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Sample records for human chromosome aberrations

  1. Induction of chromosome aberrations in human cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations induced by high-energy charged particles in normal human lymphocytes and human fibroblasts have been investigated. The charged particles included 250 MeV/nucleon protons, 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ions and 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. The energies of the charged particles were higher than in most of the studies reported in the literature. Lymphocytes were stimulated to grow immediately after irradiation, while fibroblasts were incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h for repair. Chromosomes were collected at the first mitosis after irradiation and chromosome aberrations were scored using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a whole-chromosome 4 probe. Chromosome aberrations were classified as reciprocal exchanges, incomplete exchanges, deletions and complex exchanges. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for each type of aberration was calculated by dividing a dose of 4 Gy by the dose of the charged particles producing the same effect as 4 Gy of gamma rays. Results of this study showed that complex aberrations have the highest RBE for radiation of high linear energy transfer (LET) for human lymphocytes, but for fibroblasts, the greatest effect was for incomplete exchanges. For both lymphocytes and fibroblasts, iron ions induced a similar fraction of aberrant cells.

  2. The nature of chromosomal aberrations detected in humans exposed to benzene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luoping; Eastmond, David A; Smith, Martyn T

    2002-01-01

    Benzene is an established cause of human leukemia that is thought to act by producing chromosomal aberrations and altered in cell differentiation. In several recent studies increased levels of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes were correlated with a heightened risk of cancer, especially hematological malignancies. Thus, chromosomal aberrations may be a predictor of future leukemia risk. Previous studies exploring whether benzene exposure induces chromosomal aberrations have yielded mostly positive results. However, it remains unclear whether the chromosomal aberrations induced by benzene occur in a distinct pattern. Here, we thoroughly review the major chromosome studies published to date in benzene-exposed workers, benzene-poisoned and preleukemia patients, and leukemia cases associated with benzene expose. Although three cytogenetic markers (chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges, and micronuclei) are commonly examined, our primary focus is on studies of chromosomal aberrations, because only this marker has so far been correlated with increased cancer risk. This review surveys the published literature, analyzes the study results, and discusses the characteristics of effects reported. In most studies of currently exposed workers, increases in chromosomal aberrations were observed. However, due to the relatively small number of affected individuals and variability in the reported aberrations, firm conclusions cannot be made about the involvement of specific chromosomes or chromosome regions. Further, in leukemia cases associated with benzene exposure, there is no evidence of a unique pattern of benzene-induced chromosomal aberrations in humans. Leukemia cases associated with benzene exposure are, however, more likely to contain clonal chromosome aberrations then those arising de novo in the general population.

  3. Rapid human chromosome aberration analysis using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lucas, J N; Tenjin, T; Straume, T; Pinkel, D; Moore, D; Litt, M; Gray, J W

    1989-07-01

    We have used in situ hybridization of repeat-sequence DNA probes, specific to the paracentromric locus 1q12 and the telomeric locus 1p36, to fluorescently stain regions that flank human chromosome 1p. This procedure was used for fast detection of structural aberrations involving human chromosome 1p in two separate experiments. In one, human lymphocytes were irradiated with 0, 0.8, 1.6, 2.4 and 3.2 Gy of 137Cs gamma-rays. In the other, human lymphocytes were irradiated with 0, 0.09, 0.18, 2.0, 3.1 and 4.1 Gy of 60Co gamma-rays. The frequencies (per cell) of translocations and dicentrics with one breakpoint in 1p and one elsewhere in the genome were determined for cells irradiated at each dose point. These frequencies both increased with dose, D, in a linear-quadratic manner. The delta, alpha, and beta coefficients resulting from a fit of the equation f(D)=delta + alphaD + betaD2 to the translocation frequency dose-response data were 0.0025, 0.0027 and 0.0037 for 137Cs gamma-rays, and 0.0010, 0.0041, and 0.0057 for 60Co gamma-rays. The delta, alpha, and beta coefficients resulting from a fit to the dicentric frequency dose-response data were 0.0005, 0.0010 and 0.0028 for 137Cs gamma-rays and 0.0001, 0.0002 and 0.0035, for 60Co gamma-rays. Approximately 32,000 metaphase spreads were scored in this study. The average analysis rate was over two metaphase spreads per minute. However, an experienced analyst was able to find and score one metaphase spread every 10s. The importance of this new cytogenetic analysis technique for biological dosimetry and in vivo risk assessment is discussed.

  4. [239Pu and chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Okladnikova, N D; Osovets, S V; Kudriavtseva, T I

    2009-01-01

    The genome status in somatic cells was assessed using the chromosomal aberration (CA) test in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 194 plutonium workers exposed to occupational radiation mainly from low-transportable compounds of airborne 230Pu. Pu body burden at the time of cytogenetic study varied from values close to the method sensitivity to values multiply exceeding the permissible level. Standard (routine) methods of peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivation were applied. Chromatid- and chromosomal-type structural changes were estimated. Aberrations were estimated per 100 examined metaphase cells. The quantitative relationship between the CA frequency and Pu body burden and the absorbed dose to the lung was found. Mathematical processing of results was carried out based on the phenomenological model. The results were shown as theoretical and experimental curves. The threshold of the CA yield was 0.43 +/- 0.03 kBq (Pu body burden) and 6.12 +/- 1.20 cGy (absorbed dose to the lung).

  5. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    FISH, mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromere probes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. High-LET induced damages are mostly a single track effect. Unrejoined chromosome breaks (incomplete exchanges) and complex type aberrations were higher for high-LET. Biosignatures may depend on the method the samples are collected. Recent mBAND analysis has revealed more information about the nature of intra-chromosome exchanges. Whether space flight/microgravity affects radiation-induced chromosome aberration frequencies is still an open question.

  6. Induction of chromosome aberrations in cultured human lymphocytes treated with ethoxyquin.

    PubMed

    Blaszczyk, A; Osiecka, R; Skolimowski, J

    2003-12-01

    The chromosomal aberration test was employed to investigate the effect in vitro of a known antioxidant and food preservative, ethoxyquin (EQ, 1,2-dihydro-6-ethoxy-2,2,4-trimethylquinoline) on human chromosomes. The studies were undertaken because there are no published in vitro data on genotoxicity of EQ in mammalian cells and there are many reports pointing out that it may be harmful to animals and human beings. Lymphocytes obtained from three healthy donors were incubated with EQ (0.01-0.5mM) both with and without metabolic activation. Stability studies performed by HPLC analysis showed that EQ was stable under the conditions of the lymphocyte cultures. The results of the chromosome aberration assay showed that EQ induces chromosome aberrations: gaps and breaks as well as dicentrics and atypical translocation chromosomes.

  7. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  8. Chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes exposed to energetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Ms Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and are therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/µm. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy range the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction products such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are energy dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  9. Chromosome Aberration in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to a space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/micrometer. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction produces such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are LET dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  10. [The dependence of the level of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes on the duration of their cultivation under ultraviolet irradiation].

    PubMed

    Rushkovskiĭ, S R; Bezrukov, V F; Bariliak, I R

    1998-01-01

    The effect of duration of cultivation of lymphocytes of human UV-irradiated peripheral blood on the chromosomal aberration rate was studied. Under prolonged cultivation the more irradiated blood samples revealed higher level of chromosomal aberrations. The existence of UV-induced delayed chromosomal instability is supposed that may be found under prolonged cultivation. The mechanisms of this phenomenon are discussed.

  11. Relationships between chromosome structure and chromosomal aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Yuri; Andreev, Sergey

    An interphase nucleus of human lymphocyte was simulated by the novel Monte Carlo tech-nique. The main features of interphase chromosome structure and packaging were taken into account: different levels of chromatin organisation; nonrandom localisation of chromosomes within a nucleus; chromosome loci dynamics. All chromosomes in a nucleus were modelled as polymer globules. A dynamic pattern of intra/interchromosomal contacts was simulated. The detailed information about chromosomal contacts, such as distribution of intrachromoso-mal contacts over the length of each chromosome and dependence of contact probability on genomic separation between chromosome loci, were calculated and compared to the new exper-imental data obtained by the Hi-C technique. Types and frequencies of simple and complex radiation-induced chromosomal exchange aberrations (CA) induced by X-rays were predicted with taking formation and decay of chromosomal contacts into account. Distance dependence of exchange formation probability was calculated directly. mFISH data for human lymphocytes were analysed. The calculated frequencies of simple CA agreed with the experimental data. Complex CA were underestimated despite the dense packaging of chromosome territories within a nucleus. Possible influence of chromosome-nucleus structural organisation on the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations is discussed.

  12. Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the techniques used to analyze the damage done to chromosome from ion radiation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), mFISH, mBAND, telomere and centromereprobes have been used to study chromosome aberrations induced in human cells exposed to low-and high-LET radiation in vitro. There is some comparison of the different results from the various techniques. The results of the study are summarized.

  13. Induction of chromosome aberrations and mitotic arrest by cytomegalovirus in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    AbuBakar, S.; Au, W.W.; Legator, M.S.; Albrecht, T.

    1988-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is potentially an effective but often overlooked genotoxic agent in humans. We report here evidence that indicates that infection by CMV can induce chromosome alterations and mitotic inhibition. The frequency of chromosome aberrations induced was dependent on the input multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) for human lung fibroblasts (LU), but not for human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) when both cell types were infected at the GO phase of the cell cycle. The aberrations induced by CMV were mostly chromatid breaks and chromosome pulverizations that resembled prematurely condensed S-phase chromatin. Pulverized chromosomes were not observed in LU cells infected with virus stocks that had been rendered nonlytic by UV-irradiation at 24,000 ergs/mm2 or from infection of human lymphocytes. In LU cells infected with UV-irradiated CMV, the frequency of aberrations induced was inversely dependent on the extent of the exposure of the CMV stock to the UV-light. In permissive CMV infection of proliferating LU cells at 24 hr after subculture, a high percentage (greater than 40%) of the metaphase cells were arrested at their first metaphase and displayed severely condensed chromosomes when harvested 48 hr later. A significant increase (p less than 0.05) in the chromosome aberration frequency was also observed. Our study shows that CMV infection is genotoxic to host cells. The types and extent of damage are dependent on the viral genome expression and on the cell cycle stage of the cells at the time of infection. The possible mechanisms for induction of chromosome damage by CMV are discussed.

  14. Chromosomal aberrations induced by in vitro irradiation: comparisons between human sperm and lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.F.; Gordon, L.A.; Ashworth, L.K.; Carrano, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    Types and frequencies of structural aberrations in human sperm and lymphocyte chromosomes from one donor were compared after in vitro irradiation with 100, 200, and 400 rad in order to determine if cells with dramatically different chromatin configurations are similarly affected and to investigate the feasibility of using lymphocytes as surrogates for germ cells in risk estimation. Sperm chromosomes were analyzed after fusion with eggs from the golden hamster. Total frequencies of induced aberrations were similar in the two cell types. However, the relative frequencies of rejoined lesions (dicentrics), compared with unrejoined lesions (chromosome breaks and acentric fragments), were different. At the three doses tested, a constant ratio of 5 dicentrics in lymphocytes for every dicentric in sperm was induced. Conversely, for every chromosome break or acentric fragment induced in lymphocytes, 1.7 such events were induced in sperm at the three doses tested.

  15. Analysis of Heavy Ion-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblast Cells Using In Situ Hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 0 C for 24 hours after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Unrejoined chromosomal breaks and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. In order to verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and consequently, the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/micron, the highest LET value in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique that allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy dose of the Fe ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges, values for which were higher than those obtained after a 6 Gy gamma exposure. After 0.7 Gy of Fe ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, indicating the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single Fe ion track. 2

  16. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  17. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by D-T neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, D.C.; Edwards, A.A.; Prosser, J.S.; Bolton, D.; Sherwin, A.G.

    1984-06-01

    Unstable chromosome aberrations induced by in vitro irradiation with D-T neutrons have been analyzed in human blood lymphocytes. With respect to 250 kVp X rays a maximum limiting RBE at low doses of 4.1 was obtained for dicentric aberrations. Using aberrations as markers in mixed cultures of irradiated and unirradiated cells permits an assessment of interphase death plus mitotic delay. The low-dose RBE for this effect is 2.5. Assuming all unstable aberrations observed at metaphase would lead to cell death by nondisjunction allows an assessment of mitotic death. The low-dose RBE for this effect is 4.5. The data are compared with similar work obtained earlier with /sup 242/Cm ..cap alpha.. particles. The application of the present work to cytogenetic assessment of dose after accidental exposure to D-T neutrons is discussed.

  18. M-BAND Study of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells: Radiation Quality and Dose Rate Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is its ability to identify both inter- (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra- (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome) chromosome aberrations simultaneously. To study the detailed rearrangement of low- and high-LET radiation induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) in vitro, we performed a series of experiments with Cs-137 gamma rays of both low and high dose rates, neutrons of low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions of high dose rate, with chromosome 3 painted with multi-binding colors. We also compared the chromosome aberrations in both 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures. Results of these experiments revealed the highest chromosome aberration frequencies after low dose rate neutron exposures. However, detailed analysis of the radiation induced inversions revealed that all three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intra-chromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by inter-chromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges. The location of the breaks involved in chromosome exchanges was analyzed along the painted chromosome. The breakpoint distribution was found to be randomly localized on chromosome 3 after neutron or Fe ion exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering breakpoints was observed after -ray exposure. Our comparison of chromosome aberration yields between 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures indicated a significant difference for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures. These experimental results indicated that the track structure of the radiation and the cellular/chromosome structure can both affect radiation-induced chromosome

  19. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  20. Chromosomal Aberrations in Canine Gliomas Define Candidate Genes and Common Pathways in Dogs and Humans.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Peter J; York, Dan; Higgins, Robert J; LeCouteur, Richard A; Joshi, Nikhil; Bannasch, Danika

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous gliomas in dogs occur at a frequency similar to that in humans and may provide a translational model for therapeutic development and comparative biological investigations. Copy number alterations in 38 canine gliomas, including diffuse astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, and mixed oligoastrocytomas, were defined using an Illumina 170K single nucleotide polymorphism array. Highly recurrent alterations were seen in up to 85% of some tumor types, most notably involving chromosomes 13, 22, and 38, and gliomas clustered into 2 major groups consisting of high-grade IV astrocytomas, or oligodendrogliomas and other tumors. Tumor types were characterized by specific broad and focal chromosomal events including focal loss of the INK4A/B locus in glioblastoma and loss of the RB1 gene and amplification of the PDGFRA gene in oligodendrogliomas. Genes associated with the 3 critical pathways in human high-grade gliomas (TP53, RB1, and RTK/RAS/PI3K) were frequently associated with canine aberrations. Analysis of oligodendrogliomas revealed regions of chromosomal losses syntenic to human 1p involving tumor suppressor genes, such as CDKN2C, as well as genes associated with apoptosis, autophagy, and response to chemotherapy and radiation. Analysis of high frequency chromosomal aberrations with respect to human orthologues may provide insight into both novel and common pathways in gliomagenesis and response to therapy.

  1. Chromosomal Aberrations in Canine Gliomas Define Candidate Genes and Common Pathways in Dogs and Humans.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Peter J; York, Dan; Higgins, Robert J; LeCouteur, Richard A; Joshi, Nikhil; Bannasch, Danika

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous gliomas in dogs occur at a frequency similar to that in humans and may provide a translational model for therapeutic development and comparative biological investigations. Copy number alterations in 38 canine gliomas, including diffuse astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, and mixed oligoastrocytomas, were defined using an Illumina 170K single nucleotide polymorphism array. Highly recurrent alterations were seen in up to 85% of some tumor types, most notably involving chromosomes 13, 22, and 38, and gliomas clustered into 2 major groups consisting of high-grade IV astrocytomas, or oligodendrogliomas and other tumors. Tumor types were characterized by specific broad and focal chromosomal events including focal loss of the INK4A/B locus in glioblastoma and loss of the RB1 gene and amplification of the PDGFRA gene in oligodendrogliomas. Genes associated with the 3 critical pathways in human high-grade gliomas (TP53, RB1, and RTK/RAS/PI3K) were frequently associated with canine aberrations. Analysis of oligodendrogliomas revealed regions of chromosomal losses syntenic to human 1p involving tumor suppressor genes, such as CDKN2C, as well as genes associated with apoptosis, autophagy, and response to chemotherapy and radiation. Analysis of high frequency chromosomal aberrations with respect to human orthologues may provide insight into both novel and common pathways in gliomagenesis and response to therapy. PMID:27251041

  2. [Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes at a various duration of cultivation after irradiation].

    PubMed

    Riabchenko, N I; Antoshchina, M M; Nasonova, V A; Fesenko, E V; Gotlib, V Ia

    2004-01-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to 60Co gamma-rays (a dose of 3 Gy) and cultivated during seven days in the presence of PHA and BrdU. It was shown that the metaphases of the first and second mitosises occurred during cultivation of the irradiated and unirradiated lymphocytes, being evidence about of irregularity of the coming into division of various fractions of lymphocytes. The time of cultivation did not influence a rate of aberrations in metaphases of the first and second mitosises of the irradiated lymphocytes. During the first and the subsequent mitosises the number of exchange chromosome aberrations decreased and reached a control level in metaphases of the fourth and fifth mitosises. The number of paired fragments at second and third mitosises increased a little and started to decrease only in metaphases of the fourth and fifth mitosises. The decrease in chromosome aberrations with prolongation of the cultivation of lymphocytes after irradiating is a consequence of elimination of cells with chromosome damages during sequential mitotic divisions.

  3. [Sister chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations as parameters for human risk of cancer development].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, K

    1987-04-01

    Chromosome alterations, which are directly visible changes in the DNA, have close associations to cancer development, non-specific ageing, and heritable genetic status. Human lymphocyte cultures can be used for cytogenetic monitoring of genetic health because many cancers and genetic effects are caused by long-term unhealthy life-styles. We have investigated the sensitivities of lymphocytes from inherited-cancer-prone diseases to the induction of the chromosome alterations by mutagens and carcinogens, and the correlations between the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in peripheral lymphocytes and life-styles or daily ways of living. Lymphocytes from patients with Down syndrome, Fanconi anemia, xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia telangiectasia, and Bloom syndromes showed altered (usually enhanced) susceptibilities to the induction of chromosome aberrations and SCEs by mutagens and carcinogens in our environments. Mean frequencies of baseline SCEs in lymphocytes from normal men with poor life-styles have also been shown to be significantly higher than those in cells from men having good life-styles. The former cells have further been shown to have hyper sensitivities to the induction of SCEs by mitomycin-C' treatment compared to latter cells. Unhealthy life-styles also make the lymphocytes to be more sensitive to ara-C's enhancement of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

  4. mBAND Analysis of Late Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  5. Delayed Numerical Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblasts by Low Dose of Radiation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Kim, Su Young; Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Yang Jee; Ha, Sung Whan; Chung, Hai Won

    2015-12-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability refers to a type of damage transmitted over many generations following irradiation. This delayed impact of radiation exposure may pose a high risk to human health and increases concern over the dose limit of radiation exposure for both the public and radiation workers. Therefore, the development of additional biomarkers is still needed for the detection of delayed responses following low doses of radiation exposure. In this study, we examined the effect of X-irradiation on delayed induction of numerical chromosomal aberrations in normal human fibroblasts irradiated with 20, 50 and 100 cGy of X-rays using the micronucleus-centromere assay. Frequencies of centromere negative- and positive-micronuclei, and aneuploidy of chromosome 1 and 4 were analyzed in the surviving cells at 28, 88 and 240 h after X-irradiation. X-irradiation increased the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in a dose-dependent manner in the cells at all measured time-points, but no significant differences in MN frequency among cell passages were observed. Aneuploid frequency of chromosomes 1 and 4 increased with radiation doses, and a significantly higher frequency of aneuploidy was observed in the surviving cells analyzed at 240 h compared to 28 h. These results indicate that low-dose of X-irradiation can induce delayed aneuploidy of chromosomes 1 and 4 in normal fibroblasts.

  6. Delayed Numerical Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblasts by Low Dose of Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Kim, Su Young; Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Yang Jee; Ha, Sung Whan; Chung, Hai Won

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability refers to a type of damage transmitted over many generations following irradiation. This delayed impact of radiation exposure may pose a high risk to human health and increases concern over the dose limit of radiation exposure for both the public and radiation workers. Therefore, the development of additional biomarkers is still needed for the detection of delayed responses following low doses of radiation exposure. In this study, we examined the effect of X-irradiation on delayed induction of numerical chromosomal aberrations in normal human fibroblasts irradiated with 20, 50 and 100 cGy of X-rays using the micronucleus-centromere assay. Frequencies of centromere negative- and positive-micronuclei, and aneuploidy of chromosome 1 and 4 were analyzed in the surviving cells at 28, 88 and 240 h after X-irradiation. X-irradiation increased the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in a dose-dependent manner in the cells at all measured time-points, but no significant differences in MN frequency among cell passages were observed. Aneuploid frequency of chromosomes 1 and 4 increased with radiation doses, and a significantly higher frequency of aneuploidy was observed in the surviving cells analyzed at 240 h compared to 28 h. These results indicate that low-dose of X-irradiation can induce delayed aneuploidy of chromosomes 1 and 4 in normal fibroblasts. PMID:26633443

  7. Delayed Numerical Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblasts by Low Dose of Radiation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Kim, Su Young; Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Yang Jee; Ha, Sung Whan; Chung, Hai Won

    2015-12-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability refers to a type of damage transmitted over many generations following irradiation. This delayed impact of radiation exposure may pose a high risk to human health and increases concern over the dose limit of radiation exposure for both the public and radiation workers. Therefore, the development of additional biomarkers is still needed for the detection of delayed responses following low doses of radiation exposure. In this study, we examined the effect of X-irradiation on delayed induction of numerical chromosomal aberrations in normal human fibroblasts irradiated with 20, 50 and 100 cGy of X-rays using the micronucleus-centromere assay. Frequencies of centromere negative- and positive-micronuclei, and aneuploidy of chromosome 1 and 4 were analyzed in the surviving cells at 28, 88 and 240 h after X-irradiation. X-irradiation increased the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in a dose-dependent manner in the cells at all measured time-points, but no significant differences in MN frequency among cell passages were observed. Aneuploid frequency of chromosomes 1 and 4 increased with radiation doses, and a significantly higher frequency of aneuploidy was observed in the surviving cells analyzed at 240 h compared to 28 h. These results indicate that low-dose of X-irradiation can induce delayed aneuploidy of chromosomes 1 and 4 in normal fibroblasts. PMID:26633443

  8. Chromosome Aberrations in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry A.; Durante, M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A review of currently available data on in vivo induced chromosome damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts proves that, after protracted exposure of a few months or more to space radiation, cytogenetic biodosimetry analyses of blood collected within a week or two of return from space provides a reliable estimate of equivalent radiation dose and risk. Recent studies indicate that biodosimetry estimates from single spaceflights lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry and biophysical models, but very large uncertainties are associated with single individual measurements and the total sample population remains low. Retrospective doses may be more difficult to estimate because of the fairly rapid time-dependent loss of "stable" aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Also, biodosimetry estimates from individuals who participate in multiple missions, or very long (interplanetary) missions, may be complicated by an adaptive response to space radiation and/or changes in lymphocyte survival and repopulation. A discussion of published data is presented and specific issues related to space radiation biodosimetry protocols are discussed.

  9. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to High and Low LET Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Wilkins, R.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2006-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, high energy neutron at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) or Cs-137-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center. After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The results of the mBAND study showed a higher ratio of inversion involved with interchromosomal exchange in heavy ions compared to -ray irradiation. Analysis of chromosome aberrations using mBAND has the potential to provide useful information on human cell response to space-like radiation.

  10. M-Band Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Induced By Low- and High-Let Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Gersey, B.; Saganti, P. B.; Wilkins, R.; Gonda, S. R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    Energetic primary and secondary particles pose a health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in the induction of various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer. Most of these biological endpoints are closely correlated to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insult. In this study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma rays, 1 GeV/nucleon Fe ions and secondary neutrons whose spectrum is similar to that measured inside the Space Station. Chromosomes were condensed using a premature chromosome condensation technique and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with the multi-color banding (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of both interchromosomal (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Results of the study confirmed the observation of higher incidence of inversions for high-LET irradiation. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Half of the inversions observed in the low-LET irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosome aberrations, but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosome aberrations. In contrast, Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both the inter- and intrachromosome exchanges.

  11. Chromosome aberrations in decondensed sperm DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Factors that could influence the chromosomal aberration frequency observed at first cleavage following in vivo exposure of germ cells to chemical mutagens are discussed. The techniques of chromosome aberration analysis following sperm DNA condensation by in vitro fertilization or fusion seem to be viable research areas for providing information of human germ cell exposures. However, the potential sensitivity of the assay needs to be better understood, and factors that can influence this sensitivity require a great deal of further study using animal models.

  12. Evaluation of Bleomycin-induced chromosome aberrations under simulated microgravity conditions in human lymphocytes using "FISH" techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosesso, P.; Schuber, M.; Seibt, D.; Schatz, A.; Fosci, A.; Fonti, E.; Palitti, F.

    In the present investigation we report the effects of simulated microgravity conditions (clinostat) on the induction of chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes in vitro by ®Bleomycin. Chromosomal aberrations have been analysed by means of fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) and chromosome-specific composite DNA probes (chromosome painting). The results obtained show that, under simulated microgravity conditions, the levels of both symmetrical and asymmetrical (dicentrics, rings), the number of cells bearing "complex" aberrations and hence the total numbers of aberrations were significantly elevated at any of the dose-levels assayed, compared to the parallel treatments performed as 1g control ("ground"). Furthermore, the ratio symmetrical:asymmetrical translocations was markedly elevated under simulated microgravity conditions, compared to the findings usually observed under "normal" 1g conditions. On these bases, we are much inclined to believe that simulated microgravity, rather than limiting the resealing of DNA double strand breaks (DSB's) induced by genotoxic agents is influencing in terms of enhancement the misrejoining of DSB's which is actually responsible for the fixation of the original lesions to DNA into chromosomal aberrations. In addition, the possible different misrepair processes leading to the formation of symmetrical and asymmetrical translocations might be differentially influenced by microgravity being the symmetrical translocations significantly more represented.

  13. Inter- and Intra-Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Exposed in vitro to Space-like Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, F. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes and fibroblasts induced by both low- and high-LET radiation using FISH and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) techniques. In this study, we exposed human cells in vitro to gamma rays and energetic particles of varying types and energies and dose rates, and analyzed chromosomal damages using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. Confluent human epithelial cells and lymphocytes were exposed to energetic heavy ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) or Cs-137 gamma radiation source at the Baylor College (Houston, TX). After colcemid and Calyculin A treatment, cells were fixed and painted with XCyte3 mBAND kit (MetaSystems) and chromosome aberrations were analyzed with mBAND analysis system (MetaSystems). With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). The possible relationship between the frequency of inter- and intra-chromosomal exchanges and the track structure of radiation is discussed. The work was supported by the NASA Space Radiation Health Program.

  14. High- and low-LET Radiation-induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured in 3-dimensional Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2008-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts who participate in extended ISS missions and will be an even greater concern for future manned lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D in vitro cellular environment can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultured at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected in the first cell cycle after irradiation using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference in the

  15. Induction of chromosome aberrations by Fusarium T-2 toxin in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes and Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, C.C.; Gao, Y.; Wu, J.L.; Tzian, B.

    1986-01-01

    T-2 toxin is an important representative of trichothecenes produced by various species of imperfect fungi, mainly Fusarium genus. No definite data demonstrating the carcinogenic potential of T-2 toxin had been reported up to now. The authors demonstrated that T-2 toxin reproducibly induced chromosomal structural aberrations both in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in V/sub 79/ Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The mean percentage of cells with aberration of human lymphocytes from normal individuals induced by T-2 toxin is 49-fold (9.8%) of the mean percentage of corresponding control cultures without T-2 toxin (0.2%). T-2 toxin induced chromosome type (76%) as well as chromatid type (24%) of aberrations; among them, acentric fragment (46%) was the most common type, and chromatid gap, deletion, and chromosome gap were the next most common. T-2 toxin can induce aberrations in cells at different phases of the cell cycle. There are definite dose-effect relationships within a certain range of dosage of T-2 toxin in experiments with both human peripheral blood lymphocytes and V/sub 79/ cells. T-2 toxin exhibited three types of effects on cells, namely, mitogenic at lowest concentration, clastogenic (chromosome aberration) at median concentration, and cytotoxic at higher concentration. The dose-effect curves of these three effects are partly overlapping. Sex or age effect was not observed. The results suggest that T-2 toxin has carcinogenic potentials. The dosage of aflatoxin that can induce chromosomal aberration of human peripheral blood lymphocytes is thousands-fold of the dosage of T-2 toxin as shown in this report.

  16. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  17. Chromosome aberration yields and apoptosis in human lymphocytes irradiated with Fe-ions of differing LET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R.; Nasonova, E.; Ritter, S.

    In the present paper the relationship between cell cycle delays induced by Fe-ions of differing LET and the aberration yield observable in human lymphocytes at mitosis was examined. Cells of the same donor were irradiated with 990 MeV/n Fe-ions (LET = 155 keV/μm), 200 MeV/n Fe-ions (LET = 440 keV/μm) and X-rays and aberrations were measured in first cycle mitoses harvested at different times after 48 84 h in culture and in prematurely condensed G2-cells (PCCs) collected at 48 h using calyculin A. Analysis of the time-course of chromosomal damage in first cycle metaphases revealed that the aberration frequency was similar after X-ray irradiation, but increased two and seven fold after exposure to 990 and 200 MeV/n Fe-ions, respectively. Consequently, RBEs derived from late sampling times were significantly higher than those obtained at early times. The PCC-data suggest that the delayed entry of heavily damaged cells into mitosis results especially from a prolonged arrest in G2. Preliminary data obtained for 4.1 MeV/n Cr-ions (LET = 3160 keV/μm) revealed, that these delays are even more pronounced for low energy Fe-like particles. Additionally, for the different radiation qualities, BrdU-labeling indices and apoptotic indices were determined at several time-points. Only the exposure to low energy Fe-like particles affected the entry of lymphocytes into S-phase and generated a significant apoptotic response indicating that under this particular exposure condition a large proportion of heavily damaged cells is rapidly eliminated from the cell population. The significance of this observation for the estimation of the health risk associated with space radiation remains to be elucidated.

  18. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Dose of High Let Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, K.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (0.01 - 0.20 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28 ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56 ions, including doses where on average less than one direct ion traversal per cell nucleus occurs. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The responses for doses above 0.1 Gy (more than one ion traverses a cell) showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, both Si-28 ions and Fe-56 ions showed a dose independent response above background chromosome aberrations frequencies. Possible explanations for our results are non-targeted effects due to aberrant cell signaling [1], or delta-ray dose fluctuations [2] where a fraction of cells receive significant delta-ray doses due to the contributions of multiple ion tracks that do not directly traverse cell nuclei where chromosome aberrations are scored.

  19. Chromosomal aberrations in cultured human lymphocytes treated with the fungicide, Thiram.

    PubMed

    Santovito, Alfredo; Cervella, Piero; Delpero, Massimiliano

    2012-07-01

    In vitro effects of different concentrations of Thiram were tested on human lymphocytes to determine, by means of the chromosome aberrations (CAs) assay, whether this fungicide could induce clastogenic damage. Evidences of the effect of Thiram on human lymphocytes were limited to sister chromatid exchange, micronuclei formation, and comet assays. We evaluated 0.01, 0.1, 1.2, and 12.0 μg/mL of Thiram, where 0.01 μg/mL represent the acceptable daily intake dose set by the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization for fruit and vegetables, whereas 0.1, 1.2, and 12.0 μg/mL are its multiple values. Results indicated that human lymphocytes treated in vitro with Thiram at concentrations of 1.20 and 12.0 μg/mL significantly increased CAs frequency, compared with the negative control, whereas at lower concentrations (0.01 and 0.1 μg/mL), this effect was not observed. However, Thiram showed a clastogenic effect also at the concentration value of 1.2 μg/mL that represents a lower value with respect to the residue limits found in Italy for grapes, strawberries, potatoes, tobacco, and other fruits and vegetables. Finally, according to some evidence obtained from the study of other fungicides, Thiram produced a significant reduction in the mitotic index with increasing concentration.

  20. Biomarker for Space Radiation Risk: Painting Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Energetic Heavy Ions in Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2007-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future Lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Over the years, we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast, epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world. We have also studied chromosome aberrations in astronaut s peripheral blood lymphocytes before and after space flight. Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell. We will summarize the results of the investigations, and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure.

  1. Chromosome aberrations as bioindicators of environmental genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ibrulj, Slavica; Haverić, Sanin; Haverić, Anja

    2007-11-01

    Due to the exposure to various potentially genotoxic xenobiotics, derived from recent war activities such as NATO air strikes with antitank ammunition containing depleted uranium, we have evaluated chromosome aberrations in 84 peripheral blood samples from three local populations. One population sample included 30 individuals who lived in the Sarajevo area during and after the war (exposed to potential genotoxins), second population was presented with 26 employees of the tank repair facility in Hadzići (target of NATO air strikes), and 28 inhabitants of Posusje (not exposed to war-related activities) were treated as sample of control population. The mean of chromosome aberration frequencies for the population from Hadzići was significantly higher than the frequencies for the two other populations. Point bi-serial coefficient analysis did not reveal any relationship between the frequencies of chromosome aberrations and smoking habits or gender. Results suggest that depleted uranium could be a risk factor for human health.

  2. RBE of thermal neutrons for induction of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, E; Wagner, F M; Canella, L; Romm, H; Schmid, T E

    2013-03-01

    The induction of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with slow neutrons was examined to assess the maximum low-dose RBE (RBE(M)) relative to (60)Co γ-rays. For the blood irradiations, cold neutron beam available at the prompt gamma activation analysis facility at the Munich research reactor FRM II was used. The given flux of cold neutrons can be converted into a thermally equivalent one. Since blood was taken from the same donor whose blood had been used for previous irradiation experiments using widely varying neutron energies, the greatest possible accuracy was available for such an estimation of the RBE(M) avoiding the inter-individual variations or differences in methodology usually associated with inter-laboratory comparisons. The magnitude of the coefficient α of the linear dose-response relationship (α = 0.400 ± 0.018 Gy(-1)) and the derived RBE(M) of 36.4 ± 13.3 obtained for the production of dicentrics by thermal neutrons confirm our earlier observations of a strong decrease in α and RBE(M) with decreasing neutron energy lower than 0.385 MeV (RBE(M) = 94.4 ± 38.9). The magnitude of the presently estimated RBE(M) of thermal neutrons is-with some restrictions-not significantly different to previously reported RBE(M) values of two laboratories.

  3. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by 250 MeV protons: effects of dose, dose rate and shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Willingham, V.; Wu, H.; Gridley, D.; Nelson, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Although the space radiation environment consists predominantly of energetic protons, astronauts inside a spacecraft are chronically exposed to both primary particles as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary neutrons and secondary charged particles can have an LET value that is greater than the primary protons and, therefore, produce a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). Using the accelerator facility at Loma Linda University, we exposed human lymphocytes in vitro to 250 MeV protons with doses ranging from 0 to 60 cGy at three different dose rates: a low dose rate of 7.5 cGy/h, an intermediate dose rate of 30 cGy/h and a high dose rate of 70 cGy/min. The effect of 15 g/cm2 aluminum shielding on the induction of chromosome aberrations was investigated for each dose rate. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated in growth medium containing phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and chromosome spreads were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Aberrations were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with three different colored chromosome-painting probes. The frequency of reciprocal and complex-type chromosome exchanges were compared in shielded and unshielded samples. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dose Response for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts after Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivors with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (1-20 cGy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28- ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving greater than 2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 10 cGy were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. For Si-28- ions no dose response was observed in the 2-10 cGy dose range, suggesting a non-target effect in this range.

  5. Chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes from the plateau region of the Bragg curve for a carbon-ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manti, L.; Durante, M.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Scampoli, P.; Gialanella, G.

    2007-06-01

    Radiotherapy with high-energy carbon ion beams can be more advantageous compared to photons because of better physical dose distribution and higher biological efficiency in tumour cell sterilization. Despite enhanced normal tissue sparing, damage incurred by normal cells at the beam entrance is unavoidable and may affect the progeny of surviving cells in the form of inheritable cytogenetic alterations. Furthermore, the quality of the beam along the Bragg curve is modified by nuclear fragmentation of projectile and target nuclei in the body. We present an experimental approach based on the use of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom that allows the simultaneous exposure to a particle beam of several biological samples positioned at various depths along the beam path. The device was used to measure the biological effectiveness of a 60 MeV/amu carbon-ion beam at inducing chromosomal aberrations in G0-human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Chromosome spreads were obtained from prematurely condensed cells and all structural aberration types were scored in Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH)-painted chromosomes 1 and 2. Our results show a marked increase with depth in the aberration frequency prior to the Bragg peak, which is consistent with a linear energy transfer (LET)-dependent increase in biological effectiveness.

  6. Chromosome aberrations among the Yanomamma Indians.

    PubMed

    Bloom, A D; Neel, J V; Choi, K W; Iida, S; Chagnon, N

    1970-07-01

    The chromosomes of leucocytes cultured from the peripheral blood of 49 primitive Yanomama Indians of Venezuela were studied to determine the types and frequencies of aberrations in a human population not exposed to the same exogenous agents as civilized man. In all but one instance, 100 cells per individual were scored. In 13 cases, we found one or more cells with multiple complex breaks and rearrangements, represented by tetracentric, tricentric, and numerous dicentric chromosomes. From the standpoint of chromosomal damage, these cells are among the most abnormal cells yet described in vivo in man, and were not seen in the controls. There was also a higher than expected frequency of cells with an isolated structural aberration in both Indians and controls. This may be the result of a 24- to 48-hour delay in the initiation of culture. The cause of the more extensive damage to some cells remains to be determined.

  7. Painting analysis of chromosome aberrations induced by energetic heavy ions in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Hada, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future exploration missions High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects including cell inactivation genetic mutations and cancer induction Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults Over the years we have studied chromosomal damage in human fibroblast epithelia and lymphocyte cells exposed in vitro to energetic charged particles generated at several accelerator facilities in the world Various fluorescence in situ hybridization painting techniques have been used to identify from only the telomere region of the chromosome to every chromosome in a human cell We will summarize the results of the investigations and discuss the unique radiation signatures and biomarkers for space radiation exposure

  8. Chromosome aberrations induced by zebularine in triticale.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuhui; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yanzhi; Ma, Jieyun; Wu, Nan; Ni, Shuang; Luo, Tengxiao; Zhuang, Lifang; Chu, Chenggen; Cho, Seong-Woo; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Qi, Zengjun

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome engineering is an important approach for generating wheat germplasm. Efficient development of chromosome aberrations will facilitate the introgression and application of alien genes in wheat. In this study, zebularine, a DNA methylation transferase inhibitor, was successfully used to induce chromosome aberrations in the octoploid triticale cultivar Jinghui#1. Dry seeds were soaked in zebularine solutions (250, 500, and 750 μmol/L) for 24 h, and the 500 μmol/L treatment was tested in three additional treatment times, i.e., 12, 36, and 48 h. All treatments induced aberrations involving wheat and rye chromosomes. Of the 920 cells observed in 67 M1 plants, 340 (37.0%) carried 817 aberrations with an average of 0.89 aberrations per cell (range: 0-12). The aberrations included probable deletions, telosomes and acentric fragments (49.0%), large segmental translocations (28.9%), small segmental translocations (17.1%), intercalary translocations (2.6%), long chromosomes that could carry more than one centromere (2.0%), and ring chromosomes (0.5%). Of 510 M2 plants analyzed, 110 (21.6%) were found to carry stable aberrations. Such aberrations included 79 with varied rye chromosome numbers, 7 with wheat and rye chromosome translocations, 15 with possible rye telosomes/deletions, and 9 with complex aberrations involving variation in rye chromosome number and wheat-rye translocations. These indicated that aberrations induced by zebularine can be steadily transmitted, suggesting that zebularine is a new efficient agent for chromosome manipulation. PMID:27334255

  9. Statistical analysis of the distribution of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes induced by low and high energy heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Lee, Ryonfa; Nasonova, Elena; Ritter, Sylvia; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Kac, M.; Smoluchowski, M.

    Differences in the track structure of high LET (Linear Energy Transfer) particles are clearly visible on chromosomal level, in particular in the number of lesions produced by an ion traversal through a cell nucleus and in the distribution of aberrations among the cells. In the present study we focus on the effects of low energy C-and Cr-ions (<10 MeV/u) in comparison with high energy C-ions (90 MeV/u). For the experiments human lymphocytes were exposed to 9.5 MeV/u C-ions, 4.1 MeV/u Cr-ions or 90 MeV/u C-ions with LET values of 175 keV/µm, 3160 keV/µm and 29 keV/µm, respectively. Chromosome aberrations were measured at several post-irradiation sampling times (48, 60, 72 and 84h) in first cycle metaphases following Giemsa-staining. For 90 MeV/u C-ions, where the track radius is larger than the cell nucleus, the distribution of aberrations did not change significantly with sampling time and has been well described by Poisson statistics. In contrast, for low energy C-ions, where the track radius is smaller than the cell nucleus, distribution of aberration strongly deviates from uni-modal and displays two peaks representative for subpopulations of non-hit and hit cells, respectively. Following this pattern, also damage-dependent cell cycle delay was observed. At 48 h after irradiation a high number of undamaged and probably unhit cells was found to reach mitosis. This number of undamaged cells decreased further with sampling time, while the frequencies of cells carrying aberrations (1-11 per cell) were increasing. All distributions were found to conform a compound Poisson (Neyman-type A) statistics which allows estimating the average number of particle traversals through a cell nucleus and the average number of aberrations induced by one particle traversal. Similar response has also been observed at 48h after Cr-ion exposure. In this case, however, non-aberrant cells have been found to dominate in the population even at later sampling times and a low number of

  10. The Distribution of Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Predicted by a Generalized Time-Dependent Model of Radiation-Induced Formation of Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    New experimental data show how chromosomal aberrations for low- and high-LET radiation are dependent on DSB repair deficiencies in wild-type, AT and NBS cells. We simulated the development of chromosomal aberrations in these cells lines in a stochastic track-structure-dependent model, in which different cells have different kinetics of DSB repair. We updated a previously formulated model of chromosomal aberrations, which was based on a stochastic Monte Carlo approach, to consider the time-dependence of DSB rejoining. The previous version of the model had an assumption that all DSBs would rejoin, and therefore we called it a time-independent model. The chromosomal-aberrations model takes into account the DNA and track structure for low- and high-LET radiations, and provides an explanation and prediction of the statistics of rare and more complex aberrations. We compared the program-simulated kinetics of DSB rejoining to the experimentally-derived bimodal exponential curves of the DSB kinetics. We scored the formation of translocations, dicentrics, acentric and centric rings, deletions, and inversions. The fraction of DSBs participating in aberrations was studied in relation to the rejoining time. Comparisons of simulated dose dependence for simple aberrations to the experimental dose-dependence for HF19, AT and NBS cells will be made.

  11. Chromosome aberrations in workers exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Beckman, G; Beckman, L; Nordenson, I

    1977-08-01

    The occurrence of chromosome aberrations was studied in short-term cultured lymphocytes from nine workers exposed to arsenic at the Rönnskär smeltery in northern Sweden. In the smelter workers, 87 aberrations were found in 819 mitoses. The number of aberrations varied individually from 0 to 25 aberrations per 100 cells. In a control material 13 aberrations were found in 1012 mitoses. The frequency of chromosome aberrations was significantly increased among the smelter workers, but due to the simultaneous exposure to other agents the effect of arsenic per se can not be assessed with certainty.

  12. Chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in cultured human lymphocytes treated with sodium metabisulfite, a food preservative.

    PubMed

    Rencüzogullari, E; Ila, H B; Kayraldiz, A; Topaktaş, M

    2001-02-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of sodium metabisulfite (SMB) which is used as an antimicrobial substance in food, to induce chromosome aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in human lymphocytes. SMB-induced CAs and SCEs at all concentrations (75, 150 and 300 microg/ml) and treatment periods (24 and 48h) dose-dependently. However, SMB decreased the replication index (RI) and the mitotic index (MI) at the concentrations of 150 and 300 microg/ml for 24 and 48h treatment periods. This decrease was dose-dependent as well.

  13. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes after partial-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, L.; Lai-Lei Ting; Po-Ming Wang

    1995-10-01

    Chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from two patients before and after they received one fraction of partial-body irradiation for palliative treatment were analyzed. Blood samples were taken 30 min and 24 h after radiation treatment. The yield of dicentrics obtained from case A 30 min after a partial-body (about 21%) treatment with 8 Gy was 0.066/cell, while the yield obtained 24 h radiation treatment was 0.071/cell. The fraction of irradiated lymphocytes that reached metaphase at 52 h was 0.08 as evaluated by mixing cultures of in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood. The yield of dicentrics for blood from case B 30 min after 6 Gy partial-body (about 24%) irradiation was 0.655/cell, while the yield 24 h after irradiation was 0.605/cell. The fraction of irradiated cells was 0.29. Estimation of doses and irradiated fractions for the two cases using the method proposed by Dolphin and the Qdr method is discussed. Although there was no significant difference between the mean yields of dicentrics per cell obtained 30 min and 24 h after radiation treatment, the data obtained at 24 h seemed more useful for the purpose of dose estimation. When a higher dose (8 Gy) was delivered to a smaller percentage of the body, underestimation of the dose was encountered. 18 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  15. M-BAND Analysis of Chromosome Aberration In Human Epithelial Cells exposed to Gamma-ray and Secondary Neutrons of Low Dose Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's "30L" beam line is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams at an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr or gamma-ray at 1.7cGy/hr, and assessed the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with mBAND. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results for gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate, the neutron data showed a higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. The low dose rate gamma-rays induced a lower frequency of chromosome aberrations than high dose rate gamma-rays, but the inversion spectrum was similar for the same cytotoxic effect. The distribution of damage sites on chromosome 3 for different radiation types will also be discussed.

  16. Chromatin structure and ionizing-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlmann-Diaz, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The possible influence of chromatic structure or activity on chromosomal radiosensitivity was studied. A cell line was isolated which contained some 10[sup 5] copies of an amplified plasmid in a single large mosquito artificial chromosome (MAC). This chromosome was hypersensitive to DNase I. Its radiosensitivity was some three fold greater than normal mosquito chromosomes in the same cell. In cultured human cells irradiated during G[sub 0], the initial breakage frequency in chromosome 4, 19 and the euchromatic and heterochromatic portions of the Y chromosome were measured over a wide range of doses by inducing Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) immediately after irradiation with Cs-137 gamma rays. No evidence was seen that Y heterochromatin or large fragments of it remained unbroken. The only significant deviation from the expected initial breakage frequency per Gy per unit length of chromosome was that observed for the euchromatic portion of the Y chromosome, with breakage nearly twice that expected. The development of aberrations involving X and Y chromosomes at the first mitosis after irradation was also studied. Normal female cells sustained about twice the frequency of aberrations involving X chromosomes for a dose of 7.3 Gy than the corresponding male cells. Fibroblasts from individuals with supernumerary X chromosomes did not show any further increase in X aberrations for this dos. The frequency of aberrations involving the heterochromatic portion of the long arm of the Y chromosome was about what would be expected for a similar length of autosome, but the euchromatic portion of the Y was about 3 times more radiosensitive per unit length. 5-Azacytidine treatment of cultured human female fibroblasts or fibroblasts from a 49,XXXXY individual, reduced the methylation of cytosine residues in DNA, and resulted in an increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in general, but it did not increase the frequency of aberrations involving the X chromosomes.

  17. M-BAND Analysis of Chromosome Aberration Induced by Fe-Ions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured in 3-Dimensional Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2008-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D cellular environment in vitro can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelia cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultued at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference of the chromosome aberration yield between 2D and 3D cell cultures for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures

  18. M-BAND analysis of chromosome aberration induced by Fe-ions in human epithelial cells cultured in 3-dimensional matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts in extended ISS and future lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied lowand high-LET radiationinduced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D cellular environment in vitro can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137 Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultured at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference of the chromosome aberration yield between 2D and 3D cell cultures for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures

  19. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature.

  20. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature. PMID:1962281

  1. Lymphocyte chromosomal aberration assay in radiation biodosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Agrawala, Paban K.; Adhikari, J. S.; Chaudhury, N. K.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiations, whether medical, occupational or accidental, leads to deleterious biological consequences like mortality or carcinogenesis. It is considered that no dose of ionizing radiation exposure is safe. However, once the accurate absorbed dose is estimated, one can be given appropriate medical care and the severe consequences can be minimized. Though several accurate physical dose estimation modalities exist, it is essential to estimate the absorbed dose in biological system taking into account the individual variation in radiation response, so as to plan suitable medical care. Over the last several decades, lots of efforts have been taken to design a rapid and easy biological dosimeter requiring minimum invasive procedures. The metaphase chromosomal aberration assay in human lymphocytes, though is labor intensive and requires skilled individuals, still remains the gold standard for radiation biodosimetry. The current review aims at discussing the human lymphocyte metaphase chromosomal aberration assay and recent developments involving the application of molecular cytogenetic approaches and other technological advancements to make the assay more authentic and simple to use even in the events of mass radiation casualties. PMID:21829315

  2. High-LET radiation-induced aberrations in prematurely condensed G2 chromosomes of human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Gotoh, E.; Durante, M.; Wu, H.; George, K.; Furusawa, Y.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Dicello, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the number of initial chromatid breaks induced by low- or high-LET irradiations, and to compare the kinetics of chromatid break rejoining for radiations of different quality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exponentially growing human fibroblast cells AG1522 were irradiated with gamma-rays, energetic carbon (290MeV/u), silicon (490MeV/u) and iron (200 and 600 MeV/u). Chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin A. Chromatid breaks and exchanges in G2 cells were scored. PCC were collected after several post-irradiation incubation times, ranging from 5 to 600 min. RESULTS: The kinetics of chromatid break rejoining following low- or high-LET irradiation consisted of two exponential components representing a rapid and a slow time constant. Chromatid breaks decreased rapidly during the first 10min after exposure, then continued to decrease at a slower rate. The rejoining kinetics were similar for exposure to each type of radiation. Chromatid exchanges were also formed quickly. Compared to low-LET radiation, isochromatid breaks were produced more frequently and the proportion of unrejoined breaks was higher for high-LET radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with gamma-rays, isochromatid breaks were observed more frequently in high-LET irradiated samples, suggesting that an increase in isochromatid breaks is a signature of high-LET radiation exposure.

  3. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    SciTech Connect

    Su Xiaoming; Takahashi, Akihisa; Guo Guozhen; Mori, Eiichiro; Okamoto, Noritomo; Ohnishi, Ken; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-{mu}mol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 {mu}mol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  4. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the biological effects of heavy nuclei is needed for space radiation protection and for cancer therapy. High-LET radiation produces more complex DNA lesions that may be non-repairable or that may require additional processing steps compared to endogenous DSBs, increasing the possibility of misrepair. Interplay between radiation sensitivity, dose, and radiation quality has not been studied extensively. Previously we studied chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high- LET radiation in several cell lines deficient in ATM (ataxia telangactasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. We found that the yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations were significantly increased in the DSB repair defective cells compared to normal cells. The increased aberrations observed for the ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex aberrations, while the linear dose-response term was significantly higher in NBS cells only for simple exchanges. These results point to the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that function to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. To further understand the sensitivity differences that were observed in ATM and NBS deficient cells, in this study, chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, or Mirin, an MRN complex inhibitor involved in activation of ATM. We are also testing siRNA knockdown of these proteins. Normal and ATM or NBS suppressed cells were irradiated with gamma-rays and chromosomes were collected with a premature chromosome

  5. mBAND analysis of chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells induced by gamma-rays and secondary neutrons of low dose rate.

    PubMed

    Hada, M; Gersey, B; Saganti, P B; Wilkins, R; Cucinotta, F A; Wu, H

    2010-08-14

    Human risks from chronic exposures to both low- and high-LET radiation are of intensive research interest in recent years. In the present study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma-rays at a dose rate of 17 mGy/h or secondary neutrons of 25 mGy/h. The secondary neutrons have a broad energy spectrum that simulates the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude, as well as the environment inside spacecrafts like the Russian MIR station and the International Space Station (ISS). Chromosome aberrations in the exposed cells were analyzed using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 colored bands that allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges including inversions. Comparison of present dose responses between gamma-rays and neutron irradiations for the fraction of cells with damaged chromosome 3 yielded a relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value of 26+/-4 for the secondary neutrons. Our results also revealed that secondary neutrons of low dose rate induced a higher fraction of intrachromosome exchanges than gamma-rays, but the fractions of inversions observed between these two radiation types were indistinguishable. Similar to the previous findings after acute radiation exposures, most of the inversions observed in the present study were accompanied by other aberrations. The fractions of complex type aberrations and of unrejoined chromosomal breakages were also found to be higher in the neutron-exposed cells than after gamma-rays. We further analyzed the location of the breaks involved in chromosome aberrations along chromosome 3, and observed hot spots after gamma-ray, but not neutron, exposures.

  6. mBAND analysis of chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells induced by gamma-rays and secondary neutrons of low dose rate.

    PubMed

    Hada, M; Gersey, B; Saganti, P B; Wilkins, R; Cucinotta, F A; Wu, H

    2010-08-14

    Human risks from chronic exposures to both low- and high-LET radiation are of intensive research interest in recent years. In the present study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma-rays at a dose rate of 17 mGy/h or secondary neutrons of 25 mGy/h. The secondary neutrons have a broad energy spectrum that simulates the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude, as well as the environment inside spacecrafts like the Russian MIR station and the International Space Station (ISS). Chromosome aberrations in the exposed cells were analyzed using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 colored bands that allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges including inversions. Comparison of present dose responses between gamma-rays and neutron irradiations for the fraction of cells with damaged chromosome 3 yielded a relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value of 26+/-4 for the secondary neutrons. Our results also revealed that secondary neutrons of low dose rate induced a higher fraction of intrachromosome exchanges than gamma-rays, but the fractions of inversions observed between these two radiation types were indistinguishable. Similar to the previous findings after acute radiation exposures, most of the inversions observed in the present study were accompanied by other aberrations. The fractions of complex type aberrations and of unrejoined chromosomal breakages were also found to be higher in the neutron-exposed cells than after gamma-rays. We further analyzed the location of the breaks involved in chromosome aberrations along chromosome 3, and observed hot spots after gamma-ray, but not neutron, exposures. PMID:20338263

  7. Distributions of spontaneous chromosomal aberrations and of spontaneous and induced SCE and micronuclei in peripheral lymphocytes from a human population

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.A.; Setlow, R.B.

    1992-12-31

    Biomonitoring of human populations for exposure to genotoxic/clastogenic agents in the environment or the workplace must depend upon statistical tests for elevations in the frequencies of the biological endpoints being monitored, usually chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronuclei (MN), or sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Statistical tests are based, in turn, upon certain assumptions regarding the distribution of the test statistic. When they are often not recognized as such, tests of significance can be in error, and any conclusion drawn that there is or is not a statistically significant difference between one population sample and another maybe erroneous. In population monitoring this means either false negatives or false positives can result and it is hard to know which is worse. Furthermore, even the intelligent design of studies whose object is to test for an elevated level in an exposed population must depend upon prior knowledge of the nature of both spontaneous and induced response; if variance is large enough, a given-sized study might be inconclusive, and an adequate study simply too large-to be practical.

  8. Distributions of spontaneous chromosomal aberrations and of spontaneous and induced SCE and micronuclei in peripheral lymphocytes from a human population

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.A.; Setlow, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    Biomonitoring of human populations for exposure to genotoxic/clastogenic agents in the environment or the workplace must depend upon statistical tests for elevations in the frequencies of the biological endpoints being monitored, usually chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronuclei (MN), or sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Statistical tests are based, in turn, upon certain assumptions regarding the distribution of the test statistic. When they are often not recognized as such, tests of significance can be in error, and any conclusion drawn that there is or is not a statistically significant difference between one population sample and another maybe erroneous. In population monitoring this means either false negatives or false positives can result and it is hard to know which is worse. Furthermore, even the intelligent design of studies whose object is to test for an elevated level in an exposed population must depend upon prior knowledge of the nature of both spontaneous and induced response; if variance is large enough, a given-sized study might be inconclusive, and an adequate study simply too large-to be practical.

  9. Quantitative analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

    PubMed

    Sachs, R K; Levy, D; Hahnfeldt, P; Hlatky, L

    2004-01-01

    We review chromosome aberration modeling and its applications, especially to biodosimetry and to characterizing chromosome geometry. Standard results on aberration formation pathways, randomness, dose-response, proximity effects, transmissibility, kinetics, and relations to other radiobiological endpoints are summarized. We also outline recent work on graph-theoretical descriptions of aberrations, Monte-Carlo computer simulations of aberration spectra, software for quantifying aberration complexity, and systematic links of apparently incomplete with complete or truly incomplete aberrations. PMID:15162028

  10. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  11. Non-Target Effect for Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lymphocytes and Fibroblasts After Exposure to Very Low Doses of High LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between biological effects and low doses of absorbed radiation is still uncertain, especially for high LET radiation exposure. Estimates of risks from low-dose and low-dose-rates are often extrapolated using data from Japanese atomic bomb survivor with either linear or linear quadratic models of fit. In this study, chromosome aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal skin fibroblasts cells after exposure to very low dose (.01 - 0.2 Gy) of 170 MeV/u Si-28-ions or 600 MeV/u Fe-56-ions. Chromosomes were analyzed using the whole chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique during the first cell division after irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). The curves for doses above 0.1 Gy were more than one ion traverses a cell showed linear dose responses. However, for doses less than 0.1 Gy, Si-28-ions showed no dose response, suggesting a non-targeted effect when less than one ion traversal occurs. Additional findings for Fe-56 will be discussed.

  12. Patterns of Chromosomal Aberrations in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Grade, Marian; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Camps, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a defining feature of solid tumors. Such cytogenetic alterations are mainly classified into structural chromosomal aberrations and copy number alterations, giving rise to aneuploid karyotypes. The increasing detection of these genetic changes allowed the description of specific tumor entities and the associated patterns of gene expression. In fact, tumor-specific landscapes of gross genomic copy number changes, including aneuploidies of entire chromosome arms and chromosomes result in a global deregulation of the transcriptome of cancer cells. Furthermore, the molecular characterization of cytogenetic abnormalities has provided insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and has, in a few instances, led to the clinical implementation of effective diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as treatment strategies that target a specific genetic abnormality. PMID:26376875

  13. Patterns of Chromosomal Aberrations in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Grade, Marian; Difilippantonio, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are a defining feature of solid tumors. Such cytogenetic alterations are mainly classified into structural chromosomal aberrations and copy number alterations, giving rise to aneuploid karyotypes. The increasing detection of these genetic changes allowed the description of specific tumor entities and the associated patterns of gene expression. In fact, tumor-specific landscapes of gross genomic copy number changes, including aneuploidies of entire chromosome arms and chromosomes result in a global deregulation of the transcriptome of cancer cells. Furthermore, the molecular characterization of cytogenetic abnormalities has provided insights into the mechanisms of tumorigenesis and has, in a few instances, led to the clinical implementation of effective diagnostic and prognostic tools, as well as treatment strategies that target a specific genetic abnormality. PMID:26376875

  14. M-FISH Analysis of Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblast Cells After In Vitro Exposure to Low- and High-LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis

    2002-01-01

    The recently commercialized multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (m-FISH) technique, which allows human chromosomes to be painted in 24 different colors, was used to analyze chromosome aberrations in diploid human fibroblast cells after in vitro radiation exposure. Confluent flasks of a normal primary fibroblast cell line (AG 1522) were irradiated at high dose rates with either gamma rays or 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions (LET = 440 keV/micron), incubated at 37 C for 24 hours after exposure, and subsequently subcultured. A chemically induced premature chromosome condensation technique was used to collect chromosome samples 32 hours after subculture. Results showed that the fraction of exchanges which were identified as complex, i.e. involving misrejoining of three or more DSB, were higher in the Fe-irradiated samples compared with the gamma-irradiated samples, as has been shown previously using FISH with one or two painted chromosomes . The ratios of complex/simple type exchanges were similar for samples irradiated with 0.7 Gy and 3 Gy of Fe ions, although exchanges involving five or more breaks were found only in 3 Gy irradiated samples. The fraction of incomplete exchanges was also higher in Fe- than gamma-irradiated samples. Data on the distribution of individual chromosome involvement in interchromosomal exchanges will be presented.

  15. Chromosomal aberrations in oral solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Manor, Esther; Bodner, Lipa

    2007-04-15

    The results of cytogenetic analysis of a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the oral cavity in a 43-year-old man is reported. The abnormal cells carried a complex translocation with the karyotype 46,XY [15 cells]/46,XYt(1;17;18)(p13;q11.2;q21)[5 cells]. This is the first case reporting chromosomal aberrations in an oral SFT.

  16. Measurement of chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchange, hprt mutations, and DNA adducts in peripheral lymphocytes of human populations at increased risk for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson-Kram, D. |; Albertini, R.J.; Branda, R.F.

    1993-10-01

    We have measured various indicators of DNA damage in peripheral lymphocytes of human populations potentially at increased risk for cancer. Sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-DNA adducts were evaluated in a group of firefighters; chromosomal aberrations and hprt mutations were evaluated in a group of cancer patients undergoing radioimmunoglobulin therapy (RIT); SCE and acrolein-modified DNA were measured in cancer chemotherapy, patients and in pharmacists preparing chemotherapy prescriptions; and SCE and PAH-DNA adducts are being measured in U.S. army troops stationed in Kuwait. Results indicate that both SCE and PAH-DNA adduct levels were not elevated in firefighters, but that other factors such as smoking status and race were risk factors for increased SCE and PAH-DNA adducts. RIT was found to increase background rates of chromosome-type aberrations and frequencies of hprt mutations and there was a strong correlation between levels of therapy-induced chromosome damage sustained in vivo and in vitro sensitivity to radiation-induced chromosome damage. Peripheral blood lymphocytes of cancer patients treated with cyclophosphamide showed higher levels of SCE and had a higher incidence of acrolein adducts in DNA. Lymphocytes from pharmacists preparing antineoplastic drugs were found to acquire increased in vitro sensitivity to SCE induction by phosphoramide mustard with increased lifetime duration of drug handling. A prospective, longitudinal study was performed to identify environmental factors that modulate genetic damage in breast cancer patients. Women with benign breast masses and no apparent disease served as controls. Mutant frequency, cloning efficiency, and chromosomal aberration frequency did not differ significantly among the three groups. 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Chromosomal aberrations in ISS crew members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Christian; Goedecke, Wolfgang; Antonopoulos, Alexandra

    2012-07-01

    High energy radiation is a major risk factor in manned space missions. Astronauts and cosmonauts are exposed to ionising radiations of cosmic and solar origin, while on the Earth's surface people are well protected by the atmosphere and a deflecting magnetic field. There are now data available describing the dose and the quality of ionising radiation on-board of the International Space Station (ISS). Nonetheless, the effect of increased radiation dose on mutation rates of ISS crew members are hard to predict. Therefore, direct measurements of mutation rates are required in order to better estimate the radiation risk for longer duration missions. The analysis of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a well established method to measure radiation-induced mutations. We present data of chromosome aberration analyses from lymphocyte metaphase spreads of ISS crew members participating in short term (10-14 days) or long term (around 6 months) missions. From each subject we received two blood samples. The first sample was drawn about 10 days before launch and a second one within 3 days after return from flight. From lymphocyte cultures metaphase plates were prepared on glass slides. Giemsa stained and in situ hybridised metaphases were scored for chromosome changes in pre-flight and post-flight blood samples and the mutation rates were compared. Results obtained in chromosomal studies on long-term flight crew members showed pronounced inter-individual differences in the response to elevated radiation levels. Overall slight but significant elevations of typical radiation induced aberrations, i.e., dicentric chromosomes and reciprocal translocations have been observed. Our data indicate no elevation of mutation rates due to short term stays on-board the ISS.

  18. Chromosomal aberrations analysis in a Brazilian population exposed to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, G A; de Syllos Cólus, I M

    2000-01-01

    In spite of being harmful, pesticides are widely used in Brazil. Their genotoxic effects might be studied through population monitoring by means of the analysis of chromosomal aberrations in occupationally exposed individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chromosomal aberration frequencies in temporary cultures of lymphocytes from periferic blood of 23 workers professionally exposed to a mixture of pesticides. The workers were employed by the Agronomic Institute of Parana (Brazil) and used all of the prevention measures provided. A detailed history of pesticide use, as well as personal data, smoking habits, and history of recent illnesses and medical treatment were collected through a standardized questionnaire administered to each subject. Nonexposed subjects, matched for age, sex, and smoking habits, served as the negative control. A total of 100 cells were analyzed from each individual. A significant increase in chromosomal aberration frequencies was observed in exposed individuals when compared to the control group. Some individual characteristics such as age, sex, time of exposure to the pesticides, and smoking habits showed no correlation with chromosomal aberrations. Therefore, the positive results may be considered true effects of pesticides on human somatic cells. PMID:10992273

  19. Nicotine derived genotoxic effects in human primary parotid gland cells as assessed in vitro by comet assay, cytokinesis-block micronucleus test and chromosome aberrations test.

    PubMed

    Ginzkey, Christian; Steussloff, Gudrun; Koehler, Christian; Burghartz, Marc; Scherzed, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert H

    2014-08-01

    Genotoxic effects of nicotine were described in different human cells including salivary gland cells. Based on the high nicotine concentration in saliva of smokers or patients using therapeutic nicotine patches, the current study was performed to evaluate the genotoxic potential of nicotine in human salivary gland cells. Therefore, primary salivary gland cells from 10 patients undergoing parotid gland surgery were exposed to nicotine concentrations between 1 μM and 1000 μM for 1 h in the absence of exogenous metabolic activation. The acinar phenotype was proven by immunofluorescent staining of alpha-amylase. Genotoxic effects were evaluated using the Comet assay, the micronucleus test and the chromosome aberration test. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis were determined by trypan blue exclusion test and Caspase-3 assay. Nicotine was able to induce genotoxic effects in all three assays. The chromosome aberration test was the most sensitive and increases in numerical and structural (chromatid-type and chromosome-type) aberrations were seen at ≥1 μM, whereas increases in micronuclei frequency were detected at 10 μM and DNA damage as measured in the Comet assay was noted at >100 μM. No cytotoxic damage or influence of apoptosis could be demonstrated. Nicotine as a possible risk factor for tumor initiation in salivary glands is still discussed controversially. Our results demonstrated the potential of nicotine to induce genotoxic effects in salivary gland cells. These results were observed at saliva nicotine levels similar to those found after oral or transdermal exposure to nicotine and suggest the necessity of careful monitoring of the use of nicotine in humans. PMID:24698733

  20. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells after Irradiation with Filtered and Unfiltered Beams of 1 Gev/amu Iron Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P.; Williams, A.; Nagasawa, H.; Peng, Y.; Chatterjee, A.; Bedford, J.

    To determine whether shielding materials that might be utilized for radiation protection of astronauts would affect the RBE of HZE particles such as those of concern for deep space missions we irradiated non cycling G0 monolayer cultures of contact inhibited normal human fibroblasts with 1 Gev amu iron ions with and without filtration with various thicknesses of Aluminum Al or polyethylene CH 2 and then measured the frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations dicentrics and excess fragments in the first post-irradiation mitosis Irradiations were carried out at the NRSL facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory For doses ranging up to 4 to 6 Gy the dose response for the total of these aberrations per cell was not significantly affected by beam filtrations up to 5 4 cm Al or up to 11 cm polyethylene relative to the unfiltered beam Neither was the dose response significantly different for unfiltered beams of 300 or 600 Mev amu iron ions relative to the 1 Gev amu iron ions The studies with 1 Gev amu iron ions were repeated four different times over a period of four years in each case with coded samples so the individual scoring aberrations would not know the irradiation conditions employed Comparison of the same effects in parallel experiments using 137 Cs gamma-rays allowed us to estimate that the RBE for aberration induction by these HZE iron ions for these acute high dose-rate exposures was approximately

  1. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  2. Aberrant patterns of X chromosome inactivation in a new line of human embryonic stem cells established in physiological oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Georges, Juliana Andrea; Vergani, Naja; Fonseca, Simone Aparecida Siqueira; Fraga, Ana Maria; de Mello, Joana Carvalho Moreira; Albuquerque, Maria Cecília R Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Pereira, Lygia Veiga

    2014-08-01

    One of the differences between murine and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is the epigenetic state of the X chromosomes in female lines. Murine ESCs (mESCs) present two transcriptionally active Xs that will undergo the dosage compensation process of XCI upon differentiation, whereas most human ESCs (hESCs) spontaneously inactivate one X while keeping their pluripotency. Whether this reflects differences in embryonic development of mice and humans, or distinct culture requirements for the two kinds of pluripotent cells is not known. Recently it has been shown that hESCs established in physiological oxygen levels are in a stable pre-XCI state equivalent to that of mESCs, suggesting that culture in low oxygen concentration is enough to preserve that epigenetic state of the X chromosomes. Here we describe the establishment of two new lines of hESCs under physiological oxygen level and the characterization of the XCI state in the 46,XX line BR-5. We show that a fraction of undifferentiated cells present XIST RNA accumulation and single H3K27me foci, characteristic of the inactive X. Moreover, analysis of allele specific gene expression suggests that pluripotent BR-5 cells present completely skewed XCI. Our data indicate that physiological levels of oxygen are not sufficient for the stabilization of the pre-XCI state in hESCs.

  3. Aberrant patterns of X chromosome inactivation in a new line of human embryonic stem cells established in physiological oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Georges, Juliana Andrea; Vergani, Naja; Fonseca, Simone Aparecida Siqueira; Fraga, Ana Maria; de Mello, Joana Carvalho Moreira; Albuquerque, Maria Cecília R Maciel; Fujihara, Litsuko Shimabukuro; Pereira, Lygia Veiga

    2014-08-01

    One of the differences between murine and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is the epigenetic state of the X chromosomes in female lines. Murine ESCs (mESCs) present two transcriptionally active Xs that will undergo the dosage compensation process of XCI upon differentiation, whereas most human ESCs (hESCs) spontaneously inactivate one X while keeping their pluripotency. Whether this reflects differences in embryonic development of mice and humans, or distinct culture requirements for the two kinds of pluripotent cells is not known. Recently it has been shown that hESCs established in physiological oxygen levels are in a stable pre-XCI state equivalent to that of mESCs, suggesting that culture in low oxygen concentration is enough to preserve that epigenetic state of the X chromosomes. Here we describe the establishment of two new lines of hESCs under physiological oxygen level and the characterization of the XCI state in the 46,XX line BR-5. We show that a fraction of undifferentiated cells present XIST RNA accumulation and single H3K27me foci, characteristic of the inactive X. Moreover, analysis of allele specific gene expression suggests that pluripotent BR-5 cells present completely skewed XCI. Our data indicate that physiological levels of oxygen are not sufficient for the stabilization of the pre-XCI state in hESCs. PMID:24633531

  4. Chromosomal aberrations and aneuploidies of spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Piomboni, Paola; Stendardi, Anita; Gambera, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are relevant causes of human infertility, affecting 2 -14 % of infertile males. Patients with seminal anomalies could be affected by improper meiotic recombination and increased sperm chromosome aneuploidy. Since the transmission of a haploid chromosomal asset is fundamental for embryo vitality and development, the study of sperm chromosomes has become fundamental because intracytoplasmic sperm injection allows fertilization in cases of severe male infertility.In this chapter we summarize the data on the incidence of sperm aneuploidy, detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), in infertile men with normal or abnormal karyotype. The possibility of reducing sperm chromosomal imbalance is also reported.Among control males, the lowest aneuploidy rate was detected (range: 0.09 -0.14 % for autosomes; 0.04 -0.10 % for gonosomes). In infertile patients with normal karyotype, the severity of semen alteration is correlated with the frequency of aneuploidy, particularly for X and Y chromosomes. Among patients with abnormal karyotype, 47,XXY and 47,XYY carriers showed a high variability of sperm aneuploidy both for gonosomes and autosomes. In Robertsonian translocation carriers, the increase in aneuploidy rate was particularly evident for total sex disomy, and resulted mainly from interchromosomal effect (ICE). In reciprocal translocation carriers, a high percentage of unbalanced sperm (approximately 50 %) was detected, perhaps mostly related to ICE.Sperm chromosomal constitution could be analyzed to obtain more accurate information about the causes of male infertility. It would be worthwhile to evaluate the benefits of a therapy with recombinant Follicle Stimulating Hormone (rFSH) on sperm chromosome segregation in selected infertile males.

  5. Human chromosomes: Structure, behavior, and effects

    SciTech Connect

    Therman, E.; Susman, M.

    1993-12-31

    The book `Human Chromosomes: Structure, Behavior, and Effects` covers the most important topics regarding human chromosomes and current research in cytogenetics. Attention is given both to structure and function of autosomes and sex chromosomes, as well as definitions and causes of chromosomal aberrations. This often involves discussion about various aspects of the cell cycle (both mitosis and meiosis). Methods and techniques involved in researching and mapping human chromosomes are also discussed.

  6. Pattern of Chromosomal Aberrations in Patients from North East Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghazaey, Saeedeh; Mirzaei, Farzaneh; Ahadian, Mitra; Keifi, Fatemeh; Semiramis, Tootian; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Chromosomal aberrations are common causes of multiple anomaly syndromes. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations have been identified by conventional cytogenetic methods used widely as one of the most important clinical diagnostic techniques. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the incidences of chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in a six year period from 2005 to 2011 in Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory on patients referred to from Mashhad and other cities in Khorasan province. Karyotyping was performed on 3728 patients suspected of having chromosomal abnormalities. Results: The frequencies of the different types of chromosomal abnormalities were determined, and the relative frequencies were calculated in each group. Among these patients, 83.3% had normal karyotypes with no aberrations. The overall incidences of chromosomal abnormalities were 16.7% including sex and autosomal chromosomal anomalies. Of those, 75.1 % showed autosomal chromosomal aberrations. Down syndrome (DS) was the most prevalent autosomal aberration in the patients (77.1%). Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 was seen in 5% of patients. This inversion was prevalent in patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Sex chromosomal aberrations were observed in 24.9% of abnormal patients of which 61% had Turner’s syndrome and 33.5% had Klinefelter’s syndrome. Conclusion: According to the current study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations in North East of Iran demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic evaluation in patients who show clinical abnormalities. These findings provide a reason for preparing a local cytogenetic data bank to enhance genetic counseling of families who require this service. PMID:24027668

  7. Proton and Fe Ion-Induced Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability, induced by various metabolic, genetic, and environmental factors, is the driving force of tumorigenesis. Radiation exposure from different types of radiation sources induces different types of DNA damages, increases mutation and chromosome aberration rates, and increases cellular transformation in vitro and in vivo experiments. The cell survival rates and frequency of chromosome aberrations depend on the genetic background and radiation sources. To further understand genomic instability induced by charged particles, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblast cells, human mammary epithelial cells, and bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 mice to high energy protons and Fe ions, and collected chromosomes at different generations after exposure. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescent in situ hybridization with whole chromosome specific probes.

  8. Mechanisms of formation of chromosomal aberrations: insights from studies with DNA repair-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Palitti, F

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of formation of chromosomal aberrations, studies performed on human syndromes with genomic instability can be fruitful. In this report, the results from studies in our laboratory on the importance of the transcription-coupled repair (TCR) pathway on the induction of chromosomal damage and apoptosis by ultraviolet light (UV) are discussed. UV61 cells (hamster homologue of human Cockayne's syndrome group B) deficient in TCR showed a dramatic increase in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis following UV treatment. At relatively low UV doses, the induction of chromosomal aberrations preceded the apoptotic process. Chromosomal aberrations probably lead to apoptosis and most of the cells had gone through an S phase after the UV treatment before entering apoptosis. At higher doses of UV, the cells could go into apoptosis already in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Abolition of TCR by treatment with alpha-amanitin (an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II) in the parental cell line AA8 also resulted in the induction of elevated chromosomal damage and apoptotic response similar to the one observed in UV61 cells treated with UV alone. This suggests that the lack of TCR is responsible for the increased frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis in UV61 cells. Hypersensitivity to the induction of chromosomal damage by inhibitors of antitopoisomerases I and II in Werner's syndrome cells is also discussed in relation to the compromised G2 phase processes involving the Werner protein. PMID:15162020

  9. mBAND and mFISH analysis of chromosomal aberrations and breakpoint distribution in chromosome 1 of AG01522 human fibroblasts that were exposed to radiation of different qualities.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, F; De Vitis, M; Nieri, D; Cherubini, R; De Nadal, V; Gerardi, S; Tanzarella, C; Sgura, A; Antoccia, A

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution multicolour banding FISH (mBAND) and multiplex FISH (mFISH) were used to analyse the aberrations of chromosome 1 in irradiated-AG01522 human primary fibroblasts. The cells were exposed to 1Gy of a panel of radiation of different qualities, such as X-rays, low-energy protons (28keV/μm), helium-ions (62keV/μm) and carbon-ions (96 and 252keV/μm). mBAND and mFISH analysis in calyculin-A G2-condensed chromosome spreads allowed us to detect intra- and interchromosome aberrations involving chromosome 1, including simple and complex-type exchanges, inversions (both para- and pericentric ones), deletions and rings. The data indicate that the induction of chromosomal exchanges was influenced by both Linear energy transfer (LET) and particle types. Moreover, the complex-to-simple exchanges ratio (C-ratio) and interchromosome to intrachromosome exchanges ratio (F-ratio) were evaluated by mFISH and mBAND techniques, respectively. Our results indicate that the C-ratio is a more reliable marker of radiation quality, with values that increased linearly in an LET-dependent manner. In addition, by means of mBAND analysis, the distribution of radiation-induced breakpoints along chromosome 1 was analyzed and compared with the expected distributions of the breaks. The expected values were calculated assuming a random distribution of the breakpoints. The data indicate that, irrespective of the radiation that was used, the breakpoints were non-randomly distributed along chromosome 1. In particular, breaks in the pericentromeric region were encountered at a higher frequency than expected. A deeper analysis revealed that breaks were not located in the constitutive heterochromatin (G-bands 1p11/1q11 and 1q12), but rather in a region comprised between 1p11.2 and 1p22.1, which includes G-light and G-dark bands. PMID:26520373

  10. Frequency of sister chromatid exchange and chromosomal aberrations in asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed

    Fatma, N; Jain, A K; Rahman, Q

    1991-02-01

    Exposure to asbestos minerals has been associated with a wide variety of adverse health effects including lung cancer, pleural mesothelioma, and cancer of other organs. It was shown previously that asbestos samples collected from a local asbestos factory enhanced sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosomal aberrations in vitro using human lymphocytes. In the present study, 22 workers from the same factory and 12 controls were further investigated. Controls were matched for age, sex, and socioeconomic state. The peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 48 hours for studies of chromosomal aberrations and at 72 hours for SCE frequency determinations. Asbestos workers had a raised mean SCE rate and increased numbers of chromosomal aberrations compared with a control population. Most of the chromosomal aberrations were chromatid gap and break types.

  11. Metaphase chromosome aberrations as markers of radiation exposure and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.L.; Khan, M.A.; Jostes, R.F.; Cross, F.T.

    1992-10-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency provides the most reliable biological marker of dose for detecting acute accidental radiation exposure. Significant radiation-induced changes in the frequency of chromosome aberrations can be detected at very low doses. Our paper provides information on using molecular chromosome probes ``paints`` to score chromosome damage and illustrates how technical advances make it possible to understand mechanisms involved during formation of chromosome aberrations. In animal studies chromosome aberrations provide a method to relate cellular damage to cellular dose. Using an In vivo/In vitro approach aberrations provided a biological marker of dose from radon progeny exposure which was used to convert WLM to dose in rat tracheal epithelial cells. Injection of Chinese hamsters with {sup 144}Ce which produced a low dose rate exposure of bone marrow to either low-LET radiation increased the sensitivity of the cells to subsequent external exposure to {sup 60}Co. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of chromosome damage as a biological marker of dose and cellular responsiveness.

  12. Metaphase chromosome aberrations as markers of radiation exposure and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, A.L.; Khan, M.A.; Jostes, R.F.; Cross, F.T.

    1992-10-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency provides the most reliable biological marker of dose for detecting acute accidental radiation exposure. Significant radiation-induced changes in the frequency of chromosome aberrations can be detected at very low doses. Our paper provides information on using molecular chromosome probes paints'' to score chromosome damage and illustrates how technical advances make it possible to understand mechanisms involved during formation of chromosome aberrations. In animal studies chromosome aberrations provide a method to relate cellular damage to cellular dose. Using an In vivo/In vitro approach aberrations provided a biological marker of dose from radon progeny exposure which was used to convert WLM to dose in rat tracheal epithelial cells. Injection of Chinese hamsters with [sup 144]Ce which produced a low dose rate exposure of bone marrow to either low-LET radiation increased the sensitivity of the cells to subsequent external exposure to [sup 60]Co. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of chromosome damage as a biological marker of dose and cellular responsiveness.

  13. Chromatin Folding, Fragile Sites, and Chromosome Aberrations Induced by Low- and High- LET Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Cox, Bradley; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J.; Wu, Honglu

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated non-random distributions of breaks involved in chromosome aberrations induced by low- and high-LET radiation. To investigate the factors contributing to the break point distribution in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations, human epithelial cells were fixed in G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome in separate colors. After the images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multimega base pair scale. Specific locations of the chromosome, in interphase, were also analyzed with bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) probes. Both mBAND and BAC studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested association of interphase chromatin folding to the radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. We further investigated the distribution of genes, as well as the distribution of breaks found in tumor cells. Comparisons of these distributions to the radiation hotspots showed that some of the radiation hotspots coincide with the frequent breaks found in solid tumors and with the fragile sites for other environmental toxins. Our results suggest that multiple factors, including the chromatin structure and the gene distribution, can contribute to radiation-induced chromosome aberrations.

  14. The human brain and face: mechanisms of cranial, neurological and facial development revealed through malformations of holoprosencephaly, cyclopia and aberrations in chromosome 18.

    PubMed

    Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Gboluaje, Temitayo; Reid, Shaina N; Lin, Stephen; Wang, Paul; Green, William; Diogo, Rui; Fidélia-Lambert, Marie N; Herman, Mary M

    2015-09-01

    The study of inborn genetic errors can lend insight into mechanisms of normal human development and congenital malformations. Here, we present the first detailed comparison of cranial and neuro pathology in two exceedingly rare human individuals with cyclopia and alobar holoprosencephaly (HPE) in the presence and absence of aberrant chromosome 18 (aCh18). The aCh18 fetus contained one normal Ch18 and one with a pseudo-isodicentric duplication of chromosome 18q and partial deletion of 18p from 18p11.31 where the HPE gene, TGIF, resides, to the p terminus. In addition to synophthalmia, the aCh18 cyclopic malformations included a failure of induction of most of the telencephalon - closely approximating anencephaly, unchecked development of brain stem structures, near absence of the sphenoid bone and a malformed neurocranium and viscerocranium that constitute the median face. Although there was complete erasure of the olfactory and superior nasal structures, rudiments of nasal structures derived from the maxillary bone were evident, but with absent pharyngeal structures. The second non-aCh18 cyclopic fetus was initially classified as a true Cyclops, as it appeared to have a proboscis and one median eye with a single iris, but further analysis revealed two eye globes as expected for synophthalmic cyclopia. Furthermore, the proboscis was associated with the medial ethmoid ridge, consistent with an incomplete induction of these nasal structures, even as the nasal septum and paranasal sinuses were apparently developed. An important conclusion of this study is that it is the brain that predicts the overall configuration of the face, due to its influence on the development of surrounding skeletal structures. The present data using a combination of macroscopic, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide an unparalleled analysis on the extent of the effects of median defects, and insight into normal development and patterning of the brain

  15. The human brain and face: mechanisms of cranial, neurological and facial development revealed through malformations of holoprosencephaly, cyclopia and aberrations in chromosome 18

    PubMed Central

    Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C.; Gboluaje, Temitayo; Reid, Shaina N.; Lin, Stephen; Wang, Paul; Green, William; Diogo, Rui; Fidélia-Lambert, Marie N.; Herman, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    The study of inborn genetic errors can lend insight into mechanisms of normal human development and congenital malformations. Here, we present the first detailed comparison of cranial and neuro pathology in two exceedingly rare human individuals with cyclopia and alobar holoprosencephaly (HPE) in the presence and absence of aberrant chromosome 18 (aCh18). The aCh18 fetus contained one normal Ch18 and one with a pseudo-isodicentric duplication of chromosome 18q and partial deletion of 18p from 18p11.31 where the HPE gene, TGIF, resides, to the p terminus. In addition to synophthalmia, the aCh18 cyclopic malformations included a failure of induction of most of the telencephalon – closely approximating anencephaly, unchecked development of brain stem structures, near absence of the sphenoid bone and a malformed neurocranium and viscerocranium that constitute the median face. Although there was complete erasure of the olfactory and superior nasal structures, rudiments of nasal structures derived from the maxillary bone were evident, but with absent pharyngeal structures. The second non-aCh18 cyclopic fetus was initially classified as a true Cyclops, as it appeared to have a proboscis and one median eye with a single iris, but further analysis revealed two eye globes as expected for synophthalmic cyclopia. Furthermore, the proboscis was associated with the medial ethmoid ridge, consistent with an incomplete induction of these nasal structures, even as the nasal septum and paranasal sinuses were apparently developed. An important conclusion of this study is that it is the brain that predicts the overall configuration of the face, due to its influence on the development of surrounding skeletal structures. The present data using a combination of macroscopic, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide an unparalleled analysis on the extent of the effects of median defects, and insight into normal development and patterning of the

  16. Chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of train engine drivers.

    PubMed

    Nordenson, I; Mild, K H; Järventaus, H; Hirvonen, A; Sandström, M; Wilén, J; Blix, N; Norppa, H

    2001-07-01

    Studies of Swedish railway employees have indicated that railroad engine drivers have an increased cancer morbidity and incidence of chronic lymphatic leukemia. The drivers are exposed to relatively high magnetic fields (MF), ranging from a few to over a hundred microT. Although the possible genotoxic potential of MF is unclear, some earlier studies have indicated that occupational exposure to MF may increase chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Since an increased level of chromosomal aberrations has been suggested to predict elevated cancer risk, we performed a cytogenetic analysis on cultured (48 h) peripheral lymphocytes of Swedish train engine drivers. A pilot study of 18 engine drivers indicated a significant difference in the frequency of cells with chromosomal aberrations (gaps included or excluded) in comparison with seven concurrent referents (train dispatchers) and a control group of 16 office workers. The engine drivers had about four times higher frequency of cells with chromosome-type aberrations (excluding gaps) than the office workers (P < 0.01) and the dispatchers (P < 0.05). Seventy-eight percent of the engine drivers showed at least one cell per 100 with chromosome-type aberrations compared with 29% among the dispatchers and 31% among the office workers. In a follow-up study, another 30 engine drivers showed an increase (P < 0.05) in the frequency of cells with chromosome-type aberrations (gaps excluded) as compared with 30 referent policemen. Sixty percent of the engine drivers had one or more cells (per 100 cells) with chromosome-type aberrations compared with 30% among the policemen. In conclusion, the results of the two studies support the hypothesis that exposure to MF at mean intensities of 2-15 microT can induce chromosomal damage.

  17. Using graph theory to describe and model chromosome aberrations.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Rainer K; Arsuaga, Javier; Vázquez, Mariel; Hlatky, Lynn; Hahnfeldt, Philip

    2002-11-01

    A comprehensive description of chromosome aberrations is introduced that is suitable for all cytogenetic protocols (e.g. solid staining, banding, FISH, mFISH, SKY, bar coding) and for mathematical analyses. "Aberration multigraphs" systematically characterize and interrelate three basic aberration elements: (1) the initial configuration of chromosome breaks; (2) the exchange process, whose cycle structure helps to describe aberration complexity; and (3) the final configuration of rearranged chromosomes, which determines the observed pattern but may contain cryptic misrejoinings in addition. New aberration classification methods and a far-reaching generalization of mPAINT descriptors, applicable to any protocol, emerge. The difficult problem of trying to infer actual exchange processes from cytogenetically observed final patterns is analyzed using computer algorithms, adaptations of known theorems on cubic graphs, and some new graph-theoretical constructs. Results include the following: (1) For a painting protocol, unambiguously inferring the occurrence of a high-order cycle requires a corresponding number of different colors; (2) cycle structure can be computed by a simple trick directly from mPAINT descriptors if the initial configuration has no more than one break per homologue pair; and (3) higher-order cycles are more frequent than the obligate cycle structure specifies. Aberration multigraphs are a powerful new way to describe, classify and quantitatively analyze radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. They pinpoint (but do not eliminate) the problem that, with present cytogenetic techniques, one observed pattern corresponds to many possible initial configurations and exchange processes. PMID:12385633

  18. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  19. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  20. Frequency of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Types of Cells After Proton and Fe Ion Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Bowler, Deborah

    2016-07-01

    DNA damages induced by space radiation, consisting of protons and high-LET charged particles, can be complex in nature, which are often left unrepaired and cause chromosomal aberrations. Increased level of genomic instability is attributed to tumorigenesis and increased cancer risks. To investigate genomic instability induced by charged particles, human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblasts, and human mammary epithelial cells, as well as mouse bone marrow stem cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 strains were exposed to high energy protons and Fe ions. Metaphase chromosome spreads at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and, chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole chromosome-specific probes for human cells. With proton irradiation, levels of chromosome aberrations decreased by about 50% in both lymphocytes and epithelial cells after multiple cell divisions, compared to initial chromosome aberrations at 48 hours post irradiation in both cell types. With Fe ion irradiation, however, the frequency of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes after multiple cell divisions was significantly lower than that in epithelial cells at comparable cell divisions, while their initial chromosome aberrations were at similar levels. Similar to the human cells, after Fe ion irradiation, the frequency of late chromosome aberrations was similar to that of the early damages for radio-sensitive CBA cells, but different for radio-resistant C57 cells. Our results suggest that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values are dependent not only on radiation sources, but also on cell types and cell divisions.

  1. Frequency of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Types of Cells After Proton and Fe Ion Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    DNA damages induced by space radiation, consisting of protons and high-LET charged particles, can be complex in nature, which are often left unrepaired and cause chromosomal aberrations. Increased level of genomic instability is attributed to tumorigenesis and increased cancer risks. To investigate genomic instability induced by charged particles, human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblasts, and human mammary epithelial cells, as well as mouse bone marrow stem cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 strains were exposed to high energy protons and Fe ions. Metaphase chromosome spreads at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and, chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole chromosome-specific probes for human cells. With proton irradiation, levels of chromosome aberrations decreased by about 50% in both lymphocytes and epithelial cells after multiple cell divisions, compared to initial chromosome aberrations at 48 hours post irradiation in both cell types. With Fe ion irradiation, however, the frequency of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes after multiple cell divisions was significantly lower than that in epithelial cells at comparable cell divisions, while their initial chromosome aberrations were at similar levels. Similar to the human cells, after Fe ion irradiation, the frequency of late chromosome aberrations was similar to that of the early damages for radio-sensitive CBA cells, but different for radio-resistant C57 cells. Our results suggest that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values are dependent not only on radiation sources, but also on cell types and cell divisions.

  2. Determination of chromosome aberrations in workers in a petroleum refining factory.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang Jee; Cho, Yoon Hee; Paek, Domyung; Chung, Hai Won

    2004-12-01

    Human exposure to benzene is derived occupationally from the petrochemical and petroleum refining industries. This study was performed to determine whether the frequencies of chromosome aberrations in workers exposed to low levels of benzene in a petroleum refining factory were elevated compared to an unexposed control group. The study population was comprised of 178 exposed workers and 36 unexposed workers. The frequencies of chromatid deletions and total chromosome aberrations in workers exposed to benzene were significantly higher compared to the unexposed control group. The frequency of total chromosome aberration was 4.20 per 500 metaphase cells in the exposed workers, whereas the frequency was 2.24 per 500 metaphase cells in the unexposed control group. The frequencies of total chromosome aberrations were significantly associated with benzene concentration after adjusting for confounding variables such as age, smoking status, and alcohol intake. The frequencies of chromosome aberrations were significantly increased in workers with low white blood cell counts (below 4000 cells/mm3) compared to those with high white blood cell counts (above 4000 cells/mm3). A reduced white blood cell count (below 4000/mm3) is suggestive of chronic exposure to benzene. In conclusion chronic benzene exposure and preclinical signs, such as reduced white blood cell counts, may be monitored by chromosome aberrations analysis.

  3. Genotoxic effects of a particular mixture of acetamiprid and alpha-cypermethrin on chromosome aberration, sister chromatid exchange, and micronucleus formation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kocaman, Ayşe Yavuz; Topaktaş, Mehmet

    2010-04-01

    The genotoxic effects of a particular mixture of acetamiprid (Acm, neonicotinoid insecticide) and alpha-cypermethrin (alpha-cyp, pyrethroid insecticide) on human peripheral lymphocytes were examined in vitro by chromosomal aberrations (CAs), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and micronucleus (MN) tests. The human peripheral lymphocytes were treated with 12.5 + 2.5, 15 + 5, 17.5 + 7.5, and 20 + 10 microg/mL of Acm+alpha-cyp, respectively, for 24 and 48 h. The mixture of Acm+alpha-cyp induced the CAs and SCEs at all concentrations and treatment times when compared with both the control and solvent control and these increases were concentration-dependent in both treatment times. MN formation was significantly induced at 12.5 + 2.5, 15 + 5, 17.5 + 7.5, microg/mL of Acm+alpha-cyp when compared with both controls although these increases were not concentration-dependent. Binuclear cells could not be detected sufficiently in the highest concentration of the mixture (20 + 10 microg/mL) for both the 24- and 48-h treatment times. Mitotic index (MI), proliferation index (PI) and nuclear division index (NDI) significantly decreased because of the cytotoxic and cytostatic effects of the mixture, at all concentrations for two treatment periods. Significant decreases in MI and PI were concentration dependent at both treatment times. The decrease in NDI was also concentration-dependent at 48-h treatment period. In general, Acm+alpha-cyp inhibited nuclear division more than positive control, mitomycin C (MMC) and showed a higher cytostatic effect than MMC. Furthermore, in this article, the results of combined effects of Acm+alpha-cyp were compared with the results of single effects of Acm or alpha-cyp (Kocaman and Topaktas,2007,2009, respectively). In conclusion, the particular mixture of Acm+alpha-cyp synergistically induced the genotoxicity/cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  4. Chromosome therapy. Correction of large chromosomal aberrations by inducing ring chromosomes in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Bershteyn, Marina; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of the short (p) and long (q) arms of a chromosome is referred to as a "ring chromosome." Ring chromosome disorders occur in approximately 1 in 50,000-100,000 patients. Ring chromosomes can result in birth defects, mental disabilities, and growth retardation if additional genes are deleted during the formation of the ring. Due to the severity of these large-scale aberrations affecting multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have so far been proposed. Our recent study (Bershteyn et al.) using patient-derived fibroblast lines containing ring chromosomes, found that cellular reprogramming of these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resulted in the cell-autonomous correction of the ring chromosomal aberration via compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD). These observations have important implications for studying the mechanism of chromosomal number control and may lead to the development of effective therapies for other, more common, chromosomal aberrations.

  5. Chromosome therapy. Correction of large chromosomal aberrations by inducing ring chromosomes in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Bershteyn, Marina; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of the short (p) and long (q) arms of a chromosome is referred to as a "ring chromosome." Ring chromosome disorders occur in approximately 1 in 50,000-100,000 patients. Ring chromosomes can result in birth defects, mental disabilities, and growth retardation if additional genes are deleted during the formation of the ring. Due to the severity of these large-scale aberrations affecting multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have so far been proposed. Our recent study (Bershteyn et al.) using patient-derived fibroblast lines containing ring chromosomes, found that cellular reprogramming of these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resulted in the cell-autonomous correction of the ring chromosomal aberration via compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD). These observations have important implications for studying the mechanism of chromosomal number control and may lead to the development of effective therapies for other, more common, chromosomal aberrations. PMID:25482192

  6. Increased chromosome aberration frequencies in the Bowen's patients compared to non-cancerous skin lesions individuals exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pritha; Banerjee, Mayukh; De Chaudhuri, Sujata; Das, Jayanta K; Sarma, Nilendu; Basu, Arindam; Giri, Ashok K

    2007-08-15

    Cytogenetic biomarkers are essential for assessing environmental exposure that can predict adverse human health effects such as cellular damage. Chromosomal aberrations are the most important cytogenetic end-points successfully used for the cancer risk assessment of populations occupationally or environmentally exposed to different toxic chemicals. Previous reports suggest that, increased frequency of chromosomal aberration (CA), in peripheral blood lymphocytes, is a predictor of cancer. Arsenic is a paradoxical human carcinogen, clastogen and aneugen. Despite of exposure at similar extent, only 15-20% of individuals show arsenic induced skin lesions including Bowen's disease (BD). Previously we have reported the significant increase in CA in the individuals with arsenic induced skin lesions when compared to individuals without any skin lesions, drinking arsenic contaminated water at similar extent. Presently, a matched case-control study was performed to examine whether biomarkers such as chromosomal aberrations can predict the development of arsenic induced Bowen's (in situ carcinoma) diseases. Chromosomal aberrations (both chromosome and chromatid types) and mitotic index were analyzed from the lymphocytes of 25 cases of Bowen's patient which was compared to matched control from the individuals with arsenic induced non-cancerous skin lesions such as raindrop pigmentation, keratosis of palm and sole, hypo and hyper pigmentation. Chromosomal aberrations/cell, chromosome type aberrations and total percentage of aberrant cells were significantly higher in cases compared to control (p<0.01). These results suggest that chromosomal aberrations can be used for cancer risk assessment of the population exposed to arsenic through drinking water.

  7. Chromosome aberrations as biomarkers of radiation exposure: Modelling basic mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Ottolenghi, A.

    The space radiation environment is a mixed field consisting of different particles having different energies, including high charge and energy (HZE) ions. Conventional measurements of absorbed doses may not be sufficient to completely characterise the radiation field and perform reliable estimates of health risks. Biological dosimetry, based on the observation of specific radiation-induced endpoints (typically chromosome aberrations), can be a helpful approach in case of monitored exposure to space radiation or other mixed fields, as well as in case of accidental exposure. Furthermore, various ratios of aberrations (e.g. dicentric chromosomes to centric rings and complex exchanges to simple exchanges) have been suggested as possible fingerprints of radiation quality, although all of them have been subjected to some criticisms. In this context a mechanistic model and a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of chromosome aberration induction were developed. The model, able to provide dose-responses for different aberrations (e.g. dicentrics, rings, fragments, translocations, insertions and other complex exchanges), was further developed to assess the dependence of various ratios of aberrations on radiation quality. The predictions of the model were compared with available data, whose experimental conditions were faithfully reproduced. Particular attention was devoted to the scoring criteria adopted in different laboratories and to possible biases introduced by interphase death and mitotic delay. This latter aspect was investigated by taking into account both metaphase data and data obtained with Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC).

  8. Risk estimation based on chromosomal aberrations induced by radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Bonassi, S.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a causal association between the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes and the risk of cancer has been substantiated recently by epidemiological studies. Cytogenetic analyses of crew members of the Mir Space Station have shown that a significant increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations can be detected after flight, and that such an increase is likely to be attributed to the radiation exposure. The risk of cancer can be estimated directly from the yields of chromosomal aberrations, taking into account some aspects of individual susceptibility and other factors unrelated to radiation. However, the use of an appropriate technique for the collection and analysis of chromosomes and the choice of the structural aberrations to be measured are crucial in providing sound results. Based on the fraction of aberrant lymphocytes detected before and after flight, the relative risk after a long-term Mir mission is estimated to be about 1.2-1.3. The new technique of mFISH can provide useful insights into the quantification of risk on an individual basis.

  9. Chromosome aberrations as biomarkers of radiation exposure: modelling basic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, F; Ottolenghi, A

    2003-01-01

    The space radiation environment is a mixed field consisting of different particles having different energies, including high charge and energy (HZE) ions. Conventional measurements of absorbed doses may not be sufficient to completely characterise the radiation field and perform reliable estimates of health risks. Biological dosimetry, based on the observation of specific radiation-induced endpoints (typically chromosome aberrations), can be a helpful approach in case of monitored exposure to space radiation or other mixed fields, as well as in case of accidental exposure. Furthermore, various ratios of aberrations (e.g. dicentric chromosomes to centric rings and complex exchanges to simple exchanges) have been suggested as possible fingerprints of radiation quality, although all of them have been subjected to some criticisms. In this context a mechanistic model and a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of chromosome aberration induction were developed. The model, able to provide dose-responses for different aberrations (e.g. dicentrics, rings, fragments, translocations, insertions and other complex exchanges), was further developed to assess the dependence of various ratios of aberrations on radiation quality. The predictions of the model were compared with available data, whose experimental conditions were faithfully reproduced. Particular attention was devoted to the scoring criteria adopted in different laboratories and to possible biases introduced by interphase death and mitotic delay. This latter aspect was investigated by taking into account both metaphase data and data obtained with Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC). PMID:12971411

  10. Increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations in railroad car painters.

    PubMed

    Piña-Calva, A; Madrigal-Bujaidar, E; Fuentes, M V; Neria, P; Pérez-Lucio, C; Vélez-Zamora, N M

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to paints and solvents contributes to chromosomal alterations in occupationally exposed individuals. A total of 25 male railroad and underground railroad car painters were studied. This group had a mean age of 32.7 y and a mean exposure time of 5.2 y. The results were compared with those obtained for 25 healthy (unexposed) males. The scoring of structural chromosome aberrations clearly revealed an increase in the number of all types of aberrations considered in the population of painters. This suggests that exposure to a combination of chemicals may increase genotoxicity in industrial workers. PMID:1772257

  11. Chromosome aberrations in plants as a monitoring system.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, W F

    1978-01-01

    The potential of higher plants as a first-tier assay system for detecting chemical mutagens is evaluated. The use of plant tissue (primarily root tips and pollen mother cells) for studying the induction of chromosomal aberrations is one of the oldest, simplest, most reliable, and inexpensive methods available. Specific types of abnormalities have been induced by different classes of pesticides. Chromosome clumping, contraction, stickiness, paling, fragmentation, dissolution, chromosome and chromatid bridges, C-mitosis, and endoploidy have been reported in the literature. Examples of cytogenetic studies with pesticides demonstrating the usefulness of higher plants as a monitoring system are reviewed. Pesticides which cause chromosome aberrations in plant cells also produce chromosome aberrations in cultured animal cells. Frequently, the aberrations are identical. For example, studies have shown that compounds which have a C-mitotic effect on plant cells have the same effect on animal cells. It is recommended that plant systems be accepted as a first-tier assay system for the detection of possible genetic damage by environmental chemicals. PMID:367773

  12. Modeling cell response to low doses of photon irradiation: Part 2--application to radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Micaela; Testa, Etienne; Komova, Olga V; Nasonova, Elena A; Mel'nikova, Larisa A; Shmakova, Nina L; Beuve, Michaël

    2016-03-01

    The biological phenomena observed at low doses of ionizing radiation (adaptive response, bystander effects, genomic instability, etc.) are still not well understood. While at high irradiation doses, cellular death may be directly linked to DNA damage, at low doses, other cellular structures may be involved in what are known as non-(DNA)-targeted effects. Mitochondria, in particular, may play a crucial role through their participation in a signaling network involving oxygen/nitrogen radical species. According to the size of the implicated organelles, the fluctuations in the energy deposited into these target structures may impact considerably the response of cells to low doses of ionizing irradiation. Based on a recent simulation of these fluctuations, a theoretical framework was established to have further insight into cell responses to low doses of photon irradiation, namely the triggering of radioresistance mechanisms by energy deposition into specific targets. Three versions of a model are considered depending on the target size and on the number of targets that need to be activated by energy deposition to trigger radioresistance mechanisms. These model versions are applied to the fraction of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations measured at low doses in human carcinoma cells (CAL51). For this cell line, it was found in the present study that the mechanisms of radioresistance could not be triggered by the activation of a single small target (nanometric size, 100 nm), but could instead be triggered by the activation of a large target (micrometric, 10 μm) or by the activation of a great number of small targets. The mitochondria network, viewed either as a large target or as a set of small units, might be concerned by these low-dose effects. PMID:26708100

  13. Chromosome aberrations induced by dual exposure of protons and iron ions.

    PubMed

    Hada, M; Meador, J A; Cucinotta, F A; Gonda, S R; Wu, H

    2007-06-01

    During space travel, astronauts will be exposed to protons and heavy charged particles. Since the proton flux is high compared to HZE particles, on average, it is assumed that a cell will be hit by a proton before it is hit by an HZE ion. Although the effects of individual ion species on human cells have been investigated extensively, little is known about the effects of exposure to mixed beam irradiation. To address this, we exposed human epithelial cells to protons followed by HZE particles and analyzed chromosomal damage using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) procedure. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome) as well as inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes). Our results indicated that chromosome aberration frequencies from exposures to protons followed by Fe ions did not simply decrease as the interval between the two exposures increased, but peak when the interval was 30 min.

  14. RBE of Energetic Iron Ions for the Induction of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Hada, Megumi; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Numerous published studies have reported the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) values for chromosome aberrations induced by charged particles of different LET. The RBE for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo has been suggested to show a similar relationship as the quality factor for cancer induction. Therefore, increased chromosome aberrations in the astronauts' white blood cells post long-duration missions are used to determine the biological doses from exposures to space radiation. However, the RBE value is known to be very different for different types of cancer. Previously, we reported that, even though the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions, the RBE was significantly reduced after multiple cell divisions post irradiation. To test the hypothesis that RBE values for chromosome aberrations are cell type dependent, and different between early and late damages, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, and human mammary epithelial cells in vitro to various charged particles. Chromosome aberrations were quantified using the samples collected at first mitosis post irradiation for initial damages, and the samples collected after multiple generations for the remaining or late arising aberrations. Results of the study suggested that the effectiveness of high-LET charged particles for late chromosome aberrations may be cell type dependent, even though the RBE values are similar for early damages.

  15. DNA repair and chromosome aberrations: the effect of cytosine arabinoside on the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced by radiation and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The frequency of x-ray-induced chromosome aberrations in G0 human lymphocytes was greatly increased when cells were incubated with cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) after irradiation. The frequency of dicentrics increased with increasing ara-C incubation times (one, two, and three hours). Lymphocytes from Down syndrome individuals were more sensitive to aberration induction by x-rays in G0, and the increase in dicentric frequency with ara-C incubation was much more rapid than with normal cells. When G2 normal lymphocytes were x-irradiated and incubated for two or three hours with ara-C until fixation, there was a large increase in deletion frequency compared to cells x-irradiated and incubated in the absence of ara-C. However, no exchanges were observed in the presence of ara-C, compared to 0.29 per cell as when x-rays alone were given. These results form the basis for a discussion of the mechanism of aberration induction by x-rays. Experiments with two chemicals, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and methyl methanesulfonate, show that chromosome-type aberrations can be induced in G1 treated lymphocytes incubated with ara-C. However, these chemicals, in the absence of ara-C incubation, induced no aberrations in G1 at the concentrations used. The mechanism of aberration induction is discussed, particularly in terms of whether or not chemicals can be defined as S-phase dependent.

  16. RBE of Energetic Iron Ions for the Induction of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Hada, Megumi; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Numerous published studies have reported the RBE values for chromosome chromosomes induced by charged particles of different LET. The RBE for chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed ex vivo showed a similar relationship as the quality factor for cancer induction. Consequently, increased chromosome aberrations in the astronauts' white blood cells post long-duration missions are used to determine the biological doses from exposures to space radiation. The RBE value is known to be very different for different types of cancer. Previously, we reported that the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions. After multiple cell divisions post irradiation, the RBE was significantly smaller. To test the hypothesis that the RBE values for chromosome aberrations are different between early and late damages and also different between different cell types, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, and human fibroblast cells and human mammary epithelial cells in vitro to 600 MeV/u Fe ions. Post irradiation, the cells were collected at first mitosis, or cultured for multiple generations for collections of remaining or late arising chromosome aberrations. The chromosome aberrations were quantified using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome specific probes. This study attempts to offer an explanation for the varying RBE values for different cancer types.

  17. Risk of cancer in an occupationally exposed cohort with increased level of chromosomal aberrations.

    PubMed Central

    Smerhovsky, Z; Landa, K; Rössner, P; Brabec, M; Zudova, Z; Hola, N; Pokorna, Z; Mareckova, J; Hurychova, D

    2001-01-01

    We used cytogenetic analysis to carry out a cohort study in which the major objective was to test the association between frequency of chromosomal aberrations and subsequent risk of cancer. In spite of the extensive use of the cytogenetic analysis of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in biomonitoring of exposure to various mutagens and carcinogens on an ecologic level, the long-term effects of an increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations in individuals are still uncertain. Few epidemiologic studies have addressed this issue, and a moderate risk of cancer in individuals with an elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations has been observed. In the present study, we analyzed data on 8,962 cytogenetic tests and 3,973 subjects. We found a significant and strong association between the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and cancer incidence in a group of miners exposed to radon, where a 1% increase in frequency of chromosomal aberrations was followed by a 64% increase in risk of cancer (p < 0.000). In contrast, the collected data are inadequate for a critical evaluation of the association with exposure to other chemicals. PMID:11171523

  18. Influence of GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1, NAT1, NAT2, EPHX1, MTR and MTHFR polymorphism on chromosomal aberration frequencies in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Skjelbred, Camilla Furu; Svendsen, Marit; Haugan, Vera; Eek, Anette Kildal; Clausen, Kjell Oskar; Kure, Elin H; Tuimala, Jarno T; Svendsen, Martin Veel; Norppa, Hannu; Hansteen, Inger-Lise

    2011-03-01

    We have studied the influence of genetic polymorphisms in the xenobiotic-metabolizing genes GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, EPHX1, NAT1 and NAT2 and the folate-metabolizing genes MTR and MTHFR on the frequencies of cells with chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in peripheral lymphocytes of Norwegian men. Log-linear Poisson regression models were applied on 357 subjects of whom data on all the polymorphisms examined were available. Total CAs and chromosome-type aberrations (CSAs) were significantly increased by higher age alone, whereas chromatid-type aberrations (CTAs) were elevated by the GSTT1-null genotype and MTHFR codon 222 variant allele and chromatid gaps (CTGs) by EPHX1 high activity genotype and occupational exposure. Stratification by smoking and age (<40 and ≥40 years) showed that the effect of the GSTT1 null and EPHX1 high activity genotypes only concerned (older) smokers, in agreement with the roles of the respective enzymes in detoxification and metabolic activation. The MTHFR codon 222 variant allele was associated with high CTGs in smokers, the MTR codon 919 variant allele with high CTAs in older smokers and the NAT2 fast acetylator genotype with high CTGs in older subjects. Among younger nonsmokers, however, carriers of the MTHFR codon 222 and MTR codon 919 variant alleles showed a decrease in the level of CTGs and total CAs, respectively. In conclusion, polymorphisms of GSTT1, EPHX1, MTHFR, MTR and NAT2 differentially affect the frequency of CTAs, CSAs and CTGs, showing interaction with smoking and age. It appears that CA subtypes rather than total CAs should be considered in this type of studies.

  19. Human chromosome 8.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S

    1988-01-01

    The role of human chromosome 8 in genetic disease together with the current status of the genetic linkage map for this chromosome is reviewed. Both hereditary genetic disease attributed to mutant alleles at gene loci on chromosome 8 and neoplastic disease owing to somatic mutation, particularly chromosomal translocations, are discussed. PMID:3070042

  20. The Landscape of Somatic Chromosomal Copy Number Aberrations in GEM Models of Prostate Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi-Frias, Daniella; Hernandez, Susana A.; Coleman, Roger; Wu, Hong; Nelson, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    Human prostate cancer (PCa) is known to harbor recurrent genomic aberrations consisting of chromosomal losses, gains, rearrangements and mutations that involve oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models have been constructed to assess the causal role of these putative oncogenic events and provide molecular insight into disease pathogenesis. While GEM models generally initiate neoplasia by manipulating a single gene, expression profiles of GEM tumors typically comprise hundreds of transcript alterations. It is unclear whether these transcriptional changes represent the pleiotropic effects of single oncogenes, and/or cooperating genomic or epigenomic events. Therefore, it was determined if structural chromosomal alterations occur in GEM models of PCa and whether the changes are concordant with human carcinomas. Whole genome array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to identify somatic chromosomal copy number aberrations (SCNAs) in the widely used TRAMP, Hi-Myc, Pten-null and LADY GEM models. Interestingly, very few SCNAs were identified and the genomic architecture of Hi-Myc, Pten-null and LADY tumors were essentially identical to the germline. TRAMP neuroendocrine carcinomas contained SCNAs, which comprised three recurrent aberrations including a single copy loss of chromosome 19 (encoding Pten). In contrast, cell lines derived from the TRAMP, Hi-Myc, and Pten-null tumors were notable for numerous SCNAs that included copy gains of chromosome 15 (encoding Myc) and losses of chromosome 11 (encoding p53). PMID:25298407

  1. Evaluation of an automated karyotyping system for chromosome aberration analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prichard, Howard M.

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome aberration analysis is a promising complement to conventional radiation dosimetry, particularly in the complex radiation fields encountered in the space environment. The capabilities of a recently developed automated karyotyping system were evaluated both to determine current capabilities and limitations and to suggest areas where future development should be emphasized. Cells exposed to radiometric chemicals and to photon and particulate radiation were evaluated by manual inspection and by automated karyotyping. It was demonstrated that the evaluated programs were appropriate for image digitization, storage, and transmission. However, automated and semi-automated scoring techniques must be advanced significantly if in-flight chromosome aberration analysis is to be practical. A degree of artificial intelligence may be necessary to realize this goal.

  2. Relative biological effectiveness of 25 and 10 kV X-rays for the induction of chromosomal aberrations in two human mammary epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Beyreuther, Elke; Dörr, Wolfgang; Lehnert, Anna; Lessmann, Elisabeth; Pawelke, Jörg

    2009-08-01

    Administration of ionizing radiation for diagnostic purposes can be associated with a risk for the induction of tumors. Therefore, particularly with regard to general screening programs, e.g. with mammography, cost-benefit considerations must be discussed including risk estimation depending upon the radiation quality administered. The present study was initiated to investigate the in vitro X-ray energy dependence for the induction of chromosomal aberrations in the two mammary epithelial cell lines, 184A1 and MCF-12A. The induced excess fragments, dicentric chromosomes and centric rings were analyzed and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was determined for 10 and 25 kV X-rays relative to 200 kV X-rays. The assumed energy dependence with higher values for 10 kV X-rays was confirmed for the excess fragments, with RBE(M) values of 1.92 +/- 0.26 and 1.40 +/- 0.12 for 10 kV X-rays and 1.17 +/- 0.12 and 0.97 +/- 0.10 for 25 kV photons determined for cell lines 184A1 and MCF-12A, respectively. Meaningful results for the induction of dicentric chromosomes and centric rings were obtained only for higher doses with RBE values of 1.31 +/- 0.21 and 1.70 +/- 0.29 for 184A1 and 1.08 +/- 0.08 and 1.43 +/- 0.12 for MCF-12A irradiated with 25 and 10 kV X-rays, respectively.

  3. High- and low-LET induced chromosome damage in human lymphocytes: a time-course of aberrations in metaphase and interphase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Wu, H.; Willingham, V.; Furusawa, Y.; Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Dicello, J. F. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate how cell-cycle delays in human peripheral lymphocytes affect the expression of complex chromosome damage in metaphase following high- and low-LET radiation exposure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Whole blood was irradiated in vitro with a low and a high dose of 1 GeV u(-1) iron particles, 400MeV u(-1) neon particles or y-rays. Lymphocytes were cultured and metaphase cells were collected at different time points after 48-84h in culture. Interphase chromosomes were prematurely condensed using calyculin-A, either 48 or 72 h after exposure to iron particles or gamma-rays. Cells in first division were analysed using a combination of FISH whole-chromosome painting and DAPI/ Hoechst 33258 harlequin staining. RESULTS: There was a delay in expression of chromosome damage in metaphase that was LET- and dose-dependant. This delay was mostly related to the late emergence of complex-type damage into metaphase. Yields of damage in PCC collected 48 h after irradiation with iron particles were similar to values obtained from cells undergoing mitosis after prolonged incubation. CONCLUSION: The yield of high-LET radiation-induced complex chromosome damage could be underestimated when analysing metaphase cells collected at one time point after irradiation. Chemically induced PCC is a more accurate technique since problems with complicated cell-cycle delays are avoided.

  4. Increased risk of cancer in radon-exposed miners with elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations.

    PubMed

    Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Landa, Karel; Rössner, Pavel; Juzova, Dagmar; Brabec, Marek; Zudova, Zdena; Hola, Nora; Zarska, Hana; Nevsimalova, Emilie

    2002-02-15

    In spite of the extensive use of cytogenetic analysis of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in the biomonitoring of exposure to various mutagens and carcinogens, the long-term effects of an increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations in individuals are still uncertain. Few epidemiologic studies have addressed this issue, and a moderate risk of cancer in individuals with an elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations has been observed. In the present study, we analyzed data on 1323 cytogenetic assays and 225 subjects examined because of occupational exposures to radon (range of exposure from 1.7 to 662.3 working level month (WLM)). Seventy-five subjects were non-smokers. We found 36 cases of cancer in this cohort. Chromatid breaks were the most frequently observed type of aberrations (mean frequency 1.2 per 100 cells), which statistically significantly correlated with radon exposure (Spearman's correlation coefficient R=0.22, P<0.001). Also, the frequency of aberrant cells (median of 2.5%) correlated with radon exposure (Spearman's correlation coefficient R=0.16, P<0.02). Smoking and silicosis were not associated with results of cytogenetic analyses. The Cox regression models, which accounted for the age at time of first cytogenetic assay, radon exposure, and smoking showed strong and statistically significant associations between cancer incidence and frequency of chromatid breaks and frequency of aberrant cells, respectively. A 1% increase in the frequency of aberrant cells was paralleled by a 62% increase in risk of cancer (P<0.000). An increase in frequency of chromatid breaks by 1 per 100 cells was followed by a 99% increase in risk of cancer (P<0.000). We obtained similar results when we analyzed the incidence of lung cancer and the incidence other than lung cancer separately. Contrary to frequency of chromatid breaks and frequency of aberrant cells, the frequency of chromatid exchanges, and chromosome-type aberrations were not predictive of cancer.

  5. Consistent numerical chromosome aberrations in thecofibromas of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Micci, Francesca; Haugom, Lisbeth; Abeler, Vera M; Tropé, Claes G; Danielsen, Håvard E; Heim, Sverre

    2008-03-01

    Sex cord-stromal tumors of the ovary comprise 8% of all ovarian neoplasms. Because they consist of cells that resemble embryonic sex cord and/or specialized ovarian stroma cells, their cytologic and histologic features can be viewed as reflecting a continuum from fibromas to thecomas with thecofibromas in between. Existing cytogenetic knowledge about ovarian thecomas-thecofibromas-fibromas is restricted to 44 cases with chromosomal abnormalities. The most common aberration has been trisomy 12, identified either by karyotyping or using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We wanted to obtain more information about the genomic composition of these tumors, and, therefore, examined 29 new thecoma-thecofibroma-fibroma tumors of the ovary using karyotyping, comparative genomic hybridization, interphase FISH, and DNA ploidy analysis. We detected aneuploidy in 21 tumors. Trisomy and/or tetrasomy 12 was the most common chromosomal aberration, found in 15 tumors (71.5% of the aneuploid tumors or 51.5% of all analyzed tumors), followed by trisomy for chromosomes 10, 18, 4, and 9. Some monosomies (for chromosomes 4, 9, 10, and 18) were also identified, either as the sole change or in combination with trisomies. The nonrandom occurrence of these aneuploidies in these benign tumors strongly indicates that they play a major pathogenetic role, but how trisomies and other aneuploidies contribute to tumorigenesis remains unknown. PMID:18188592

  6. Detection of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.; Gordon, L.; Ashworth, A.K.; Watchmaker, G.; Carrano, A.V.

    1985-06-19

    A new technology developed by Rudak, et al. for examining the chromosomal constitution of human sperm through fusion with eggs from the Syrian hamster was used to obtain baseline data on the types and frequencies of aberrations in sperm of normal men. The frequency of structural aberrations in 2724 sperm chromosome karyotypes from the 13 healthy non-exposed donors ranged from 2 to 15.8%, demonstrating significant interindividual variability. The most frequently occurring aberrations were chromosome breaks, followed by acentric fragments, chromatid exchanges, chromatid breaks, dicentrics and translocations, chromosome deletions and duplications, inversions, and chromatid deletions. Two donors previously reported had one cell each with multiple chromatid exchanges and breaks. In addition, the oldest donor, AA, had 5 cells out of 124 examined with multiple breaks and rearrangements too extensive to completely identify. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. The prevalence of chromosomal aberrations in Argentine air crew members.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Julio César; Picco, Sebastián Julio; Macintyre, Carlos; Dulout, Fernando Noel; Lopez-Larraza, Daniel Mario

    2009-01-01

    The authors analyzed the effects of chronic exposure of Argentine air crew members to low doses of ionizing radiations. Genetic damage induced by either low doses or low rates of ionizing radiation was higher than expected. Seventy-one heparinized blood samples were obtained from technical ground workers (group A; n = 10), pilots of domestic flights (group B; n = 14), pilots of transequatorial flights (group C; n = 17;), pilots of transpolar flights (group D; n = 17) and retired pilots (group E; n = 10) The frequency of dicentric chromosomes was higher in groups B and C compared with groups D and E. These observations suggest that the exposure of the aircraft to ionizing radiations may induce chromosomal aberrations. However, dicentric chromosomes in both domestic and retired pilots are still high compared with dicentric control participants. PMID:19395340

  8. The landscape of chromosomal aberrations in breast cancer mouse models reveals driver-specific routes to tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ben-David, Uri; Ha, Gavin; Khadka, Prasidda; Jin, Xin; Wong, Bang; Franke, Lude; Golub, Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy and copy-number alterations (CNAs) are a hallmark of human cancer. Although genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) are commonly used to model human cancer, their chromosomal landscapes remain underexplored. Here we use gene expression profiles to infer CNAs in 3,108 samples from 45 mouse models, providing the first comprehensive catalogue of chromosomal aberrations in cancer GEMMs. Mining this resource, we find that most chromosomal aberrations accumulate late during breast tumorigenesis, and observe marked differences in CNA prevalence between mouse mammary tumours initiated with distinct drivers. Some aberrations are recurrent and unique to specific GEMMs, suggesting distinct driver-dependent routes to tumorigenesis. Synteny-based comparison of mouse and human tumours narrows critical regions in CNAs, thereby identifying candidate driver genes. We experimentally validate that loss of Stratifin (SFN) promotes HER2-induced tumorigenesis in human cells. These results demonstrate the power of GEMM CNA analysis to inform the pathogenesis of human cancer. PMID:27374210

  9. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  10. [Estimation of bleomycin-induced chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of laryngeal cancer subjects. Preliminary report].

    PubMed

    Kita, S; Jarmuz, M; Dabrowski, P; Biegalski, W; Jezewska, A; Kowalczyk, M; Szyfter, W; Szyfter, K

    1999-01-01

    Chromosome instability is associated with an increased risk of malignancy. However, the quantitative analysis of chromosome breaks provided by the bleomycin test requires additional analysis aimed for the localisation of chromosome aberrations. For this reason, the metaphasis slides prepared for bleomycin test were stained with fluorochrome DAPI to estimate chromosome breaks in particular chromosomes. The additional staining of chromosomes can be recognised as an extension of the classical bleomycin test addressed for identification of structural aberrations. Preliminary results indicate that the most frequent chromosome breaks were found in chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 7 and 13. PMID:10481493

  11. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  12. Comparison of hprt variant frequencies and chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes from radiotherapy and chemotherapy patients: A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Ammenheuser, M.M.; Au, W.W.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Belli, J.A.; Ward, J.B. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    The autoradiographic 6-thioguanine-resistant mutant lymphocyte assay and a chromosome aberration assay were used to determine the time-course of appearance and persistence of elevated frequencies of hprt variants and dicentric chromosomes in patients receiving x-irradiation therapy. The hprt mutation assays were done with frozen/thawed lymphocytes isolated from aliquots of the same blood samples used for the chromosome aberration assays. Five multiple sclerosis patients were also studied before and at 2 and 4 wk intervals after treatment with monthly i.v. doses of 750 mg/m{sup 2} of cyclophosphamide (CP). There were no significant elevations in chromosome aberrations at these post-treatment sample times. The results demonstrate the complementary nature of these two human monitoring assays and emphasize the importance of careful selection of optimal sampling times.

  13. [Safety Evaluation of Rare Sugar Syrup: Single-dose Oral Toxicity in Rats, Reverse Mutation Assay, Chromosome Aberration Assay, and Acute Non-Effect Level for Diarrhea of a Single Dose in Humans].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takako; Iida, Tetsuo; Takamine, Satoshi; Hayashi, Noriko; Okuma, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The safety of rare sugar syrup obtained from high-fructose corn syrup under slightly alkaline conditions was studied. Mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was assessed by a reverse mutation assay using Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli, and an in vitro chromosomal aberration assay using Chinese hamster lung cell line (CHL/IU). No mutagenicity of rare sugar syrup was detected under these experimental conditions. Oral administration of single dose (15,000 mg/kg) of rare sugar syrup to rats caused no abnormalities, suggesting no adverse effect of rare sugar syrup. In humans, the acute non-effect level of rare sugar syrup for causing diarrhea was estimated as 0.9 g/kg body weight as dry solid base in both males and females. PMID:26537651

  14. Chromosome aberrations and their relevance to metal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vainio, H; Sorsa, M

    1981-01-01

    Scoring for structural chromosome abnormalities is one of the only practical methods available for detecting visual damage in human genetic material. Cytogenetic tests in vivo and in vitro have shown the clastogenic potential of a number of metals and metal compounds. The difficulties in in vivo studies lie in identifying a specific clastogen in an occupational setting, where simultaneous exposure to a number of organic and inorganic chemicals is a common phenomenon. Metals known to be carcinogens in animals also tend to possess chromosome-damaging properties, even though more extensive studies are needed before any conclusive evidence can be reached. The visible chromosomal damage produced by exposure to metal compounds should be considered as a warning indication of potentially adverse genetic and somatic effects in humans. PMID:7023931

  15. Maternal age, reproduction and chromosomal aberrations in Wistar derived rats.

    PubMed

    Niggeschulze, A; Kast, A

    1994-01-01

    The fertility of rats ranges from one to 18 months. In standard teratogenicity testing young, mature females are used which may not reflect the situation in women above 35 years old. Reproduction among different age groups of Wistar ats (strain Chbb: THOM) was compared at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months. At least 20 virgin females were inseminated per age group. The copulation rate did not differ between the groups. From the maternal age of 12 months, the pregnancy rate was significantly decreased, from the age of 9 months, the litter values were significantly lowered and the resorption rates were increased. Maternal age did not influence the incidence of fetal variations and malformations. Additionally, the chromosomal aberration rate in the bone marrow was evaluated in male and female rats. Twelve animals of each sex were scheduled per group, and studied at the age of 1, 3, 6, 12, 15, 18, 21 or 24 months. In males, the aberration rate increased continuously from 0.18 through 3%, while in females the increase continued from 0.33 to 2.29% at 15 months old when a plateau was reached. When testing new compounds for embryotoxicity or genotoxicity in female rats, the animals should be of comparable age to man in order to avoid a misinterpretation of spontaneous abnormalities. From these studies, however, it was concluded that the use of higher age groups of female rats in teratogenicity studies would not improve the risk assessment.

  16. [In vitro chromosome aberration test and in vivo micronucleus test of Ca-type Garcinia extract].

    PubMed

    Ono, Hiromi; Tamura, Hideyuki; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Kouichi; Iwakura, Keiko

    2006-04-01

    The induction of chromosome aberration of Ca-type Garcinia cambogia extract containing about 65% (-)-hydroxycitric acid was investigated by use of the chromosome aberration test in cultured Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU) and the micronucleus test in mice. In the chromosome aberration test, Ca-type Garcinia cambogia extract did not increase the number of cells with structural aberration and/or numerical aberrations. The micronucleus test was carried out with bone marrow cells of Slc : ddY male mice after single oral administration of up to 2,000 microg/kg. There was no significant increase in the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes. These results indicate that Ca-type Garcinia cambogia extract does not induce chromosome aberration. PMID:16729669

  17. Induction of Chromosomal Aberrations at Fluences of Less Than One HZE Particle per Cell Nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori J.; Wang, Minli; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    The assumption of a linear dose response used to describe the biological effects of high LET radiation is fundamental in radiation protection methodologies. We investigated the dose response for chromosomal aberrations for exposures corresponding to less than one particle traversal per cell nucleus by high energy and charge (HZE) nuclei. Human fibroblast and lymphocyte cells where irradiated with several low doses of <0.1 Gy, and several higher doses of up to 1 Gy with O (77 keV/ (long-s)m), Si (99 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (175 keV/ (long-s)m), Fe (195 keV/ (long-s)m) or Fe (240 keV/ (long-s)m) particles. Chromosomal aberrations at first mitosis were scored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome specific paints for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 and DAPI staining of background chromosomes. Non-linear regression models were used to evaluate possible linear and non-linear dose response models based on these data. Dose responses for simple exchanges for human fibroblast irradiated under confluent culture conditions were best fit by non-linear models motivated by a non-targeted effect (NTE). Best fits for the dose response data for human lymphocytes irradiated in blood tubes were a NTE model for O and a linear response model fit best for Si and Fe particles. Additional evidence for NTE were found in low dose experiments measuring gamma-H2AX foci, a marker of double strand breaks (DSB), and split-dose experiments with human fibroblasts. Our results suggest that simple exchanges in normal human fibroblasts have an important NTE contribution at low particle fluence. The current and prior experimental studies provide important evidence against the linear dose response assumption used in radiation protection for HZE particles and other high LET radiation at the relevant range of low doses.

  18. Chromosome aberrations induced by high-LET radiations.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2004-12-01

    Measurements of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes are currently the most sensitive and reliable indicator of radiation exposure that can be used for biological dosimetry. This technique has been implemented recently to study radiation exposures incurred by astronauts during space flight, where a significant proportion of the dose is delivered by high-LET particle exposure. Traditional methods for the assessing of cytogenetic damage in mitotic cells collected at one time point after exposure may not be suitable for measuring high-LET radiation effects due to the drastic cell cycle perturbations and interphase cell death induced by this type of exposure. In this manuscript we review the recent advances in methodology used to study high-LET induced cytogenetic effects and evaluate the use of chemically-induced Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) as an alternative to metaphase analysis. Published data on the cytogenetic effects of in vitro exposures of high-LET radiation is reviewed, along with biodosimetry results from astronauts after short or long space missions. PMID:15858388

  19. Chromosome aberrations induced by high-LET radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes are currently the most sensitive and reliable indicator of radiation exposure that can be used for biological dosimetry. This technique has been implemented recently to study radiation exposures incurred by astronauts during space flight, where a significant proportion of the dose is delivered by high-LET particle exposure. Traditional methods for the assessing of cytogenetic damage in mitotic cells collected at one time point after exposure may not be suitable for measuring high-LET radiation effects due to the drastic cell cycle perturbations and interphase cell death induced by this type of exposure. In this manuscript we review the recent advances in methodology used to study high-LET induced cytogenetic effects and evaluate the use of chemically-induced Premature Chromosome Condensation (PCC) as an alternative to metaphase analysis. Published data on the cytogenetic effects of in vitro exposures of high-LET radiation is reviewed, along with biodosimetry results from astronauts after short or long space missions.

  20. Human chromosome 22.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, J C; Aurias, A; Julier, C; Prieur, M; Szajnert, M F

    1987-01-01

    The acrocentric chromosome 22, one of the shortest human chromosomes, carries about 52 000 kb of DNA. The short arm is made up essentially of heterochromatin and, as in other acrocentric chromosomes, it contains ribosomal RNA genes. Ten identified genes have been assigned to the long arm, of which four have already been cloned and documented (the cluster of lambda immunoglobulin genes, myoglobin, the proto-oncogene c-sis, bcr). In addition, about 10 anonymous DNA segments have been cloned from chromosome 22 specific DNA libraries. About a dozen diseases, including at least four different malignancies, are related to an inherited or acquired pathology of chromosome 22. They have been characterised at the phenotypic or chromosome level or both. In chronic myelogenous leukaemia, with the Ph1 chromosome, and Burkitt's lymphoma, with the t(8;22) variant translocation, the molecular pathology is being studied at the DNA level, bridging for the first time the gap between cytogenetics and molecular genetics. PMID:3550088

  1. Induction of chromosomal aberrations at fluences of less than one HZE particle per cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hada, Megumi; Chappell, Lori J; Wang, Minli; George, Kerry A; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2014-10-01

    The assumption of a linear dose response used to describe the biological effects of high-LET radiation is fundamental in radiation protection methodologies. We investigated the dose response for chromosomal aberrations for exposures corresponding to less than one particle traversal per cell nucleus by high-energy charged (HZE) nuclei. Human fibroblast and lymphocyte cells were irradiated with several low doses of <0.1 Gy, and several higher doses of up to 1 Gy with oxygen (77 keV/μm), silicon (99 keV/μm) or Fe (175 keV/μm), Fe (195 keV/μm) or Fe (240 keV/μm) particles. Chromosomal aberrations at first mitosis were scored using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome specific paints for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 and DAPI staining of background chromosomes. Nonlinear regression models were used to evaluate possible linear and nonlinear dose-response models based on these data. Dose responses for simple exchanges for human fibroblasts irradiated under confluent culture conditions were best fit by nonlinear models motivated by a nontargeted effect (NTE). The best fits for dose response data for human lymphocytes irradiated in blood tubes were a linear response model for all particles. Our results suggest that simple exchanges in normal human fibroblasts have an important NTE contribution at low-particle fluence. The current and prior experimental studies provide important evidence against the linear dose response assumption used in radiation protection for HZE particles and other high-LET radiation at the relevant range of low doses.

  2. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  3. The prevalence of chromosomal aberrations associated with myelodysplastic syndromes in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinyong; Chu, Yuxin; Song, Qibin; Yao, Yi; Yang, Weihong; Huang, Shiang

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence and distribution of diverse chromosomal aberrations associated with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in China. Bone marrow samples were collected from multiple cities in China. Metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were initially used to test chromosomal lesions. Affymetrix CytoScan 750 K genechip platform performed a genome-wide detection of chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal gain was identified in 76 patients; the most prevalent was trisomy 8(17.9 %). New chromosomal gain was detected on chromosome 9, 19p, and X. Chromosomal loss was detected in 101 patients. The most frequent was loss 5q (21.0 %). Some loss and gain were not identified by MC or FISH but identified by genechip. UPD was solely identified by genechip in 51 patients; the most prevalent were UPD 7q (4.94 %) and UPD 17p (4.32 %). Furthermore, complex chromosomal aberrations were detected in 56 patients. In conclusion, Affymetrix CytoScan 750 K genechip was more precise than MC and FISH in detection of cryptic chromosomal aberrations relevant to MDS. Analysis of the prevalence and distribution of diverse chromosomal aberrations in China may improve strategies for MDS diagnosis and therapies. PMID:27225263

  4. Proton and Fe Ion-Induced Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Lu, Tao; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zhang, Ye; Kadhim, Munira

    2016-01-01

    An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. To investigate GI induced by charged particles, we exposed human lymphocytes, human fibroblast cells, and human mammary epithelial cells to high energy protons and Fe ions. In addition, we also investigated GI in bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH (CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mice, by analyzing cell survival and chromosome aberrations in the cells after multiple cell divisions. Results analyzed so far from the experiments indicated different sensitivities to charged particles between CBA/CaH (CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mouse strains, suggesting that there are two main types of response to irradiation: 1) responses associated with survival of damaged cells and 2) responses associated with the induction of non-clonal chromosomal instability in the surviving progeny of stem cells. Previously, we reported that the RBE for initial chromosome damages was high in human lymphocytes exposed to Fe ions. Our results with different cell types demonstrated different RBE values between different cell types and between early and late chromosomal damages. This study also attempts to offer an explanation for the varying RBE values for different cancer types.

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphism array profiling identifies distinct chromosomal aberration patterns across colorectal adenomas and carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zarzour, Peter; Boelen, Lies; Luciani, Fabio; Beck, Dominik; Sakthianandeswaren, Anuratha; Mouradov, Dmitri; Sieber, Oliver M; Hawkins, Nicholas J; Hesson, Luke B; Ward, Robyn L; Wong, Jason W H

    2015-05-01

    The progression of benign colorectal adenomas into cancer is associated with the accumulation of chromosomal aberrations. Even though patterns and frequencies of chromosomal aberrations have been well established in colorectal carcinomas, corresponding patterns of aberrations in adenomas are less well documented. The aim of this study was to profile chromosomal aberrations across colorectal adenomas and carcinomas to provide a better insight into key changes during tumor initiation and progression. Single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis was performed on 216 colorectal tumor/normal matched pairs, comprising 60 adenomas and 156 carcinomas. While many chromosomal aberrations were specific to carcinomas, those with the highest frequency in carcinomas (amplification of chromosome 7, 13q, and 20q; deletion of 17p and chromosome 18; LOH of 1p, chromosome 4, 5q, 8p, 17p, chromosome 18, and 20p) were also identified in adenomas. Hierarchical clustering using chromosomal aberrations revealed three distinct subtypes. Interestingly, these subtypes were only partially dependent on tumor staging. A cluster of colorectal cancer patients with frequent chromosomal deletions had the least favorable prognosis, and a number of adenomas (n = 9) were also present in the cluster suggesting that, at least in some tumors, the chromosomal aberration pattern is determined at a very early stage of tumor formation. Finally, analysis of LOH events revealed that copy-neutral/gain LOH (CN/G-LOH) is frequent (>10%) in carcinomas at 5q, 11q, 15q, 17p, chromosome 18, 20p, and 22q. Deletion of the corresponding region is sometimes present in adenomas, suggesting that LOH at these loci may play an important role in tumor initiation.

  6. Detection of numerical chromosome aberrations using in situ hybridization in paraffin sections of routinely processed bladder cancers.

    PubMed

    Hopman, A H; van Hooren, E; van de Kaa, C A; Vooijs, P G; Ramaekers, F C

    1991-07-01

    An improved protocol for in situ hybridization (ISH) to routinely processed, paraffin-imbedded tissue sections from transitional bladder carcinoma (TCC) is presented. The protocol to detect numerical chromosome aberrations involved treatment of sections with thiocyanate prior to proteolytic digestion, resulting in reproducible ISH reactions. It was used to explore the influence of nuclear truncation in the detection of numerical chromosome aberrations and the detection of tumor cells among stromal and inflammatory cells, to compare the flow cytometric DNA index with chromosome copy number, and to study chromosome heterogeneity within tumors. For this study, a DNA probe for the chromosome region 1q12 was used. Hybridization of model systems with known chromosome numbers, such as sections of paraffin-embedded lymph nodes, paraffin-embedded human peripheral lymphocytes, T24 and Molt-4 cells with two, three, and four chromosomes 1, respectively, showed in at least 50% of the cells the proper number of chromosome hybridization signals in standard 6-microns-thick sections. Depending on the size of the nucleus, a certain percentage of the cells showed lower copy numbers as a result of truncation. In four cases of normal urothelium in paraffin sections, the percentage of nuclei with more than two chromosome spots did not exceed 5%. Comparison of the number of ISH signals, as detected in ethanol-fixed single cell suspensions of 11 TCCs [five flow cytometric (FCM) diploid, three FCM aneuploid, and three FCM tetraploid], with ISH results obtained in paraffin sections of the same tumors showed that typical numerical chromosome aberrations, such as trisomy and tetrasomy up to nonasomy, could be detected. However, the real chromosome copy number is underestimated, especially in tumors with high copy numbers, as detected in the single cell suspensions of the same tumors. Hybridization of a TCC with extremely large nuclei (DNA index = 3.2) containing six to nine ISH signals as

  7. [Chromosome aberration frequency in workers in tire and industrial ruber manufacture].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, S E

    1982-01-01

    A cytogenetic study was carried out with the view to analyse blood and embryonic tissue cultures taken from female workers of various shops of tyre and rubber industry. In workers of preparation shops the level of chromosome aberrations in blood was equal to 2.63%, while in embryonic tissues the value was 6.33%. The number of aberrations on blood and embryonic tissue exhibited by workers of chemical shops was equal to 1.34 and 2.79%, respectively. No specific differences were observed in the sub-group of women having been in frequent contacts with gasoline or curing gases, as compared with the group on the whole. Curing accelerators which are ingredients of toxic dust in preparation shops of tyre and rubber industry cause a sharp increase in the number of chromosome aberrations both in blood and in the embryonic tissues of women. Data on induced abortions may be used for evaluation of the influence of chemicals on the developing fetus and can serve as a test models of mutagenic and embryotoxic effect. They also may be regarded as a part of the general system of the evaluation of mutagenic effects of chemicals in humans. PMID:7199008

  8. [Fetal diagnosis from the mother's blood--noninvasive screening of chromosomal aberrations].

    PubMed

    Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa; Stefanovic, Vedran; Aittomäki, Kristiina

    2015-01-01

    In Finland, the screening of fetal chromosome aberrations is currently based on combined screening in the first trimester. Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) is a new method enabling a more accurate screening than combined screening of fetal chromosome aberrations from the mother's blood sample by analyzing cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA). In addition, it is possible to determine the gender of the fetus or assess the number of sex chromosomes. Although NIPT is an accurate screening method, an aberrant result should always be confirmed by an invasive fetal diagnostic test. PMID:26749901

  9. Research on spontaneously emerged chromosomal aberrations in the periphery blood lymphocytes in cattle ('Busa' breed).

    PubMed

    Hasanbasić, Danica; Rukavina, Dunja; Hodzić, Aida; Brka, Muhamed; Vegara, Mensur; Hamamdzić, Muhidin

    2007-11-01

    Knowledge of spontaneous aberrations, namely, of their frequency in non-irradiated cells is of paramount importance not only in cytogenetic research, but also in contemporary animal production. The paper deals with research on spontaneously emerged chromosomal aberrations in the peripheral blood lymphocytes in the cattle of 'Busa' breed. To obtain metaphase chromosomes the conventional method of lymphocyte cultivation was used, albeit slightly modified and adapted to the examined animals and the laboratory conditions. The research findings indicate that a certain percent of spontaneously emerged chromosomal aberrations of chromatid type (gap and break) have been found in the peripheral blood lymphocytes in the cattle of 'Busa' breed.

  10. Chromosome aberrations in leukocytes of filaria-infected indigenous inhabitants in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Hirai, M; Omoto, K; Tanaka, H; Misawa, S; Mercado, A S; Pagaran, I G; Eviota, W

    1986-12-01

    In the course of genetic population surveys of a tribal group of the Philippine Negritos living on Mindanao island, microfilariae (Wuchereria bancrofti) were incidentally found on the microscopic slides for a cytogenetic investigation. Structural chromosome aberrations in the cultured leukocytes from 19 filaria-infected and 22 uninfected subjects were studied. The frequencies of chromosome type aberrations such as dicentrics and chromosome breaks in the infected subjects were significantly higher than those in the uninfected subjects (P less than 0.05). The frequencies of chromatid type aberrations, however, were not significantly different between the filaria-infected subjects and the uninfected subjects.

  11. Effects of mixed neutron-gamma beams in both sequential and simultaneous irradiation modalities on chromosomal aberrations of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in-vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, P.K.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Meisner, L.F.; Gould, M.N.

    1984-01-01

    Initial irradiations have been performed in preparation for testing the independent action hypothesis for chromosomal abnormality production between low- and high-LET radiation. Results of these irradiations are compared with typical dose response curves. Lessons learned and proposed experiments for the future are discussed. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia-Telangiectasia Cells Exposed to Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Ito, H.; Liu, C.; Shigematsu, N.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Although cells derived from Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients are known to exhibit abnormal responses to ionizing radiations, its underlying mechanism still remains unclear. Previously, the authors reported that at the same gamma-irradiation dose AT cells show higher frequencies of misrepair and deletions compared to normal human fibroblast cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/m), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/m) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/m) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/m and then decreased at 440 keV/m. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/m there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for AT cells when it was compared at 185 keV/m but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types

  13. Biological dosimetry by chromosome aberration scoring with parallel image processing with the Heidelberg POLYP Polyprocessor system

    SciTech Connect

    Bille, J.; Scharfenberg, H.; Maenner, R.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood are recognized parameters of cellular damage and are used as indicators of exposure to ionizing radiation. In order to reach the low dose range, up to 10,000 metaphase cells each consisting of 46 chromosomes have to be analysed for each radiation exposed person. In order to perform this task within reasonable time limits the application of the Heidelberg POLYP Polyprocessor is considered. The POLYP consists of a number of processor modules and several global memory modules which are interconnected by a multi-common-bus for parallel data transfers and a multiple synchronization bus for processor/task-scheduling. The system is designed for handling large amounts of data in real time as is typical for image processing applications.

  14. Analysis of chromosomal aberrations and recombination by allelic bias in RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Weissbein, Uri; Schachter, Maya; Egli, Dieter; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2016-01-01

    Genomic instability has profound effects on cellular phenotypes. Studies have shown that pluripotent cells with abnormal karyotypes may grow faster, differentiate less and become more resistance to apoptosis. Previously, we showed that microarray gene expression profiles can be utilized for the analysis of chromosomal aberrations by comparing gene expression levels between normal and aneuploid samples. Here we adopted this method for RNA-Seq data and present eSNP-Karyotyping for the detection of chromosomal aberrations, based on measuring the ratio of expression between the two alleles. We demonstrate its ability to detect chromosomal gains and losses in pluripotent cells and their derivatives, as well as meiotic recombination patterns. This method is advantageous since it does not require matched diploid samples for comparison, is less sensitive to global expression changes caused by the aberration and utilizes already available gene expression profiles to determine chromosomal aberrations. PMID:27385103

  15. Effect of LET and track structure on the statistical distribution of chromosome aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Lee, R.; Nasonova, E.; Ritter, S.; Scholz, M.

    Chromosome aberration data obtained for various types of mammalian cells after exposure to low and high LET radiation clearly demonstrate differences in the energy deposition pattern of both radiation qualities. In the present study we focus on the distributions of chromosome aberrations induced in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after exposure to 990 MeV/u Fe ions (LET = 155 keV/μm) or X-rays. For the analysis three different types of distributions were applied, namely a Poisson distribution, a compound Poisson-Poisson (Neyman type A) distribution and a convoluted Poisson-Neyman distribution. The analysis showed that after low LET radiation the distribution of aberrations can be well described by Poisson statistics, reflecting a simple random distribution of damages as expected according to the homogeneous pattern of energy depositions. In contrast, for particles the energy is deposited spatially very inhomogeneous and concentrated along the ion trajectories. After exposure to high energy, high LET particles where the track radius is much larger than the cell nucleus, best fits to the data were achieved by a convoluted Poisson-Neyman statistics. The analysis indicates that, under this exposure condition, the distribution of aberrations is determined by two independent components. The first component is determined by the damage induced by a center of the tracks and follows the Neyman distribution. The second component is determined by the overlapping part of tracks which in the case of very high energetic particles leads to a "photon-like" background dose and is thus characterized by a Poisson distribution.

  16. Intrinsic factors that can affect sensitivity to chromosome-aberration induction

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The paper addresses the question, are there individuals who are hypersensitive, or are more likely to be hypersensitive, to the induction of chromosome aberrations by radiation and chemicals. Lymphocytes of persons heterozygous for xeroderma pigmentosum, ataxia telangiectasia, and Fauconi's anemia were subjected to chemical and/or ionizing radiations to determine their sensitivity to chromosome aberration induction. In the majority of cases the sensitivity was intermediate between that of normal individuals and homozygotes for these genes. (ACR)

  17. 40 CFR 799.9538 - TSCA mammalian bone marrow chromosomal aberration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... as a dose-related increase in the relative number of cells with chromosome aberrations or a clear increase in the number of cells with aberrations in a single dose group at a single sampling time... study. (D) Stability of the test substance, if known. (ii) Solvent/vehicle: (A) Justification for...

  18. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  19. Comparative evaluation of the in vitro micronucleus test and the in vitro chromosome aberration test: industrial experience.

    PubMed

    Miller, B; Albertini, S; Locher, F; Thybaud, V; Lorge, E

    1997-08-01

    Because of its rapidness, simplicity and potential for automation, the measurement of micronucleated cells in vivo is not only equivalent to the analysis of chromosome aberrations, but often even preferred within routine genotoxicity testing. In order to evaluate the correlation between the in vitro micronucleus assay (MNT) and the in vitro chromosome aberration test (CA), we collected data from four pharmaceutical companies obtained either in Chinese hamster cell lines (CHO-K5, CHO-K1, V79) or in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Among the 57 compounds included in this comparison, 45 compounds gave rise to concordant results in both assays (26 compounds negative in both assays; 19 compounds positive in both assays). The high percentage of concordance, i.e. about 79% is very promising and can be even increased to about 88% by omitting the 3 aneugenic compounds and 2 compounds inducing endoreduplicated chromosomes which were found positive only in the in vitro MNT. The results are remarkable in particular considering that most of the compounds evaluated are 'standard' pharmaceutical compounds and thus are at most weak inducers of chromosome damage. Our comparison strongly supports that the in vitro micronucleus test is a suitable alternative to the in vitro chromosome aberration assay. Moreover, the MNT has the potential of not only detecting clastogens but additionally aneuploidy inducing chemicals.

  20. Genotoxicity evaluation of dental restoration nanocomposite using comet assay and chromosome aberration test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, Marahaini; Thirumulu Ponnuraj, Kannan; Mohamad, Dasmawati; Rahman, Ismail Ab

    2013-01-01

    Nanocomposite is used as a dental filling to restore the affected tooth, especially in dental caries. The dental nanocomposite (KelFil) for tooth restoration used in this study was produced by the School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia and is incorporated with monodispersed, spherical nanosilica fillers. The aim of the study was to determine the genotoxic effect of KelFil using in vitro genotoxicity tests. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of KelFil was evaluated using MTT assay, comet assay and chromosome aberration tests with or without the addition of a metabolic activation system (S9 mix), using the human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Concurrent negative and positive controls were included. In the comet assay, no comet formation was found in the KelFil groups. There was a significant difference in tail moment between KelFil groups and positive control (p < 0.05). Similarly, no significant aberrations in chromosomes were noticed in KelFil groups. The mitotic indices of treatment groups and negative control were significantly different from positive controls. Hence, it can be concluded that the locally produced dental restoration nanocomposite (KelFil) is non-genotoxic under the present test conditions.

  1. Genotoxicity evaluation of dental restoration nanocomposite using comet assay and chromosome aberration test.

    PubMed

    Musa, Marahaini; Ponnuraj, Kannan Thirumulu; Mohamad, Dasmawati; Rahman, Ismail Ab

    2013-01-11

    Nanocomposite is used as a dental filling to restore the affected tooth, especially in dental caries. The dental nanocomposite (KelFil) for tooth restoration used in this study was produced by the School of Dental Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia and is incorporated with monodispersed, spherical nanosilica fillers. The aim of the study was to determine the genotoxic effect of KelFil using in vitro genotoxicity tests. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of KelFil was evaluated using MTT assay, comet assay and chromosome aberration tests with or without the addition of a metabolic activation system (S9 mix), using the human lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5). Concurrent negative and positive controls were included. In the comet assay, no comet formation was found in the KelFil groups. There was a significant difference in tail moment between KelFil groups and positive control (p < 0.05). Similarly, no significant aberrations in chromosomes were noticed in KelFil groups. The mitotic indices of treatment groups and negative control were significantly different from positive controls. Hence, it can be concluded that the locally produced dental restoration nanocomposite (KelFil) is non-genotoxic under the present test conditions.

  2. Persistence of chromosome aberrations in mice acutely exposed to 56Fe+26 ions.

    PubMed

    Tucker, James D; Marples, Brian; Ramsey, Marilyn J; Lutze-Mann, Louise H

    2004-06-01

    Space exploration has the potential to yield exciting and significant discoveries, but it also brings with it many risks for flight crews. Among the less well studied of these are health effects from space radiation, which includes the highly charged, energetic particles of elements with high atomic numbers that constitute the galactic cosmic rays. In this study, we demonstrated that 1 Gy iron ions acutely administered to mice in vivo resulted in highly complex chromosome damage. We found that all types of aberrations, including dicentrics as well as translocations, insertions and acentric fragments, disappear rapidly with time after exposure, probably as a result of the death of heavily damaged cells, i.e. cells with multiple and/or complex aberrations. In addition, numerous cells have apparently simple exchanges as their only aberrations, and these cells appear to survive longer than heavily damaged cells. Eight weeks after exposure, the frequency of cells showing cytogenetic damage was reduced to less than 20% of the levels evident at 1 week, with little further decline apparent over an additional 8 weeks. These results indicate that exposure to 1 Gy iron ions produces heavily damaged cells, a small fraction of which appear to be capable of surviving for relatively long periods. The health effects of exposure to high-LET radiation in humans on prolonged space flights should remain a matter of concern.

  3. Persistence of chromosome aberrations in mice acutely exposed to 56Fe+26 ions.

    PubMed

    Tucker, James D; Marples, Brian; Ramsey, Marilyn J; Lutze-Mann, Louise H

    2004-06-01

    Space exploration has the potential to yield exciting and significant discoveries, but it also brings with it many risks for flight crews. Among the less well studied of these are health effects from space radiation, which includes the highly charged, energetic particles of elements with high atomic numbers that constitute the galactic cosmic rays. In this study, we demonstrated that 1 Gy iron ions acutely administered to mice in vivo resulted in highly complex chromosome damage. We found that all types of aberrations, including dicentrics as well as translocations, insertions and acentric fragments, disappear rapidly with time after exposure, probably as a result of the death of heavily damaged cells, i.e. cells with multiple and/or complex aberrations. In addition, numerous cells have apparently simple exchanges as their only aberrations, and these cells appear to survive longer than heavily damaged cells. Eight weeks after exposure, the frequency of cells showing cytogenetic damage was reduced to less than 20% of the levels evident at 1 week, with little further decline apparent over an additional 8 weeks. These results indicate that exposure to 1 Gy iron ions produces heavily damaged cells, a small fraction of which appear to be capable of surviving for relatively long periods. The health effects of exposure to high-LET radiation in humans on prolonged space flights should remain a matter of concern. PMID:15161355

  4. Induction and repair of chromosome aberrations in scid cells measured by premature chromosome condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.W.; Kirchgessner, C.U.; Brown, J.M.; X.F. Liu

    1996-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficient (scid) murine cells, which are defective in both repair of DNA double-strand breaks and V(D)J recombination, are deficient in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a protein which forms an activated complex with the DNA end-binding Ku proteins (p80 and p70) upon association with damaged DNA. Xrs 5 cells are deficient in the Ku p80 protein and also fail to form an active DNA-PK repair complex. Since both scid and xrs cells are defective in the same protein complex, we compared the kinetics of chromosome repair in scid cells to results published previously for xrs 5 cells. C.B-17 cells, scid cells and scid cells complemented with a single human chromosome 8 were irradiated with 6 Gy and allowed to repair from 0-24 h before fusion to HeLa cells for chromosome condensation. Breaks and dicentrics were visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization. All cells had the same initial amount of chromosome damage, but scid cells had a slower rate of rejoining, more unrejoined breaks and more dicentrics than C.B-17 and scid cells with human chromosome 8. The scid cells appear to respond differently than xrs 5 cells, despite both cells lacking an essential component of the same DNA repair complex. 40 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Simulation of the Formation of DNA Double Strand Breaks and Chromosome Aberrations in Irradiated Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Wu, Honglu; Blattnig, Steve; George, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome aberrations is an important consequence of ionizing radiation. To simulate DNA double-strand breaks and the formation of chromosome aberrations, we have recently merged the codes RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) and NASARTI (NASA Radiation Track Image). The program RITRACKS is a stochastic code developed to simulate detailed event-by-event radiation track structure: [1] This code is used to calculate the dose in voxels of 20 nm, in a volume containing simulated chromosomes, [2] The number of tracks in the volume is calculated for each simulation by sampling a Poisson distribution, with the distribution parameter obtained from the irradiation dose, ion type and energy. The program NASARTI generates the chromosomes present in a cell nucleus by random walks of 20 nm, corresponding to the size of the dose voxels, [3] The generated chromosomes are located within domains which may intertwine, and [4] Each segment of the random walks corresponds to approx. 2,000 DNA base pairs. NASARTI uses pre-calculated dose at each voxel to calculate the probability of DNA damage at each random walk segment. Using the location of double-strand breaks, possible rejoining between damaged segments is evaluated. This yields various types of chromosomes aberrations, including deletions, inversions, exchanges, etc. By performing the calculations using various types of radiations, it will be possible to obtain relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for several types of chromosome aberrations.

  6. The effectiveness of the high-LET radiations from the boron neutron capture [10B(n,α) 7Li] reaction determined for induction of chromosome aberrations and apoptosis in lymphocytes of human blood samples.

    PubMed

    Schmid, T E; Canella, L; Kudejova, P; Wagner, F M; Röhrmoser, A; Schmid, E

    2015-03-01

    Provided that a selective accumulation of (10)B-containing compounds is introduced in tumor cells, following irradiation by thermal neutrons produces high-LET alpha-particles ((4)He) and recoiling lithium-7 ((7)Li) nuclei emitted during the capture of thermalized neutrons (0.025 eV) from (10)B. To estimate the biological effectiveness of this boron neutron capture [(10)B(n,α)(7)Li] reaction, the chromosome aberration assay and the flow cytometry apoptosis assay were applied. At the presence of the clinically used compounds BSH (sodium borocaptate) and BPA (p-boronophenylalanine), human lymphocytes were irradiated by sub-thermal neutrons. For analyzing chromosome aberrations, human lymphocytes were exposed to thermally equivalent neutron fluences of 1.82 × 10(11) cm(-2) or 7.30 × 10(11) cm(-2) (corresponding to thermal neutron doses of 0.062 and 0.248 Gy, respectively) in the presence of 0, 10, 20, and 30 ppm of BSH or BPA. Since the kerma coefficient of blood increased by 0.864 × 10(-12) Gy cm(2) per 10 ppm of (10)B, the kerma coefficients in blood increase from 0.34 × 10(-12) cm(2) (blood without BSH or BPA) up to 2.93 × 10(-12) Gy cm(2) in the presence of 30 ppm of (10)B. For the (10)B(n, α)(7)Li reaction, linear dose-response relations for dicentrics with coefficients α = 0.0546 ± 0.0081 Gy(-1) for BSH and α = 0.0654 ± 0.0075 Gy(-1) for BPA were obtained at 0.062 Gy as well as α = 0.0985 ± 0.0284 Gy(-1) for BSH and α = 0.1293 ± 0.0419 Gy(-1) for BPA at 0.248 Gy. At both doses, the corresponding (10)B(n, α)(7)Li reactions from BSH and BPA are not significantly different. A linear dose-response relation for dicentrics also was obtained for the induction of apoptosis by the (10)B(n, α)(7)Li reaction at 0.248 Gy. The linear coefficients α = 0.0249 ± 0.0119 Gy(-1) for BSH and α = 0.0334 ± 0.0064 Gy(-1) for BPA are not significantly different. Independently of the applied thermal neutron doses of

  7. Prevalence of chromosomal aberrations in Mexican women with primary amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M

    2007-10-01

    Primary amenorrhoea refers to the absence of menarche by the age of 16-18 years in the presence of secondary sexual characteristics, and occurs in 1-3% of women of reproductive age. To study the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and the different options available for clinical management of women in Mexico with primary amenorrhoea, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 187 women with primary amenorrhoea referred from Department of Reproductive Medicine of Morones Prieto Hospital, IMSS in Monterrey, Mexico during 1995-2003. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were cultured for chromosomal studies by the standard methods. Numerical or structural abnormalities of the sex chromosome were found in 78 women (41.71%). These women were classified into four categories: X-chromosome aneuploidies (22.99%: 12.83% pure line and 10.16% mosaicism association with a 45, X cell line); presence of chromosome Y (10.70%); structural anomalies of the X chromosome (4.28%); and marker chromosomes (3.74%). In conclusion, the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in Mexican women with primary amenorrhoea is within the range (24-46%) reported in world literature. Chromosomal analysis is absolutely necessary for appropriate clinical management of these patients.

  8. Freshwater planarians as novel organisms for genotoxicity testing: Analysis of chromosome aberrations.

    PubMed

    Lau, Adriana Helena; Knakievicz, Tanise; Prá, Daniel; Erdtmann, Bernardo

    2007-07-01

    Two freshwater species of planarians, Girardia schubarti Marcus and G. tigrina Girard, were used for measuring chromosome aberration (CA) induction under laboratory conditions. Three genotoxicants were tested: methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), a direct-acting genotoxicant; cyclophosphamide, a metabolism-dependent genotoxicant; and gamma-radiation, a clastogenic agent. All three agents produced positive responses in both species. The strongest dose-responses were detected with MMS, and, in general, G. tigrina was somewhat more sensitive to the genotoxicity of the agents than G. schubarti. This difference in sensitivity may be due to: (a) the smaller body mass of G. tigrina; (b) differences in DNA repair, which may be reflected in the marginally higher background CA frequency of G. tigrina; and/or (c) the greater number of chromosomes in G. tigrina (2N = 16) as compared with G. schubarti (2N = 8). The responses induced by gamma-radiation in the planarians were similar to or higher than those induced in cultured human lymphocytes. The CA-planarian assay has advantages for monitoring environmental genotoxicity in natural water resources or urban and industrial wastewater since planarians are characterized by (a) a relatively low number of easily analyzable chromosomes; (b) high regenerating capacity, allowing exposure of replicating cells from different parts of the same organism to different doses; (c) easy maintenance under laboratory conditions; and (d) worldwide distribution, making them available for genotoxicity tests using either in situ or controlled laboratory exposure conditions.

  9. The relationship between sister chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations in Bloom's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Y; Sandberg, A A

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of the break points of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) was compared with that of chromosome aberrations in Bloom's syndrome by using differential sister chromatid staining and banding techniques. A comparison was made of the distribution in chromosomes 1, 2, and 3, since the exact identification of other chromosomes is difficult with the differential sister-chromatid staining technique. It was shown that SCE and chromosome breaks do not necessarily correlate as to location. Some chromosome break points, e.g., 1q21, 1p36, 2q31, 3q12, and 3p13, were common with those of SCE, whereas others (at 1p13, 2p11, 2q11, and 3q11) showed little or no SCE. SCE breaks were not observed in the centromeric regions. In addition, the SCE frequency was examined in Bloom's syndrome cells with and without chromosome aberrations, and no significant differences of SCE frequency were observed between cells with chromatid- or chromosome-type of aberrations and those with normal complements. Banding analyses indicated a nonrandom distribution of chromosome breaks in the lymphocytes and marrow cells of the Bloom's syndrome patient.

  10. Behavior of Aberrant Chromosome Configurations in Drosophila melanogaster Female Meiosis I

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, William D.; Colwell, Eileen M.; Lane, Fiona M.; Snouffer, Ashley A.

    2014-01-01

    One essential role of the first meiotic division is to reduce chromosome number by half. Although this is normally accomplished by segregating homologous chromosomes from each other, it is possible for a genome to have one or more chromosomes that lack a homolog (such as compound chromosomes), or have chromosomes with multiple potential homologs (such as in XXY females). These configurations complete meiosis but engage in unusual segregation patterns. In Drosophila melanogaster females carrying two compound chromosomes, the compounds can accurately segregate from each other, a process known as heterologous segregation. Similarly, in XXY females, when the X chromosomes fail to cross over, they often undergo secondary nondisjunction, where both Xs segregate away from the Y. Although both of these processes have been known for decades, the orientation mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Taking advantage of the recent discovery of chromosome congression in female meiosis I, we have examined a number of different aberrant chromosome configurations. We show that these genotypes complete congression normally, with their chromosomes bioriented at metaphase I arrest at the same rates that they segregate, indicating that orientation must be established during prometaphase I before congression. We also show that monovalent chromosomes can move out on the prometaphase I spindle, but the dot 4 chromosomes appear required for this movement. Finally, we show that, similar to achiasmate chromosomes, heterologous chromosomes can be connected by chromatin threads, suggesting a mechanism for how heterochromatic homology establishes these unusual biorientation patterns. PMID:25491942

  11. Karyotype evolution in apomictic Boechera and the origin of the aberrant chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mandáková, Terezie; Schranz, M Eric; Sharbel, Timothy F; de Jong, Hans; Lysak, Martin A

    2015-06-01

    Chromosome rearrangements may result in both decrease and increase of chromosome numbers. Here we have used comparative chromosome painting (CCP) to reconstruct the pathways of descending and ascending dysploidy in the genus Boechera (tribe Boechereae, Brassicaceae). We describe the origin and structure of three Boechera genomes and establish the origin of the previously described aberrant Het and Del chromosomes found in Boechera apomicts with euploid (2n = 14) and aneuploid (2n = 15) chromosome number. CCP analysis allowed us to reconstruct the origin of seven chromosomes in sexual B. stricta and apomictic B. divaricarpa from the ancestral karyotype (n = 8) of Brassicaceae lineage I. Whereas three chromosomes (BS4, BS6, and BS7) retained their ancestral structure, five chromosomes were reshuffled by reciprocal translocations to form chromosomes BS1-BS3 and BS5. The reduction of the chromosome number (from x = 8 to x = 7) was accomplished through the inactivation of a paleocentromere on chromosome BS5. In apomictic 2n = 14 plants, CCP identifies the largely heterochromatic chromosome (Het) being one of the BS1 homologues with the expansion of pericentromeric heterochromatin. In apomictic B. polyantha (2n = 15), the Het has undergone a centric fission resulting in two smaller chromosomes - the submetacentric Het' and telocentric Del. Here we show that new chromosomes can be formed by a centric fission and can be fixed in populations due to the apomictic mode of reproduction.

  12. Behavior of aberrant chromosome configurations in Drosophila melanogaster female meiosis I.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, William D; Colwell, Eileen M; Lane, Fiona M; Snouffer, Ashley A

    2014-12-09

    One essential role of the first meiotic division is to reduce chromosome number by half. Although this is normally accomplished by segregating homologous chromosomes from each other, it is possible for a genome to have one or more chromosomes that lack a homolog (such as compound chromosomes), or have chromosomes with multiple potential homologs (such as in XXY females). These configurations complete meiosis but engage in unusual segregation patterns. In Drosophila melanogaster females carrying two compound chromosomes, the compounds can accurately segregate from each other, a process known as heterologous segregation. Similarly, in XXY females, when the X chromosomes fail to cross over, they often undergo secondary nondisjunction, where both Xs segregate away from the Y. Although both of these processes have been known for decades, the orientation mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Taking advantage of the recent discovery of chromosome congression in female meiosis I, we have examined a number of different aberrant chromosome configurations. We show that these genotypes complete congression normally, with their chromosomes bioriented at metaphase I arrest at the same rates that they segregate, indicating that orientation must be established during prometaphase I before congression. We also show that monovalent chromosomes can move out on the prometaphase I spindle, but the dot 4 chromosomes appear required for this movement. Finally, we show that, similar to achiasmate chromosomes, heterologous chromosomes can be connected by chromatin threads, suggesting a mechanism for how heterochromatic homology establishes these unusual biorientation patterns.

  13. Behavior of aberrant chromosome configurations in Drosophila melanogaster female meiosis I.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, William D; Colwell, Eileen M; Lane, Fiona M; Snouffer, Ashley A

    2015-02-01

    One essential role of the first meiotic division is to reduce chromosome number by half. Although this is normally accomplished by segregating homologous chromosomes from each other, it is possible for a genome to have one or more chromosomes that lack a homolog (such as compound chromosomes), or have chromosomes with multiple potential homologs (such as in XXY females). These configurations complete meiosis but engage in unusual segregation patterns. In Drosophila melanogaster females carrying two compound chromosomes, the compounds can accurately segregate from each other, a process known as heterologous segregation. Similarly, in XXY females, when the X chromosomes fail to cross over, they often undergo secondary nondisjunction, where both Xs segregate away from the Y. Although both of these processes have been known for decades, the orientation mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Taking advantage of the recent discovery of chromosome congression in female meiosis I, we have examined a number of different aberrant chromosome configurations. We show that these genotypes complete congression normally, with their chromosomes bioriented at metaphase I arrest at the same rates that they segregate, indicating that orientation must be established during prometaphase I before congression. We also show that monovalent chromosomes can move out on the prometaphase I spindle, but the dot 4 chromosomes appear required for this movement. Finally, we show that, similar to achiasmate chromosomes, heterologous chromosomes can be connected by chromatin threads, suggesting a mechanism for how heterochromatic homology establishes these unusual biorientation patterns. PMID:25491942

  14. Karyotype evolution in apomictic Boechera and the origin of the aberrant chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mandáková, Terezie; Schranz, M Eric; Sharbel, Timothy F; de Jong, Hans; Lysak, Martin A

    2015-06-01

    Chromosome rearrangements may result in both decrease and increase of chromosome numbers. Here we have used comparative chromosome painting (CCP) to reconstruct the pathways of descending and ascending dysploidy in the genus Boechera (tribe Boechereae, Brassicaceae). We describe the origin and structure of three Boechera genomes and establish the origin of the previously described aberrant Het and Del chromosomes found in Boechera apomicts with euploid (2n = 14) and aneuploid (2n = 15) chromosome number. CCP analysis allowed us to reconstruct the origin of seven chromosomes in sexual B. stricta and apomictic B. divaricarpa from the ancestral karyotype (n = 8) of Brassicaceae lineage I. Whereas three chromosomes (BS4, BS6, and BS7) retained their ancestral structure, five chromosomes were reshuffled by reciprocal translocations to form chromosomes BS1-BS3 and BS5. The reduction of the chromosome number (from x = 8 to x = 7) was accomplished through the inactivation of a paleocentromere on chromosome BS5. In apomictic 2n = 14 plants, CCP identifies the largely heterochromatic chromosome (Het) being one of the BS1 homologues with the expansion of pericentromeric heterochromatin. In apomictic B. polyantha (2n = 15), the Het has undergone a centric fission resulting in two smaller chromosomes - the submetacentric Het' and telocentric Del. Here we show that new chromosomes can be formed by a centric fission and can be fixed in populations due to the apomictic mode of reproduction. PMID:25864414

  15. G2-chromosome aberrations induced by high-LET radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, T.; Durante, M.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Ito, H.; Wu, H.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    We report measurements of initial G2-chromatid breaks in normal human fibroblasts exposed to various types of high-LET particles. Exponentially growing AG 1522 cells were exposed to γ-rays or heavy ions. Chromosomes were prematurely condensed by calyculin A. Chromatid-type breaks and isochromatid-type breaks were scored separately. The dose response curves for the induction of total chromatid breaks (chromatid-type + isochromatid-type) and chromatid-type breaks were linear for each type of radiation. However, dose response curves for the induction of isochromatid-type breaks were linear for high-LET radiations and linear-quadratic for γ-rays. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE), calculated from total breaks, showed a LET dependent tendency with a peak at 55 keV/μm silicon (2.7) or 80 keV/μm carbon (2.7) and then decreased with LET (1.5 at 440 keV/μm). RBE for chromatid-type break peaked at 55 keV/μm (2.4) then decreased rapidly with LET. The RBE of 440 keV/μm iron particles was 0.7. The RBE calculated from induction of isochromatid-type breaks was much higher for high-LET radiations. It is concluded that the increased production of isochromatid-type breaks, induced by the densely ionizing track structure, is a signature of high-LET radiation exposure.

  16. Effect of epithalon on the incidence of chromosome aberrations in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, S V; Togo, E F; Mikheev, V S; Popovich, I G; Khavinson, V Kh; Anisimov, V N

    2002-03-01

    The incidence of chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells of 12-month-old SAMP-1 female mice characterized by accelerated aging was 1.8 times higher than in wild-type SAMR-1 females and 2.2 times higher than in SHR females of the same age. Treatment with Epithalon (Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly) starting from the age of 2 months decreased the incidence of chromosome aberrations in SAMP-1, SAMR-1, and SHR mice by 20%, 30.1%, and 17.9%, respectively, compared to age-matched controls (p<0.05). Treatment with melatonin (given with drinking water in a dose of 20 mg/liter in night hours) had no effect on the incidence of chromosome aberrations in SHR mice. These data indicate antimutagenic effect of Epithalon, which probably underlies the geroprotective effect of this peptide. PMID:12360351

  17. Induction of chromosomal aberrations by propoxur in mouse bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, R C

    1999-12-01

    Propoxur is a widely used dithiocarbamate insecticide. In this study, the clastogenic effect of propoxur has been evaluated using chromosomal aberration assay in mouse bone marrow cells. Single i.p. administration of propoxur, at 25 mg/kg b.wt., a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and 12.5 mg/kg b.wt (50% of MTD) have significantly induced different types of aberrations after 24 h of treatment. The aberrations were dose and time dependent and reached a maximum after 24 h of exposure. The results suggest a genotoxic potential of propoxur.

  18. Biodosimetry: chromosome aberration in lymphocytes and electron paramagnetic resonance in tooth enamel from atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, N; Miyazawa, C; Akiyama, M; Sawada, S; Awa, A A

    1996-01-01

    One hundred enamel samples isolated from extracted teeth donated by atomic bomb survivors were subjected to free radical measurement by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (ESR). Results comparing ESR with the chromosome aberration frequency in lymphocytes of the tooth donors, and with the physically estimated DS86 dose suggested that ESR data correlated more closely with chromosome data than with the estimated DS86 doses, probably because DS86 may depend on erroneous memory in some cases.

  19. Allium cepa chromosome aberration and micronucleus tests applied to study genotoxicity of extracts from pesticide-treated vegetables and grapes.

    PubMed

    Feretti, D; Zerbini, I; Zani, C; Ceretti, E; Moretti, M; Monarca, S

    2007-06-01

    The Allium cepa assay is an efficient test for chemical screening and in situ monitoring for genotoxicity of environmental contaminants. The test has been used widely to study genotoxicity of many pesticides revealing that these compounds can induce chromosomal aberrations in root meristems of A. cepa. Pesticide residues can be present in fruit and vegetables and represent a risk for human health. The mutagenic and carcinogenic action of herbicides, insecticides and fungicides on experimental animals is well known. Several studies have shown that chronic exposure to low levels of pesticides can cause birth defects and that prenatal exposure is associated with carcinogenicity. This study evaluated the potential application of plant genotoxicity tests for monitoring mutagens in edible vegetables. The presence of pesticides and genotoxic compounds extracted from 21 treated vegetables and eight types of grapes sampled from several markets in Campania, a region in Southern Italy, was monitored concurrently. The extracts were analysed for pesticides by gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, and for genotoxicity using two plant tests: the micronucleus test and the chromosomal aberration test in A. cepa roots. Thirty-three pesticides were detected, some of which are not approved. Genotoxicity was found in some of the vegetables and grapes tested. Allium cepa tests proved to be sensitive in monitoring genotoxicity in food extracts. The micronucleus test in interphase cells gave a much higher mutagenicity than the chromosomal aberration test in anaphase-telophase cells. PMID:17487597

  20. Noninvolvement of the X chromosome in radiation-induced chromosome translocations in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization procedures were used to examine the influence of chromosome locus on the frequency and type of chromosome aberrations induced by [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Aberrations involving the X chromosome were compared to those involving the similarly sized autosome chromosome 7. When corrected for DNA content, acentric fragments were induced with equal frequency in the X and 7 chromosomes. Dose-dependent increases in chromosomal interchanges involving chromosome 7 were noted, and the frequencies of balanced translocations and dicentrics produced were approximately equal. Chromosome interchanges involving the X chromosome were rare and showed no apparent dose dependence. Thus, while chromosomes 7 and X are equally sensitive to the induction of chromosome breaks, the X chromosome is much less likely to interact with autosomes than chromosome 7. The noninvolvement of the X chromosome in translocations with autosomes may reflect a more peripheral and separate location for the X chromosome in the mammalian nucleus. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Increased chromosome-type chromosome aberration frequencies as biomarkers of cancer risk in a blackfoot endemic area.

    PubMed

    Liou, S H; Lung, J C; Chen, Y H; Yang, T; Hsieh, L L; Chen, C J; Wu, T N

    1999-04-01

    To examine whether biomarkers such as sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosome aberrations (CAs) can predict cancer development, a nested case-control study was performed in a blackfoot endemic area with a known high cancer risk. A cohort of 686 residents was recruited from three villages in the blackfoot endemic area. Personal characteristics were collected, and venous blood was drawn for lymphocyte culture and stored in a refrigerator. The vital status and cancer development were followed using the National Death Registry, Cancer Registry, and Blackfoot Disease Registry. The follow-up period was from August 1991 to July 1995. During this 4-year period, 31 residents developed various types of cancer. Blood culture samples from nine of these subjects were unsuitable for experiments due to improper storage. Finally, a total of 22 cancer cases had cytogenetic samples that could be analyzed. Twenty-two control subjects were selected from those who did not develop cancer in the study period, and these subjects were matched to cases by sex, age, smoking habits, and residential area. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the frequencies of SCE and chromatid-type CAs between the case and control groups. However, the frequencies of chromosome-type CAs, e.g., chromosome-type gaps, chromosome-type breaks, chromosome-type breaks plus exchanges, total chromosome-type aberrations, and total frequencies of CAs in the case group, were significantly higher than those in the control group (P < 0.05). The odds ratio of cancer risk in subjects with more than zero chromosome-type breaks was 5.0 (95% confidence interval = 1.09-22.82) compared to those with zero chromosomal breaks. The odds ratios for more than zero chromosome-type breaks plus exchanges and a frequency of total chromosome-type aberrations of >1.007% were 11.0 and 12.0, respectively (P < 0.05). Subjects with a total CA frequency of >4.023% had a 9-fold increase for cancer risk. These

  2. Dynamics of chromosomal aberrations in male mice of various strains during aging.

    PubMed

    Rozenfel'd, S V; Togo, E F; Mikheev, V S; Popovich, I G; Zabezhinskii, M A; Anisimov, V N

    2001-05-01

    We studied the incidence of chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells and primary spermatocytes in various mouse strains. Experiments were performed on SAMP mice (accelerated aging), control SAMR mice, and long-living CBA and SHR mice. Experiments revealed a positive correlation between the age and the incidence of mutations in their somatic cells and gametes. PMID:11550060

  3. 40 CFR 799.9537 - TSCA in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... equally divided amongst the duplicates, if applicable. This number can be reduced when high numbers of... or a reproducible increase in the number of cells with chromosome aberrations. Biological relevance... not be the only determining factor for a positive response. (ii) An increase in the number......

  4. 40 CFR 799.9537 - TSCA in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... equally divided amongst the duplicates, if applicable. This number can be reduced when high numbers of... or a reproducible increase in the number of cells with chromosome aberrations. Biological relevance... not be the only determining factor for a positive response. (ii) An increase in the number......

  5. Stable chromosome aberration frequencies in men occupationally exposed to radiation.

    PubMed

    Tawn, E Janet; Whitehouse, Caroline A

    2003-09-01

    The introduction of fluorescence in situ hybridisation techniques to cytogenetic biodosimetry has enabled the detection of stable aberrations, e.g. translocations, which can provide an integrated measure of radiation exposure. The opportunity to study stable aberration frequencies in lymphocyte cultures from occupationally exposed workers with well-documented dosimetry records enables the establishment of dose-response relationships which can be compared with those obtained from studies of populations with high acute exposures. Since there is good mechanistic evidence for the role of translocations in oncogenesis, this provides an insight into the risks associated with low-dose exposure for which no direct epidemiological evidence is available. This paper provides preliminary data on a group of 98 individuals with cumulative occupational doses > 500 mSv and 96 controls with doses < 50 mSv. An increased frequency of translocations was found for the high-dose group (20.50 +/- 0.78 x 10(-3) per genome equivalent) in comparison with the control group (11.71 +/- 0.59 x 10(-3) per genome equivalent). Further analysis of the control group revealed increasing frequencies of translocations with increasing age. An increase associated with ever-smoking status was found for the control group which appeared to be driven by the lower age groups but no overall effect of smoking was seen in the > 500 mSv group.

  6. A Monte-Carlo Model for the Formation of Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cornforth, Michael N.; Loucas, Brad D.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To simulate radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells (e.g., rings, translocations, and dicentrics) and to calculate their frequency distributions following exposure to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) produced by high-LET ions. Methods: The interphase genome was assumed to be comprised of a collection of 2 kbp rigid-block monomers following the random-walk geometry. Additional details for the modeling of chromosomal structure, such as chromosomal domains and chromosomal loops, were included. A radial energy profile for heavy ion tracks was used to simulate the high-LET pattern of induced DSBs. The induced DSB pattern depended on the ion charge and kinetic energy, but always corresponded to the DSB yield of 25 DSBs/cell/Gy. The sum of all energy contributions from Poisson-distributed particle tracks was taken to account for all possible one-track and multi-track effects. The relevant output of the model was DNA fragments produced by DSBs. The DSBs, or breakpoints, were defined by (x, y, z, l) positions, where x, y, z were the Euclidian coordinates of a DSB, and where l was the relative position along the genome. Results: The code was used to carry out Monte Carlo simulations for DSB rejoinings at low doses. The resulting fragments were analyzed to estimate the frequencies of specific types of chromosomal aberrations. Histograms for relative frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and P.D.F.s (probability density functions) of a given aberration type were produced. The relative frequency of dicentrics to rings was compared to empirical data to calibrate rejoining probabilities. Of particular interest was the predicted distribution of ring sizes, irrespective of their frequencies relative to other aberrations. Simulated ring sizes were . 4 kbp, which are far too small to be observed experimentally (i.e., by microscopy) but which, nevertheless, are conjectured to exist. Other aberrations, for example, inversions, translocations, as well as

  7. Effect of met-enkephalin on chromosomal aberrations in the lymphocytes of the peripheral blood of patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rakanović-Todić, Maida; Burnazović-Ristić, Lejla; Ibrulj, Slavka; Mulabegović, Nedžad

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous opiod met-enkephalin throughout previous research manifested cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Previous research suggests that met-enkephalin has cytogenetic effects. Reducement in the frequency of structural chromosome aberrations as well as a suppressive effect on lymphocyte cell cycle is found. It also reduces apoptosis in the blood samples of the patients with immune-mediated diseases. Met-enkephalin exerts immunomodulatory properties and induces stabilization of the clinical condition in patients with multiple Sclerosis (MS). The goal of the present research was to evaluate met-enkephalin in vitro effects on the number and type of chromosome aberrations in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with MS. Our research detected disappearance of ring chromosomes and chromosome fragmentations in the cultures of the peripheral blood lymphocytes treated with met-enkephalin (1.2 μg/mL). However, this research did not detect any significant effects of met-enkephalin on the reduction of structural chromosome aberrations and disappearance of dicentric chromosomes. Chromosomes with the greatest percent of inclusion in chromosome aberrations were noted as: chromosome 1, chromosome 2 and chromosome 9. Additionally, we confirmed chromosome 14 as the most frequently included in translocations. Furthermore, met-enkephalin effects on the increase of the numerical aberrations in both concentrations applied were detected. Those findings should be interpreted cautiously and more research in this field should be conducted. PMID:24856378

  8. Kinetics of DSB rejoining and formation of simple chromosome exchange aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Nikjoo, H.; O'Neill, P.; Goodhead, D. T.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the role of kinetics in the processing of DNA double strand breaks (DSB), and the formation of simple chromosome exchange aberrations following X-ray exposures to mammalian cells based on an enzymatic approach. METHODS: Using computer simulations based on a biochemical approach, rate-equations that describe the processing of DSB through the formation of a DNA-enzyme complex were formulated. A second model that allows for competition between two processing pathways was also formulated. The formation of simple exchange aberrations was modelled as misrepair during the recombination of single DSB with undamaged DNA. Non-linear coupled differential equations corresponding to biochemical pathways were solved numerically by fitting to experimental data. RESULTS: When mediated by a DSB repair enzyme complex, the processing of single DSB showed a complex behaviour that gives the appearance of fast and slow components of rejoining. This is due to the time-delay caused by the action time of enzymes in biomolecular reactions. It is shown that the kinetic- and dose-responses of simple chromosome exchange aberrations are well described by a recombination model of DSB interacting with undamaged DNA when aberration formation increases with linear dose-dependence. Competition between two or more recombination processes is shown to lead to the formation of simple exchange aberrations with a dose-dependence similar to that of a linear quadratic model. CONCLUSIONS: Using a minimal number of assumptions, the kinetics and dose response observed experimentally for DSB rejoining and the formation of simple chromosome exchange aberrations are shown to be consistent with kinetic models based on enzymatic reaction approaches. A non-linear dose response for simple exchange aberrations is possible in a model of recombination of DNA containing a DSB with undamaged DNA when two or more pathways compete for DSB repair.

  9. Persistent chromosome aberrations in the somatic cells of A-bomb survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Awa, A A

    1991-03-01

    Current status of knowledge on the radiation-induced chromosome aberrations persisting since their induction in 1945 to date in the somatic cells of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki is reviewed. Dose-response relationship for chromosome aberration frequencies observed with the use of the old A-bomb dosimetry system (T65D) is also demonstrable based on the new dosimetry system (DS86). Despite the fact that the remarkable decrease in the amount of neutron component relative to the total dose in Hiroshima, there still exist inter-city differences in aberration frequency per unit dose both for kerma and bone marrow dose; the dose-square term is smaller in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. The differential contribution of neutron radiation may be responsible in some part for the observed difference between Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although proof still remains to be obtained. There is a wide variability of the frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations between survivors within a given dose range. Random errors in the dose estimates assigned to individual survivors seem responsible, to a large extent, for the observed overdispersions in aberration frequencies in both cities. New molecular biology-oriented techniques to differentially stain specific chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific composite DNA probes seem extremely promising for future rapid, accurate and extensive screening of reciprocal translocations observed predominantly in A-bomb survivors. Such data may be utilized to establish a better biological dosimetry system, especially for those persons who are irradiated in vivo many years before cytogenetic examinations.

  10. Chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Durante, M.; Wu, H.; Willingham, V.; Badhwar, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of the lymphocytes of astronauts provides a direct measurement of space radiation damage in vivo, which takes into account individual radiosensitivity and considers the influence of microgravity and other stress conditions. Chromosome exchanges were measured in the blood lymphocytes of eight crew members after their respective space missions, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Significant increases in aberrations were observed after the long-duration missions. The in vivo dose was derived from the frequencies of translocations and total exchanges using calibration curves determined before flight, and the RBE was estimated by comparison with individually measured physical absorbed doses. The values for average RBE were compared to the average quality factor (Q) from direct measurements of the lineal energy spectra using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and radiation transport codes. The ratio of aberrations identified as complex was slightly higher after flight, which is thought to be an indication of exposure to high-LET radiation. To determine whether the frequency of complex aberrations measured in metaphase spreads after exposure to high-LET radiation was influenced by a cell cycle delay, chromosome damage was analyzed in prematurely condensed chromosome samples collected from two crew members before and after a short-duration mission. The frequency of complex exchanges after flight was higher in prematurely condensed chromosomes than in metaphase cells for one crew member.

  11. Chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts after space flight.

    PubMed

    George, K; Durante, M; Wu, H; Willingham, V; Badhwar, G; Cucinotta, F A

    2001-12-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of the lymphocytes of astronauts provides a direct measurement of space radiation damage in vivo, which takes into account individual radiosensitivity and considers the influence of microgravity and other stress conditions. Chromosome exchanges were measured in the blood lymphocytes of eight crew members after their respective space missions, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Significant increases in aberrations were observed after the long-duration missions. The in vivo dose was derived from the frequencies of translocations and total exchanges using calibration curves determined before flight, and the RBE was estimated by comparison with individually measured physical absorbed doses. The values for average RBE were compared to the average quality factor (Q) from direct measurements of the lineal energy spectra using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and radiation transport codes. The ratio of aberrations identified as complex was slightly higher after flight, which is thought to be an indication of exposure to high-LET radiation. To determine whether the frequency of complex aberrations measured in metaphase spreads after exposure to high-LET radiation was influenced by a cell cycle delay, chromosome damage was analyzed in prematurely condensed chromosome samples collected from two crew members before and after a short-duration mission. The frequency of complex exchanges after flight was higher in prematurely condensed chromosomes than in metaphase cells for one crew member. PMID:11741497

  12. Stability of chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts measured after space flight by FISH chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    George, K; Willingham, V; Cucinotta, F A

    2005-10-01

    Follow-up measurements of chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts were performed by FISH chromosome painting at various intervals from 5 months to more than 5 years after space flight and compared to preflight baseline measurements. For five of the six astronauts studied, the analysis of individual time courses for translocations revealed a temporal decline of yields with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months after flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction, and the differences in the decay time may reflect individual variability in risk from space radiation exposure. PMID:16187752

  13. Stability of chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts measured after space flight by FISH chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    George, K; Willingham, V; Cucinotta, F A

    2005-10-01

    Follow-up measurements of chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts were performed by FISH chromosome painting at various intervals from 5 months to more than 5 years after space flight and compared to preflight baseline measurements. For five of the six astronauts studied, the analysis of individual time courses for translocations revealed a temporal decline of yields with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months after flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction, and the differences in the decay time may reflect individual variability in risk from space radiation exposure.

  14. Stability of chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts measured after space flight by FISH chromosome painting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2005-01-01

    Follow-up measurements of chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts were performed by FISH chromosome painting at various intervals from 5 months to more than 5 years after space flight and compared to preflight baseline measurements. For five of the six astronauts studied, the analysis of individual time courses for translocations revealed a temporal decline of yields with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months after flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction, and the differences in the decay time may reflect individual variability in risk from space radiation exposure.

  15. Effect of lET and track structure on the statistical analysis of chromosome aberrations: Use of the convoluted Poisson-Neyman distribution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Lee, R.; Nasonova, E.; Scholz, M.

    Chromosome aberration data obtained for various types of mammalian cells including human lymphocytes after exposure to low and high LET clearly demonstrate the differences in the energy deposition pattern of both radiation qualities In our paper the distribution of chromosome aberrations observed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after exposure to 900 MeV u Fe ions are analyzed and compared to the effects of 250 kV X-rays After low LET exposure the distribution of aberrations among cells at the first post-irradiation mitosis is characterized by a Poisson distribution reflecting a simple random distribution of damages as expected according to the homogeneous pattern of energy distribution On the contrary after high LET exposure the distribution of aberrations reflects the microscopic inhomogeneity of energy depositions If particle hits to the cell nucleus can be viewed as independent events each contributing with an average number of aberrations per hit the overall distribution of aberrations can be represented by a compound Poisson Neyman statistics However in the case of high energetic particles the radial extension of the particle tracks cannot be neglected due to overlap effects from different tracks the particle traversals cannot be treated as independent In this case the distribution of aberrations is characterized by a mixture of a Neyman distribution with a background of a Poisson-type distribution representing the contributions from the center part of the tracks and the outer overlapping part of the tracks respectively

  16. Spectral karyotyping analysis of human and mouse chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Barenboim-Stapleton, Linda; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Ried, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Classical banding methods provide basic information about the identities and structures of chromosomes on the basis of their unique banding patterns. Spectral karyotyping (SKY), and the related multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH), are chromosome-specific multicolor FISH techniques that augment cytogenetic evaluations of malignant disease by providing additional information and improved characterization of aberrant chromosomes that contain DNA sequences not identifiable using conventional banding methods. SKY is based on cohybridization of combinatorially labeled chromosome-painting probes with unique fluorochrome signatures onto human or mouse metaphase chromosome preparations. Image acquisition and analysis use a specialized imaging system, combining Sagnac interferometer and CCD camera images to reconstruct spectral information at each pixel. Here we present a protocol for SKY analysis using commercially available SkyPaint probes, including procedures for metaphase chromosome preparation, slide pretreatment and probe hybridization and detection. SKY analysis requires approximately 6 d. PMID:17406576

  17. Frequency, molecular pathology and potential clinical significance of partial chromosome 3 aberrations in uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H; Christopher, Benjamin N; Faramawi, Mohammed F; Said-Ahmed, Khaled; Cole, Carol; McFaddin, Andrew; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Heerema, Nyla; Davidorf, Frederick H

    2011-07-01

    The clinical significance of partial chromosome 3 alteration in uveal melanoma is still not clear. Also, the reported frequencies vary considerably in the published literature from 0 to 48%. The aims of the following study were to identify the frequency, molecular pathology and potential clinical significance of partial chromosome 3 alteration in uveal melanoma. We studied 47 uveal melanomas with an average follow-up of 36 months. Of these, 14 had confirmed metastasis. Allelic imbalance/loss of heterozygosity was studied using microsatellite markers on chromosome 3 enriched in markers located in the previously reported smallest regions of deletion overlap. Chromosomal alterations were assessed by conventional cytogenetics or comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) in a subset of patients. Utilizing genotyping, partial chromosome 3 alteration was detected in 14/47 tumors (30%). In the 23 tumors with available cytogenetic/CGH, partial chromosome 3 alteration was detected in 8/23 (38%) and was caused by both gains (4/8) and losses (4/8) of chromosome 3 with high frequency of complex chromosome 3 aberrations detected by cytogenetics. Out of the 14 tumors with confirmed metastasis, only 1 showed partial chromosome 3 alteration and the remaining showed monosomy 3. By limiting the aggressive disease marker to monosomy 3, genotyping showed 93% sensitivity and 67% specificity for detection of aggressive uveal melanoma. In conclusion, partial chromosome 3 alterations are common in uveal melanoma and mostly caused by complex cytogenetic changes leading to partial gains and/or partial losses of chromosome 3. Partial chromosome 3 alteration is not likely to be associated with highly aggressive uveal melanoma that metastasizes within the first 3 years after treatment. Microsatellite-based genotyping of chromosome 3 is highly sensitive for detection of aggressive uveal melanoma.

  18. The inhibition of CHO-K1-BH4 cell proliferation and induction of chromosomal aberrations by brevetoxins in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, A.N.; Hu, Q.; Bourdelais, A.J.; Baden, D.G.; Gibson, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Brevetoxins (PbTxs) are highly potent trans-syn polyether neurotoxins produced during blooms of several species of marine dinoflagellates, most notably Karenia brevis. These neurotoxins act on voltage-sensitive sodium channels prolonging the active state. During red tides, the commercial fishing and tourism industries experience millions of dollars of lost revenue. Human consumption of shellfish contaminated with PbTxs results in neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). Additionally, blooms of K. brevis are potentially responsible for adverse human health effects such as respiratory irritation and airway constriction in coastal residents. There is little information regarding the full range of potential toxic effects caused by PbTxs. Recent evidence suggests that PbTxs are genotoxic substances. The purpose of this study was to determine if PbTxs could induce chromosomal aberrations and inhibit cellular proliferation in CHO-K1-BH4 cells, and if so, could the damage be negated or reduced by the PbTx antagonist brevenal. Results from the chromosomal aberrations assay demonstrated that PbTxs are potent inducers of CHO-K1-BH4 chromosome damage. Results from the inhibition of cellular proliferation assays demonstrated that PbTxs inhibit the ability of CHO-K1-BH4 cells to proliferate, an effect which can be reduced with brevenal. PMID:16487644

  19. Low level radiation and chromosome aberrations. January, 1970-May, 1981 (citations from Pollution Abstracts). Report, for January 1970-May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    This retrospective bibliography contains citations concerning low level radiation and the incidence of chromosome aberration. Many types of chromosome abnormalities are covered and include aneuploidy and nondisjunction. Hematopoietic pathology and the increased risk of cancer are noted. The cytological methods available to study chromosomes are mentioned. (Contains 61 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  20. Chromosome aberrations of clonal origin are present in astronauts' blood lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Durante, M.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation-induced chromosome translocations remain in peripheral blood cells over many years, and can potentially be used to measure retrospective doses or prolonged low-dose rate exposures. However, several recent studies have indicated that some individuals possess clones of cells with balanced chromosome abnormalities, which can result in an overestimation of damage and, therefore, influence the accuracy of dose calculations. We carefully examined the patterns of chromosome damage found in the blood lymphocytes of twelve astronauts, and also applied statistical methods to screen for the presence of potential clones. Cells with clonal aberrations were identified in three of the twelve individuals. These clonal cells were present in samples collected both before and after space flight, and yields are higher than previously reported for healthy individuals in this age range (40-52 years of age). The frequency of clonal damage appears to be even greater in chromosomes prematurely condensed in interphase, when compared with equivalent analysis in metaphase cells. The individuals with clonal aberrations were followed-up over several months and the yields of all clones decreased during this period. Since clonal aberrations may be associated with increased risk of tumorigenesis, it is important to accurately identify cells containing clonal rearrangements for risk assessment as well as biodosimetry. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Disruption of Maternal DNA Repair Increases Sperm-DerivedChromosomal Aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Essers, Jeroun; Kanaar, Roland; Wyrobek,Andrew J.

    2007-02-07

    The final weeks of male germ cell differentiation occur in aDNA repair-deficient environment and normal development depends on theability of the egg to repair DNA damage in the fertilizing sperm. Geneticdisruption of maternal DNA double-strand break repair pathways in micesignificantly increased the frequency of zygotes with chromosomalstructural aberrations after paternal exposure to ionizing radiation.These findings demonstrate that radiation-induced DNA sperm lesions arerepaired after fertilization by maternal factors and suggest that geneticvariation in maternal DNA repair can modulate the risk of early pregnancylosses and of children with chromosomal aberrations of paternalorigin.

  2. Cell-autonomous correction of ring chromosomes in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershteyn, Marina; Hayashi, Yohei; Desachy, Guillaume; Hsiao, Edward C.; Sami, Salma; Tsang, Kathryn M.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Ring chromosomes are structural aberrations commonly associated with birth defects, mental disabilities and growth retardation. Rings form after fusion of the long and short arms of a chromosome, and are sometimes associated with large terminal deletions. Owing to the severity of these large aberrations that can affect multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have been proposed. During cell division, ring chromosomes can exhibit unstable behaviour leading to continuous production of aneuploid progeny with low viability and high cellular death rate. The overall consequences of this chromosomal instability have been largely unexplored in experimental model systems. Here we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient fibroblasts containing ring chromosomes with large deletions and found that reprogrammed cells lost the abnormal chromosome and duplicated the wild-type homologue through the compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD) mechanism. The karyotypically normal iPSCs with isodisomy for the corrected chromosome outgrew co-existing aneuploid populations, enabling rapid and efficient isolation of patient-derived iPSCs devoid of the original chromosomal aberration. Our results suggest a fundamentally different function for cellular reprogramming as a means of `chromosome therapy' to reverse combined loss-of-function across many genes in cells with large-scale aberrations involving ring structures. In addition, our work provides an experimentally tractable human cellular system for studying mechanisms of chromosomal number control, which is of critical relevance to human development and disease.

  3. The effect of track structure on the induction of chromosomal aberrations in murine cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Cella, L.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Saito, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure chromosome aberrations in C3H 10T1/2 mouse fibroblasts using FISH painting at the first mitosis following exposure to 30 keV/microm hydrogen or neon ions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cells in plateau-phase were irradiated with 0.86 MeV protons at the TTT-3 Tandem accelerator in Naples (Italy), or with 400 MeV/n Ne ions at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (Japan). Colcemid-blocked cells were harvested at the first mitosis following exposure, and chromosome spreads were hybridized in situ with a fluorescein-labelled composite mouse DNA probe specific for chromosomes 2 and 8. RESULTS: Protons were more efficient than neon ions at the same LET in the induction of chromosome interchanges and breaks. Yields of complex exchanges were similar for both particles at the same dose, but protons produced mostly insertions, while with Ne exposure non-reciprocal exchanges were the most frequent complex-type exchange. CONCLUSIONS: Charged particles with the same LET produce different yields of chromosome aberrations, and some observed differences can be explained based on the available track-structure models.

  4. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, D. C.; Dolphin, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis for chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes has been developed as an indicator of dose from ionising radiation. This paper outlines the mechanism of production of aberrations, the technique for their analysis and the dose-effect relationships for various types of radiation. During the past ten years the National Radiological Protection Board has developed a service for the UK in which estimates of dose from chromosome aberration analysis are made on people known or suspected of being accidentally over-exposed. This service can provide estimates where no physical dosemeter was worn and is frequently able to resolve anomalous or disputed data from routine film badges. Several problems in the interpretation of chromosome aberration yields are reviewed. These include the effects of partial body irradiation and the response to variations in dose rate and the intermittent nature of some exposures. The dosimetry service is supported by a research programme which includes surveys of groups of patients irradiated for medical purposes. Two surveys are described. In the first, lymphocyte aberrations were examined in rheumatiod arthritis patients receiving intra-articular injections of colloidal radiogold or radioyttrium. A proportion of the nuclide leaked from the joint into the regional lymphatic system. In the second survey a comparison was made between the cytogenetic and physical estimates of whole body dose in patients receiving iodine 131 for thyroid carcinoma. Images PMID:338021

  5. Induction of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of asbestotic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fatma, N.; Khan, S.G.; Aslam, M.; Rahman, Q. )

    1992-04-01

    In the present study, cytogenetic effects of Indian chrysotile asbestos in rat bone marrow cells after 290 days of intratracheal inoculation, when it develops massive pulmonary fibrosis, were investigated. The pulmonary fibrosis was confirmed by both histopathological studies and increased collagen content in the lung of the treated animals. In the asbestotic rats a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations was recorded and a decrease in mitotic index of bone marrow cells. The types of chromosomal aberrations in these cells were chromatid gaps and breaks. The results indicate the significant cytogenetic changes in the bone marrow cells of asbestotic rats and also suggest that these changes directly or indirectly may be one of the biological events involved in eliciting the asbestos-mediated toxic responses.

  6. Chromosome aberrations induced in patients treated with telecobalt therapy for mammary carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, J.L.; Gerber, G.B.; Leonard, A.; Richard, F.; Wambersie, A.

    1981-04-01

    The yields of dicentric and ring chromosomes were recorded during telecobalt therapy for mammary carcinoma. The data were fitted to a power or a quadratic function and were compared with those obtained in patients treated for ankylosing spondylitis and nuclear dockyard workers as well as with the results of an in vitro blood irradiation. As expected, the aberration yield for the same absorbed dose level is much greater after irradiation of ankylosing spondylitis than after irradiation for mammary carcinoma; lymphocytes exposed in vitro display the highest rate of aberration. A deviation of the aberrations observed in cells of the mammary carcinoma patients from the theoretical Poisson distribution also indicates that not all lymphocytes in the body has been exposed under these conditions.

  7. Changes in Sperm Motility and Capacitation Induce Chromosomal Aberration of the Bovine Embryo following Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoku; Nagao, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has become the method of choice to treat human male infertility. One of the outstanding problems associated with this technique is our current lack of knowledge concerning the effect of sperm capacitation and motility upon the subsequent development of oocytes following ICSI. In the present study, we first examined the capacitation state of sperm exhibiting normal motility, along with sperm that had been activated, and examined the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by these sperm types upon embryogenesis following bovine in vitro fertilization (IVF) and ICSI. Data showed that activated sperm reduced the chromosomal integrity of IVF/ICSI embryos at the blastocyst stage, while capacitated sperm produced ROS in capacitation media. Secondly, we treated sperm with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazine (CCCP), a chemical known to uncouple cell respiration within the mitochondria, and investigated the effect of this treatment upon blastocyst formation and chromosomal integrity at the blastocyst stage. Activated sperm in which the mitochondria had been treated with CCCP reduced levels of chromosomal aberration at the blastocyst stage following ICSI, by reducing mitochondrial activity in activated sperm. In conclusion, these findings suggest that capacitated sperm exhibiting activated motility induced chromosomal aberration during development to the blastocyst stage following ICSI. The injection of sperm exhibiting normal motility, or activated sperm in which mitochondrial activity had been reduced, improved the quality of ICSI-derived embryos. Therefore, the selection of sperm exhibiting progressive motility may not always be better for early embryo development and fetal growth following human ICSI, and that the use of a bovine model may contribute to a deeper understanding of sperm selection for human ICSI embryo development.

  8. Brahmarasayana protects against Ethyl methanesulfonate or Methyl methanesulfonate induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine has given great emphasis to the promotion of health. Rasayana is one of the eight branches of Ayurveda which refers to rejuvenant therapy. It has been reported that rasayanas have immuno-modulatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions, however, the genotoxic potential and modulation of DNA repair of many rasayanas have not been evaluated. Methods The present study assessed the role of Brahmarasayana (BR) on Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-and Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced genotoxicity and DNA repair in in vivo mouse test system. The mice were orally fed with BR (5 g or 8 mg / day) for two months and 24 h later EMS or MMS was given intraperitoneally. The genotoxicity was analyzed by chromosomal aberrations, sperm count, and sperm abnormalities. Results The results have revealed that BR did not induce significant chromosomal aberrations when compared to that of the control animals (p >0.05). On the other hand, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations induced by EMS (240 mg / kg body weight) or MMS (125 mg / kg body weight) were significantly higher (p<0.05) to that of the control group. The treatment of BR for 60 days and single dose of EMS or MMS on day 61, resulted in significant (p <0.05) reduction in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in comparison to EMS or MMS treatment alone, indicating a protective effect of BR. Constitutive base excision repair capacity was also increased in BR treated animals. Conclusion The effect of BR, as it relates to antioxidant activity was not evident in liver tissue however rasayana treatment was observed to increase constitutive DNA base excision repair and reduce clastogenicity. Whilst, the molecular mechanisms of such repair need further exploration, this is the first report to demonstrate these effects and provides further evidence for the role of brahmarasayana in the possible improvement of quality of life. PMID:22853637

  9. Chromosome aberrations produced by radiation: The relationship between excess acentric fragments and dicentrics

    SciTech Connect

    Hahnfeldt, P.; Hlatky, L.R.; Brenner, D.J.; Sachs, R.K.

    1995-02-01

    Most chromosome aberrations produced by ionizing radiation develop from DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Published date on the yield and variance of excess acentric fragments after in vitro irradiation of human lymphocytes were compared with corresponding data on dicentrics. At low LET the number of excess acentric fragments is about 60% of the number of dicentrics, independent of dose and perhaps of dose rate, suggesting that dicentrics and excess acentric fragments arise from similar kinetics rather than from fundamentally different reactions. Only a weak dependence of the ratio on LET is observed. These results are quantified using generalizations of models for pairwise DSB interactions suggested by Brewen and Brock based on data for marsupial cells. By allowing singly incomplete and some {open_quotes}doubly incomplete{close_quotes} exchanges, the models can also account for the experimental observation that the dispersion for excess acentric fragments, a measure of cell-to-cell variance, is systematically larger than the dispersion for dicentrics. Numerical estimates of an incompleteness parameter are derived. 47 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Molecular and clinical characteristics of 26 cases with structural Y chromosome aberrations.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-W; Park, S-Y; Ryu, H-M; Lee, D-E; Lee, B-Y; Kim, S-Y; Park, Y-S; Lee, H-S; Seo, J-T

    2012-01-01

    Structural abnormalities include various types of translocations, inversions, deletions, duplications and isochromosomes. Structural abnormalities of the Y chromosome are estimated to affect less than 1% of the newborn male population and are particularly hazardous for male reproductive function. The objective of this study was to characterize a group of patients with structural abnormalities of the Y chromosome. All patients who visited our laboratory between 2007 and 2010 underwent cytogenetic investigations. Among these, we detected 26 patients with structural abnormalities of the Y chromosome. To confirm the structural Y chromosome alterations, we used special bandings, FISH and multiplex PCR to detect Y chromosome microdeletions. Of the 26 patients presented here, 11 had an isodicentric Y chromosome, 7 had an inversion, 3 had a translocation, 2 had a derivative, 2 had a Yqs and 1 had a deletion. Sixteen were diagnosed with azoospermia, 8 as normal fertile males and 1 as a man who was unable to donate semen due to mental retardation. One of the patients having 45,X/46,X,idic(Y) was reported to be phenotypically female with primary amenorrhea and without uterus. Deletions of the AZFbc region were correlated with the sperm concentration (p < 0.05), but no correlation with the levels of FSH, LH, testosterone, prolactin and estradiol were found. The present report shows that the precise identification of structural Y chromosome aberrations may be clinically important for genetic counseling and assisted reproductive technology treatment.

  11. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Chromosomal Aberrations in DNA Repair Defective Cell Lines: Comparisons of Dose Rate and Radiation Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K. A.; Hada, M.; Patel, Z.; Huff, J.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome aberration yields were assessed in DNA double-strand break repair (DSB) deficient cells after acute doses of gamma-rays or high-LET iron nuclei, or low dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma-rays. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post-irradiation and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma radiation induced higher yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both chromosome exchange types were significantly higher for the ATM and NBS defective lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges in the NBS cells. Large increases in the quadratic dose response terms indicate the important roles of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications that facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize aberration formation. Differences in the response of AT and NBS deficient cells at lower doses suggests important questions about the applicability of observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low dose exposures. For all iron nuclei irradiated cells, regression models preferred purely linear and quadratic dose responses for simple and complex exchanges, respectively. All the DNA repair defective cell lines had lower Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values than normal cells, the lowest being for the DNA-PK-deficient cells, which was near unity. To further

  13. Early and Late Chromosome Damages in Human Lymphocytes Induced by Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations and inversions are considered stable, and cells containing these types of chromosome aberrations can survive multiple cell divisions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. Detailed analysis of chromosome break ends participating in exchanges revealed a greater fraction of break ends involved in intrachromosome aberrations in the 7- and 14-day samples in comparison to the fraction at first mitosis. In particular, simple inversions were found at 7 and 14 days, but not at the first mitosis, suggesting that some of the aberrations might be formed days post irradiation. In contrast, at the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Comparison between low and high doses of Fe ion irradiation in the induction of late damages will also be discussed.

  14. Chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from women irradiated for benign and malignant gynecological disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinerman, R.A.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Inskip, P.D.; Tarone, R.E.; Littlefield, L.G.; Sayer, A.M.; Cookfair, D.L.; Wactawski-Wende, J.

    1994-07-01

    Excess leukemias have occurred after partial-body radiotherapy for cervical cancer and benign gynecological disease (BGD). However, the level of risk is nearly the same in both groups, about twofold, despite a tenfold difference in average dose to active bone marrow. High-dose cell killing has been postulated as one explanation for this apparent inconsistency. To examine whether chromosome aberration rates observed in lymphocytes many years after exposure might serve as population markers of cancer risk, blood samples were taken from 60 women treated for BGD (34 with radiation) and cytogenetic data compared with previous results from 96 women irradiated for cervical cancer. Remarkably, the rate of stable aberrations, which reflects nonlethal damage in surviving stem cells, was only slightly higher among the cancer patients. Thus the lower-dose regimens to treat benign disorders resulted in much higher aberration yields per unit dose than those for cervical cancer. Assuming that the fraction of cytogenetically aberrant stem cells that survive radiotherapy contributes to the leukemogenic process, these data are then consistent with the epidemiological observations of comparable overall leukemia risks seen in these two irradiated populations. Accordingly, for patient populations given partial-body radiotherapy, stable aberrations at a long time after exposure appear to serve as biomarkers of effective risk rather than as biomarkers of radiation dose received. 30 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  16. Construction of human chromosome 21-specific yeast artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M K; Shero, J H; Cheung, M C; Kan, Y W; Hieter, P A; Antonarakis, S E

    1989-12-01

    Chromosome 21-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) have been constructed by a method that performs all steps in agarose, allowing size selection by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and the use of nanogram to microgram quantities of DNA. The DNA sources used were hybrid cell line WAV-17, containing chromosome 21 as the only human chromosome and flow-sorted chromosome 21. The transformation efficiency of ligation products was similar to that obtained in aqueous transformations and yielded YACs with sizes ranging from 100 kilobases (kb) to greater than 1 megabase when polyamines were included in the transformation procedure. Twenty-five YACs containing human DNA have been obtained from a mouse-human hybrid, ranging in size from 200 to greater than 1000 kb, with an average size of 410 kb. Ten of these YACs were localized to subregions of chromosome 21 by hybridization of RNA probes (corresponding to the YAC ends recovered in Escherichia coli) to a panel of somatic cell hybrid DNA. Twenty-one human YACs, ranging in size from 100 to 500 kb, with an average size of 150 kb, were obtained from approximately equal to 50 ng of flow-sorted chromosome 21 DNA. Three were localized to subregions of chromosome 21. YACs will aid the construction of a physical map of human chromosome 21 and the study of disorders associated with chromosome 21 such as Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome.

  17. Nuclear anomalies, chromosomal aberrations and proliferation rates in cultured lymphocytes of head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    George, Alex; Dey, Rupraj; Bhuria, Vikas; Banerjee, Shouvik; Ethirajan, Sivakumar; Siluvaimuthu, Ashok; Saraswathy, Radha

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNC) are extremely complex disease types and it is likely that chromosomal instability is involved in the genetic mechanisms of its genesis. However, there is little information regarding the background levels of chromosome instability in these patients. In this pilot study, we examined spontaneous chromosome instability in short-term lymphocyte cultures (72 hours) from 72 study subjects - 36 newly diagnosed HNC squamous cell carcinoma patients and 36 healthy ethnic controls. We estimated chromosome instability (CIN) using chromosomal aberration (CA) analysis and nuclear level anomalies using the Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus Cytome Assay (CBMN Cyt Assay). The proliferation rates in cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were assessed by calculating the Cytokinesis Block Proliferation Index (CBPI). Our results showed a significantly higher mean level of spontaneous chromosome type aberrations (CSAs), chromatid type aberration (CTAs) dicentric chromosomes (DIC) and chromosome aneuploidy (CANEUP) in patients (CSAs, 0.0294±0.0038; CTAs, 0.0925±0.0060; DICs, 0.0213±0.0028; and CANEUPs, 0.0308±0.0035) compared to controls (CSAs, 0.0005±0.0003; CTAs, 0.0058±0.0015; DICs, 0.0005±0.0003; and CANEUPs, 0.0052±0.0013) where p<0.001. Similarly, spontaneous nuclear anomalies showed significantly higher mean level of micronuclei (MNi), nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and nuclear buds (NBUDs) among cases (MNi, 0.01867±0.00108; NPBs, 0.01561±0.00234; NBUDs, 0.00658±0.00068) compared with controls (MNi, 0.00027±0.00009; NPBs, 0.00002±0.00002; NBUDs, 0.00011±0.00007).The evaluation of CBPI supported genomic instability in the peripheral blood lymphocytes showing a significantly lower proliferation rate in HNC patients (1.525±0.005552) compared to healthy subjects (1.686±0.009520 ) (p<0.0001). In conclusion, our preliminary results showed that visible spontaneous genomic instability and low rate proliferation in the cultured peripheral

  18. Induction of chromosome aberrations by cis-platinum(II)diamminodichloride in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Brodberg, R.K.; Lyman, R.F.; Woodruff, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have determined the in vivo effects of cis-platinum(II)diamminodichloride (cis-PDD) treatment on the induction of chromosome aberrations in Drosophila melanogaster germ cells. cis-PDD treatment induces significant increases in chromosome breakage in all stages of spermatogenesis in a battery of test systems using ring or rod-X males and repair-proficient or deficient females. Since no increase in nondisjunction was induced by cis-PDD in either male or female germ cells, any aneuploidy inducing effects of this compound should result from its clastogenic action. They also find that mei-9 excision repair function is involved in the repair of cis-PDD-induced DNA lesions in a manner that provides additional evidence that partital and ring chromosome losses are not completely homologous.

  19. Disruption of human vigilin impairs chromosome condensation and segregation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ling; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Junhong; Li, Ran; Shen, Wenyan; Duan, Shuwang; Zhao, Rongce; Yang, Wenli; Liu, Qiuying; Fu, Qiang; Qin, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Appropriate packaging and condensation are critical for eukaryotic chromatin's accommodation and separation during cell division. Human vigilin, a multi-KH-domain nucleic acid-binding protein, is associated with alpha satellites of centromeres. DDP1, a vigilin's homolog, is implicated with chromatin condensation and segregation. The expression of vigilin was previously reported to elevate in highly proliferating tissues and increased in a subset of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Other studies showed that vigilin interacts with CTCF, contributes to regulation of imprinted genes Igf2/H19, and colocalizes with HP1α on heterochromatic satellite 2 and β-satellite repeats. These studies indicate that human vigilin might be involved in chromatin remodeling and regular cell growth. To investigate the potential role of human vigilin in cell cycle, the correlations between vigilin and chromosomal condensation and segregation were studied. Depletion of human vigilin by RNA interference in HepG2 cells resulted in chromosome undercondensation and various chromosomal defects during mitotic phase, including chromosome misalignments, lagging chromosomes, and chromosome bridges. Aberrant polyploid nucleus in telophase was also observed. Unlike the abnormal staining pattern of chromosomes, the shape of spindle was normal. Furthermore, the chromatin showed a greater sensitivity to MNase digestion. Collectively, our findings show that human vigilin apparently participates in chromatin condensation and segregation.

  20. Disruption of human vigilin impairs chromosome condensation and segregation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ling; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Junhong; Li, Ran; Shen, Wenyan; Duan, Shuwang; Zhao, Rongce; Yang, Wenli; Liu, Qiuying; Fu, Qiang; Qin, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Appropriate packaging and condensation are critical for eukaryotic chromatin's accommodation and separation during cell division. Human vigilin, a multi-KH-domain nucleic acid-binding protein, is associated with alpha satellites of centromeres. DDP1, a vigilin's homolog, is implicated with chromatin condensation and segregation. The expression of vigilin was previously reported to elevate in highly proliferating tissues and increased in a subset of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Other studies showed that vigilin interacts with CTCF, contributes to regulation of imprinted genes Igf2/H19, and colocalizes with HP1α on heterochromatic satellite 2 and β-satellite repeats. These studies indicate that human vigilin might be involved in chromatin remodeling and regular cell growth. To investigate the potential role of human vigilin in cell cycle, the correlations between vigilin and chromosomal condensation and segregation were studied. Depletion of human vigilin by RNA interference in HepG2 cells resulted in chromosome undercondensation and various chromosomal defects during mitotic phase, including chromosome misalignments, lagging chromosomes, and chromosome bridges. Aberrant polyploid nucleus in telophase was also observed. Unlike the abnormal staining pattern of chromosomes, the shape of spindle was normal. Furthermore, the chromatin showed a greater sensitivity to MNase digestion. Collectively, our findings show that human vigilin apparently participates in chromatin condensation and segregation. PMID:26032007

  1. Chromosome aberrations and aneuploidy in sperm of Hodgkin`s disease patients before and {approximately}15 years after MOPP-chemotherapy analyzed by multi-color FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Hummelen, P.V.; Lowe, X.; Wyrobek, A.J.

    1997-10-01

    MOPP-chemistry includes potent mutagens which induce chromosomal abnormalities in human somatic and rodent germ cells. Sperm samples five pre- and four rodent germ cells. Sperm samples (five pre- and four post-treatment) from 8 Hodgkin`s patients were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to detect 3 categories of chromosomal defects in sperm: (1) terminal duplications of deletions in chr. 1p, (2) aneuploidy involving chr. 1 or 8, and (3) diploidy. In 3 pre-treatment and 2 post-treatment samples, each from a different donor, the levels of chromosomal damage were comparable to those of healthy controls. For one patient significantly higher proportions of sperm carrying structural chromosome aberrations were detected in a 15 years post-treatment sample, compared to his pre-treatment sample and pre-treatment samples of other patients. This patient also showed significantly elevated levels of hyperploid and diploid sperm in both his pre- and post-treatment samples. Elevated levels of diploid sperm were also observed in a pre-treatment sample of a second patient. In a 23 years post-treatment sample of another patient the fraction of sperm carrying chromosome aberrations was also significantly higher than in pre-treatment samples. To conclude, elevated frequencies of sperm with structural chromosome damage were observed in at least one patient, suggesting clonal outgrowth of chromosomal aberrant stem cells due to MOPP treatment. Although MOPP does not seem to increase numerical aberrations in sperm significant inter-individual differences were present among the Hodgkin`s patient.

  2. Increased levels of chromosomal aberrations and DNA damage in a group of workers exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Costa, Solange; Carvalho, Sandra; Costa, Carla; Coelho, Patrícia; Silva, Susana; Santos, Luís S; Gaspar, Jorge F; Porto, Beatriz; Laffon, Blanca; Teixeira, João P

    2015-07-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a commonly used chemical in anatomy and pathology laboratories as a tissue preservative and fixative. Because of its sensitising properties, irritating effects and cancer implication, FA accounts probably for the most important chemical-exposure hazard concerning this professional group. Evidence for genotoxic effects and carcinogenic properties in humans is insufficient and conflicting, particularly in regard to the ability of inhaled FA to induce toxicity on other cells besides first contact tissues, such as buccal and nasal cells. To evaluate the effects of exposure to FA in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, a group of 84 anatomy pathology laboratory workers exposed occupationally to FA and 87 control subjects were tested for chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and DNA damage (comet assay). The level of exposure to FA in the workplace air was evaluated. The association between genotoxicity biomarkers and polymorphic genes of xenobiotic-metabolising and DNA repair enzymes were also assessed. The estimated mean level of FA exposure was 0.38±0.03 ppm. All cytogenetic endpoints assessed by CAs test and comet assay % tail DNA (%TDNA) were significantly higher in FA-exposed workers compared with controls. Regarding the effect of susceptibility biomarkers, results suggest that polymorphisms in CYP2E1 and GSTP1 metabolic genes, as well as, XRCC1 and PARP1 polymorphic genes involved in DNA repair pathways are associated with higher genetic damage in FA-exposed subjects. Data obtained in this study show a potential health risk situation of anatomy pathology laboratory workers exposed to FA (0.38 ppm). Implementation of security and hygiene measures may be crucial to decrease risk. The obtained information may also provide new important data to be used by health care programs and by governmental agencies responsible for occupational health and safety.

  3. High-LET Radiation Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Normal and Ataxia Telangiectasia Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; George, Ms Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Ito, Hisao; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uno, Takashi

    We investigated the effects of heavy ions beams on chromosomal aberrations in normal and AT cells. Normal and AT fibroblast cells arrested at G0/G1 phase were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, 490 MeV/u Silicon (LET 55 keV/micron), 500 MeV/u Iron (LET 185 keV/micron) and 200 MeV/u Iron (LET 440 keV/micron) particles, and then cells were allowed to repair for 24 hours at 37 degrees before subculture. Calyculin-A induced PCC method was employed to collect G2/M chromosomes and whole DNA probes 1 and 3 were used to analyze chromosomal aberrations such as color-junctions, deletions, simple exchanges (incomplete and reciprocal exchanges) and complex-type exchanges. The percentages of aberrant cells were higher when normal and AT cells were exposed to heavy ions compared to X-rays, and had a tendency to increase with increasing LET up to 185 keV/micron and then decreased at 440 keV/micron. When the frequency of color-junctions per cell was compared after X-ray exposure, AT cells had around three times higher frequency of color-junctions (mis-rejoining) than normal cells. However, at 185 keV/micron there was no difference in the frequency of color-junctions between two cell lines. It was also found that the frequency of simple exchanges per cell was almost constant in AT cells regardless LET levels, but it was LET dependent for normal cells. Interestingly, the frequency of simple exchanges was higher for normal fibroblast cells when it was compared at 185 keV/micron, but AT cells had more complex-type exchanges at the same LET levels. Heavy ions are more efficient in inducing chromosome aberrations in normal and AT cells compared to X-rays, and the aberration types between normal and AT fibroblast appeared different probably due to difference in the ATM gene function.

  4. High frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance in direct chromosome preparation.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Therese; Lenhoff, Stig; Rylander, Lars; Höglund, Mattias; Turesson, Ingemar; Mitelman, Felix; Westin, Jan; Johansson, Bertil

    2004-08-01

    Although many cases of multiple myeloma (MM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are cytogenetically normal, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses reveal aberrations in the majority of the cases. Most likely, non-neoplastic cells are more prone to divide in culture than neoplastic cells. Direct chromosome preparations (DCP) would be one way to circumvent this methodological problem. We have investigated 47 bone marrow samples from 39 patients by DCP. A median of 58 metaphases (range 9-158) was analysed per sample. Interphase FISH analyses using probes to detect IGH rearrangements, -13/13q-, +3, +7, and +11 were also performed. Abnormal karyotypes were detected in 15 (63%) of 24 MM and in 4 (50%) of eight MGUS/smouldering MM (SMM) cases that could be successfully cytogenetically analysed. Age, sex, or degree of bone marrow plasma cell (PC) infiltration did not influence the karyotypic patterns (P > 0.05). However, the frequencies of aberrant karyotypes varied in relation to the Colcemide concentrations used - 7% (30 ng/ml) versus 69% and 67% (100 and 200 ng/ml, respectively) (P = 0.01). Combining the G-banding and FISH results, abnormalities were detected in 29 of 31 (94%) MM and in six of eight (75%) MGUS/SMM patients. Thus, cytogenetic and FISH analyses after DCP using 100-200 ng Colcemide/ml identified aberrations in most MM/MGUS/SMM, irrespective of PC percentages. PMID:15287940

  5. Evaluation of genotoxicity of Trois through Ames and in vitro chromosomal aberration tests

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Manu; Payasi, Anurag

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mutagenic potential of Trois using the bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test) and in vitro chromosomal aberration test. Methods The ability of Trois to induce reverse mutations was evaluated in Salmonella typhimurium (TA 98, TA100, TA1535 and TA1537) and Escherichia coli (WP2 uvrA) with and without metabolic activation system (S9 mix) at the dose range of 313 to 5000 µg/plate. Chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cell line at the dose levels of 15, 7.5, 3.7, 1.9 and 0.9 mg/mL in the absence and presence of S9 mix. Results There were no increases in the number of revertant colonies at any concentrations of Trois used in the study with and without S9 mix in all tester strains. Trois did not produce any structural aberration in CHL cells in the presence or absence of S9 mix. Conclusions Results of this study suggest that Trois is non-mutagenic.

  6. [Genotoxic effects of pesticide-treated vegetable extracts using the Allium cepa chromosome aberration and micronucleus tests].

    PubMed

    Biscardi, D; De Fusco, R; Feretti, D; Zerbini, I; Izzo, C; Esposito, V; Nardi, G; Monarca, S

    2003-01-01

    The presence of chemical residues in vegetables and fruit is a source of human exposure to toxic and genotoxic chemicals. The mutagenic and carcinogenic action of herbicides, insecticides and fungicides on experimental animals is already known. Several studies have shown that chronic exposure to low levels of pesticides can cause adverse health effects and that many pesticides are mutagenic/carcinogenic. In the present research we monitored concurrently the presence of pesticides and genotoxic compounds extracted from 21 treated vegetables and 8 types of grapes sampled from the markets of a region in Southern Italy. The extracts were analysed for pesticides by gas-chromatography and HPLC, and for genotoxicity with two plant tests in Allium cepa roots: the micronucleus test and the chromosomal aberration test. We found 33 pesticides, some of which are outlawed. Genotoxicity was found in some of the vegetables and grapes tested. Allium cepa tests were sensitive for monitoring genotoxicity in food extracts. The micronucleus test in interphase cells gave much higher mutagenicity than the chromosomal aberration test in anaphase-telophase cells. PMID:15049565

  7. Continuous chromosomal instability in human pluripotent stem cells - the role of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Noa; Kerem, Batsheva

    2016-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) frequently acquire chromosomal aberrations, including aneuploidy, during culture. Recently, we identified a replication stress-based mechanism leading to ongoing chromosomal instability in aneuploid hPSCs that may also operate during the initiation of instability in diploid cells. PMID:27652327

  8. [A case of central nervous system myelomatosis with complex chromosome aberrations].

    PubMed

    Bang, Hae In; Yoo, Jin Young; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Park, Rojin; Shin, Jeong Won; Choi, Tae Youn; Lee, Sang Cheol; Park, Hee Sook; Won, Jong Ho

    2010-08-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system is very uncommon in multiple myeloma, observed in approximately 1% of the multiple myeloma patients. We report a case of central nervous system myelomatosis with complex chromosome aberrations in a 62-yr-old female patient, who had previously been diagnosed as multiple myeloma. Fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed 13q deletion, p53 gene deletion and IGH/FGFR3 rearrangement and chromosomal study showed complex chromosome aberrations. After four cycles of chemotherapy, the patient was admitted to the hematology department with severe headache. Plasma cells were found in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and CSF immunoelectrophoresis revealed abnormal precipitin arcs against anti-IgG and anti-lambda antisera. She was given systemic chemotherapy and eight courses of intrathecal chemotherapy, which cleared plasma cells in the CSF. Two months later, she was given autologous stem cell transplantation. Three months after stem cell transplantation, central nervous system myelomatosis progressed to plasma cell leukemia and two months later, the patient expired.

  9. Why it is crucial to analyze non clonal chromosome aberrations or NCCAs?

    PubMed

    Heng, Henry H Q; Regan, Sarah M; Liu, Guo; Ye, Christine J

    2016-01-01

    Current cytogenetics has largely focused its efforts on the identification of recurrent karyotypic alterations, also known as clonal chromosomal aberrations (CCAs). The rationale of doing so seems simple: recurrent genetic changes are relevant for diseases or specific physiological conditions, while non clonal chromosome aberrations (NCCAs) are insignificant genetic background or noise. However, in reality, the vast majority of chromosomal alterations are NCCAs, and it is challenging to identify commonly shared CCAs in most solid tumors. Furthermore, the karyotype, rather than genes, represents the system inheritance, or blueprint, and each NCCA represents an altered genome system. These realizations underscore the importance of the re-evaluation of NCCAs in cytogenetic analyses. In this concept article, we briefly review the definition of NCCAs, some historical misconceptions about them, and why NCCAs are not insignificant "noise," but rather a highly significant feature of the cellular population for providing genome heterogeneity and complexity, representing one important form of fuzzy inheritance. The frequencies of NCCAs also represent an index to measure both internally- and environmentally-induced genome instability. Additionally, the NCCA/CCA cycle is associated with macro- and micro-cellular evolution. Lastly, elevated NCCAs are observed in many disease/illness conditions. Considering all of these factors, we call for the immediate action of studying and reporting NCCAs. Specifically, effort is needed to characterize and compare different types of NCCAs, to define their baseline in various tissues, to develop methods to access mitotic cells, to re-examine/interpret the NCCAs data, and to develop an NCCA database.

  10. Increased incidence of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of retired nickel workers

    SciTech Connect

    Waksvik, H.; Boysen, M.; Hogetveit, A.C.

    1984-11-01

    Chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges were analysed in the peripheral lymphocytes of nine retired nickel refinery workers 4-15 years after the retirement and compared with 11 matched non-nickel exposed controls. None of the controls had previous occupations with known relation to induction of chromosomal aberrations nor sister chromatid exchanges. The groups were equal as to socioeconomic status and environmental factors other than the occupational ones, which could influence the chromosome parameters, were to the largest possible extent excluded. The nickel workers previous occupational employment involved exposure to inhalation of furnace dust of Ni3S2 and NiO or aerosols of NiCl2 and NiSO4. The concentration of nickel in the working atmospheres has been higher than 1.0 mg/m3 air and the exposure time more than 25 years. The retired nickel workers showed an increased incidence of breaks (p less than 0.001) and gaps (p less than 0.05) but no difference in the incidence of sister chromatid exchanges when compared with the controls.

  11. Estimating the number of hematopoietic or lymphoid stem cells giving rise to clonal chromosome aberrations in blood T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakano, M; Kodama, Y; Ohtaki, K; Itoh, M; Awa, A A; Cologne, J; Kusunoki, Y; Nakamura, N

    2004-03-01

    Quantifying the proliferative capacity of long-term hematopoietic stem cells in humans is important for bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. Obtaining appropriate data is difficult, however, because the experimental tools are limited. We hypothesized that tracking clonal descendants originating from hematopoietic stem cells would be possible if we used clonal chromosome aberrations as unique tags of individual hematopoietic stem cells in vivo. Using FISH, we screened 500 blood T lymphocytes from each of 513 atomic bomb survivors and detected 96 clones composed of at least three cells with identical aberrations. The number of clones was inversely related to their population size, which we interpreted to mean that the progenitor cells were heterogeneous in the number of progeny that they could produce. The absolute number of progenitor cells contributing to the formation of the observed clones was estimated as about two in an unexposed individual. Further, scrutiny of ten clones revealed that lymphocyte clones could originate roughly equally from hematopoietic stem cells or from mature T lymphocytes, thereby suggesting that the estimated two progenitor cells are shared as one hematopoietic stem cell and one mature T cell. Our model predicts that one out of ten people bears a non- aberrant clone comprising >10% of the total lymphocytes, which indicates that clonal expansions are common and probably are not health-threatening. PMID:14982487

  12. Chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to a mixed beam of low energy neutrons and gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, A; Obe, G; Lisowska, H; Czub, J; Nievaart, V; Moss, R; Huiskamp, R; Sauerwein, W

    2012-09-01

    Cells exposed to thermal neutrons are simultaneously damaged by radiations with high and low linear energy transfer (LET). A question relevant for the assessment of risk of exposure to a mixed beam is whether the biological effect of both radiation types is additive or synergistic. The aim of the present investigation was to calculate whether the high and low LET components of a thermal neutron field interact when damaging cells. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to neutrons from the HB11 beam at the Institute for Energy and Transport, Petten, Netherlands, in a 37 °C water phantom at varying depths, where the mix of high and low LET beam components differs. Chromosomal aberrations were analysed and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values as well as the expected contributions of protons and photons to the aberration yield were calculated based on a dose response of aberrations in lymphocytes exposed to (60)Co gamma radiation. The RBE for 10 dicentrics per 100 cells was 3 for mixed beam and 7.2 for protons. For 20 dicentrics per 100 cells the respective values were 2.4 and 5.8. Within the limitations of the experimental setup the results indicate that for this endpoint there is no synergism between the high and low LET radiations.

  13. Transcription coupled repair deficiency results in increased chromosomal aberrations and apoptotic death in the UV61 cell line, the Chinese hamster homologue of Cockayne's syndrome B.

    PubMed

    Proietti De Santis, L; Garcia, C L; Balajee, A S; Brea Calvo, G T; Bassi, L; Palitti, F

    2001-03-01

    Transcription coupled repair (TCR), a special sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER), removes transcription blocking lesions rapidly from the transcribing strand of active genes. In this study, we have evaluated the importance of the TCR pathway in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis in isogenic Chinese hamster cell lines, which differ in TCR efficiency. AA8 is the parental cell line, which is proficient in the genome overall repair of UV-C radiation induced 6-4 photoproducts (6-4 PP) and the repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) from the transcribing strand of active genes. UV61 cells (hamster homologue of human Cockayne's syndrome (CS) group B cells) originally isolated from AA8, exhibit proficient repair of 6-4 PP but are deficient in CPD removal by the TCR pathway. Upon UV-C irradiation of cells in G1-phase, UV61 showed a dramatic increase in apoptotic response as compared to AA8 cells. Abolition of TCR by treatment with alpha-amanitin (an inhibitor of RNA polymerase II) in AA8 cells also resulted in an elevated apoptotic response like that observed in UV61 cells treated with UV alone. This suggests that the lack of TCR is largely responsible for increased apoptotic response in UV61 cells. Furthermore, the chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induced by UV were also found to be higher in UV61 cells than in TCR proficient AA8 cells. This study shows that the increased chromosomal aberrations and apoptotic death in UV61 cells is due to their inability to remove CPD from the transcribing strand of active genes and suggests a protective role for TCR in the prevention of both chromosomal aberrations and apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis and time-course appearance of apoptotic cells suggest that the conversion of UV-DNA damage into chromosomal aberrations precedes and determines the apoptotic process. PMID:11182543

  14. Chromosomal aberrations in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: 15-year single center experience.

    PubMed

    Jarosova, Marie; Volejnikova, Jana; Porizkova, Ilona; Holzerova, Milena; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Novak, Zbynek; Vrbkova, Jana; Mihal, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Genetic analysis of leukemic cells significantly impacts prognosis and treatment stratification in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Our retrospective single center study of 86 children with ALL enrolled into three consecutive treatment protocols (ALL-BFM 90, ALL-BFM 95 and ALL IC-BFM 2002) between 1991 and 2007 demonstrates the importance of conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Cytogenetic and FISH examinations were performed successfully in 82/86 (95.3%) patients and chromosomal changes were detected in 78 of the 82 (95.1%) patients: in 69/73 patients with B-cell precursor (BCP)-ALL and in 9/9 patients with T-lineage ALL (T-ALL). The most frequent chromosomal changes in subgroups divided according to WHO classification independent of treatment protocol and leukemia subtype were hyperdiploidy in 36 patients (with ≥50 chromosomes in 23 patients, with 47-49 chromosomes 13 patients) followed by translocation t(12;21) with ETV6/RUNX1 fusion detected by FISH in 18 (22%) patients. Additional changes were detected in 16/18 (88.8%) ETV6/RUNX1-positive ALL patients with predominant deletion or rearrangement of untranslocated ETV6 allele. Unique aberrations were detected in 4 patients and dicentric chromosomes in 8 patients, one with T-ALL. These results demonstrate that cytogenetics and FISH successfully provided important prognostic information and revealed not only recurrent but also new and rare rearrangements requiring further investigation in terms of prognostic significance. PMID:27341996

  15. Chromosomal aberration analysis among underground water well workers in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    AlSuhaibani, Entissar S

    2011-03-01

    In the absence of permanent rivers or bodies of water, half of the Saudi Arabia domestic water consumption is provided through desalination. The other half is derived from groundwater. Groundwater from the Disi aquifer is already used for drinking water in parts of Jordan and, more extensively, in Saudi Arabia, where it is known as the Saq aquifer. Some of the geological analyses of the host sandstone aquifer rocks show (228)Ra and (226)Ra. The usefulness of chromosomal aberrations analysis as a bioindicator for ionising radiation effect was tested in underground water well workers of Saudi Arabia in this industry producing technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material. The incidence of chromosomal aberrations was evaluated using the metaphase analysis method in the lymphocytes of peripheral blood of 10 persons working in underground water well. The age range of the workers was 25-40 y and their duration of service ranged from 3-7 y. For comparison, blood samples were also collected from 10 subjects (controls) who belonged to same age and socioeconomic status. Subjects in the both groups were non-smokers and non-alcoholics. Results showed that the mean frequencies of dicentrics and acentrics in underground water well workers are significantly higher than those in controls. The higher frequency of chromosomal aberration in lymphocytes of underground water well workers compared with controls could be due to the accumulative effect of radiation. The results of this study demonstrated that occupational exposure to radiation leads to a significant induction of cytogenetic damage in peripheral lymphocytes of workers engaged in underground water well.

  16. Inhaled ozone as a mutagen. II - Effect on the frequency of chromosome aberrations observed in irradiated Chinese hamsters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelac, R. E.; Cromroy, H. L.; Bolch, W. E., Jr.; Dunavant, B. G.; Bevis, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Exposure-adjusted break frequencies for chromosome aberrations produced in Chinese hamster circulating blood lymphocytes were the quantitative indicator of damage from 5 hrs of exposure to X-radiation and/or to ozone. Radiation produced 5.51 x 0.0001 breaks/cell rad for cells withdrawn 2 weeks after exposure, a reasonable value when compared with data from in vivo exposure of human lymphocytes and Chinese hamster bone marrow cells. Animals exposed to the two agents simultaneously exhibited more than 70% of the total breaks anticipated assuming the expected equal contributions to be additive. Extending to humans, at presently permitted levels, exposure to ozone would be much more detrimental than exposure to radiati*n.

  17. Chromosomal aberrations in onion (Allium cepa) induced by water chlorination by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sabti, K.; Kurelec, B.

    1985-01-01

    It has recently come to light that water chlorination generates mutagens and carcinogens. The mutagenicity of nonvolatile mutagenic by-products of water chlorination has been demonstrated in short-term biological testings. The predictive value of short-term tests is considerably enhanced by the use of more than one test system. A scientifically stringent approach in formulating a testing program for the assessment of genotoxins is to rely on tests that directly measure gene mutations and chromosome alterations. Chromosome aberrations (CA) become such a relevant bioassay. The CA measurement in the allium test is suitable for measuring the cytogenotoxic potential of chemicals present in water; it is simple, cheap, sensitive, and it does not require a generally undefined step of concentrating chemicals present in polluted waters. In the present investigation CA in Allium were chosen for the detection of mutagenic potential of a polluted river waters before and after the under-breakpoint chlorination.

  18. Analysis of Terminal Deletions using a Generalized Time-Dependent Model of Radiation-Induced Formation of Chromosomal Aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; George, K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a model that can simulate different types of radiation induced chromosomal aberrations (CA's) and can provide predictions on the frequency and size of chromosomes with terminal deletions. Chromosomes with terminal deletions lack telomeres and this can elicit sister chromatid unions and the prolonged breakage/fusion/bridge (B/F/B) cycles that have been observed in mammalian tumors. The loss of a single telomere has been shown to cause extensive genomic instability through the B/F/B cycle process. Our model uses a stochastic process of DNA broken end joining, in which a realistic spectrum of CA's is created from improperly joined DNA free ends formed by DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). The distribution of the DNA free ends is given by a mechanistic model that takes into account the chromatin structure and track structure for high-LET radiation. The model allows for DSB clustering from high-LET radiation and simulates the formation of CA's in stages that correspond to the actual time after radiation exposure. The time scale for CA formation is derived from experimental data on DSB repair kinetics. At any given time a nucleus may have intact chromosomes, CA's, and/or unrepaired fragments, some of which are defined as terminal deletions, if they are capped by one telomere. The model produces a spectrum of terminal deletions with their corresponding probabilities and size distributions for different heavy ions exposures for the first division after exposure. This data provides valuable information because there is limited experimental data available in the literature on the on the actual size of terminal deletions. We compare our model output to the available experimental data and make a reasonable extrapolation on the number of chromosomes lacking telomeres in human lymphocytes exposed to heavy ions. This model generates data which may lead to predictions on the rate of genomic instability in cells after exposure to high charge and energy nuclei

  19. Ability of fourteen chemical agents used in dental practice to induce chromosome aberrations in Syrian hamster embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Hikiba, Hirohito; Watanabe, Eiko; Barrett, J Carl; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2005-01-01

    To assess the genotoxicity of 14 chemical agents used in dental practice, the ability of these agents to induce chromosome aberrations was examined using Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Statistically significant increases in the frequencies of chromosome aberrations were induced in SHE cells treated with 7 of 10 chemical agents used as endodontic medicaments, that is, carbol camphor, m-cresol, eugenol, guaiacol, zinc oxide, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde. The other 3 chemical agents, that is, thymol, glutaraldehyde, and iodoform, did not increase the levels of chromosome aberrations. Of the 4 chemical agents that are used as an antiseptic on the oral mucosa, chromosome aberrations were induced by iodine, but not by the other 3 antiseptics, benzalkonium chloride, benzethonium chloride, and chlorhexidine. Among the 6 chemical agents exhibiting a negative response in the assay, only thymol induced chromosome aberrations in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation. Our results indicate that chemical agents having a positive response in the present study are potentially genotoxic to mammalian cells and need to be studied further in detail. PMID:15665446

  20. Gender differences in the induction of chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations in rodent germ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, Ilse-Dore; Carere, Angelo; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2007-05-15

    Germ cell mutagenicity testing provides experimental data to quantify genetic risk for exposed human populations. The majority of tests are performed with exposure of males, and female data are relatively rare. The reason for this paucity lies in the differences between male and female germ cell biology. Male germ cells are produced throughout reproductive life and all developmental stages can be ascertained by appropriate breeding schemes. In contrast, the female germ cell pool is limited, meiosis begins during embryogenesis and oocytes are arrested over long periods of time until maturation processes start for small numbers of oocytes during the oestrus cycle in mature females. The literature data are reviewed to point out possible gender differences of germ cells to exogenous agents such as chemicals or ionizing radiation. From the limited information, it can be concluded that male germ cells are more sensitive than female germ cells to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and gene mutations. However, exceptions are described which shed doubt on the extrapolation of experimental data from male rodents to the genetic risk of the human population. Furthermore, the female genome may be more sensitive to mutation induction during peri-conceptional stages compared to the male genome of the zygote. With few exceptions, germ cell experiments have been carried out under high acute exposure to optimize the effects and to compensate for the limited sample size in animal experiments. Human exposure to environmental agents, on the other hand, is usually chronic and involves low doses. Under these conditions, gender differences may become apparent that have not been studied so far. Additionally, data are reviewed that suggest a false impression of safety when responses are negative under high acute exposure of male rodents while a mutational response is induced by low chronic exposure. The classical (morphological) germ cell mutation tests are not performed anymore

  1. mBAND analysis for high- and low-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations: a review.

    PubMed

    Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2011-06-01

    During long-term space travel or cancer therapy, humans are exposed to high linear energy transfer (LET) energetic heavy ions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, and cytogenetic damage can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Epidemiological data, mainly from survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan, have enabled risk estimation from low-LET radiation exposures. The identification of a cytogenetic signature that distinguishes high- from low-LET exposure remains a long-term goal in radiobiology. Recently developed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-painting methodologies have revealed unique endpoints related to radiation quality. Heavy-ions induce a high fraction of complex-type exchanges, and possibly unique chromosome rearrangements. This review will concentrate on recent data obtained with multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) methods in mammalian cells exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. Chromosome analysis with mBAND technique allows detection of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges, and also distribution of the breakpoints of aberrations.

  2. Chromosome aberrations, micronucleus and sperm head abnormalities in mice treated with natamycin, [corrected] a food preservative.

    PubMed

    Rasgele, Pinar Goc; Kaymak, Fisun

    2010-03-01

    Natamycin [corrected] is used as preservative in foods. The genotoxic effects of the food preservative natamycin [corrected] were evaluated using chromosome aberrations and micronucleus test in bone marrow cells and sperm head abnormality assays in mice. Blood samples were taken from mice and levels of total testosterone in serum were also determined. Natamycin [corrected] was intraperitoneally (ip) injected at 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg. Natamycin [corrected] did not induce chromosome aberrations but significantly increased the number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in bone marrow and sperm head abnormalities at all concentrations and treatment periods. It also decreased MI at all concentrations for 6, 12 and 24h treatment periods. Natamycin [corrected] decreased PCE/NCE ratio at all concentrations for 48h in female mice, for 24 and 48h treatment periods in male mice. At the 800 mg/kg concentration, natamycin [corrected] decreased PCE/NCE ratio for 24 and 72h in female mice. A dose dependent increase was observed in the percentage of sperm head abnormalities. The levels of serum testosterone decreased dose-dependently. The obtained results indicate that natamycin [corrected] is not clastogenic, but it is aneugenic in mice bone marrow and it is a potential germ cell mutagen in sperm cells.

  3. Effect of aspirin on chromosome aberration and DNA damage induced by X-rays in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niikawa, M.; Chuuriki, K.; Shibuya, K.; Seo, M.; Nagase, H.

    In order to reveal the anticlastogenic potency of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray. Aspirin at doses of 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally or orally at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation. The anticlastogenic activity of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray was determined in the mouse micronucleus test and alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) assay in vivo. The frequency by polychromatic erythrocytes with micronuclei (MNPCEs) was decreased by about 19-61% at 0.5 h after and about 23-62% at 0.5 h before the X-ray irradiation. DNA damage by X-ray was significantly decreased by oral administration of aspirin at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation for the SCG assay. We consider aspirin can be used as preventive agents against exposure of X-ray.

  4. Chromosomal Aberrations in Wild Mice Captured in Areas Differentially Contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshihisa; Tsuji, Hideo; Kawagoshi, Taiki; Shiomi, Naoko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshito; Fuma, Shoichi; Doi, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Isao; Aoki, Masanari; Kubota, Masahide; Furuhata, Yoshiaki; Shigemura, Yusaku; Mizoguchi, Masahiko; Yamada, Fumio; Tomozawa, Morihiko; Sakamoto, Shinsuke H; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2015-08-18

    Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, radiation effects on nonhuman biota in the contaminated areas have been a great concern. The induction of chromosomal aberrations in splenic lymphocytes of small Japanese field mice (Apodemus argenteus) and house mice (Mus musculus) inhabiting Fukushima Prefecture was investigated. In mice inhabiting the slightly contaminated area, the average frequency of dicentric chromosomes was similar to that seen in mice inhabiting a noncontaminated control area. In contrast, mice inhabiting the moderately and heavily contaminated areas showed a significant increase in the average frequencies of dicentric chromosomes. Total absorbed dose rate was estimated to be approximately 1 mGy d(-1) and 3 mGy d(-1) in the moderately and heavily contaminated areas, respectively. Chromosomal aberrations tended to roughly increase with dose rate. Although theoretically, the frequency of chromosomal aberrations was considered proportional to the absorbed dose, chromosomal aberrations in old mice (estimated median age 300 days) did not increase with radiation dose at the same rate as that observed in young mice (estimated median age 105 days). PMID:26217955

  5. Frequent, unconventional structural changes of the human Y chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.R.

    1994-09-01

    Six human cell lines in which the Y/autosome translocations were suspected by the conventional chromosome banding study exhibited unconventional, complex structural rearrangements of the Y chromosome. These translocations included Yqter{r_arrow}Yq12::Ycen{r_arrow}Yp11 (or Yq11{r_arrow}Ycen)::9pter{r_arrow}9qter; insertion of Ycen interstitially to an autosome; interstitial insertion of two Yq12 segments separated by an euchromatic non-Y segment; and multiple Y/autosomal translocations containing unequal Yq12 segments. These markers required three or more breaks/reunions. Loci of breaks and retaining segments of the Y chromosome were identified by the combination of conventional chromosome bandings, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and Southern blot DNA analyses. Extensive structural rearrangements involving the Y chromosome were evident. The heterochromatic Y segments retained in cell lines of male donor origins at a distinctively higher rate than the euchromatic Y arms. The Y/A markers were present in all cells and paired Y/As were found in some cell lines. These facts strongly suggested that at least some of these markers were present in the tissue explant, but not entirely derived newly in vitro. These naturally occurring structural changes of the Y chromosomes are very complex, and often rather unique. Therefore, a single Y/A marker chromosome may be used solely to identify a cell line; cell lines with the unique aberration(s) can be collated to construct a Y segment sequential panel for mapping genes; and the unique Y/A translocations can be used to discriminate a DNA segment at multiple sites on the Y chromosome arm simultaneously.

  6. Chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of mice after sub-acute low-level inhalation exposure to benzene.

    PubMed

    Au, W W; Ramanujam, V M; Ward, J B; Legator, M S

    1991-06-01

    Male and female CD-1 mice were exposed to near ambient air concentrations of benzene by inhalation for 22 h per day, 7 days per week for 6 weeks. The concentrations were 0, 40, 100 and 1000 ppb. Significant increases in chromosome aberrations in spleen lymphocytes were observed in exposed compared with control mice except in the high-dose group (p less than 0.05 for female mice in 2 experiments and for male mice in 1 experiment; p less than 0.15 for male mice in the second experiment). A lack of increase in aberrations among mice of the high-dose group may be due to an induction of detoxifying enzymes as observed by us in a previous study (Au et al., 1988b). We also found that the female mice were more sensitive to the clastogenic activity of benzene than male mice under our experimental conditions. Our study serves to emphasize the need to conduct subchronic, low-dose in vivo genotoxicity studies using exposure conditions similar to those of humans, for evaluation of potential hazards. Our data suggest that the current occupational exposure concentrations for benzene (less than 1000 ppb) may still be hazardous to humans.

  7. Induction of chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells after heavy ion exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, S.; Kraft-Weyrather, W.; Scholz, M.; Kraft, G.

    The induction of chromosome aberrations by heavy charged particles was studied in V79 Chinese hamster cells over a wide range of energies (3-100 MeV/u) and LET (20-16000 keV/μm). For comparison, X-ray experiments were performed. Our data indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the response of cells to particle and x-ray irradiation. For the same level of cell survival the amount of damaged cells which can be observed is smaller in heavy ion (11.4 MeV/u Ar) irradiated samples. The highest yield of damaged cells is found 8 to 12 hours after particle irradiation and 4 hours after x-irradiation. Differences in the amount of damaged cells are attributed to cell cycle perturbations which interfere with the expression of damage. After heavy ion exposure the amount of cells reaching mitosis (mitotic index) decreases drastically and not all damaged cells reach mitosis within 48 hours after exposure. A portion of cells die in interphase. Cell cycle delays induced by x-ray irradiation are less pronounced and all cells reach the first post-irradiation mitosis within 24 hours after irradiation. Additionally, the damage produced by charged particles seems to be more severe. The disintegration of chromosomes was only observed after high LET radiation: an indication of the high and local energy deposition in the particle track. Only cross sections for the induction of chromosome aberrations in mitotic cells were reported in this paper because of the problems arising from the drastic cell cycle perturbations. In this case, cells were irradiated in mitosis and assayed immediately.

  8. Why it is crucial to analyze non clonal chromosome aberrations or NCCAs?

    PubMed

    Heng, Henry H Q; Regan, Sarah M; Liu, Guo; Ye, Christine J

    2016-01-01

    Current cytogenetics has largely focused its efforts on the identification of recurrent karyotypic alterations, also known as clonal chromosomal aberrations (CCAs). The rationale of doing so seems simple: recurrent genetic changes are relevant for diseases or specific physiological conditions, while non clonal chromosome aberrations (NCCAs) are insignificant genetic background or noise. However, in reality, the vast majority of chromosomal alterations are NCCAs, and it is challenging to identify commonly shared CCAs in most solid tumors. Furthermore, the karyotype, rather than genes, represents the system inheritance, or blueprint, and each NCCA represents an altered genome system. These realizations underscore the importance of the re-evaluation of NCCAs in cytogenetic analyses. In this concept article, we briefly review the definition of NCCAs, some historical misconceptions about them, and why NCCAs are not insignificant "noise," but rather a highly significant feature of the cellular population for providing genome heterogeneity and complexity, representing one important form of fuzzy inheritance. The frequencies of NCCAs also represent an index to measure both internally- and environmentally-induced genome instability. Additionally, the NCCA/CCA cycle is associated with macro- and micro-cellular evolution. Lastly, elevated NCCAs are observed in many disease/illness conditions. Considering all of these factors, we call for the immediate action of studying and reporting NCCAs. Specifically, effort is needed to characterize and compare different types of NCCAs, to define their baseline in various tissues, to develop methods to access mitotic cells, to re-examine/interpret the NCCAs data, and to develop an NCCA database. PMID:26877768

  9. Thyroid nodularity and chromosome aberrations among women in areas of high background radiation in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.Y.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Wei, L.X.; Beebe, G.W.; Zha, Y.R.; Kaplan, M.M.; Tao, Z.F.; Maxon, H.R. III; Zhang, S.Z.; Schneider, A.B. )

    1990-03-21

    Thyroid nodularity following continuous low-dose radiation exposure in China was determined in 1,001 women aged 50-65 years who resided in areas of high background radiation (330 mR/yr) their entire lives, and in 1,005 comparison subjects exposed to normal levels of radiation (114 mR/yr). Cumulative doses to the thyroid were estimated to be of the order of 14 cGy and 5 cGy, respectively. Personal interviews and physical examinations were conducted, and measurements were made of serum thyroid hormone levels, urinary iodine concentrations, and chromosome aberrations in circulating lymphocytes. For all nodular disease, the prevalences in the high background and control areas were 9.5% and 9.3%, respectively. For single nodules, the prevalences were 7.4% in the high background area and 6.6% in the control area (prevalence ratio = 1.13; 95% confidence interval = 0.82-1.55). There were no differences found in serum levels of thyroid hormones. Women in the high background region, however, had significantly lower concentrations of urinary iodine and significantly higher frequencies of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations. Increased intake of allium vegetables such as garlic and onions was associated with a decreased risk of nodular disease, which seems consistent with experimental studies suggesting that allium compounds can inhibit tumor growth and proliferation. The prevalence of mild diffuse goiter was higher in the high background radiation region, perhaps related to a low dietary intake of iodine. These data suggest that continuous exposure to low-level radiation throughout life is unlikely to appreciably increase the risk of thyroid cancer. However, such exposure may cause chromosomal damage.

  10. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations in the Blood Lymphocytes of Astronauts after Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Kim, M. Y.; Elliott, T.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    It is a NASA requirement that biodosimetry analysis be performed on all US astronauts who participate in long duration missions of 3 months or more onboard the International Space Station. Cytogenetic analysis of blood lymphocytes is the most sensitive and reliable biodosimetry method available at present, especially if chromosome damage is assessed before as well as after space flight. Results provide a direct measurement of space radiation damage in vivo that takes into account individual radiosensitivity and considers the influence of microgravity and other stress conditions. We present data obtained from all twenty-five of the crewmembers who have participated in the biodosimetry program so far. The yield of chromosome exchanges, measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with chromosome painting probes, increased after space flight for all these individuals. In vivo dose was derived from frequencies of chromosome exchanges using preflight calibration curves of in vitro exposed cells from the same individual, and RBE was compared with individually measured physically absorbed dose and projected organ dose equivalents. Biodosimetry estimates using samples collected within a few weeks of return from space lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. For some of these individuals chromosome aberrations were assessed again several months after their respective missions and a temporal decline in stable exchanges was observed in some cases, suggesting that translocations are unstable with time after whole body exposure to space radiation. This may indicate complications with the use of translocations for retrospective dose reconstruction. Data from one crewmember who has participated in two separate long duration space missions and has been followed up for over 10 years provides limited data on the effect of repeat flights and shows a possible adaptive response to space radiation exposure.

  11. Cytogenetics of human sperm: Structural aberrations and DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.F.; Gordon, L.A.; Carrano, A.V.

    1989-07-11

    The human sperm-hamster egg system, first introduced in 1978 (Rudak et al), has yielded some important insights into questions on chromosomal integrity of human sperm. In this system, human sperm are co-incubated with eggs from the golden hamster. After the gametes fuse, eggs are cultured overnight and approximately 15 hours after fusion, display the haploid chromosomal complement of individual human sperm cells. These chromosomes can be analyzed by standard banding techniques to identify and quantify structural and numerical abnormalities in single sperm. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Structural chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from children previously treated for Wilms' tumor or Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brogger, A.; Kolmannskog, S.; Nicolaysen, R.B.; Wesenberg, F.; Nygaard, R. )

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen children treated for Wilms' tumor (thirteen cases) or Hodgkin's disease (six cases) with cytostatic agents and/or radiotherapy were studied cytogenetically on lymphocytes cultivated from blood samples drawn after at least 1 year of complete remission after end of therapy. A reference group of children was matched for age, sex, and residence. The frequencies of sister chromatid exchange (5.4 versus 5.6 SCE/cell), and chromosome damage type gaps (6.6 versus 7.1%) and breaks (1.9 versus 1.9%) were not different in the two groups, but exchange type aberrations were more frequent in the patients (0.9 versus 0.06%). Fifty karyotypes were analyzed in all but two cases of Hodgkin's disease. The overall frequency of stable (3.1 versus 3.8%) and unstable (1.7 versus 1.4%) structural chromosome changes such as translocations, deletions, chromatid exchanges, and dicentrics were not different in the patient and the control groups. If the chromosome data reflect a general cancer risk, this risk cannot be considerably higher among the cancer-treated children.

  13. Antimutagenic effects of piperine on cyclophosphamide-induced chromosome aberrations in rat bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Wongpa, Sareeya; Himakoun, Lakana; Soontornchai, Sarisak; Temcharoen, Punya

    2007-01-01

    Piperine is a major pungent substance and active component of black pepper (Piper nigrum Linn.) and long pepper (Piper longum Linn.). Both plants are used worldwide as household spices and condiments. They are also used as important ingredients in folklore medicine in many Asian countries. Therefore, it is of interest to study antimutagenic effects of piperine. In this study, its influence on chromosomes was investigated in rat bone marrow cells. Male Wistar rats were orally administered piperine at the doses of 100, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight for 24 hours then challenged with cyclophosphamide at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight by intraperitoneal injection. Twenty-four hours thereafter, all animals were sacrificed and bone marrow samples were collected for chromosomal analysis. The results demonstrated that piperine at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight gave a statistically significant reduction in cyclophosphamide-induced chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, piperine may have antimutagenic potential. The underlying molecular mechanisms now require attention.

  14. Chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of welders and characterization of their exposure by biological samples analysis.

    PubMed

    Elias, Z; Mur, J M; Pierre, F; Gilgenkrantz, S; Schneider, O; Baruthio, F; Danière, M C; Fontana, J M

    1989-05-01

    Chromosomal aberrations in cultured lymphocytes obtained from 55 welders and 55 matched controls were analyzed. Depending on the welding techniques and the nature of the consumables and metals welded, three separate groups of welders were examined. Chromium, nickel, and manganese levels in serum and urine were measured to assess the exposure to welding fumes. A statistically significant increase of chromosomal aberrations was found in one of the three analyzed groups of welders. This group used the semi-automatic metal active gas welding process with cored wire containing nickel for welding mild steel. These welders had significantly higher concentrations of serum and urine manganese and, unlike the other welders, significantly elevated concentrations of nickel, both in serum and urine. However, no significant correlations between nickel or manganese levels and the frequency of chromosomal aberrations were found. There was a significant correlation between the length of welding employment of these welders and the frequency of chromosomal breaks, although there was no significant correlation between age and the frequency of chromosomal aberrations. The other two groups of welders, for which the analyses of biologic fluids proved chromium and manganese exposure, had no statistically significant higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations. One of these groups used the manual metal arc welding process with coated electrodes for welding mainly mild steel and the other group used the tungsten inert gas welding process for welding stainless steel. A significant correlation between the daily amount of cigarettes smoked and the frequency of chromosomal breakages, in controls as in welders, was observed. The present data indicate that certain welding processes may generate fumes that seem to have a clastogenic activity. PMID:2715858

  15. Chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of welders and characterization of their exposure by biological samples analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Z.; Mur, J.M.; Pierre, F.; Gilgenkrantz, S.; Schneider, O.; Baruthio, F.; Daniere, M.C.; Fontana, J.M.

    1989-05-01

    Chromosomal aberrations in cultured lymphocytes obtained from 55 welders and 55 matched controls were analyzed. Depending on the welding techniques and the nature of the consumables and metals welded, three separate groups of welders were examined. Chromium, nickel, and manganese levels in serum and urine were measured to assess the exposure to welding fumes. A statistically significant increase of chromosomal aberrations was found in one of the three analyzed groups of welders. This group used the semi-automatic metal active gas welding process with cored wire containing nickel for welding mild steel. These welders had significantly higher concentrations of serum and urine manganese and, unlike the other welders, significantly elevated concentrations of nickel, both in serum and urine. However, no significant correlations between nickel or manganese levels and the frequency of chromosomal aberrations were found. There was a significant correlation between the length of welding employment of these welders and the frequency of chromosomal breaks, although there was no significant correlation between age and the frequency of chromosomal aberrations. The other two groups of welders, for which the analyses of biologic fluids proved chromium and manganese exposure, had no statistically significant higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations. One of these groups used the manual metal arc welding process with coated electrodes for welding mainly mild steel and the other group used the tungsten inert gas welding process for welding stainless steel. A significant correlation between the daily amount of cigarettes smoked and the frequency of chromosomal breakages, in controls as in welders, was observed. The present data indicate that certain welding processes may generate fumes that seem to have a clastogenic activity.

  16. Chromosome abnormalities in human arrested preimplantation embryos: A multiple-probe FISH study

    SciTech Connect

    Munne, S.; Grifo, J.; Cohen, J. ); Weier, H.U.G. )

    1994-07-01

    Numerical chromosome abnormalities were studied in single blastomeres from arrested or otherwise morphologically abnormal human preimplantation embryos. A 6-h FISH procedure with fluorochrome-labeled DNA probes was developed to determine numerical abnormalities of chromosomes X, Y, and 18. The three chromosomes were stained and detected simultaneously in 571 blastomeres from 131 embryos. Successful analysis including biopsy, fixation, and FISH analysis was achieved in 86.5% of all blastomeres. The procedure described here offers a reliable alternative to sexing of embryos by PCR and allows simultaneous ploidy assessment. For the three chromosomes tested, numerical aberrations were found in 56.5% of the embroys. Most abnormal embryos were polyploid or mosaics, and 6.1% were aneuploid for gonosomes or chromosome 18. Extrapolation of these results to all human chromosomes suggests that the majority of abnormally developing and arrested human embryos carry numerical chromosome abnormalities. 44 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Variation in sensitivity to. gamma. -ray-induced chromosomal aberrations during the mitotic cycle of the sea urchin egg

    SciTech Connect

    Ejima, Y.; Nakamura, I.; Shiroya, T.

    1982-11-01

    Sea urchin eggs were irradiated with /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays at various stages of the mitotic cycle, and chromosomal aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis and embryonic abnormalities at later developmental stages were examined. The radiosensitivity of the eggs to both endpoints varied in parallel with the mitotic stage at the time of irradiation, suggesting a possible relationship between chromosomal damage and embryonic abnormalities.

  18. Role of p53 codon 72 polymorphism in chromosomal aberrations and mitotic index in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Akbaş, H.; Yalcin, K.; Isi, H.; Tekes, S.; Atay, A.E.; Akkus, Z.; Budak, T.

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms of the p53 gene, which participates in DNA repair, can affect the functioning of the p53 protein. The Arg and Pro variants in p53 codon 72 were shown to have different regulation properties of p53-dependent DNA repair target genes that can affect various levels of cytogenetic aberrations in chronic hepatitis B patients. The present study aimed to examine the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and the mitotic index in patients with chronic hepatitis B and their possible association with p53 gene exon 4 codon 72 Arg72Pro (Ex4+119 G>C; rs1042522) polymorphism. Fifty-eight patients with chronic hepatitis B and 30 healthy individuals were genotyped in terms of the p53 gene codon 72 Arg72Pro polymorphism by PCR-RFLP. A 72-h cell culture was performed on the same individuals and evaluated in terms of chromosomal aberrations and mitotic index. A high frequency of chromosomal aberrations and low mitotic index were detected in the patient group compared to the control group. A higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations was detected in both the patient and the control groups with a homozygous proline genotype (13 patients, 3 control subjects) compared to patients and controls with other genotypes [Arg/Pro (38 patients, 20 control subjects) and Arg/Arg (7 patients, 7 control subjects)]. We observed an increased frequency of cytogenetic aberrations in patients with chronic hepatitis B. In addition, a higher frequency of cytogenetic aberrations was observed in p53 variants having the homozygous proline genotype compared to variants having other genotypes both in patients and healthy individuals. PMID:22892830

  19. Cytogenetic investigation of chromosomal aberrations in cells treated with plantamajoside from Plantago asiatica.

    PubMed

    Koo, Yun-Chang; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Yang, Ji-Hee; Ryu, Yung-Sun; Kim, Eun-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2009-10-01

    Plantago asiatica is a member of the Plantaginaceae family, and is widely distributed in East Asia. In our previous work, a single active compound, plantamajoside was isolated and confirmed to have glycation inhibitory activity, and did not possess toxicity during a 90 day repeated oral toxicity test in rats. In the present study, a chromosomal aberration test was performed to investigate the genotoxicity of plantamajoside. From the results of the cytotoxicity test, plantamajoside proved to be less toxic when it was treated combined with S9 cell fractions. However, there was a significant increase in structural aberrations during the short-term treatment of plantamajoside at its highest dose (5000 microg/mL) even when combined with S9. This seems to have been a natural phenomenon due to the very high dose of plantamajoside that was used. However, to confirm the safety of plantamajoside for its potential use as a phytochemical agent in health products, additional mutagenicity tests are necessary. PMID:19288521

  20. Influence of radiofrequency radiation on chromosome aberrations in CHO cells and its interaction with DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Kerbacher, J J; Meltz, M L; Erwin, D N

    1990-09-01

    A limited number of contradictory reports have appeared in the literature about the ability of radiofrequency (rf) radiation to induce chromosome aberrations in different biological systems. The technical documentation associated with such reports is often absent or deficient. In addition, no information is available as to whether any additional genotoxic hazard would result from a simultaneous exposure of mammalian cells to rf radiation and a chemical which (by itself) induces chromosome aberrations. In the work described, we have therefore tested two hypotheses. The first is that rf radiation by itself, at power densities and exposure conditions which are higher than is consistent with accepted safety guidelines, can induce chromosome aberrations in mammalian cells. The second is that, during a simultaneous exposure to a chemical known to be genotoxic, rf radiation can affect molecules, biochemical processes, or cellular organelles, and thus result in an increase or decrease in chromosome aberrations. Mitomycin C (MMC) and Adriamycin (ADR) were selected because they act by different mechanisms, and because they might put normal cells at risk during combined-modality rf radiation (hyperthermia)-chemotherapy treatment of cancer. The studies were performed with suitable 37 degrees C and equivalent convection heating-temperature controls in a manner designed to discriminate between any thermal and possible nonthermal action. Radiofrequency exposures were conducted for 2 h under conditions resulting in measurable heating (a maximum increase of 3.2 degrees C), with pulsed-wave rf radiation at a frequency of 2450 MHz and an average net forward power of 600 W, resulting in an SAR of 33.8 W/kg. Treatments with MMC or ADR were for a total of 2.5 h and encompassed the 2-h rf radiation exposure period. The CHO cells from each of the conditions were subsequently analyzed for chromosome aberrations. In cells exposed to rf radiation alone, and where a maximum temperature of

  1. Functional structure of the human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 23, describes the functional structure of the human X chromosome. It provides a functional map of the human X chromosome, discussing in depth the inactivation center, always-active regions, and critical region. Finally, it provides a summary of X inactivation. 34 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Sister chromatid exchanges and chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of nurses handling cytostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Benhamou, S; Pot-Deprun, J; Sancho-Garnier, H; Chouroulinkov, I

    1988-03-15

    A cohort study of 29 nurses who constantly handled cytostatic drugs, and 29 controls matched according to sex and age, was carried out between 1983 and 1986. Cytogenetic damage was assessed by sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations. No significant increase in mean number of SCE was found for nurses (7.37) as compared to matched controls (7.00), whereas a significant excess of SCE (p less than 0.001) was observed for smokers (8.23) as compared to non-smokers (6.75). The number of SCE was studied in relation to the amount and nature of cytostatics handled as well as to the duration of exposure. A significant association (p less than 0.05) was found between individual mean number of SCE and the total number of drugs handled after adjustment for confounding factors. In contrast, the number of SCE was not significantly related to the nature of drugs handled or to the duration of exposure. With regard to chromosomal damage, no significant difference was observed between nurses and controls in gap, break, dicentric and translocation frequencies.

  3. Chromosome aberration assays in Pisum for the study of environmental mutagens.

    PubMed

    Grant, W F; Owens, E T

    2001-05-01

    From a literature survey, 117 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 179 assays for their clastogenic effects in Pisum. Of the 117 chemicals that have been assayed, 65 are reported at giving a positive reaction (i.e. causing chromosome aberrations), 30 positive with a dose response, five borderline positive. Seventeen chemicals gave a negative response. Eighty-one percent of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. A c-mitotic effect was detected from treatment with 17 chemicals. In addition to the above tabulation of chemicals, 39 chemicals have been reported with an antimitotic effect. Thirteen assays have been recorded for five types of radiation, which with the exception of ultrasound reacted positively. The results of assays with 38 chemicals and/or radiations in combined treatments, as well as 15 chemicals and three types of radiations that induce somatic mutations are tabulated. The Pisum sativum (2n=14) bioassay has been shown to be a very good plant bioassay for assessing chromosome damage both in mitosis and meiosis for somatic mutations induced by chemicals, radiations, and environmental pollutants. For some chemicals, the Pisum assay is not as sensitive in assessing clastogenicity as the Allium assay, although this should be considered in relative terms. Pisum fulvum (2n=14) has been used in clastogenic studies also, but to a much lesser extent.

  4. Chromosome aberration assays in Pisum for the study of environmental mutagens.

    PubMed

    Grant, W F; Owens, E T

    2001-05-01

    From a literature survey, 117 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 179 assays for their clastogenic effects in Pisum. Of the 117 chemicals that have been assayed, 65 are reported at giving a positive reaction (i.e. causing chromosome aberrations), 30 positive with a dose response, five borderline positive. Seventeen chemicals gave a negative response. Eighty-one percent of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. A c-mitotic effect was detected from treatment with 17 chemicals. In addition to the above tabulation of chemicals, 39 chemicals have been reported with an antimitotic effect. Thirteen assays have been recorded for five types of radiation, which with the exception of ultrasound reacted positively. The results of assays with 38 chemicals and/or radiations in combined treatments, as well as 15 chemicals and three types of radiations that induce somatic mutations are tabulated. The Pisum sativum (2n=14) bioassay has been shown to be a very good plant bioassay for assessing chromosome damage both in mitosis and meiosis for somatic mutations induced by chemicals, radiations, and environmental pollutants. For some chemicals, the Pisum assay is not as sensitive in assessing clastogenicity as the Allium assay, although this should be considered in relative terms. Pisum fulvum (2n=14) has been used in clastogenic studies also, but to a much lesser extent. PMID:11344039

  5. Cadmium chloride strongly enhances cyclophosphamide-induced chromosome aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pandurangarao, V.L.; Blazina, S.; Bherje, R.

    1997-10-01

    Earlier we reported that a single 5 mg cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2})/kg ip dose enhanced chromosome aberrations (ca) with 50 mg/kg cyclophosphamide (CP) in mouse bone marrow cells. In this report groups of 4 mice were injected ip with saline, 0.31, 0.62, 1.25, 2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg CdCl{sub 2}, followed by saline injections at 24 h. Other mice similarly uninjected at 0 h were injected with 50 mg/kg CP at 24 h. All the mice were injected ip with 4 mg colchicine/kg at 44 h. At 48 h the bone marrow cells were processed for chromosome spreads. After dissection, visual examination revealed obvious internal hemorrhaging of the testes at 1.25 CdCl{sub 2} mg/kg and higher doses. This effect was not further increased by CP treatment. The lowest ca enhancing dose of CdCl{sub 2} on CP was 0.625 mg/kg. Our hypothesis is that Cd replaces zinc presents in numerous DNA repair enzymes and proteins resulting in diminished repair. Subsequently, the excess of unrepaired DNA damage is seen as chromatid breaks, deletions, fragments and exchanges.

  6. Complex Patterns of Chromosome 11 Aberrations in Myeloid Malignancies Target CBL, MLL, DDB1 and LMO2

    PubMed Central

    Klampfl, Thorsten; Milosevic, Jelena D.; Puda, Ana; Schönegger, Andreas; Bagienski, Klaudia; Berg, Tiina; Harutyunyan, Ashot S.; Gisslinger, Bettina; Rumi, Elisa; Malcovati, Luca; Pietra, Daniela; Elena, Chiara; Della Porta, Matteo Giovanni; Pieri, Lisa; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bock, Christoph; Doubek, Michael; Dvorakova, Dana; Suvajdzic, Nada; Tomin, Dragica; Tosic, Natasa; Racil, Zdenek; Steurer, Michael; Pavlovic, Sonja; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.; Cazzola, Mario; Gisslinger, Heinz; Kralovics, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Exome sequencing of primary tumors identifies complex somatic mutation patterns. Assignment of relevance of individual somatic mutations is difficult and poses the next challenge for interpretation of next generation sequencing data. Here we present an approach how exome sequencing in combination with SNP microarray data may identify targets of chromosomal aberrations in myeloid malignancies. The rationale of this approach is that hotspots of chromosomal aberrations might also harbor point mutations in the target genes of deletions, gains or uniparental disomies (UPDs). Chromosome 11 is a frequent target of lesions in myeloid malignancies. Therefore, we studied chromosome 11 in a total of 813 samples from 773 individual patients with different myeloid malignancies by SNP microarrays and complemented the data with exome sequencing in selected cases exhibiting chromosome 11 defects. We found gains, losses and UPDs of chromosome 11 in 52 of the 813 samples (6.4%). Chromosome 11q UPDs frequently associated with mutations of CBL. In one patient the 11qUPD amplified somatic mutations in both CBL and the DNA repair gene DDB1. A duplication within MLL exon 3 was detected in another patient with 11qUPD. We identified several common deleted regions (CDR) on chromosome 11. One of the CDRs associated with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.013). One patient with a deletion at the LMO2 locus harbored an additional point mutation on the other allele indicating that LMO2 might be a tumor suppressor frequently targeted by 11p deletions. Our chromosome-centered analysis indicates that chromosome 11 contains a number of tumor suppressor genes and that the role of this chromosome in myeloid malignancies is more complex than previously recognized. PMID:24147083

  7. Genomic Instability in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Arises from Replicative Stress and Chromosome Condensation Defects.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Noa; Ben-David, Uri; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Storchová, Zuzana; Benvenisty, Nissim; Kerem, Batsheva

    2016-02-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) frequently acquire chromosomal aberrations such as aneuploidy in culture. These aberrations progressively increase over time and may compromise the properties and clinical utility of the cells. The underlying mechanisms that drive initial genomic instability and its continued progression are largely unknown. Here, we show that aneuploid hPSCs undergo DNA replication stress, resulting in defective chromosome condensation and segregation. Aneuploid hPSCs show altered levels of actin cytoskeletal genes controlled by the transcription factor SRF, and overexpression of SRF rescues impaired chromosome condensation and segregation defects in aneuploid hPSCs. Furthermore, SRF downregulation in diploid hPSCs induces replication stress and perturbed condensation similar to that seen in aneuploid cells. Together, these results suggest that decreased SRF expression induces replicative stress and chromosomal condensation defects that underlie the ongoing chromosomal instability seen in aneuploid hPSCs. A similar mechanism may also operate during initiation of instability in diploid cells.

  8. Chromosome aberrations, spontaneous SCE, and growth kinetics in PHA-stimulated lymphocytes of five cases with Sézary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Limon, J; Nedoszytko, B; Brozek, I; Hellmann, A; Zajaczek, S; Lubiński, J; Mrózek, K

    1995-08-01

    Cytogenetic studies of five patients with Sézary syndrome (SS) revealed clonal chromosome aberrations in all cases. In one patient, a del(8)(p21) was the sole abnormality, whereas the remaining cases had karyotypes with multiple chromosome changes. In three SS cases with hypodiploid chromosome numbers, structural rearrangements affecting regions 10q22-24 and 12p11-13, and aberrations leading to loss of material from 17p were found concurrently. Bands 14q11 and 14q32 were involved in structural rearrangements in one case each. Our results and review of 51 published previously SS cases that were analyzed with banding techniques indicate that the chromosomes most frequently involved in structural changes were chromosomes 1 and 2 (in 43% of cases), 6 (in 38%), 17 (in 34%), 14 (in 27%), 11 (in 25%), 13 (in 21%), and 9 (in 20%). In particular, the breakpoints tended to aggregate at 1p11, 1p36, 2p11-24, 6q, 9q, 11q, 13q11-14, 14q11, 14q32, and in the pericentric region of chromosome 17. The most common numerical change was loss of chromosome 10, detected in 32% of SS cases. In our studies of three SS cases, sister chromatid exchange frequencies were significantly higher in comparison to the normal control. Cell cycle kinetics analysis revealed that the cell cycle time in the malignant cells was significantly longer than in lymphocytes of normal individuals.

  9. An improved system for exposure of cultured mammalian cells to gaseous compounds in the chromosomal aberration assay.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Masumi; Sasaki, Toshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshie; Arito, Heihachiro; Fukushima, Shoji; Matsushima, Taijiro

    2008-04-30

    A gas exposure system using rotating vessels was improved for exposure of cultured mammalian cells to gaseous compounds in the chromosomal aberration assay. This system was composed of 12 square culture vessels, a device for preparation of air containing test gas, and positive and negative control gases at target concentrations and for supplying these gases to the culture vessels, and a roller apparatus in an incubator. Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU) were grown on one side of the inner surface of the square culture vessel in the MEM medium. Immediately prior to exposure, the medium was changed to the modified MEM. Air in the culture vessel was replaced with air containing test gas, positive or negative control gas. Then, the culture vessels were rotated at 1.0 rpm. The monolayered culture cells were exposed to test gas during about 3/4 rotation at upper positions and alternatively immersed into the culture medium during about 1/4 rotation at lower positions. This system allowed the chromosomal aberration assay simultaneously at least at three different concentrations of a test gas together with positive and negative control gases with and without metabolic activations, and duplicate culture at each exposure concentration. Seven gaseous compounds, 1,3-butadiene, chlorodifluoromethane, ethyl chloride, methyl bromide, methyl chloride, propyne, and vinyl chloride, none of which has been tested to date, were tested on CHL/IU for the chromosomal aberration assay using this gas exposure system. All the compounds except chlorodifluoromethane showed positive responses of the structural chromosomal aberrations, whereas polyploidy was not induced by any of these gases. This improved gas exposure system proved to be useful for detecting chromosomal aberrations of gaseous compounds.

  10. An improved system for exposure of cultured mammalian cells to gaseous compounds in the chromosomal aberration assay.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Masumi; Sasaki, Toshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshie; Arito, Heihachiro; Fukushima, Shoji; Matsushima, Taijiro

    2008-04-30

    A gas exposure system using rotating vessels was improved for exposure of cultured mammalian cells to gaseous compounds in the chromosomal aberration assay. This system was composed of 12 square culture vessels, a device for preparation of air containing test gas, and positive and negative control gases at target concentrations and for supplying these gases to the culture vessels, and a roller apparatus in an incubator. Chinese hamster lung cells (CHL/IU) were grown on one side of the inner surface of the square culture vessel in the MEM medium. Immediately prior to exposure, the medium was changed to the modified MEM. Air in the culture vessel was replaced with air containing test gas, positive or negative control gas. Then, the culture vessels were rotated at 1.0 rpm. The monolayered culture cells were exposed to test gas during about 3/4 rotation at upper positions and alternatively immersed into the culture medium during about 1/4 rotation at lower positions. This system allowed the chromosomal aberration assay simultaneously at least at three different concentrations of a test gas together with positive and negative control gases with and without metabolic activations, and duplicate culture at each exposure concentration. Seven gaseous compounds, 1,3-butadiene, chlorodifluoromethane, ethyl chloride, methyl bromide, methyl chloride, propyne, and vinyl chloride, none of which has been tested to date, were tested on CHL/IU for the chromosomal aberration assay using this gas exposure system. All the compounds except chlorodifluoromethane showed positive responses of the structural chromosomal aberrations, whereas polyploidy was not induced by any of these gases. This improved gas exposure system proved to be useful for detecting chromosomal aberrations of gaseous compounds. PMID:18342567

  11. [The evolution of human Y chromosome].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xianrong; Wang, Meiqin; Li, Shaohua

    2014-09-01

    The human Y chromosome is always intriguing for researchers, because of its role in gender determination and its unusual evolutionary history. The Y chromosome evolves from an autosome, and its evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. The lack of recombination and protein-coding genes and high content of repetitive sequences have hindered the progress in our understanding of the Y chromosome biology. Recently, with the advances in comparative genomics and sequencing technology, the research on Y chromosome has become a hotspot, with an intensified debate about Y-chromosome final destination resulting from degeneration. This review focuses on the structure, inheritance characteristics, gene content, and the origin and evolution of Y chromosome. We also discuss the long-term destiny of Y chromosome.

  12. Analysis of α-particle-induced chromosomal aberrations by chemically-induced PCC. Elaboration of dose-effect curves.

    PubMed

    Puig, Roser; Pujol, Mònica; Barrios, Leonardo; Caballín, María Rosa; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc

    2016-09-01

    In a similar way to high-dose exposures to low-LET radiations, cells show difficulties reaching mitosis after high-LET radiation exposure. For this reason, techniques have been proposed that are able to analyze chromosome aberrations in interphase by prematurely condensing the chromosomes (PCC-techniques). Few dose-effect curves for high-LET radiation types have been reported, and none for α-particles. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by chemically-induced PCC, the chromosome aberrations induced by several doses of α-particles. Monolayers of peripheral lymphocytes were exposed to an α-source of Americium-241 with a mean energy entering the cells of 2.7 MeV. Lymphocytes were exposed to 10 doses, from 0-2.5 Gy, and then cultured for 48 h. Colcemid and Calyculin-A were added at 24 and 1 h before harvesting, respectively. During microscope analysis, chromosome rings and extra chromosome pieces were scored in G2/M-PCC and M cells, while dicentric chromosomes were only scored in M cells. As the dose increased, fewer cells were able to reach mitosis and the proportion of G2/M-PCC cells increased. Chromosome rings were hardly observed in M cells when compared to G2/M-PCC cells. Extra fragments were more frequent than rings in both G2/M-PCC and M cells, but with lower frequencies than in G2/M-PCC cells. The distribution of dicentrics and extra fragments showed a clear overdispersion; this was not so evident for rings. The dose-effect curves obtained fitted very well to a linear model. Damaged cells after α-particle irradiation show more difficulties in reaching mitosis than cells exposed to γ-rays. After α-particle irradiation the frequency of all the chromosome aberrations considered increased linearly with the dose, and α-particles clearly produced more dicentrics and extra chromosome pieces with respect to γ-rays. After α-particle exposure, the existence of extra chromosome fragments in PCC cells seems to be a good candidate for use as a biomarker

  13. Analysis of α-particle-induced chromosomal aberrations by chemically-induced PCC. Elaboration of dose-effect curves.

    PubMed

    Puig, Roser; Pujol, Mònica; Barrios, Leonardo; Caballín, María Rosa; Barquinero, Joan-Francesc

    2016-09-01

    In a similar way to high-dose exposures to low-LET radiations, cells show difficulties reaching mitosis after high-LET radiation exposure. For this reason, techniques have been proposed that are able to analyze chromosome aberrations in interphase by prematurely condensing the chromosomes (PCC-techniques). Few dose-effect curves for high-LET radiation types have been reported, and none for α-particles. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by chemically-induced PCC, the chromosome aberrations induced by several doses of α-particles. Monolayers of peripheral lymphocytes were exposed to an α-source of Americium-241 with a mean energy entering the cells of 2.7 MeV. Lymphocytes were exposed to 10 doses, from 0-2.5 Gy, and then cultured for 48 h. Colcemid and Calyculin-A were added at 24 and 1 h before harvesting, respectively. During microscope analysis, chromosome rings and extra chromosome pieces were scored in G2/M-PCC and M cells, while dicentric chromosomes were only scored in M cells. As the dose increased, fewer cells were able to reach mitosis and the proportion of G2/M-PCC cells increased. Chromosome rings were hardly observed in M cells when compared to G2/M-PCC cells. Extra fragments were more frequent than rings in both G2/M-PCC and M cells, but with lower frequencies than in G2/M-PCC cells. The distribution of dicentrics and extra fragments showed a clear overdispersion; this was not so evident for rings. The dose-effect curves obtained fitted very well to a linear model. Damaged cells after α-particle irradiation show more difficulties in reaching mitosis than cells exposed to γ-rays. After α-particle irradiation the frequency of all the chromosome aberrations considered increased linearly with the dose, and α-particles clearly produced more dicentrics and extra chromosome pieces with respect to γ-rays. After α-particle exposure, the existence of extra chromosome fragments in PCC cells seems to be a good candidate for use as a biomarker

  14. Frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in the benthic worm Neanthes arenaceodentata exposed to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Rice, D.W. Jr., Moore, D.H.

    1984-07-01

    Traditional bioassays are unsuitable for assessing sublethal effects from ocean disposal of low-level radioactive waste because mortality and phenotypic responses are not anticipated. We compared the usefulness of chromosomal aberration and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction as measures of low-level radiation effects in a sediment-dwelling marine worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata. The SCEs, in contrast to chromosomal aberrations, do not alter the overall chromosome morphology and in mammalian cells appear to be a more sensitive indicator of DNA alterations caused by environmental mutagens. Newly hatched larvae were exposed to two radiation-exposure regimes of either x rays at a high dose rate of 0.7 Gy (70 rad)/min for as long as 5.5 min or to /sup 60/Co gamma rays at a low dose rate of from 4.8 x 10/sup -5/ to 1.2 x 10/sup -1/ Gy (0.0048 to 12 rad)/h for 24 h. After irradiation, the larvae were exposed to 3 x 10/sup -5/M bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) for 28 h (x-ray-irradiated larvae) or for 54 h (/sup 60/Co-irradiated larvae). Larval cells were examined for the proportion of cells in first, second, and third or greater division. Frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and SCEs were determined in first and second division cells, respectively. Results from x-ray irradiation indicated that dose-related increases occur in chromosome and chromatid deletions, but a dose of equal or greater 2 Gy (equal to or greater than 200 rad) was required to observe a significant increase. Worm larvae receiving /sup 60/Co irradiation showed elevated SCE frequencies with a significant increase of 0.6 Gy (60 rad). We suggest that both SCEs and chromosomal aberrations may be useful for measuring effects on genetic material induced by radiation. 56 references, 7 figures, 9 tables.

  15. A Plain English Map of the Human Chromosomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Presents a chromosome map for 19 known chromosomes in human genetics. Describes the characteristics attributed to the genetic codes for each of the chromosomes and discusses the teaching applications of the chromosome map. (MDH)

  16. High Performance DNA Probes for Perinatal Detection of Numerical Chromosome Aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Kalistyn H; Weier, Jingly F; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G; Lawin-O’Brien, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    Human reproduction is a tightly controlled process of stepwise evolution with multiple, mostly yet unknown milestones and checkpoints. Healthy halpoid gametes have to be produced by the parents, which will fuse to form the diploid zygote that implants in the female uterus and grows to become first an embryo, then a fetus and finally matures into a newborn. There are several known risk factors that interfere with normal production of gametes, spermatocytes or oocytes, and often cause embryonic mortality and fetal demise at an early stage. Yet some embryos with chomosomal abnormalities can develop beyond the critical first trimester of pregnancy and, while those with supernumary chromosomes in their hyperdiploid cells will be spontaneously aborted, a small fraction of fetuses with an extra chromosome continues to grow to term and will be delivered as a liveborn baby. While minor clinical symptoms displayed by children with trisomies are manageable for many parents, the burden of caring for a child with numerical chromosome abnormalities can be overwhelming to partners or individual families. It also poses a significant financial burden to the society and poses ethical dilemma. In this communication, we will review the progress that has been made in the development of molecular techniques to test individual fetal cells for chromosomal imbalances. We will focus our discussion on the direct visualization of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in live or fixed specimens using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and, more specifically, talk about the groundbreaking progress that in recent years has been achieved towards an improved diagnosis with novel, chromosome-specific DNA probes. PMID:26855976

  17. Chromosome aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes and radiation dose to active bone marrow in patients treated for cancer of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinerman, R.A.; Littlefield, L.G.; Tarone, R.E.; Machado, S.G.; Blettner, M.; Peters, L.J.; Boice, J.D. Jr. )

    1989-07-01

    An international study of cervical cancer patients reported a doubling of the risk for leukemia following radiotherapy. To evaluate the extent of residual chromosome damage in circulating T-cell lymphocytes in this population, approximately 200 metaphases were examined from each of 96 irradiated and 26 nonirradiated cervical cancer patients treated more than 17 years ago (average 23 years). Radiation dose averaged over the total red bone marrow was estimated to be 8.1 Gy. The type and frequency of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations were quantified in 24,117 metaphases. Unstable aberrations did not differ significantly between irradiated and nonirradiated patients (P greater than 0.5). Stable aberrations (i.e., translocations, inversions, or chromosomes with deleted segments), however, were significantly higher among irradiated (2.8 per 100 cells) compared to nonirradiated (0.7 per 100 cells) women (P less than 10(4)). The frequency of these stable aberrations was found to increase significantly with increasing dose to the bone marrow. These data indicate that a direct relationship between radiation dose and extent of damage to somatic cells persists in populations and can be detected many years after partial-body radiation exposure. The stable aberration rate in irradiated cervical cancer patients was 50 to 75% lower than those observed 25 years or more after radiation exposure in atomic bomb survivors and in ankylosing spondylitis patients treated with radiotherapy. The average marrow dose was only 1 Gy in the examined atomic bomb survivors and 3.5 Gy in the ankylosing spondylitis patients. It appears, then, that a very high dose delivered to the pelvic cavity in fractionated doses resulted in far fewer persistent stable aberrations than lower doses delivered either in acute whole-body exposure or in fractionated doses to the spinal column and sacroiliac joints.

  18. Identification of Chromosomal Aberrations by Using Trypsin G-banding in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients (HCC) in Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Mohana Devi, Subramaniam; Balachandar, Vellingiri; Murugan, Palanivel Vel; Sasikala, Keshavarao; Manikantan, Pappusamy; Venkatakrishnan, Leela Krishnan

    2010-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (or liver cancer) is one of the most common human malignancies worldwide. Aetiologically, HCC is closely associated with chronic hepatitis B and C virus infection, cirrhosis and alcohol intake. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the chromosomal abberations (CA) in HCC patients using the trypsin G-banding technique. This study may help in understanding the pattern of the disease and to assess whether these aberrations are associated with HCC susceptibility. The study examined 51 HCC cases and an equal number (n = 51) of age and gender matched cancer-free controls recruited from the hospitals in Tamil Nadu. The HCC cases were grouped depending upon their age into group I (≤ 45 years) and group II (≥ 46 years). The development of effective markers for the detection of HCC could have an impact on cancer mortality and may have significant public health implications worldwide. Subjects were recruited based on their alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum level, which is an effective marker for HCC. In the HCC cases, a higher number of chromatid aberrations [group I 13(25.5%) and group II 43(84.3%)] and CA [group I 10(19.6%) and group II 28(54.9%)] were observed. In contrast, controls showed a lower number of chromatid [group I 5(9.8%) and group II 12(23.5%)] and CA [group I 4(7.8%) and group II 9(17.6%)]. In conclusion, the results of this study contribute to the validation of CA as an intermediate end point in carcinogenesis. Because many people are unaware of this lethal disease, this study will raise awareness of this cancer.

  19. Identification of Chromosomal Aberrations by Using Trypsin G-banding in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients (HCC) in Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Mohana Devi, Subramaniam; Balachandar, Vellingiri; Murugan, Palanivel Vel; Sasikala, Keshavarao; Manikantan, Pappusamy; Venkatakrishnan, Leela Krishnan

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (or liver cancer) is one of the most common human malignancies worldwide. Aetiologically, HCC is closely associated with chronic hepatitis B and C virus infection, cirrhosis and alcohol intake. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the chromosomal abberations (CA) in HCC patients using the trypsin G-banding technique. This study may help in understanding the pattern of the disease and to assess whether these aberrations are associated with HCC susceptibility. The study examined 51 HCC cases and an equal number (n = 51) of age and gender matched cancer-free controls recruited from the hospitals in Tamil Nadu. The HCC cases were grouped depending upon their age into group I (≤ 45 years) and group II (≥ 46 years). The development of effective markers for the detection of HCC could have an impact on cancer mortality and may have significant public health implications worldwide. Subjects were recruited based on their alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) serum level, which is an effective marker for HCC. In the HCC cases, a higher number of chromatid aberrations [group I 13(25.5%) and group II 43(84.3%)] and CA [group I 10(19.6%) and group II 28(54.9%)] were observed. In contrast, controls showed a lower number of chromatid [group I 5(9.8%) and group II 12(23.5%)] and CA [group I 4(7.8%) and group II 9(17.6%)]. In conclusion, the results of this study contribute to the validation of CA as an intermediate end point in carcinogenesis. Because many people are unaware of this lethal disease, this study will raise awareness of this cancer. PMID:24575188

  20. [Number of aberrations per cell as a parameter of chromosome instability. 2. Comparative analysis of the factors of different nature].

    PubMed

    Kutsokon', N K; Lazarenko, L M; Bezrukov, V F; Rashydov, N M; Grodzyns'kyĭ, D M

    2004-01-01

    The average number of aberrations per aberrant cell was concluded to carry out information on chromosome instability peculiarities induced by different mutagens as it was shown in our previous work. The purpose of the current study was to present comparative analysis of intercellular distribution of number of aberrations and their theoretical approximations. Distribution of numbers of aberrations per cell in Allium cepa L. and Allium fistulosum L. root tip cells induced by different mutagenic factors (gamma-irradiation, thiotepa, formaldehyde and seed aging) have been studied. The results were approximated to theoretical Poisson, geometric and negative binomial distributions. The intercellular distribution of aberrations did not correspond to any of the used theoretical distributions when A. cepa seeds were gamma-irradiated. There was some, but not regular, accordance with theoretical distributions when chemical mutagens thiotepa in A. cepa and formaldehyde in A. fistulosum and seed aging in both species were evaluated. During seed aging frequency of aberrant cells increased more quickly in A. fistulosum in comparison with A. cepa. PMID:15098449

  1. Changes in metal levels and chromosome aberrations in the peripheral blood of patients after metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ladon, Dariusz; Doherty, Ann; Newson, Roger; Turner, Justine; Bhamra, Manjit; Case, C Patrick

    2004-12-01

    A prospective study was performed to investigate changes in metal levels and chromosome aberrations in patients within 2 years of receiving metal-on-metal hip arthroplasties. There was a statistically significant increase of cobalt and chromium concentrations, with a small increase in molybdenum, in whole blood at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. There was also a statistically significant increase of both chromosome translocations and aneuploidy in peripheral blood lymphocytes at 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. The changes were generally progressive with time, but the change in aneuploidy was much greater than in chromosome translocations. No statistically significant correlations were found in secondary analyses between chromosome translocation indices and cobalt or chromium concentration in whole blood. Although the clinical consequences of these changes, if any, are unknown, future epidemiological studies could usefully include direct comparisons of patients with implants of different composition.

  2. Studies on Brahma rasayana in male swiss albino mice: Chromosomal aberrations and sperm abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Guruprasad, K. P.; Mascarenhas, Roshan; Gopinath, P. M.; Satyamoorthy, K.

    2010-01-01

    Ayurveda, the Indian holistic healthcare system encompasses traditional medicines with a principle of creating harmony and maintaining balance within the natural rhythms of the body. Rasayana is one of the branches of Ayurveda frequently used as rejuvenant therapy to overcome many discomforts and prevent diseases. It has been reported that rasayanas have immunomodulatory, antioxidant and antitumor functions. However, the genotoxic potential of many rasayanas remains to be evaluated. The present study was undertaken to assess the role of Brahma rasayana(BR) on genotoxicity in vivo in a mouse test system. The older mice (9 months) were orally fed with rasayana for 8 weeks. The treated groups showed no signs of dose-dependent toxicity at the dosage levels tested. The body weight loss/gain and feed consumption were unaffected at tested doses. Furthermore, sperm abnormalities and chromosomal aberrations were insignificant in the treatment group when compared to controls. However, there was a marginal increase in sperm count in the BR treated animals. These findings clearly indicate that there are no observed adverse genotoxic effects elicited by BR in experimental animals such as mice. PMID:21829300

  3. Temporary variations in chromosomal aberrations in a group of agricultural workers exposed to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, E; Valbuena, A; Xamena, N; Creus, A; Marcos, R

    1995-10-01

    The induction of chromosomal aberrations (CA) was studied in the peripheral lymphocytes of 29 male agricultural workers occupationally exposed to several pesticides. To investigate possible exposure-related changes in the frequency of CA, a longitudinal study has been conducted. Two blood samples were taken from each individual: one in a period of high exposure (spring-summer) and the other in a period of lower exposure (autumn-winter). Simultaneously, two matched control groups constituted by 29 and 24 healthy men, without indication of exposure to pesticides, were analysed. During the period of major exposure, the group of agricultural workers showed a significant increase in the frequency of CA, mainly of chromatid-type, when compared to the unexposed control group; nevertheless, this increase in the expression of CA was not found in the period of minor exposure. This finding could indicate that the frequency of CA is related to the intensity of the pesticide exposure, and that CA have a relatively short-life, recovering the control value a few months later. In addition to the cytogenetic analysis, biochemical and haemotological blood parameters were also analysed and no significant variations were detected. PMID:7491130

  4. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  5. Clinico-Pathological Association of Delineated miRNAs in Uveal Melanoma with Monosomy 3/Disomy 3 Chromosomal Aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Nalini; Kanwar, Jagat; Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi; Khetan, Vikas; Crowley, Tamsyn M.; Raguraman, Rajeswari; Sugneswari, Ganesan; Rishi, Pukhraj; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To correlate the differentially expressed miRNAs with clinico-pathological features in uveal melanoma (UM) tumors harbouring chromosomal 3 aberrations among South Asian Indian cohort. Methods Based on chromosomal 3 aberration, UM (n = 86) were grouped into monosomy 3 (M3; n = 51) and disomy 3 (D3; n = 35) by chromogenic in-situ hybridisation (CISH). The clinico-pathological features were recorded. miRNA profiling was performed in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) UM samples (n = 6) using Agilent, Human miRNA microarray, 8x15KV3 arrays. The association between miRNAs and clinico-pathological features were studied using univariate and multivariate analysis. miRNA-gene targets were predicted using Target-scan and MiRanda database. Significantly dys-regulated miRNAs were validated in FFPE UM (n = 86) and mRNAs were validated in frozen UM (n = 10) by qRT-PCR. Metastasis free-survival and miRNA expressions were analysed by Kaplen-Meier analysis in UM tissues (n = 52). Results Unsupervised analysis revealed 585 differentially expressed miRNAs while supervised analysis demonstrated 82 miRNAs (FDR; Q = 0.0). Differential expression of 8 miRNAs: miR-214, miR-149*, miR-143, miR-146b, miR-199a, let7b, miR-1238 and miR-134 were studied. Gene target prediction revealed SMAD4, WISP1, HIPK1, HDAC8 and C-KIT as the post-transcriptional regulators of miR-146b, miR-199a, miR-1238 and miR-134. Five miRNAs (miR-214, miR146b, miR-143, miR-199a and miR-134) were found to be differentially expressed in M3/ D3 UM tumors. In UM patients with liver metastasis, miR-149* and miR-134 expressions were strongly correlated. Conclusion UM can be stratified using miRNAs from FFPE sections. miRNAs predicting liver metastasis and survival have been identified. Mechanistic linkage of de-regulated miRNA/mRNA expressions provide new insights on their role in UM progression and aggressiveness. PMID:26812476

  6. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, Joe N.; Straume, Tore; Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration.

  7. Identification of random nucleic acid sequence aberrations using dual capture probes which hybridize to different chromosome regions

    DOEpatents

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.; Bogen, K.T.

    1998-03-24

    A method is provided for detecting nucleic acid sequence aberrations using two immobilization steps. According to the method, a nucleic acid sequence aberration is detected by detecting nucleic acid sequences having both a first nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a first chromosome) and a second nucleic acid sequence type (e.g., from a second chromosome), the presence of the first and the second nucleic acid sequence type on the same nucleic acid sequence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. In the method, immobilization of a first hybridization probe is used to isolate a first set of nucleic acids in the sample which contain the first nucleic acid sequence type. Immobilization of a second hybridization probe is then used to isolate a second set of nucleic acids from within the first set of nucleic acids which contain the second nucleic acid sequence type. The second set of nucleic acids are then detected, their presence indicating the presence of a nucleic acid sequence aberration. 14 figs.

  8. Identification of Novel Chromosomal Aberrations Induced by (60)Co-γ-Irradiation in Wheat-Dasypyrum villosum Lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Jiang, Yun; Guo, Yuanlin; Li, Guangrong; Yang, Zujun; Xu, Delin; Xuan, Pu

    2015-01-01

    Mutations induced by radiation are widely used for developing new varieties of plants. To better understand the frequency and pattern of irradiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements, we irradiated the dry seeds of Chinese Spring (CS)-Dasypyrum villosum nullisomic-tetrasomic (6A/6D) addition (6V) line (2n = 44), WD14, with (60)Co-γ-rays at dosages of 100, 200, and 300 Gy. The M₀ and M₁ generations were analyzed using Feulgen staining and non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization (ND-FISH) by using oligonucleotide probes. Abnormal mitotic behavior and chromosomes with structural changes were observed in the M₀ plants. In all, 39 M₁ plants had structurally changed chromosomes, with the B genome showing the highest frequency of aberrations and tendency to recombine with chromosomes of the D genome. In addition, 19 M₁ plants showed a variation in chromosome number. The frequency of chromosome loss was considerably higher for 6D than for the alien chromosome 6V, indicating that 6D is less stable after irradiation. Our findings suggested that the newly obtained γ-induced genetic materials might be beneficial for future wheat breeding programs and functional gene analyses. PMID:26694350

  9. Identification of Novel Chromosomal Aberrations Induced by 60Co-γ-Irradiation in Wheat-Dasypyrum villosum Lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Jiang, Yun; Guo, Yuanlin; Li, Guangrong; Yang, Zujun; Xu, Delin; Xuan, Pu

    2015-01-01

    Mutations induced by radiation are widely used for developing new varieties of plants. To better understand the frequency and pattern of irradiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements, we irradiated the dry seeds of Chinese Spring (CS)-Dasypyrum villosum nullisomic-tetrasomic (6A/6D) addition (6V) line (2n = 44), WD14, with 60Co-γ-rays at dosages of 100, 200, and 300 Gy. The M0 and M1 generations were analyzed using Feulgen staining and non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization (ND-FISH) by using oligonucleotide probes. Abnormal mitotic behavior and chromosomes with structural changes were observed in the M0 plants. In all, 39 M1 plants had structurally changed chromosomes, with the B genome showing the highest frequency of aberrations and tendency to recombine with chromosomes of the D genome. In addition, 19 M1 plants showed a variation in chromosome number. The frequency of chromosome loss was considerably higher for 6D than for the alien chromosome 6V, indicating that 6D is less stable after irradiation. Our findings suggested that the newly obtained γ-induced genetic materials might be beneficial for future wheat breeding programs and functional gene analyses. PMID:26694350

  10. Identification of Novel Chromosomal Aberrations Induced by (60)Co-γ-Irradiation in Wheat-Dasypyrum villosum Lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Jiang, Yun; Guo, Yuanlin; Li, Guangrong; Yang, Zujun; Xu, Delin; Xuan, Pu

    2015-12-14

    Mutations induced by radiation are widely used for developing new varieties of plants. To better understand the frequency and pattern of irradiation-induced chromosomal rearrangements, we irradiated the dry seeds of Chinese Spring (CS)-Dasypyrum villosum nullisomic-tetrasomic (6A/6D) addition (6V) line (2n = 44), WD14, with (60)Co-γ-rays at dosages of 100, 200, and 300 Gy. The M₀ and M₁ generations were analyzed using Feulgen staining and non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization (ND-FISH) by using oligonucleotide probes. Abnormal mitotic behavior and chromosomes with structural changes were observed in the M₀ plants. In all, 39 M₁ plants had structurally changed chromosomes, with the B genome showing the highest frequency of aberrations and tendency to recombine with chromosomes of the D genome. In addition, 19 M₁ plants showed a variation in chromosome number. The frequency of chromosome loss was considerably higher for 6D than for the alien chromosome 6V, indicating that 6D is less stable after irradiation. Our findings suggested that the newly obtained γ-induced genetic materials might be beneficial for future wheat breeding programs and functional gene analyses.

  11. Human sperm chromosomes. Long-term effect of cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Genesca, A.; Caballin, M.R.; Miro, R.; Benet, J.; Bonfill, X.; Egozcue, J. )

    1990-06-01

    The long-term cytogenetic effect of radio- or chemotherapy or both on male germ cells was evaluated by study of the chromosomal abnormalities in spermatozoa of four men treated for cancer 5-18 years earlier. The cytogenetic analysis of 422 sperm metaphases showed no differences in the aneuploidy rate. The incidence of structural chromosome aberrations was 14.0%, however, which is much higher than in controls. Thus, the high incidence of structurally aberrant spermatozoa observed in our long-term study indicates that antitumoral treatments affect stem-cell spermatogonia and that aberrant cells can survive germinal selection and produce abnormal spermatozoa.

  12. Chromosome aberrations determined by sFISH and G-banding in lymphocytes from workers with internal deposits of plutonium

    PubMed Central

    Tawn, E. Janet; Curwen, Gillian B.; Jonas, Patricia; Riddell, Anthony E.; Hodgson, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To examine the influence of α-particle radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium on chromosome aberration frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes of workers from the Sellafield nuclear facility, UK. Materials and methods: Chromosome aberration data from historical single colour fluorescence in situ hybridization (sFISH) and Giemsa banding (G-banding) analyses, together with more recent sFISH results, were assessed using common aberration analysis criteria and revised radiation dosimetry. The combined sFISH group comprised 29 men with a mean internal red bone marrow dose of 21.0 mGy and a mean external γ-ray dose of 541 mGy. The G-banding group comprised 23 men with a mean internal red bone marrow dose of 23.0 mGy and a mean external γ-ray dose of 315 mGy. Results: Observed translocation frequencies corresponded to expectations based on age and external γ-ray dose with no need to postulate a contribution from α-particle irradiation of the red bone marrow by internally deposited plutonium. Frequencies of stable cells with complex aberrations, including insertions, were similar to those in a group of controls and a group of workers with external radiation exposure only, who were studied concurrently. In a similar comparison there is some suggestion of an increase in cells with unstable complex aberrations and this may reflect recent direct exposure to circulating lymphocytes. Conclusions: Reference to in vitro dose response data for the induction of stable aberrant cells by α-particle irradiation indicates that the low red bone marrow α-particle radiation doses received by the Sellafield workers would not result in a discernible increase in translocations, thus supporting the in vivo findings. Therefore, the greater risk from occupational radiation exposure of the bone marrow resulting in viable chromosomally aberrant cells comes from, in general, much larger γ-ray exposure in comparison to α-particle exposure from plutonium

  13. Comprehensive retrospective evaluation of existing in vitro chromosomal aberration test data by cytotoxicity index transformation.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yurika; Morita, Takeshi; Matsumura, Shoji; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Ito, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Naohiro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    New OECD test guidelines have been issued, in which the cytotoxicity index relative cell count (RCC) is replaced with a new index, RICC or RPD (relative increase in cell count/relative population doubling), with the goal of reducing the high proportion of false positive results in in vitro chromosomal aberration tests. Using a mathematical approach to estimate new indices from the RCC, we constructed an evaluation flow that quantitatively estimates how often the previous test conclusions change when applying the updated cytotoxicity criteria. The new evaluation flow was applied to a retrospective evaluation of 285 chemicals in two databases. The effects of the employment of new cytotoxicity indices are investigated at a large scale. Using the new evaluation flow, 90 chemicals were estimated as positive, 39 were designated as estimated negative (13 probably negative and 26 possibly negative), and 140 were designated as negative. Moreover, we also applied a prioritization index to indicate the likelihood of a chemical being re-evaluated as negative and assigned priorities for testing. Most of the chemicals that were designated as estimated negative and had negative results in the in vivo micronucleus tests were considered as false-positives that would be correctly judged under the new test guideline. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the frequency of estimated negatives revealed that the results for Ames-positive chemicals, especially those with a strong response, are unlikely to change. Therefore, we concluded that the new indices would likely reduce the proportion of false positive results and not increase the proportion of false negative results. This study is the first report of a comprehensive re-evaluation of test results in terms of new cytotoxicity indices. The evaluation flow we have developed facilitates efficient retrospective evaluation of genotoxicity.

  14. Cytochemical study of pseudoisocyanine stained human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Vagner-Capodano, A M; Pinna-Delgrossi, M H; Stahl, A

    1976-01-28

    Human meiotic and mitotic chromosomes were studied with N-N' diethyl pseudoisocyanine stain. Following methylation and oxydation, the staining allowed microscopic observation of slides with both monochromatic light and fluorescence. In addition, stained preparations can be permanently conserved. Preceeded by diverse methods of chromosome denaturation or 5-BUDR incorporation, PIC lends itself to a large number of banding techniques. Cytochemical study of stained chromosomes demonstrated a certain PIC affinity for DNA although tests performed do not exclude the possibility of PIC reaction with certain proteins.

  15. Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

    2001-09-01

    Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

  16. Aberrations Involving Chromosome 1 as a Possible Predictor of Odds Ratio for Colon Cancer - Results from the Krakow Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Galas, Aleksander; Miszczyk, Justyna

    2016-01-01

    Background There is still an open question how to predict colorectal cancer risk before any morphological changes appear in the colon. Objective The purpose was to investigate aberrations in chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 in peripheral blood lymphocytes analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization technique as a tool to assess the likelihood of colorectal cancer. Methods A hospital-based case-control study included 20 colon cancer patients and 18 hospital-based controls. Information about potential covariates was collected by interview. The frequency of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations in chromosome 1, 2 and 4 was assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization technique. Results Colorectal cancer patients, as compared to controls, had a relatively higher frequency of chromosome 1 translocations (median: 3.5 versus 1.0 /1000 cells, p = 0.006), stable aberrations (3.8 versus 1.0 /1000 cells, p = 0.007) and total aberrations (p = 0.009). There were no differences observed for chromosomes 2 and 4. Our results showed an increase in the odds of having colon cancer by about 50–80% associated with an increase by 1/1000 cells in the number of chromosome 1 aberrations. Conclusions The results revealed that the frequency of chromosomal aberrations, especially translocations in chromosome 1, seems to be a promising method to show a colon cancer risk. Additionally, our study suggests the reasonableness of use of biomarkers such as chromosome 1 aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in screening prevention programs for individuals at higher colon cancer risk to identify those who are at increased risk and require more frequent investigations, e.g. by sigmoidoscopy. PMID:26824604

  17. Comparison of chromosome aberration frequencies in pre- and post-flight astronaut lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H.; George, K.; Willingham, V.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    If radiosensitivity is altered in a microgravity environment, it will affect the accuracy of assessing astronauts' risk from exposure to space radiation. To investigate the effects of space flight on radiosensitivity, we exposed a crewmember's blood to gamma rays at doses ranging from 0 to 3 Gy and analyzed chromosome aberrations in mitotic lymphocytes. The blood samples were collected 10 days prior to an 8-day Shuttle mission, the day the flight returned, and 14 days after the flight. After exposure, lymphocytes were stimulated to grow in media containing phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and mitotic cells were harvested for chromosome analysis using a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome specific probes. The dose response of total exchanges showed no changes in the radiosensitivity after the mission.

  18. Non-meiotic chromosome instability in human immature oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Daina, Gemma; Ramos, Laia; Rius, Mariona; Obradors, Albert; del Rey, Javier; Giralt, Magda; Campillo, Mercedes; Velilla, Esther; Pujol, Aïda; Martinez-Pasarell, Olga; Benet, Jordi; Navarro, Joaquima

    2014-01-01

    Aneuploidy has been a major issue in human gametes and is closely related to fertility problems, as it is known to be present in cleavage stage embryos and gestational losses. Pre-meiotic chromosome abnormalities in women have been previously described. The aim of this study is to assess the whole-chromosome complement in immature oocytes to find those abnormalities caused by mitotic instability. For this purpose, a total of 157 oocytes at the germinal vesicle or metaphase I stage, and discarded from IVF cycles, were analysed by CGH. Fifty-six women, between 18 and 45 years old (mean 32.5 years), including 32 IVF patients (25–45 years of age) and 24 IVF oocyte donors (18–33 years of age), were included in the study. A total of 25/157 (15.9%) of the oocytes analysed, obtained from three IVF clinics, contained chromosome abnormalities, including both aneuploidy (24/157) and structural aberrations (9/157). Independently of the maternal age, the incidence of abnormal oocytes which originated before meiosis is 15.9%, and these imbalances were found in 33.9% of the females studied. This work sheds light on the relevance of mitotic instability responsible for the generation of the abnormalities present in human oocytes. PMID:23695274

  19. DNA Copy Number Aberrations, and Human Papillomavirus Status in Penile Carcinoma. Clinico-Pathological Correlations and Potential Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Weigelt, Britta; Rajab, Ramzi; Tinwell, Brendan; Corbishley, Cathy; Watkin, Nick; Berney, Dan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2016-01-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinoma is a rare disease, in which somatic genetic aberrations have yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that gene copy aberrations might correlate with human papillomavirus status and clinico-pathological features. We sought to determine the spectrum of gene copy number aberrations in a large series of PSCCs and to define their correlations with human papillomavirus, histopathological subtype, and tumor grade, stage and lymph node status. Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded penile squamous cell carcinomas were centrally reviewed by expert uropathologists. DNA was extracted from micro-dissected samples, subjected to PCR-based human papillomavirus assessment and genotyping (INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus Genotyping Extra Assay) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a 32K Bacterial Artificial Chromosome array platform. Sixty-four samples yielded interpretable results. Recurrent gains were observed in chromosomes 1p13.3-q44 (88%), 3p12.3-q29 (86%), 5p15.33-p11 (67%) and 8p12-q24.3 (84%). Amplifications of 5p15.33-p11 and 11p14.1-p12 were found in seven (11%) and four (6%) cases, respectively. Losses were observed in chromosomes 2q33-q37.3 (86%), 3p26.3-q11.1 (83%) and 11q12.2-q25 (81%). Although many losses and gains were similar throughout the cohort, there were small significant differences observed at specific loci, between human papillomavirus positive and negative tumors, between tumor types, and tumor grade and nodal status. These results demonstrate that despite the diversity of genetic aberrations in penile squamous cell carcinomas, there are significant correlations between the clinico-pathological data and the genetic changes that may play a role in disease natural history and progression and highlight potential driver genes, which may feature in molecular pathways for existing therapeutic agents. PMID:26901676

  20. Chromosome speciation: Humans, Drosophila, and mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Francisco J.; Coluzzi, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements (such as inversions, fusions, and fissions) may play significant roles in the speciation between parapatric (contiguous) or partly sympatric (geographically overlapping) populations. According to the “hybrid-dysfunction” model, speciation occurs because hybrids with heterozygous chromosome rearrangements produce dysfunctional gametes and thus have low reproductive fitness. Natural selection will, therefore, promote mutations that reduce the probability of intercrossing between populations carrying different rearrangements and thus promote their reproductive isolation. This model encounters a disabling difficulty: namely, how to account for the spread in a population of a chromosome rearrangement after it first arises as a mutation in a single individual. The “suppressed-recombination” model of speciation points out that chromosome rearrangements act as a genetic filter between populations. Mutations associated with the rearranged chromosomes cannot flow from one to another population, whereas genetic exchange will freely occur between colinear chromosomes. Mutations adaptive to local conditions will, therefore, accumulate differentially in the protected chromosome regions so that parapatric or partially sympatric populations will genetically differentiate, eventually evolving into different species. The speciation model of suppressed recombination has recently been tested by gene and DNA sequence comparisons between humans and chimpanzees, between Drosophila species, and between species related to Anopheles gambiae, the vector of malignant malaria in Africa. PMID:15851677

  1. Theoretical and experimental tests of a chromosomal fingerprint for densely ionizing radiation based on F ratios calculated from stable and unstable chromosome aberrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. N.; Deng, W.; Oram, S. W.; Hill, F. S.; Durante, M.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Owens, C. L.; Yang, T.

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, F ratios for both stable chromosome aberrations, i.e. ratios of translocations to pericentric inversions, and unstable aberrations, i.e. dicentrics and centric rings, were measured using fluorescence in situ hybridization. F ratios for stable aberrations measured after exposure to low (2.89 Gy 60Co gamma rays) and high-LET (0.25 Gy 56Fe ions; 1.25 Gy 56Fe ions; 3.0 Gy 12C ions) radiation were 6.5 +/- 1.5, 4.7 +/- 1.6, 9.3 +/- 2.5 and 10.4 +/- 3.0, respectively. F ratios for unstable aberrations measured after low (2.89 Gy 60Co gamma rays) and high-LET (0.25 Gy 56Fe ions; 3.0 Gy 12C ions) radiations were 6.5 +/- 1.6, 6.3 +/- 2.3 and 11.1 +/- 3.7, respectively. No significant difference between the F ratios for low- and high-LET radiation was found. Further tests on the models for calculation of the F ratio proposed by Brenner and Sachs (Radiat. Res. 140, 134-142, 1994) showed that the F ratio may not be straightforward as a practical fingerprint for densely ionizing radiation.

  2. Growth rate of late passage sarcoma cells is independent of epigenetic events but dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Becerikli, Mustafa; Jacobsen, Frank; Rittig, Andrea; Köhne, Wiebke; Nambiar, Sandeep; Mirmohammadsadegh, Alireza; Stricker, Ingo; Tannapfel, Andrea; Wieczorek, Stefan; Epplen, Joerg Thomas; Tilkorn, Daniel; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2013-07-15

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are characterized by co-participation of several epigenetic and genetic events during tumorigenesis. Having bypassed cellular senescence barriers during oncogenic transformation, the factors further affecting growth rate of STS cells remain poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of gene silencing (DNA promoter methylation of LINE-1, PTEN), genetic aberrations (karyotype, KRAS and BRAF mutations) as well as their contribution to the proliferation rate and migratory potential that underlies “initial” and “final” passage sarcoma cells. Three different cell lines were used, SW982 (synovial sarcoma), U2197 (malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)) and HT1080 (fibrosarcoma). Increased proliferative potential of final passage STS cells was not associated with significant differences in methylation (LINE-1, PTEN) and mutation status (KRAS, BRAF), but it was dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that these fairly differentiated/advanced cancer cell lines have still the potential to gain an additional spontaneous growth benefit without external influences and that maintenance of increased proliferative potential towards longevity of STS cells (having crossed senescence barriers) may be independent of overt epigenetic alterations. -- Highlights: Increased proliferative potential of late passage STS cells was: • Not associated with epigenetic changes (methylation changes at LINE-1, PTEN). • Not associated with mutation status of KRAS, BRAF. • Dependent on presence/absence of chromosomal aberrations.

  3. Comparison of cell repair mechanisms by means of chromosomal aberration induced by proton and gamma irradiation - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, A.; Czerski, K.; Kaczmarski, M.; Lewocki, M.; Masojć, B.; Łukowiak, A.

    2015-03-01

    DNA damage of peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to gamma and proton irradiation is studied by means of chromosome aberrations to validate the efficiency of the repair mechanisms of individual cells. A new method based on an observed deviation from the Poisson statistics of the chromosome aberration number is applied for estimation of a repair factor ( RF) defined as a ratio between originally damaged cells to the amount of finally observed aberrations. The repair factors are evaluated by studying the variance of individual damage factors in a collective of healthy persons at a given dose as well as by using the chi-square analysis for the dose-effect curves. The blood samples from fifteen donors have been irradiated by Co60 gamma rays and from nine persons by 150 MeV protons with different doses up to 2 Gy. A standard extraction of lymphocyte has been used whereby dicentrics, acentrics and rings have been scored under a microscope. The RF values determined for the proton radiation are slightly larger than for gamma rays, indicating that up to 70% DNA double strand breaks can be repaired.

  4. Chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in individuals exposed to arsenic through drinking water in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Mahata, J; Basu, A; Ghoshal, S; Sarkar, J N; Roy, A K; Poddar, G; Nandy, A K; Banerjee, A; Ray, K; Natarajan, A T; Nilsson, R; Giri, A K

    2003-01-10

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater has become a worldwide problem. Currently an unprecedented number of people in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh are exposed to the ubiquitous toxicant via drinking water in exposure levels far exceeding the maximum recommended limit laid down by WHO. This arsenic epidemic has devastated nine districts of West Bengal encompassing an area of 38,865 km(2) leading to various clinical manifestations of chronic arsenicosis. We conducted a human bio-monitoring study using chromosomal aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) as end points to explore the cytogenetic effects of chronic arsenic toxicity in the population of North 24 Parganas, one of the arsenic affected districts in West Bengal. Study participants included 59 individuals residing in this district where the mean level (+/-S.E.) of arsenic in drinking water (microg/l) was 211.70+/-15.28. As age matched controls with similar socio-economic status we selected 36 healthy, asymptomatic individuals residing in two unaffected districts--Midnapur and Howrah where the mean arsenic content of water (microg/l) was 6.35+/-0.45. Exposure was assessed by standardized questionnaires and by detecting the levels of arsenic in drinking water, nails, hair and urine samples. In the exposed group the mean arsenic concentrations in nails (microg/g), hair (microg/g) and urine (microg/l) samples were 9.04+/-0.78, 5.63+/-0.38 and 140.52+/-8.82, respectively, which were significantly high (P<0.01) compared to the corresponding control values of 0.44+/-0.03, 0.30+/-0.02 and 5.91+/-0.49, respectively. Elevated mean values (P<0.01) of the percentage of aberrant cells (8.08%) and SCEs per cell (7.26) were also observed in the exposed individuals in comparison to controls (1.96% and 5.95, respectively). The enhanced rates of CAs and SCEs among the residents of North 24 Parganas are indicative of the cytogenetic damage due to long term exposure to arsenic through consumption of contaminated

  5. Effect of copper on morphology, weight, and chromosomal aberrations in the spiny lobster, Panulirus homarus (Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Maharajan, A; Vaseeharan, B; Rajalakshmi, S; Vijayakumaran, M; Kumarasamy, P; Chen, J C

    2011-12-01

    Spiny lobster Panulirus homarus which had been exposed to cupric ion at 9.55 and 19.1 μg/l for 28 days was examined for sub-lethal effects including morphology, wet weight, and induced genotoxic effect on the chromosome. Following cupric exposure, the color of lobster P. homarus changed from yellowish-brown to greenish black in the hepatopancreas, changed from normal creamy white to yellowish white in the muscle, and changed to greenish black in the gill. A significant change in the percentage of wet weight of muscle (28.70 ± 0.41-23.47 ± 0.45), hepatopancreas (4.03 ± 0.12-2.63 ± 0.17), and gills (3.63 ± 0.45-3.87 ± 0.12) were observed in the copper-treated lobsters. The diploid number of chromosomes of P. homarus was over 200 metaphases from ten lobsters, as 2n = 58, and consisted of 16 acrocentric, seven metacentric, and six sub-metacentric chromosomes. The lobsters exposed to cupric ion at 9.55 and 19.1 μg/l showed different types of chromosomal aberrations such as centromeric gaps, chromatid breaks, centromeric fusion, stickiness, ring chromosomes, and acrocentric association region. The frequency of aberrations increased with duration of exposure. In conclusion, it was suggested that cupric ion interacts with the spindle formation and consequently distorts the normal karyomorphology, indicating cytogenetic effect on lobster.

  6. Distribution of Chromosome Breakpoints in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed to Low- and High-LET Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is not only its ability to identify simultaneously both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges, but also the ability to measure the breakpoint location along the length of the chromosome in a precision that is unmatched with other traditional banding techniques. Breakpoints on specific regions of a chromosome have been known to associate with specific cancers. The breakpoint distribution in cells after low- and high-LET radiation exposures will also provide the data for biophysical modeling of the chromatin structure, as well as the data for the modeling the formation of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. In a series of experiments, we studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations using the mBAND technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 different colored bands. Human epithelial cells (CH1 84B5F5/M10) were exposed in vitro to Cs- 137 rays at both low and high dose rates, secondary neutrons with a broad energy spectrum at a low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions at a high dose rate. The data of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations involving the painted chromosome have been reported previously. Here we present data of the location of the chromosome breaks along the length of chromosome 3 in the cells after exposures to each of the four radiation scenarios. In comparison to the expected breakpoint distribution based on the length of the bands, the observed distribution appeared to be non-random for both the low- and high-LET radiations. In particular, hot spots towards both ends of the chromosome were found after low-LET irradiations of either low or high dose rates. For both high-LET radiation types (Fe ions and neutrons), the breakpoint distributions were similar, and were much smoother than that for low-LET radiation. The dependence of the breakpoint distribution on the radiation quality requires further investigations.

  7. Report from the working group on the in vivo mammalian bone marrow chromosomal aberration test.

    PubMed

    Tice, R R; Hayashi, M; MacGregor, J T; Anderson, D; Blakey, D H; Holden, H E; Kirsch-Volders, M; Oleson, F B; Pacchierotti, F; Preston, R J

    1994-06-01

    The following summary represents a consensus of the working group, except where noted. The goal of this working group was to identify the minimal requirements needed to conduct a scientifically valid and practical in vivo chromosomal aberration assay. For easy reference, the items discussed are listed in the order in which they appear in OECD guideline 475. Specific disagreement with the current and/or proposed OECD guideline is presented in the text. Introduction, purpose, scope, relevance, application, and limits of test: This test would not be appropriate in situations where there was sufficient evidence to indicate that the test article or reactive metabolites could not reach the bone marrow. Test substances: Solid and liquid test substances should be dissolved, if possible, in water or isotonic saline. If insoluble in water/saline, the test substance should be dissolved or homogeneously suspended in an appropriate vehicle (e.g., vegetable oil). A suspension was not considered suitable for an intravenous injection. The use of dimethyl sulfoxide as an organic solvent was not recommended. The use of any uncommonly used solvent/vehicle should be justified. Freshly prepared solutions or suspensions of the test substance should be employed unless stability data demonstrate the acceptability of storage. Selection of species: Any commonly used rodent species was deemed acceptable but rats or mice were preferred, with no strain preference. Number and sex: A consensus could not be reached as to the requirement for both sexes versus one sex in this assay. It was suggested that a single sex should be used unless pharmacokinetic and/or toxicity data indicated a difference in metabolism and/or sensitivity between males and females. The size of the experiment (i.e., number of cells per animal, number of animals per treatment group) should be based on statistical considerations. Lacking a formal analysis, it was agreed that at least 100 metaphase cells should be scored per

  8. Accumulation of DSBs in {gamma}-H2AX domains fuel chromosomal aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Scherthan, H. Hieber, L.; Braselmann, H.; Meineke, V.; Zitzelsberger, H.

    2008-07-11

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) pose a severe hazard to the genome as erroneous rejoining of DSBs can lead to mutation and cancer. Here, we have investigated the correlation between X irradiation-induced {gamma}-H2AX foci, theoretically induced DSBs, and the minimal number of mis-rejoined DNA breaks (MNB) in irradiated lymphocytes obtained from two healthy humans by painting of the whole chromosome complement by spectral karyotyping. There were less {gamma}-H2AX foci/dose than theoretically expected, while misrepair, as expressed by MNB/{gamma}-H2AX focus, was similar at 0.5 and 1 Gy but 3.6-fold up at 3 Gy. Hence, our results suggest that X-ray-induced {gamma}-H2AX foci in G0 lymphocyte nuclei contain more than one DSB and that the increasing number of DSBs per {gamma}-H2AX repair factory lead to an increased rate of misrepair.

  9. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    PubMed

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility.

  10. Numerical chromosomal aberrations in the early life-history stages of a marine tubeworm, Pomatoceros lamarckii (Polychaeta: Serpulidae).

    PubMed

    Wilson, James T; Dixon, David R; Dixon, Linda R J

    2002-09-24

    The marine environment provides a sink for a host of toxic chemicals, directly or inadvertently, released as a result of human activity. Some of these chemicals have the potential to act as aneugens, substances that cause numerical chromosomal aberrations (NCAs). NCAs are one of the most important classes of genetic abnormality and are implicated in a variety of deleterious effects, including premature ageing, birth defects and cancer. Clearly, any increase in the incidence of these agents in the marine environment poses a risk to the indigenous biota and its predators, including man. In this paper, we describe our recent success with applying the fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique (FISH) to detect NCAs in the interphase cell nuclei of Pomatoceros lamarckii, a common rocky shore invertebrate. Given the lack of requirement for any detailed cytogenetic knowledge, the method holds considerable promise for laboratory and field studies in general, and should lend itself to automated screening protocols, where large numbers of cells can be screened rapidly, for example, using a flow cytometer. When exposed either under acute or chronic (viz. adult) exposure conditions, colchicine and di-butylphthalate (DBP) (a widely-used plasticiser), two recognised aneugens, induced significant increases in the levels of NCAs, in the dose range 1 x 10(-6)-5 x 10(-6) M, in both four to eight cell embryo stages and 24 h-old larvae. In keeping with the severely debilitating effects of this class of agent, an inverse correlation was observed between the induced levels of NCAs and larval fitness based on the results of a standard 48-h larval bioassay.

  11. Karyotyping of Chromosomes in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Transformed by High Energy Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zhang, Ye; Park, Seongmi; Story, Michael T.; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer induced from exposure to space radiation is believed to be one of the most significant health risks for long-term space travels. In a previous study, normal human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs), immortalized through the expression of Cdk4 and hTERT, were exposed to gamma rays and high energy Fe ions for the selection of transformed clones induced by low- and high-LET radiation. In this research, we analyzed chromosome aberrations in these selected clones for genomic instability using the multi-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (mFISH), as well as the multi-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) techniques. In most of the clones, we found chromosomal aberrations involving translocations between different chromosomes, with several of the breaks occurred in the q-arm of chromosome 3. We also identified copy number variations between the transformed clones and the parental HBEC cells regardless of the exposure condition. Our results indicated that the chromosomal aberrations in low- and high radiation-induced transformed clones are inadequately different from spontaneous soft agar growth. Further analysis is underway to reveal the genomic instability in more transformed clones

  12. Changes in developmental capacity of artemia cyst and chromosomal aberrations in lettuce seeds flown aboard Salyut-7 (Biobloc III experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevzgodina, V.; Kovalev, E. E.; Maximova, E. N.; Gaubin, Y.; Planel, H.; Gasset, G.; Pianezzi, B.; Clegg, J.

    This paper gives the results of investigations performed on the first container (A) of the Biobloc III experiment, flown aboard the orbital station Salyut 7 for 40 days. The space flight resulted in a decreased developmental capacity of Artemia cysts, hit or not hit by the HZE particles. No effect was observed in cysts in bulk. A synergetic effect of microgravity and gamma pre irradiation is described. The germination of in-flight lettuce seeds was decreased. The space flight resulted also in a higher percentage of cells with chromosomal aberrations. Relations between biological response, TEL and location of HZE particles are discussed.

  13. [Investigation of the effect of polluted water in Song-hua River on the chromosome aberrations and SCE of inhabitants].

    PubMed

    Yang, B C

    1991-09-01

    This investigation indicated that the chromosome aberration of lymphocytes in inhabitants influenced by mercury- or methylmercury-polluted water was higher than that in control persons although the difference was not significant; but the SCE of them was significantly higher than the control. Both endpoints had a tendency of decreasing with the distance away from the polluted river water. Smoking and age did not have any effect. It was suggested that the polluted river water by mercury or methylmercury compounds could have some cytogenetic effects, although other factors cannot be excluded.

  14. Early and Late Damages in Chromosome 3 of Human Lymphocytes After Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Kahdim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor formation in humans or animals is a multi-step process. An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. GI is defined as elevated or persistent genetic damages occurring many generations after the cells are exposed. While early studies have demonstrated radiation-induced GI in several cell types as detected in endpoints such as mutation, apoptosis and damages in chromosomes, the dependence of GI on the quality of radiation remains uncertain. To investigate GI in human lymphocytes induced by both low- and high-LET radiation, we initially exposed white blood cells collected from healthy subjects to gamma rays in vitro, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis post irradiation and at several intervals during the culture period. Among a number of biological endpoints planned for the project, the multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) allows identification of inversions that were expected to be stable. We present here early and late chromosome aberrations detected with mBAND in chromosome 3 after gamma exposure. Comparison of chromosome damages in between human lymphocytes and human epithelial cells is also discussed

  15. [Estimation of efficiency of seed irradiation by thermal neutrons for inducing chromosomal aberration in M2 of cotton Gossipium hirsutum L].

    PubMed

    Rakhmatullina, E M; Sanam'ian, M F

    2007-05-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of M2 plants after irradiation of cotton by thermal neutrons was performed in 56 families. In 40 plants of 27 M2 families, different abnormalities of chromosome pairing were found. These abnormalities were caused by primary monosomy, chromosomal interchange, and desynapsis. The presence of chromosome aberrations in some cases decreased meiotic index and pollen fertility. Comparison of the results of cytogenetics analysis, performed in M1 and M2 after irradiation, showed a nearly two-fold decrease in the number of plants with chromosomal aberrations in M2, as well as narrowing of the spectrum of these aberrations. The latter result is explained by the fact that some mutations are impossible to detect in subsequent generations because of complete or partial sterility of aberrant M1 plants. It was established that the most efficient radiation doses for inducing chromosomal aberrations in the present study were 15 and 25 Gy, since they affected survival and fertility of altered plant to a lesser extent.

  16. Mapping genes to human chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Sarah

    1996-05-01

    For this project, 22 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) were fine mapped to regions of human chromosome 19. An EST is a short DNA sequence that occurs once in the genome and corresponds to a single expressed gene. {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probes were made by polymerase chain reaction for each EST and hybridized to filters containing a chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. The location of the ESTs on the chromosome was determined by the location of the ordered cosmid to which the EST hybridized. Of the 22 ESTs that were sublocalized, 6 correspond to known genes, and 16 correspond to anonymous genes. These localized ESTs may serve as potential candidates for disease genes, as well as markers for future physical mapping.

  17. Strategies for sequencing human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1996-06-01

    This project funded for four years (02.92 to 01.96) was a renewal of a project funded for 2.5 years (07.89 to 01.92). This report covers the period 07.89 to 07.94. The original project was entitled {open_quotes}Correlation of physical and genetic maps of Human Chromosome 16{close_quotes}. The aim over this period was to construct a cytogenetic-based physical map of chromosome 16, to enable integration of its physical and genetic maps. This was achieved by collaboration and isolation of new markers until each bin on the physical map contained a polymorphic marker on the linkage map. A further aim was to integrate all mapping data for this chromosome and to achieve contig closure over band q24.

  18. The complete sequence of human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, State; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie, Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan, Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, Chris; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstenin, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimbal, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar, Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan M.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-04-15

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding and syntenic conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-encoding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families and the first complete versions of each of the large chromosome 5 specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and play a likely mechanistic role, since deletions of these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  19. Cell death, chromosome damage and mitotic delay in normal human, ataxia telangiectasia and retinoblastoma fibroblasts after x-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zampetti-Bosseler, F; Scott, D

    1981-05-01

    We recently showed (Scott and Zampetti-Bosseler 1980) that X-ray sensitive mouse lymphoma cells sustain more chromosome damage, mitotic delay and spindle defects than X-ray resistant cells. We proposed that (a) chromosome aberrations contribute much more to lethality than spindle defects, and (b) that DNA lesions are less effectively repaired in the sensitive cells and give rise to more G2 mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations. Our present results on human fibroblasts with reported differential sensitivity to ionizing radiation (i.e. normal donors and patients with ataxia telangiectasia and retinoblastoma) support the first hypothesis since we observed a positive correlation between chromosome aberration frequencies and cell killing and no induced spindle defects. Our second hypothesis is however not substantiated since X-ray sensitive fibroblasts from the ataxia patient suffered less mitotic delay than cells from normal donors. A common lesion for mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations can still be assumed by adopting the hypothesis of Painter and Young (1981) that the defect in ataxia cells is not in repair but in a failure of DNA damage to initiate mitotic delay. In contrast to other reports, we found the retinoblastoma cells to be of normal radiation sensitivity (cell killing and aberration).

  20. mBAND Analysis of Early and Late Damages in the Chromosome of Human Lymphocytes after Exposures to Gamma Rays and Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2013-01-01

    Stable type chromosome aberrations that survive multiple generations of cell division include translocation and inversions. An efficient method to detect an inversion is multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) which allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations simultaneously. Post irradiation, chromosome aberrations may also arise after multiple cell divisions as a result of genomic instability. To investigate the stable or late-arising chromosome aberrations induced after radiation exposure, we exposed human lymphocytes to gamma rays and Fe ions ex vivo, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis and at several time intervals during the culture period post irradiation. With gamma irradiation, about half of the damages observed at first mitosis remained after 7 day- and 14 day- culture, suggesting the transmissibility of damages to the surviving progeny. At the doses that produced similar frequencies of gamma-induced chromosome aberrations as observed at first mitosis, a significantly lower yield of aberrations remained at the same population doublings after Fe ion exposure. At these equitoxic doses, more complex type aberrations were observed for Fe ions, indicating that Fe ion-induced initial chromosome damages are more severe and may lead to cell death. Detailed analysis of breaks participating in total chromosome exchanges within the first cell cycle post irradiation revealed a common hotspot located in the 3p21 region, which is a known fragile site corresponding to the band 6 in the mBand analysis. The breakpoint distribution in chromosomes collected at 7 days, but not at 14 days, post irradiation appeared similar to the distribution in cells collected within the first cell cycle post irradiation. The breakpoint distribution for human lymphocytes after radiation exposure was different from the previously published distribution for human

  1. Chromosomal translocation t(8;12) induces aberrant HMGIC expression in aggressive angiomyxoma of the vulva.

    PubMed

    Nucci, M R; Weremowicz, S; Neskey, D M; Sornberger, K; Tallini, G; Morton, C C; Quade, B J

    2001-10-01

    Benign mesenchymal neoplasms associated with rearrangements of the DNA architectural factor gene HMGIC on chromosome 12 include lipomas, uterine leiomyomata, pulmonary chondroid hamartomas, endometrial polyps, salivary gland pleomorphic adenomas, and breast fibroadenomas. Although HMGIC also has been implicated in the pathobiology of aggressive angiomyxoma of the vulva, the molecular mechanisms pertaining to this neoplasm are unclear. Tissue from a recurrent aggressive angiomyxoma was investigated by cytogenetic and expression analysis for HMGIC and HMGIY. The trypsin-Giemsa-banded karyotype showed a clonal translocation between chromosomes 8 and 12 [46,XX,t(8;12)(p12;q15)]. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with whole chromosome paint probes for chromosomes 8 and 12 excluded cryptic involvement of other chromosomes. The chromosome 12 breakpoint was mapped with two-color FISH analysis using cosmid probes at the 5' and 3' termini of HMGIC. Both cosmid probes showed hybridization to the normal chromosome 12 and the der(12) chromosome, indicating that the breakpoint was 3' (telomeric) to the gene. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed HMGIC expression in the tumor, and immunohistochemistry localized HMGIC expression to the tumor's spindle cells. Like numerous benign mesenchymal tumors, this locally aggressive tumor is associated with rearrangements near or within HMGIC, but chimeric gene formation was not required for tumorigenesis. Inappropriate expression of this DNA binding protein, however, may be important in the pathobiology of this tumor. Understanding the pathogenetic mechanism may also be helpful in developing new diagnostic tools for identifying residual disease.

  2. The 5q deletion size in myeloid malignancies is correlated to additional chromosomal aberrations and to TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Anna; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Deletions in the long arm of chromosome 5 (del(5q)) are recurrent abnormalities in myeloid malignancies. We analyzed del(5q) and accompanying molecular mutations in MDS, MPN and MDS/MPN cases. A high del(5q) frequency was revealed in MDS (1869/11398 cases; 16%), followed by MDS/MPN (37/1107; 3%) and MPN (97/6373; 2%). To investigate potential associations of the del(5q) size with the respective phenotypes, we applied array CGH analyses in selected cohorts of 61 MDS, 22 MDS/MPN and 23 MPN cases. The size varied between 16 and 119 Mb with no differences between the entities. However, MPN and MDS/MPN cases with del(5q) sole showed a significantly smaller del(5q) than cases with additional aberrations. Sequence analysis of 27 genes revealed ≥1 mutation in 91% of patients. The highest mutation frequencies in the total cohort were observed for TP53 (31%), JAK2 (23%) and DNMT3A (18%). The molecular mutation patterns in the del(5q) cohorts were different between the entities but resembled known patterns of cohorts not selected for del(5q). Further, TP53 mutations were significantly more frequent in cases with a larger deletion size (P = 0.003). The results suggest a correlation of large del(5q) with TP53 mutations and with additional chromosomal aberrations possibly contributing to more severe courses of these cases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218649

  3. Mate pair sequencing for the detection of chromosomal aberrations in patients with intellectual disability and congenital malformations

    PubMed Central

    Vergult, Sarah; Van Binsbergen, Ellen; Sante, Tom; Nowak, Silke; Vanakker, Olivier; Claes, Kathleen; Poppe, Bruce; Van der Aa, Nathalie; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Duran, Karen; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Swinkels, Marielle; van den Boogaard, Marie-José; van Haelst, Mieke; Roelens, Filip; Speleman, Frank; Cuppen, Edwin; Mortier, Geert; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Menten, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Recently, microarrays have replaced karyotyping as a first tier test in patients with idiopathic intellectual disability and/or multiple congenital abnormalities (ID/MCA) in many laboratories. Although in about 14–18% of such patients, DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) with clinical significance can be detected, microarrays have the disadvantage of missing balanced rearrangements, as well as providing no information about the genomic architecture of structural variants (SVs) like duplications and complex rearrangements. Such information could possibly lead to a better interpretation of the clinical significance of the SV. In this study, the clinical use of mate pair next-generation sequencing was evaluated for the detection and further characterization of structural variants within the genomes of 50 ID/MCA patients. Thirty of these patients carried a chromosomal aberration that was previously detected by array CGH or karyotyping and suspected to be pathogenic. In the remaining 20 patients no causal SVs were found and only benign aberrations were detected by conventional techniques. Combined cluster and coverage analysis of the mate pair data allowed precise breakpoint detection and further refinement of previously identified balanced and (complex) unbalanced aberrations, pinpointing the causal gene for some patients. We conclude that mate pair sequencing is a powerful technology that can provide rapid and unequivocal characterization of unbalanced and balanced SVs in patient genomes and can be essential for the clinical interpretation of some SVs. PMID:24105367

  4. Mate pair sequencing for the detection of chromosomal aberrations in patients with intellectual disability and congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Vergult, Sarah; Van Binsbergen, Ellen; Sante, Tom; Nowak, Silke; Vanakker, Olivier; Claes, Kathleen; Poppe, Bruce; Van der Aa, Nathalie; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Duran, Karen; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Swinkels, Marielle; van den Boogaard, Marie-José; van Haelst, Mieke; Roelens, Filip; Speleman, Frank; Cuppen, Edwin; Mortier, Geert; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Menten, Björn

    2014-05-01

    Recently, microarrays have replaced karyotyping as a first tier test in patients with idiopathic intellectual disability and/or multiple congenital abnormalities (ID/MCA) in many laboratories. Although in about 14-18% of such patients, DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) with clinical significance can be detected, microarrays have the disadvantage of missing balanced rearrangements, as well as providing no information about the genomic architecture of structural variants (SVs) like duplications and complex rearrangements. Such information could possibly lead to a better interpretation of the clinical significance of the SV. In this study, the clinical use of mate pair next-generation sequencing was evaluated for the detection and further characterization of structural variants within the genomes of 50 ID/MCA patients. Thirty of these patients carried a chromosomal aberration that was previously detected by array CGH or karyotyping and suspected to be pathogenic. In the remaining 20 patients no causal SVs were found and only benign aberrations were detected by conventional techniques. Combined cluster and coverage analysis of the mate pair data allowed precise breakpoint detection and further refinement of previously identified balanced and (complex) unbalanced aberrations, pinpointing the causal gene for some patients. We conclude that mate pair sequencing is a powerful technology that can provide rapid and unequivocal characterization of unbalanced and balanced SVs in patient genomes and can be essential for the clinical interpretation of some SVs.

  5. Chromosome aberration, cancer mortality and hormetic phenomena among inhabitants in areas of high background radiation in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Wei, L

    1991-12-01

    The respective average annual doses are about 330 and 110 mR/yr, in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) in Yangjiang County and the control areas (CA) in Enping and Taishan Counties. Both the HBRA and CA are in Guangdong Province which borders the South China Sea. The frequencies of chromosome aberration in circulating lymphocytes were examined for persons residing in the HBRA and CA. Those in the HBRA had increased frequencies of detectable abnormalities in stable aberrations (translocations and inversions) and unstable aberrations (dicentrics and rings). Previous reports have shown that when samples of circulating lymphocytes taken from inhabitants were tested in vitro for mitotic responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and for the degree of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) induced by UV-irradiation, there were higher responsiveness and UDS rates for those in the HBRA than in the CA. In contrast, mortality from all cancers and those from leukemia, breast and lung cancers that are inducible by radiation was not higher in the HBRA. Although the differences in the cancer mortality rates for the HBRA and CA are not significant, the findings are compatible with the assumption that the lower mortality from cancer in the HBRA is the result of the hormetic effects of the three-fold higher dose rate of background radiation in that areas. This assumption requires further study.

  6. Longitudinal chromatic aberration of the human infant eye

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyun; Candy, T. Rowan; Teel, Danielle F. W.; Jacobs, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Although the longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) of the adult eye has been studied, there are no data collected from the human infant eye. A chromatic retinoscope was used to measure cyclopleged infant and adult refractions with four pseudomonochromatic sources (centered at 472, 538, 589, and 652 nm) and with polychromatic light. The LCA of the infant eyes between 472 and 652 nm was a factor of 1.7 greater than the LCA found in the adult group: infant mean=1.62 D, SD±0.14 D; adult mean=0.96 D, SD±0.17 D. The elevated level of LCA in infant eyes is consistent with the greater optical power of the immature eye and indicates similar chromatic dispersion in infant and adult eyes. The implications for visual performance, defocus detection, and measurement of refraction are discussed. PMID:18758552

  7. Genetic and Chromosomal Aberrations and Their Clinical Significance in Renal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Ning Yi; Rajandram, Retnagowri; Ng, Keng Lim; Pailoor, Jayalakshmi; Fadzli, Ahmad; Gobe, Glenda Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The most common form of malignant renal neoplasms is renal cell carcinoma (RCC), which is classified into several different subtypes based on the histomorphological features. However, overlaps in these characteristics may present difficulties in the accurate diagnosis of these subtypes, which have different clinical outcomes. Genomic and molecular studies have revealed unique genetic aberrations in each subtype. Knowledge of these genetic changes in hereditary and sporadic renal neoplasms has given an insight into the various proteins and signalling pathways involved in tumour formation and progression. In this review, the genetic aberrations characteristic to each renal neoplasm subtype are evaluated along with the associated protein products and affected pathways. The potential applications of these genetic aberrations and proteins as diagnostic tools, prognostic markers, or therapeutic targets are also assessed. PMID:26448938

  8. Array painting: a protocol for the rapid analysis of aberrant chromosomes using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Susan M; Ng, Bee Ling; Prigmore, Elena; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Carter, Nigel P

    2012-01-01

    Aarray painting is a technique that uses microarray technology to rapidly map chromosome translocation breakpoints. previous methods to map translocation breakpoints have used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FIsH) and have consequently been labor-intensive, time-consuming and restricted to the low breakpoint resolution imposed by the use of metaphase chromosomes. array painting combines the isolation of derivative chromosomes (chromosomes with translocations) and high-resolution microarray analysis to refine the genomic location of translocation breakpoints in a single experiment. In this protocol, we describe array painting by isolation of derivative chromosomes using a MoFlo flow sorter, amplification of these derivatives using whole-genome amplification and hybridization onto commercially available oligonucleotide microarrays. although the sorting of derivative chromosomes is a specialized procedure requiring sophisticated equipment, the amplification, labeling and hybridization of Dna is straightforward, robust and can be completed within 1 week. the protocol described produces good quality data; however, array painting is equally achievable using any combination of the available alternative methodologies for chromosome isolation, amplification and hybridization. PMID:19893508

  9. Assessing the level of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes in long-term resident children under conditions of high exposure to radon and its decay products.

    PubMed

    Druzhinin, Vladimir G; Sinitsky, Maxim Yu; Larionov, Aleksey V; Volobaev, Valentin P; Minina, Varvara I; Golovina, Tatiana A

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the frequency and spectrum of chromosomal aberrations were analysed in samples of peripheral blood from 372 (mean age = 12.24 ± 2.60 years old) long-term resident children in a boarding school (Tashtagol city, Kemerovo Region, Russian Federation) under conditions of high exposure to radon and its decay products. As a control group, we used blood samples from people living in Zarubino village (Kemerovo Region, Russian Federation). We discovered that the average frequencies of single and double fragments, chromosomal exchanges, total number of aberrations, chromatid type, chromosome type and all types of aberrations were significantly increased in the exposed group. This is evidence of considerable genotoxicity to children living under conditions of high exposure to radon compared to children living under ecological conditions without increased radon radiation.

  10. Molecular genetics of the human X chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, K E

    1985-01-01

    The human X chromosome will soon be mapped at 10 cM intervals. This will permit the localisation of any X linked disorder provided that informative families are available for linkage analysis. The location of RFLPs currently in use for clinical diagnosis is summarised. The next decade should witness the elucidation of the molecular basis of some of the more common defects, such as the muscular dystrophies and X linked mental retardation. PMID:2995673

  11. Analysis of chromosome aberrations in atomic bomb survivors for dose assessment: studies at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation from 1968 to 1993.

    PubMed

    Awa, A

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation causes damage to living cells, especially to DNA in the cell nucleus. The degree of this cellular damage depends on the amount of radiation administered. This review discusses current findings concerning radiation-induced chromosome aberrations that were produced in 1945 and that can still be observed in the somatic cells of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The scoring methods of G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization are compared. In addition, some findings concerning chromosomal aberrations in citizens of the former Soviet Union affected by the Chernobyl accident are presented.

  12. OCTOBASE: ACEDB implementation of human chromosome 8

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, S.; Durbin, R.; Ritter, O.

    1994-09-01

    ACEDB, A C. elegans Database is a generalized genome database that was originally written to meet the needs of the C. elegans community. Additions and refinements to the original database are continually being made. Documentation, code and data available from anonymous FTP servers at lirmm, lirmm.fr, cele,mrc-lmb,cam.ac.uk and ncbi.nim.nih.gov. ACEDB can be used to create new databases without the need for reprogramming, and has been implemented for a number of different species as well as several human chromosomes. It displays data through a graphical interface in a manner that closely resembles the way that geneticists model their data. We have chosen to name the chromosome 8 database that relies upon the ACEDB implementation OCTOBASE. This database allows the user to view the chromosome at all levels from the cytogenetic ideogram to the DNA sequence. Besides allowing displays that span several orders of magnitude, the database will also allow simultaneously display of several types of genetic map, such as the linkage, STS content and physical map. The database also provides an excellent tool for the entry of routine laboratory data as it is collected. The gridded clone display is particularly useful for data entry. Since the database is generalized it can also be custom modified to meet the needs of individual users. Overall OCTOBASE meets the needs of the community for entry of the large amounts for data that are now being collected for chromosome 8.

  13. Assessment of genotoxicity of inorganic mercury in rats in vivo using both chromosomal aberration and comet assays.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Niladri; Patra, Manomita

    2015-07-01

    The major objective of the present investigation was to assess the genotoxic effects of mercuric chloride (HgCl2), an inorganic mercury (Hg), in rats (Rattus norvegicus) using two different genetic endpoints, namely, chromosomal aberration (CA) and comet assays following both short-term (acute) and long-term (chronic) exposures. The study showed that the acute exposures to HgCl2 at 2 and 5 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) induced nonsignificant effects. HgCl2 at 10 and 12 mg/kg b.w. was significantly toxic and is exhibited by the induction of different types of CAs like chromatid breaks, chromosomal breaks, clumps and damaged cells and types of comets. HgCl2 at 15 mg/kg b.w. was found to be highly toxic, as mitostatic condition of cells were observed in CA assay. Chronic exposure to the lowest dose (2 mg/kg b.w.) of HgCl2 for 15 consecutive days produced a significant genotoxicity. Although Hg was found to induce both DNA strand breakage and chromosomal breaks in a dose-dependent manner, the results of the present investigation showed that the combination of comet and CA assays provided a better choice for assessing the genotoxicity of inorganicHg. PMID:23448859

  14. Assessment of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei in peripheral lymphocytes from tunisian hospital workers exposed to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Sakly, Amina; Ayed, Yosra; Chaari, Neila; Akrout, Mohamed; Bacha, Hassen; Cheikh, Hassen Ben

    2013-09-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that cytogenetic biomarkers, such as micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood lymphocytes may predict cancer risk because they indicate genomic instability. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the frequencies of MN and chromosome aberrations (CA) in peripheral blood lymphocytes of hospital workers exposed to ionizing radiation and healthy subjects. The study was conducted using peripheral blood lymphocytes from 30 workers from the radiology department and 30 from the cardiology department. This study included 27 healthy age- and sex-matched individuals as the control group. The assessment of chromosomal damage was carried out by the use of CA and micronucleus assays in peripheral lymphocytes. Our results show that CA and micronucleus frequencies were significantly higher among the exposed groups when compared to controls. Our finding of significant increase of CA and MN frequencies in peripheral lymphocytes in exposed workers indicates a potential cytogenetic hazard due to this exposure. The enhanced chromosomal damage of subjects exposed to genotoxic agents emphasizes the need to develop safety programs. PMID:23216272

  15. Chaos in ocular aberration dynamics of the human eye

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Karen M.; Mallen, Edward A. H.

    2012-01-01

    Since the characterization of the eye’s monochromatic aberration fluctuations in 2001, the power spectrum has remained the most widely used method for analyzing their dynamics. However, the power spectrum does not capture the complexities of the fluctuations. We measured the monochromatic aberration dynamics of six subjects using a Shack-Hartmann sensor sampling at 21 Hz. We characterized the dynamics using techniques from chaos theory. We found that the attractor embedding dimension for all aberrations, for all subjects, was equal to three. The embedding lag averaged across aberrations and subjects was 0.31 ± 0.07 s. The Lyapunov exponent of the rms wavefront error was positive for each subject, with an average value of 0.44 ± 0.15 µm/s. This indicates that the aberration dynamics are chaotic. Implications for future modeling are discussed. PMID:22567581

  16. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Seifried, Erhard; Fournier, Claudia; Tonn, Torsten

    2015-07-01

    In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34(+) cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60-85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤ 0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼ 30-35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼ 25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼ 70% and ∼ 40% for 1 Gy of carbon ions and X-rays, respectively), with a higher fraction of non-transmissible aberrations. In contrast, for both radiation qualities the percentage of clones with chromosomal abnormalities was similar (40%). Using the frequency of colonies with clonal aberrations as a surrogate marker for the leukemia risk following radiotherapy of solid tumors, charged particle therapy is not expected to lead to an increased risk of

  17. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Seifried, Erhard; Fournier, Claudia; Tonn, Torsten

    2015-07-01

    In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34(+) cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60-85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤ 0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼ 30-35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼ 25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼ 70% and ∼ 40% for 1 Gy of carbon ions and X-rays, respectively), with a higher fraction of non-transmissible aberrations. In contrast, for both radiation qualities the percentage of clones with chromosomal abnormalities was similar (40%). Using the frequency of colonies with clonal aberrations as a surrogate marker for the leukemia risk following radiotherapy of solid tumors, charged particle therapy is not expected to lead to an increased risk of

  18. Patterns of recombination on human chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Schlumpf, K.S.; Kim, D.; Haines, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    Virtually all genetic linkage maps generated to date are gross averages across individuals, ages, and (often) sexes. In addition, although some level of positive interference has been assumed, until recently little evidence to support this in humans has been available. The major stumbling block has been the quality of the data available, since even a few genotypic errors can have drastic effects on both the map length and the number of apparent recombinants. In addition, variation in recombination by factors other than sex have pretty much been ignored. To explore recombination in more detail, we have generated a microsatellite marker map of human chromosome 22. This map includes 32 markers genotyped through 46 sibships of the Venezuelan Reference Pedigree (VRP). Extensive error checking and regenotyping was performed to remove as many genotypic errors as possible, but no genotypes were removed simply because they created unlikely events. The following 1000:1 odds map has been obtained: cen--F8VWFP1--11--S264--3-S311--4--S257--2--TOP1P2--3--S156--1--CRYB2--1--S258--2--S310--6--S193--1--S275--3--S268--1--S280--4--S304--3--S283--2--LiR1--3--IL2RB--3--S299--1--S302--1--S537--2--S270--4--PDGF--8--S274--qter. The female map (91 cM) is twice as long as the male map (46 cM) and the log-likelihood difference in the maps (22.3) is highly significant (P=0.001, df=22) and appears constant across the chromosome. Analysis of recombination with age showed no particular trends for either males or females when chromosomes were grouped into three categories (20, 20-30, 30+) by parental age at birth of child. Positive interference was found in maternally derived chromosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=30.5 (4), p<0.005), but not in paternally derived chromosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=6.24 (3), P=0.10). This contrasts to data from chromosomes 9 and 21 where positive interference was found for both sexes. More detailed analyses are in progress.

  19. Chromosomal localization of the human fibromodulin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Roughley, P.J.; Sztrolovics, R.; Grover, J.

    1994-09-01

    The identification and mapping of genes is a fundamental step in understanding inherited diseases. This study reports the chromosomal localization of the human gene encoding fibromodulin, a collagen-binding proteoglycan which exhibits a wide distribution in connective tissue extracellular matrices. Attempts to localize the gene utilizing a probe covering the published coding region of the human fibromodulin cDNA were unsuccessful. Thus, in order to obtain an alternate probe, the 3{prime}-untranslated region of the cDNA was cloned utilizing the 3{prime}-RACE protocol. Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA with probes covering either the coding sequence or the 3{prime}-untranslated region revealed simple patterns, indicative of a single-copy gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with the 3{prime}-untranslated region probe resulted in hybridization at two chromosomal regions. The majority of signals were observed at 1q32, but some signals were also observed at 9q34.1. The localization of the fibromodulin gene to chromosome 1 was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction analysis of genomic DNA from a panel of somatic cell hybrid lines. In addition to allowing the gene localization, cloning of the 3{prime}-untranslated region demonstrates that the human fibromodulin cDNA possesses an insert of approximately 160 base pairs which is not present in the published bovine sequence. The human sequence also possesses a single polyadenylation signal, yielding a 3 kb mRNA which was observed in Northern blotting experiments. These results now provide the necessary information to evaluate the potential role of fibromodulin in genetic disorders of connective tissues.

  20. Developmental potential of clinically discarded human embryos and associated chromosomal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guidong; Xu, Jiawei; Xin, Zhimin; Niu, Wenbin; Shi, Senlin; Jin, Haixia; Song, Wenyan; Wang, Enyin; Yang, Qingling; Chen, Lei; Sun, Yingpu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically discarded human embryos, which are generated from both normal and abnormal fertilizations, have the potential of developing into blastocysts. A total of 1,649 discarded human embryos, including zygotes containing normal (2PN) and abnormal (0PN, 1PN, 3PN and ≥4PN) pronuclei and prematurely cleaved embryos (2Cell), were collected for in vitro culture to investigate their developmental potential and chromosomal constitution using an SNP array-based chromosomal analysis. We found that blastocyst formation rates were 63.8% (for 2Cell embryos), 22.6% (2PN), 16.7% (0PN), 11.2% (3PN) and 3.6% (1PN). SNP array-based chromosomal analysis of the resultant blastocysts revealed that the percentages of normal chromosomes were 55.2% (2Cell), 60.7% (2PN), 44.4% (0PN) and 47.4% (0PN). Compared with clinical preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) data generated with clinically acceptable embryos, results of the SNP array-based chromosome analysis on blastocysts from clinically discarded embryos showed similar values for the frequency of abnormal chromosome occurrence, aberrant signal classification and chromosomal distribution. The present study is perhaps the first systematic analysis of the developmental potential of clinically discarded embryos and provides a basis for future studies. PMID:27045374

  1. Molecular pathogenesis of multiple myeloma: chromosomal aberrations, changes in gene expression, cytokine networks, and the bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Klein, Bernard; Seckinger, Anja; Moehler, Thomas; Hose, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    This chapter focuses on two aspects of myeloma pathogenesis: (1) chromosomal aberrations and resulting changes in gene and protein expression with a special focus on growth and survival factors of malignant (and normal) plasma cells and (2) the remodeling of the bone marrow microenvironment induced by accumulating myeloma cells. We begin this chapter with a discussion of normal plasma cell generation, their survival, and a novel class of inhibitory factors. This is crucial for the understanding of multiple myeloma, as several abilities attributed to malignant plasma cells are already present in their normal counterpart, especially the production of survival factors and interaction with the bone marrow microenvironment (niche). The chapter closes with a new model of pathogenesis of myeloma.

  2. Chromosome aberration and environmental physical activity: Down syndrome and solar and cosmic ray activity, Israel, 1990-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoupel, Eliahu G.; Frimer, Helena; Appelman, Zvi; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Dar, Hanna; Fejgin, Moshe D.; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Manor, Esther; Barkai, Gad; Shalev, Stavit; Gelman-Kohan, Zully; Reish, Orit; Lev, Dorit; Davidov, Bella; Goldman, Boleslaw; Shohat, Mordechai

    2005-09-01

    The possibility that environmental effects are associated with chromosome aberrations and various congenital pathologies has been discussed previously. Recent advances in the collection and computerization of data make studying these potential associations more feasible. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible link between the number of Down syndrome (DS) cases detected prenatally or at birth yearly in Israel over a 10-year period compared with the levels of solar and cosmic ray activity 1 year before the detection or birth of each affected child. Information about 1,108,449 births was collected for the years 1990-2000, excluding 1991, when data were unavailable. A total of 1,310 cases of DS were detected prenatally or at birth—138 in the non-Jewish community and 1,172 in the Jewish population. Solar activity indices—sunspot number and solar radio flux 2,800 MHz at 10.7 cm wavelength for 1989-1999—were compared with the number of DS cases detected. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) and their probabilities (P) were established for the percentage of DS cases in the whole population. There was a significant inverse correlation between the indices of solar activity and the number of cases of DS detected—r=-0.78, P=0.008 for sunspot number and r=-0.76, P=0.01 for solar flux. The possibility that cosmophysical factors inversely related to solar activity play a role in the pathogenesis of chromosome aberrations should be considered. We have confirmed a strong trend towards an association between the cosmic ray activity level and the incidence of DS.

  3. Karyotyping of Chromosomes in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Transformed by High Energy Fe Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zhang, Ye; Park, Seongmi; Story, Michael D.; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer induced from exposures to space radiation is one of the most significant health risks for long-term space travels. Evidences show that low- and high- Linear energy transfer (LET)-induced transformation of normal human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) that are immortalized through the expression of Cdk4 and hTERT. The cells were exposed to gamma rays and high-energy Fe ions for the selection of transformed clones. Transformed HBEC are identified and analyzed chromosome aberrations (i.e. genomic instability) using the multi-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (mFISH), as well as the multi-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) techniques. Our results show chromosomal translocations between different chromosomes and several of the breaks occurred in the q-arm of chromosome 3. We also identified copy number variations between the transformed and the parental HBEC regardless of the exposure conditions. We observed chromosomal aberrations in the lowand high-LET radiation-induced transformed clones and they are imperfectly different from clones obtain in spontaneous soft agar growth.

  4. Chromosomal Aberrations in ETV6/RUNX1-positive Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia using 244K Oligonucleotide Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous form of hematological cancer consisting of various subtypes. We are interested to study the genetic aberration in precursor B-cell ALL with specific t(12;21) translocation in childhood ALL patients. A high resolution 244K array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array-CGH) was used to study eleven ETV6/RUNX1-positive childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. Result 155 chromosomal aberrations (119 losses, 36 gains) were reported in the array findings, corresponding to 76.8% deletions and 23.2% amplifications. The ETV6 gene deletion occurred in 4 of the patients, corresponding to 45% of the sample. The most common alterations above 1 Mb were deletion 6q (13%), 12p (12%) and 9p (8%), and duplication 4q (6%) and Xq (4%). Other genes important in ALL were also identified in this study including RUNX1, CDKN2A, FHIT, and PAX5. The array-CGH technique was able to detect microdeletion as small as 400 bp. Conclusion The results demonstrate the usefulness of high resolution array-CGH as a complementary tool in the investigation of ALL. PMID:23151340

  5. Centrosome aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells driven by cooperative interactions between p16INK4a deficiency and telomere-dependent genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Daniel; Feijoo, Purificación; Bernal, Aina; Ercilla, Amaia; Agell, Neus; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all human cancers display chromosome instability (CIN), a condition in which chromosomes are gained or lost at a high rate. CIN occurs early in cancer development where it may undermine the advance of the neoplastic disease. With the aim of establishing the mechanisms underlying CIN in cancer, we investigated possible links between telomere-dysfunction and centrosome defects, which were seen to coincide in early in breast carcinogenesis using human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs). In this study, we show that TP53 proficient vHMECs cells develop centrosome aberrations when telomere-dysfunction genotoxic stress is produced in the presence of a defective p16INK4a setting and in parallel with an activation of the DNA damage checkpoint response. These aberrations consist of the accumulation of centrosomes in polyploid vHMECs, plus centriole overduplication in both diploid and polyploid cells, thus reflecting that distinct mechanisms underlie the generation of centrosome aberrations in vHMECs. Transduction of vHMEC with hTERT, which rescued the telomere dysfunction phenotype and consequently reduced DNA damage checkpoint activation, led to a progressive reduction of centrosome aberrations with cell culture, both in diploid and in polyploid vHMECs. Radiation-induced DNA damage also raised centrosome aberrations in vHMEC-hTERT. Collectively, our results, using vHMECs define a model where p16INK4a deficiency along with short dysfunctional telomeres cooperatively engenders centrosome abnormalities before p53 function is compromised. PMID:26318587

  6. Chromosomal aberrations induced by Dispersion Yellow 3 in Rana clamitans larvae during tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gray, P S; Hunter, R; Patterson, R M

    1979-01-01

    Azo dyes have been shown to be mutagenic and toxic in a variety of organisms. The azo dye, Dispersion Yellow 3 is a pollutant in the river water supply of Northern Georgia. Preliminary and definitive studies have indicated that it is mutagenic in micro-organisms and causes several malformations in chicken embryos. The present study revealed that when larvae are exposed to the dye during tail regeneration, several aberrations are seen in the squash preparations from regenerates. Included are gaps (the most frequent abnormality), dicentrics, rings and breaks. The data suggest that this azo dye deserves more detailed study to determine its mutagenicity.

  7. Mapping genes on human chromosome 20

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, T.; Phipps, P.; Serino, K.

    1994-09-01

    While a substantial number of genes have been physically localized to human chromosome 20, few have been genetically mapped. In the process of developing a genetic linkage map of chromosome 20, we have mapped microsatellite polymorphisms associated with six genes. Three of these had highly informative polymorphisms (greater than 0.70) that were originally identified by other investigators. These include avian sarcoma oncogene homolog (SRC), ribophorin II (RPN2), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1). Polymorphisms associated with two genes were determined following a screen of their DNA sequences in GenBank. These include dinucleotide polymorphisms in introl II of cystatin c (CST3) and in the promoter region of neuroendocrine convertase 2 (NEC2) with heterozygosities of 0.52 and 0.54, respectively. A sixth gene, prodynorphin (PDYN) was mapped following the identification of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (heterozygosity of 0.35) in a cosmid subclone from a YAC homologous to the original phage clone. CA-positive cosmid subclones from a YAC for an additional gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha (GNAS10), have been identified and sequencing is in progress. Similar efforts were utilized to identify a microsatellite polymorphism from a half-YAC cloned by W. Brown and localized by FISH to 20pter. This polymorphism is highly informative, with a heterozygosity of 0.83, and serves to delimit the genetic map of the short arm of this chromosome.

  8. Mucinous spindle and tubular renal cell carcinoma: analysis of chromosomal aberration pattern of low-grade, high-grade, and overlapping morphologic variant with papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Peckova, Kvetoslava; Martinek, Petr; Sperga, Maris; Montiel, Delia Perez; Daum, Ondrej; Rotterova, Pavla; Kalusová, Kristýna; Hora, Milan; Pivovarcikova, Kristýna; Rychly, Boris; Vranic, Semir; Davidson, Whitney; Vodicka, Josef; Dubová, Magdaléna; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej

    2015-08-01

    The chromosomal numerical aberration pattern in mucinous tubular and spindle renal cell carcinoma (MTSRCC) is referred to as variable with frequent gains and losses. The objectives of this study are to map the spectrum of chromosomal aberrations (extent and location) in a large cohort of the cases and relate these findings to the morphologic variants of MTSRCC. Fifty-four MTSRCCs with uniform morphologic pattern were selected (of 133 MTSRCCs available in our registry) and divided into 3 groups: classic low-grade MTSRCC (Fuhrman nucleolar International Society of Urological Pathology grade 2), high-grade MTSRCC (grade 3), and overlapping MTSRCC with papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) morphology. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis was applied to 16 cases in which DNA was well preserved. Four analyzable classic low-grade MTSRCCs showed multiple losses affecting chromosomes 1, 4, 8, 9, 14, 15, and 22. No chromosomal gains were found. Four analyzable cases of MTSRCC showing overlapping morphology with PRCC displayed a more variable pattern including normal chromosomal status; losses of chromosomes 1, 6, 8, 9, 14, 15, and 22; and gains of 3, 7, 16, and 17. The group of 4 high-grade MTSRCCs exhibited a more uniform chromosomal aberration pattern with losses of chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, and 22 and without any gains detected. (1) MTSRCC, both low-grade and high-grade, shows chromosomal losses (including 1, 4, 6, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, and 22) in all analyzable cases; this seems to be the most frequent chromosomal numerical aberration in this type of RCC. (2) Cases with overlapping morphologic features (MTSRCC and PRCC) showed a more variable pattern with multiple losses and gains, including gains of chromosomes 7 and 17 (2 cases). This result is in line with previously published morphologic and immunohistochemical studies that describe the broad morphologic spectrum of MTSRCC, with changes resembling papillary RCC. (3) The diagnosis of MTSRCC in

  9. Appearance of chromosomal aberrations in females heterozygous for deletion MS2-10: Maternal effect

    SciTech Connect

    Artemova, E.V.; Chadov, B.F.

    1995-01-01

    The mutagenic effect of the paracentromeric heterochromatin deletion MS2-10 was studied in direct and reciprocal crosses of laboratory and wild-type lines of Drosophila melanogaster. The effect of deletion MS2-10 depended on the opposite chromosome. This was shown for the combination of autosome MS2-10 with autosome 2 from the Berlin wild line, but when MS2-10 was combined with an autosome 2 from lines Canton S and pr pk cn, the effect was absent. When deletion MS2-10 was inherited from the female parent and the opposite chromosome from the male parent, the effect of the deletion was present, but it was absent in males heterozygous for MS2-10, obtained in reciprocal crosses. In maternal effect, this case of mutagenesis is similar to hybrid dysgenesis. However, the pattern of P-M dysgenesis was shown to differ from the type of mutagenesis described in the present work.

  10. Meiotic interstrand DNA damage escapes paternal repair and causes chromosomal aberrations in the zygote by maternal misrepair

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Gingerich, John; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2015-01-08

    De novo point mutations and chromosomal structural aberrations (CSA) detected in offspring of unaffected parents show a preferential paternal origin with higher risk for older fathers. Studies in rodents suggest that heritable mutations transmitted from the father can arise from either paternal or maternal misrepair of damaged paternal DNA, and that the entire spermatogenic cycle can be at risk after mutagenic exposure. Understanding the susceptibility and mechanisms of transmission of paternal mutations is important in family planning after chemotherapy and donor selection for assisted reproduction. We report that treatment of male mice with melphalan (MLP), a bifunctional alkylating agent widelymore » used in chemotherapy, induces DNA lesions during male mouse meiosis that persist unrepaired as germ cells progress through DNA repair-competent phases of spermatogenic development. After fertilization, unrepaired sperm DNA lesions are mis-repaired into CSA by the egg's DNA repair machinery producing chromosomally abnormal offspring. In conclusion, these findings highlight the importance of both pre- and post-fertilization DNA repair in assuring the genomic integrity of the conceptus.« less

  11. Meiotic interstrand DNA damage escapes paternal repair and causes chromosomal aberrations in the zygote by maternal misrepair

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Gingerich, John; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2015-01-08

    De novo point mutations and chromosomal structural aberrations (CSA) detected in offspring of unaffected parents show a preferential paternal origin with higher risk for older fathers. Studies in rodents suggest that heritable mutations transmitted from the father can arise from either paternal or maternal misrepair of damaged paternal DNA, and that the entire spermatogenic cycle can be at risk after mutagenic exposure. Understanding the susceptibility and mechanisms of transmission of paternal mutations is important in family planning after chemotherapy and donor selection for assisted reproduction. We report that treatment of male mice with melphalan (MLP), a bifunctional alkylating agent widely used in chemotherapy, induces DNA lesions during male mouse meiosis that persist unrepaired as germ cells progress through DNA repair-competent phases of spermatogenic development. After fertilization, unrepaired sperm DNA lesions are mis-repaired into CSA by the egg's DNA repair machinery producing chromosomally abnormal offspring. In conclusion, these findings highlight the importance of both pre- and post-fertilization DNA repair in assuring the genomic integrity of the conceptus.

  12. The DrosDel collection: a set of P-element insertions for generating custom chromosomal aberrations in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Edward; Blows, Fiona; Ashburner, Michael; Bautista-Llacer, Rosa; Coulson, Darin; Drummond, Jenny; Webster, Jane; Gubb, David; Gunton, Nicola; Johnson, Glynnis; O'Kane, Cahir J; Huen, David; Sharma, Punita; Asztalos, Zoltan; Baisch, Heiko; Schulze, Janet; Kube, Maria; Kittlaus, Kathrin; Reuter, Gunter; Maroy, Peter; Szidonya, Janos; Rasmuson-Lestander, Asa; Ekström, Karin; Dickson, Barry; Hugentobler, Christoph; Stocker, Hugo; Hafen, Ernst; Lepesant, Jean Antoine; Pflugfelder, Gert; Heisenberg, Martin; Mechler, Bernard; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat; Schneuwly, Stephan; Preat, Thomas; Roote, John; Russell, Steven

    2004-01-01

    We describe a collection of P-element insertions that have considerable utility for generating custom chromosomal aberrations in Drosophila melanogaster. We have mobilized a pair of engineered P elements, p[RS3] and p[RS5], to collect 3243 lines unambiguously mapped to the Drosophila genome sequence. The collection contains, on average, an element every 35 kb. We demonstrate the utility of the collection for generating custom chromosomal deletions that have their end points mapped, with base-pair resolution, to the genome sequence. The collection was generated in an isogenic strain, thus affording a uniform background for screens where sensitivity to genetic background is high. The entire collection, along with a computational and genetic toolbox for designing and generating custom deletions, is publicly available. Using the collection it is theoretically possible to generate >12,000 deletions between 1 bp and 1 Mb in size by simple eye color selection. In addition, a further 37,000 deletions, selectable by molecular screening, may be generated. We are now using the collection to generate a second-generation deficiency kit that is precisely mapped to the genome sequence. PMID:15238529

  13. Effects of radiation on frequency of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchange in the benthic worm Neanthes arenaceodentata

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Rice, D.W. Jr.; Moore, D.H.; Varela, M.

    1983-04-01

    Traditional bioassays are unsuitable for assessing sublethal effects of low levels of radioactivity because mortality and phenotypic responses are not anticipated. We compared the usefulness of chromosomal aberration (CA) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) induction as measures of low-level radiation effects in a sediment-dwelling marine worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata. Newly hatched larvae were exposed to two radiation exposure regimes. Groups of 100 larvae were exposed to either x rays delivered at high dose rates (0.7 Gy min/sup -1/) or to /sup 60/Co gamma rays delivered at low dose rates (4.8 X 10/sup -5/ to 1.2 X 10/sup -1/ Gy h/sup -1/). After irradiation, the larvae were exposed to 3 X 10/sup -5/M bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) for 28 h (x-ray-irradiated larvae) or for 54 h (/sup 60/Co-irradiated larvae). Slides of larval cells were prepared for observation of CAs and SCEs. Frequencies of CAs were determined in first division cells; frequencies of SCEs were determined in second division cells. Results from x-ray irradiation indicated that dose-related increases occur in chromosome and chromatid deletions, but an x-ray dose greater than or equal to 2 Gy was required to observe a significant increase. Worm larvae receiving /sup 60/Co irradiation showed elevated SCE frequencies; a significant increase in SCE frequency was observed at 0.6 Gy. 49 references, 2 figures.

  14. Meiotic interstrand DNA damage escapes paternal repair and causes chromosomal aberrations in the zygote by maternal misrepair

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Francesco; Bishop, Jack; Gingerich, John; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    De novo point mutations and chromosomal structural aberrations (CSA) detected in offspring of unaffected parents show a preferential paternal origin with higher risk for older fathers. Studies in rodents suggest that heritable mutations transmitted from the father can arise from either paternal or maternal misrepair of damaged paternal DNA, and that the entire spermatogenic cycle can be at risk after mutagenic exposure. Understanding the susceptibility and mechanisms of transmission of paternal mutations is important in family planning after chemotherapy and donor selection for assisted reproduction. We report that treatment of male mice with melphalan (MLP), a bifunctional alkylating agent widely used in chemotherapy, induces DNA lesions during male mouse meiosis that persist unrepaired as germ cells progress through DNA repair-competent phases of spermatogenic development. After fertilization, unrepaired sperm DNA lesions are mis-repaired into CSA by the egg's DNA repair machinery producing chromosomally abnormal offspring. These findings highlight the importance of both pre- and post-fertilization DNA repair in assuring the genomic integrity of the conceptus. PMID:25567288

  15. The DrosDel collection: a set of P-element insertions for generating custom chromosomal aberrations in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Edward; Blows, Fiona; Ashburner, Michael; Bautista-Llacer, Rosa; Coulson, Darin; Drummond, Jenny; Webster, Jane; Gubb, David; Gunton, Nicola; Johnson, Glynnis; O'Kane, Cahir J; Huen, David; Sharma, Punita; Asztalos, Zoltan; Baisch, Heiko; Schulze, Janet; Kube, Maria; Kittlaus, Kathrin; Reuter, Gunter; Maroy, Peter; Szidonya, Janos; Rasmuson-Lestander, Asa; Ekström, Karin; Dickson, Barry; Hugentobler, Christoph; Stocker, Hugo; Hafen, Ernst; Lepesant, Jean Antoine; Pflugfelder, Gert; Heisenberg, Martin; Mechler, Bernard; Serras, Florenci; Corominas, Montserrat; Schneuwly, Stephan; Preat, Thomas; Roote, John; Russell, Steven

    2004-06-01

    We describe a collection of P-element insertions that have considerable utility for generating custom chromosomal aberrations in Drosophila melanogaster. We have mobilized a pair of engineered P elements, p[RS3] and p[RS5], to collect 3243 lines unambiguously mapped to the Drosophila genome sequence. The collection contains, on average, an element every 35 kb. We demonstrate the utility of the collection for generating custom chromosomal deletions that have their end points mapped, with base-pair resolution, to the genome sequence. The collection was generated in an isogenic strain, thus affording a uniform background for screens where sensitivity to genetic background is high. The entire collection, along with a computational and genetic toolbox for designing and generating custom deletions, is publicly available. Using the collection it is theoretically possible to generate >12,000 deletions between 1 bp and 1 Mb in size by simple eye color selection. In addition, a further 37,000 deletions, selectable by molecular screening, may be generated. We are now using the collection to generate a second-generation deficiency kit that is precisely mapped to the genome sequence. PMID:15238529

  16. Role of Peltigera rufescens (Weis) Humb. (a lichen) on imazalil-induced genotoxicity: analysis of micronucleus and chromosome aberrations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Türkez, Hasan; Aydin, Elanur; Sişman, Turgay; Aslan, Ali

    2012-07-01

    Imazalil (IMA), a commonly used fungicide in both agricultural and clinical domains, is suspected to produce very serious toxic effects on vertebrates. On the other hand, in recent years, a number of studies have suggested that lichens might be easily accessible sources of natural drugs that could be used as a possible food supplement. Extensive research is being carried out to explore the importance of lichen species, which are known to contain a variety of pharmacological active compounds. In this context, the anti-genotoxic effects of aqueous Peltigera rufescens (Weis) Humb. extracts (PREs) were studied against the genotoxic damage induced by IMA on cultured human lymphocytes using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and micronucleus (MN) as cytogenetic parameters. Human peripheral lymphocytes were treated in vitro with varying concentrations of PREs (0, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 mg/L), tested in combination with IMA (336 mg/L). PREs alone were not genotoxic and when combined with IMA treatment, reduced the frequency of CAs and the rates of MNs. A clear dose-dependent decrease in the genotoxic damage of IMA was observed, suggesting a genoprotective role of P. rufescens extract. The results of the present study indicate that this plant extract per se do not have genotoxic potential but can minimize the genotoxicity of IMA on human lymphocytes in vitro. In conclusion our findings may have an important application for the protection of human lymphocyte from the genetic damage and side effects induced by agricultural and medical chemicals hazardous in people.

  17. Development of a two-parameter slit-scan flow cytometer for screening of normal and aberrant chromosomes: application to a karyotype of Sus scrofa domestica (pig)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Michael; Doelle, Juergen; Arnold, Armin; Stepanow, Boris; Wickert, Burkhard; Boscher, Jeannine; Popescu, Paul C.; Cremer, Christoph

    1992-07-01

    Laser fluorescence activated slit-scan flow cytometry offers an approach to a fast, quantitative characterization of chromosomes due to morphological features. It can be applied for screening of chromosomal abnormalities. We give a preliminary report on the development of the Heidelberg slit-scan flow cytometer. Time-resolved measurement of the fluorescence intensity along the chromosome axis can be registered simultaneously for two parameters when the chromosome axis can be registered simultaneously for two parameters when the chromosome passes perpendicularly through a narrowly focused laser beam combined by a detection slit in the image plane. So far automated data analysis has been performed off-line on a PC. In its final performance, the Heidelberg slit-scan flow cytometer will achieve on-line data analysis that allows an electro-acoustical sorting of chromosomes of interest. Interest is high in the agriculture field to study chromosome aberrations that influence the size of litters in pig (Sus scrofa domestica) breeding. Slit-scan measurements have been performed to characterize chromosomes of pigs; we present results for chromosome 1 and a translocation chromosome 6/15.

  18. Numerical and structural aberrations in advanced neuroblastoma tumours by CGH analysis; survival correlates with chromosome 17 status

    PubMed Central

    Cunsolo, C Lo; Bicocchi, M P; Petti, A R; Tonini, G P

    2000-01-01

    Rapid tumour progression in neuroblastoma is associated with MYCN amplification, deletion of the short arm of chromosome 1 and gain of 17q. However, patients with advanced disease without MYCN amplification and/or 1p deletion have a very poor outcome too, which suggests other genetic defects may predict an unfavourable prognosis. We employed CGH to study 22 tumours of patients at stages 3 and 4 over one year of age (6 and 16 cases respectively). Patients were divided in groups (A) long-term survivors and (B) short-term survivors. CGH showed a total of 226 chromosome imbalances (110 in group A and 116 in group B). The neuroblastoma cells of long-term survivors showed a preponderance of numerical aberrations (54%vs 43%); particularly gains of entire chromosomes 1 (P< 0.03), 7 (P< 0.04) and 19 (P< 0.05). An extra copy of 17 was detected in 6/8 (75%) samples of group A and only 1/14 (7%) samples of group B (P< 0.002). Conversely, tumours of patients who died from disease progression displayed a higher frequency of structural abnormalities (43%vs 35%), including loss of 1p, 9p, 11q, 15q and 18q and gain of 12q, although the difference was not significant (P= 0.24). Unbalanced gain of 17q was detected in 8/14 (57%) tumours of group B and only 1/8 (13%) tumours of group A (P< 0.05). The peculiar genetic difference observed in the tumours of long and short-term survivors may have prognostic relevance. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11044353

  19. Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage Measured in Metaphase and Interphase Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Durante, Marco; Willingham, Veronica; Wu, Honglu; Yang, Tracy C.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were investigated in human lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to 1H-, 3He-, 12C-, 40Ar-, 28Si-, 56Fe-, or 197Au-ion beams, with LET ranging from approximately 0.4-1393 keV/microm in the dose range of 0.075-3 Gy. Dose-response curves for chromosome exchanges, measured at the first mitosis postirradiation using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole-chromosome probes, were fitted with linear or linear-quadratic functions. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose-response curve for chromosomal damage with respect to low- or high-dose-rate gamma rays. Estimates of RBEmax values for mitotic spreads, which ranged from near 0.7 to 11.1 for total exchanges, increased with LET, reaching a maximum at about 150 keV/microm, and decreased with further increase in LET. RBEs for complex aberrations are undefined due to the lack of an initial slope for gamma rays. Additionally, the effect of mitotic delay on RBE values was investigated by measuring chromosome aberrations in interphase after chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC), and values were up to threefold higher than for metaphase analysis.

  20. Truly incomplete and complex exchanges in prematurely condensed chromosomes of human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to energetic heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon silicon ions, or iron ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Incomplete and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. To verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole-chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after irradiation with the heavy ions of high LET, and consequently the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/microm, the highest LET included in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon iron ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique, which allows identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy iron ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges; these ratios were higher than those obtained after exposure to 6 Gy gamma rays. After 0.7 Gy of iron ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, which is a likely indication of the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single iron-ion track.

  1. Truly Incomplete and Complex Chromosomal Exchanges in Human Fibroblast Cells Exposed In Situ to Energetic Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, marco; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG 1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 or 500 MeV/nucleon. The cells were allowed to repair at 37 C for 24 hours after exposure, and a chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Incomplete and complex exchanges were analyzed in the irradiated samples. In order to verify that chromosomal breaks were truly unrejoined, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosome. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and consequently, the ratio of incomplete to complete exchanges increased steadily with LET up to 440 keV/micron, the highest LET value in the present study. For samples exposed to 200 MeV/nucleon Fe ions, chromosome aberrations were analyzed using the multicolor FISH (mFISH) technique that allow identification of both complex and truly incomplete exchanges. Results of the mFISH study showed that 0.7 and 3 Gy dose of the Fe ions produced similar ratios of complex to simple exchanges and incomplete to complete exchanges, values for which were higher than those obtained after a 6 Gy gamma exposure. After 0.7 Gy of Fe ions, most complex aberrations were found to involve three or four chromosomes, which is a likely indication of the maximum number of chromosome domains traversed by a single Fe ion track.

  2. OPTICAL EYE MODEL: Human eye aberrations: 2. Development of a dynamic model of the human eye based on measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galetskii, S. O.; Cherezova, T. Yu; Kudryashov, A. V.

    2008-11-01

    A human eye model based on a flexible semipassive bimorph mirror is proposed and experimentally realised. The model can be used for the real-time reproduction of human eye aberrations and their fluctuations. The accuracy of the reproduction of individual Zernike polynomials and of total eye aberrations of inspected patients is discussed.

  3. Human structural variation: mechanisms of chromosome rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Weckselblatt, Brooke; Rudd, M. Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome structural variation (SV) is a normal part of variation in the human genome, but some classes of SV can cause neurodevelopmental disorders. Analysis of the DNA sequence at SV breakpoints can reveal mutational mechanisms and risk factors for chromosome rearrangement. Large-scale SV breakpoint studies have become possible recently owing to advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) including whole-genome sequencing (WGS). These findings have shed light on complex forms of SV such as triplications, inverted duplications, insertional translocations, and chromothripsis. Sequence-level breakpoint data resolve SV structure and determine how genes are disrupted, fused, and/or misregulated by breakpoints. Recent improvements in breakpoint sequencing have also revealed non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between paralogous long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) or human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) repeats as a cause of deletions, duplications, and translocations. This review covers the genomic organization of simple and complex constitutional SVs, as well as the molecular mechanisms of their formation. PMID:26209074

  4. Construction and availability of human chromosome-specific gene libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Fuscoe, J.C.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Deaven, L.L.

    1985-06-14

    This report briefly describes Phase I of the project, the production of complete digest fibraries. Each laboratory is currently in the process of sorting individual human chromosomes from normal human fibroblasts or human X hamster hybrids. The goal of 4 x 10/sup 6/ chromosomes for cloning purposes has been achieved. Each laboratory is also in the process of cloning the chromosomal DNA, after complete digestion with a 6-cutter, into the bacteriophage vector Charon 21A. 3 refs.

  5. Adaptive and aberrant reward prediction signals in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Roiser, Jonathan P; Stephan, Klaas E; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Friston, Karl J; Joyce, Eileen M

    2010-04-01

    Theories of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia hypothesize a role for aberrant reinforcement signaling driven by dysregulated dopamine transmission. Recently, we provided evidence of aberrant reward learning in symptomatic, but not asymptomatic patients with schizophrenia, using a novel paradigm, the Salience Attribution Test (SAT). The SAT is a probabilistic reward learning game that employs cues that vary across task-relevant and task-irrelevant dimensions; it provides behavioral indices of adaptive and aberrant reward learning. As an initial step prior to future clinical studies, here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural basis of adaptive and aberrant reward learning during the SAT in healthy volunteers. As expected, cues associated with high relative to low reward probabilities elicited robust hemodynamic responses in a network of structures previously implicated in motivational salience; the midbrain, in the vicinity of the ventral tegmental area, and regions targeted by its dopaminergic projections, i.e. medial dorsal thalamus, ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Responses in the medial dorsal thalamus and polar PFC were strongly correlated with the degree of adaptive reward learning across participants. Finally, and most importantly, differential dorsolateral PFC and middle temporal gyrus (MTG) responses to cues with identical reward probabilities were very strongly correlated with the degree of aberrant reward learning. Participants who showed greater aberrant learning exhibited greater dorsolateral PFC responses, and reduced MTG responses, to cues erroneously inferred to be less strongly associated with reward. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for different theories of associative learning. PMID:19969090

  6. Stability of Radiation Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; George, K.; Willingham, V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage in an individual's peripheral blood lymphocytes can be an indicator of radiation exposure and this data can be used to evaluate dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Evidence suggests that the yield of chromosome damage in lymphocytes is also a relevant biomarker of cancer risk in humans that reflects individual cancer susceptibility. It follows that biomonitoring studies can be used to uncover subjects who are particularly susceptible to radiation damage and therefore at higher risk of cancer. Translocations and other stable aberrations are commonly believed to persist in peripheral blood cells for many years after exposure, and it has been suggested that translocations can be used for assessing retrospective radiation doses or chronic exposures. However, recent investigations suggest that translocations might not always persist indefinitely. We measured chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of six astronauts before their respective missions of approximately 3 to 6 months onboard the international space station, and again at various intervals up to 5 years after flight. In samples collected a few days after return to earth, the yield of chromosome translocations had significantly increased compared with preflight values, and results indicate that biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, for five of the astronauts, follow up analysis revealed a temporal decline in translocations with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months post-flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction and could affect cancer risk predictions that are estimated from yields of chromosome damage obtained shortly after exposure.

  7. The DNA sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Gregory, S G; Barlow, K F; McLay, K E; Kaul, R; Swarbreck, D; Dunham, A; Scott, C E; Howe, K L; Woodfine, K; Spencer, C C A; Jones, M C; Gillson, C; Searle, S; Zhou, Y; Kokocinski, F; McDonald, L; Evans, R; Phillips, K; Atkinson, A; Cooper, R; Jones, C; Hall, R E; Andrews, T D; Lloyd, C; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ambrose, K D; Anderson, F; Andrew, R W; Ashwell, R I S; Aubin, K; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Beasley, H; Bethel, G; Bird, C P; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, J Y; Brown, A J; Buckley, D; Burton, J; Bye, J; Carder, C; Chapman, J C; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C; Cobley, V; Collier, R E; Corby, N; Coville, G J; Davies, J; Deadman, R; Dunn, M; Earthrowl, M; Ellington, A G; Errington, H; Frankish, A; Frankland, J; French, L; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gay, L; Ghori, M R J; Gibson, R; Gilby, L M; Gillett, W; Glithero, R J; Grafham, D V; Griffiths, C; Griffiths-Jones, S; Grocock, R; Hammond, S; Harrison, E S I; Hart, E; Haugen, E; Heath, P D; Holmes, S; Holt, K; Howden, P J; Hunt, A R; Hunt, S E; Hunter, G; Isherwood, J; James, R; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Joy, A; Kay, M; Kershaw, J K; Kibukawa, M; Kimberley, A M; King, A; Knights, A J; Lad, H; Laird, G; Lawlor, S; Leongamornlert, D A; Lloyd, D M; Loveland, J; Lovell, J; Lush, M J; Lyne, R; Martin, S; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; Matthews, N S W; McLaren, S; Milne, S; Mistry, S; Moore, M J F; Nickerson, T; O'Dell, C N; Oliver, K; Palmeiri, A; Palmer, S A; Parker, A; Patel, D; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phelps, K; Phillimore, B J; Plumb, R; Rajan, J; Raymond, C; Rouse, G; Saenphimmachak, C; Sehra, H K; Sheridan, E; Shownkeen, R; Sims, S; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Steward, C; Subramanian, S; Sycamore, N; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Van Helmond, Z; Wall, M; Wallis, J M; White, S; Whitehead, S L; Wilkinson, J E; Willey, D L; Williams, H; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Wu, Z; Coulson, A; Vaudin, M; Sulston, J E; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Wooster, R; Dunham, I; Carter, N P; McVean, G; Ross, M T; Harrow, J; Olson, M V; Beck, S; Rogers, J; Bentley, D R; Banerjee, R; Bryant, S P; Burford, D C; Burrill, W D H; Clegg, S M; Dhami, P; Dovey, O; Faulkner, L M; Gribble, S M; Langford, C F; Pandian, R D; Porter, K M; Prigmore, E

    2006-05-18

    The reference sequence for each human chromosome provides the framework for understanding genome function, variation and evolution. Here we report the finished sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1. Chromosome 1 is gene-dense, with 3,141 genes and 991 pseudogenes, and many coding sequences overlap. Rearrangements and mutations of chromosome 1 are prevalent in cancer and many other diseases. Patterns of sequence variation reveal signals of recent selection in specific genes that may contribute to human fitness, and also in regions where no function is evident. Fine-scale recombination occurs in hotspots of varying intensity along the sequence, and is enriched near genes. These and other studies of human biology and disease encoded within chromosome 1 are made possible with the highly accurate annotated sequence, as part of the completed set of chromosome sequences that comprise the reference human genome.

  8. [Comparative investigation of structural and gene somatic mutations in workers of nuclear chemical plants. I. A study of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations].

    PubMed

    Sevan'kaev, A V; Shkavrova, T G; Potetnia, O I; Mikhaĭlova, G F; Tsepenko, V V; Golub, E V; Khvostunov, I K; Saenko, A S; Gasteva, G N; Nugis, V Iu; Molokanov, A A

    2005-01-01

    A study of frequency of unstable chromosome aberrations in 50 workers of nuclear chemical plants in remote period after beginning or finishing professional contact with ionizing radiation was carried out. 14 persons from this cohort were mainly whole-body exposed to external gamma-rays and 36 were exposed to combined external and internal radiation from incorporated Pu nuclides. In results of this irradiating practically every subject had a chronical radiation sickness. In the 1-st group the frequency of unstable aberrations varied from 0.2 to 3.6 per 100 cells and exceeded reliably control level in 5 persons. In the 2-nd group the frequency of unstable aberrations varied from 0 to 11.6 per 100 cells and exceeded reliably control level in 20 examined workers. The FISH study of frequency of stable aberrations was performed in 13 subjects who were exposed to combined external and internal radiation. Total frequency of complete and incomplete translocations varied from 0.6 to 18.5 aberrations per genome per 100 cells and reliable exceeded control level in 9 subjects. Non-random participation in exchange rearrangements (translocations) was revealed for used set of chromosomes (2, 3 and 8).

  9. Prevalence of the 14/20 centric fusion chromosomal aberration in US Simmental cattle.

    PubMed

    Weber, A F; Buoen, L C; Zhang, T; Ruth, G R

    1992-05-01

    Cytogenetic evaluation was made on 353 Simmental cattle (166 male, 187 female) from 113 herds in 26 states. One hundred thirty-eight (39%) were found to be heterozygous-positive for the 14/20 centric fusion chromosomal translocation, including 41 (25%) males and 97 (52%) females. One submitted heparinized blood sample from a Simbrah bull was found to be positive for 14/20 and 1/29 centric fusions. Sampling, which was based on requests, was highly selective. Thus, the 39% prevalence found was not representative of 14/20 centric fusion in the national Simmental breed. On the basis of our findings, cytogenetic evaluation of breeding stock was consistent with modern management practice.

  10. Prevalence of the 14/20 centric fusion chromosomal aberration in US Simmental cattle.

    PubMed

    Weber, A F; Buoen, L C; Zhang, T; Ruth, G R

    1992-05-01

    Cytogenetic evaluation was made on 353 Simmental cattle (166 male, 187 female) from 113 herds in 26 states. One hundred thirty-eight (39%) were found to be heterozygous-positive for the 14/20 centric fusion chromosomal translocation, including 41 (25%) males and 97 (52%) females. One submitted heparinized blood sample from a Simbrah bull was found to be positive for 14/20 and 1/29 centric fusions. Sampling, which was based on requests, was highly selective. Thus, the 39% prevalence found was not representative of 14/20 centric fusion in the national Simmental breed. On the basis of our findings, cytogenetic evaluation of breeding stock was consistent with modern management practice. PMID:1601712

  11. Loss of centromeric histone H2AT120 phosphorylation accompanies somatic chromosomes inactivation in the aberrant spermatocytes of Acricotopus lucidus (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Staiber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In the germ line of the chironomid Acricotopus lucidus, two cells with quite different chromosome constitutions result from the last unequal gonial mitosis. In the male, the future primary spermatocyte receives all the germ line-limited chromosomes (=Ks) together with somatic chromosomes (=Ss), and later on undergoes meiotic divisions, while the connected aberrant spermatocyte gets only Ss and remains undivided with chromosomes inactivated in a metaphase-like condensed state. This raises the question whether the centromeres of the permanently condensed Ss of the aberrant spermatocyte remain active during meiosis of the connected regular spermatocyte. Active centromeres exhibit an epigenetic phosphorylation mark at threonine 120 of histone H2A. To visualise the centromeric H2A phosphorylation of the Ss in the aberrant spermatocyte, meiotic stages were immunostained with different anti-phospho histone H2AT120 antibodies. Clear H2AT120ph signals appear at the centromeres of the Ss during prophase, persist on the metaphase-like condensed Ss during meiosis I of the connected primary spermatocyte and disappear during transition to meiosis II. The centromeres of the Ss and Ks of the regular spermatocytes display H2AT120ph signals from prophase I to anaphase II. The loss of the H2AT120 phosphorylation detected on the centromeres of the Ss of the aberrant spermatocyte indicating their deactivation supports the idea of a programmed inactivation of the Ss to block the entry of the germ line-derived aberrant spermatocyte, lacking Ks, into meiosis, and thus to prevent the generation of sperms possessing only Ss. This mechanism would ensure the presence of the Ks in the germ line.

  12. Flow cytometry measurements of human chromosome kinetochore labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fantes, J.A.; Green, D.K.; Malloy, P.; Sumner, A.T.

    1989-03-01

    A method for the preparation and measurement of immunofluorescent human chromosome centromeres in suspension is described using CREST antibodies, which bind to the centromeric region of chromosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated antihuman antibodies provide the fluorescent label. Labeled chromosomes are examined on microscope slides and by flow cytometry. In both cases a dye which binds to DNA is added to provide identification of the chromosome groups. Sera from different CREST patients vary in their ability to bind to chromosome arms in addition to the centromeric region. Flow cytometry and microfluorimetry measurements have shown that with a given CREST serum the differences in kinetochore fluorescence between chromosomes are only minor. Flow cytometry experiments to relate the number of dicentric chromosomes, induced by in vitro radiation of peripheral blood cells to the slightly increased number of chromosomes with above-average kinetochore fluorescence did not produce decisive radiation dosimetry results.

  13. Chromosomal DNA Replication Pattern in Human Tumour Cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kucheria, Kiran

    1970-01-01

    The present paper deals with the chromosomal DNA replication pattern in human solid tumour cells in vitro. This was studied at the terminal stages of the S-period. All the cell lines of female origin showed a late replicating chromosome in group XX6-12. In cell lines of male origin one of the chromosomes of group 21-22Y was later replicating than the rest of the members of the group. The DNA replication pattern of the autosomes and the sex chromosomes was similar to that of the cultured human leucocytes. The results of the present study show that the DNA replication pattern of the chromosome in neoplastic cells is basically unchanged despite the changes in the chromosome number and morphology. Therefore the abnormal behaviour of the neoplastic cells cannot be related to the changes in the pattern of the chromosomal DNA replication. ImagesFig. 5Fig. 1Fig. 6Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:5475754

  14. In vitro induction of sister chromatid exchanges and chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of the oyster toadfish and American eel.

    PubMed

    Ellingham, T J; Christensen, E A; Maddock, M B

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to characterize the proliferation of oyster toadfish lymphocytes in medium containing 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) and to determine the effectiveness of cytogenetic endpoints for assessing the genotoxic effects of in vitro exposure of toadfish and eel lymphocytes to known mammalian clastogens. Although the rate of proliferation of toadfish lymphocytes was low compared to that of mammalian lymphocytes, the effects of increasing BrdUrd concentrations were similar, in that proliferation exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibition for concentrations above 10 microM BrdUrd, and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequencies exhibited a concentration-dependent increase for concentrations above 100 microM BrdUrd. Mitomycin C (MMC) and ethylene dibromide (EDB) induced concentration-dependent increases in chromatid-type exchange and SCE frequencies with least effective concentrations (control SCE frequency divided by the slope of the least-squares line) for SCE induction by MMC (6.8 X 10(-9) M) and EDB (2.6 X 10(-4) M) that were comparable to or slightly lower than those that have been obtained with mammalian in vitro systems. In vitro exposure of toadfish lymphocytes to dimethoate (DIM) induced a concentration-dependent increase in SCE frequency with a least effective concentration of 2.8 X 10(-3) M that was much higher than that observed with mammalian in vitro systems. In vitro exposure of American eel lymphocytes to MMC also induced a concentration-dependent increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and SCEs with a least effective concentration for SCE induction of 2.0 X 10(-9) M. These results indicate that cytogenetic endpoints can be effectively scored with cultured lymphocytes from these and perhaps other fish species with comparable karyotypes that contain an average of at least 0.07 pg DNA/chromosome.

  15. In vitro induction of sister chromatid exchanges and chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of the oyster toadfish and American eel

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingham, T.J.; Christensen, E.A.; Maddock, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to characterize the proliferation of oyster toadfish lymphocytes in medium containing 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) and to determine the effectiveness of cytogenetic endpoints for assessing the genotoxic effects of in vitro exposure of toadfish and eel lymphocytes to known mammalian clastogens. Although the rate of proliferation of toadfish lymphocytes was low compared to that of mammalian lymphocytes, the effects of increasing BrdUrd concentrations were similar. Mitomycin C (MMC) and ethylene dibromide (EDB) induced concentration-dependent increases in chromatid-type exchange and SCE frequencies with least effective concentrations for SCE induction by MMC (6.8 x 10/sup -9/ M) and EDB (2.6 x 10/sup -4/ M) that were comparable to or slightly lower than those that have been obtained with mammalian in vitro systems. In vitro exposure of toadfish lymphocytes to dimethoate (DIM) induced a concentration-dependent increase in SCE frequency with a least effective concentration of 2.8 x 10/sup -3/ M that was much higher than that observed with mammalian in vitro systems. In vitro exposure of American eel lymphocytes to MMC also induced a concentration-dependent increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and SCEs with a least effective concentration for SCE induction of 2.0 x 10/sup -9/ M. These results indicate that cytogenetic endpoints can be effectively scored with cultured lymphocytes from these and perhaps other fish species with comparable karyotypes that contain an average of at least 0.07 pg DNA/chromosome.

  16. [The estimation of appropriateness of chromosomal aberration assay as a biological dosimetry based on cytogenetic investigation of lung cancer patients given non-uniform fractional exposures to high doses of therapeutic 60Co gamma-rays].

    PubMed

    Khvostunov, I K; Kursova, L V; Shepel', N N; Ragulin, Iu A; Sevan'kaev, A V; Gulidov, I A; Glazyrin, D A; Ivanova, I N

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate in vivo the dose response of radiation induced chromosomal aberrations in human blood lymphocytes of lung cancer patients given non-uniform fractional exposures to high doses of therapeutic 60Co gamma-rays delivered synchronously with polychemotherapy. The chromosome aberration analysis was carried out in peripheral blood lymphocytes of 13 lung cancer patients who manifested II to IV developmental clinical stage. During the course of radiotherapy they received the accumulated tumor dose ranged 47.5 to 70 Gy. The yield ofdicentrics, centric rings and fragments was measured in the blood samples taken before treatment, after the first day and after the complete course of radiotherapy. Based on cytogenetic measurements of 3 patients, the average tumor dose after the first day was estimated to be 2.1 to 3.0 Gy given that the corresponding physical dose was (1.0 Gy + 1.5 Gy). The quotient of the individual dose estimated by the frequency of aberrations to the physical dose after the complete course of radiotherapy was calculated for all 13 patients. The mean quotient was shown to be equal to 93 +/- 9% ranged 50 to 154%.

  17. Aberrant caspase-activated DNase (CAD) transcripts in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S Y; Liaw, S F; Lee, S N; Hsieh, P S; Lin, K H; Chu, C M; Liaw, Y F

    2003-01-27

    The gene of caspase-activated DNase (CAD), the key enzyme for nucleosome cleavage during apoptosis, is mapped at chromosome 1p36, a region usually associated with hemizygous deletions in human cancers, particularly in hepatoma (HCC). It is tempting to speculate that CAD plays a tumour-suppressive role in hepatocarcinogenesis. To address this, we examined the CAD transcripts in six human HCC cell lines, one liver tissue from a non-HCC subject, and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from three healthy individuals. Alternatively spliced CAD transcripts with fusion of exon 1 to exon 7 were isolated in most of the examined samples including HCC cells and normal controls. However, relatively abundant alternatively spliced CAD transcripts with fusion of exon 2 to exon 6 or 7, in which the corresponding domain directing CAD interaction with ICAD was preserved, were found only in poorly differentiated Mahlavu and SK-Hep1 cells. Interestingly, an abnormal CAD transcript with its exon 3 replaced by a truncated transposable Alu repeat was isolated in Hep3B cells, indicative of the implication of an Alu-mediated genomic mutation. Moreover, mis-sense mutations in the CAD genes were identified in all six HCC cell lines. Upon UV-induced apoptosis, DNA fragmentation efficiency was found to be intact, partially reduced and remarkably reduced in Huh7 and J328, Hep3B and HepG2, and Mahlavu cells, respectively. That mutations and aberrantly spliced transcripts for the CAD gene are frequently present in human HCC cells, especially in poorly differentiated HCC cells, suggests a significant role of CAD in human hepatocarcinogenesis.

  18. Comparison of RBE values of high- LET α-particles for the induction of DNA-DSBs, chromosome aberrations and cell reproductive death

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Various types of radiation effects in mammalian cells have been studied with the aim to predict the radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues, e.g. DNA double strand breaks (DSB), chromosome aberrations and cell reproductive inactivation. However, variation in correlations with clinical results has reduced general application. An additional type of information is required for the increasing application of high-LET radiation in cancer therapy: the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) for effects in tumours and normal tissues. Relevant information on RBE values might be derived from studies on cells in culture. Methods To evaluate relationships between DNA-DSB, chromosome aberrations and the clinically most relevant effect of cell reproductive death, for ionizing radiations of different LET, dose-effect relationships were determined for the induction of these effects in cultured SW-1573 cells irradiated with gamma-rays from a Cs-137 source or with α-particles from an Am-241 source. RBE values were derived for these effects. Ionizing radiation induced foci (IRIF) of DNA repair related proteins, indicative of DSB, were assessed by counting gamma-H2AX foci. Chromosome aberration frequencies were determined by scoring fragments and translocations using premature chromosome condensation. Cell survival was measured by colony formation assay. Analysis of dose-effect relations was based on the linear-quadratic model. Results Our results show that, although both investigated radiation types induce similar numbers of IRIF per absorbed dose, only a small fraction of the DSB induced by the low-LET gamma-rays result in chromosome rearrangements and cell reproductive death, while this fraction is considerably enhanced for the high-LET alpha-radiation. Calculated RBE values derived for the linear components of dose-effect relations for gamma-H2AX foci, cell reproductive death, chromosome fragments and colour junctions are 1.0 ± 0.3, 14.7 ± 5.1, 15.3 ± 5.9 and

  19. Aberrant TAL1 activation is mediated by an interchromosomal interaction in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, B; Kang, Y; Cui, K; Litt, M; Riberio, M S J; Deng, C; Salz, T; Casada, S; Fu, X; Qiu, Y; Zhao, K; Huang, S

    2014-02-01

    Long-range chromatin interactions control metazoan gene transcription. However, the involvement of intra- and interchromosomal interactions in development and oncogenesis remains unclear. TAL1/SCL is a critical transcription factor required for the development of all hematopoietic lineages; yet, aberrant TAL1 transcription often occurs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we report that oncogenic TAL1 expression is regulated by different intra- and interchromosomal loops in normal hematopoietic and leukemic cells, respectively. These intra- and interchromosomal loops alter the cell-type-specific enhancers that interact with the TAL1 promoter. We show that human SET1 (hSET1)-mediated H3K4 methylations promote a long-range chromatin loop, which brings the +51 enhancer in close proximity to TAL1 promoter 1 in erythroid cells. The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) facilitates this long-range enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in erythroid cells while blocking the same enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in human T-cell leukemia. In human T-ALL, a T-cell-specific transcription factor c-Maf-mediated interchromosomal interaction brings the TAL1 promoter into close proximity with a T-cell-specific regulatory element located on chromosome 16, activating aberrant TAL1 oncogene expression. Thus, our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism involving changes in three-dimensional chromatin interactions that activate the TAL1 oncogene in human T-cell leukemia. PMID:23698277

  20. Aberrant activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression in Philadelphia chromosome-positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoxian; Durkin, Lisa; Rogers, Heesun Joyce; Hsi, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in germinal center B cells and plays a critical role in somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes. Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis and is specifically treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Interestingly, AID has been shown to be aberrantly expressed and functional in Ph+ ALL and is thought to contribute to genetic instability. We hypothesized that AID might be detectable in routinely processed bone marrow biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and assist in identifying Ph+ ALL. We found that AID was expressed in 26 (70%) of 37 cases of Ph+ ALL but only 1 (2.9%) of 38 cases of Ph- ALL cases. There was a significant difference in AID expression between these 2 ALL groups (P < .001, Fisher exact test). The expression of AID was confirmed by RT-PCR (reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) and correlated with IHC scoring. AID protein is expressed in a large proportion of Ph+ ALL cases at levels detectable by IHC in clinical samples and might be useful to rapidly identify cases likely to have a BCR/ABL1 fusion. PMID:26980048

  1. Assessment of chromosomal aberration in the bone marrow cells of Swiss Albino mice treated by 4-methylimidazole.

    PubMed

    Norizadeh Tazehkand, Mostafa; Topaktas, Mehmet; Yilmaz, Mehmet Bertan

    2016-01-01

    4-Methylimidazole (4-MEI) is formed during the production of certain caramel coloring agents used in many food and drink products. It may also be formed during the cooking, roasting, or other processing of some foods and beverages. So it was unintentionally consumed in worldwide. This study was aimed to investigate the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of 4-MEI using chromosome aberration (CA) and mitotic index (MI) in Swiss Albino mice. In this research, CA and MI of the mouse bone marrow cells were analyzed after treating the animals with 4-MEI (100, 130 and 160 mg/kg) for 12 h and 24 h treatment times. All data were analyzed using statistical methods. 4-MEI significantly increased the percentage of CAs at all concentrations for 12 h and at highest concentration for 24 h treatment periods. 4-MEI at highest concentration for 12 h and at all concentrations for 24 h decreased the MI in comparison with control. Genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of 4-MEI at 24 h treatment periods were concentration dependent. Consequently, it can be said that 4-MEI have genotoxic and cytotoxic effect in mouse. PMID:26634952

  2. Influence of retinol on carcinogen-induced sister chromatid exchangers and chromosome aberrations in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, S.; Batt, T.; Huang, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of retinol (Rol) on sister chromatid exchangers (SCE) in V79 cells induced by six indirect and two direct carcinogens, and on chromosome aberration (CA) in V79 cells induced by four indirect carcinogens were studied. The indirect carcinogens used were aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB), cyclophosphamide (CPP), benzo(a)anthracene (BA), benzo(a)pyrene (BP), 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benz(a)anthracene (DMBA), and 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). The two direct carcinogens were ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Rol effectively inhibited SCE and CA induced by AFB and CPP in a dose-dependent manner, but it had no effect on SCE induced by BA, BP, DMBA, MCA, EMS, and MNNG. To the contrary, Rol had an enhancing effect on CA induced by BP and DMBA. The possibility that Rol exerts its anticarcinogenic effects by inhibiting certain forms of the cytochrome P-450 isoenzymes required for activation of precarcinogens, such as AFB and CPP but not those enzymes required by BA, BP, DMBA, and MCA, is discussed.

  3. Chromosome aberration and sister chromatid exchange tests in Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro III: Results with 27 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, D.K. ); Witt, K.; Anderson, B.; Zeiger, E.; Shelby, M.D. )

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-seven chemicals previously tested in rodent carcinogenicity assays were tested for induction of chromosomal aberrations (ABS) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as part of a larger analysis of the correlation between results of in vitro genetic toxicity assays and carcinogenicity bioassays. Chemicals were tested up to toxic doses with and without exogenous metabolic activation. Seventeen of the chemicals tested were carcinogens; only two of these were negative for both ABS and SCE. Of the eight noncarcinogens tested, four were negative for both endpoints and four gave a positive response for at least one endpoint. Of the remaining two chemicals, one, diallylphthalate, gave an equivocal response in the bioassay and a positive response in these CHO cell cytogenetics tests. The other chemical, 2,4-toluene diisocyanate, was tested for carcinogenicity as a mixture with the 2,6-isomer; the mixture was carinogenic, but the cytogenetic test results for the 2,4-isomer were negative. Experiments with unsynchronized CHO cells demonstrated that mean SCE frequency increased with increasing culture time, and this may have been a factor in the positive results obtained for five chemicals in the SCE test under conditions of delayed harvest.

  4. Chromosome aberration and micronucleus frequencies in Allium cepa cells exposed to petroleum polluted water--a case study.

    PubMed

    Leme, Daniela Morais; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2008-01-31

    In the present study, we applied Chromosome Aberration (CA) and Micronucleus (MN) tests to Allium cepa root cells, in order to evaluate the water quality of Guaecá river. This river, located in the city of São Sebastião, SP, Brazil, had been affected by an oil pipeline leak. Chemical analyses of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPHs) and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also carried out in water samples, collected in July 2005 (dry season) and February 2006 (rainy season) in 4 different river sites. The largest CA and MN incidence in the meristematic cells of A. cepa was observed after exposure to water sample collected during the dry season, at the spring of the river, where the oil leak has arisen. The F(1) cells from roots exposed to such sample (non-merismatic region) were also analyzed for the incidence of MN, showing a larger frequency of irregularities, indicating a possible development of CA into MN. Lastly, our study reveals a direct correlation between water chemical analyses (contamination by TPHs and PAHs) and both genotoxic and mutagenic effects observed in exposed A. cepa cells. PMID:18068420

  5. Wave aberration of human eyes and new descriptors of image optical quality and visual performance.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Marco; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    The expansion of wavefront-sensing techniques redefined the meaning of refractive error in clinical ophthalmology. Clinical aberrometers provide detailed measurements of the eye's wavefront aberration. The distribution and contribution of each higher-order aberration to the overall wavefront aberration in the individual eye can now be accurately determined and predicted. Using corneal or ocular wavefront sensors, studies have measured the interindividual and age-related changes in the wavefront aberration in the normal population with the goal of optimizing refractive surgery outcomes for the individual. New objective optical-quality metrics would lead to better use and interpretation of newly available information on aberrations in the eye. However, the first metrics introduced, based on sets of Zernike polynomials, is not completely suitable to depict visual quality because they do not directly relate to the quality of the retinal image. Thus, several approaches to describe the real, complex optical performance of human eyes have been implemented. These include objective metrics that quantify the quality of the optical wavefront in the plane of the pupil (ie, pupil-plane metrics) and others that quantify the quality of the retinal image (ie, image-plane metrics). These metrics are derived by wavefront aberration information from the individual eye. This paper reviews the more recent knowledge of the wavefront aberration in human eyes and discusses the image-quality and optical-quality metrics and predictors that are now routinely calculated by wavefront-sensor software to describe the optical and image quality in the individual eye.

  6. Genomics and genetics of human and primate y chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jennifer F; Rozen, Steve

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, the Y chromosome plays the pivotal role in male sex determination and is essential for normal sperm production. Yet only three Y chromosomes have been completely sequenced to date--those of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. While Y chromosomes are notoriously difficult to sequence owing to their highly repetitive genomic landscapes, these dedicated sequencing efforts have generated tremendous yields in medical, biological, and evolutionary insight. Knowledge of the complex structural organization of the human Y chromosome and a complete catalog of its gene content have provided a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that generate disease-causing mutations and large-scale rearrangements. Variation among human Y-chromosome sequences has been an invaluable tool for understanding relationships among human populations. Comprehensive comparisons of the human Y-chromosome sequence with those of other primates have illuminated aspects of Y-chromosome evolutionary dynamics over much longer timescales (>25 million years compared with 100,000 years). The future sequencing of additional Y chromosomes will provide a basis for a more comprehensive understanding of the evolution of Y chromosomes and their roles in reproductive biology.

  7. The human Y chromosome: function, evolution and disease.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Murci, L; Krausz, C; McElreavey, K

    2001-05-15

    The human Y chromosome is strictly paternally inherited and, in most of its length, does not recombine during male meiosis. These features make the Y a very useful genetic marker for different purposes. In the last decade, the Y has been increasingly used to investigate the evolution, migrations and range expansions of modern humans. The possibility to construct highly informative Y chromosome haplotypes has also had a significant impact in forensic studies and paternity testing. All these studies assume that the Y chromosome markers used are selectively neutral. However, recent experimental and statistical analyses suggest that both positive and negative selection are acting on the Y chromosome and, consequently, may influence Y chromosome haplotype distribution in the general population. Current data suggest that the effects of selection on patterns of Y chromosome distribution are minimal, however as interest focuses on biological functions of the Y chromosome which have a major impact on male fitness such as fertility, these assumptions may be challenged. This review briefly describes the genes and biological functions of the human Y chromosome and its use in disentangling the origin and history of human populations. An overview of the role of selection acting on the Y chromosome from the perspective of human population histories and disease is given.

  8. Hormone dependency of chromosome aberrations induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene in rat bone marrow cells: site-specific increase by erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, N.; Suglyama, T.; Chattopadhyay, S.C.; Goto-Mimura, K.; Maeda, S.

    1981-08-01

    The frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) 6 hours after iv injection of 50 mg 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA0/kg was studied in bone marrow cells of the noninbred Long-Evans rat under various hematopoietic conditions. The percentage of metaphase cells with CA was enhanced by anemia and suppressed by polycythemia. The low incidence of CA in polycythemic rats was reversed by 6 U of sheep erythropoietin (EP) injected at the time of DMBA treatment. The interchromosomal and intrachromosomal distribution of CA indicated that hematopoietic stimuli, more specifically EP, greatly enhanced DMBA-induced CA in specific chromosomal regions.

  9. Werner's syndrome: a review of recent research with an analysis of connective tissue metabolism, growth control of cultured cells, and chromosomal aberrations.

    PubMed

    Salk, D

    1982-01-01

    Werner's syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive condition with multiple progeroid features, but it is an imitation of aging rather than accelerated or premature senescence. Somatic chromosome aberrations occur in multiple tissues in vivo and in vitro, and there is an increased incidence of neoplasia. Thus. Werner's syndrome can be classified in the group of chromosome instability syndromes. Recent findings provide additional support for the concept that there is an aberration of connective tissue metabolism in Werner's syndrome, but it is unclear whether this is a primary or secondary manifestation of the underlying genetic defect. Abnormal growth characteristics are observed in cultured skin fibroblast-like cells and this provides another avenue for current research. Identification of the basic genetic defect in Werner's syndrome might clarify our understanding of the normal aging process in general, or might elucidate specific aspects such as the development of neoplasia, atherosclerosis, diabetes, or osteoporosis.

  10. Lack of Mutagenicity Potential of Periploca sepium Bge. in Bacterial Reverse Mutation (Ames) Test, Chromosomal Aberration and Micronucleus Test in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Shu; Bang, In-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The root barks of Periploca sepium Bge. (P. sepium) has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for healing wounds and treating rheumatoid arthritis. However, toxicity in high-doses was often diagnosed by the presence of many glycosides. The potential mutagenicity of P. sepium was investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Methods This was examined by the bacterial reverse mutation (Ames) test using Escherichia coli WP2uvrA and Salmonella typhimurium strains, such as TA98, TA100, TA1535, and TA1537. Chromosomal aberrations were investigated using Chinese hamster lung cells, and the micronucleus test using mice. Results P. sepium did not induce mutagenicity in the bacterial test or chromosomal aberrations in Chinese hamster lung cells, although metabolic activation and micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes were seen in the mice bone marrow cells. Conclusions Considering these results, it is suggested that P. sepium does not have mutagenic potential under the conditions examined in each study. PMID:22888473

  11. Micronucleus and chromosome aberrations induced in onion (Allium cepa) by a petroleum refinery effluent and by river water that receives this effluent.

    PubMed

    Hoshina, Márcia M; Marin-Morales, Maria A

    2009-11-01

    In this study, micronucleus (MN) and chromosome aberration (CA) tests in Allium cepa (onion) were carried out in order to make a preliminary characterization of the water quality of the Atibaia River in an area that is under the influence of petroleum refinery and also to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments used by the refinery. For these evaluations, seeds of A. cepa were germinated in waters collected in five different sites related with the refinery in ultra-pure water (negative control) and in methyl methanesulfonate solution (positive control). According to our results, we can suggest that even after the treatments (physicochemical, biological and stabilization pond) the final refinery effluent could induce chromosome aberrations and micronucleus in meristematic cells of A. cepa and that the discharge of the petroleum refinery effluents in the Atibaia River can interfere in the quality of this river. PMID:19647317

  12. Altered pattern of replication of human chromosomes in a human fibroblast-mouse cell hybrid.

    PubMed Central

    Farber, R A; Davidson, R L

    1978-01-01

    The pattern of terminal replication of the human chromosomes in a clone of hybrids between diploid human fibroblasts and mouse cells was analyzed by autoradiography. An average of 10 human chromosomes was present in the hybrid cells. Several of these chromosomes were found to terminate replication in a different order from the same chromosomes in the parental human fibroblasts. Chromosomes 4 and 5 completed replication later in the hybrid than in the fibroblasts (relative to the other human chromosomes). In contrast, chromosomes 7, 12, and 15 completed replication earlier in the hybrid than in the fibroblasts. These results suggest that the sequence of terminal chromosome replication in human fibroblasts is not irreversibly programmed into each chromosome. Images PMID:274734

  13. Regional mapping of loci from human chromosome 2q to sheep chromosome 2q

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, H.A.; Pearce, P.D.; Maher, D.W.; Malcolm, A.A.; Wood, N.J.; Phua, S.H.; Broad, T.E. )

    1994-03-01

    The human chromosome 2q loci, fibronectin 1 (FN1), the [alpha]1 chain of type III collagen (COL3A1), and the [delta] subunit of the muscle acetylcholine receptor (CHRND) have been regionally assigned to sheep chromosome 2q by in situ hybridization. COL3A1 is pericentromeric (2q12-q21), while FN1 and CHRND are in the subterminal region at 2q41-q44 and 2q42-qter, respectively. The mapping of FN1 assigns the sheep synthenic group U11, which contains FN1, villin 1 (VIL1), isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), and [gamma] subunit of the muscle acetylcholine receptor (CHRNG), to sheep chromosome 2q. Inhibin-[alpha] (INHA) is also assigned to sheep chromosome 2q as FN1 and INHA compose sheep linkage group 3. These seven loci are members of a conserved chromosomal segment in human, mouse, and sheep. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Influence of DNA repair gene polymorphisms of hOGG1, XRCC1, XRCC3, ERCC2 and the folate metabolism gene MTHFR on chromosomal aberration frequencies.

    PubMed

    Skjelbred, Camilla Furu; Svendsen, Marit; Haugan, Vera; Eek, Anette Kildal; Clausen, Kjell Oskar; Svendsen, Martin Veel; Hansteen, Inger-Lise

    2006-12-01

    We have studied the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes hOGG1, XRCC1, XRCC3, ERCC2 and the MTHFR gene in the folate metabolism on the frequencies of cells with chromosomal aberrations (CA), chromosome-type aberrations (CSA), chromatid-type aberrations (CTA), chromatid breaks (CTB) and chromatid gaps (CTG) scored in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 651 Norwegian subjects of Caucasian descendant. DNA was extracted from fixed cell suspensions. The log-linear Poisson regression model was used for the combined data which included age, smoking, occupational exposure and genotype for 449 subjects. Our results suggest that individuals carrying the hOGG1 326Cys or the XRCC1 399Gln allele have an increased risk of chromosomal damage, while individuals carrying the XRCC1 194Trp or the ERCC2 751Gln allele have a reduced risk regardless of smoking habits and age. Individuals carrying the XRCC1 280His allele had an increased risk of CSA which was only apparent in non-smokers. This was independent of age. A protective effect of the XRCC3 241Met allele was only found in the older age group in non-smokers for CA, CSA and CTA, and in smokers for CSA. In the youngest age group, the opposite effect was found, with an increased risk for CA, CTA and CTG in smokers. Carrying the MTHFR 222Val allele gave an increased risk for chromosome and chromatid-type aberrations for both non-smokers and smokers, especially for individuals in the older age group, and with variable results in the youngest age group. The variables included in the different regression models accounted, however, for only 4-10% of the variation. The frequency ratio for CTG was significantly higher than for CTA and CTB for only 7 of the 43 comparisons performed. Some of the gap frequencies diverge from the trend in the CA, CSA, CTA and CTB results.

  15. [The effect of mixed cultivation of lymphocytes irradiated at a dose of 1 Gy and non-irradiated lymphocytes on the frequency of chromosomal aberration].

    PubMed

    Kolesnikova, I S

    2012-01-01

    The mutual influence of irradiated (1 Gy) and non-irradiated cells was demonstrated on the model of the mixed culture oflymphocytes from opposite gender donors using chromosome aberrations (ChA) as an endpoint. The number of ChA in non-irradiated lymphocytes in mixed cultures with irradiated ones increased as compared to the corresponding monocultures. At the same time, the number of induced ChA decreased in the irradiated lymphocytes cultivated with non-irradiated ones.

  16. The antigenotoxic activities of cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) cladodes against the mycotoxin zearalenone in Balb/c mice: prevention of micronuclei, chromosome aberrations and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Zorgui, Lazhar; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Ayed, Yosra; Bacha, Hassen; Hassen, Wafa

    2009-03-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a potent estrogenic metabolite. Evidence of its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity has recently emerged from several reports. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) cladodes to protect Balb/c mice against ZEN induced genotoxicity. To this end, the effect of a single dose of ZEN (40 mg/kg b.w.) alone and with extract of cactus cladodes (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg b.w.) was monitored by measuring: (i) micronuclei induction in bone marrow cells, (ii) chromosome aberrations mainly breaks and gaps in bone marrow cells also and finally and (iii) DNA fragmentation in liver and kidney. Our results clearly show that ZEN is genotoxic to Balb/c mice. It induces DNA damage as indicated by DNA fragmentation, micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells. It is of note that cactus cladodes extract assayed alone at high dose (100 mg/kg b.w.) was found completely safe and did not induce any genotoxic effects. The simultaneous administration of cactus cladodes extract with ZEN resulted in an efficient prevention of micronuclei (the number of PCE MN decreased from 71.3+/-6.1 for animals treated with Zen to 32.6+/-15.5 for animals treated with cactus cladodes), chromosomal aberrations frequency (the % of chromosomal aberrations decreased from 38.3+/-3.0 to 18.6+/-1.1) in bone marrow cells and of DNA fragmentation compared to the group treated with ZEN alone. It could be concluded that cactus cladodes extract was effective in the protection against ZEN genotoxicity. This could be relevant, particularly with the emergent demand for natural products which may neutralize the genotoxic effects of the multiple food contaminants.

  17. The antigenotoxic activities of cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) cladodes against the mycotoxin zearalenone in Balb/c mice: prevention of micronuclei, chromosome aberrations and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Zorgui, Lazhar; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Ayed, Yosra; Bacha, Hassen; Hassen, Wafa

    2009-03-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a potent estrogenic metabolite. Evidence of its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity has recently emerged from several reports. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) cladodes to protect Balb/c mice against ZEN induced genotoxicity. To this end, the effect of a single dose of ZEN (40 mg/kg b.w.) alone and with extract of cactus cladodes (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg b.w.) was monitored by measuring: (i) micronuclei induction in bone marrow cells, (ii) chromosome aberrations mainly breaks and gaps in bone marrow cells also and finally and (iii) DNA fragmentation in liver and kidney. Our results clearly show that ZEN is genotoxic to Balb/c mice. It induces DNA damage as indicated by DNA fragmentation, micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells. It is of note that cactus cladodes extract assayed alone at high dose (100 mg/kg b.w.) was found completely safe and did not induce any genotoxic effects. The simultaneous administration of cactus cladodes extract with ZEN resulted in an efficient prevention of micronuclei (the number of PCE MN decreased from 71.3+/-6.1 for animals treated with Zen to 32.6+/-15.5 for animals treated with cactus cladodes), chromosomal aberrations frequency (the % of chromosomal aberrations decreased from 38.3+/-3.0 to 18.6+/-1.1) in bone marrow cells and of DNA fragmentation compared to the group treated with ZEN alone. It could be concluded that cactus cladodes extract was effective in the protection against ZEN genotoxicity. This could be relevant, particularly with the emergent demand for natural products which may neutralize the genotoxic effects of the multiple food contaminants. PMID:19152824

  18. Assignment of the lactotransferrin gene to human chromosome 3 and to mouse chromosome 9.

    PubMed

    Teng, C T; Pentecost, B T; Marshall, A; Solomon, A; Bowman, B H; Lalley, P A; Naylor, S L

    1987-11-01

    Lactotransferrin (LTF), a member of the transferrin family of genes, is the major iron-binding protein in milk and body secretions. The amino acid sequence of LTF consists of two homologous domains homologous to proteins in the transferrin family. Recent isolation of cDNA encoding mouse LTF has expedited the mapping of both mouse and human LTF genes. Southern blot analysis of DNA from mouse-Chinese hamster and human-mouse somatic cell hybrids maps the LTF gene to mouse chromosome 9 and to human chromosome 3, respectively. Furthermore, analysis of cell hybrids containing defined segments of human chromosome 3 demonstrates that the gene is located in the 3q21-qter region. These results suggest that LTF and associated genes of the transferrin family have existed together on the same chromosomal region for 300-500 million years. PMID:3478818

  19. Radiosensitivity of chromosomes in two successive mitotic cycles of human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Luchnik, N.V.; Poryadkova, N.A.

    1988-11-01

    A culture of human lymphocytes was irradiated with /gamma/-quanta in a dose of 0.5 Gy with different ratios of cells in first (M1) and second (M2) mitotic cycle and the frequency of aberrations induced at stage G2 was analyzed. With increase in interval of time between the start of culturing and irradiation, total yield of aberrations increased in a regular way. However, if the M1:M2 ratio is considered, then it turns out that in M2 chromosomes are /approximately/1.5 times more sensitive than in M1: within the limits of each cycle, radiosensitivity is constant and does not depend on its duration. It was established in accordance with data of other authors that 5-bromodeoxyuridine (5-BdU) increases radiosensitivity materially.

  20. Particle trajectories in seeds of Lactuca sativa and chromosome aberrations after exposure to cosmic heavy ions on Cosmos Biosatellites 8 and 9.

    PubMed

    Facius, R; Scherer, K; Reitz, G; Bucker, H; Nevzgodina, L V; Maximova, E N

    1994-10-01

    The potentially specific importance of the heavy ions of the galactic cosmic radiation for radiation protection in manned spaceflight continues to stimulate in situ, i.e., spaceflight experiments to investigate their radiobiological properties. Chromosome aberrations as an expression of a direct assault on the genome are of particular interest in view of cancerogenesis being the primary radiation risk for man in space. In such investigations the establishment of the geometrical correlation between heavy ions' trajectories and the location of radiation sensitive biological substructures is an essential task. The overall qualitative and quantitative precision achieved for the identification of particle trajectories in the order of approximately 10 micrometers as well as the contributing sources of uncertainties are discussed. We describe how this was achieved for seeds of Lactuca sativa as biological test organisms, whose location and orientation had to be derived from contact photographies displaying their outlines and those of the holder plates only. The incidence of chromosome aberrations in cells exposed during the COSMOS 1887 (Biosatellite 8) and the COSMOS 2044 (Biosatellite 9) mission was determined for seeds hit by cosmic heavy ions. In those seeds the incidence of both single and multiple chromosome aberrations was enhanced. The results of the Biosatellite 9 experiment, however, are confounded by spaceflight effects unrelated to the passage of heavy ions.

  1. Particle trajectories in seeds of Lactuca sativa and chromosome aberrations after exposure to cosmic heavy ions on cosmos biosatellites 8 and 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facius, R.; Scherer, K.; Reitz, G.; Bücker, H.; Nevzgodina, L. V.; Maximova, E. N.

    1994-10-01

    The potentially specific importance of the heavy ions of the galactic cosmic radiation for radiation protection in manned spaceflight continues to stimulate in situ, i.e., spaceflight experiments to investigate their radiobiological properties. Chromosome aberrations as an expression of a direct assault on the genome are of particular interest in view of cancerogenesis being the primary radiation risk for man in space. In such investigations the establishment of the geometrical correlation between heavy ions' trajectories and the location of radiation sensitive biological substructures is an essential task. The overall qualitative and quantitative precision achieved for the identification of particle trajectories in the order of 2~10 μm as well as the contributing sources of uncertainties are discussed. We describe how this was achieved for seeds of Lactuca sativa as biological test organisms, whose location and orientation had to be derived from contact photographies displaying their outlines and those of the holder plates only. The incidence of chromosome aberrations in cells exposed during the COSMOS 1887 (Biosatellite 8) and the COSMOS 2044 (Biosatellite 9) mission was determined for seeds hit by cosmic heavy ions. In those seeds the incidence of both single and multiple chromosome aberrations was enhanced. The results of the Biosatellite 9 experiment, however, are confounded by spaceflight effects unrelated to the passage of heavy ions.

  2. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Kido, Tatsuo; Lau, Yun-Fai Chris

    2015-01-01

    Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition) with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT), such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  3. The Biological Effectiveness of Four Energies of Neon Ions for the Induction of Chromosome Damage in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations were measured in human peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro exposure to neon ions at energies of 64, 89, 142, or 267. The corresponding LET values for these energies of neon ranged from 38-103 keV/micrometers and doses delivered were in the 10 to 80 cGy range. Chromosome exchanges were assessed in metaphase and G2 phase cells at first division after exposure using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with whole chromosome probes and dose response curves were generated for different types of chromosomal exchanges. The yields of total chromosome exchanges were similar for the 64, 89, and 142 MeV exposures, whereas the 267 MeV/u neon with LET of 38 keV/micrometers produced about half as many exchanges per unit dose. The induction of complex type chromosome exchanges (exchanges involving three or more breaks and two or more chromosomes) showed a clear LET dependence for all energies. The ratio of simple to complex type exchanges increased with LET from 18 to 51%. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) was estimated from the initial slope of the dose response curve for chromosome damage with respect to gamma-rays. The RBE(sub max) values for total chromosome exchanges for the 64 MeV/u was around 30.

  4. Mechanistic modeling of aberrant energy metabolism in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Sangar, Vineet; Eddy, James A.; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Price, Nathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction in energy metabolism—including in pathways localized to the mitochondria—has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide array of disorders, ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases to type II diabetes. The inherent complexities of energy and mitochondrial metabolism present a significant obstacle in the effort to understand the role that these molecular processes play in the development of disease. To help unravel these complexities, systems biology methods have been applied to develop an array of computational metabolic models, ranging from mitochondria-specific processes to genome-scale cellular networks. These constraint-based (CB) models can efficiently simulate aspects of normal and aberrant metabolism in various genetic and environmental conditions. Development of these models leverages—and also provides a powerful means to integrate and interpret—information from a wide range of sources including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and enzyme kinetics. Here, we review a variety of mechanistic modeling studies that explore metabolic functions, deficiency disorders, and aberrant biochemical pathways in mitochondria and related regions in the cell. PMID:23112774

  5. Hierarchical radial and polar organisation of chromosomes in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Millan, N M; Lau, P; Hann, M; Ioannou, D; Hoffman, D; Barrionuevo, M; Maxson, W; Ory, S; Tempest, H G

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that chromosomes occupy distinct positions within the interphase nuclei, conferring a potential functional implication to the genome. In addition, alterations in the nuclear organisation patterns have been associated with disease phenotypes (e.g. cancer or laminopathies). The human sperm is the smallest cell in the body with specific DNA packaging and the mission of delivering the paternal genome to the oocyte during fertilisation. Studies of nuclear organisation in the sperm have postulated nonrandom chromosome position and have proposed a chromocentre model with the centromeres facing toward the interior and the telomeres toward the periphery of the nucleus. Most studies have assessed the nuclear address in the sperm longitudinally predominantly using centromeric or telomeric probes and to a lesser extent with whole chromosome paints. To date, studies investigating the radial organisation of human sperm have been limited. The purpose of this study was to utilise whole chromosome paints for six clinically important chromosomes (18, 19, 21, 22, X, and Y) to investigate nuclear address by assessing their radial and longitudinal nuclear organisation. A total of 10,800 sperm were analysed in nine normozoospermic individuals. The results have shown nonrandom chromosome position for all chromosomes using both methods of analysis. We present novel radial and polar analysis of chromosome territory localization within the human sperm nucleus. Specifically, a hierarchical organisation was observed radially with chromosomes organised from the interior to the periphery (chromosomes 22, 21, Y, X, 19, and 18 respectively) and polar organisation from the sperm head to tail (chromosomes X, 19, Y, 22, 21, and 18, respectively). We provide evidence of defined nuclear organisation in the human sperm and discuss the function of organisation and potential possible clinical ramifications of these results in regards to male infertility and early human development

  6. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents. PMID:16541075

  7. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents.

  8. Conserved synteny between pig chromosome 8 and human chromosome 4 but rearranged and distorted linkage maps

    SciTech Connect

    Ellegren, H.; Edfors-Lilja, I.; Anderson, L. ); Wintero, A.K. )

    1993-09-01

    The porcine genes encoding interleukin 2, alcohol dehydrogenase (class I) gamma polypeptide, and osteopontin were mapped to chromosome 8 by linkage analysis. Together with previous assignments to this chromosome (the albumin, platelet-derived growth factor receptor A, and fibrinogen genes), an extensive syntenic homology with human chromosome 4 was discovered. Loci from about three-quarters of the q arm of human chromosome 4 are on pig chromosome 8. However, the linear order of the markers is not identical in the two species, and there are several examples of interspecific differences in the recombination fractions between adjacent markers. The conserved synteny between man and the pig gives strong support to a previous suggestion that a synteny group present in the ancestor of mammalian species has been retained on human chromosome 4q. Since loci from this synteny group are found on two cattle chromosomes, the bovine rearrangement must have occurred after the split of Suidae and Bovidae within Artiodactyla. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Biodosimetry of ionizing radiation by selective painting of prematurely condensed chromosomes in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1997-01-01

    Painting of interphase chromosomes can be useful for biodosimetric purposes in particular cases such as radiation therapy, accidental exposure to very high radiation doses and exposure to densely ionizing radiation, for example during space missions. Biodosimetry of charged-particle radiation is analyzed in the present paper. Target cells were human peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro with gamma rays, protons and iron ions. After exposure, lymphocytes were incubated for different times to allow repair of radiation-induced damage and then fused to mitotic hamster cells to promote premature condensation in the interphase chromosomes. Chromosome spreads were then hybridized with whole-chromosome DNA probes labeled with fluorescent stains. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromatin fragments shortly after exposure, as well as the kinetics of rejoining and misrejoining, were not markedly dependent on linear energy transfer. However, after exposure to heavy ions, more aberrations were scored in the interphase cells after incubation for repair than in metaphase samples harvested at the first postirradiation mitosis. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in the two samples after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. These results suggest that interphase chromosome painting can be a useful tool for biodosimetry of particle radiation.

  10. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells: high frequency of deletions and misrejoining detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, Tetsuya; Ito, Hisao; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu; Uno, Takashi; Isobe, Kouichi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells were investigated by analyzing chromosome aberrations in the G(2) and M phases of the cell cycle using a combination of chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome painting probes. Confluent cultures of normal fibroblast cells (AG1522) and fibroblast cells derived from an individual with AT (GM02052) were exposed to gamma rays and allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 h. At doses that resulted in 10% survival, GM02052 cells were approximately five times more sensitive to gamma rays than AG1522 cells. For a given dose, GM02052 cells contained a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. For both cell types, a good correlation was found between the percentage of aberrant cells and cell survival. The average number of color junctions, which represent the frequency of chromosome misrejoining, was also found to correlate well with survival. However, in a similar surviving population of GM02052 and AG1522 cells, induced by 1 Gy and 6 Gy, respectively, AG1522 cells contained four times more color junctions and half as many deletions as GM02052 cells. These results indicate that both repair deficiency and misrepair may be involved in the hyper-radiosensitivity of AT cells.

  11. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  12. Phyllanthus emblica Fruit Extract Activates Spindle Assembly Checkpoint, Prevents Mitotic Aberrations and Genomic Instability in Human Colon Epithelial NCM460 Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xihan; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The fruit of Phyllanthus emblica Linn. (PE) has been widely consumed as a functional food and folk medicine in Southeast Asia due to its remarkable nutritional and pharmacological effects. Previous research showed PE delays mitotic progress and increases genomic instability (GIN) in human colorectal cancer cells. This study aimed to investigate the similar effects of PE by the biomarkers related to spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic aberrations and GIN in human NCM460 normal colon epithelial cells. Cells were treated with PE and harvested differently according to the biomarkers observed. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN), nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) and nuclear bud (NB) in cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay were used as indicators of GIN. Mitotic aberrations were assessed by the biomarkers of chromosome misalignment, multipolar division, chromosome lagging and chromatin bridge. SAC activity was determined by anaphase-to- metaphase ratio (AMR) and the expression of core SAC gene budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles related 1 (BubR1). Compared with the control, PE-treated cells showed (1) decreased incidences of MN, NPB and NB (p < 0.01); (2) decreased frequencies of all mitotic aberration biomarkers (p < 0.01); and (3) decreased AMR (p < 0.01) and increased BubR1 expression (p < 0.001). The results revealed PE has the potential to protect human normal colon epithelial cells from mitotic and genomic damages partially by enhancing the function of SAC. PMID:27598149

  13. Chaetophractus villosus as a sentinel organism: Baseline values of mitotic index, chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Luis Francisco; Luaces, Juan Pablo; Browne, Melanie; Chirino, Mónica Gabriela; Merani, María Susana; Mudry, Marta Dolores

    2016-01-15

    Sentinel species are useful tools for studying the deleterious effects of xenobiotics on wildlife. The large hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus villosus) is the most abundant and widely distributed mammal in Argentina. It is a long-lived, omnivorous, burrowing species, with fairly restricted home ranges. To evaluate the level of spontaneous genetic damage in this mammal, we determined the baseline values of several genotoxicity biomarkers. The study included 20 C. villosus adults of both sexes from eight pristine localities within its geographic distribution range. Genotoxicity analysis was performed on 72-h lymphocyte cultures, using mitomycin C as positive control. We obtained the baseline values of mitotic index (MI=10.52±0.30 metaphases/total cells, n=20), chromosome aberrations (CA=0.13±0.22, n=20), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE)=6.55±0.26, n=6) and replication index (RI=1.66, n=6). MI and CA did not show significant differences (P>0.05) among localities or between sexes. No significant differences in MI, CA, SCE, and RI (P>0.05) were found between values from the pristine localities and historical data. There were significant differences in CA, SCE, and RI (P<0.05) between lymphocyte cultures from pristine localities and those exposed to mitomycin C. We propose the large hairy armadillo as a sentinel organism for environmental biomonitoring of genotoxic chemicals due to its abundance, easy manipulation, well-known biology, the fact that it is usually exposed to different mixtures and concentrations of environmental contaminants, and the baseline values of genetic damage characterized by MI, CA, SCE and RI as biomarkers. PMID:26778508

  14. Evaluation of chromosome aberration and micronucleus frequencies in blood lymphocytes of workers exposed to low concentrations of benzene.

    PubMed

    Lovreglio, Piero; Maffei, Francesca; Carrieri, Mariella; D'Errico, Maria N; Drago, Ignazio; Hrelia, Patrizia; Bartolucci, Giovanni B; Soleo, Leonardo

    2014-08-01

    The frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronuclei (MN) was investigated in the peripheral lymphocytes of workers occupationally exposed to low or very low concentrations of benzene. The study included 43 exposed workers (all males), namely 19 fuel-tanker drivers and 24 filling-station attendants, and 31 male subjects with no occupational exposure to the toxicant (controls). Benzene exposure was verified by means of environmental monitoring with passive personal samplers (Radiello(®)), and through biological monitoring, i.e. by measurement of urinary trans,trans-muconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid and benzene. The frequency of CA and MN in peripheral lymphocytes was determined according to standard procedures. Exposure to benzene was found to be significantly higher for fuel-tanker drivers (median 246.6 μg/m(3)) than for filling-station attendants (median 19.9 μg/m(3)). Both groups had significantly higher exposure than controls (median 4.3 μg/m(3)). No increased frequency of CA and MN was observed in either fuel-tanker drivers or filling-station attendants compared with controls. In all subjects examined as a single group, the frequency of MN was significantly dependent on age. Only in the fuel-tanker drivers was the frequency of MN found to depend not only on age, but also on exposure to benzene. In conclusion, the frequency of MN, but not of CA, could be influenced by exposure to benzene concentrations of up to one order of magnitude lower than the threshold limit value (time-weighted average).

  15. Chaetophractus villosus as a sentinel organism: Baseline values of mitotic index, chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Luis Francisco; Luaces, Juan Pablo; Browne, Melanie; Chirino, Mónica Gabriela; Merani, María Susana; Mudry, Marta Dolores

    2016-01-15

    Sentinel species are useful tools for studying the deleterious effects of xenobiotics on wildlife. The large hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus villosus) is the most abundant and widely distributed mammal in Argentina. It is a long-lived, omnivorous, burrowing species, with fairly restricted home ranges. To evaluate the level of spontaneous genetic damage in this mammal, we determined the baseline values of several genotoxicity biomarkers. The study included 20 C. villosus adults of both sexes from eight pristine localities within its geographic distribution range. Genotoxicity analysis was performed on 72-h lymphocyte cultures, using mitomycin C as positive control. We obtained the baseline values of mitotic index (MI=10.52±0.30 metaphases/total cells, n=20), chromosome aberrations (CA=0.13±0.22, n=20), sister chromatid exchanges (SCE)=6.55±0.26, n=6) and replication index (RI=1.66, n=6). MI and CA did not show significant differences (P>0.05) among localities or between sexes. No significant differences in MI, CA, SCE, and RI (P>0.05) were found between values from the pristine localities and historical data. There were significant differences in CA, SCE, and RI (P<0.05) between lymphocyte cultures from pristine localities and those exposed to mitomycin C. We propose the large hairy armadillo as a sentinel organism for environmental biomonitoring of genotoxic chemicals due to its abundance, easy manipulation, well-known biology, the fact that it is usually exposed to different mixtures and concentrations of environmental contaminants, and the baseline values of genetic damage characterized by MI, CA, SCE and RI as biomarkers.

  16. Deficit of mitonuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2015-02-01

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, display underrepresentations of mitonuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions over the generality of the role of sexual conflict in shaping the distribution of mt-N genes. Here we tested whether mt-N genes moved off of the therian X chromosome following sex chromosome formation, consistent with the role of sexual conflict, or whether the paucity of mt-N genes on the therian X is a chance result of an underrepresentation on the ancestral regions that formed the X chromosome. We used a synteny-based approach to identify the ancestral regions in the platypus and chicken genomes that later formed the therian X chromosome. We then quantified the movement of mt-N genes on and off of the X chromosome and the distribution of mt-N genes on the human X and ancestral X regions. We failed to find an excess of mt-N gene movement off of the X. The bias of mt-N genes on ancestral therian X chromosomes was also not significantly different from the biases on the human X. Together our results suggest that, rather than conflict driving mt-N genes off of the mammalian X, random biases on chromosomes that formed the X chromosome could explain the paucity of mt-N genes in the therian lineage.

  17. Deficit of mitonuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation.

    PubMed

    Dean, Rebecca; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2015-02-01

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, display underrepresentations of mitonuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions over the generality of the role of sexual conflict in shaping the distribution of mt-N genes. Here we tested whether mt-N genes moved off of the therian X chromosome following sex chromosome formation, consistent with the role of sexual conflict, or whether the paucity of mt-N genes on the therian X is a chance result of an underrepresentation on the ancestral regions that formed the X chromosome. We used a synteny-based approach to identify the ancestral regions in the platypus and chicken genomes that later formed the therian X chromosome. We then quantified the movement of mt-N genes on and off of the X chromosome and the distribution of mt-N genes on the human X and ancestral X regions. We failed to find an excess of mt-N gene movement off of the X. The bias of mt-N genes on ancestral therian X chromosomes was also not significantly different from the biases on the human X. Together our results suggest that, rather than conflict driving mt-N genes off of the mammalian X, random biases on chromosomes that formed the X chromosome could explain the paucity of mt-N genes in the therian lineage. PMID:25637223

  18. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    This project aimed to divide chromosome 16 into approximately 50 intervals of {approximately}2Mb in size by constructing a series of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids each containing a rearranged chromosome 16. Using these hybrids, DNA probes would be regionally mapped by Southern blot or PCR analysis. Preference would be given to mapping probes which demonstrated polymorphisms for which the CEPH panel of families had been typed. This would allow a correlation of the physical and linkage maps of this chromosome. The aims have been substantially achieved. 49 somatic cell hybrids have been constructed which have allowed definition of 46, and potentially 57, different physical intervals on the chromosome. 164 loci have been fully mapped into these intervals. A correlation of the physical and genetic maps of the chromosome is in an advanced stage of preparation. The somatic cell hybrids constructed have been widely distributed to groups working on chromosome 16 and other genome projects.

  19. Dissecting the role of aberrant DNA methylation in human leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Amabile, Giovanni; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Müller, Fabian; Welner, Robert S; Yang, Henry; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Zhang, Hong; Levantini, Elena; Qi, Lihua; Martinelli, Giovanni; Brummelkamp, Thijn; Le Beau, Michelle M; Figueroa, Maria E; Bock, Christoph; Tenen, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the genetic translocation t(9;22)(q34;q11.2) encoding for the BCR-ABL fusion oncogene. However, many molecular mechanisms of the disease progression still remain poorly understood. A growing body of evidence suggests that epigenetic abnormalities are involved in tyrosine kinase resistance in CML, leading to leukemic clone escape and disease propagation. Here we show that, by applying cellular reprogramming to primary CML cells, aberrant DNA methylation contributes to the disease evolution. Importantly, using a BCR-ABL inducible murine model, we demonstrate that a single oncogenic lesion triggers DNA methylation changes which in turn act as a precipitating event in leukemia progression. PMID:25997600

  20. Human chromosomes 6 and 21 are required for sensitivity to human interferon. gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, V.; Rashidbaigi, A.; Jones, C.; Tischfield, J.A.; Shows, T.B.; Pestka, S.

    1987-06-01

    The human interferon ..gamma.. receptor has previously been assigned to chromosome 6. Chromosome 6 also encodes HLA, the human class I major histocompatibility antigens. However, the presence of chromosome 6 in hamster-human hybrids is by itself insufficient to confer sensitivity to human immune interferon as measured by the induction of human HLA. Human chromosome 21 was found to be the second chromosome essential for HLA inducibility. Similar results were found with mouse-human somatic cell hybrids. Thus, at least two steps are involved in the action of human interferon ..gamma..: the binding of interferon ..gamma.. to its receptor coded by chromosome 6 and the linkage of this binding event through a factor coded by chromosome 21 to trigger biological action. Both of these steps are species-specific.

  1. Adaptive Optics Analysis of Visual Benefit with Higher-order Aberrations Correction of Human Eye - Poster Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lixia; Dai, Yun; Rao, Xuejun; Wang, Cheng; Hu, Yiyun; Liu, Qian; Jiang, Wenhan

    2008-01-01

    Higher-order aberrations correction can improve visual performance of human eye to some extent. To evaluate how much visual benefit can be obtained with higher-order aberrations correction we developed an adaptive optics vision simulator (AOVS). Dynamic real time optimized modal compensation was used to implement various customized higher-order ocular aberrations correction strategies. The experimental results indicate that higher-order aberrations correction can improve visual performance of human eye comparing with only lower-order aberration correction but the improvement degree and higher-order aberration correction strategy are different from each individual. Some subjects can acquire great visual benefit when higher-order aberrations were corrected but some subjects acquire little visual benefit even though all higher-order aberrations were corrected. Therefore, relative to general lower-order aberrations correction strategy, customized higher-order aberrations correction strategy is needed to obtain optimal visual improvement for each individual. AOVS provides an effective tool for higher-order ocular aberrations optometry for customized ocular aberrations correction.

  2. Number and size of human X chromosome fragments transferred to mouse cells by chromosome-mediated gene transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.S.; McBride, O.W.; Moore, D.E.

    1981-05-01

    Labeled probes of unique-sequence human X chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid, prepared by two different procedures, were used to measure the amount of human X chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid in 12 mouse cell lines expressing human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase after chromosome-mediated gene transfer. The amount of X chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid detected by this procedure ranged from undetectable levels in the three stable transformants and some unstable transformants examined to about 20% of the human X chromosome in two unstable transformants. Reassociation kinetics of the X chromosomal probe with deoxyribonucleic acid from the two unstable transformants containing 15 to 20% of the human X chromosome indicate that a single copy of these sequences is present. In one of these lines, the X chromosomal sequences exist as multiple fragments which were not concordantly segregated when the cells were selected for loss of hprt.

  3. Sex chromosome evolution: platypus gene mapping suggests that part of the human X chromosome was originally autosomal.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J M; Spencer, J A; Riggs, A D; Graves, J A

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the evolution of the mammalian sex chromosomes, we have compared the gene content of the X chromosomes in the mammalian groups most distantly related to man (marsupials and monotremes). Previous work established that genes on the long arm of the human X chromosome are conserved on the X chromosomes in all mammals, revealing that this region was part of an ancient mammalian X chromosome. However, we now report that several genes located on the short arm of the human X chromosome are absent from the platypus X chromosome, as well as from the marsupial X chromosome. Because monotremes and marsupials diverged independently from eutherian mammals, this finding implies that the whole human X short arm region is a relatively recent addition to the X chromosome in eutherian mammals. Images PMID:1763040

  4. The transfer of human artificial chromosomes via cryopreserved microcells.

    PubMed

    Uno, Narumi; Uno, Katsuhiro; Zatti, Susi; Ueda, Kana; Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Katoh, Motonobu; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2013-10-01

    Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) technology enables a single and intact mammalian chromosome or megabase-sized chromosome fragments to be transferred from donor to recipient cells. The conventional MMCT method is performed immediately after the purification of microcells. The timing of the isolation of microcells and the preparation of recipient cells is very important. Thus, ready-made microcells can improve and simplify the process of MMCT. Here, we established a cryopreservation method to store microcells at -80 °C, and compared these cells with conventionally- (immediately-) prepared cells with respect to the efficiency of MMCT and the stability of a human artificial chromosome (HAC) transferred to human HT1080 cells. The HAC transfer in microcell hybrids was confirmed by FISH analysis. There was no significant difference between the two methods regarding chromosome transfer efficiency and the retention rate of HAC. Thus, cryopreservation of ready-to-use microcells provides an improved and simplified protocol for MMCT.

  5. Epigenetic Pattern on the Human Y Chromosome Is Evolutionarily Conserved

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hao; Agbagwa, Ikechukwu O.; Wang, Ling-Xiang; Wang, Yingzhi; Yan, Shi; Ren, Shancheng; Sun, Yinghao; Pei, Gang; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jiang; Jin, Li; Li, Hui; Sun, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role for mammalian development. However, it is unclear whether the DNA methylation pattern is evolutionarily conserved. The Y chromosome serves as a powerful tool for the study of human evolution because it is transferred between males. In this study, based on deep-rooted pedigrees and the latest Y chromosome phylogenetic tree, we performed epigenetic pattern analysis of the Y chromosome from 72 donors. By comparing their respective DNA methylation level, we found that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was stable among family members and haplogroups. Interestingly, two haplogroup-specific methylation sites were found, which were both genotype-dependent. Moreover, the African and Asian samples also had similar DNA methylation pattern with a remote divergence time. Our findings indicated that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was conservative during human male history. PMID:26760298

  6. Epigenetic Pattern on the Human Y Chromosome Is Evolutionarily Conserved.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Agbagwa, Ikechukwu O; Wang, Ling-Xiang; Wang, Yingzhi; Yan, Shi; Ren, Shancheng; Sun, Yinghao; Pei, Gang; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jiang; Jin, Li; Li, Hui; Sun, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role for mammalian development. However, it is unclear whether the DNA methylation pattern is evolutionarily conserved. The Y chromosome serves as a powerful tool for the study of human evolution because it is transferred between males. In this study, based on deep-rooted pedigrees and the latest Y chromosome phylogenetic tree, we performed epigenetic pattern analysis of the Y chromosome from 72 donors. By comparing their respective DNA methylation level, we found that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was stable among family members and haplogroups. Interestingly, two haplogroup-specific methylation sites were found, which were both genotype-dependent. Moreover, the African and Asian samples also had similar DNA methylation pattern with a remote divergence time. Our findings indicated that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was conservative during human male history. PMID:26760298

  7. Epigenetic Pattern on the Human Y Chromosome Is Evolutionarily Conserved.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Agbagwa, Ikechukwu O; Wang, Ling-Xiang; Wang, Yingzhi; Yan, Shi; Ren, Shancheng; Sun, Yinghao; Pei, Gang; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jiang; Jin, Li; Li, Hui; Sun, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role for mammalian development. However, it is unclear whether the DNA methylation pattern is evolutionarily conserved. The Y chromosome serves as a powerful tool for the study of human evolution because it is transferred between males. In this study, based on deep-rooted pedigrees and the latest Y chromosome phylogenetic tree, we performed epigenetic pattern analysis of the Y chromosome from 72 donors. By comparing their respective DNA methylation level, we found that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was stable among family members and haplogroups. Interestingly, two haplogroup-specific methylation sites were found, which were both genotype-dependent. Moreover, the African and Asian samples also had similar DNA methylation pattern with a remote divergence time. Our findings indicated that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was conservative during human male history.

  8. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A.; Seldin, M.F.

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Chromosomal duplications in bacteria, fruit flies, and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lupski, J.R.; Weinstock, G.M.; Roth, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Tandem duplication of chromosomal segments has been recognized as a frequent mutational mechanism in several genetic model systems. In bacteria, fruit flies, and humans, duplications form by similar molecular mechanisms and appear to be important in genome evolution. 80 refs.

  10. Analysis of unrejoined chromosomal breakage in human fibroblast cells exposed to low- and high-LET radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu; Furusawa, Yoshiya; George, Kerry; Kawata, Tetsuya; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    Reported studies of DNA breakage induced by radiation of various qualities have generally shown a higher fraction of unrejoined residual breaks after high-LET exposure. This observation is supported by the argument that high-LET radiation induced DNA breaks that are more complex in nature and, thus, less likely to be repaired. In most cases the doses used in these studies were very high. We have studied unrejoined chromosome breaks by analyzing chromosome aberrations using a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with a combination of whole chromosome specific probes and probes specific for the telomere region of the chromosomes. Confluent human fibroblast cells (AG1522) were irradiated with gamma rays, 490 MeV/nucleon Si, or with Fe ions at either 200 and 500 MeV/nucleon, and were allowed to repair at 37 degrees C for 24 hours after exposure. A chemically induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to condense chromosomes in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Results showed that the frequency of unrejoined chromosome breaks was higher after high-LET radiation, and the ratio of unrejoined to misrejoined chromosome breaks increased steadily with LET up a peak value at 440 keV/microm.

  11. Association of epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification with loss of chromosome 10 in human glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    von Deimling, A; Louis, D N; von Ammon, K; Petersen, I; Hoell, T; Chung, R Y; Martuza, R L; Schoenfeld, D A; Yaşargil, M G; Wiestler, O D

    1992-08-01

    Although the loss of tumor suppressor genes and the activation of oncogenes have been established as two of the fundamental mechanisms of tumorigenesis in human cancer, little is known about the possible interactions between these two mechanisms. Loss of genetic material on chromosome 10 and amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are the most frequently reported genetic abnormalities in glioblastoma multiforme. In order to examine a possible correlation between these two genetic aberrations, the authors studied 106 gliomas (58 glioblastomas, 14 anaplastic astrocytomas, five astrocytomas, nine pilocytic astrocytomas, seven mixed gliomas, six oligodendrogliomas, two ependymomas, one subependymoma, one subependymal giant-cell astrocytoma, and three gangliogliomas) with Southern blot analysis for loss of heterozygosity on both arms of chromosome 10 and for amplification of the EGFR gene. Both the loss of genetic material on chromosome 10 and EGFR gene amplification were restricted to the glioblastomas. Of the 58 glioblastoma patients, 72% showed loss of chromosome 10 and 38% showed EGFR gene amplification. The remaining 28% had neither loss of chromosome 10 nor EGFR gene amplification. Without exception, the glioblastomas that exhibited EGFR gene amplification had also lost genetic material on chromosome 10 (p less than 0.001). This invariable association suggests a relationship between the two genetic events. Moreover, the presence of 15 cases of glioblastoma with loss of chromosome 10 but without EGFR gene amplification may further imply that the loss of a tumor suppressor gene (or genes) on chromosome 10 precedes EGFR gene amplification in glioblastoma tumorigenesis.

  12. Chromosome Conformation of Human Fibroblasts Grown in 3-Dimensional Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiming; Comment, Nicholas; Chen, Jie; Ronquist, Scott; Hero, Alfred; Ried, Thomas; Rajapakse, Indika

    2015-01-01

    In the study of interphase chromosome organization, genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) maps are often generated using 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. These 2D cells have morphological deviations from cells that exist in 3-dimensional (3D) tissues in vivo, and may not maintain the same chromosome conformation. We used Hi-C maps to test the extent of differences in chromosome conformation between human fibroblasts grown in 2D cultures and those grown in 3D spheroids. Significant differences in chromosome conformation were found between 2D cells and those grown in spheroids. Intra-chromosomal interactions were generally increased in spheroid cells, with a few exceptions, while inter-chromosomal interactions were generally decreased. Overall, chromosomes located closer to the nuclear periphery had increased intra-chromosomal contacts in spheroid cells, while those located more centrally had decreased interactions. This study highlights the necessity to conduct studies on the topography of the interphase nucleus under conditions that mimic an in vivo environment. PMID:25738643

  13. The third international workshop of human chromosome 5. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Third International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 was held in Laguna Beach, California, March 5-8, 1994. The pace at which new mapping information has been published in the last year make almost any report outdated before publication. Much of the information in this report and the most recent data from the Human chromosome 5 Genome Center at U.C. Irvine on the physical map of chromosome 5 are accessible via a WWW server. For most loci referred to in this report that can be detected by Polymerase Chain Reaction, the sequences of the oligonucleotide primers are available and some primer sequences are provided in this report.

  14. Choice of model and uncertainties of the gamma-ray and neutron dosimetry in relation to the chromosome aberrations data in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Rühm, W; Walsh, L; Chomentowski, M

    2003-07-01

    Chromosome data pertaining to blood samples from 1,703 survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bombs, were utilized and different models for chromosome aberration dose response investigated. Models applied included those linear or linear-quadratic in equivalent dose. Models in which neutron and gamma doses were treated separately (LQ-L model) were also used, which included either the use of a low-dose limiting value for the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons of R(0)=70+/-10 or an RBE value of R(1)=15+/-5 at 1 Gy. The use of R(1) incorporates the assumption that it is much better known than R(0), with much less associated uncertainty. In addition, error-reducing transformations were included which were found to result in a 50% reduction of the standard error associated with one of the model fit parameters which is associated with the proportion of cells with at least one aberration, at 1 Gy gamma dose. Several justifiable modifications to the DS86 doses according to recent nuclear retrospective dosimetry measurements were also investigated. Gamma-dose modifications were based on published thermoluminescence measurements of quartz samples from Hiroshima and on a tentative reduction for Nagasaki factory worker candidates by a factor of 0.6. Neutron doses in Hiroshima were modified to become consistent with recent fast neutron activation data based on copper samples. The applied dose modifications result in an increase in non-linearity of the dose-response curve for Hiroshima, and a corresponding decrease in that for Nagasaki, an effect found to be most pronounced for the LQ-L models investigated. As a result the difference in the dose-response curves observed for both cities based on DS86 doses, is somewhat reduced but cannot be entirely explained by the dose modifications applied. The extent to which the neutrons contribute to chromosome aberration induction in Hiroshima depends significantly on the model used. The LQ-L model including an R(1

  15. Chromosomal translocation engineering to recapitulate primary events of human cancer.

    PubMed

    Forster, A; Pannell, R; Drynan, L; Cano, F; Chan, N; Codrington, R; Daser, A; Lobato, N; Metzler, M; Nam, C-H; Rodriguez, S; Tanaka, T; Rabbitts, T

    2005-01-01

    Mouse models of human cancers are important for understanding determinants of overt disease and for "preclinical" development of rational therapeutic strategies; for instance, based on macrodrugs. Chromosomal translocations underlie many human leukemias, sarcomas, and epithelial tumors. We have developed three technologies based on homologous recombination in mouse ES cells to mimic human chromosome translocations. The first, called the knockin method, allows creation of fusion genes like those typical of translocations of human leukemias and sarcomas. Two new conditional chromosomal translocation mimics have been developed. The first is a method for generating reciprocal chromosomal translocations de novo using Cre-loxP recombination (translocator mice). In some cases, there is incompatible gene orientation and the translocator model cannot be applied. We have developed a different model (invertor mice) for these situations. This method consists of introducing an inverted cDNA cassette into the intron of a target gene and bringing the cassette into the correct transcriptional orientation by Cre-loxP recombination. We describe experiments using the translocator model to generate MLL-mediated neoplasias and the invertor method to generate EWS-ERG-mediated cancer. These methods mimic the situation found in human chromosome translocations and provide the framework for design and study of human chromosomal translocations in mice.

  16. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for radiation molecular cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Repin, Mikhail V; Golubev, Pavel I; Repina, Ludmila A

    2009-01-01

    Background The objective of this work is to obtain the correct relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes for the use at FISH analysis of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Results The relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the male and female human diploid genomes have been calculated from the publicly available international Human Genome Project data. New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of human chromosomes were compared with the data recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2001. The differences in the values of the relative DNA contents of chromosomes obtained by using different approaches for 15 human chromosomes, mainly for large chromosomes, were below 2%. For the chromosomes 13, 17, 20 and 22 the differences were above 5%. Conclusion New sequence-based data on the relative DNA contents of chromosomes in the normal male and female human diploid genomes were obtained. This approach, based on the genome sequence, can be recommended for the use in radiation molecular cytogenetics. PMID:19500331

  17. Fourth international workshop on human chromosome 5. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Fourth International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 was held in Manchester, UK on November 9--10, 1996 and was hosted by the University of Manchester. The major goals of the workshop were: (1) to collate the various genetic, cytogenetic and physical maps of human chromosome 5; (2) to integrate these maps and identify/correct discrepancies between them wherever possible; (3) to catalogue the sequence-ready contigs of the chromosome; (4) to co-ordinate the various sequencing efforts to avoid future duplication; (5) to establish the first (to the author`s knowledge) web site for the human chromosome 5 community which contains the above information in a readily accessible form.

  18. Chromosomal assignment of the gene encoding the human 58-kDa inhibitor (PRKRI) of the interferon-induced dsRNA-activated protein kinase to chromosome 13q32

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, M.J.; Katze, M.G.; Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.

    1996-01-15

    The 58-kDa inhibitor (p58) of the interferon-induced dsRNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a cellular protein recruited by the influenza virus to down-regulate the activity of PKR during virus infection. The inhibitor also appears to play a role in the regulation of cellular gene expression in the absence of viral infection and has oncogenic properties when overexpressed. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the p58 gene (PRKRI) to human chromosome 13 band q32. Aberrations in the structure or number of chromosome 13 have been identified in a variety of human cancers, particularly in acute leukemia. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Characterization of putative human homologues of the yeast chromosome transmission fidelity gene, CHL1.

    PubMed

    Amann, J; Kidd, V J; Lahti, J M

    1997-02-01

    Helicases are components of numerous protein complexes, including those regulating transcription, translation, DNA replication and repair, splicing, and mitotic chromosome transmission. Helicases unwind double-stranded DNA and RNA homo- and hetero-duplexes. The yeast CHL1 helicase has been linked to maintenance of the high fidelity of chromosome transmission during mitosis. Mutations in this gene result in a 200-fold increase in the rate of aberrant chromosome segregation with a concomitant delay in the cell cycle at G2-M, suggesting that CHL1 is required for the maintenance of proper chromosome transmission. Two highly related human cDNA clones encoding proteins which are homologous to the yeast CHL1 gene product have been isolated. Here we show that these two distinct human CHL1-related mRNAs and proteins (hCHLR1 and hCHLR2) are expressed only in proliferating human cell lines. Quiescent normal human fibroblasts stimulated to re-enter the cell cycle by addition of serum begin to express the CHL1-related proteins as the cells enter S phase, concomitant with the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Furthermore, expression of the CHL1-related mRNAs is lost when human K562 cells cease to proliferate and terminally differentiate in response to phorbol ester treatments. Human hCHLR expression is not extinguished during hemin-induced differentiation of the same cell line, which produces erythrocyte-like cells that continue to proliferate. These experiments are consistent with the requirement of this putative helicase during either S or G2-M phase but not G1. In vitro transcribed and translated hCHLR1 protein binds to both single- and double-stranded DNA, supporting the possibility that these proteins are DNA helicases. Finally, affinity-purified hCHLR1 antisera was used to demonstrate the localization of the hCHLR proteins to the nucleolus by indirect immunofluorescence as well as by cell fractionation.

  20. Abnormal chromosome behavior in human oocytes which remained unfertilized during human in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, H; Krüger, C; Stauber, M; Vogel, R

    1985-09-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities and abnormal embryonic development have previously been observed after human in vitro fertilization (IVF). Chromosomal abnormalities may arise not only after fertilization but even earlier during meiotic maturation of human oocytes in culture. Since chromosomal analysis is simple in oocytes during meiotic maturation, the chromosomal status was analyzed in oocytes which remained unfertilized in a human in vitro fertilization program. In 50 fertilization attempts the chromosomes of 62 unfertilized oocytes could be analyzed; 45 of them were in the process of meiotic maturation. In three oocytes two small polar bodies were observed 16-18 hr after insemination in the absence of fertilization. In one oocyte abnormal chromosome behavior was found during the first meiotic division, and in four oocytes during metaphase of the second meiotic division. These data suggest that chromosomal analysis of unfertilized oocytes in human IVF may improve the understanding human oocyte maturation and fertilization.

  1. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Fernando L; Poznik, G David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-04-01

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes-including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447-806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7-2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups.

  2. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Fernando L; Poznik, G David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-04-01

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes-including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447-806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7-2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups. PMID:27058445

  3. The fibulin-1 gene (FBLN1) is located on human chromosome 22 and on mouse chromosome 15

    SciTech Connect

    Mattei, M.G.; Pan, T.C.; Zhang, R.Z.

    1994-07-15

    Fibulin-1 is a calcium-binding glycoprotein present in the extracellular matrix and in the serum. The gene coding for fibulin-1 (FBLN1) was located by in situ hybridization of {sup 3}H-labeled cDNA probes to human and mouse metaphase chromosomes. The gene was assigned to the q13.2-q13.3 region of human chromosome 22 and to the E-F band of mouse chromosome 15. The finding extends the evolutionary conservation between human chromosome 22 and mouse chromosome 15. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  4. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Mark T.; Grafham, Darren V.; Coffey, Alison J.; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R.; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P.; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L.; Howe, Kevin L.; Ashurst, Jennifer L.; Fulton, Robert S.; Sudbrak, Ralf; Wen, Gaiping; Jones, Matthew C.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Andrews, T. Daniel; Scott, Carol E.; Searle, Stephen; Ramser, Juliane; Whittaker, Adam; Deadman, Rebecca; Carter, Nigel P.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Gunaratne, Preethi; Havlak, Paul; Hodgson, Anne; Metzker, Michael L.; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Ainscough, Rachael; Ambrose, Kerrie D.; Ansari-Lari, M. Ali; Aradhya, Swaroop; Ashwell, Robert I. S.; Babbage, Anne K.; Bagguley, Claire L.; Ballabio, Andrea; Banerjee, Ruby; Barker, Gary E.; Barlow, Karen F.; Barrett, Ian P.; Bates, Karen N.; Beare, David M.; Beasley, Helen; Beasley, Oliver; Beck, Alfred; Bethel, Graeme; Blechschmidt, Karin; Brady, Nicola; Bray-Allen, Sarah; Bridgeman, Anne M.; Brown, Andrew J.; Brown, Mary J.; Bonnin, David; Bruford, Elspeth A.; Buhay, Christian; Burch, Paula; Burford, Deborah; Burgess, Joanne; Burrill, Wayne; Burton, John; Bye, Jackie M.; Carder, Carol; Carrel, Laura; Chako, Joseph; Chapman, Joanne C.; Chavez, Dean; Chen, Ellson; Chen, Guan; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Zhijian; Chinault, Craig; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Clark, Sue Y.; Clarke, Graham; Clee, Chris M.; Clegg, Sheila; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin; Clifford, Karen; Cobley, Vicky; Cole, Charlotte G.; Conquer, Jen S.; Corby, Nicole; Connor, Richard E.; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Davis, Clay; Davis, John; Delgado, Oliver; DeShazo, Denise; Dhami, Pawandeep; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen; Dodsworth, Steve; Draper, Heather; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Dunham, Andrew; Dunn, Matthew; Durbin, K. James; Dutta, Ireena; Eades, Tamsin; Ellwood, Matthew; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra; Errington, Helen; Evans, Kathryn L.; Faulkner, Louisa; Francis, Fiona; Frankland, John; Fraser, Audrey E.; Galgoczy, Petra; Gilbert, James; Gill, Rachel; Glöckner, Gernot; Gregory, Simon G.; Gribble, Susan; Griffiths, Coline; Grocock, Russell; Gu, Yanghong; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hamilton, Cerissa; Hart, Elizabeth A.; Hawes, Alicia; Heath, Paul D.; Heitmann, Katja; Hennig, Steffen; Hernandez, Judith; Hinzmann, Bernd; Ho, Sarah; Hoffs, Michael; Howden, Phillip J.; Huckle, Elizabeth J.; Hume, Jennifer; Hunt, Paul J.; Hunt, Adrienne R.; Isherwood, Judith; Jacob, Leni; Johnson, David; Jones, Sally; de Jong, Pieter J.; Joseph, Shirin S.; Keenan, Stephen; Kelly, Susan; Kershaw, Joanne K.; Khan, Ziad; Kioschis, Petra; Klages, Sven; Knights, Andrew J.; Kosiura, Anna; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Laird, Gavin K.; Langford, Cordelia; Lawlor, Stephanie; Leversha, Margaret; Lewis, Lora; Liu, Wen; Lloyd, Christine; Lloyd, David M.; Loulseged, Hermela; Loveland, Jane E.; Lovell, Jamieson D.; Lozado, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Lyne, Rachael; Ma, Jie; Maheshwari, Manjula; Matthews, Lucy H.; McDowall, Jennifer; McLaren, Stuart; McMurray, Amanda; Meidl, Patrick; Meitinger, Thomas; Milne, Sarah; Miner, George; Mistry, Shailesh L.; Morgan, Margaret; Morris, Sidney; Müller, Ines; Mullikin, James C.; Nguyen, Ngoc; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Nyakatura, Gerald; O’Dell, Christopher N.; Okwuonu, Geoffery; Palmer, Sophie; Pandian, Richard; Parker, David; Parrish, Julia; Pasternak, Shiran; Patel, Dina; Pearce, Alex V.; Pearson, Danita M.; Pelan, Sarah E.; Perez, Lesette; Porter, Keith M.; Ramsey, Yvonne; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rhodes, Susan; Ridler, Kerry A.; Schlessinger, David; Schueler, Mary G.; Sehra, Harminder K.; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Shen, Hua; Sheridan, Elizabeth M.; Shownkeen, Ratna; Skuce, Carl D.; Smith, Michelle L.; Sotheran, Elizabeth C.; Steingruber, Helen E.; Steward, Charles A.; Storey, Roy; Swann, R. Mark; Swarbreck, David; Tabor, Paul E.; Taudien, Stefan; Taylor, Tineace; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Karen; Thorpe, Andrea; Timms, Kirsten; Tracey, Alan; Trevanion, Steve; Tromans, Anthony C.; d’Urso, Michele; Verduzco, Daniel; Villasana, Donna; Waldron, Lenee; Wall, Melanie; Wang, Qiaoyan; Warren, James; Warry, Georgina L.; Wei, Xuehong; West, Anthony; Whitehead, Siobhan L.; Whiteley, Mathew N.; Wilkinson, Jane E.; Willey, David L.; Williams, Gabrielle; Williams, Leanne; Williamson, Angela; Williamson, Helen; Wilming, Laurens; Woodmansey, Rebecca L.; Wray, Paul W.; Yen, Jennifer; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Zoghbi, Huda; Zorilla, Sara; Buck, David; Reinhardt, Richard; Poustka, Annemarie; Rosenthal, André; Lehrach, Hans; Meindl, Alfons; Minx, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence. PMID:15772651

  5. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mark T; Grafham, Darren V; Coffey, Alison J; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L; Howe, Kevin L; Ashurst, Jennifer L; Fulton, Robert S; Sudbrak, Ralf; Wen, Gaiping; Jones, Matthew C; Hurles, Matthew E; Andrews, T Daniel; Scott, Carol E; Searle, Stephen; Ramser, Juliane; Whittaker, Adam; Deadman, Rebecca; Carter, Nigel P; Hunt, Sarah E; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Gunaratne, Preethi; Havlak, Paul; Hodgson, Anne; Metzker, Michael L; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Ainscough, Rachael; Ambrose, Kerrie D; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Aradhya, Swaroop; Ashwell, Robert I S; Babbage, Anne K; Bagguley, Claire L; Ballabio, Andrea; Banerjee, Ruby; Barker, Gary E; Barlow, Karen F; Barrett, Ian P; Bates, Karen N; Beare, David M; Beasley, Helen; Beasley, Oliver; Beck, Alfred; Bethel, Graeme; Blechschmidt, Karin; Brady, Nicola; Bray-Allen, Sarah; Bridgeman, Anne M; Brown, Andrew J; Brown, Mary J; Bonnin, David; Bruford, Elspeth A; Buhay, Christian; Burch, Paula; Burford, Deborah; Burgess, Joanne; Burrill, Wayne; Burton, John; Bye, Jackie M; Carder, Carol; Carrel, Laura; Chako, Joseph; Chapman, Joanne C; Chavez, Dean; Chen, Ellson; Chen, Guan; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Zhijian; Chinault, Craig; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Clark, Sue Y; Clarke, Graham; Clee, Chris M; Clegg, Sheila; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin; Clifford, Karen; Cobley, Vicky; Cole, Charlotte G; Conquer, Jen S; Corby, Nicole; Connor, Richard E; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Davis, Clay; Davis, John; Delgado, Oliver; Deshazo, Denise; Dhami, Pawandeep; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen; Dodsworth, Steve; Draper, Heather; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Dunham, Andrew; Dunn, Matthew; Durbin, K James; Dutta, Ireena; Eades, Tamsin; Ellwood, Matthew; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra; Errington, Helen; Evans, Kathryn L; Faulkner, Louisa; Francis, Fiona; Frankland, John; Fraser, Audrey E; Galgoczy, Petra; Gilbert, James; Gill, Rachel; Glöckner, Gernot; Gregory, Simon G; Gribble, Susan; Griffiths, Coline; Grocock, Russell; Gu, Yanghong; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hamilton, Cerissa; Hart, Elizabeth A; Hawes, Alicia; Heath, Paul D; Heitmann, Katja; Hennig, Steffen; Hernandez, Judith; Hinzmann, Bernd; Ho, Sarah; Hoffs, Michael; Howden, Phillip J; Huckle, Elizabeth J; Hume, Jennifer; Hunt, Paul J; Hunt, Adrienne R; Isherwood, Judith; Jacob, Leni; Johnson, David; Jones, Sally; de Jong, Pieter J; Joseph, Shirin S; Keenan, Stephen; Kelly, Susan; Kershaw, Joanne K; Khan, Ziad; Kioschis, Petra; Klages, Sven; Knights, Andrew J; Kosiura, Anna; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Laird, Gavin K; Langford, Cordelia; Lawlor, Stephanie; Leversha, Margaret; Lewis, Lora; Liu, Wen; Lloyd, Christine; Lloyd, David M; Loulseged, Hermela; Loveland, Jane E; Lovell, Jamieson D; Lozado, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Lyne, Rachael; Ma, Jie; Maheshwari, Manjula; Matthews, Lucy H; McDowall, Jennifer; McLaren, Stuart; McMurray, Amanda; Meidl, Patrick; Meitinger, Thomas; Milne, Sarah; Miner, George; Mistry, Shailesh L; Morgan, Margaret; Morris, Sidney; Müller, Ines; Mullikin, James C; Nguyen, Ngoc; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Nyakatura, Gerald; O'Dell, Christopher N; Okwuonu, Geoffery; Palmer, Sophie; Pandian, Richard; Parker, David; Parrish, Julia; Pasternak, Shiran; Patel, Dina; Pearce, Alex V; Pearson, Danita M; Pelan, Sarah E; Perez, Lesette; Porter, Keith M; Ramsey, Yvonne; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rhodes, Susan; Ridler, Kerry A; Schlessinger, David; Schueler, Mary G; Sehra, Harminder K; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Shen, Hua; Sheridan, Elizabeth M; Shownkeen, Ratna; Skuce, Carl D; Smith, Michelle L; Sotheran, Elizabeth C; Steingruber, Helen E; Steward, Charles A; Storey, Roy; Swann, R Mark; Swarbreck, David; Tabor, Paul E; Taudien, Stefan; Taylor, Tineace; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Karen; Thorpe, Andrea; Timms, Kirsten; Tracey, Alan; Trevanion, Steve; Tromans, Anthony C; d'Urso, Michele; Verduzco, Daniel; Villasana, Donna; Waldron, Lenee; Wall, Melanie; Wang, Qiaoyan; Warren, James; Warry, Georgina L; Wei, Xuehong; West, Anthony; Whitehead, Siobhan L; Whiteley, Mathew N; Wilkinson, Jane E; Willey, David L; Williams, Gabrielle; Williams, Leanne; Williamson, Angela; Williamson, Helen; Wilming, Laurens; Woodmansey, Rebecca L; Wray, Paul W; Yen, Jennifer; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Zoghbi, Huda; Zorilla, Sara; Buck, David; Reinhardt, Richard; Poustka, Annemarie; Rosenthal, André; Lehrach, Hans; Meindl, Alfons; Minx, Patrick J; Hillier, Ladeana W; Willard, Huntington F; Wilson, Richard K; Waterston, Robert H; Rice, Catherine M; Vaudin, Mark; Coulson, Alan; Nelson, David L; Weinstock, George; Sulston, John E; Durbin, Richard; Hubbard, Tim; Gibbs, Richard A; Beck, Stephan; Rogers, Jane; Bentley, David R

    2005-03-17

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence.

  6. Rearrangements in human chromosome 1 visualized by arm-specific probes in the progeny of blood lymphocytes exposed to iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manti, L.; Bertucci, A.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Scampoli, P.; Durante, M.

    It is well known that heavy ions are more effective than sparsely ionizing radiation in the induction of chromosomal aberrations in heavy ions However most of the complex rearrangements induced by densely ionizing radiation ultimately lead to cell death For risk assessment it is more important to measure the residual cytotgenetic damage in cells surviving the exposure and able to proliferate This analyses will be strongly influenced by the technique used to visualize the chromosomes and consequently on the aberrations scored For instance symmetrical exchanges have higher transmission probability than asymmetrical exchanges Multi-fuor FISH including mBAND mFISH or RxFISH allows the detection of many different aberrations with high resolution but it is slow and expensive thus affecting the statistical power of the study In this study we hybridized metaphase cells with human DNA probes specific for the p and q arms of the chromosome 1 The arm-specific probes allow a fast and reliable detection of both symmetrical and asymmetrical inter-chromosomal exchanges and inter-arm intra-changes in the painted chromosome pair We used this method to score aberrations in human lymphocytes exposed to 1 Gy of either 250 kVp X-rays or 1 GeV n Fe-ions LET 145 keV mu m and harvested following 120 h in culture including 2 h in colcemid for metaphase-block Although iron ions are much more effective than X-rays in the induction of chromosomal aberrations formed during the first post-exposure cell-cycle we found that the effectiveness drops when

  7. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  8. The human chromosome. Electron microscopic observations on chromatin fiber organization.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, J G; Moore, D E

    1969-04-01

    Human lymphocytes were grown in short-term tissue culture and were arrested in metaphase with Colcemid. Their chromosomes were prepared by the Langmuir trough-critical point drying technique and were examined under the electron microscope. In addition, some chromosomes were digested with trypsin, Pronase, or DNase. The chromosomes consist entirely of tightly packed, 240 +/- 50-A chromatin fibers. Trypsin and Pronase treatments induce relaxation of fiber packing and reveal certain underlying fiber arrangements. Furthermore, trypsin treatment demonstrates that the chromatin fiber has a 25-50 A trypsin-resistant core surrounded by a trypsin-sensitive sheath. DNase digestion suggests that this core contains DNA.

  9. Chromosome studies in human subjects chronically exposed to arsenic in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Vig, B.K.; Figueroa, M.L.; Cornforth, M.N.; Jenkins, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    A two-year study was carried out on human subjects of various ages and backgrounds who had been drinking water containing more than 0.05 mg/liter (0.05 ppm) arsenic for a period of at least five years. The main aim was to correlate the frequency of chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in the lymphocytes with the amount of arsenic in the water. In addition, the incidence of skin cancer, fetal wastage, and genetic or developmental abnormalities were explored. Several other variables--eg, coffee, wine, and cigarette consumption; sex; residence (rural vs urban); and exposure to chemicals, smelters, or pesticides--were also taken into consideration. The data on chromosome aberrations (104 exposed and 86 control individuals) and on sister chromatid exchanges (98 exposed and 83 control individuals) did not show that arsenic at concentrations (greater than 0.05 mg/liter) has any effect on these parameters. Similarly, no other health effects of arsenic at these concentrations were found.

  10. Gene order is conserved within the human chromosome 21 linkage group on mouse chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, N.G.; Cabin, D.E.; Swanson, D.A.; Reeves, R.H. )

    1994-05-01

    One hundred progeny from each of two intersubspecific mouse backcrosses were used to construct a comparative genetic map of a region of mouse chromosome 10 (MMU10) that is homologous to the distal tip of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (HSA21). The analysis included five genes and three simple sequence repeat markers, two of which flanked the HSA21-homologous cluster on either side. Analysis of 200 backcross progeny detected at least one crossover between each pair of adjacent genes and demonstrated that the proximal to distal orientation of the cluster was reversed between human and mouse. The order was determined to be Fyn-1-D10Mit20-S100b-Col6a1-Itgb2-Pfk1/D10Mit7-D10Mit11. Comparative mapping supports the order of corresponding markers on HSA21 determined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and radiation hybrid line data. However, sequence tagged site content mapping of human yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) yielded conflicting data on the relative positions of human COL6A1 and S100B on HSA21. This discrepancy was resolved here by demonstrating that several key YACs used in the human contig analysis were mistyped for S100B. The murine map reported here provides a scaffold for construction of physical maps and yeast artificial chromosome contigs that will be useful in the development of mouse models for the study of Down syndrome. 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The pronatriodilatin gene is located on the distal short arm of human chromosome 1 and on mouse chromosome 4.

    PubMed

    Yang-Feng, T L; Floyd-Smith, G; Nemer, M; Drouin, J; Francke, U

    1985-11-01

    Atrial natriuretic factors (ANF) are polypeptides having natriuretic, diuretic, and smooth muscle-relaxing activities that are synthesized from a single larger precursor: pronatriodilatin. Chromosomal assignment of the gene coding for human pronatriodilatin was accomplished by in situ hybridization of a [3H]-labeled pronatriodilatin probe to human chromosome preparations and by Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrid DNAs with normal and rearranged chromosomes 1. The human pronatriodilatin gene was mapped to the distal short arm of chromosome 1, in band 1p36. Southern blot analysis of mouse X Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids was used to assign the mouse pronatriodilatin gene to chromosome 4. This assignment adds another locus to the conserved syntenic group of homologous genes located on the distal half of the short arm of human chromosome 1 and on mouse chromosome 4.

  12. Syntenic conservation between humans and cattle. I. Human chromosome 9.

    PubMed

    Threadgill, D W; Womack, J E

    1990-09-01

    Bovine X hamster hybrid somatic cells have been used to investigate the syntenic relationship of nine loci in the bovine that have homologous loci on human chromosome 9. Six loci, ALDH1, ALDOB, C5, GGTB2, GSN, and ITIL, were assigned to the previously identified bovine syntenic group U18 represented by ACO1, whereas the other three loci, ABL, ASS, and GRP78, mapped to a new, previously unidentified autosomal syntenic group. Additionally, a secondary locus, ABLL, which cross-hybridized with the ABL probe, was mapped to bovine syntenic group U1 with the HSA 1 loci PGD and ENO1. The results predict that ACO1 will map proximal to ALDH1; GRP78 distal to ITIL and C5; GSN proximal to AK1, ABL, and ASS on HSA 9; GRP78 to MMU 2; and ITIL and GSN to MMU 4. PMID:2081596

  13. Ribosomal protein gene mapping and human chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmochi, N.; Goodman, N.; Page, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    In Drosophila, the Minute phenotype (reduced body size, diminished viability and fertility, and short, thin bristles) results from heterozygous deficiencies (deletions) at any one of 50 loci scattered about the genome. A handful of these Minute loci have been molecularly characterized, and all have been found to encode ribosomal proteins. Thus, the Minute phenotype appears to result from reduced protein synthetic capacity in flies with one rather than two copies of a given ribosomal protein (rp) gene. We are pursuing the possibility that similar reductions in protein synthetic capacity--again resulting from rp gene deficiencies--might underlie phenotypes associated with certain chromosomal disorders in humans. We and our colleagues have reported findings consistent with a role for RPS4 deficiency in the etiology of certain features of Turner syndrome, a complex human disorder classically associated with an XO karyotype. We are intrigued by the possibility that deficiencies of other human rp genes might cause phenotypic abnormalities similar to those seen in Turner syndrome--just as deficiencies of any of a number of Drosophila rp genes cause the Minute phenotype. We must first learn the chromosomal map position of each of the estimated 83 human rp genes. The task of mapping the functional (intron-containing) rp genes is complicated by the existence of processed pseudogenes elsewhere in the genome. To date, we have assigned (or confirmed the previous assignment of) 38 rp genes to individual human chromosomes by PCR analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids containing subsets of human chromosomes, with all but four chromosomes carrying at least one rp gene. We have also identified more than 100 large-insert human YAC (yeast artificial chromosome) clones that contain individual rp genes. Such screening of YAC libraries will result in precise positioning of the rp genes on the emerging physical map of the human genome.

  14. Physical mapping of human chromosome 16. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1993-08-01

    We aim to isolate cDNAs mapping to human chromosome 16 and localise such cDNAs on the high resolution physical map. In collaboration with LANL, PCR primers will be synthesised from cDNA sequences mapped to chromosome 16 and used as ESTs in the generation of mega-YAC contigs for this chromosome. Probing of high density cosmid grids will enable integration of the ESTs into cosmid contigs and location of the cosmid contigs on the YAC contig. A hn-cDNA library has been constructed from the hybrid CY18 which contains chromosome 16 as the only human chromosome. A modified screening protocol has been successfully developed and 15 hn-cDNA clones have been sequenced and localised on the hybrid map. Sequence analysis of four of these revealed that they were known cDNAs, which are now mapped to chromosome 16. Development of techniques to allow the isolation of longer cDNAs from the identified exons is in progress. This will depend on PCR amplification of cDNAs from a total human CDNA library.

  15. The