis protocols. The compounds were tested for inhibition of human protein kinase CK2, which is a potential drug target for many diseases including inflammatory disorders and cancer. New inhibitors with IC50 in the micro- and sub-micromolar range were identified. The most promising compound, the 4-[(3-chlorophenyl)amino]pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline-3-carboxylic acid 1c inhibited human CK2 with an IC50 of 49 nM. Our findings indicate that pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalines are a promising starting scaffold for further development and optimization of human protein kinase CK2 inhibitors.

  3. The Design and Synthesis of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 for the Treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a genetically validated drug target for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also called African sleeping sickness. We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of aminopyrazole derivatives as Trypanosoma brucei GSK3 short inhibitors. Low nanomolar inhibitors, which had high selectivity over the off-target human CDK2 and good selectivity over human GSK3β enzyme, have been prepared. These potent kinase inhibitors demonstrated low micromolar levels of inhibition of the Trypanosoma brucei brucei parasite grown in culture. PMID:25198388

  4. NK-cell dysfunction in human renal carcinoma reveals diacylglycerol kinase as key regulator and target for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Petra U; Mendler, Anna N; Brech, Dorothee; Masouris, Ilias; Oberneder, Ralph; Noessner, Elfriede

    2014-10-15

    The relevance of NK cells in tumor control is well established in mouse models and human hematologic malignancies; however, their contribution to the control of human solid tumors remains disputed due to problems with in situ detection and reports of functional inactivity in the tumor milieu. In this study, we established a reliable in situ detection method for NK cells. Moreover, we performed analysis to elucidate mechanisms that impair NK-cell function in the tumor milieu and thereby identify therapeutic targets that allow recovery of NK-cell functionality. It was observed that NK cells from clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), compared to NK cells from nontumor kidney and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), displayed conjoint phenotypic alterations and dysfunction induced by the tumor milieu, which were associated mechanistically with high levels of signaling attenuator diacylglycerol kinase (DGK)-α and blunted mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation (ERK1/2, Jun kinase). Reinstating NK-cell functionality was possible by DGK inhibition or brief IL-2 culture, interventions that de-repressed the ERK pathway. The extent of alteration and magnitude of recovery could be linked to NK-cell frequency within ccRCC-infiltrating lymphocytes, possibly explaining the observed survival benefit of patients with NK(high) tumors. In conclusion, DGK-mediated dampening of the ERK pathway ensuing in NK-cell dysfunction was identified as an important escape mechanism in ccRCC. DGK and the ERK pathway thus emerge as promising therapeutic targets to restore suppressed NK-cell activity for the improvement of antitumor immunity.

  5. Protein kinase B modulates the sensitivity of human neuroblastoma cells to insulin-like growth factor receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Ana S; Boller, Danielle; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael A; Arcaro, Alexandre

    2006-12-01

    The potential of the novel insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) inhibitor NVP-AEW541 as an antiproliferative agent in human neuroblastoma was investigated. Pro