Science.gov

Sample records for human cytokine synthesis

  1. Leptin enhances survival and induces migration, degranulation, and cytokine synthesis of human basophils.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Maho; Nagase, Hiroyuki; Ogahara, Ikuko; Han, Kaiyu; Tashimo, Hiroyuki; Shibui, Akiko; Koketsu, Rikiya; Nakae, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Masao; Ohta, Ken

    2011-05-01

    Basophils are the rarest leukocytes in human blood, but they are now recognized as one of the most important immunomodulatory as well as effector cells in allergic inflammation. Leptin, a member of the IL-6 cytokine family, has metabolic effects as an adipokine, and it is also known to participate in the pathogenesis of inflammatory reactions. Because there is an epidemiologic relationship between obesity and allergy, we examined whether basophil functions are modified by leptin. We found that human basophils express leptin receptor (LepR) at both the mRNA and surface protein levels, which were upregulated by IL-33. Leptin exerted strong effects on multiple basophil functions. It induced a strong migratory response in human basophils, similar in potency to that of basophil-active chemokines. Also, leptin enhanced survival of human basophils, although its potency was less than that of IL-3. Additionally, CD63, a basophil activation marker expressed on the cell surface, was upregulated by leptin, an effect that was neutralized by blocking of LepR. Assessments of basophil degranulation and cytokine synthesis found that leptin showed a strong priming effect on human basophil degranulation in response to FcεRI aggregation and induced Th2, but not Th1, cytokine production by the cells. In summary, the present findings indicate that leptin may be a key molecule mediating the effects of adipocytes on inflammatory cells such as basophils by binding to LepR and activating the cellular functions, presumably exacerbating allergic inflammation.

  2. Calcium dependent and independent cytokine synthesis by air pollution particle-exposed human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Noriho; Hayashi, Shizu; Gosselink, John; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Mukae, Hiroshi; Hogg, James C.; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2007-12-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution particles with a diameter of < 10 {mu}m (PM{sub 10}) has been associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. We have shown that human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) exposed to PM{sub 10} produce pro-inflammatory mediators that contribute to a local and systemic inflammatory response. Changes in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) have been demonstrated to regulate several functions of the airway epithelium including the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. The aim of the present study was to determine the nature and mechanism of calcium responses induced by PM{sub 10} in HBECs and its relationship to cytokine synthesis. Methods: Primary HBECs were exposed to urban air pollution particles (EHC-93) and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} responses were measured using the fluoroprobe (Fura-2). Cytokine levels were measured at mRNA and protein levels using real-time PCR and ELISA. Results: PM{sub 10} increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in a dose-dependent manner. This calcium response was reduced by blocking the influx of calcium into cells (i.e. calcium-free medium, NiCl{sub 2}, LaCl{sub 3}). PM{sub 10} also decreased the activity of calcium pumps. PM{sub 10} increased the production of IL-1{beta}, IL-8, GM-CSF and LIF. Preincubation with intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA-AM) attenuated IL-1{beta} and IL-8 production, but not GM-CSF and LIF production. Conclusion: We conclude that exposure to PM{sub 10} induces an increase in cytosolic calcium and cytokine production in bronchial epithelial cells. Our results also suggest that PM{sub 10} induces the production of pro-inflammatory mediators via either intracellular calcium-dependent (IL-1{beta}, IL-8) or -independent (GM-CSF, LIF) pathways.

  3. An Autocrine Cytokine/JAK/STAT-Signaling Induces Kynurenine Synthesis in Multidrug Resistant Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Campia, Ivana; Buondonno, Ilaria; Castella, Barbara; Rolando, Barbara; Kopecka, Joanna; Gazzano, Elena; Ghigo, Dario; Riganti, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Background Multidrug resistant cancer cells are hard to eradicate for the inefficacy of conventional anticancer drugs. Besides escaping the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy, they also bypass the pro-immunogenic effects induced by anticancer drugs: indeed they are not well recognized by host dendritic cells and do not elicit a durable anti-tumor immunity. It has not yet been investigated whether multidrug resistant cells have a different ability to induce immunosuppression than chemosensitive ones. We addressed this issue in human and murine chemosensitive and multidrug resistant cancer cells. Results We found that the activity and expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1), which catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan into the immunosuppressive metabolite kynurenine, was higher in all the multidrug resistant cells analyzed and that IDO1 inhibition reduced the growth of drug-resistant tumors in immunocompetent animals. In chemoresistant cells the basal activity of JAK1/STAT1 and JAK1/STAT3 signaling was higher, the STAT3 inhibitor PIAS3 was down-regulated, and the autocrine production of STAT3-target and IDO1-inducers cytokines IL-6, IL-4, IL-1β, IL-13, TNF-α and CD40L, was increased. The disruption of the JAK/STAT signaling lowered the IDO1 activity and reversed the kynurenine-induced pro-immunosuppressive effects, as revealed by the restored proliferation of T-lymphocytes in STAT-silenced chemoresistant cells. Conclusions Our work shows that multidrug resistant cells have a stronger immunosuppressive attitude than chemosensitive cells, due to the constitutive activation of the JAK/STAT/IDO1 axis, thus resulting chemo- and immune-evasive. Disrupting this axis may significantly improve the efficacy of chemo-immunotherapy protocols against resistant tumors. PMID:25955018

  4. Isolation and expression of human cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor cDNA clones: Homology to Epstein-Barr virus open reading frame BCRFI

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, P.; De Waal-Malefyt, R.; Dang, M.N.; Johnson, K.E.; Kastelein, R.; Fiorentino, D.F.; DeVries, J.E.; Roncarolo, M.G.; Mosmann, T.R.; Moore, K.W. )

    1991-02-15

    The authors demonstrated the existence of human cytokine synthesis inhibitory factor (DSIF) (interleukin 10 (IL-10)). cDNA clones encoding human IL-10 (hIL-10) were isolated from a tetanus toxin-specific human T-cell clone. Like mouse IL-10, hIL-10 exhibits strong DNA and amino acid sequence homology to an open reading frame in the Epstein-Barr virus, BDRFL. hIL-10 and the BCRFI product inhibit cytokine synthesis by activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and by a mouse Th1 clone. Both hIL-10 and mouse IL-10 sustain the viability of a mouse mast cell line in culture, but BCRFI lacks comparable activity in this way, suggesting that BCRFI may have conserved only a subset of hIL-10 activities.

  5. Cytokines in human lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martinet, Y; Menard, O; Vaillant, P; Vignaud, J M; Martinet, N

    1996-01-01

    Fibrosis is a pathological process characterized by the replacement of normal tissue by mesenchymal cells and the extracellular matrix produced by these cells. The sequence of events leading to fibrosis of an organ involves the subsequent processes of injury with inflammation and disruption of the normal tissue architecture, followed by tissue repair with accumulation of mesenchymal cells in the area of derangement. The same sequence of events occurs in wound healing with normal granulation tissue and scar formation, but, while normal scar formation is very localized and transient, in contrast, in fibrosis, the repair process is exaggerated and usually widespread and can be chronic. Inflammatory cells (mainly mononuclear phagocytes), platelets, endothelial cells, and type II pneumocytes play a direct and indirect role in tissue injury and repair. The evaluation of three human fibrotic lung diseases, two diffuse [idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)], and one focal (tumor stroma in lung cancer), has shown that several cytokines participate to the local injury and inflammatory reaction [interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)], while other cytokines are involved in tissue repair and fibrosis [platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)]. A better understanding of the cytokines and cytokine networks involved in lung fibrosis leads to the possibility of new therapeutic approaches.

  6. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to further explore the effects of space flight on cytokines and cytokine-directed immunological function.

  7. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to explore further the effects of space flight on cyotokines and cytokine-directed immunological function. Among the tests carried out are interferon-alpha production, interferon-gamma production, interleukin-1 and -2 production, signal transduction in neutrophils, signal transduction in monocytes, and monocyte phagocytic activity. The experiments will be performed using peripheral blood obtained from human subjects. It is our intent to eventually carry out these experiments using astronauts as subjects to determine the effects of space flight on cytokine production and activity. However, these subjects are not currently available. Until they become available, we will carry out these experiments using subjects maintained in the bed-rest model for microgravity.

  8. Cytokine-mediated PGE2 expression in human colonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, E C; Zhu, Y; Andersen, V; Sciaky, D; Cao, H J; Meekins, H; Smith, T J; Lance, P

    1998-10-01

    We investigated prostanoid biogenesis in human colonic fibroblasts (CCD-18Co and 5 primary fibroblast cultures) and epithelial cell lines (NCM460, T84, HT-29, and LS 174T) and the effect of PGE2 on fibroblast morphology. Cytokine-stimulated PGE2 production was measured. PGH synthase-1 and -2 (PGHS-1 and -2) protein and mRNA expression were evaluated. Basal PGE2 levels were low in all cell types (0.15-6.47 ng/mg protein). Treatment for 24 h with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta; 10 ng/ml) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (50 ng/ml), respectively, elicited maximal 25- and 6-fold inductions of PGE2 synthesis in CCD-18Co cultures and similar results in primary fibroblast cultures; maximal inductions with IL-1beta in colonic epithelial cell lines were from zero to fivefold. Treatment of CCD-18Co fibroblasts with IL-1beta caused maximal 21- and 53-fold increases, respectively, in PGHS-2 protein and mRNA levels without altering PGHS-1 expression. PGE2 (0.1 micromol/l) elicited a dramatic shape change in selected fibroblasts. Colonic fibroblasts are potentially important as cytokine targets and a source of and target for colonic prostanoids in vivo.

  9. Temporal trends in the inflammatory cytokine profile of human breastmilk.

    PubMed

    Chollet-Hinton, Lynn S; Stuebe, Alison M; Casbas-Hernandez, Patricia; Chetwynd, Ellen; Troester, Melissa A

    2014-12-01

    A longer lifetime duration of breastfeeding may decrease the risk of breast cancer by reducing breast inflammation and mitigating inflammatory cytokine expression during postlactational involution. However, little is known about how the inflammatory cytokine profile in human breastmilk changes over time. To study temporal trends in breastmilk cytokine expression, we measured 80 human cytokines in the whey fraction of breastmilk samples from 15 mothers at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks postpartum. We used mixed models to identify temporal changes in cytokine expression and investigated parity status (multiparous vs. primiparous) as a potential confounder. Nine cytokines (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, epithelial-derived neutrophil-activating protein-78, hepatocyte growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1, interleukin-16, interleukin-8, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, osteoprotegerin, and tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidase-2) had significantly decreased expression with increasing breastfeeding duration; all nine have known roles in breast involution, inflammation, and cancer and may serve as biomarkers of changing breast microenvironment. No cytokine significantly increased in level over the study period. Total protein concentration significantly decreased over time (p<0.0001), which may mediate the association between length of breastfeeding and inflammatory cytokine expression. Parity status did not confound temporal trends, but levels of several cytokines were significantly higher among multiparous versus primiparous women. Our results suggest that inflammatory cytokine expression during lactation is dynamic, and expressed milk may provide a noninvasive window into the extensive biological changes that occur in the postpartum breast.

  10. AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER DECREASED IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACHROPHAGE CYTOKINE RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) is associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and morbidity, including increased hospitalizations for lung infection. Normal lung immune responses to bacterial infection include alveolar macrophage cytokine production and...

  11. Liver X receptor is a key regulator of cytokine release in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Myhre, Anders E; Agren, Joanna; Dahle, Maria K; Tamburstuen, Margareth V; Lyngstadaas, Ståle P; Collins, A Jon L; Foster, Simon J; Thiemermann, Christoph; Aasen, Ansgar O; Wang, Jacob E

    2008-04-01

    Aberrant regulation of innate immune responses and uncontrolled cytokine bursts are hallmarks of sepsis and endotoxemia. Activation of the nuclear liver X receptor (LXR) was recently demonstrated to suppress inflammatory genes. Our aim was to investigate the expression of LXR in human monocytes under normal and endotoxemic conditions and to study the influence of LXR activation on endotoxin-induced cytokine synthesis and release. Adherent human monocytes or whole blood were pretreated with a synthetic LXR agonist (3-{3-[(2-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-benzyl)-(2,2-diphenyl-ethyl)-amino]-propoxy}-phenyl)-acetic acid) and subsequently challenged with LPS (from Escherichia coli) or peptidoglycan (from Staphylococcus aureus). Cytokine release was assessed by a Multiplex antibody bead kit, and cytokine mRNA levels were measured by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We found that LXRalpha mRNA was up-regulated in CD14+ monocytes in LPS-challenged blood, whereas LXRbeta mRNA was not altered. Addition of 3-{3-[(2-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-benzyl)-(2,2-diphenyl-ethyl)-amino]-propoxy}-phenyl)-acetic acid to monocytes suppressed the LPS-induced release of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, TMF-alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in a concentration-dependent manner. Surprisingly, an accompanying decrease in cytokine mRNA accumulation was not observed. The suppressed cytokine release could not be explained by a diminished transport of mRNA out of the nucleus or a decreased secretion of cytokines. We propose that LXR is a key regulator of cytokine release in LPS-challenged human monocytes, possibly by interfering with translational events.

  12. Regulation of Human Helper T Cell Subset Differentiation by Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Th1 and Th2 cells in the late 80’s, the family of effector CD4+ helper T (Th) cell subsets has expanded. The differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells is largely determined when they interact with dendritic cells in lymphoid organs, and cytokines play a major role in the regulation of Th differentiation in the early stages. Recent studies show that the developmental mechanism of certain Th subsets is not fully shared between mice and humans. Here we will review recent discoveries on the roles of cytokines in the regulation of Th differentiation in humans, and discuss the differences between mice and humans in the developmental mechanisms of several Th subsets, including Th17 cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. We propose that the differentiation of human Th subsets is largely regulated by the three cytokines, IL-12, IL-23, and TGF-β. PMID:25879814

  13. The Vitronectin Receptor and its Associated CD47 Molecule Mediates Proinflammatory Cytokine Synthesis in Human Monocytes by Interaction with Soluble CD23

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, P.; Armant, M.; Brown, E.; Rubio, M.; Ishihara, H.; Ulrich, D.; Caspary, R.G.; Lindberg, F.P.; Armitage, R.; Maliszewski, C.; Delespesse, G.; Sarfati, M.

    1999-01-01

    The vitronectin receptor, αvβ3 integrin, plays an important role in tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis, and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. CD47, a member of the multispan transmembrane receptor family, physically and functionally associates with vitronectin receptor (VnR). Although vitronectin (Vn) is not a ligand of CD47, anti-CD47 and β3 mAbs suppress Vn, but not fibronectin (Fn) binding and function. Here, we show that anti-CD47, anti-β3 mAb and Vn, but not Fn, inhibit sCD23-mediated proinflammatory function (TNF-α, IL-12, and IFN-γ release). Surprisingly, anti-CD47 and β3 mAbs do not block sCD23 binding to αv+β3+ T cell lines, whereas Vn and an αv mAb (clone AMF7) do inhibit sCD23 binding, suggesting the VnR complex may be a functional receptor for sCD23. sCD23 directly binds αv+β3+/CD47− cell lines, but coexpression of CD47 increases binding. Moreover, sCD23 binds purified αv protein and a single human αv chain CHO transfectant. We conclude that the VnR and its associated CD47 molecule may function as a novel receptor for sCD23 to mediate its proinflammatory activity and, as such, may be involved in the inflammatory process of the immune response. PMID:10037797

  14. Analysis of inflammatory cytokines in human blood, breath ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A change in the expression of cytokines in human biological media indicates an inflammatory response to external stressors and reflects an early step along the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for various health endpoints. To characterize and interpret this inflammatory response, methodology was developed for measuring a suite of 10 different cytokines in human blood, exhaled breath condensate (EBC), and urine using an electrochemiluminescent multiplex Th1/Th2 cytokine immunoassay platform. Measurement distributions and correlations for eight interleukins (IL) (1β, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 12p70 and 13), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were evaluated using 90 blood plasma, 77 EBC, and 400 urine samples collected from nominally healthy adults subjects in North Carolina in 2008-2012. The in vivo results show that there is sufficient sensitivity for characterizing all 10 cytokines at levels of 0.05-0.10 ρg/ml with a dynamic range up to 100 ng/ml across all three of these biological media. The measured in vivo results also show that the duplicate analysis of blood, EBC and urine samples have average estimated fold ranges of 2.21, 3.49, and 2.50, respectively, which are similar to the mean estimated fold range (2.88) for the lowest concentration (0.610ρg/ml) from a series of spiked control samples; the cytokine method can be used for all three biological media. Nine out of the 10 cytokines measured in EBC were highly correlated within one a

  15. Human malarial disease: a consequence of inflammatory cytokine release

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ian A; Budd, Alison C; Alleva, Lisa M; Cowden, William B

    2006-01-01

    Malaria causes an acute systemic human disease that bears many similarities, both clinically and mechanistically, to those caused by bacteria, rickettsia, and viruses. Over the past few decades, a literature has emerged that argues for most of the pathology seen in all of these infectious diseases being explained by activation of the inflammatory system, with the balance between the pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines being tipped towards the onset of systemic inflammation. Although not often expressed in energy terms, there is, when reduced to biochemical essentials, wide agreement that infection with falciparum malaria is often fatal because mitochondria are unable to generate enough ATP to maintain normal cellular function. Most, however, would contend that this largely occurs because sequestered parasitized red cells prevent sufficient oxygen getting to where it is needed. This review considers the evidence that an equally or more important way ATP deficency arises in malaria, as well as these other infectious diseases, is an inability of mitochondria, through the effects of inflammatory cytokines on their function, to utilise available oxygen. This activity of these cytokines, plus their capacity to control the pathways through which oxygen supply to mitochondria are restricted (particularly through directing sequestration and driving anaemia), combine to make falciparum malaria primarily an inflammatory cytokine-driven disease. PMID:17029647

  16. The role of cytokines in human lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, P; Menard, O; Vignaud, J M; Martinet, N; Martinet, Y

    1996-04-01

    Fibrosis is a disorder characterized by a qualitative and quantitative alteration of the deposition of extracellular matrix with accumulation of mesenchymal cells in replacement of normal tissue. The sequence of events leading to fibrosis of an organ involves the subsequent processes of injury with inflammation and disruption of the normal tissue architecture, followed by tissue repair with accumulation of mesenchymal cells in this area. A similar sequence of events occurs in wound healing with formation of normal, limited and transient granulation tissue, while in fibrosis, a maladaptive repair leads to an extensive, exaggerated process with functional impairment. Inflammatory cells (mainly mononuclear phagocytes), platelets, endothelial cells, and type II pneumocytes play a direct and indirect role in tissue injury and repair. The evaluation of several human fibrotic lung diseases, five diffuse (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF); adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS); coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP); Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS); systemic sclerosis (SS)) and two focal (tumour stroma in lung cancer; and obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) after lung transplantation), has shown that several cytokines participate in the local injury and inflammatory reaction (interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)), while other cytokines are involved in tissue repair and fibrosis (platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and basic-fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF)). A better understanding of the cytokines and cytokine networks involved in lung fibrosis leads to the possibility of new therapeutic approaches.

  17. Cytosolic dsDNA triggers apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in normal human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suiquan; Liu, Dongyin; Ning, Weixuan; Xu, Aie

    2015-04-01

    Considerable evidence implicates that viral infection might be a participant factor in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. However, it is still unclear how viral infection leads to the melanocyte destruction. To elucidate the effects of viral dsDNA on the viability and cytokine synthesis of normal human melanocytes and to explore the underlying mechanisms, primary cultured normal human melanocytes were transfected with poly(dA:dT). The results demonstrated that poly(dA:dT) triggered apoptosis instead of pyroptosis in melanocytes. Knocking down AIM2 or RIG-I by RNA interference partially reduced the poly(dA:dT)-induced LDH release, suggesting the involvement of both nucleic acid sensors in the process of melanocyte death. Poly(dA:dT) induced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes including IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 as well, whereas the pro-inflammatory cytokine production was suppressed by RIG-I siRNA, but not by AIM2 siRNA. Poly(dA:dT) treatment increased the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and NFκB. Accordingly, NFκB inhibitor Bay 11-7082 and JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked the induction of the cytokine genes except IFN-β. The production of IL6 and IL8 was also suppressed by p38 inhibitor SB203580. On the contrary, the Poly(dA:dT)-induced melanocyte death was only decreased by SP600125. This study provides the possible mechanism of melanocyte destruction and immuno-stimulation in vitiligo by innate immune response following viral infection.

  18. Modulation of cytokine expression in human macrophages by endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yanzhen; Mei, Chenfang; Liu, Hao; Wang, Hongsheng; Zeng, Guoqu; Lin, Jianhui; Xu, Meiying

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Effects of BPA on the cytokines expression of human macrophages were investigated. • BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 production. • BPA decreased anti-inflammation IL-10 and TGF-β production. • ERα/β/ERK/NF-κB signaling involved in BPA-mediated cytokines expression. - Abstract: Exposure to environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical Bisphenol-A (BPA) is often associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the cytokines responses of human macrophages were investigated. Treatment with BPA increased pro-inflammation cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production, but decreased anti-inflammation cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in THP1 macrophages, as well as in primary human macrophages. BPA effected cytokines expression through estrogen receptor α/β (ERα/β)-dependent mechanism with the evidence of ERα/β antagonist reversed the expression of cytokines. We also identified that activation of extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signal cascade marked the effects of BPA on cytokines expression. Our results indicated that BPA effected inflammatory responses of macrophages via modulating of cytokines expression, and provided a new insight into the link between exposure to BPA and human health.

  19. Proinflammatory cytokines induce amelotin transcription in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yohei; Takai, Hideki; Matsui, Sari; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Zhou, Liming; Kato, Ayako; Ganss, Bernhard; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2014-12-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) is a secreted protein transcribed predominantly during the maturation stage of enamel formation and localized in the junctional epithelium. We investigated differences in the levels of AMTN gene expression between non-inflamed gingiva and inflamed gingiva from patients with chronic periodontitis. Total RNAs were isolated from these tissues and their gene expression profiles were monitored by DNA microarray. The observed induction of AMTN mRNA in inflamed gingiva and cultured human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was confirmed by real-time PCR. Transient transfection assays were performed using chimeric constructs of mouse AMTN gene promoter fragments linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Immunohistochemical localization of AMTN in inflamed and non-inflamed gingiva was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Among many differentially expressed genes, the level of AMTN mRNA was significantly increased in inflamed gingiva. Treatment of HGF with interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced the expression of AMTN mRNA, and increased the luciferase activities of the AMTN promoter constructs. AMTN protein was detected in inflamed gingival connective tissue and junctional epithelium. These findings demonstrate that proinflammatory cytokines induce AMTN gene expression in human gingival fibroblasts and suggest a role for AMTN in gingival inflammation.

  20. Cytokine release and cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts induced by phenols and sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Newby, C S; Barr, R M; Greaves, M W; Mallet, A I

    2000-08-01

    Phenolic compounds used in pharmaceutical and industrial products can cause irritant contact dermatitis. We studied the effects of resorcinol, phenol, 3,5-xylenol, chloroxylenol, and 4-hexyl-resorcinol on normal human epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts for cytotoxicity and cytokine release, determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide methodology and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. An inverse correlation between phenol concentrations causing a 50% reduction in keratinocyte and fibroblast viability at 24 h and their octanol water-partition coefficients (i.e., hydrophobicity) was observed. 3,5-xylenol, chloroxylenol, hexyl-resorcinol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate, but not resorcinol or phenol, induced release of interleukin-1alpha from keratinocytes at cytotoxic concentrations. Variable release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-8 from keratinocytes occurred only at toxic threshold concentrations of the phenols or sodium dodecyl sulfate. Subtoxic concentrations of phenols or sodium dodecyl sulfate did not induce cytokine release from keratinocytes. Neither the phenols nor sodium dodecyl sulfate induced release of the chemokines interleukin-8, growth-related oncogene-alpha or monocyte chemotactic protein-1 from fibroblasts. Conditioned media from keratinocytes treated with cytotoxic concentrations of 3,5-xylenol, chloroxylenol, hexyl-resorcinol, or sodium dodecyl sulfate stimulated further release of the chemokines from fibroblasts above that obtained with control media. Rabbit anti-interleukin-1alpha serum inhibited keratinocyte-conditioned media induction of chemokine release. We have shown a structure-cytotoxicity relationship for a series of phenols as well as an association of interleukin-1alpha release with a cytotoxic effect. We demonstrated a cytokine cascade amplification step by the actions of stimulated keratinocyte media on cultured dermal fibroblasts, identifying interleukin-1alpha as

  1. Type 1 and type 2 cytokine dysregulation in human infectious, neoplastic, and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, D R; Clerici, M; Shearer, G M

    1996-01-01

    In the mid-1980s, Mosmann, Coffman, and their colleagues discovered that murine CD4+ helper T-cell clones could be distinguished by the cytokines they synthesized. The isolation of human Th1 and Th2 clones by Romagnani and coworkers in the early 1990s has led to a large number of reports on the effects of Th1 and Th2 on the human immune system. More recently, cells other than CD4+ T cells, including CD8+ T cells, monocytes, NK cells, B cells, eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and other cells, have been shown to be capable of producing "Th1" and "Th2" cytokines. In this review, we examine the literature on human diseases, using the nomenclature of type 1 (Th1-like) and type 2 (Th2-like) cytokines, which includes all cell types producing these cytokines rather than only CD4+ T cells. Type 1 cytokines include interleukin-2 (IL-2), gamma interferon, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor beta, while type 2 cytokines include IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-13. In general, type 1 cytokines favor the development of a strong cellular immune response whereas type 2 cytokines favor a strong humoral immune response. Some of these type 1 and type 2 cytokines are cross-regulatory. For example, gamma interferon and IL-12 decrease the levels of type 2 cytokines whereas IL-4 and IL-10 decrease the levels of type 1 cytokines. We use this cytokine perspective to examine human diseases including infections due to viruses, bacteria, parasites, and fungi, as well as selected neoplastic, atopic, rheumatologic, autoimmune, and idiopathic-inflammatory conditions. Clinically, type 1 cytokine-predominant responses should be suspected in any delayed-type hypersensitivity-like granulomatous reactions and in infections with intracellular pathogens, whereas conditions involving hypergammaglobulinemia, increased immunoglobulin E levels, and/or eosinophilia are suggestive of type 2 cytokine-predominant conditions. If this immunologic concept is relevant to human diseases, the potential exists for

  2. Effect of leptin on activation and cytokine synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes of malnourished infected children

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, L; Graniel, J; Ortiz, R

    2007-01-01

    Malnutrition compromises immune function, resulting in reduced resistance to infection. Recent animal and human studies have suggested that leptin is capable of modulating the immune response and that its levels, which are regulated by nutritional status, fall rapidly during starvation. Leptin deficiency is associated with impaired cell-mediated immunity, an increased incidence of infectious disease and an associated increase in mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of leptin on activation and cytokine production in peripheral blood T cells from malnourished children. The data obtained in the present study demonstrate that leptin produced an increase in the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells producing interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ in 24-h cultures. Moreover, leptin decreased the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells producing IL-4 and IL-10, and enhanced activation of circulating T cells when co-stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA)–ionomycin. Leptin enhanced the expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 in both CD4+ and CD8+ cells after 5 h of stimulation. In conclusion, the results obtained show that leptin modulates CD4+ and CD8+ cell activation towards a T helper 1 (Th1) phenotype by stimulating the synthesis of IL-2 and IFN-γ. In contrast, leptin decreases IL-4 and IL-10 production. Moreover, leptin enhanced the expression of CD69 and CD25 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells after stimulation with PMA–ionomycin. PMID:17355247

  3. St. John's wort extract and hyperforin protect rat and human pancreatic islets against cytokine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Michela; Beffy, Pascale; Menegazzi, Marta; De Tata, Vincenzo; Martino, Luisa; Sgarbossa, Anna; Porozov, Svetlana; Pippa, Anna; Masini, Matilde; Marchetti, Piero; Masiello, Pellegrino

    2014-02-01

    The extract of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort, SJW) and its component hyperforin (HPF) were previously shown to inhibit cytokine-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 and nuclear factor κB and prevent apoptosis in a cultured β-cell line. Objective of this study was to assess the protection exerted by SJW and HPF on isolated rat and human islets exposed to cytokines in vitro. Functional, ultrastructural, biomolecular and cell death evaluation studies were performed. In both rat and human islets, SJW and HPF counteracted cytokine-induced functional impairment and down-regulated mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory target genes, such as iNOS, CXCL9, CXCL10, COX2. Cytokine-induced NO production from cultured islets, evaluated by nitrites measurement in the medium, was significantly reduced in the presence of the vegetal compounds. Noteworthy, the increase in apoptosis and necrosis following 48-h exposure to cytokines was fully prevented by SJW and partially by HPF. Ultrastructural morphometric analysis in human islets exposed to cytokines for 20 h showed that SJW or HPF avoided early β-cell damage (e.g., mitochondrial alterations and loss of insulin granules). In conclusion, SJW compounds protect rat and human islets against cytokine effects by counteracting key mechanisms of cytokine-mediated β-cell injury and represent promising pharmacological tools for prevention or limitation of β-cell dysfunction and loss in type 1 diabetes.

  4. ROCKing cytokine secretion balance in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Waksal, Samuel D

    2015-04-01

    Balanced regulation of cytokine secretion in T cells is critical for maintenance of immune homeostasis and prevention of autoimmunity. The Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) 2 signaling pathway was previously shown to be involved in controlling of cellular movement and shape. However, recent work from our group and others has demonstrated a new and important role of ROCK2 in regulating cytokine secretion in T cells. We found that ROCK2 promotes pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17 and IL-21, whereas IL-2 and IL-10 secretion are negatively regulated by ROCK2 under Th17-skewing activation. Also, in disease, but not in steady state conditions, ROCK2 contributes to regulation of IFN-γ secretion in T cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients. Thus, ROCK2 signaling is a key pathway in modulation of T-cell mediated immune responses underscoring the therapeutic potential of targeted inhibition of ROCK2 in autoimmunity.

  5. Cytokine modulation of human blood viscosity from vivax malaria patients.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Edson Fredulin; Cantarini, Déborah Giovanna; Siqueira, Renan; Ribeiro, Elton Brito; Braga, Érika Martins; Honório-França, Adenilda Cristina; França, Eduardo Luzía

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major infectious disease in several countries and is caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. In vivax malaria patients, inflammatory processes occur, as well as changes in cytokines and blood flow. The present study analyzed the cytokine modulation of blood viscosity from patients infected with Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax). Blood samples were collected from 42 non-infected individuals (control group) and 37 individuals infected with P. vivax. The IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNFα, TGF-β and IL-17 cytokine concentrations in the serum were assessed, and the blood rheological properties were determined. The analysis of blood viscosity for shear rates revealed that the blood viscosity of the infected patients was significantly greater than that of the non-infected individuals. The viscosity of the blood was greater in the infected individuals than in the non-infected subjects. The serum from individuals with P. vivax infections exhibited higher IFN-γ and IL-17 concentrations and lower TGF-β levels. Incubation of the blood from infected individuals with IL-17 or IL-17 associated with IFN-γ reduced the viscosity to rates equivalent to the blood from non-infected individuals. Independently of cytokine modulation, no correlation was found between the parasitemia and blood viscosity of the infected patients. These data suggest that the alterations of blood viscosity are relevant as an auxiliary tool for the clinical diagnosis of disease. In malaria, erythrocytes are more sensitive to osmotic shock, and the reduction of viscosity by IL-17 may be related to a possible immunomodulator agent during infection.

  6. Serum cytokine profiles of children with human enterovirus 71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gan, Xing; Song, Juan; Sun, Peng; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Cytokine profiles may impact the pathogenicity and severity of hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by human enterovirus (HEV) 71. In 91 severe or mild HEV 71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease children, serum was collected between days 2 and 10 or day >10. Serum cytokines including Type 1 T helper (Th1) cytokines: interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), IL-12, and IL-18, Type 1 T helper (Th2) cytokines: IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, proinflammatory cytokines: IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), were assessed during the early stage and recovery. In the patients with mild illness, the peaks of IL-8 and IL-10 were observed on day 6 and that of IL-18 was on day 4. In the patients with severe illness, all cytokines spiked on day 3 and peaked on day 11. All cytokines except IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, and TNF-α were significantly correlated with immunoglobulin M levels by the end of the disease course. Cytokine profile variations between the patients with mild and severe illness may indicate prognosis and strain virulence, useful in clinical treatment of patients.

  7. A whole blood in vitro cytokine release assay with aqueous monoclonal antibody presentation for the prediction of therapeutic protein induced cytokine release syndrome in humans.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Babette; Morgan, Hannah; Krieg, Jennifer; Gani, Zaahira; Milicov, Adriana; Warncke, Max; Brennan, Frank; Jones, Stewart; Sims, Jennifer; Kiessling, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    The administration of several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to humans has been associated with acute adverse events characterized by clinically significant release of cytokines in the blood. The limited predictive value of toxicology species in this field has triggered intensive research to establish human in vitro assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells or blood to predict cytokine release in humans. A thorough characterization of these assays is required to understand their predictive value for hazard identification and risk assessment in an optimal manner, and to highlight potential limitations of individual assay formats. We have characterized a whole human blood cytokine release assay with only minimal dilution by the test antibodies (95% v/v blood) in aqueous presentation format, an assay which has so far received less attention in the scientific world with respect to the evaluation of its suitability to predict cytokine release in humans. This format was compared with a human PBMC assay with immobilized mAbs presentation already well-characterized by others. Cytokine secretion into plasma or cell culture supernatants after 24h incubation with the test mAbs (anti-CD28 superagonist TGN1412-like material (TGN1412L), another anti-CD28 superagonistic mAb (ANC28.1), a T-cell depleting mAb (Orthoclone™), and a TGN1412 isotype-matched control (Tysabri™) not associated with clinically-relevant cytokine release) was detected by a multiplex assay based on electrochemiluminescent excitation. We provide proof that this whole blood assay is a suitable new method for hazard identification of safety-relevant cytokine release in the clinic based on its ability to detect the typical cytokine signatures found in humans for the tested mAbs and on a markedly lower assay background and cytokine release with the isotype-matched control mAb Tysabri™ - a clear advantage over the PBMC assay. Importantly, quantitative and qualitative differences in the relative cytokine

  8. Moraxella catarrhalis induces mast cell activation and nuclear factor kappa B-dependent cytokine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, G; Martin, R; Walker, E; Li, C; Hossler, F; Hall, K; Chi, D S

    2003-01-01

    Human mast cells are often found perivascularly and at mucosal sites and may play crucial roles in the inflammatory response. Recent studies have suggested a prominent role for mast cells in host defense. In this study, we analyzed the effects of a common airway pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis and a commensal bacterium, Neiserria cinerea, on activation of human mast cells. Human mast cell leukemia cells (HMC-1) were activated with either phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore or with varying concentrations of heat-killed suspensions of bacteria. Supernatants were assayed for the cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4), granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-6, IL-8, IL-13 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Nuclear proteins were isolated and assayed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) for nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) nuclear binding activity. In some experiments, NF-kappaB inhibitor, Bay-11 was added to determine functional significance. Both M. catarrhalis and N. cinerea induced mast cell activation and selective secretion of two key inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and MCP-1. This was accompanied by NF-kappaB activation. Neither spun bacterial supernatants nor bacterial lipopolysaccharide induced cytokine secretion, suggesting need for direct bacterial contact with mast cells. Scanning electron microscopy revealed active aggregation of bacteria over mast cell surfaces. The NF-kappaB inhibitor, Bay-11, inhibited expression of MCP-1. These findings suggest the possibility of direct interactions between human mast cells and common bacteria and provide evidence for a novel role for human mast cells in innate immunity.

  9. Human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive cell walls of normal intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Toivanen, P

    1999-01-01

    The normal microbiota plays an important role in the health of the host, but little is known of how the human immune system recognizes and responds to Gram-positive indigenous bacteria. We have investigated cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to Gram-positive cell walls (CW) derived from four common intestinal indigenous bacteria, Eubacterium aerofaciens (Eu.a.), Eubacterium limosum(Eu.l.), Lactobacillus casei(L.c.), and Lactobacillus fermentum (L.f.). Our results indicate that Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota can induce cytokine responses of the human PBMC. The profile, level and kinetics of these responses are similar to those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CW derived from a pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes (S.p.). Bacterial CW are capable of inducing production of a proinflammatory cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, but not that of IL-4 or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Monocytes are the main cell population in PBMC to produce TNF-α and IL-10. Induction of cytokine secretion is serum-dependent; both CD14-dependent and -independent pathways are involved. These findings suggest that the human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota are similar to those induced by LPS or Gram-positive CW of the pathogens. PMID:10540188

  10. Circadian disruption, Per3, and human cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Guess, Jaclyn; Burch, James B; Ogoussan, Kisito; Armstead, Cheryl A; Zhang, Hongmei; Wagner, Sara; Hebert, James R; Wood, Patricia; Youngstedt, Shawn D; Hofseth, Lorne J; Singh, Udai P; Xie, Dawen; Hrushesky, William J M

    2009-12-01

    Circadian disruption has been linked with inflammation, an established cancer risk factor. Per3 clock gene polymorphisms have also been associated with circadian disruption and with increased cancer risk. Patients completed a questionnaire and provided a blood sample prior to undergoing a colonoscopy (n = 70). Adjusted mean serum cytokine concentrations (IL-6, TNF-alpha, gamma-INF, IL-1ra, IL-1-beta, VEGF) were compared among patients with high and low scores for fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory II), or sleep disruption (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), or among patients with different Per3 clock gene variants. Poor sleep was associated with elevated VEGF, and fatigue-related reduced activity was associated with elevated TNF-alpha concentrations. Participants with the 4/5 or 5/5 Per3 variable tandem repeat sequence had elevated IL-6 concentrations compared to those with the 4/4 genotype. Biological processes linking circadian disruption with cancer remain to be elucidated. Increased inflammatory cytokine secretion may play a role.

  11. Specific activation of human interleukin-5 depends on de novo synthesis of an AP-1 complex.

    PubMed

    Schwenger, Gretchen T F; Kok, Chee Choy; Arthaningtyas, Estri; Thomas, Marc A; Sanderson, Colin J; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A

    2002-12-06

    It is clear from the biology of eosinophilia that a specific regulatory mechanism must exist. Because interleukin-5 (IL5) is the key regulatory cytokine, it follows that a gene-specific control of IL5 expression must exist that differs even from closely related cytokines such as IL4. Two features of IL5 induction make it unique compared with other cytokines; first, induction by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which inhibits other T-cell-derived cytokines, and second, sensitivity to protein synthesis inhibitors, which have no effect on other cytokines. This study has utilized the activation of different transcription factors by different stimuli in a human T-cell line to study the role of conserved lymphokine element 0 (CLE0) in the specific induction of IL5. In unstimulated cells the ubiquitous Oct-1 binds to CLE0. Stimulation induces de novo synthesis of the AP-1 members JunD and Fra-2, which bind to CLE0. The amount of IL5 produced correlates with the production of the AP-1 complex, suggesting a key role in IL5 expression. The formation of the AP-1 complex is essential, but the rate-limiting step is the synthesis of AP-1, especially Fra-2. This provides an explanation for the sensitivity of IL5 to protein synthesis inhibitors and a mechanism for the specific induction of IL5 compared with other cytokines.

  12. Faithful expression of the human 5q31 cytokine cluster intransgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Dee A.; Wang, Zhi-En; Symula, Derek J.; McArthur, CliffordJ.; Rubin, Edward M.; Frazer, Kelly A.; Locksley, Richard M.

    1999-12-03

    ILs 4,5, and 13, cardinal cytokines produced by Th2 cells,are coordinately expressed and clustered in the 150-kb syntenic regions on mouse chromosome 11 and human chromosome 5q31. We analyzed two sets of human yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice that contained the5931cytokines to assess whether conserved sequences required for their coordinate and cell-specific regulation are contained within the cytokine cluster itself. Human Il-4, IL-13, and Il-5 were expressed under Th2, but not Th1, conditions in vitro. Each of these cytokines was produced during infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a Th2 inducing stimulus, and human Il-4 was generated after activation of NK T cells in vivo.Consistently fewer cells produced the endogenous mouse cytokines in transgenic than in control mice, suggesting competition for stable expression between the mouse and human genes. These data imply the existence of both conserved trans-activating factors and cis-regulatory elements that underlie the coordinate expression and lineage specificity of the type 2 ctyokine genes in lymphocytes.

  13. Modulation of cytokines and chemokines expression by NAC in cadmium chloride treated human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Odewumi, Caroline O; Latinwo, Lekan M; Ruden, Michael L; Badisa, Veera L D; Fils-Aime, Sheila; Badisa, Ramesh B

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd), is one of the most hazardous metals found in the environment. Cd exposure through inhalation has been linked to various diseases in lungs. It was shown that Cd induces proinflammatory cytokines through oxidative stress mechanism. In this report, we studied the immunomodulatory effect of a well known antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on cadmium chloride (CdCl2 ) treated human lung A549 cells through human cytokine array 6. The lung cells were treated with 0 or 75 µM CdCl2 alone, 2.5 mM NAC alone, or co-treated with 2.5 mM NAC and 75 µM CdCl2 for 24 h. The viability of cells was measured by crystal violet dye. The array results were validated by human IL-1alpha enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. The viability of the 75 µM CdCl2 alone treated cells was decreased to 44.5%, while the viability of the co-treated cells with 2.5 mM NAC was increased to 84.1% in comparison with untreated cells. In the cell lysate of CdCl2 alone treated cells, 19 and 8 cytokines were up and down-regulated, while in the medium 15 and 3 cytokines were up and downregulated in comparison with the untreated cells. In the co-treated cells, all these cytokines expression was modulated by the NAC treatment. The IL-1α ELISA result showed the same pattern of cytokine expression as the cytokine array. This study clearly showed the modulatory effect of NAC on cytokines and chemokines expression in CdCl2- treated cells and suggests the use of NAC as protective agent against cadmium toxicity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1612-1619, 2016.

  14. Bacterial modulins: a novel class of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology by inducing cytokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, B; Poole, S; Wilson, M

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines are a diverse group of proteins and glycoproteins which have potent and wide-ranging effects on eukaryotic cell function and are now recognized as important mediators of tissue pathology in infectious diseases. It is increasingly recognized that for many bacterial species, cytokine induction is a major virulence mechanism. Until recent years, the only bacterial component known to stimulate cytokine synthesis was lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It is only within the past decade that it has been clearly shown that many components associated with the bacterial cell wall, including proteins, glycoproteins, lipoproteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, have the capacity to stimulate mammalian cells to produce a diverse array of cytokines. It has been established that many of these cytokine-inducing molecules act by mechanisms distinct from that of LPS, and thus their activities are not due to LPS contamination. Bacteria produce a wide range of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology, and these diverse factors have been grouped into four families: adhesins, aggressins, impedins, and invasins. We suggest that the array of bacterial cytokine-inducing molecules represents a new class of bacterial virulence factor, and, by analogy with the known virulence families, we suggest the term "modulin" to describe these molecules, because the action of cytokines is to modulate eukaryotic cell behavior. This review summarizes our current understanding of cytokine biology in relation to tissue homeostasis and disease and concisely reviews the current literature on the cytokine-inducing molecules produced by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, with an emphasis on the cellular mechanisms responsible for cytokine induction. We propose that modulins, by controlling the host immune and inflammatory responses, maintain the large commensal flora that all multicellular organisms support. PMID:8801436

  15. Polyfunctional responses by human T cells result from sequential release of cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qing; Bagheri, Neda; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; Hafler, David A.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Love, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The release of cytokines by T cells defines a significant part of their functional activity in vivo, and their ability to produce multiple cytokines has been associated with beneficial immune responses. To date, time-integrated end-point measurements have obscured whether these polyfunctional states arise from the simultaneous or successive release of cytokines. Here, we used serial, time-dependent, single-cell analysis of primary human T cells to resolve the temporal dynamics of cytokine secretion from individual cells after activation ex vivo. We show that multifunctional, Th1-skewed cytokine responses (IFN-γ, IL-2, TNFα) are initiated asynchronously, but the ensuing dynamic trajectories of these responses evolve programmatically in a sequential manner. That is, cells predominantly release one of these cytokines at a time rather than maintain active secretion of multiple cytokines simultaneously. Furthermore, these dynamic trajectories are strongly associated with the various states of cell differentiation suggesting that transient programmatic activities of many individual T cells contribute to sustained, population-level responses. The trajectories of responses by single cells may also provide unique, time-dependent signatures for immune monitoring that are less compromised by the timing and duration of integrated measures. PMID:22160692

  16. Acellular components of Chlamydia pneumoniae stimulate cytokine production in human blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Netea, M G; Selzman, C H; Kullberg, B J; Galama, J M; Weinberg, A; Stalenhoef, A F; Van der Meer, J W; Dinarello, C A

    2000-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest that infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae is associated with atherosclerosis, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Inflammation is important in the initial phase of atherogenesis, and cytokines are important in the initiation and progression of inflammation. The aim of this study was to assess the capacity of acellular components of C. pneumoniae to stimulate the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated in vitro with sonicated C. pneumoniae. Significant amounts of TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) were produced. Inhibition of endotoxin using polymyxin B revealed that chlamydial endotoxin plays a minor role in the cytokine induction. Neutralization of TNF by TNF-binding protein and blockade of IL-1 receptors by IL-1 receptor antagonist revealed that TNF, IL-1 and IL-6 production was independent from each other, whereas IL-8 synthesis was strongly dependent on endogenous TNF and IL-1. In contrast, synthesis of MCP-1 and MIP-1alpha was dependent on endogenous TNF, but not IL-1. In conclusion, acellular components of C. pneumoniae are a potent stimulus for cytokine production, and this mechanism may have an important role in the inflammatory aspects of atherogenesis.

  17. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2002-09-01

    In persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and/or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), the immune system becomes dysfunctional in many ways. There is both immunodeficiency due to the loss of CD4-positive T helper cells and hyperactivity as a result of B-cell activation. Likewise, both decreases and increases are seen in the production and/or activity of cytokines. Cytokine changes in HIV infection have been assessed by a variety of techniques, ranging from determination of cytokine gene expression at the mRNA level to secretion of cytokine proteins in vivo and in vitro. Changes in cytokine levels in HIV-infected persons can affect the function of the immune system, and have the potential to directly impact the course of HIV disease by enhancing or suppressing HIV replication. In particular, the balance between the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which up-regulate HIV expression, and IL-10, which can act both as an anti-inflammatory cytokine and a B-cell stimulatory factor, may play an important role in the progression to AIDS. In light of its ability to suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and, under some conditions, suppress HIV replication, increased IL-10 may be viewed as beneficial in slowing HIV disease progression. However, an association between increased IL-10 and the development of AIDS-associated B-cell lymphoma highlights the bifunctional nature of IL-10 as both an anti-inflammatory and B-cell-stimulatory cytokine that could have beneficial and detrimental effects on the course of HIV infection and AIDS.

  18. Cytokines and macrophage function in humans - role of stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    We have begun this study to commence the determination of the role of mild chronic stress in the effects of space flight on macrophage/monocyte function, a component of the immune response. Medical students undergoing regular periods of stress and relaxation have been shown to be an excellent model for determining the effects of stress on immune responses. We have begun using this model using the macrophage/monocyte as model leukocyte. The monocyte/macrophage plays a central role in immunoregulation. The studies to be included in this three year project are the effects of stress on: (1) interactions of monocytes with microbes, (2) monocyte production of cytokines, (3) monocyte phagocytosis and activity, and (4) monocyte expression of cell surface antigens important in immune responses. Stress hormone levels will also be carried out to determine if there is a correlation between stress effects on immune responses and hormonal levels. Psychological testing to insure subjects are actually stressed or relaxed at the time of testing will also be carried out. The results obtained from the proposed studies should be comparable with space flight studies with whole animals and isolated cell cultures. When complete this study should allow the commencement of the establishment of the role of stress as one compartment of the induction of immune alterations by space flight.

  19. Yeast Modulation of Human Dendritic Cell Cytokine Secretion: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ida M.; Christensen, Jeffrey E.; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  20. Yeast modulation of human dendritic cell cytokine secretion: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  1. Enhanced and efficient detection of virus-driven cytokine expression by human NK and T cells.

    PubMed

    Pattacini, Laura; Murnane, Pamela M; Fluharty, Tayler R; Katabira, Elly; De Rosa, Stephen C; Baeten, Jared M; Lund, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Cutting edge immune monitoring techniques increasingly measure multiple functional outputs for various cell types, such as intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assays that measure cytokines expressed by T cells. To date, however, there is no precise method to measure virus-specific cytokine production by both T cells as well as NK cells in the same well, which is important to a greater extent given recent identification of NK cells expressing a memory phenotype. This study describes an adaptable and efficient ICS assay platform that can be used to detect antigen-driven cytokine production by human T cells and NK cells, termed "viral ICS". Importantly, this assay uses limited amount of cryopreserved PBMCs along with autologous heat-inactivated serum, thereby allowing for this assay to be performed when sample is scarce as well as geographically distant from the laboratory. Compared to a standard ICS assay that detects antigen-specific T cell cytokine expression alone, the viral ICS assay is comparable in terms of both HIV-specific CD4 and CD8T cell cytokine response rates and magnitude of response, with the added advantage of ability to detect virus-specific NK cell responses.

  2. The cytokine response to human traumatic brain injury: temporal profiles and evidence for cerebral parenchymal production.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Adel; Carpenter, Keri L H; Menon, David K; Pickard, John D; Hutchinson, Peter J A

    2011-02-01

    The role of neuroinflammation is increasingly being recognised in a diverse range of cerebral pathologies, including traumatic brain injury (TBI). We used cerebral microdialysis and paired arterial and jugular bulb plasma sampling to characterise the production of 42 cytokines after severe TBI in 12 patients over 5 days. We compared two microdialysis perfusates in six patients: central nervous system perfusion fluid and 3.5% human albumin solution (HAS); 3.5% HAS has a superior fluid recovery (95.8 versus 83.3%), a superior relative recovery in 18 of 42 cytokines (versus 8 of 42), and a qualitatively superior recovery profile. All 42 cytokines were recovered from the human brain. Sixteen cytokines showed a stereotyped temporal peak, at least twice the median value for that cytokine over the monitoring period; day 1: tumour necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)7, IL8, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)1α, soluble CD40 ligand, GRO, IL1β, platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA, MIP1β, RANTES; day 2: IL1 receptor antagonist (ra). IL6, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), chemokine CXC motif ligand 10 (IP10); days 4 to 5: IL12p70, IL10. Brain extracellular fluid concentrations were significantly higher than plasma concentrations for 19 cytokines: basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), G-CSF, IL1α, IL1β, IL1ra, IL3, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL12p40, IL12p70, IP10, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)1, MCP3, MIP1α, MIP1β, PDGF-AA, transforming growth factor (TGF)α and vascular endothelial growth factor. No clear arterio-jugular venous gradients were apparent. These data provide evidence for the cerebral production of these cytokines and show a stereotyped temporal pattern after TBI.

  3. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum genes modulating the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modulation of the immune system is one of the most plausible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health. Presently, the specific probiotic cell products responsible for immunomodulation are largely unknown. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic diversity of strains of the Lactobacillus plantarum species were investigated to identify genes of L. plantarum with the potential to influence the amounts of cytokines interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-12 and the ratio of IL-10/IL-12 produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results A total of 42 Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from diverse environmental and human sources were evaluated for their capacity to stimulate cytokine production in PBMCs. The L. plantarum strains induced the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 over an average 14-fold range and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12 over an average 16-fold range. Comparisons of the strain-specific cytokine responses of PBMCs to comparative genome hybridization profiles obtained with L. plantarum WCFS1 DNA microarrays (also termed gene-trait matching) resulted in the identification of 6 candidate genetic loci with immunomodulatory capacities. These loci included genes encoding an N-acetyl-glucosamine/galactosamine phosphotransferase system, the LamBDCA quorum sensing system, and components of the plantaricin (bacteriocin) biosynthesis and transport pathway. Deletion of these genes in L. plantarum WCFS1 resulted in growth phase-dependent changes in the PBMC IL-10 and IL-12 cytokine profiles compared with wild-type cells. Conclusions The altered PBMC cytokine profiles obtained with the L. plantarum WCFS1 mutants were in good agreement with the predictions made by gene-trait matching for the 42 L. plantarum strains. This study therefore resulted in the identification of genes present in certain strains of L. plantarum which might be responsible for the stimulation of anti

  4. Complete artificial saliva alters expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Malpass, Gloria E; Arimilli, Subhashini; Prasad, Gaddamanugu L; Howlett, Allyn C

    2013-07-01

    Complete artificial saliva (CAS) is a saliva substitute often used as a vehicle for test articles, including smokeless tobacco products. In the course of a study employing normal adult human dermal fibroblasts (HDFa) as a model in vitro, we discovered that CAS as a vehicle introduced a significant change in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. To determine the effects of CAS on gene expression, real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR gene array analysis was used. Results indicate that robust changes in the expression of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 8 (IL8) and the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1) occur within 5h of exposure to CAS. To determine whether CAS also alters cytokine release into the culture media, cytometric bead array assays for human inflammatory cytokines were performed. Analysis shows that CAS induced the release of IL8 and IL6. This study focused on determining which components in CAS were responsible for the proinflammatory response in HDFa. The following components were investigated: α-amylase, lysozyme, acid phosphatase, and urea. Results demonstrated that enzymatically active α-amylase induced gene expression for proinflammatory cytokines IL8, IL6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL1α and for VCAM1. Therefore, it is important to carefully evaluate the "vehicle effects" of CAS and its components in in vitro toxicology research.

  5. Enhanced Ca(2+) response and stimulation of prostaglandin release by the bradykinin B2 receptor in human retinal pigment epithelial cells primed with proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Catalioto, Rose-Marie; Valenti, Claudio; Maggi, Carlo Alberto; Giuliani, Sandro

    2015-09-15

    Kallikrein, kininogen and kinin receptors are present in human ocular tissues including the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), suggesting a possible role of bradykinin (BK) in physiological and/or pathological conditions. To test this hypothesis, kinin receptors expression and function was investigated for the first time in human fetal RPE cells, a model close to native RPE, in both control conditions and after treatment with proinflammatory cytokines. Results showed that BK evoked intracellular Ca(2+) transients in human RPE cells by activating the kinin B2 receptor. Pretreatment of the cells with TNF-α and/or IL-1β enhanced Ca(2+) response in a time- and concentration-dependent additive manner, whereas the potency of BK and that of the selective B2 receptor antagonist, fasitibant chloride, both in the nanomolar range, remained unaffected. Cytokines have no significant effect on cell number and viability and on the activity of other GPCRs such as the kinin B1, acetylcholine, ATP and thrombin receptors. Immunoblot analysis and immunofluorescence studies revealed that cytokines treatment was associated with an increase in both kinin B2 receptor and COX-2 expression and with the secretion of prostaglandin E1 and E2 into the extracellular medium. BK, through activation of the kinin B2 receptor, potentiated the COX-2 mediated prostaglandin release in cytokines-primed RPE cells while new protein synthesis and prostaglandin production contribute to the potentiating effect of cytokines on BK-induced Ca(2+) response. In conclusion, overall data revealed a cross-talk between the kinin B2 receptor and cytokines in human RPE in promoting inflammation, a key feature in retinal pathologies including diabetic retinopathy and macular edema.

  6. Analysis of inflammatory cytokines in human blood, breath condensate, and urine using a multiplex immunoassay platform

    EPA Science Inventory

    A change in the expression of cytokines in human biological media indicates an inflammatory response to external stressors and reflects an early step along the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for various health endpoints. To characterize and interpret this inflammatory response, m...

  7. Selected scorpion toxin exposures induce cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Espino-Solis, Gerardo Pavel

    2017-03-01

    A cytokine screening on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with selected scorpion toxins (ScTx's) was performed in order to evaluate their effect on human immune cells. The ScTx's chosen for this report were three typical buthid scorpion venom peptides, one with lethal effects on mammals Centruroides suffussus suffusus toxin II (CssII), another, with lethal effects on insects and crustaceans Centruroides noxius toxin 5 (Cn5), and one more without lethal effects Tityus discrepans toxin (Discrepin). A Luminex multiplex analysis was performed in order to determine the amounts chemokines and cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12-p40, IL-13, interferon alpha (IFN-α), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha TNF-α, and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) secreted from human PBMCs exposed to these toxins. Although, the ScTx Cn5 is not lethal for mammals, it was able to induce the secretion of cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, IL-10 and IP-10 in comparison to the lethal CssII, which was able to induce only IP-10 secretion. Discrepin also was able to induce only IP-10. Interestingly, only low amounts of interferons α and β were induced in the presence of the ScTx's assayed. In a synergic experiment, the combination of Discrepin and Cn5 displayed considerable reverse effects on induction of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, but they had a slight synergic effect on IP-10 cytokine production in comparison with the single effect obtained with the Cn5 alone. Thus, the results obtained suggest that the profile of secreted cytokines promoted by ScTx Cn5 is highly related with a cytokine storm event, and also it suggests that the mammalian lethal neurotoxins are not solely responsible of the scorpion envenomation symptomatology.

  8. Role of the cytokine environment and cytokine receptor expression on the generation of functionally distinct dendritic cells from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Conti, Lucia; Cardone, Marco; Varano, Barbara; Puddu, Patrizia; Belardelli, Filippo; Gessani, Sandra

    2008-03-01

    Myeloid dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages evolve from a common precursor. However, factors controlling monocyte differentiation toward DC or macrophages are poorly defined. We report that the surface density of the GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) alpha subunit in human peripheral blood monocytes varies among donors. Although no correlation was found between the extent of GM-CSFR and monocyte differentiation into DC driven by GM-CSF and IL-4, GM-CSFR expression strongly influenced the generation of CD1a(+) dendritic-like cells in the absence of IL-4. CD1a(+) cells generated in the presence of GM-CSF express CD40, CD80, MHC class I and II, DC-SIGN, MR, CCR5, and partially retain CD14 expression. Interestingly, they spontaneously induce the expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) allogeneic T lymphocytes producing IFN-gamma, and migrate toward CCL4 and CCL19. Upon stimulation with TLR ligands, they acquire the phenotypic features of mature DC. In contrast, the allostimulatory capacity is not further increased upon LPS activation. However, by blocking LPS-induced IL-10, a higher T cell proliferative response and IL-12 production were observed. Interestingly, IL-23 secretion was not affected by endogenous IL-10. These results highlight the importance of GM-CSFR expression in monocytes for cytokine-induced DC generation and point to GM-CSF as a direct player in the generation of functionally distinct DC.

  9. DNA from Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia induce cytokine production in human monocytic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sahingur, S E; Xia, X-J; Alamgir, S; Honma, K; Sharma, A; Schenkein, H A

    2010-04-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) expression is increased in periodontally diseased tissues compared with healthy sites indicating a possible role of TLR9 and its ligand, bacterial DNA (bDNA), in periodontal disease pathology. Here, we determine the immunostimulatory effects of periodontal bDNA in human monocytic cells (THP-1). THP-1 cells were stimulated with DNA of two putative periodontal pathogens: Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia. The role of TLR9 in periodontal bDNA-initiated cytokine production was determined either by blocking TLR9 signaling in THP-1 cells with chloroquine or by measuring IL-8 production and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation in HEK293 cells stably transfected with human TLR9. Cytokine production (IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha) was increased significantly in bDNA-stimulated cells compared with controls. Chloroquine treatment of THP-1 cells decreased cytokine production, suggesting that TLR9-mediated signaling pathways are operant in the recognition of DNA from periodontal pathogens. Compared with native HEK293 cells, TLR9-transfected cells demonstrated significantly increased IL-8 production (P < 0.001) and NF-kappaB activation in response to bDNA, further confirming the role of TLR9 in periodontal bDNA recognition. The results of PCR arrays demonstrated upregulation of proinflammatory cytokine and NF-kappaB genes in response to periodontal bDNA in THP-1 cells, suggesting that cytokine induction is through NF-kappaB activation. Hence, immune responses triggered by periodontal bacterial nucleic acids may contribute to periodontal disease pathology by inducing proinflammatory cytokine production through the TLR9 signaling pathway.

  10. Tacaribe Virus but Not Junin Virus Infection Induces Cytokine Release from Primary Human Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Groseth, Allison; Hoenen, Thomas; Weber, Michaela; Wolff, Svenja; Herwig, Astrid; Kaufmann, Andreas; Becker, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the development of disease during arenavirus infection are poorly understood. However, common to all hemorrhagic fever diseases is the involvement of macrophages as primary target cells, suggesting that the immune response in these cells may be of paramount importance during infection. Thus, in order to identify features of the immune response that contribute to arenavirus pathogenesis, we have examined the growth kinetics and cytokine profiles of two closely related New World arenaviruses, the apathogenic Tacaribe virus (TCRV) and the hemorrhagic fever-causing Junin virus (JUNV), in primary human monocytes and macrophages. Both viruses grew robustly in VeroE6 cells; however, TCRV titres were decreased by approximately 10 fold compared to JUNV in both monocytes and macrophages. Infection of both monocytes and macrophages with TCRV also resulted in the release of high levels of IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, while levels of IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-12 were not affected. However, we could show that the presence of these cytokines had no direct effect on growth of either TCRV of JUNV in macrophages. Further analysis also showed that while the production of IL-6 and IL-10 are dependent on viral replication, production of TNF-α also occurs after exposure to UV-inactivated TCRV particles and is thus independent of productive virus infection. Surprisingly, JUNV infection did not have an effect on any of the cytokines examined indicating that, in contrast to other viral hemorrhagic fever viruses, macrophage-derived cytokine production is unlikely to play an active role in contributing to the cytokine dysregulation observed in JUNV infected patients. Rather, these results suggest that an early, controlled immune response by infected macrophages may be critical for the successful control of infection of apathogenic viruses and prevention of subsequent disease, including systemic cytokine dysregulation. PMID:21572983

  11. IL-10 is excluded from the functional cytokine memory of human CD4+ memory T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Ivascu, Claudia; Chang, Hyun-Dong; Wu, Peihua; Angeli, Roberta; Maggi, Laura; Eckhardt, Florian; Tykocinski, Lars; Haefliger, Carolina; Möwes, Beate; Sieper, Jochen; Radbruch, Andreas; Annunziato, Francesco; Thiel, Andreas

    2007-08-15

    Epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation, profoundly influence gene expression of CD4(+) Th-specific cells thereby shaping memory Th cell function. We demonstrate here a correlation between a lacking fixed potential of human memory Th cells to re-express the immunoregulatory cytokine gene IL10 and its DNA methylation status. Memory Th cells secreting IL-10 or IFN-gamma were directly isolated ex vivo from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers, and the DNA methylation status of IL10 and IFNG was assessed. Limited difference in methylation was found for the IL10 gene locus in IL-10-secreting Th cells, as compared with Th cells not secreting IL-10 isolated directly ex vivo or from in vitro-established human Th1 and Th2 clones. In contrast, in IFN-gamma(+) memory Th cells the promoter of the IFNG gene was hypomethylated, as compared with IFN-gamma-nonsecreting memory Th cells. In accordance with the lack of epigenetic memory, almost 90% of ex vivo-isolated IL-10-secreting Th cells lacked a functional memory for IL-10 re-expression after restimulation. Our data indicate that IL10 does not become epigenetically marked in human memory Th cells unlike effector cytokine genes such as IFNG. The exclusion of IL-10, but not effector cytokines, from the functional memory of human CD4(+) T lymphocytes ex vivo may reflect the need for appropriate regulation of IL-10 secretion, due to its potent immunoregulatory potential.

  12. Lactobacillus acidophilus and L. reuteri modulate cytokine responses in gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, M. S. P.; Zhang, W.; Wen, K.; Gonzalez, A. M.; Saif, L. J.; Yousef, A. E.; Yuan, L.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been shown to alleviate inflammation, enhance the immunogenicity of rotavirus vaccines, or reduce the severity of rotavirus diarrhoea. Although the mechanisms are not clear, the differential Th1/Th2/Th3-driving capacities and modulating effects on cytokine production of different LAB strains may be the key. Our goal was to delineate the influence of combining two probiotic strains L. acidophilus and L. reuteri on the development of cytokine responses in neonatal gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus (HRV). We demonstrated that HRV alone, or HRV plus LAB, but not LAB alone, initiated serum cytokine responses, as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-10 at post-inoculation day (PID) 2 in the HRV only and LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs. Peak cytokine responses coincided with the peak of HRV replication. LAB further enhanced the Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to HRV infection as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 in the LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to the LAB-HRV+ pigs. The LAB+HRV+ pigs maintained relatively constant concentrations of TGF-β compared to the HRV only group which had a significant increase at PID 2 and decrease at PID 7, suggesting a regulatory role of LAB in maintaining gut homeostasis. At PID 28, cytokine secreting cell (CSC) responses, measured by ELISpot, showed increased Th1 (IL-12, IFN-γ) CSC numbers in the LAB+HRV+ and LAB-HRV+ groups compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs, with significantly increased IL-12 CSCs in spleen and PBMCs and IFN-γ CSCs in spleen of the LAB+HRV+ group. Thus, HRV infection alone, but not LAB alone was effective in inducing cytokine responses but LAB significantly enhanced both Th1 and Th2 cytokines in HRV-infected pigs. LAB may also help to maintain immunological homeostasis during HRV infection by regulating TGF-β production. PMID:22348907

  13. Cross-Regulation of Proinflammatory Cytokines by Interleukin-10 and miR-155 in Orientia tsutsugamushi-Infected Human Macrophages Prevents Cytokine Storm.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tsai, Rong-Kung; Hong, Yi-Ren; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Fan, Kan-Tang; Peng, Chi-Wen; Wu, Ching-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Li; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Chen, Li-Kuang; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2016-07-01

    Scrub typhus is caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi. Macrophages are host cells for its replication and clearance. Severe complications in patients are mainly caused by a cytokine storm resulting from overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines; nevertheless, the molecular mechanism for the occurrence remains obscure. Herein, we investigate the interactive regulation of cytokines and micro-RNA (miR) in human macrophages infected with low and high doses of O. tsutsugamushi. During low dose infection, macrophages produce high levels of IL-10 through extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, which inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production and facilitates pathogen replication. Increasing levels of pathogen results in reduced levels of IL-10, and macrophages begin to generate high levels of proinflammatory cytokines through NF-κB activation. However, during a high dose infection, macrophages produce high levels of miR-155 to slow the proinflammatory response. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/IL-10 axis suppresses the NF-κB/tumor necrosis factor alpha axis via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Both IL-10 and miR-155 inhibit the NF-κB signaling pathway. Furthermore, IL-10 is a potent inhibitor of miR-155. Patients susceptible to a cytokine storm, peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed significantly lower IL-10 and miR-155 responses to O. tsutsugamushi challenge. Thus, IL-10 and miR-155 operate inhibitory mechanisms to achieve a proper defense mechanism and prevent a cytokine storm.

  14. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist promotes M1 microglia biased cytokines and chemokines following human traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Carpenter, Keri Lh; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) has demonstrated efficacy in a wide range of animal models of neuronal injury. We have previously published a randomised controlled study of IL1ra in human severe TBI, with concomitant microdialysis and plasma sampling of 42 cytokines and chemokines. In this study, we have used partial least squares discriminant analysis to model the effects of drug administration and time following injury on the cytokine milieu within the injured brain. We demonstrate that treatment with rhIL1ra causes a brain-specific modification of the cytokine and chemokine response to injury, particularly in samples from the first 48 h following injury. The magnitude of this response is dependent on the concentration of IL1ra achieved in the brain extracellular space. Chemokines related to recruitment of macrophages from the plasma compartment (MCP-1) and biasing towards a M1 microglial phenotype (GM-CSF, IL1) are increased in patient samples in the rhIL1ra-treated patients. In control patients, cytokines and chemokines biased to a M2 microglia phenotype (IL4, IL10, MDC) are relatively increased. This pattern of response suggests that a simple classification of IL1ra as an 'anti-inflammatory' cytokine may not be appropriate and highlights the importance of the microglial response to injury.

  15. Distinct cytokine release profiles from human endothelial and THP-1 macrophage-like cells exposed to different amphotericin B formulations.

    PubMed

    Turtinen, Lloyd W; Bremer, Lindsay A; Prall, David N; Schwartzhoff, Jenifer; Hartsel, Scott C

    2005-01-01

    Amphotericin B(AmB) formulations, Fungizone, and Amphotec caused substantially greater proinflammatory cytokine release than AmBisome (L-AMB) and Abelcet in TPA differentiated THP-1 macrophages as determined by antibody based protein arrays. Lipopolysaccharide but not AmB induced significant pro-inflammatory cytokines in human endothelial cells.

  16. Analysis of inflammatory cytokines in human blood, breath condensate, and urine using a multiplex immunoassay platform.

    PubMed

    Stiegel, Matthew A; Pleil, Joachim D; Sobus, Jon R; Morgan, Marsha K; Madden, Michael C

    2015-02-01

    A change in the expression of cytokines in human biological media indicates an inflammatory response to external stressors and reflects an early step along the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for various health endpoints. To characterize and interpret this inflammatory response, methodology was developed for measuring a suite of 10 different cytokines in human blood, exhaled breath condensate (EBC), and urine using an electrochemiluminescent multiplex Th1/Th2 cytokine immunoassay platform. Measurement distributions and correlations for eight interleukins (IL) (1β, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 12p70 and 13), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were evaluated using 90 blood plasma, 77 EBC, and 400 urine samples collected from nominally healthy adults subjects in North Carolina in 2008-2012. The in vivo results show that there is sufficient sensitivity for characterizing all 10 cytokines at levels of 0.05-0.10 ρg/ml with a dynamic range up to 100 ng/ml across all three of these biological media. The measured in vivo results also show that the duplicate analysis of blood, EBC and urine samples have average estimated fold ranges of 2.21, 3.49, and 2.50, respectively, which are similar to the mean estimated fold range (2.88) for the lowest concentration (0.610 ρg/ml) from a series of spiked control samples; the cytokine method can be used for all three biological media. Nine out of the 10 cytokines measured in EBC were highly correlated within one another with Spearman ρ coefficients ranging from 0.679 to 0.852, while the cytokines measured in blood had a mix of negative and positive correlations, ranging from -0.620 to 0.836. Almost all correlations between EBC and blood were positive. This work also represents the first successful within- and between-person evaluation of ultra trace-level inflammatory markers in blood, EBC, and urine.

  17. A High-Dimensional Atlas of Human T Cell Diversity Reveals Tissue-Specific Trafficking and Cytokine Signatures.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael Thomas; Ong, David Eng Hui; Lim, Frances Sheau Huei; Teng, Karen Wei Weng; McGovern, Naomi; Narayanan, Sriram; Ho, Wen Qi; Cerny, Daniela; Tan, Henry Kun Kiaang; Anicete, Rosslyn; Tan, Bien Keem; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon; Chan, Chung Yip; Cheow, Peng Chung; Lee, Ser Yee; Takano, Angela; Tan, Eng-Huat; Tam, John Kit Chung; Tan, Ern Yu; Chan, Jerry Kok Yen; Fink, Katja; Bertoletti, Antonio; Ginhoux, Florent; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria Alicia; Newell, Evan William

    2016-08-16

    Depending on the tissue microenvironment, T cells can differentiate into highly diverse subsets expressing unique trafficking receptors and cytokines. Studies of human lymphocytes have primarily focused on a limited number of parameters in blood, representing an incomplete view of the human immune system. Here, we have utilized mass cytometry to simultaneously analyze T cell trafficking and functional markers across eight different human tissues, including blood, lymphoid, and non-lymphoid tissues. These data have revealed that combinatorial expression of trafficking receptors and cytokines better defines tissue specificity. Notably, we identified numerous T helper cell subsets with overlapping cytokine expression, but only specific cytokine combinations are secreted regardless of tissue type. This indicates that T cell lineages defined in mouse models cannot be clearly distinguished in humans. Overall, our data uncover a plethora of tissue immune signatures and provide a systemic map of how T cell phenotypes are altered throughout the human body.

  18. Cytokine-mediated inhibition of fibrillar amyloid-β peptide degradation by human mononuclear phagocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masaru; Kiyota, Tomomi; Walsh, Shannon M.; Liu, Jianuo; Kipnis, Jonathan; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2008-01-01

    Vaccination therapy of AD animal models and patients strongly suggests an active role of brain mononuclear phagocytes in immune-mediated clearance of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in brain. Although Aβ uptake by macrophages can be regulated by pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, their effects on macrophage-mediated Aβ degradation are poorly understood. To better understand this mechanism of degradation, we examined whether pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines affect the degradation of Aβ using primary cultured human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and microglia using pulse-chase analysis of fibrillar and oligomer 125I-Aβ40 and Aβ42. Initial uptake of fibrillar Aβ40 and Aβ42 was 40% and its degradation was saturated by 120 hrs in both MDM and microglia, compared to an initial uptake of oligomeric Aβ less than 0.5% and saturation of degradation within 24 hrs. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) increased the intracellular retention of fibrillar Aβ40 and Aβ42 by inhibiting degradation, whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), but not IL-13 and IL-27, enhanced degradation. Fibrillar Aβ degradation in MDM is sensitive to lysosomal and insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) inhibitors but insensitive to proteasomal and neprilysin inhibitors. IFN-γ and TNF-α directly reduced the expression of IDE and chaperone molecules (Hsp70 and Hsc70), which are involved in refolding of aggregated proteins. Co-culture of MDM with activated, but not naïve T cells, suppressed Aβ degradation in MDM, which was partially blocked by a combination of neutralizing antibodies against pro-inflammatory cytokines. These data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines suppress Aβ degradation in MDM, whereas select anti-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines antagonize these effects. PMID:18768842

  19. The human carotid body releases acetylcholine, ATP and cytokines during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kåhlin, Jessica; Mkrtchian, Souren; Ebberyd, Anette; Hammarstedt-Nordenvall, Lalle; Nordlander, Britt; Yoshitake, Takashi; Kehr, Jan; Prabhakar, Nanduri; Poellinger, Lorenz; Fagerlund, Malin Jonsson; Eriksson, Lars I

    2014-08-01

    Studies on experimental animals established that the carotid bodies are sensory organs for detecting arterial blood O2 levels and that the ensuing chemosensory reflex is a major regulator of cardiorespiratory functions during hypoxia. However, little information is available on the human carotid body responses to hypoxia. The present study was performed on human carotid bodies obtained from surgical patients undergoing elective head and neck cancer surgery. Our results show that exposing carotid body slices to hypoxia for a period as brief as 5 min markedly facilitates the release of ACh and ATP. Furthermore, prolonged hypoxia for 1 h induces an increased release of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that type 1 cells of the human carotid body express an array of cytokine receptors as well as hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ACh and ATP are released from the human carotid body in response to hypoxia, suggesting that these neurotransmitters, as in several experimental animal models, play a role in hypoxic signalling also in the human carotid body. The finding that the human carotid body releases cytokines in response to hypoxia adds to the growing body of information suggesting that the carotid body may play a role in detecting inflammation, providing a link between the immune system and the nervous system.

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase are involved in Prevotella intermedia-induced proinflammatory cytokines expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Su-Min; Zhang, Ming; He, Jian-Jun; Wu, Jun-Zheng

    2009-08-28

    Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting periodontal connective tissues and alveolar bone. Proinflammatory mediators induced by periodontal pathogens play vital roles in the initiation and progression of the disease. In this study, we examined whether Prevotella intermedia induces proinflammatory cytokines expression in human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs). The mRNA expression and protein production were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) respectively. P. intermedia treatment dose- and time-dependently increased IL-6, IL-8 and M-CSF, but not IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA expression and protein secretion. Preincubation of hPDLs with extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors PD98059, SP600125, SB203580 and LY294002 resulted in significant reduction in P. intermedia-induced IL-6, IL-8 and M-CSF expression. Blocking the synthesis of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) by indomethacin also abolished the stimulatory effects of P. intermedia on cytokines expression. Our results indicate that P. intermedia induces proinflammatory cytokines through MAPKs and PI3K signaling pathways, and PGE(2) is involved in the P. intermedia-induced proinflammatory cytokines upregulation.

  1. Interleukin 10 regulates inflammatory cytokine synthesis to protect against lipopolysaccharide-induced abortion and fetal growth restriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Sarah A; Care, Alison S; Skinner, Rebecca J

    2007-05-01

    Interleukin 10 (IL10) is a potent immune-regulating cytokine and inhibitor of inflammatory cytokine synthesis. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory role of IL10 in pregnancy, the response of genetically IL10-deficient mice to low-dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced abortion was examined. When IL10-null mutant C57Bl/6 (Il10(-/-)) and control (Il10(+/+)) mice were administered low-dose LPS on Day 9.5 of gestation, IL10 deficiency predisposed to fetal loss accompanied by growth restriction in remaining viable fetuses, with an approximately 10-fold reduction in the threshold dose for 100% abortion. After LPS administration, inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFA) and IL6 were markedly increased in serum, uterine, and conceptus tissues in Il10(-/-) mice compared with Il10(+/+) mice, with elevated local synthesis of Tnfa and Il6 mRNAs in the gestational tissues. IL1A and IL12p40 were similarly elevated in serum and gestational tissues, whereas interferon gamma (IFNG) and soluble TNFRII content were unchanged in the absence of IL10. Recombinant IL10 rescued the increased susceptibility to LPS-induced fetal loss in Il10(-/-) mice but did not improve outcomes in Il10(+/+) mice. IL10 genotype also influenced the responsiveness of mice to a TNFA antagonist, etanercept. Fetal loss in Il10(-/-) mice was partly alleviated by moderate or high doses of etanercept, whereas Il10(+/+) mice were refractory to high-dose etanercept, consistent with attenuation by IL10 status of TNFA bioavailability after etanercept treatment. These data show that IL10 modulates resistance to inflammatory stimuli by downregulating expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNFA, IL6, IL1A, and IL12, acting to protect against inflammation-induced pathology in the implantation site.

  2. Carvedilol differentially regulates cytokine production from activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Ping; Ho, Ling-Jun; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Hsu, Yu-Lin; Tsao, Tien-Ping; Chang, Deh-Ming; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2004-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is one of the important mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis formation. The activated monocytes and their secreted cytokines contribute significantly to this inflammatory process. Here we examined the effects of carvedilol, a recently introduced cardio-protective alpha-1- and beta-receptor blocker, on cytokine production from various stimuli-activated human immune effector cells. By ELISA analysis, we showed that carvedilol inhibited interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but enhanced interleukin (IL)-12 production in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)- and concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was marginally affected. When purified monocytes were examined, we observed the consistent up-regulation of IL-12 production while both IL-10 and TNF-alpha were unaffected or marginally down-regulated, respectively, by carvedilol. In agreement with the observation in monocytes, the production of IL-12 from activated macrophages was also up-regulated by carvedilol. We concluded that carvedilol might mediate its therapeutic effects through differentially regulating cytokine production from activated mononuclear cells, including at least monocytes and macrophages.

  3. NKG2D receptor regulates human effector T-cell cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Amorette

    2011-01-01

    Although innate immune signals shape the activation of naive T cells, it is unclear how innate signals influence effector T-cell function. This study determined the effects of stimulating the NKG2D receptor in conjunction with the TCR on human effector CD8+ T cells. Stimulation of CD8+ T cells through CD3 and NKG2D simultaneously or through a chimeric NKG2D receptor, which consists of NKG2D fused to the intracellular region of CD3ζ, activated β-catenin and increased expression of β-catenin–induced genes, whereas T cells stimulated through the TCR or a combination of the TCR and CD28 did not. Activation by TCR and NKG2D prevented expression and production of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10, IL-9, IL-13, and VEGF-α in a β-catenin– and PPARγ- dependent manner. NKG2D stimulation also modulated the cytokine secretion of T cells activated simultaneously through CD3 and CD28. These data indicate that activating CD8+ T cells through the NKG2D receptor along with the TCR modulates signal transduction and the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, human effector T cells alter their function depending on which innate receptors are engaged in conjunction with the TCR complex. PMID:21518928

  4. Soluble antigens from group B streptococci induce cytokine production in human blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    von Hunolstein, C; Totolian, A; Alfarone, G; Mancuso, G; Cusumano, V; Teti, G; Orefici, G

    1997-01-01

    Group B streptococcal antigens stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 production in human blood cultures in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The minimal concentrations of type-specific polysaccharides, lipoteichoic acid, and group-specific polysaccharide required to produce these effects were, respectively, 0.01, 1, and 10 microg/ml. Cell separation experiments indicated that monocytes were the cell type mainly responsible for cytokine production. Time course studies indicated that TNF-alpha was released before the other cytokines. TNF-alpha, however, did not appear to directly induce IL-1beta, as shown by blockade experiments with anti-TNF-alpha antibodies. IL-6 levels were moderately but significantly decreased by anti-TNF-alpha. These data indicate that several products from group B streptococci are able to directly stimulate human monocytes to release TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6. These findings may be clinically relevant, since proinflammatory cytokines can mediate pathophysiologic changes during sepsis. PMID:9317001

  5. Human dendritic cell maturation and cytokine secretion upon stimulation with Bordetella pertussis filamentous haemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Dirix, Violette; Mielcarek, Nathalie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Willery, Eve; Alonso, Sylvie; Versheure, Virginie; Mascart, Françoise; Locht, Camille

    2014-07-01

    In addition to antibodies, Th1-type T cell responses are also important for long-lasting protection against pertussis. However, upon immunization with the current acellular vaccines, many children fail to induce Th1-type responses, potentially due to immunomodulatory effects of some vaccine antigens, such as filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA). We therefore analysed the ability of FHA to modulate immune functions of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). FHA was purified from pertussis toxin (PTX)-deficient or from PTX- and adenylate cyclase-deficient Bordetella pertussis strains, and residual endotoxin was neutralized with polymyxin B. FHA from both strains induced phenotypic maturation of human MDDC and cytokine secretion (IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-23 and IL-6). To identify the FHA domains responsible for MDDC immunomodulation, MDDC were stimulated with FHA containing a Gly→Ala substitution at its RGD site (FHA-RAD) or with an 80-kDa N-terminal moiety of FHA (Fha44), containing its heparin-binding site. Whereas FHA-RAD induced maturation and cytokine production comparable to those of FHA, Fha44 did not induce IL-10 production, but maturated MDDC at least partially. Nevertheless, Fha44 induced the secretion of IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-23 and IL-6 by MDDC, albeit at lower levels than FHA. Thus, FHA can modulate MDDC responses in multiple ways, and IL-10 induction can be dissociated from the induction of other cytokines.

  6. Caries induced cytokine network in the odontoblast layer of human teeth

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Immunologic responses of the tooth to caries begin with odontoblasts recognizing carious bacteria. Inflammatory propagation eventually leads to tooth pulp necrosis and danger to health. The present study aims to determine cytokine gene expression profiles generated within human teeth in response to dental caries in vivo and to build a mechanistic model of these responses and the downstream signaling network. Results We demonstrate profound differential up-regulation of inflammatory genes in the odontoblast layer (ODL) in human teeth with caries in vivo, while the pulp remains largely unchanged. Interleukins, chemokines, and all tested receptors thereof were differentially up-regulated in ODL of carious teeth, well over one hundred-fold for 35 of 84 genes. By interrogating reconstructed protein interaction networks corresponding to the differentially up-regulated genes, we develop the hypothesis that pro-inflammatory cytokines highly expressed in ODL of carious teeth, IL-1β, IL-1α, and TNF-α, carry the converged inflammatory signal. We show that IL1β amplifies antimicrobial peptide production in odontoblasts in vitro 100-fold more than lipopolysaccharide, in a manner matching subsequent in vivo measurements. Conclusions Our data suggest that ODL amplifies bacterial signals dramatically by self-feedback cytokine-chemokine signal-receptor cycling, and signal convergence through IL1R1 and possibly others, to increase defensive capacity including antimicrobial peptide production to protect the tooth and contain the battle against carious bacteria within the dentin. PMID:21261944

  7. Increased hydrophobicity in Malassezia species correlates with increased proinflammatory cytokine expression in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Narifumi; Akamatsu, Hirohiko; Takeoka, Shiori; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Nakata, Satoru; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2012-11-01

    Malassezia cells stimulate cytokine production by keratinocytes, although this ability differs among Malassezia species for unknown reasons. The aim of this study was to clarify the factors determining the ability to induce cytokine production by human keratinocytes in response to Malassezia species. M. furfur NBRC 0656, M. sympodialis CBS 7222, M. dermatis JCM 11348, M. globosa CBS 7966, M. restricta CBS 7877, and three strains each of M. globosa, M. restricta, M. dermatis, M. sympodialis, and M. furfur maintained under various culture conditions were used. Normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) (1 × 10(5) cells) and the Malassezia species (1 × 10(6) cells) were co-cultured, and IL-1α, IL-6, and IL-8 mRNA levels were determined. Moreover, the hydrophobicity and β-1,3-glucan expression at the surface of Malassezia cells were analyzed. The ability of Malassezia cells to trigger the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines in NHEKs differed with the species and conditions and was dependent upon the hydrophobicity of Malassezia cells not β-1,3-glucan expression.

  8. Human TNF cytokine neutralization with a vNAR from Heterodontus francisci shark

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Villegas, Tanya; Mata-Gonzalez, Teresa; Paniagua-Solis, Jorge; Sanchez, Edna; Licea, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic use of single domain antibodies (sdAbs) is a promising new approach because these small antibodies maintain antigen recognition and neutralization capacity, have thermal and chemical stability and have good solubility. In this study, using phage display technology, we isolated a variable domain of a IgNAR (vNAR) from a Heterodontus francisci shark immunized against the recombinant human cytokine TNFα (rhTNFα). One clone T43, which expresses the vNAR protein in the periplasmic space, was isolated from the fourth round of panning. T43 had the capacity to recognize rhTNF and neutralize it in vitro, indicating that T43 has potential as a therapeutic that can be used for diseases in which this pro-inflammatory cytokine needs to be controlled. PMID:23221782

  9. Regulation of the syncytin-1 promoter in human astrocytes by multiple sclerosis-related cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Mameli, Giuseppe . E-mail: viross@uniss.it; Astone, Vito; Khalili, Kamel; Serra, Caterina; Sawaya, Bassel E.; Dolei, Antonina

    2007-05-25

    Syncytin-1 has a physiological role during early pregnancy, as mediator of trophoblast fusion into the syncytiotrophoblast layer, hence allowing embryo implantation. In addition, its expression in nerve tissue has been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Syncytin-1 is the env glycoprotein of the ERVWE1 component of the W family of human endogenous retroviruses (HERV), located on chromosome 7q21-22, in a candidate region for genetic susceptibility to MS. The mechanisms of ERVWE1 regulation in nerve tissue remain to be identified. Since there are correlations between some cytokines and MS outcome, we examined the regulation of the syncytin-1 promoter by MS-related cytokines in human U-87MG astrocytic cells. Using transient transfection assays, we observed that the MS-detrimental cytokines TNF{alpha}, interferon-{gamma}, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1 activate the ERVWE1 promoter, while the MS-protective interferon-{beta} is inhibitory. The effects of cytokines are reduced by the deletion of the cellular enhancer domain of the promoter that contains binding sites for several transcription factors. In particular, we found that TNF{alpha} had the ability to activate the ERVWE1 promoter through an NF-{kappa}B-responsive element located within the enhancer domain of the promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift and ChIP assays showed that TNF{alpha} enhances the binding of the p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B, to its cognate site within the promoter. The effect of TNF{alpha} is abolished by siRNA directed against p65. Taken together, these results illustrate a role for p65 in regulating the ERVWE1 promoter and in TNF{alpha}-mediated induction of syncytin-1 in multiple sclerosis.

  10. [Cytokine profile in human hydatidosis: possible role in the immunosurveillance of patients infected with Echinococcus granulosus].

    PubMed

    Mezioug, D; Touil-Boukoffa, C

    2009-03-01

    Hydatidosis is a severe parasitic disease caused by infection with metacestode of the tapeworms Echinococcus granulosus. In human, the larval forms develop into large cysts especially in the liver, lung and brain. Our aim in this study was to investigate Th1 and Th2 cytokines production in hydatid disease in order to evaluate implication of Th1/Th2 ratio in the evolution of pathology according to the cystic localization, clinical stage and clinical evolution. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukine-12 (Il-12), interleukine-16 (Il-16), interleukine-18 (Il-18), interleukine-4 (Il-4), interleukine-5 (Il-5), interleukine-10 (Il-10) and interleukine-13 (Il-13) production is determined in sera from hydatid Algerian patients (n = 177) with liver, lung, liver and lung associated, spleen, kidney, osseo, heart and multiples hydatid cyst and in sera from patients with clinical complications (calcified liver cysts; infected lung cysts; vomique lung cysts and patients who relapsed) and according clinical stage (before surgical extirpation of the cyst and after surgical extirpation of the cyst). Cytokines are evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent Kits (ELISA Immunotech). The coexistence of elevated activities of IFN-gamma, Il-12, Il-16, Il-18, Il-4, Il-5, Il-10, and Il-13 is observed in most of sera from hydatid patients. In contrast, healthy controls showed minor levels. These results support Th1 and Th2 cell subsets activation in human hydatidosis. The comparison of Th1/Th2 production shows that the induction of these mediators is related to the cystic localization, the clinical stage and clinical evolution. Collectively, our data indicates that Th1 cytokines are related to the protective immunity, in contrast Th2 cytokines are responsible to the susceptibility to disease and associated with chronicle stage, clinical complications and secondary locations.

  11. Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench modulates human T-cell cytokine response☆

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fabiana N.; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Lin, Hong; Lau, Clara B.S.; Kennelly, Edward J.; Cassileth, Barrie R.; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the composition of a neutral and weakly acidic water-soluble extract from Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (EchNWA) previously shown to modify murine influenza infection, and to assess immunomodulatory effects on human T-cells. EchNWA extract from fresh aerial parts was extracted with water, ethanolic precipitation, and size-exclusion chromatography. The chemical profile of EchNWA was characterized by chromatography (size-exclusion, HPLC, GC–MS), and small molecule finger-print analysis performed by HPLC–PDA. Jurkat T-cells at high and low cell density were pretreated or not with doses of EchNWA, followed by activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin (PMA+I). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon gamma (IFNg) cytokine secretions were measured by multi-cytokine luminex technology. Results showed that EchNWA contains 80% polysaccharides, predominantly a 10 kDa entity; phenolic compounds, cynarin, cichoric and caftaric acids, but no detectable alkylamides. Cytokine production required stimulation and was lower after PMA+I activation in high-density compared to low-density conditions. EchNWA mediated a strong dose-dependent enhancement of high-density T-cell production of IL-2 and IFNg response to PMA+I. EchNWA alone did not stimulate T-cells. EchNWA enhanced mean fluorescence intensity of IL-2 in Jurkat T-cells activated by PMA+1 or ionomycin alone. Conversely EchNWA mediated modest but significant suppression of IFNg response and reduced the percentage of CD25+ T-cells under low-density conditions. Conclusions are that EchNWA polysaccharides, but not phenolic compounds have dose-related adjuvant effects on human T-cell cytokine responses characterized by enhancing and suppressive effects that are regulated by T-cell density. PMID:24434371

  12. Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench modulates human T-cell cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fabiana N; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Lin, Hong; Lau, Clara B S; Kennelly, Edward J; Cassileth, Barrie R; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2014-03-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the composition of a neutral and weakly acidic water-soluble extract from Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (EchNWA) previously shown to modify murine influenza infection, and to assess immunomodulatory effects on human T-cells. EchNWA extract from fresh aerial parts was extracted with water, ethanolic precipitation, and size-exclusion chromatography. The chemical profile of EchNWA was characterized by chromatography (size-exclusion, HPLC, GC-MS), and small molecule fingerprint analysis performed by HPLC-PDA. Jurkat T-cells at high and low cell density were pretreated or not with doses of EchNWA, followed by activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin (PMA+I). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon gamma (IFNg) cytokine secretions were measured by multi-cytokine luminex technology. Results showed that EchNWA contains 80% polysaccharides, predominantly a 10kDa entity; phenolic compounds, cynarin, cichoric and caftaric acids, but no detectable alkylamides. Cytokine production required stimulation and was lower after PMA+I activation in high-density compared to low-density conditions. EchNWA mediated a strong dose-dependent enhancement of high-density T-cell production of IL-2 and IFNg response to PMA+I. EchNWA alone did not stimulate T-cells. EchNWA enhanced mean fluorescence intensity of IL-2 in Jurkat T-cells activated by PMA+1 or ionomycin alone. Conversely EchNWA mediated modest but significant suppression of IFNg response and reduced the percentage of CD25+ T-cells under low-density conditions. Conclusions are that EchNWA polysaccharides, but not phenolic compounds have dose-related adjuvant effects on human T-cell cytokine responses characterized by enhancing and suppressive effects that are regulated by T-cell density.

  13. Nitric oxide promotes infectious bone resorption by enhancing cytokine-stimulated interstitial collagenase synthesis in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sze-Kwan; Kok, Sang-Heng; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping; Lee, Ming-Shu; Wang, Chih-Chiang; Lan, Wan-Hong; Hsiao, Michael; Goldring, Steven R; Hong, Chi-Yuan

    2003-01-01

    This experiment was undertaken to determine the role of macrophage-derived nitric oxide (NO) in mediating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced bone resorption by using an in vitro co-culture system and an in vivo model of infectious bone resorption. Our results demonstrated that LPS stimulated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a mRNAs and nitrite synthesis in the J774 mouse macrophage cell line but not in the UMR-106 (rat) and MC3T3-E1 (mouse) osteoblast cell lines. Conditioned media (CM) from LPS-stimulated J774 triggered only low to moderate levels of iNOS mRNAs in MC3T3-E1 and a trivial effect in UMR-106. On the other hand, CM induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) gene expression in both osteoblast cell lines. The NOS inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) did not alter this effect in MC3T3-E1 and UMR-106, whereas TNF-a antibody diminished the CM-induced MMP-1 gene expression in both cell lines. Interestingly, SNAP, a NO donor, although by itself is not a MMP-1 stimulator for UMR-106, augmented the TNF-alpha-stimulated MMP-1 mRNA production in UMR-106. In a J774/UMR-106 co-culture system, LPS stimulated significant MMP-1 gene expression in UMR-106, and this upregulation was abolished by L-NMMA and TNF-alpha antibodies. Immunohistochemical analysis in a rat model of infectious bone resorption (periapical lesion) showed co-distributions of iNOS+ macrophages and MMP-1+ osteoblasts around the osteolytic areas. Administration of L-NMMA markedly reduced the extent of bone loss and the percentage of MMP-1-synthesizing osteoblasts. These data suggest that NO derived from macrophages after LPS stimulation may enhance bone loss by augmenting the cytokine-induced MMP-1 production in osteoblasts.

  14. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide induces cytokine expression, lipolysis, and insulin resistance in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Timper, Katharina; Grisouard, Jean; Sauter, Nadine S; Herzog-Radimerski, Tanja; Dembinski, Kaethi; Peterli, Ralph; Frey, Daniel M; Zulewski, Henryk; Keller, Ulrich; Müller, Beat; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Obesity-related insulin resistance is linked to a chronic state of systemic and adipose tissue-derived inflammation. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone also acting on adipocytes. We investigated whether GIP affects inflammation, lipolysis, and insulin resistance in human adipocytes. Human subcutaneous preadipocyte-derived adipocytes, differentiated in vitro, were treated with human GIP to analyze mRNA expression and protein secretion of cytokines, glycerol, and free fatty acid release and insulin-induced glucose uptake. GIP induced mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-1β, and the IL-1 receptor antagonist IL-1Ra, whereas TNFα, IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 remained unchanged. Cytokine induction involved PKA and the NF-κB pathway as well as an autocrine IL-1 effect. Furthermore, GIP potentiated IL-6 and IL-1Ra secretion in the presence of LPS, IL-1β, and TNFα. GIP induced lipolysis via activation of hormone-sensitive lipase and was linked to NF-κB activation. Finally, chronic GIP treatment impaired insulin-induced glucose uptake possibly due to the observed impaired translocation of glucose transporter GLUT4. In conclusion, GIP induces an inflammatory and prolipolytic response via the PKA -NF-κB-IL-1 pathway and impairs insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake in human adipocytes.

  15. Herbal medicine IMOD suppresses LPS-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines in human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Saeedeh; Drewniak, Agata; Sarrami-Forooshani, Ramin; Kaptein, Tanja M.; Gharibdoost, Farhad; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2015-01-01

    Traditional medicines that stimulate or modulate the immune system can be used as innovative approaches to treat immunological diseases. The herbal medicine IMOD has been shown to strongly modulate immune responses in several animal studies as well as in clinical trials. However, little is known about the mechanisms of IMOD to modulate immunity. Here we have investigated whether IMOD modulates the immunological function of human dendritic cells (DCs). IMOD alone did not induce DC maturation nor production of cytokines. Notably, IMOD decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-12 p70, and TNFα by LPS-activated DCs at both mRNA and protein levels in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, treatment with IMOD did not affect LPS induced-production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Furthermore, IMOD inhibited T cell activation/proliferation by LPS-treated DCs and skewed T-cells responses toward the T helper type 2 polarization. These data strongly indicate that IMOD has a potent immunomodulatory ability that affects TLR signaling and thereby modulates DC function. Insight into the immunomodulatory effect of herbal medicine IMOD may provide innovative strategies to affect the immune system and to help combat various diseases. PMID:25870561

  16. Modulation of the cytokine response in human monocytes by mycobacterium leprae phenolic glycolipid-1.

    PubMed

    Manca, Claudia; Peixoto, Blas; Malaga, Wladimir; Guilhot, Christophe; Kaplan, Gilla

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic but treatable infectious disease caused by the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. M. leprae cell wall is characterized by a unique phenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) reported to have several immune functions. We have examined the role of PGL-1 in the modulation of monocyte cytokine/chemokine production in naive human monocytes. PGL-1 in its purified form or expressed in a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Colmette-Guérin (BCG) background (rBCG-PGL-1) was tested. We found that PGL-1 selectively modulated the induction of specific monocyte cytokines and chemokines and, when used as prestimulus, exerted priming and/or inhibitory effects on the induction of selected cytokines/chemokines in response to a second stimulus. Taken together, the results of this study support a modulatory role for PGL-1 in the innate immune response to M. leprae. Thus, PGL-1 may play an important role in the development of the anergic clinical forms of disease and in tissue damage seen in lepromatous patients and during the reactional states of leprosy.

  17. Erythropoietin stimulation of human adipose tissue for therapeutic refilling releases protective cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Sabbatini, Maurizio; Bosetti, Michela; Borrone, Alessia; Moalem, Liah; Taveggia, Antonio; Verna, Giovanni; Cannas, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis and inflammatory processes may be at the basis of reducing graft survival. Erythropoietin is a tissue-protective hormone with pleiotropic potential, and it interferes with the activities of pro-inflammatory cytokines and stimulates healing following injury, preventing destruction of tissue surrounding the injury site. It may represent a useful tool to increase the autograft integration. Through the use of multipanel kit cytokine analysis we have detected the cytokines secreted by human tissue adipose mass seeded in culture following withdrawal by Coleman’s modified technique in three groups: control, after lipopolysaccharides stimulation and after erythropoietin stimulation. In the control group, we have observed expression of factors that may have a role in protecting the tissue homeostatic mechanism. But the same factors were secreted following stimulation with lipopolysaccharides combined with others factors that delineated the inflammatory state. Instead through erythropoietin stimulation, the factors known to exert tissue-protective action were secreted. Therefore, the use of a trophic factors such as erythropoietin may help to inhibit the potential inflammatory process development and stimulate the activation of reparative/regenerative process in the tissue graft. PMID:27738510

  18. Maraviroc reduces cytokine expression and secretion in human adipose cells without altering adipogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Delfín, Julieta; Domingo, Pere; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2013-03-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is a drug approved for use as part of HAART in treatment-experienced HIV-1 patients with CCR5-tropic virus. Despite the current concerns on the alterations in adipose tissue that frequently appear in HIV-infected patients under HAART, there is no information available on the effects of MVC on adipose tissue. Here we studied the effects of MVC during and after the differentiation of human adipocytes in culture, and compared the results with the effects of efavirenz (EFV). We measured the acquisition of adipocyte morphology; the gene expression levels of markers for mitochondrial toxicity, adipogenesis and inflammation; and the release of adipokines and cytokines to the medium. Additionally, we determined the effects of MVC on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in adipocytes. Unlike EFV-treated pre-adipocytes, MVC-treated pre-adipocytes showed no alterations in the capacity to differentiate into adipocytes and accumulated lipids normally. Consistent with this, there were no changes in the mRNA levels of PPARγ or SREBP-1c, two master regulators of adipogenesis. In addition, MVC caused a significant decrease in the gene expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas EFV had the opposite effect. Moreover, MVC lowered inflammation-related gene expression and inhibited the LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes in differentiated adipocytes. We conclude that MVC does not alter adipocyte differentiation but rather shows anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Collectively, our results suggest that MVC may minimize adverse effects on adipose tissue development, metabolism, and inflammation, and thus could be a potentially beneficial component of antiretroviral therapy.

  19. Effects of tropism and virulence of Leishmania parasites on cytokine production by infected human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Meddeb-Garnaoui, A; Zrelli, H; Dellagi, K

    2009-01-01

    The nature of early interactions between Leishmania and macrophages which determine the outcome of infection can be related directly to parasite biological properties. Here we compared the capacity of L. major (Lm) strains, reported to be high (LmHV) and low virulent and (LmLV) in the mouse model and L. infantum (Li) strains, dermotropic (LiD) and viscerotropic (LiV), to infect and modulate cytokine production in human peripheral blood derived monocytes. Monocytes were infected with metacyclic promastigotes for 24, 48 and 72 h. Parasite burden was significantly higher in Lm- than in Li-infected monocytes. LmHV and LiD induced a significantly higher parasite burden than LmLV and LiV respectively. Cytokine production was evaluated in monocytes infected for 24 h. Contrary to interleukin (IL)-12p70, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and transforming growth factor-β production was increased significantly in infected monocytes with no differences between strains. Lm isolates induced significantly higher quantities of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α than Li isolates. Low levels of IL-10 were induced by all Leishmania strains and, interestingly, co-stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was accompanied by a dramatic increase in IL-10 production by infected monocytes. In conclusion, Lm isolates displaying different levels of virulence in mice exhibited significant differences in parasite burden but similar abilities to modulate cytokine production in human monocytes. Li strains showed weaker infectivity and TNF-α inducing-capacity compared with Lm strains. The dramatic increase of IL-10 production in infected monocytes co-stimulated by LPS may play a role in disease progression considering the presence of LPS during bacterial superinfections observed during human leishmaniasis. PMID:19040614

  20. Cytokine profile in human eyes: contribution of a new cytokine combination for differential diagnosis between intraocular lymphoma or uveitis.

    PubMed

    Fisson, Sylvain; Ouakrim, Hanane; Touitou, Valérie; Baudet, Sylvie; Ben Abdelwahed, Rym; Donnou, Sabrina; Miloudi, Amine; Galand, Claire; Bodaghi, Bahram; Lehoang, Phuc; Brissard, Martine; Le Garff-Tavernier, Magali; Fridman, Wolf Herman; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cassoux, Nathalie; Merle-Béral, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    Primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL), also called primary vitreoretinal lymphomas, often masquerades as uveitis. This misdiagnosis can result in subsequent brain involvement and oculocerebral lymphoma (OCL). In this study, we sought to characterize the helper T-cell type 1 (Th1)/Th2 cytokine profile in vitreous samples from patients with PIOL, OCL, uveitis and controls with non-inflammatory disease. Vitreous and aqueous humor samples from 87 patients with PIOL (n = 30), OCL (n = 12), uveitis (n = 34), and retinal detachment (RD) without hemorrhage (n = 11) were analyzed and their concentrations of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, interferon (IFN)-γ, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were determined by flow cytometric bead arrays (CBA). The IL-10 levels determined by CBA were compared with those by ELISA. IL-10 concentrations measured by CBA and ELISA were highly correlated. IL-2, IL-4, and TNFα were not detected in any sample. The only cytokine detected at a significant level in samples from RD vitreous was IL-6. The IL-10/IL-6 ratio, as previously reported, was slightly higher in PIOL than in uveitis samples, but not for all patients. Cytokine profiles from PIOL and OCL samples did not differ. The combination of the IL-10/IL-6 and IL-10/IFNγ ratios was highly informative for discriminating PIOL/OCL from uveitis samples and for therapeutic follow up of PIOL. This strategy might be very helpful as an initial screening to rule out PIOL in patients thought to have uveitis.

  1. Distinct differences in the responses of the human pancreatic β-cell line EndoC-βH1 and human islets to proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Bryndon J; McGraw, Jennifer A; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Annamalai, Mani; Chen, Jing; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Davis, Dawn B; Corbett, John A; Mathews, Clayton E

    2015-09-01

    While insulinoma cells have been developed and proven to be extremely useful in studies focused on mechanisms controlling β-cell function and viability, translating findings to human β-cells has proven difficult because of the limited access to human islets and the absence of suitable insulinoma cell lines of human origin. Recently, a human β-cell line, EndoC-βH1, has been derived from human fetal pancreatic buds. The purpose of this study was to determine whether human EndoC-βH1 cells respond to cytokines in a fashion comparable to human islets. Unlike most rodent-derived insulinoma cell lines that respond to cytokines in a manner consistent with rodent islets, EndoC-βH1 cells fail to respond to a combination of cytokines (IL-1, IFN-γ, and TNF) in a manner consistent with human islets. Nitric oxide, produced following inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, is a major mediator of cytokine-induced human islet cell damage. We show that EndoC-βH1 cells fail to express iNOS or produce nitric oxide in response to this combination of cytokines. Inhibitors of iNOS prevent cytokine-induced loss of human islet cell viability; however, they do not prevent cytokine-induced EndoC-βH1 cell death. Stressed human islets or human islets expressing heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) are resistant to cytokines, and, much like stressed human islets, EndoC-βH1 cells express HSP70 under basal conditions. Elevated basal expression of HSP70 in EndoC-βH1 cells is consistent with the lack of iNOS expression in response to cytokine treatment. While expressing HSP70, EndoC-βH1 cells fail to respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress activators, such as thapsigargin. These findings indicate that EndoC-βH1 cells do not faithfully recapitulate the response of human islets to cytokines. Therefore, caution should be exercised when making conclusions regarding the actions of cytokines on human islets when using this human-derived insulinoma cell line.

  2. Longitudinal Study of Cytokine Expression, Lipid Profile and Neuronal Growth Factors in Human Breast Milk from Term and Preterm Deliveries.

    PubMed

    Collado, Maria Carmen; Santaella, Marina; Mira-Pascual, Laia; Martínez-Arias, Elena; Khodayar-Pardo, Parisá; Ros, Gaspar; Martínez-Costa, Cecilia

    2015-10-19

    Breast milk (BM) is considered as a reference for infant nutrition. The role of bioactive components, such as cytokines, hormones, growth factors (GFs) and fatty acids (FAs) is poorly known, but they might be implicated in immune response development. The aim of this study was to identify the lipid profile and the spectrum of cytokines and neuronal GF in BM samples and analyse the influence of gestational age and lactation time on these components. This study used a longitudinal prospective method for the characterization of cytokines, FAs and GFs global profiles in 120 BM samples from 40 healthy mothers (20 preterm and 20 term) collected as colostrum, transitional and mature milk. The cytokines were analysed by protein array (Ray Bio® Human Cytokine Array G6. Ray Biotech, Inc. Norcross, GA, USA) and the FAs were analysed by gas chromatography. The FA profile was similar between the term and the preterm BM samples. Omega-3-α-linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and omega-6-linoleic acid were the most abundant in the term and preterm samples during lactation. Omega-3 ETA and omega-3 EPA we observed exclusively in the preterm samples. The cytokine profile showed a different trend based on gestational age. A significantly higher expression of neurotrophic factors was found in the mature preterm milk samples as compared to the mature term samples. Our study is the first to identify the influence and interactions of perinatal factors on cytokine, GFs and FAs in human milk.

  3. Longitudinal Study of Cytokine Expression, Lipid Profile and Neuronal Growth Factors in Human Breast Milk from Term and Preterm Deliveries

    PubMed Central

    Collado, Maria Carmen; Santaella, Marina; Mira-Pascual, Laia; Martínez-Arias, Elena; Khodayar-Pardo, Parisá; Ros, Gaspar; Martínez-Costa, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Breast milk (BM) is considered as a reference for infant nutrition. The role of bioactive components, such as cytokines, hormones, growth factors (GFs) and fatty acids (FAs) is poorly known, but they might be implicated in immune response development. The aim of this study was to identify the lipid profile and the spectrum of cytokines and neuronal GF in BM samples and analyse the influence of gestational age and lactation time on these components. This study used a longitudinal prospective method for the characterization of cytokines, FAs and GFs global profiles in 120 BM samples from 40 healthy mothers (20 preterm and 20 term) collected as colostrum, transitional and mature milk. The cytokines were analysed by protein array (Ray Bio® Human Cytokine Array G6. Ray Biotech, Inc. Norcross, GA, USA) and the FAs were analysed by gas chromatography. The FA profile was similar between the term and the preterm BM samples. Omega-3-α-linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and omega-6-linoleic acid were the most abundant in the term and preterm samples during lactation. Omega-3 ETA and omega-3 EPA we observed exclusively in the preterm samples. The cytokine profile showed a different trend based on gestational age. A significantly higher expression of neurotrophic factors was found in the mature preterm milk samples as compared to the mature term samples. Our study is the first to identify the influence and interactions of perinatal factors on cytokine, GFs and FAs in human milk. PMID:26492267

  4. DMSO Represses Inflammatory Cytokine Production from Human Blood Cells and Reduces Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Elisia, Ingrid; Nakamura, Hisae; Lam, Vivian; Hofs, Elyse; Cederberg, Rachel; Cait, Jessica; Hughes, Michael R.; Lee, Leora; Jia, William; Adomat, Hans H.; Guns, Emma S.; McNagny, Kelly M.; Samudio, Ismael; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is currently used as an alternative treatment for various inflammatory conditions as well as for cancer. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of data regarding its safety and efficacy as well as its mechanism of action in human cells. Herein, we demonstrate that DMSO has ex-vivo anti-inflammatory activity using Escherichia coli- (E. coli) and herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1)-stimulated whole human blood. Specifically, we found that between 0.5%– 2%, DMSO significantly suppressed the expression of many pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, a significant reduction in monocyte viability was also observed at 2% DMSO, suggesting a narrow window of efficacy. Anti-inflammatory concentrations of DMSO suppressed E. coli-induced ERK1/2, p38, JNK and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting DMSO acts on these signaling pathways to suppress inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production. Although DMSO induces the differentiation of B16/F10 melanoma cells in vitro, topical administration of DMSO to mice subcutaneously implanted with B16 melanoma cells was ineffective at reducing tumor growth, DMSO was also found to block mouse macrophages from polarizing to either an M1- or an M2-phenotype, which may contribute to its inability to slow tumor growth. Topical administration of DMSO, however, significantly mitigated K/BxN serum-induced arthritis in mice, and this was associated with reduced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the joints and white blood cell levels in the blood. Thus, while we cannot confirm the efficacy of DMSO as an anti-cancer agent, the use of DMSO in arthritis warrants further investigation to ascertain its therapeutic potential. PMID:27031833

  5. Injury Induces Localized Airway Increases in Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Mark A.; Hermsen, Joshua L.; Gomez, F. Enrique; Sano, Yoshifumi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) increases in the airways of humans and mice after injury to protect against infection. The pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 are linked molecularly to sIgA production and secretion and are required for sIgA increases in the airway after injury in a mouse model. We investigated the injury effect on airway and serum concentrations to determine the source of the cytokines involved in the airway IgA response. Methods In the first experiment, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and serum obtained from 11 ventilated trauma patients within 30 h of admission were compared with those in eight elective surgical patients. In the second experiment, male ICR mice received no injury (n = 7) or injury with sham celiotomy and neck incisions (n = 8) with sacrifice of all animals at 8 h for BAL fluid and serum cytokine measurements by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Injured patients had significantly higher BAL fluid and serum TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations, with greater increases in the BAL fluid than in the serum. Injured mice had significantly increased BAL fluid concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 without significant changes in serum TNF-α or IL-1β. Serum IL-6 increased significantly. Conclusions Injury significantly increases human and mouse airway TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Increases are greater in the airway than in serum, implying a local rather than a systemic stress response to injury. PMID:21166596

  6. Leukocyte Lysis and Cytokine Induction by the Human Sexually Transmitted Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Frances; Diala, Fitz Gerald I.; Chen, Yi-Pei; Molgora, Brenda M.; Ng, Shek Hang; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis (Tv) is an extracellular protozoan parasite that causes the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection: trichomoniasis. While acute symptoms in women may include vaginitis, infections are often asymptomatic, but can persist and are associated with medical complications including increased HIV susceptibility, infertility, pre-term labor, and higher incidence of cervical cancer. Heightened inflammation resulting from Tv infection could account for these complications. Effective cellular immune responses to Tv have not been characterized, and re-infection is common, suggesting a dysfunctional adaptive immune response. Using primary human leukocyte components, we have established an in vitro co-culture system to assess the interaction between Tv and the cells of the human immune system. We determined that in vitro, Tv is able to lyse T-cells and B-cells, showing a preference for B-cells. We also found that Tv lysis of lymphocytes was mediated by contact-dependent and soluble factors. Tv lysis of monocytes is far less efficient, and almost entirely contact-dependent. Interestingly, a common symbiont of Tv, Mycoplasma hominis, did not affect cytolytic activity of the parasite, but had a major impact on cytokine responses. M. hominis enabled more diverse inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to Tv and, of the cytokines tested, Tv strains cleared of M. hominis induced only IL-8 secretion from monocytes. The quality of the adaptive immune response to Tv is therefore likely influenced by Tv symbionts, commensals, and concomitant infections, and may be further complicated by direct parasite lysis of effector immune cells. PMID:27529696

  7. Leukotriene B4 potentiates CpG signaling for enhanced cytokine secretion by human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Gosselin, Jean

    2009-08-15

    TLRs are known to be important in innate host defense against a variety of microbial infections. In particular, TLR9 has been associated with immune defense against different foreign organisms by recognition of unmethylated DNA sequences. In this report, we provide evidence that leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) has the capacity to modulate TLR9 expression on human neutrophils. The effect of LTB(4) was found to be specific, because related leukotrienes such as LTC(4) and LTD(4) or neutrophil agonists IL-8 and C5a failed to modulate TLR9 expression in neutrophils. Using fluorochrome-tagged CpG DNA, we observed that LTB(4) treatment also increased TLR9 ligand binding in neutrophils. Moreover, LTB(4) stimulation potentiates CpG-mediated signaling via an endosome-independent mechanism in human neutrophils, leading to enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. The increase in cytokine secretion by LTB(4) following CpG stimulation of neutrophils was associated with the activation of TGF-beta-activated kinase (TAK-1) as well as p38 and c-Jun (JNK) kinases. In contrast, in PBMC LTB(4) leads to an increase in cytokine secretion following CpG stimulation but via a MyD88- and endosome-dependent mechanism. As observed in neutrophils, PBMC stimulation with LTB(4) in the presence of CpG also results in enhanced TAK-1, p38, and JNK phosphorylation/activation. These data provide new evidence underlying the immunomodulatory properties of LTB(4) leading to antimicrobial defense.

  8. B7 expression and antigen presentation by human brain endothelial cells: requirement for proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Prat, A; Biernacki, K; Becher, B; Antel, J P

    2000-02-01

    Interaction between systemic immune cells with cells of the blood-brain barrier is a central step in development of CNS-directed immune responses. Endothelial cells are the first cells of the blood-brain barrier encountered by migrating lymphocytes. To investigate the antigen-presenting capacity of human adult brain endothelial cells (HBECs), we used HBECs derived from surgically resected temporal lobe tissue, cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood derived CD4+ T lymphocytes. HBECs in response to IFN-gamma, but not under basal culture conditions, expressed HLA-DR, B7.1 and B7.2 antigens. Despite such up-regulation, these IFN-gamma-treated HBECs, in contrast to human microglia and PB monocytes, did not sustain allogeneic CD4+ cell proliferation, supported only low levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma production, and did not stimulate IL-2 receptor expression. CD4+ T cell proliferation and increased IL-2 receptor expression could be obtained by addition of IL-2. Our data suggests that, although HBECs cannot alone support T cell proliferation and cytokine production, HBECs acting in concert with cytokines derived from a proinflammatory environment could support such a response.

  9. High insulin and leptin increase resistin and inflammatory cytokine production from human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Tsiotra, Panayoula C; Boutati, Eleni; Dimitriadis, George; Raptis, Sotirios A

    2013-01-01

    Resistin and the proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β , produced by adipocytes, and macrophages, are considered to be important modulators of chronic inflammation contributing to the development of obesity and atherosclerosis. Human monocyte-enriched mononuclear cells, from ten healthy individuals, were exposed to high concentrations of insulin, leptin, and glucose (alone or in combination) for 24 hours in vitro. Resistin, TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β production was examined and compared to that in untreated cells. High insulin and leptin concentrations significantly upregulated resistin and the cytokines. The subsequent addition of high glucose significantly upregulated resistin and TNF- α mRNA and protein secretion, while it did not have any effect on IL-6 or IL-1 β production. By comparison, exposure to dexamethasone reduced TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β production, while at this time point it increased resistin protein secretion. These data suggest that the expression of resistin, TNF- α , IL-6, and IL-1 β from human mononuclear cells, might be enhanced by the hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia and possibly by the hyperglycemia in metabolic diseases as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Therefore, the above increased production may contribute to detrimental effects of their increased adipocyte-derived circulating levels on systemic inflammation, insulin sensitivity, and endothelial function of these patients.

  10. Multiple effects of TRAIL in human carcinoma cells: Induction of apoptosis, senescence, proliferation, and cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Levina, Vera; Marrangoni, Adele M.; DeMarco, Richard; Gorelik, Elieser; Lokshin, Anna E.

    2008-04-15

    TRAIL is a death ligand that induces apoptosis in malignant but not normal cells. Recently the ability of TRAIL to induce proliferation in apoptosis-resistant normal and malignant cells was reported. In this study, we analyzed TRAIL effects in apoptosis sensitive MCF7, OVCAR3 and H460 human tumor cell lines. TRAIL at low concentrations preferentially induced cell proliferation. At 100 ng/ml, apoptotic death was readily observed, however surviving cells acquired higher proliferative capacity. TRAIL-stimulated production of several cytokines, IL-8, RANTES, MCP-1 and bFGF, and activation of caspases 1 and 8 was essential for this effect. Antibodies to IL-8, RANTES, and bFGF blocked TRAIL-induced cell proliferation and further stimulated apoptosis. For the first time, we report that high TRAIL concentrations induced cell senescence as determined by the altered morphology and expression of several senescence markers: SA-{beta}-gal, p21{sup Waf1/Cip1}, p16{sup INK4a}, and HMGA. Caspase 9 inhibition protected TRAIL-treated cells from senescence, whereas inhibition of caspases 1 and 8 increased the yield of SLP cells. In conclusion, in cultured human carcinoma cells, TRAIL therapy results in three functional outcomes, apoptosis, proliferation and senescence. TRAIL-induced proapoptotic and prosurvival responses correlate with the strength of signaling. TRAIL-induced cytokine production is responsible for its proliferative and prosurvival effects.

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines Predominate in Acute Human Plasmodium knowlesi Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cox-Singh, Janet; Singh, Balbir; Daneshvar, Cyrus; Planche, Timothy; Parker-Williams, John; Krishna, Sanjeev

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi has entered the human population of Southeast Asia. Naturally acquired knowlesi malaria is newly described with relatively little available data, including data on the host response to infection. Therefore pre-treatment cytokine and chemokine profiles were determined for 94 P. knowlesi, and for comparison, 20, P. vivax and 22 P. falciparum, patients recruited in Malaysian Borneo. Nine, five and one patient with P. knowlesi, P. falciparum and P. vivax respectively had complicated malaria as defined by World Health Organisation. Patients with uncomplicated P. knowlesi had lower levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNFα than those with complicated disease (both p<0.05, Dunn's post test, DPT). The anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1ra and IL-10 were detected in all patients in the study. IL-1ra, the most abundant cytokine measured, correlated with parasitaemia in P. knowlesi (rs = 0.47, p =  <0.0001), P. vivax (rs = 0.61, p = 0.0042) and P. falciparum (rs = 0.57,p = 0.0054) malaria. IL-10 correlated with parasitaemia in both P. knowlesi (rs = 0.54, p =  <0.0001) and P. vivax (rs = 0.78, p =  <0.0001) infections. There were between group differences in soluble markers of macrophage activation (MIP-1β and MCP-1). P. knowlesi patients had significantly lower levels of MIP-1β than P. falciparum (DPT, p =  <0.01). Uncomplicated P. knowlesi patients had significantly lower levels of MCP-1 than uncomplicated P. falciparum patients (DPT, p =  <0.001). There was no significant difference between complicated and uncomplicated P. knowlesi infections. MCP-1, MIP-1β, IL-8 and TNFα increased in complicated P. knowlesi but decreased in complicated P. falciparum infections. Descriptions of human knowlesi malaria provide a comparative means to discover mediators of pathophysiology in severe P. knowlesi as well as P. falciparum malaria. Crucially, P. knowlesi may be the disease and experimental primate

  12. Differential subnetwork of chemokines/cytokines in human, mouse, and rat brain cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Du, Yang; Deng, Wenjun; Wang, Zixing; Ning, MingMing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yiming; Lo, Eng H; Xing, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Mice and rats are the most commonly used animals for preclinical stroke studies, but it is unclear whether targets and mechanisms are always the same across different species. Here, we mapped the baseline expression of a chemokine/cytokine subnetwork and compared responses after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons, astrocytes, and microglia from mouse, rat, and human. Baseline profiles of chemokines (CX3CL1, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10) and cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNFα) showed significant differences between human and rodents. The response of chemokines/cytokines to oxygen-glucose deprivation was also significantly different between species. After 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation and 4 h reoxygenation, human and rat neurons showed similar changes with a downregulation in many chemokines, whereas mouse neurons showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. For astrocytes, subnetwork response patterns were more similar in rats and mice compared to humans. For microglia, rat cells showed an upregulation in all chemokines/cytokines, mouse cells had many down-regulated genes, and human cells showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. This study provides proof-of-concept that species differences exist in chemokine/cytokine subnetworks in brain cells that may be relevant to stroke pathophysiology. Further investigation of differential gene pathways across species is warranted.

  13. Modulation of mdr1 expression by cytokines in human colon carcinoma cells: an approach for reversal of multidrug resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, U.; Walther, W.; Shoemaker, R. H.

    1996-01-01

    Reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR) may offer a means of increasing the effectiveness of tumour chemotherapy. A variety of recent evidence indicates that cytokines may be particularly useful in this endeavour. To investigate the molecular mechanism by which cytokines may sensitise multidrug-resistant colon carcinoma cells, HCT15 and HCT116, to treatment with MDR-related drugs, we evaluated the effects of the human cytokines tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interferon gamma (IFN gamma) on mdr1 gene expression at the mRNA level by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and at the protein level with monoclonal antibodies by immuno flow cytometry. P-glycoprotein function was examined after accumulation of the fluorescent drug, doxorubicin, by flow cytometry. Chemosensitivity to doxorubicin and vincristine was analysed using the XTT assay. All three cytokines were found to modulate the MDR characteristics on mdr1 expression levels, P-glycoprotein function and measured chemosensitivity to MDR-associated anti-cancer drugs. This cytokine-induced reversal of MDR was strongly time dependent, with maximal effects after 48 and 72 h of cytokine treatment. If similar modulation of MDR phenotype can be obtained in in vivo models, it may be possible to verify the time course for modulation by cytokine treatment and to design appropriate clinical trials of this strategy for MDR reversal. Images Figure 1 PMID:8912533

  14. Effects of Rilpivirine on Human Adipocyte Differentiation, Gene Expression, and Release of Adipokines and Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Delfín, Julieta; Domingo, Pere; Mateo, Maria Gracia; Gutierrez, Maria del Mar; Domingo, Joan Carles; Giralt, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Rilpivirine is a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) recently developed as a drug of choice for initial antiretroviral treatment of HIV-1 infection. Disturbances in lipid metabolism and, ultimately, in adipose tissue distribution and function are common concerns as secondary effects of antiretroviral treatment. Efavirenz, the most commonly used NNRTI, causes mild dyslipidemic effects in patients and strongly impaired adipocyte differentiation in vitro. In this study, we provide the first demonstration of the effects of rilpivirine on human adipocyte differentiation, gene expression, and release of regulatory proteins (adipokines and cytokines) and compare them with those caused by efavirenz. Rilpivirine caused a repression of adipocyte differentiation that was associated with impaired expression of the master adipogenesis regulators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα), and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBP-1) and their target genes encoding lipoprotein lipase and the adipokines leptin and adiponectin. Rilpivirine also repressed adiponectin release by adipocytes, but only at high concentrations, and did not alter leptin release. Rilpivirine induced the release of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 and -8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 [PAI-1]) only at very high concentrations (10 μM). A comparison of the effects of rilpivirine and efavirenz at the same concentration (4 μM) or even at lower concentrations of efavirenz (2 μM) showed that rilpivirine-induced impairment of adipogenesis and induction of proinflammatory cytokine expression and release were systematically milder than those of efavirenz. It is concluded that rilpivirine causes an antiadipogenic and proinflammatory response pattern, but only at high concentrations, whereas efavirenz causes similar effects at lower concentrations

  15. Control of pro-inflammatory cytokine release from human monocytes with the use of an interleukin-10 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hardik; Davidson, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The monocytes (MONOs) can be considered as "double-edge swords"; they have both important pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions manifested in part by cytokine production and release. Although MONOs are circulating cells, they are the major precursors of a variety of tissue-specific immune cells such as the alveolar macrophage, dendritic cells, microglial cells, and Kupffer cells. Unlike the polymorphonuclear leukocyte, which produces no or very little interleukin-10 (IL-10), the monocyte can produce this potent anti-inflammatory cytokine to control inflammation. IL-10, on an equimolar basis, is a more potent inhibitor of pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by monocytes than many anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids which are used clinically. This chapter describes how to isolate monocytes from human blood and the use of IL-10 monoclonal antibody to determine the effect and timing of endogenous IL-10 release on the production and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  16. Combined effects of proinflammatory cytokines and intermittent cyclic mechanical strain in inhibiting osteogenicity in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chaofan; Chen, Lijiao; Shi, Xinlian; Cao, Zhensheng; Hu, Bibo; Yu, Wenbin; Ren, Manman; Hu, Rongdang; Deng, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical strain plays an important role in bone formation and resorption during orthodontic tooth movement. The mechanism has not been fully studied, and the process becomes complex with increased amounts of periodontal patients seeking orthodontic care. Our aims were to elucidate the combined effects of proinflammatory cytokines and intermittent cyclic strain (ICS) on the osteogenic capacity of human periodontal ligament cells. Cultured human periodontal ligament cells were exposed to proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β 5 ng/mL and tumor necrosis factor-α 10 ng/mL) for 1 and 5 days, and ICS (0.5 Hz, 12% elongation) was applied for 4 h per day. The autocrine of inflammatory cytokines was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of osteoblast markers runt-related transcription factor 2 and rabbit collagen type I was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The osteogenic capacity was also detected by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining, ALP activity, and alizarin red staining. We demonstrated that ICS impaired the osteogenic capacity of human periodontal ligament cells when incubated with proinflammatory cytokines, as evidenced by the low expression of ALP staining, low ALP activity, reduced alizarin red staining, and reduced osteoblast markers. These data, for the first time, suggest that ICS has a negative effect on the inductive inhibition of osteogenicity in human PDL cells mediated by proinflammatory cytokines.

  17. Peripheral CD4+ T cell cytokine responses following human challenge and re-challenge with Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Fimlaid, Kelly A; Lindow, Janet C; Tribble, David R; Bunn, Janice Y; Maue, Alexander C; Kirkpatrick, Beth D

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide; however, our understanding of the human immune response to C. jejuni infection is limited. A previous human challenge model has shown that C. jejuni elicits IFNγ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a response associated with protection from clinical disease following re-infection. In this study, we investigate T lymphocyte profiles associated with campylobacteriosis using specimens from a new human challenge model in which C. jejuni-naïve subjects were challenged and re-challenged with C. jejuni CG8421. Multiparameter flow cytometry was used to investigate T lymphocytes as a source of cytokines, including IFNγ, and to identify cytokine patterns associated with either campylobacteriosis or protection from disease. Unexpectedly, all but one subject evaluated re-experienced campylobacteriosis after re-challenge. We show that CD4+ T cells make IFNγ and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to infection; however, multifunctional cytokine response patterns were not found. Cytokine production from peripheral CD4+ T cells was not enhanced following re-challenge, which may suggest deletion or tolerance. Evaluation of alternative paradigms or models is needed to better understand the immune components of protection from campylobacteriosis.

  18. Interleukin-13 as an important cytokine: A review on its roles in some human diseases.

    PubMed

    Seyfizadeh, Narges; Seyfizadeh, Nayer; Gharibi, Tohid; Babaloo, Zohreh

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin-13 (IL-13) as a pleiotropic cytokine acts through the IL-13Ra1/IL-4Ra complex to induce activation responses which contribute to the inflammatory diseases. Genetic polymorphisms in IL-13 and its receptor components have been proved to be associated with higher disease prevalence rates. Animal models such as in IL-13 deficient mice and transgenic animals also have been confirmed the critical role of this cytokine in the immune responses, mostly by IL-13 neutralization and IL-13/IL-4 dual neutralization strategies. This review highlights IL-13 structure as well as its pivotal roles in the normal physiologic and pathologic states. It is followed by a section on the recent findings on IL-13 receptors and signalling mechanisms to briefly summarize its functions in the immune systems. IL-13 roles in the human diseases such as asthma, systematic sclerosis, and some inflammatory diseases are described concisely. Finally some of the ongoing therapeutic applications are presented to comprehensively review IL-13 mediator roles.

  19. Thimerosal induces TH2 responses via influencing cytokine secretion by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anshu; Kaushal, Poonam; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gollapudi, Sastry; Gupta, Sudhir

    2007-02-01

    Thimerosal is an organic mercury compound that is used as a preservative in vaccines and pharmaceutical products. Recent studies have shown a TH2-skewing effect of mercury, although the underlying mechanisms have not been identified. In this study, we investigated whether thimerosal can exercise a TH2-promoting effect through modulation of functions of dendritic cells (DC). Thimerosal, in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibited the secretion of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-12p70 from human monocyte-derived DC. However, the secretion of IL-10 from DC was not affected. These thimerosal-exposed DC induced increased TH2 (IL-5 and IL-13) and decreased TH1 (IFN-gamma) cytokine secretion from the T cells in the absence of additional thimerosal added to the coculture. Thimerosal exposure of DC led to the depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH), and addition of exogenous GSH to DC abolished the TH2-promoting effect of thimerosal-treated DC, restoring secretion of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-12p70 by DC and IFN-gamma secretion by T cells. These data suggest that modulation of TH2 responses by mercury and thimerosal, in particular, is through depletion of GSH in DC.

  20. Effect of cadmium on the expression levels of interleukin-1α and interleukin-10 cytokines in human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    ODEWUMI, CAROLINE; LATINWO, LEKAN M.; SINCLAIR, ANDRE; BADISA, VEERA L.D.; ABDULLAH, AHKINYALA; BADISA, RAMESH B.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is an environmentally hazardous metal, which causes toxicity in humans. Inhalation of cigarette smoke and industrial fumes containing cadmium are sources of cadmium exposure. It is responsible for the malfunction of various organs, leading to disease particularly in the lungs, liver and kidneys. In the present study, the effect of cadmium chloride (CdCl2) on cell viability, and the expression levels of interleukin (IL)-1α and IL-10 cytokines at various concentrations and incubation durations were assessed in MRC-9 human normal lung and A549 human lung cancer cells to elucidate the mechanism of cadmium toxicity. Cell viability was measured using a crystal violet dye binding assay. The expression levels of the cytokines were measured by cytokine specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The viability assay results revealed higher sensitivity of the A549 lung cancer cells to CdCl2 compared with the normal MRC-9 lung cells. In the normal MRC-9 lung cells, higher expression levels of the cytokines were observed at the lowest CdCl2 concentration at a shorter exposure time compared with the lung cancer cells. Higher levels of the cytokines were observed in the A549 lung cancer cells at all other times and concentrations compared with the MRC-9 cells, indicating higher levels of inflammation. The cytokine levels were reduced at higher CdCl2 concentrations and longer exposure durations, demonstrating the toxic effect of cadmium. The results indicated that CdCl2 affected the expression levels of the cytokines and led to cytotoxicity in human lung cells, and suggested that compounds which reduce inflammation may prevent cadmium toxicity. PMID:26397147

  1. Gomisin N Decreases Inflammatory Cytokine Production in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Hosokawa, Ikuko; Shindo, Satoru; Ozaki, Kazumi; Matsuo, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    Gomisin N, which is a lignan isolated from Schisandra chinensis, has some pharmacological effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effects of gomisin N on periodontal disease are uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of gomisin N on inflammatory mediator production in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-stimulated human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLC). Gomisin N inhibited interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, CC chemokine ligand (CCL) 2, and CCL20 production in TNF-α-stimulated HPDLC in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, we revealed that gomisin N could suppress extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation in TNF-α-stimulated HPDLC though protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation was not suppressed by gomisin N treatment. In summary, gomisin N might exert anti-inflammatory effects by attenuating cytokine production in periodontal ligament cells via inhibiting the TNF-α-stimulated ERK and JNK pathways activation.

  2. Immunomodulatory effects of inosine pranobex on cytokine production by human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lasek, Witold; Janyst, Michał; Wolny, Rafał; Zapała, Łukasz; Bocian, Katarzyna; Drela, Nadzieja

    2015-06-01

    Inosine pranobex (inosine dimepranol acedoben, isoprinosine) (Inos) is an immunomodulatory and antiviral drug used in some viral infections, especially in patients with weakened immunity. In the present study, effects of Inos on the production of cytokines attributable to Th1 (IL-2, IFN-g, and TNF-a) or Th2 cells (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) were tested in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Inos enhanced TNF-a secretion significantly (in short-term--24-hour, and prolonged term--72-hour cultures) and IFN-g (in 72-hour cultures). Surprisingly, production of IL-10 by PHA-stimulated lymphocytes was suppressed by Inos in a dose-dependent manner in both 24-hour and 72-hour cultures. These results shed some light on immunomodulatory properties of Inos and suggest applicability of this agent in patients with a depressed function of the immune system.

  3. Augmented gp130-mediated cytokine signalling accompanies human gastric cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C B; Judd, L M; Menheniott, T R; Kronborg, I; Dow, C; Yeomans, N D; Boussioutas, A; Robb, L; Giraud, A S

    2007-10-01

    H. pylori infection accounts for most cases of gastric cancer, but the initiating events remain unclear. The principal H. pylori pathogenicity-associated CagA protein disrupts intracellular SHP-2 signalling pathways including those used by the IL-6 family cytokines, IL-6 and IL-11. Imbalanced IL-6 family cytokine signalling in the gp130(757FF) mouse model of gastric cancer arising from hyperactivation of oncogenic STAT3 after altered SHP-2 : ERK1/2 signalling produces dysplastic antral tumours preceded by gastritis and metaplasia. In a cohort of patient gastric biopsies with known H. pylori and CagA status, we investigated whether (i) STAT3 and ERK1/2 activation is altered in H. pylori-dependent gastritis; (ii) these profiles are more pronounced in CagA+ H. pylori infection; and (iii) the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines that activate STAT3 and ERK 1/2 pathways is associated with progression to gastric cancer. IL-6, IL-11, and activated STAT3 and ERK1/2 were quantified in antral biopsies from gastritic stomach, metaplastic tissue, and resected gastric cancer tissues. We observed significantly increased STAT3 and ERK1/2 activation (p = 0.001) in H. pylori-dependent gastritis, which was further enhanced in the presence of CagA+ H. pylori strains. Of known gastric ligands that drive STAT3 activation, IL-6 expression was increased after H. pylori infection and both IL-6 and IL-11 were strongly up-regulated in the gastric cancer biopsies. This suggests a mechanism by which IL-11 drives STAT3 activation and proliferation during gastric cancer progression. We addressed this using an in vitro approach, demonstrating that recombinant human IL-11 activates STAT3 and concomitantly increases proliferation of MKN28 gastric epithelial cells. In summary, we show increased STAT3 and ERK1/2 activation in H. pylori-dependent gastritis that is likely driven in an IL-6-dependent fashion. IL-11 expression is associated with adenocarcinoma development, but not gastritic lesions

  4. Profile of cytokine production within the periparasitic granuloma in human alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Harraga, Saïd; Godot, Véronique; Bresson-Hadni, Solange; Mantion, Georges; Vuitton, Dominique Angèle

    2003-02-01

    Th2 responses, especially IL-10 secretion by circulating mononuclear cells are associated with the progressive form of AE and Th1 responses with resistance. The HLA B8, DR3, DQ2 haplotype is associated with the severity of AE in humans through immune-mediated mechanisms including an elevated production of Interleukin-10 (IL-10). Granulomatous infiltration of mononuclear cells around the parasitic vesicles is a hallmark of this disease; however, cytokine production by granuloma cells has never been studied. Tissue samples were taken in the periparasitic area and in the central area of the periparasitic granulomatous lesions from a patient with a progressive AE at surgery. Six pieces for each zone were incubated in culture medium with antibiotics and IL-2, together with irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells as feeder cells. After four days the dead feeder cells were removed by density gradient centrifugation. Lymphocytes were stimulated with Echinococcus multilocularis vesicular fluid antigen (Emf) or PHA to study IL-10, IFN-, and IL-4 production in the supernatant. Emf-stimulated mononuclear cells from the central part of the lesions secreted more IL-10 and less IFN-gamma than cells from the periphery of the granuloma. At the basal level, IL-10 secretion by the locally infiltrating cells was also high and this confirms at the local granuloma level our previous results obtained from cultures of circulating mononuclear cells. The present study confirms that IL-10 secretion is a key feature of the immune response against E. multilocularis in humans. The location of the cells which produce the highest amount of IL-10, those in contact with parasitic structures, suggests that the parasite itself is able to modulate the immune response of the host so that the infiltrating cells cannot participate in the effector phase of the cellular immune response. The nature of the parasitic structures involved and the mechanisms which lead to an imbalanced cytokine

  5. Bile acids and cytokines inhibit the human cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene via the JNK/c-jun pathway in human liver cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiangang; Jahan, Asmeen; Chiang, John Y L

    2006-06-01

    Cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) of the bile acid biosynthesis pathway is suppressed by bile acids and inflammatory cytokines. Bile acids are known to induce inflammatory cytokines to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway that inhibits CYP7A1 gene transcription. c-Jun has been postulated to mediate bile acid inhibition of CYP7A1. However, the c-Jun target involved in the regulation of CYP7A1 is unknown. Human primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells were used as models to study chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) regulation of human CYP7A1 gene expression via real-time polymerase chain reaction, reporter assays, co-immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunocipitation (ChIP) assays. IL-1 beta and CDCA reduced CYP7A1 but induced c-Jun messenger RNA expression in human primary hepatocytes. IL-1beta inhibited human CYP7A1 reporter activity via the HNF4 alpha binding site. A JNK-specific inhibitor blocked the inhibitory effect of IL-1 beta on HNF4 alpha expression and CYP7A1 reporter activity. c-Jun inhibited HNF4 alpha and PPARgamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1 alpha) coactivation of CYP7A1 reporter activity, whereas a dominant negative c-Jun did not. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assays revealed that IL-1 beta and CDCA reduced HNF4 alpha bound to the CYP7A1 chromatin, and that c-Jun interacted with HNF4 alpha and blocked HNF4 alpha recruitment of PGC-1 alpha to the CYP7A1 chromatin. In conclusion, IL-1 beta and CDCA inhibit HNF4 alpha but induce c-Jun, which in turn blocks HNF 4 alpha recruitment of PGC-1 alpha to the CYP7A1 chromatin and results in inhibition of CYP7A1 gene transcription. The JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway inhibits bile acid synthesis and protects hepatocytes against the toxic effect of inflammatory agents.

  6. Cytokine modulation (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10) by human breast milk lipids on intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2).

    PubMed

    Barrera, Girolamo J; Sánchez, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Human breast milk is the best form of nourishment for infants during the first year of life. It is composed by a complex mixture of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Breast milk provides nutrients and bioactive factors that themselves modulate maturation and development of the gastrointestinal tract. Many studies have shown that it provides protection against gastrointestinal tract inflammation. In this sense, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of human breast milk lipids on epithelial intestinal cells (Caco-2) cytokine regulation and the fatty acid transporter protein (FATP) involved in this process. Caco-2 cells were cultivated and stimulated with different concentration of human milk lipids from healthy human mothers (18-30-year-olds) or single commercial lipids for 48 h. We measured the concentrations and mRNA levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 cytokines by immunoassay (ELISA) and quantitative-PCR (qRT-PCR) technique, respectively. We observed a two to three times decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (p < 0.01) as well as an increase in anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels in cells stimulated with increasing concentrations of breast milk lipids. These results suggest that human breast milk lipids could have an important role on the cytokine modulation in the newborn bowel.

  7. Benexate hydrochloride betadex modulates nitric oxide synthesis and cytokine expression in gastric ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Lim, Ji-Youn; Kim, Yoonjin; Kim, Ye Ji; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Ryu, Ho Sang; Sul, Donggeun; Hong, Junghwa; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated benexate hydrochloride betadex (BHB)-mediated ulcer healing, and changes to microcirculation modulated through nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and anti-inflammatory activity. A rat model of gastric mucosal injury was established through injection of a 60% acetic acid solution into the stomach. Following ulcer induction, the rats were administered BHB orally for 5 days at doses of 0, 100, 300 or 1,000 mg/kg. The highest dose of BHB was also administered with or without L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). The area of gastric ulcers was determined by planimetry, and expression of cyclooxygenases (COX), cytokines and NOS in stomach tissues were measured using western blotting. Compared with the control group, gastric ulcer size was significantly decreased in the 1,000 mg/kg BHB-treated group (P<0.05). Administration of BHB led to a significant increase in endothelial (e)NOS expression (P<0.05). Although acetic acid co-treatment with L-NAME induced more severe mucosal damage, BHB decreased COX expression and tumor necrosis factor-α levels when administered with the nitric oxide inhibitor, L-NAME (P<0.05). BHB exhibited protective effects in a rat model of gastric ulcers, which were associated with a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and the activation of eNOS. PMID:27446246

  8. A new method to measure air-borne pyrogens based on human whole blood cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Kindinger, Ilona; Daneshian, Mardas; Baur, Hans; Gabrio, Thomas; Hofmann, Andreas; Fennrich, Stefan; von Aulock, Sonja; Hartung, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    Air-borne microorganisms, as well as their fragments and components, are increasingly recognized to be associated with pulmonary diseases, e.g. organic dust toxic syndrome, humidifier lung, building-related illness, "Monday sickness." We have previously described and validated a new method for the detection of pyrogenic (fever-inducing) microbial contaminations in injectable drugs, based on the inflammatory reaction of human blood to pyrogens. We have now adapted this test to evaluate the total inflammatory capacity of air samples. Air was drawn onto PTFE membrane filters, which were incubated with human whole blood from healthy volunteers inside the collection device. Cytokine release was measured by ELISA. The test detects endotoxins and non-endotoxins, such as fungal spores, Gram-positive bacteria and their lipoteichoic acid moiety and pyrogenic dust particles with high sensitivity, thus reflecting the total inflammatory capacity of a sample. When air from different surroundings such as working environments and animal housing was assayed, the method yielded reproducible data which correlated with other parameters of microbial burden tested. We further developed a standard material for quantification and showed that this assay can be performed with cryopreserved as well as fresh blood. The method offers a test to measure the integral inflammatory capacity of air-borne microbial contaminations relevant to humans. It could thus be employed to assess air quality in different living and work environments.

  9. Fucoidan delays apoptosis and induces pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun-O; Yu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    Although some immune modulatory effects of fucoidan have been elucidated, the effects of fucoidan on the apoptosis and activation of human neutrophils have not been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that fucoidan purified from the brown seaweed Undaria pinnatifilda delays spontaneous apoptosis of human neutrophils and induces their activation. Fucoidan treatment inhibited apoptotic nuclei changes and phosphatidyl serine (PS) exposure on neutrophils cultured in vitro for 24h. The delay in neutrophil apoptosis mediated by fucoidan was associated with increased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and decreased levels of activated caspase-3. Screening of the signaling pathways by specific inhibitors indicated that fucoidan-induced delay in neutrophil apoptosis was dependent on the activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, whereas MAPK signaling pathway was not critical. In addition, fucoidan enhanced the production of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α from neutrophils in an AKT-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrated that fucoidan delays human neutrophil apoptosis and induces their production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This knowledge could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for infectious diseases and neutropenia by controlling neutrophil homeostasis and function with fucoidan.

  10. Neisseria gonorrhoeae survives within and modulates apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine production of human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Château, Alice; Seifert, H Steven

    2016-04-01

    The human-adapted organism Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the causative agent of gonorrhoea, a sexually transmitted infection. It readily colonizes the genital, rectal and nasalpharyngeal mucosa during infection. While it is well established that N. gonorrhoeae recruits and modulates the functions of polymorphonuclear leukocytes during infection, how N. gonorrhoeae interacts with macrophages present in infected tissue is not fully defined. We studied the interactions of N. gonorrhoeae with two human monocytic cell lines, THP-1 and U937, and primary monocytes, all differentiated into macrophages. Most engulfed bacteria were killed in the phagolysosome, but a subset of bacteria was able to survive and replicate inside the macrophages suggesting that those cells may be an unexplored cellular reservoir for N. gonorrhoeae during infection. N. gonorrhoeae was able to modulate macrophage apoptosis: N. gonorrhoeae induced apoptosis in THP-1 cells whereas it inhibited induced apoptosis in U937 cells and primary human macrophages. Furthermore, N. gonorrhoeae induced expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages, suggesting a role for macrophages in recruiting polymorphonuclear leukocytes to the site of infection. These results indicate macrophages may serve as a significant replicative niche for N. gonorrhoeae and play an important role in gonorrheal pathogenesis.

  11. Biological and Technical Variables Affecting Immunoassay Recovery of Cytokines from Human Serum and Simulated Vaginal Fluid: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The increase of proinflammatory cytokines in vaginal secretions may serve as a surrogate marker of unwanted inflammatory reaction to microbicide products topically applied for the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV-1. Interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 have been proposed as indicators of inflammation and increased risk of HIV-1 transmission; however, the lack of information regarding detection platforms optimal for vaginal fluids and interlaboratory variation limit their use for microbicide evaluation and other clinical applications. This study examines fluid matrix variants relevant to vaginal sampling techniques and proposes a model for interlaboratory comparisons across current cytokine detection technologies. IL-1β and IL-6 standards were measured by 12 laboratories in four countries, using 14 immunoassays and four detection platforms based on absorbance, chemiluminescence, electrochemiluminescence, and fluorescence. International reference preparations of cytokines with defined biological activity were spiked into (1) a defined medium simulating the composition of human vaginal fluid at pH 4.5 and 7.2, (2) physiologic salt solutions (phosphate-buffered saline and saline) commonly used for vaginal lavage sampling in clinical studies of cytokines, and (3) human blood serum. Assays were assessed for reproducibility, linearity, accuracy, and significantly detectable fold difference in cytokine level. Factors with significant impact on cytokine recovery were determined by Kruskal−Wallis analysis of variance with Dunn’s multiple comparison test and multiple regression models. All assays showed acceptable intra-assay reproducibility; however, most were associated with significant interlaboratory variation. The smallest reliably detectable cytokine differences (P < 0.05) derived from pooled interlaboratory data varied from 1.5- to 26-fold depending on assay, cytokine, and matrix type. IL-6 but not IL-1β determinations were lower in both saline

  12. TREK-1 Regulates Cytokine Secretion from Cultured Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells Independently of Cytoskeletal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Roan, Esra; Teng, Bin; Waters, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Background TREK-1 deficient alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) secrete less IL-6, more MCP-1, and contain less F-actin. Whether these alterations in cytokine secretion and F-actin content are related remains unknown. We now hypothesized that cytokine secretion from TREK-1-deficient AECs was regulated by cytoskeletal rearrangements. Methods We determined F-actin and α-tubulin contents of control, TREK-1-deficient and TREK-1-overexpressing human A549 cells by confocal microscopy and western blotting, and measured IL-6 and MCP-1 levels using real-time PCR and ELISA. Results Cytochalasin D decreased the F-actin content of control cells. Jasplakinolide increased the F-actin content of TREK-1 deficient cells, similar to the effect of TREK-1 overexpression in control cells. Treatment of control and TREK-1 deficient cells with TNF-α, a strong stimulus for IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion, had no effect on F-actin structures. The combination of TNF-α+cytochalasin D or TNF-α+jasplakinolide had no additional effect on the F-actin content or architecture when compared to cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide alone. Although TREK-1 deficient AECs contained less F-actin at baseline, quantified biochemically, they contained more α-tubulin. Exposure to nocodazole disrupted α-tubulin filaments in control and TREK-1 deficient cells, but left the overall amount of α-tubulin unchanged. Although TNF-α had no effect on the F-actin or α-tubulin contents, it increased IL-6 and MCP-1 production and secretion from control and TREK-1 deficient cells. IL-6 and MCP-1 secretions from control and TREK-1 deficient cells after TNF-α+jasplakinolide or TNF-α+nocodazole treatment was similar to the effect of TNF-α alone. Interestingly, cytochalasin D decreased TNF-α-induced IL-6 but not MCP-1 secretion from control but not TREK-1 deficient cells. Conclusion Although cytochalasin D, jasplakinolide and nocodazole altered the F-actin and α-tubulin structures of control and TREK-1 deficient AEC, the

  13. Expression of adhesion molecules and chemotactic cytokines in cultured human mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jonjić, N; Peri, G; Bernasconi, S; Sciacca, F L; Colotta, F; Pelicci, P; Lanfrancone, L; Mantovani, A

    1992-10-01

    The mesothelium is a flat epithelial lining of serous cavities that could gate the traffic of molecules and cells between the circulation and these body compartments. The present study was designed to elucidate the capacity of mesothelial cells to express adhesion molecules and chemoattractant cytokines, two fundamental mechanisms of regulation of leukocyte recruitment. Cultured human mesothelial cells express appreciable levels of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and these were increased by in vitro exposure to tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), or TNF and IFN-gamma. Interleukin 1 (IL-1) was a less consistent stimulus for adhesion molecule expression in vitro. Unlike endothelial cells, used as a reference cell population, resting or stimulated mesothelial cells did not express E-selectin and ICAM-2, as assessed by flow cytometry. Analysis of VCAM-1 mRNA by reverse transcriptase and polymerase chain reaction using appropriate primers revealed that mesothelial cells expressed both the seven- and the six-Ig domain transcripts, with predominance of the longer species. Monocytes bound appreciably to "resting" and, to a greater extent, to stimulated mesothelial cells. Monocytes exposed to IFN-gamma and lipopolysaccharide, used as prototypic activation signals, showed increased capacity to bind mesothelial cells. Anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody significantly inhibited binding of monocytes to mesothelial cells, and this blocking effect was amplified by anti-very late antigen 4. Mesothelial cells were able to express the chemotactic cytokines IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 at the mRNA and protein levels. These results indicate that mesothelial cells can express a set of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) overlapping with, but distinct from, that expressed in vascular endothelium (ICAM-1, ICAM-2, VCAM-1, E-selectin), and that these are functionally relevant for interacting with

  14. Manumycin A downregulates release of proinflammatory cytokines from TNF alpha stimulated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Cecrdlova, Eva; Petrickova, Katerina; Kolesar, Libor; Petricek, Miroslav; Sekerkova, Alena; Svachova, Veronika; Striz, Ilja

    2016-01-01

    Macrolide antibiotics such as azithromycin or clarithromycin are known to have potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects but these properties cannot be widely used due to a risk of bacterial resistance. We studied another polyketide antibiotic, structurally related manumycin A known as a streptomycete derived farnesyltransferase inhibitor with limited antibacterial effects, with respect to its potential regulation of mRNA expression of several genes associated with proinflammatory responses. Downregulation of mRNA for IL-6, TLR-8, IL-1 beta and IL-10 was found in THP-1 cells after 4h stimulation with TNF alpha in the presence of manumycin A and downregulated TLR-8 and EGR-1 genes were observed after 8h. Among the genes upregulated in response to manumycin were HMOX-1, TNFRSF10A, IL-1R1, TICAM2, NLRP12 after 4h and only IL-1R1 after 8h. Furthermore, manumycin A was found to inhibit IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 production in TNF alpha stimulated THP-1 cells and peripheral blood monocytes in a dose dependent manner (0.25-1 μM of manumycin A) without affecting cell viability. Cell viability of blood monocytes decreased by about 30% at manumycin A doses of 2-5 μM. Manumycin A also inhibited IL-18 release from THP-1 cells, while in cultures of blood monocytes, this cytokine was not detectable. That manumycin A mediated downregulation of proinflammatory genes in human monocytes confirmed by a measurement of cytokine levels in culture supernatants, together with a very limited effect on cell viability, might suggest potential anti-inflammatory properties of this polyketide antibiotic.

  15. Effects of the Commercial Flame Retardant Mixture DE-71 on Cytokine Production by Human Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mynster Kronborg, Thit; Frohnert Hansen, Juliana; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Ramhøj, Louise; Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although production of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) is now banned, release from existing products will continue for many years. The PBDEs are assumed to be neurotoxic and toxic to endocrine organs at low concentrations. Their effect on the immune system has not been investigated thoroughly. We aimed to investigate the influence of DE-71 on cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with Escherichia Coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phytohaemagglutinin-L (PHA-L). Material and Methods PBMCs isolated from healthy donors were pre-incubated with DE-71 at various concentrations and subsequently incubated with the monocyte stimulator LPS, or the T-cell activator PHA-L. Interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-17A, and IL-17F were quantified in the supernatants by Luminex kits. Results At non-cytotoxic concentrations (0.01–10 μg/mL), DE-71 significantly enhanced secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL8, IL-10, and TNF-α (p<0.001–0.019; n = 6) from LPS-stimulated PBMCs. IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17A, and IL-17F (p = <0.001–0.043; n = 6) secretion were enhanced from PHA-L-stimulated PBMCs as well. Secretion of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, IL-8 and IL-6 was not significantly affected by DE-71. Conclusions We demonstrate an enhancing effect of DE-71 on cytokine production by normal human PBMCs stimulated with LPS or PHA-L ex vivo. PMID:27128973

  16. ADHESION AND POLLUTION PARTICLE-INDUCED OXIDANT GENERATION IS NEITHER NECESSARY NOR SUFFICIENT FOR CYTOKINE INDUCTION IN HUMAN ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adhesion of human monocytes (MOs) results in the rapid transcriptional activation of cytokine genes that are dependent on nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB. Several pathways leading to activation of NF-kappaB have been described, including those involving reactive oxygen intermediates (...

  17. Endotoxin or cytokines attenuate ozone-induced DNA synthesis in rat nasal transitional epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, J.A.; Harkema, J.R. )

    1992-06-01

    Pretreatment of rats with endotoxin (E), a potent inducer of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), and interleukin 1 beta (IL 1), or a combination of TNF and IL1, has been shown to increase levels of lung antioxidant enzymes and protect against pulmonary toxicity associated with hyperoxia. Inhalation of ozone (O3) induces cell injury, followed by increased DNA synthesis, cell proliferation, and secretory cell metaplasia in rat nasal transitional epithelium (NTE). This study was designed to test the effects of E, TNF, and IL1 pretreatment on acute O3-induced NTE cell injury as measured by changes in NTE cell DNA synthesis. Rats were exposed to either 0.8 ppm O3 or air for 6 hr in whole-body inhalation chambers. Immediately before exposure, rats in each group were injected intraperitoneally (ip) with either saline alone or saline containing E, TNF, IL1, or both TNF and IL1. Eighteen hours postexposure, rats were injected ip with bromodeoxyuridine to label cells undergoing DNA synthesis and were euthanized 2 hr later. NTE was processed for light microscopy and immunochemically stained to identify cells that had incorporated BrdU into nuclear DNA. The number of BrdU-labeled NTE nuclei per millimeter of basal lamina was quantitated. There were no significant differences in the number of BrdU-labeled NTE nuclei in air-exposed rats that were injected with E, TNF, IL1, or TNF/IL1 compared with those in saline-injected, air-exposed controls. Rats that were injected with saline and exposed to O3 had approximately 10 times the number of BrdU-labeled NTE nuclei than saline-injected, air-exposed control rats. O3 exposure also induced a significant increase in labeled nuclei in rats that were pretreated with TNF alone. In contrast, pretreatment with E, IL1, or TNF/IL1 attenuated the O3-induced increase in NTE DNA synthesis.

  18. Human Invasive Muscular Sarcocystosis Induces Th2 Cytokine Polarization and Biphasic Cytokine Changes, Based on an Investigation among Travelers Returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Slesak, Günther; Pérez-Girón, José Vicente; Schäfer, Johannes; Langeheinecke, Andreas; Just-Nübling, Gudrun; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Püllmann, Kerstin

    2015-06-01

    Sarcocystis nesbitti is a parasite responsible for a biphasic eosinophilic febrile myositis syndrome in two recent outbreaks in Malaysia. We demonstrate Th2 cytokine polarization in infected travelers, an overall cytokine production decrease in the early phase of the disease suggestive of initial immunosuppression, and elevated levels of proinflammatory and chemotactic cytokines in the later myositic phase.

  19. Human MAIT-cell responses to Escherichia coli: activation, cytokine production, proliferation, and cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Joana; Sobkowiak, Michał J.; Sandberg, Johan K.; Leeansyah, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T cells are a large and relatively recently described innate-like antimicrobial T-cell subset in humans. These cells recognize riboflavin metabolites from a range of microbes presented by evolutionarily conserved major histocompatibility complex, class I-related molecules. Given the innate-like characteristics of mucosa-associated invariant T cells and the novel type of antigens they recognize, new methodology must be developed and existing methods refined to allow comprehensive studies of their role in human immune defense against microbial infection. In this study, we established protocols to examine a range of mucosa-associated invariant T-cell functions as they respond to antigen produced by Escherichia coli. These improved and dose- and time-optimized experimental protocols allow detailed studies of MR1-dependent mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to Escherichia coli pulsed antigen-presenting cells, as assessed by expression of activation markers and cytokines, by proliferation, and by induction of apoptosis and death in major histocompatibility complex, class I-related–expressing target cells. The novel and optimized protocols establish a framework of methods and open new possibilities to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell immunobiology, using Escherichia coli as a model antigen. Furthermore, we propose that these robust experimental systems can also be adapted to study mucosa-associated invariant T-cell responses to other microbes and types of antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27034405

  20. Natural innate cytokine response to immunomodulators and adjuvants in human precision-cut lung slices

    SciTech Connect

    Switalla, S.; Lauenstein, L.; Prenzler, F.; Knothe, S.; Foerster, C.; Fieguth, H.-G.; Pfennig, O.; Schaumann, F.; Martin, C.; Guzman, C.A.; Ebensen, T.; Mueller, M.; Hohlfeld, J.M.; Krug, N.; Braun, A.; Sewald, K.

    2010-08-01

    Prediction of lung innate immune responses is critical for developing new drugs. Well-established immune modulators like lipopolysaccharides (LPS) can elicit a wide range of immunological effects. They are involved in acute lung diseases such as infections or chronic airway diseases such as COPD. LPS has a strong adjuvant activity, but its pyrogenicity has precluded therapeutic use. The bacterial lipopeptide MALP-2 and its synthetic derivative BPPcysMPEG are better tolerated. We have compared the effects of LPS and BPPcysMPEG on the innate immune response in human precision-cut lung slices. Cytokine responses were quantified by ELISA, Luminex, and Meso Scale Discovery technology. The initial response to LPS and BPPcysMPEG was marked by coordinated and significant release of the mediators IL-1{beta}, MIP-1{beta}, and IL-10 in viable PCLS. Stimulation of lung tissue with BPPcysMPEG, however, induced a differential response. While LPS upregulated IFN-{gamma}, BPPcysMPEG did not. This traces back to their signaling pathways via TLR4 and TLR2/6. The calculated exposure doses selected for LPS covered ranges occurring in clinical studies with human beings. Correlation of obtained data with data from human BAL fluid after segmental provocation with endotoxin showed highly comparable effects, resulting in a coefficient of correlation > 0.9. Furthermore, we were interested in modulating the response to LPS. Using dexamethasone as an immunosuppressive drug for anti-inflammatory therapy, we found a significant reduction of GM-CSF, IL-1{beta}, and IFN-{gamma}. The PCLS-model offers the unique opportunity to test the efficacy and toxicity of biological agents intended for use by inhalation in a complex setting in humans.

  1. Pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α is a key inhibitory factor for lactose synthesis pathway in lactating mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ken; Kuki, Chinatsu; Oyama, Shoko; Kumura, Haruto

    2016-01-15

    Lactose is a milk-specific carbohydrate synthesized by mammary epithelial cells (MECs) in mammary glands during lactation. Lactose synthesis is downregulated under conditions causing inflammation such as mastitis, in which MECs are exposed to high concentrations of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we investigated whether inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) directly influence the lactose synthesis pathway by using two types of murine MEC culture models: the monolayer culture of MECs to induce lactogenesis; and the three-dimensional culture of MECs surrounded by Matrigel to induce reconstitution of the alveolar structure in vitro. TNF-α caused severe down-regulation of lactose synthesis-related genes concurrently with the degradation of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) from the basolateral membranes in MECs. IL-1β also caused degradation of GLUT1 along with a decrease in the expression level of β-1,4-galactosylransferase 3. IL-6 caused both up-regulation and down-regulation of the expression levels of lactose synthesis-related genes in MECs. These results indicate that TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 have different effects on the lactose synthesis pathway in MECs. Furthermore, TNF-α triggered activation of NFκB and inactivation of STAT5, suggesting that NFκB and STAT5 signaling pathways are involved in the multiple adverse effects of TNF-α on the lactose synthesis pathway.

  2. Type 1 and type 2 cytokine profiles in children exposed to or infected with vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, B N; Lu, J G; Kline, M W; Paul, M; Doyle, M; Kozinetz, C; Shearer, W T; Reuben, J M

    1996-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, cytokine production profiles switch from predominantly type 1 (interleukin-2 [IL-2] and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma]) to type 2 (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines with disease progression. To test this hypothesis in vertically HIV-infected children, we measured cytokine transcription and production in rapid progressors (RPs), seroreverters (SRs), and those children exposed to HIV in utero (P0s). Production of type 1 and type 2 cytokines was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of 8 SR, 25 P0, and 11 RP children. Unstimulated cultures, irrespective of infection and stage of disease, produced similar levels of IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4, and IL-10. Upon stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) plus phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), RP children produced less IL-2 (P < 0.01) and IFN-gamma (P < 0.02) than SR children and also expressed significantly less IFN-gamma mRNA (P < 0.01) than SR children. RP children expressed significantly higher levels of IL-4 mRNA than P0 children (P < 0.03). There were no differences in the production of IL-10 by PHA-PMA-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures among the three groups of children. Our data with these pediatric patients suggest that a deficiency in mitogen-stimulated type 1 cytokine production and excess type 2 cytokine (IL-4) transcription correlate with disease progression. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to test further the hypothesis of the type 1-to-type 2 cytokine switch in children infected with HIV. PMID:8877124

  3. Entamoeba lysyl-tRNA synthetase contains a cytokine-like domain with chemokine activity towards human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Castro de Moura, Manuel; Miro, Francesc; Han, Jung Min; Kim, Sunghoon; Celada, Antonio; Ribas de Pouplana, Lluís

    2011-11-01

    Immunological pressure encountered by protozoan parasites drives the selection of strategies to modulate or avoid the immune responses of their hosts. Here we show that the parasite Entamoeba histolytica has evolved a chemokine that mimics the sequence, structure, and function of the human cytokine HsEMAPII (Homo sapiens endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide II). This Entamoeba EMAPII-like polypeptide (EELP) is translated as a domain attached to two different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) that are overexpressed when parasites are exposed to inflammatory signals. EELP is dispensable for the tRNA aminoacylation activity of the enzymes that harbor it, and it is cleaved from them by Entamoeba proteases to generate a standalone cytokine. Isolated EELP acts as a chemoattractant for human cells, but its cell specificity is different from that of HsEMAPII. We show that cell specificity differences between HsEMAPII and EELP can be swapped by site directed mutagenesis of only two residues in the cytokines' signal sequence. Thus, Entamoeba has evolved a functional mimic of an aaRS-associated human cytokine with modified cell specificity.

  4. Effect Of α2-Adrenergic Agonists And Antagonists On Cytokine Release From Human Lung Macrophages Cultured In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, O.; Staiano, R.I.; De Robertis, E.; Conti, G.; Di Crescenzo, V.; Loffredo, S.; Marone, G.; Marinosci, G. Zito; Cataldi, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The most trusted hypothesis to explain how α2-adrenergic agonists may preserve pulmonary functions in critically ill patients is that they directly act on macrophages by interfering with an autocrine/paracrine adrenergic system that controls cytokine release through locally synthetized noradrenaline and α1- and α2-adrenoreceptors. We tested this hypothesis in primary cultures of resident macrophages from human lung (HLMs). HLMs were isolated by centrifugation on percoll gradients from macroscopically healthy human lung tissue obtained from four different patients at the time of lung resection for cancer. HLMs from these patients showed a significant expression of α2A, α2B and α2C adrenoreceptors both at the mRNA and at the protein level. To evaluate whether α2 adrenoreceptors controlled cytokine release from HMLs, we measured IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α concentrations in the culture medium in basal conditions and after preincubation with several α2-adrenergic agonists or antagonists. Neither the pretreatment with the α2-adrenergic agonists clonidine, medetomidine or dexdemetomidine or with the α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine caused significant changes in the response of any of these cytokines to LPS. These results show that, different from what reported in rodents, clonidine and dexdemetomidine do not directly suppress cytokine release from human pulmonary macrophages. This suggests that alternative mechanisms such as effects on immune cells activation or the modulation of autonomic neurotransmission could be responsible for the beneficial effects of these drugs on lung function in critical patients. PMID:27896229

  5. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines and receptors by human fallopian tubes in organ culture following challenge with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Maisey, Kevin; Nardocci, Gino; Imarai, Monica; Cardenas, Hugo; Rios, Miguel; Croxatto, Horacio B; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron; Velasquez, Luis A

    2003-01-01

    Infection of the Fallopian tubes (FT) by Neisseria gonorrhoeae can lead to acute salpingitis, an inflammatory condition, which is a major cause of infertility. Challenge of explants of human FT with gonococci induced mRNA expression and protein secretion for the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-1beta, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) but not for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. In contrast, FT expression of IL-6 and of the cytokine receptors IL-6R, TNF receptor I (TNF-RI), and TNF-RII was constitutive and was not increased by gonococcal challenge. These studies suggest that several proinflammatory cytokines are likely to contribute to the cell and tissue damage observed in gonococcal salpingitis.

  6. Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Receptors by Human Fallopian Tubes in Organ Culture following Challenge with Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Maisey, Kevin; Nardocci, Gino; Imarai, Monica; Cardenas, Hugo; Rios, Miguel; Croxatto, Horacio B.; Heckels, John E.; Christodoulides, Myron; Velasquez, Luis A.

    2003-01-01

    Infection of the Fallopian tubes (FT) by Neisseria gonorrhoeae can lead to acute salpingitis, an inflammatory condition, which is a major cause of infertility. Challenge of explants of human FT with gonococci induced mRNA expression and protein secretion for the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) but not for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. In contrast, FT expression of IL-6 and of the cytokine receptors IL-6R, TNF receptor I (TNF-RI), and TNF-RII was constitutive and was not increased by gonococcal challenge. These studies suggest that several proinflammatory cytokines are likely to contribute to the cell and tissue damage observed in gonococcal salpingitis. PMID:12496205

  7. 3D Human Motion Editing and Synthesis: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Chen, Qiudi; Wang, Wanliang

    2014-01-01

    The ways to compute the kinematics and dynamic quantities of human bodies in motion have been studied in many biomedical papers. This paper presents a comprehensive survey of 3D human motion editing and synthesis techniques. Firstly, four types of methods for 3D human motion synthesis are introduced and compared. Secondly, motion capture data representation, motion editing, and motion synthesis are reviewed successively. Finally, future research directions are suggested. PMID:25045395

  8. A Comparitive Assessement of Cytokine Expression in Human-Derived Cell Lines Exposed to Alpha Particles and X-Rays

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Wilkins, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Alpha- (α-) particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to α-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5 Gy to either α-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF) was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after α-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to α- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific. PMID:22619631

  9. Determination of the Absolute Number of Cytokine mRNA Molecules within Individual Activated Human T Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Laurel J.; Marshall, Gwen; Hockett, Richard D.; Bucy, R. Pat; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A primary function of activated T cells is the expression and subsequent secretion of cytokines, which orchestrate the differentiation of other lymphocytes, modulate antigen presenting cell activity, and alter vascular endothelium to mediate an immune response. Since many features of immune regulation probably result from modest alterations of endogenous rates of multiple interacting processes, quantitative analysis of the frequency and specific activity of individual T cells is critically important. Using a coordinated set of quantitative methods, the absolute number of molecules of several key cytokine mRNA species in individual T cells has been determined. The frequency of human blood T cells activated in vitro by mitogens and recall protein antigens was determined by intracellular cytokine protein staining, in situ hybridization for cytokine mRNA, and by limiting dilution analysis for cytokine mRNA+ cells. The absolute number of mRNA molecules was simultaneously determined in both homogenates of the entire population of cells and in individual cells obtained by limiting dilution, using a quantitative, competitive RT-PCR assay. The absolute numbers of mRNA molecules in a population of cells divided by the frequency of individual positive cells, yielded essentially the same number of mRNA molecules per cell as direct analysis of individual cells by limiting dilution analysis. Mean numbers of mRNA per positive cell from both mitogen and antigen activated T cells, using these stimulation conditions, were 6000 for IL-2, 6300 for IFN-gamma, and 1600 for IL-4.

  10. A comparitive assessement of cytokine expression in human-derived cell lines exposed to alpha particles and X-rays.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vinita; Howland, Matthew; Wilkins, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Alpha- (α-) particle radiation exposure has been linked to the development of lung cancer and has been identified as a radiation type likely to be employed in radiological dispersal devices. Currently, there exists a knowledge gap concerning cytokine modulations associated with exposure to α-particles. Bio-plex technology was employed to investigate changes in proinflammatory cytokines in two human-derived cell lines. Cells were irradiated at a dose of 1.5 Gy to either α-particles or X-rays at equivalent dose rates. The two cell lines exhibited a unique pattern of cytokine expression and the response varied with radiation type. Of the 27 cytokines assessed, only vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF) was observed to be modulated in both cell lines solely after α-particle exposure, and the expression of VEGF was shown to be dose responsive. These results suggest that certain proinflammatory cytokines may be involved in the biological effects related to α- particle exposure and the responses are cell type and radiation type specific.

  11. Distinct cytokine pattern in response to different bacterial pathogens in human brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Anamika; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Mishra, Priyanka; Singh, Aloukick Kumar; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Ojha, Bal Krishan

    2014-08-15

    Brain abscess is a focal suppurative process. Host inflammatory response in Gram type and specific bacteria has not been studied in brain abscess. A total of 57 brain abscess patients with monomicrobial infections were studied for Th1 (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL1-β), Th2 (IL-4, IL-10) and Th17 (IL-17, IL-23) cytokine response by reverse-transcriptase PCR and ELISA. Th1 and Th17 cytokines were significantly elevated in Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus intermedius) and Th2 cytokine (IL-10) in Gram negative (Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli) infections (p<0.05). Cytokine levels were significantly higher in abscess than blood (p<0.001). Elevated levels of several inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL1-β, IL-17 and IL-23) were associated with the duration of symptoms; predisposing factors also influenced the levels of several cytokines. The expression of inflammatory cytokines in abscess was influenced by the bacterial pathogen, duration of symptoms and predisposing factors. Local milieu of brain plays significant role in secretion of various cytokines.

  12. Modulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases production in co-cultivated human keratinocytes and melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Decean, H; Perde-Schrepler, M; Tatomir, C; Fischer-Fodor, E; Brie, I; Virag, P

    2013-10-01

    The human epidermis exerts immunoregulatory functions through the variety of cytokines and other molecules elaborated by keratinocytes and melanocytes. Their constitutive production is very low; however, considerably increased upon stimulation. In vivo, keratinocytes and melanocytes have a typical exposure in the skin, referred as melanocyte epidermal unit. In the present study we co-cultivated these cells in vitro proposing to elucidate some communication links in close cell-to-cell association. We assessed the amounts of IL-6, IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in individually and co-cultured cells, exposed or not to UVB radiation. Normal human epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes were grown in specific media and supplements. Cells were exposed to UVB radiation (100 mJ/cm(2)) to create comparable stress to the environmental one. Cytokines were determined with ELISA and confirmed with Western blot and metalloproteinases with gel zimography. Pure cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes released low amounts of cytokines and metalloproteinases, these secretions being enhanced by UVB irradiation. In co-cultures, the cell-to-cell proximity triggered signals which markedly augmented the cytokines' secretions, whereas metalloproteinases were down-regulated. UVB irradiation did not influence either of these secretions in co-cultures. Concurrently with the highest levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, MMP-9 was up-regulated creating pro-inflammatory conditions and premises for changes in cellular survival, differentiation and phenotype. A complex network of interactions occurred between keratinocytes and melanocytes in co-cultures, resulting in modulated pro-inflammatory cytokines and metalloproteinases productions. Therefore, any disturbances in the microenvironmental signaling system and its molecular constituents may result in inflammation or even tumorigenesis in the epidermis.

  13. Robotics-based synthesis of human motion.

    PubMed

    Khatib, O; Demircan, E; De Sapio, V; Sentis, L; Besier, T; Delp, S

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of human motion is a complex procedure that involves accurate reconstruction of movement sequences, modeling of musculoskeletal kinematics, dynamics and actuation, and characterization of reliable performance criteria. Many of these processes have much in common with the problems found in robotics research. Task-based methods used in robotics may be leveraged to provide novel musculoskeletal modeling methods and physiologically accurate performance predictions. In this paper, we present (i) a new method for the real-time reconstruction of human motion trajectories using direct marker tracking, (ii) a task-driven muscular effort minimization criterion and (iii) new human performance metrics for dynamic characterization of athletic skills. Dynamic motion reconstruction is achieved through the control of a simulated human model to follow the captured marker trajectories in real-time. The operational space control and real-time simulation provide human dynamics at any configuration of the performance. A new criteria of muscular effort minimization has been introduced to analyze human static postures. Extensive motion capture experiments were conducted to validate the new minimization criterion. Finally, new human performance metrics were introduced to study in details an athletic skill. These metrics include the effort expenditure and the feasible set of operational space accelerations during the performance of the skill. The dynamic characterization takes into account skeletal kinematics as well as muscle routing kinematics and force generating capacities. The developments draw upon an advanced musculoskeletal modeling platform and a task-oriented framework for the effective integration of biomechanics and robotics methods.

  14. Thrombin potently stimulates cytokine production in human vascular smooth muscle cells but not in mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Kranzhöfer, R; Clinton, S K; Ishii, K; Coughlin, S R; Fenton, J W; Libby, P

    1996-08-01

    Thrombosis frequently occurs during atherogenesis and in response to vascular injury. Accumulating evidence supports a role for inflammation in the same situation. The present study therefore sought links between thrombosis and inflammation by determining whether thrombin, which is present in active form at sites of thrombosis, can elicit inflammatory functions of human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), two major constituents of advanced atheroma. Human alpha-thrombin (EC50, approximately equal to 500 pmol/L) potently induced interleukin (IL)-6 release from SMCs. The tethered-ligand thrombin receptor appeared to mediate this effect. Furthermore, alpha-thrombin also rapidly increased levels of mRNA encoding IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in SMCs. In contrast, only alpha-thrombin concentrations of > or = 100 nmol/L could stimulate release of IL-6 or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) in peripheral blood monocytes or monocyte-derived macrophages. Lipid loading of macrophages did not augment thrombin responsiveness. Likewise, only alpha-thrombin concentrations of > or = 100 nmol/L increased levels of IL-6, IL-1 beta, MCP-1, or TNF alpha mRNA in monocytes. Differential responses of SMCs and monocytes to thrombin extended to early agonist-mediated increases in [Ca2+]i. SMCs and endothelial cells, but not monocytes, contained abundant mRNA encoding the thrombin receptor and displayed cell surface thrombin receptor expression detected with a novel monoclonal antibody. Thus, the level of thrombin receptors appeared to account for the differential thrombin susceptibility of SMCs and monocytes. These data suggest that SMCs may be more sensitive than monocytes/macrophages to thrombin activation in human atheroma. Cytokines produced by thrombin-activated SMCs may contribute to ongoing inflammation in atheroma complicated by thrombosis or subjected to angioplasty.

  15. Insights into cytokine-receptor interactions from cytokine engineering.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Jamie B; Moraga, Ignacio; Mendoza, Juan L; Garcia, K Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines exert a vast array of immunoregulatory actions critical to human biology and disease. However, the desired immunotherapeutic effects of native cytokines are often mitigated by toxicity or lack of efficacy, either of which results from cytokine receptor pleiotropy and/or undesired activation of off-target cells. As our understanding of the structural principles of cytokine-receptor interactions has advanced, mechanism-based manipulation of cytokine signaling through protein engineering has become an increasingly feasible and powerful approach. Modified cytokines, both agonists and antagonists, have been engineered with narrowed target cell specificities, and they have also yielded important mechanistic insights into cytokine biology and signaling. Here we review the theory and practice of cytokine engineering and rationalize the mechanisms of several engineered cytokines in the context of structure. We discuss specific examples of how structure-based cytokine engineering has opened new opportunities for cytokines as drugs, with a focus on the immunotherapeutic cytokines interferon, interleukin-2, and interleukin-4.

  16. Activation of cytokine production by secreted phospholipase A2 in human lung macrophages expressing the M-type receptor.

    PubMed

    Granata, Francescopaolo; Petraroli, Angelica; Boilard, Eric; Bezzine, Sofiane; Bollinger, James; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Gelb, Michael H; Lambeau, Gerard; Marone, Gianni; Triggiani, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    Secreted phospholipases A(2) (sPLA(2)) are enzymes released in plasma and extracellular fluids during inflammatory diseases. Because human group IB and X sPLA(2)s are expressed in the lung, we examined their effects on primary human lung macrophages (HLM). Both sPLA(2)s induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 release in a concentration-dependent manner by increasing their mRNA expression. This effect was independent of their enzymatic activity because 1) the capacity of sPLA(2)s to mobilize arachidonic acid from HLM was unrelated to their ability to induce cytokine production; and 2) two catalytically inactive isoforms of group IB sPLA(2) (bromophenacyl bromide-inactivated human sPLA(2) and the H48Q mutant of the porcine sPLA(2)) were as effective as the catalytically active sPLA(2)s in inducing cytokine production. HLM expressed the M-type receptor for sPLA(2)s at both mRNA and protein levels, as determined by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and flow cytometry. Me-indoxam, which decreases sPLA(2) activity as well as binding to the M-type receptor, suppressed sPLA(2)-induced cytokine production. Incubation of HLM with the sPLA(2)s was associated with phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and a specific inhibitor of this pathway, PD98059, significantly reduced the production of IL-6 elicited by sPLA(2)s. In conclusion, two distinct sPLA(2)s produced in the human lung stimulate cytokine production by HLM via a mechanism that is independent of their enzymatic activity and involves activation of the ERK1/2 pathway. HLM express the M-type receptor, but its involvement in eliciting cytokine production deserves further investigation.

  17. Cancer Cytokines and the Relevance of 3D Cultures for Studying those Implicated in Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Maddaly, Ravi; Subramaniyan, Aishwarya; Balasubramanian, Harini

    2017-03-06

    Cancers are complex conditions and involving several factors for oncogenesis and progression. Of the various factors influencing the physiology of cancers, cytokines are known to play significant roles as mediators of functions. Intricate cytokine networks have been identified in cancers and interest in cytokines associated with cancers has been gaining ground. Of late, some of these cytokines are even identified as potential targets for cancer therapy apart from a few others such as IL-6 being identified as markers for disease prognosis. Of the major contributors to cancer research, cancer cell lines occupy the top slot as the most widely used material in vitro. In vitro cell cultures have seen significant evolution by the introduction of 3 dimensional (3D) culture systems. 3D cell cultures are now widely accepted as excellent material for cancer research which surpasses the traditional monolayer cultures. Cancer research has benefitted from 3D cell cultures for understanding the various hallmarks of cancers. However, the potential of these culture systems are still unexploited for cancer cytokine research compared to the other aspects of cancers such as gene expression changes, drug-induced toxicity, morphology, angiogenesis and invasion. Considering the importance of cancer cytokines, 3D cell cultures can be better utilized in understanding their roles and functions. Some of the possibilities where 3D cell cultures can contribute to cancer cytokine research arise from the distinct morphology of the tumor spheroids, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and the spontaneous occurrence of nutrient and oxygen gradients. Also, the 3D culture models enable one to co-culture different types of cells as a simulation of in vivo conditions, enhancing their utility to study cancer cytokines. We review here the cancer associated cytokines the contributions of 3D cancer cell cultures for studying cancer cytokines. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of human inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) gene by cytokines: initial analysis of the human NOS2 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    de Vera, M E; Shapiro, R A; Nussler, A K; Mudgett, J S; Simmons, R L; Morris, S M; Billiar, T R; Geller, D A

    1996-01-01

    The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) is complex and is regulated in part by gene transcription. In this investigation we studied the regulation of NOS2 in a human liver epithelial cell line (AKN-1) which expresses high levels of NOS2 mRNA and protein in response to tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interferon gamma (cytokine mix, CM). Nuclear run-on analysis revealed that CM transcriptionally activated the human NOS2 gene. To delineate the cytokine-responsive regions of the human NOS2 promoter, we stimulated AKN-1 cells with CM following transfection of NOS2 luciferase constructs. Analysis of the first 3.8 kb upstream of the NOS2 gene demonstrated basal promoter activity but failed to show any cytokine-inducible activity. However, 3- to 5-fold inductions of luciferase activity were seen in constructs extending up to -5.8 and -7.0 kg, and a 10-fold increase was seen upon transfection of a -16 kb construct. Further analysis of various NOS2 luciferase constructs ligated upstream of the thymidine kinase promoter identified three regions containing cytokine-responsive elements in the human NOS2 gene: -3.8 to -5.8, -5.8 to -7.0, and -7.0 to -16 kb. These results are in marked contrast with the murine macrophage NOS2 promoter in which only 1 kb of the proximal 5' flanking region is necessary to confer inducibility to lipopolysaccharide and interferon gamma. These data demonstrate that the human NOS2 gene is transcriptionally regulated by cytokines and identify multiple cytokine-responsive regions in the 5' flanking region of the human NOS2 gene. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8577713

  19. Particulate matter initiates inflammatory cytokine release by activation of capsaicin and acid receptors in a human bronchial epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, B; Oortgiesen, M; Carter, J D; Devlin, R B

    1999-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that human bronchial epithelial cells (i.e., BEAS-2B) release pro-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL-6 and TNFalpha) in a receptor-mediated fashion in response to the neuropeptides, substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related protein (CGRP), and the prototype botanical irritant capsaicin. In the present experiments, we examined the relevance of these receptors to particulate matter (PM)-associated cellular inflammation. BEAS-2B cells, exposed to residual oil fly ash particles (ROFA), responded with an immediate (<30 s) increase in intracellular calcium levels ([Ca2+]i), increases of key inflammatory cytokine transcripts (i.e., IL-6, IL-8, TNFalpha) within 2 h exposure, and subsequent release of IL-6 and IL-8 cytokine protein after 4 h exposure. Pretreatment of BEAS-2B cells with pharmacological antagonists selective for the SP or CGRP receptors reduced the ROFA-stimulated IL-6 cytokine production by approximately 25 and 50%, respectively. However, pretreatment of these cells with capsazepine (CPZ), an antagonist for capsaicin (i.e., vanilloid) receptors, inhibited the immediate increases in [Ca2+]i, diminished transcript (i.e., IL-6, IL-8, TNFalpha) levels and reduced IL-6 cytokine release to control levels. BEAS-2B cells exposed to ROFA in calcium-free media failed to demonstrate increases of [Ca2+]i and showed reduced levels of cytokine transcript (i.e., IL-6, IL-8, TNFalpha) and IL-6 release, suggesting that ROFA-stimulated cytokine formation was partially dependent on extracellular calcium sources. A final set of experiments compared the inflammatory properties of the soluble and acidic insoluble components of ROFA. BEAS-2B cells, exposed to ROFA or ROFA that had been filtered through a 0.2-micrometer pore filter, produced equivocal IL-6. BEAS-2B cells exposed to pH 5.0 media for 15 min released moderate amounts of IL-6, 4 h later. This cytokine release could be blocked by amiloride, a pH receptor antagonist, but not by CPZ. BEAS-2B

  20. Granzyme K synergistically potentiates LPS-induced cytokine responses in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wensink, Annette C.; Kemp, Vera; Fermie, Job; García Laorden, M. Isabel; van der Poll, Tom; Hack, C. Erik; Bovenschen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Granzymes are serine proteases released by cytotoxic lymphocytes to induce apoptosis in virus-infected cells and tumor cells. Evidence is emerging that granzymes also play a role in controlling inflammation. Granzyme serum levels are elevated in patients with autoimmune diseases and infections, including sepsis. However, the function of extracellular granzymes in inflammation largely remains unknown. Here, we show that granzyme K (GrK) binds to Gram-negative bacteria and their cell-wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS). GrK synergistically enhances LPS-induced cytokine release in vitro from primary human monocytes and in vivo in a mouse model of LPS challenge. Intriguingly, these extracellular effects are independent of GrK catalytic activity. GrK disaggregates LPS from micelles and augments LPS–CD14 complex formation, thereby likely boosting monocyte activation by LPS. We conclude that extracellular GrK is an unexpected direct modulator of LPS–TLR4 signaling during the antimicrobial innate immune response. PMID:24711407

  1. Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Chu, Vivian; Pandya, Hitesh C; Amrani, Yassine; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-06-01

    Asthma in the pediatric population remains a significant contributor to morbidity and increasing healthcare costs. Vitamin D3 insufficiency and deficiency have been associated with development of asthma. Recent studies in models of adult airway diseases suggest that the bioactive Vitamin D3 metabolite, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ; 1,25(OH)2 D3 ), modulates responses to inflammation; however, this concept has not been explored in developing airways in the context of pediatric asthma. We used human fetal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells as a model of the early postnatal airway to explore how calcitriol modulates remodeling induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Cells were pre-treated with calcitriol and then exposed to TNFα or TGFβ for up to 72 h. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and cell proliferation were assessed. Calcitriol attenuated TNFα enhancement of MMP-9 expression and activity. Additionally, calcitriol attenuated TNFα and TGFβ-induced collagen III expression and deposition, and separately, inhibited proliferation of fetal ASM cells induced by either inflammatory mediator. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested that calcitriol effects in fetal ASM involve ERK signaling, but not other major inflammatory pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that calcitriol can blunt multiple effects of TNFα and TGFβ in developing airway, and point to a potentially novel approach to alleviating structural changes in inflammatory airway diseases of childhood.

  2. Applications of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant cytokines for the treatment of human colorectal and other carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, J.W.; Smalley, R.V.; Borden, E.C.; Martin, E.W.; Guadagni, F.; Roselli, M.; Schlom, J. )

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which recognize a human tumor antigen, termed tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72), have successfully been used to localize primary as well as metastatic colorectal tumor lesions in patients. The localization of the anti-TAG-72 MAbs has also been exploited intraoperatively using a hand-held gamma probe. That procedure, termed radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS), has identified occult tumors which were not detected using standard external imaging techniques. In another clinical trial, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was administered intraperitoneally to patients diagnosed with either gastrointestinal or ovarian carcinoma with secondary ascites. Analysis of the tumor cells isolated from the malignant ascites revealed a substantial increase in TAG-72 expression on the surface of tumor cells isolated from seven of eight patients. The results provide evidence that the combination of an anti-carcinoma MAb with the administration of a cytokine, such as IFN-gamma, may be an effective approach for the detection and subsequent treatment, of colorectal carcinoma. 15 references.

  3. Subfractions of enamel matrix derivative differentially influence cytokine secretion from human oral fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Oscar; Brookes, Steven J; Thiede, Bernd; Heijl, Lars; Lyngstadaas, Staale P

    2015-01-01

    Enamel matrix derivative is used to promote periodontal regeneration during the corrective phase of the treatment of periodontal defects. Our main goal was to analyze the bioactivity of different molecular weight fractions of enamel matrix derivative. Enamel matrix derivative, a complex mixture of proteins, was separated into 13 fractions using size-exclusion chromatography and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–tandem mass spectrometry. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were treated with either enamel matrix derivative or the different fractions. Proliferation and cytokine secretion to the cell culture medium were measured and compared to untreated cells. The liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed that the most abundant peptides were amelogenin and leucine-rich amelogenin peptide related. The fractions containing proteins above 20 kDa induced an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 secretion, whereas lower molecular weight fractions enhanced proliferation and secretion of interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and reduced interleukin-4 release. The various molecular components in the enamel matrix derivative formulation might contribute to reported effects on tissue regeneration through their influence on vascularization, the immune response, and chemotaxis. PMID:26090085

  4. Subfractions of enamel matrix derivative differentially influence cytokine secretion from human oral fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Villa, Oscar; Brookes, Steven J; Thiede, Bernd; Heijl, Lars; Lyngstadaas, Staale P; Reseland, Janne E

    2015-01-01

    Enamel matrix derivative is used to promote periodontal regeneration during the corrective phase of the treatment of periodontal defects. Our main goal was to analyze the bioactivity of different molecular weight fractions of enamel matrix derivative. Enamel matrix derivative, a complex mixture of proteins, was separated into 13 fractions using size-exclusion chromatography and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were treated with either enamel matrix derivative or the different fractions. Proliferation and cytokine secretion to the cell culture medium were measured and compared to untreated cells. The liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed that the most abundant peptides were amelogenin and leucine-rich amelogenin peptide related. The fractions containing proteins above 20 kDa induced an increase in vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-6 secretion, whereas lower molecular weight fractions enhanced proliferation and secretion of interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and reduced interleukin-4 release. The various molecular components in the enamel matrix derivative formulation might contribute to reported effects on tissue regeneration through their influence on vascularization, the immune response, and chemotaxis.

  5. Cytokine and Eicosanoid Production by Cultured Human Monocytes Exposed to Titanium Particulate Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Timothy M.; Manley, Paul A.; Sims, Paul A.; Albrecht, Ralph; Darien, Benjamin J.

    1999-10-01

    Phagocytosis of particulate wear debris from arthroplasties by macrophages induces an inflammatory response that has been linked to implant loosening and premature failure of artificial joints. Inflammatory mediators released by phagocytic macrophages such as tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-[alpha]), interleukin-1[beta] (IL-1[beta]), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of aseptic loosening. The objective of this study was to characterize titanium alloy particulates that closely match wear debris found around joint arthroplasties and to study their effects on the biosynthesis of inflammatory mediators by cultured monocytes. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human volunteers. Monocytes were cultured in 96-well plates for 24 h, washed, and exposed to three concentrations of titanium particulates and controls from 18Ð24 h. Supernatants were assayed for TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta], IL-6, and PGE2 activity. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) verified the titanium alloy to be Ti6A14V. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed significant titanium particulate heterogeneity with approximately 95% of the particles <1 micrometer in diameter. SEM and EDX technology was useful in the characterization of the titanium particulates utilized for in vitro models of titanium-induced cytokine release by monocytes. Incubation of titanium particulates (in concentrations similar to those found around loosened prosthetic joints) with cultured monocytes significantly increased their production of TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta], and PGE2.

  6. Antibody and cytokine levels in humans fed on by the common bedbug, Cimex lectularius L.

    PubMed

    Sheele, J M; Ridge, G E; Coppolino, K; Bonfield, T; Young, A B; Gaines, S L; McCormick, T S

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about cimicosis, the resultant dermal reaction from feeding activity by the common bedbug, Cimex lectularius L. We fed C. lectularius on human study subjects four times over four weeks and measured serum cytokine and antibody levels, and subjects recorded any cimicosis. The average time for subjects to develop cimicosis decreased with each feeding from 8.4, to 2.1, 1.5 and 1.3 days, respectively. There were no significant changes in total IgG, IgG1, IgG2, IgG4 or IgE levels between the first and fourth bedbug feedings, but there was a significant decrease in total IgG3 levels (P<.001). IgG4 was not required for cimicosis. Higher IgG2 and IgG4 levels at study visit 4 were associated with an increased duration of cimicosis (P=.04) and lower pruritis (P=.03), respectively. There were no significant changes in serum TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ and IL-17A levels before and one hour after the C. lectularius feeding. Lower post-C. lectularius feeding IL-6 levels were associated with increased pruritis (P=.001) and the time to maximum pruritis (P=.04), respectively. Higher post-C. lectularius feeding IL-5 levels were associated with a longer duration of pruritis (P=.05).

  7. Flagella from Five Cronobacter Species Induce Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Macrophage Derivatives from Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rocha-Ramírez, Luz M.; Ochoa, Sara A.; Gónzalez-Pedrajo, Bertha; Espinosa, Norma; Eslava, Carlos; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Sadowinski-Pine, Stanislaw; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Estrada-García, Iris; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre; Rosas, Irma; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens linked to lie-threatening infections in neonates and contaminated powdered infant formula that has been epidemiologically associated with these cases. Clinical symptoms of Cronobacter include necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. Flagella from C. sakazakii are involved in biofilm formation and its adhesion to epithelial cells. We investigated the role of flagella from C. sakazakii ST1 and ST4, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis and C. dublinensis during the activation of cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10) in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes, which has not been extensively studied. The production and identity of flagella from the five Cronobacter species were visualized and recognized with anti-flagella antibodies by immunogold labeling through transmission electron microscopy. Purified flagella were dissociated into monomers in 12% SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue-stained gels showing a band of ∼28 kDa and, in addition, mass spectrometry revealed the presence of several peptides that correspond to flagellin. Flagella (100 ng) induced the release of IL-8 (3314–6025 pg/ml), TNF-α (39–359 pg/ml), and IL-10 (2–96 pg/ml), in macrophage isolates from human monocytes and similar results were obtained when flagella were dissociated into monomers. Inhibition assays using three dilutions of anti-flagella antibodies (1∶10, 1∶100, and 1∶200) suppressed the secretion of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 between 95–100% using 100 ng of protein. A transfection assay using 293-hTLR5 cells showed IL-8 release of 197 pg/ml and suppression in the secretion of IL-8 when anti-hTLR5-IgA antibodies were used at different concentrations. These observations suggest that flagella and flagellin are involved in an inflammatory response dependent on TLR5 recognition, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of the bacteria. PMID:23284883

  8. Flagella from five Cronobacter species induce pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rocha-Ramírez, Luz M; Ochoa, Sara A; González-Pedrajo, Bertha; Gónzalez-Pedrajo, Bertha; Espinosa, Norma; Eslava, Carlos; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Leviz, Alejandra; Valencia-Mayoral, Pedro; Sadowinski-Pine, Stanislaw; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto; Estrada-García, Iris; Muñoz-Hernández, Onofre; Rosas, Irma; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Cronobacter spp. are opportunistic pathogens linked to lie-threatening infections in neonates and contaminated powdered infant formula that has been epidemiologically associated with these cases. Clinical symptoms of Cronobacter include necrotizing enterocolitis, bacteremia, and meningitis. Flagella from C. sakazakii are involved in biofilm formation and its adhesion to epithelial cells. We investigated the role of flagella from C. sakazakii ST1 and ST4, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis and C. dublinensis during the activation of cytokines (IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10) in macrophage derivatives from human monocytes, which has not been extensively studied. The production and identity of flagella from the five Cronobacter species were visualized and recognized with anti-flagella antibodies by immunogold labeling through transmission electron microscopy. Purified flagella were dissociated into monomers in 12% SDS-PAGE Coomassie blue-stained gels showing a band of ∼28 kDa and, in addition, mass spectrometry revealed the presence of several peptides that correspond to flagellin. Flagella (100 ng) induced the release of IL-8 (3314-6025 pg/ml), TNF-α (39-359 pg/ml), and IL-10 (2-96 pg/ml), in macrophage isolates from human monocytes and similar results were obtained when flagella were dissociated into monomers. Inhibition assays using three dilutions of anti-flagella antibodies (1∶10, 1∶100, and 1∶200) suppressed the secretion of IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 between 95-100% using 100 ng of protein. A transfection assay using 293-hTLR5 cells showed IL-8 release of 197 pg/ml and suppression in the secretion of IL-8 when anti-hTLR5-IgA antibodies were used at different concentrations. These observations suggest that flagella and flagellin are involved in an inflammatory response dependent on TLR5 recognition, which could contribute to the pathogenesis of the bacteria.

  9. Cytokine receptor expression in human lymphoid tissue: analysis by fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zola, H; Ridings, J; Weedon, H; Fusco, M; Byard, R W; Macardle, P J

    1995-08-01

    A highly-sensitive flourescence method, capable of detecting cytokine receptors present at low concentrations (around 100 molecules per cell) by flow cytometry, was adapted for use on tissue sections. This method was used to examine the expression of several cytokine receptors in lymphoid tissues. IL-2 receptors were distributed broadly, with higher concentrations in T cell areas. IL-1 receptor Type 1 was detected in T cell areas and in the follicular mantle, and was strongly expressed on vascular endothelium. IL-6 receptor was found at very low concentration, both within and outside germinal centres. The gp 130 molecule, which is involved in the functional receptor complex for IL-6 and several other cytokines, was present at higher concentrations, particularly in the germinal centre. Analysis of receptor expression in secondary lymphoid tissue provides evidence bearing on the physiological roles of cytokines, as these tissues contain cells at various stages of physiological activation located in well-defined functional zones.

  10. HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein determinants for cytokine burst in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Coutu, Mathieu; Prévost, Jérémie; Brassard, Nathalie; Peres, Adam; Stegen, Camille; Madrenas, Joaquín; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    The first step of HIV infection involves the interaction of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein to its receptor CD4, mainly expressed on CD4+ T cells. Besides its role on HIV-1 entry, the gp120 has been shown to be involved in the production of IL-1, IL-6, CCL20 and other innate response cytokines by bystander, uninfected CD4+ T cells and monocytes. However, the gp120 determinants involved in these functions are not completely understood. Whether signalling leading to cytokine production is due to CD4 or other receptors is still unclear. Enhanced chemokine receptor binding and subsequent clustering receptors may lead to cytokine production. By using a comprehensive panel of gp120 mutants, here we show that CD4 binding is mandatory for cytokine outburst in monocytes. Our data suggest that targeting monocytes in HIV-infected patients might decrease systemic inflammation and the potential tissue injury associated with the production of inflammatory cytokines. Understanding how gp120 mediates a cytokine burst in monocytes might help develop new approaches to improve the chronic inflammation that persists in these patients despite effective suppression of viremia by antiretroviral therapy. PMID:28346521

  11. Lung Infection by Human Bocavirus Induces the Release of Profibrotic Mediator Cytokines In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannidis, Christian; Bayh, Inga; Brockmann, Michael; Pieper, Monika; Windisch, Wolfram; Schildgen, Oliver; Schildgen, Verena

    2016-01-01

    Human Bocavirus subtype 1 (HBoV1) is associated with respiratory diseases and may contribute to chronic lung diseases by persisting in the infected host. Here the question was addressed if HBoV infections could contribute to fibrogenesis processes as suggested by previously published clinical observations. Cytokine profiles induced by HBoV infection in CuFi-8 air-liquid interphase cell cultures and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of 20 HBoV-positive and 12 HBoV-negative patients were analysed by semi-quantitative Western spot blot analyses. Although lots of cytokines were regulated independently of HBoV status, several cytokines associated with lung fibrosis and tumour development, e.g., EGF, VEGF, TARC (CCL17), TNF-α, TNF-β, TIMP-1, were clearly upregulated in the HBoV-positive cohort. These findings suggest that the development of lung fibrosis might be triggered by HBoV induced cytokine expression. PMID:26807786

  12. Analysis of complex biomarkers for human immune-mediated disorders based on cytokine responsiveness of peripheral blood cells123

    PubMed Central

    Davis, John M.; Knutson, Keith L.; Strausbauch, Michael A.; Crowson, Cynthia S.; Therneau, Terry M.; Wettstein, Peter J.; Matteson, Eric L.; Gabriel, Sherine E.

    2010-01-01

    The advent of improved biomarkers promises to enhance the clinical care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other immune-mediated disorders. We have developed an innovative approach to broadly assess the cytokine responsiveness of human PBMC using a multi-stimulant panel and multiplexed immunoassays. The objective of this study was to demonstrate this concept by determining whether cytokine profiles could discriminate RA patients according to disease stage (early vs. late) or severity. A 10-cytokine profile, consisting of IL-12, CCL4, TNFα, IL-4, and IL-10 release in response to stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28, CXCL8 and IL-6 in response to CMV/EBV lysate, and IL-17A, GM-CSF, and CCL2 in response to HSP60, easily discriminated the early RA group from controls. These data were used to create an immune response score, which performed well in distinguishing the early RA patients from controls and also correlated with several markers of disease severity among the patients with late RA. In contrast, the same 10-cytokine profile assessed in serum was far less effective in discriminating the groups. Thus, our approach lays the foundation for the development of immunologic ‘signatures’ that could be useful in predicting disease course and monitoring the outcomes of therapy among patients with immune-mediated diseases. PMID:20495063

  13. Low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field affects proliferation, tissue-specific gene expression, and cytokines release of human tendon cells.

    PubMed

    de Girolamo, L; Stanco, D; Galliera, E; Viganò, M; Colombini, A; Setti, S; Vianello, E; Corsi Romanelli, M M; Sansone, V

    2013-07-01

    Low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has proven to be effective in the modulation of bone and cartilage tissue functional responsiveness, but its effect on tendon tissue and tendon cells (TCs) is still underinvestigated. PEMF treatment (1.5 mT, 75 Hz) was assessed on primary TCs, harvested from semitendinosus and gracilis tendons of eight patients, under different experimental conditions (4, 8, 12 h). Quantitative PCR analyses were conducted to identify the possible effect of PEMF on tendon-specific gene transcription (scleraxis, SCX and type I collagen, COL1A1); the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was also assessed. Our findings show that PEMF exposure is not cytotoxic and is able to stimulate TCs' proliferation. The increase of SCX and COL1A1 in PEMF-treated cells was positively correlated to the treatment length. The release of anti-inflammatory cytokines in TCs treated with PEMF for 8 and 12 h was significantly higher in comparison with untreated cells, while the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was not affected. A dramatically higher increase of VEGF-A mRNA transcription and of its related protein was observed after PEMF exposure. Our data demonstrated that PEMF positively influence, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation, tendon-specific marker expression, and release of anti-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factor in a healthy human TCs culture model.

  14. Anti-Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis of cultured human glioma cells. Induction and modulation of sensitivity by cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Weller, M; Frei, K; Groscurth, P; Krammer, P H; Yonekawa, Y; Fontana, A

    1994-01-01

    Fas/APO-1 is a transmembrane protein of the nerve growth factor/TNF alpha receptor family which signals apoptotic cell death in susceptible target cells. We have investigated the susceptibility of seven human malignant glioma cell lines to Fas/APO-1-dependent apoptosis. Sensitivity to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated cell killing correlated with cell surface expression of Fas/APO-1. Expression of Fas/APO-1 as well as Fas/APO-1-dependent cytotoxicity were augmented by preexposure of human malignant glioma cells to IFN gamma and TNF alpha. Further, pretreatment with TGF beta 2, IL1 and IL8 enhanced Fas/APO-1 antibody-induced glioma cell apoptosis whereas other cytokines including TNF beta, IL6, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IL10 and IL13 had no such effect. None of the human malignant glioma cell lines was susceptible to TNF alpha-induced cytotoxicity. Fas/APO-1 antibody-sensitive glioma cell lines (n = 5), but not Fas/APO-1 antibody-resistant glioma cell lines (n = 2), became sensitive to TNF alpha when co-treated with inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis. Resistance of human glioma cells to Fas/APO-1 antibody-mediated apoptosis was mainly related to low level expression of Fas/APO-1 and appeared not to be linked to overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protooncogene, bcl-2. Given the resistance of human malignant glioma to surgery, irradiation, chemotherapy and immunotherapy, we propose that Fas/APO-1 may be a promising target for a novel locoregionary approach to human malignant glioma. This strategy gains support from the demonstration of Fas/APO-1 expression in ex vivo human malignant glioma specimens and from the absence of Fas/APO-1 in normal human brain parenchyma. Images PMID:7521890

  15. Immunostimulatory Activity of the Cytokine-Based Biologic, IRX-2, on Human Papillomavirus-Exposed Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Diane M.; Woodham, Andrew W.; Naylor, Paul H.; Egan, James E.; Berinstein, Neil L.

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the antigen-presenting cells of the epithelial layer and are responsible for initiating immune responses against skin and mucosa-invading viruses. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated suppression of LC function is a crucial mechanism of HPV immune evasion, which can lead to persistent infection and development of several human cancers, including cervical, anal, and head and neck cancers. The cell-derived cytokine-based biologic, IRX-2, consists of multiple well-defined cytokines and is broadly active on various immune cell subsets. In this study, we investigated primary human LC activation after exposure to HPV16, followed by treatment with IRX-2 in vitro, and evaluated their subsequent ability to induce HPV16-specific T cells. In contrast to its activity on dendritic cells, HPV16 alone is not sufficient to induce phenotypic and functional activation of LCs. However, IRX-2 induces a significant upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory molecules, T helper 1 (Th1)-associated cytokine release, and chemokine-directed migration of LCs pre-exposed to HPV16. Furthermore, LCs treated with IRX-2 after HPV16 exposure induced CD8+ T-cell responses against specific HLA-A*0201-binding HPV16 T-cell epitopes. The present study suggests that IRX-2 is an attractive immunomodulator for assisting the immune response in eradication of HPV-infected cells, thereby potentially preventing HPV-induced cancers. PMID:26653678

  16. Combination of lipid metabolism alterations and their sensitivity to inflammatory cytokines in human lipin-1-deficient myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Michot, Caroline; Mamoune, Asmaa; Vamecq, Joseph; Viou, Mai Thao; Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Testet, Eric; Lainé, Jeanne; Hubert, Laurence; Dessein, Anne-Frédérique; Fontaine, Monique; Ottolenghi, Chris; Fouillen, Laetitia; Nadra, Karim; Blanc, Etienne; Bastin, Jean; Candon, Sophie; Pende, Mario; Munnich, Arnold; Smahi, Asma; Djouadi, Fatima; Carman, George M; Romero, Norma; de Keyzer, Yves; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2013-12-01

    Lipin-1 deficiency is associated with massive rhabdomyolysis episodes in humans, precipitated by febrile illnesses. Despite well-known roles of lipin-1 in lipid biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to rhabdomyolysis remain unknown. Here we show that primary myoblasts from lipin-1-deficient patients exhibit a dramatic decrease in LPIN1 expression and phosphatidic acid phosphatase 1 activity, and a significant accumulation of lipid droplets (LD). The expression levels of LPIN1-target genes [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors delta and alpha (PPARδ, PPARα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, very long (ACADVL), carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB and 2 (CPT1B and CPT2)] were not affected while lipin-2 protein level, a closely related member of the family, was increased. Microarray analysis of patients' myotubes identified 19 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated genes, indicating pleiotropic effects of lipin-1 deficiency. Special attention was paid to the up-regulated ACACB (acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta), a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis/oxidation balance. We demonstrated that overexpression of ACACB was associated with free fatty acid accumulation in patients' myoblasts whereas malonyl-carnitine (as a measure of malonyl-CoA) and CPT1 activity were in the normal range in basal conditions accordingly to the normal daily activity reported by the patients. Remarkably ACACB invalidation in patients' myoblasts decreased LD number and size while LPIN1 invalidation in controls induced LD accumulation. Further, pro-inflammatory treatments tumor necrosis factor alpha+Interleukin-1beta(TNF1α+IL-1ß) designed to mimic febrile illness, resulted in increased malonyl-carnitine levels, reduced CPT1 activity and enhanced LD accumulation, a phenomenon reversed by dexamethasone and TNFα or IL-1ß inhibitors. Our data suggest that the pathogenic mechanism

  17. Combination of lipid metabolism alterations and their sensitivity to inflammatory cytokines in human lipin-1-deficient myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Michot, Caroline; Mamoune, Asmaa; Vamecq, Joseph; Viou, Mai Thao; Hsieh, Lu-Sheng; Testet, Eric; Lainé, Jeanne; Hubert, Laurence; Dessein, Anne-Frédérique; Fontaine, Monique; Ottolenghi, Chris; Fouillen, Laetitia; Nadra, Karim; Blanc, Etienne; Bastin, Jean; Candon, Sophie; Pende, Mario; Munnich, Arnold; Smahi, Asma; Djouadi, Fatima; Carman, George M.; Romero, Norma; de Keyzer, Yves; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Lipin-1 deficiency is associated with massive rhabdomyolysis episodes in humans, precipitated by febrile illnesses. Despite well-known roles of lipin-1 in lipid biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to rhabdomyolysis remain unknown. Here we show that primary myoblasts from lipin-1-deficient patients exhibit a dramatic decrease in LPIN1 expression and phosphatidic acid phosphatase 1 activity, and a significant accumulation of lipid droplets (LD). The expression levels of LPIN1-target genes [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors delta and alpha (PPARδ, PPARα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, very long (ACADVL), carnitine palmitoyltransferase IB and 2 (CPT1B and CPT2)] were not affected while lipin-2 protein level, a closely related member of the family, was increased. Microarray analysis of patients’ myotubes identified 19 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated genes, indicating pleiotropic effects of lipin-1 deficiency. Special attention was paid to the up-regulated ACACB (acetyl-CoA carboxylase beta), a key enzyme in the fatty acid synthesis/oxidation balance. We demonstrated that overexpression of ACACB was associated with free fatty acid accumulation in patients’ myoblasts whereas malonyl-carnitine (as a measure of malonyl-CoA) and CPT1 activity were in the normal range in basal conditions accordingly to the normal daily activity reported by the patients. Remarkably ACACB invalidation in patients’ myoblasts decreased LD number and size while LPIN1 invalidation in controls induced LD accumulation. Further, pro-inflammatory treatments tumor necrosis factor alpha + Interleukin-1beta(TNF1α + IL-1β) designed to mimic febrile illness, resulted in increased malonyl-carnitine levels, reduced CPT1 activity and enhanced LD accumulation, a phenomenon reversed by dexamethasone and TNFα or IL-1β inhibitors. Our data suggest that the pathogenic

  18. Early cytokine signatures of ischemia/reperfusion injury in human orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sosa, Rebecca A; Zarrinpar, Ali; Rossetti, Maura; Lassman, Charles R; Naini, Bita V; Datta, Nakul; Rao, Ping; Harre, Nicholas; Zheng, Ying; Spreafico, Roberto; Hoffmann, Alexander; Busuttil, Ronald W; Gjertson, David W; Zhai, Yuan; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Reed, Elaine F

    2016-12-08

    BACKGROUND. Orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) is the primary therapy for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. However, ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) can severely compromise allograft survival. To understand the evolution of immune responses underlying OLT-IRI, we evaluated longitudinal cytokine expression profiles from adult OLT recipients before transplant through 1 month after transplant. METHODS. We measured the expression of 38 cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in preoperative and postoperative recipient circulating systemic blood (before transplant and 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after transplant) and intraoperative portal blood (before and after reperfusion) of 53 OLT patients and analyzed this expression in relation to biopsy-proven IRI (n = 26 IRI+; 27 IRI-), clinical liver function tests early (days 1-7) after transplant, and expression of genes encoding cytokine receptors in biopsies of donor allograft taken before and after reperfusion. RESULTS. Bilirubin and arginine transaminase levels early after transplant correlated with IRI. Fourteen cytokines were significantly increased in the systemic and/or portal blood of IRI+ recipients that shifted from innate to adaptive-immune responses over time. Additionally, expression of cognate receptors for 10 of these cytokines was detected in donor organ biopsies by RNAseq. CONCLUSION. These results provide a mechanistic roadmap of the early immunological events both before and after IRI and suggest several candidates for patient stratification, monitoring, and treatment. FUNDING. Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award T32CA009120, Keck Foundation award 986722, and a Quantitative & Computational Biosciences Collaboratory Postdoctoral Fellowship.

  19. Early cytokine signatures of ischemia/reperfusion injury in human orthotopic liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, Rebecca A.; Zarrinpar, Ali; Lassman, Charles R.; Naini, Bita V.; Datta, Nakul; Rao, Ping; Harre, Nicholas; Zheng, Ying; Hoffmann, Alexander; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Gjertson, David W.; Zhai, Yuan; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) is the primary therapy for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. However, ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) can severely compromise allograft survival. To understand the evolution of immune responses underlying OLT-IRI, we evaluated longitudinal cytokine expression profiles from adult OLT recipients before transplant through 1 month after transplant. METHODS. We measured the expression of 38 cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in preoperative and postoperative recipient circulating systemic blood (before transplant and 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after transplant) and intraoperative portal blood (before and after reperfusion) of 53 OLT patients and analyzed this expression in relation to biopsy-proven IRI (n = 26 IRI+; 27 IRI–), clinical liver function tests early (days 1–7) after transplant, and expression of genes encoding cytokine receptors in biopsies of donor allograft taken before and after reperfusion. RESULTS. Bilirubin and arginine transaminase levels early after transplant correlated with IRI. Fourteen cytokines were significantly increased in the systemic and/or portal blood of IRI+ recipients that shifted from innate to adaptive-immune responses over time. Additionally, expression of cognate receptors for 10 of these cytokines was detected in donor organ biopsies by RNAseq. CONCLUSION. These results provide a mechanistic roadmap of the early immunological events both before and after IRI and suggest several candidates for patient stratification, monitoring, and treatment. FUNDING. Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award T32CA009120, Keck Foundation award 986722, and a Quantitative & Computational Biosciences Collaboratory Postdoctoral Fellowship. PMID:27942590

  20. Pro-inflammatory Macrophages Sustain Pyruvate Oxidation through Pyruvate Dehydrogenase for the Synthesis of Itaconate and to Enable Cytokine Expression.

    PubMed

    Meiser, Johannes; Krämer, Lisa; Sapcariu, Sean C; Battello, Nadia; Ghelfi, Jenny; D'Herouel, Aymeric Fouquier; Skupin, Alexander; Hiller, Karsten

    2016-02-19

    Upon stimulation with Th1 cytokines or bacterial lipopolysaccharides, resting macrophages shift their phenotype toward a pro-inflammatory state as part of the innate immune response. LPS-activated macrophages undergo profound metabolic changes to adapt to these new physiological requirements. One key step to mediate this metabolic adaptation is the stabilization of HIF1α, which leads to increased glycolysis and lactate release, as well as decreased oxygen consumption. HIF1 abundance can result in the induction of the gene encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) via phosphorylation. Therefore, it has been speculated that pyruvate oxidation through PDH is decreased in pro-inflammatory macrophages. However, to answer this open question, an in-depth analysis of this metabolic branching point was so far lacking. In this work, we applied stable isotope-assisted metabolomics techniques and demonstrate that pyruvate oxidation is maintained in mature pro-inflammatory macrophages. Glucose-derived pyruvate is oxidized via PDH to generate citrate in the mitochondria. Citrate is used for the synthesis of the antimicrobial metabolite itaconate and for lipogenesis. An increased demand for these metabolites decreases citrate oxidation through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, whereas increased glutamine uptake serves to replenish the TCA cycle. Furthermore, we found that the PDH flux is maintained by unchanged PDK1 abundance, despite the presence of HIF1. By pharmacological intervention, we demonstrate that the PDH flux is an important node for M(LPS) macrophage activation. Therefore, PDH represents a metabolic intervention point that might become a research target for translational medicine to treat chronic inflammatory diseases.

  1. Pro-inflammatory Macrophages Sustain Pyruvate Oxidation through Pyruvate Dehydrogenase for the Synthesis of Itaconate and to Enable Cytokine Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Meiser, Johannes; Krämer, Lisa; Sapcariu, Sean C.; Battello, Nadia; Ghelfi, Jenny; D'Herouel, Aymeric Fouquier; Skupin, Alexander; Hiller, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Upon stimulation with Th1 cytokines or bacterial lipopolysaccharides, resting macrophages shift their phenotype toward a pro-inflammatory state as part of the innate immune response. LPS-activated macrophages undergo profound metabolic changes to adapt to these new physiological requirements. One key step to mediate this metabolic adaptation is the stabilization of HIF1α, which leads to increased glycolysis and lactate release, as well as decreased oxygen consumption. HIF1 abundance can result in the induction of the gene encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) via phosphorylation. Therefore, it has been speculated that pyruvate oxidation through PDH is decreased in pro-inflammatory macrophages. However, to answer this open question, an in-depth analysis of this metabolic branching point was so far lacking. In this work, we applied stable isotope-assisted metabolomics techniques and demonstrate that pyruvate oxidation is maintained in mature pro-inflammatory macrophages. Glucose-derived pyruvate is oxidized via PDH to generate citrate in the mitochondria. Citrate is used for the synthesis of the antimicrobial metabolite itaconate and for lipogenesis. An increased demand for these metabolites decreases citrate oxidation through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, whereas increased glutamine uptake serves to replenish the TCA cycle. Furthermore, we found that the PDH flux is maintained by unchanged PDK1 abundance, despite the presence of HIF1. By pharmacological intervention, we demonstrate that the PDH flux is an important node for M(LPS) macrophage activation. Therefore, PDH represents a metabolic intervention point that might become a research target for translational medicine to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26679997

  2. ApoE production in human monocytes and its regulation by inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Braesch-Andersen, Sten; Paulie, Staffan; Smedman, Christian; Mia, Sohel; Kumagai-Braesch, Makiko

    2013-01-01

    The apoE production by tissue macrophages is crucial for the prevention of atherosclerosis and the aim of this study was to further elucidate how this apolipoprotein is regulated by cytokines present during inflammation. Here we studied apoE production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and analysis was made with a newly developed apoE ELISpot assay. In PBMC, apoE secretion was restricted to monocytes with classical (CD14(++)CD16(-)) and intermediate (CD14(+)CD16(+)) monocytes being the main producers. As earlier described for macrophages, production was strongly upregulated by TGF-β and downregulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β. We could here show that a similar down-regulatory effect was also observed with the type I interferon, IFN-α, while IL-6, often regarded as one of the more prominent inflammatory cytokines, did not affect TGF-β-induced apoE production. The TNF-α inhibitor Enbrel could partly block the down-regulatory effect of IFN-γ, IFN-α and IL-1β, indicating that inhibition of apoE by these cytokines may be dependent on or synergize with TNF-α. Other cytokines tested, IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17A and IL-23, had no inhibitory effect on apoE production. In contrast to the effect on monocytes, apoE production by primary hepatocytes and the hepatoma cell line HepG2 was more or less unaffected by treatment with cytokines or LPS.

  3. Downregulating galectin-3 inhibits proinflammatory cytokine production by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells via RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Chen, Swey-Shen; Sun, Liang-Wu; Brickner, Howard; Sun, Pei-Qing

    2015-03-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a β-galactoside-binding lectin, serves as a pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) of dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating proinflammatory cytokine production. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) siRNA downregulates expression of IL-6, IL-1β and IL-23 p19, while upregulates IL-10 and IL-12 p35 in TLR/NLR stimulated human MoDCs. Furthermore, Gal-3 siRNA-treated MoDCs enhanced IFN-γ production in SEB-stimulated CD45RO CD4 T-cells, but attenuated IL-17A and IL-5 production by CD4 T-cells. Addition of neutralizing antibodies against Gal-3, or recombinant Gal-3 did not differentially modulate IL-23 p19 versus IL-12 p35. The data indicate that intracellular Gal-3 acts as cytokine hub of human DCs in responding to innate immunity signals. Gal-3 downregulation reprograms proinflammatory cytokine production by MoDCs that inhibit Th2/Th17 development.

  4. Effects of Japanese mistletoe lectin on cytokine gene expression in human colonic carcinoma cells and in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Monira, Pervin; Koyama, Yu; Fukutomi, Ryuuta; Yasui, Kensuke; Isemura, Mamoru; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2009-10-01

    Mistletoe lectins have various biological activities including anti-cancer and immunomodulatory effects. We previously isolated a lectin (ML-J) from Japanese mistletoe. In the present study, we examined the effects of ML-J on cytokine gene expression in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells and in the mouse intestine. The results of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that ML-J caused an upregulation of the gene expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-6 in Caco-2 cells and TNF-alpha and IL-6 in the duodenum. This study provides the first example to show that a perorally administered plant lectin affects gene expression in the duodenum.

  5. Human TNF cytokine neutralization with a vNAR from Heterodontus francisci shark: a potential therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Villegas, Tanya; Mata-Gonzalez, Teresa; Paniagua-Solis, Jorge; Sanchez, Edna; Licea, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic use of single domain antibodies (sdAbs) is a promising new approach because these small antibodies maintain antigen recognition and neutralization capacity, have thermal and chemical stability and have good solubility. In this study, using phage display technology, we isolated a variable domain of a IgNAR (vNAR) from a Heterodontus francisci shark immunized against the recombinant human cytokine TNFα (rhTNFα). One clone T43, which expresses the vNAR protein in the periplasmic space, was isolated from the fourth round of panning. T43 had the capacity to recognize rhTNF and neutralize it in vitro, indicating that T43 has potential as a therapeutic that can be used for diseases in which this pro-inflammatory cytokine needs to be controlled.

  6. Role of cytosolic phospholipase A2 in cytokine-stimulated prostaglandin release by human gallbladder cells.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, E M; Longo, W E; Mazuski, J E; Panesar, N; Kaminski, D L

    2000-01-01

    Eicosanoids are involved in gallbladder inflammation, epithelial water transport, and mucous secretion. Phospholipase Asubscript2 enzymes liberate arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids for the synthesis of eicosanoids. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of selective cytoplasmic and secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitors on basal and stimulated arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 release in gallbladder cells. Western immunoblotting was employed to evaluate both cytosolic and secretory phospholipase A2 enzymes in human gallbladder cells. Cells were incubated for 22 hours with (3)H-labeled arachidonic acid. Arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 release was then measured in the supernate after 2 hours of exposure to human interleukin-1beta, alone or after pretreatment for 1 hour with the inhibitors. Unstimulated gallbladder cells express both 85 kDa cytosolic and 14 kDa secretory phospholipase A2++. The 85 kDa phospholipase A2 was induced by interleukin-1beta, whereas there was no apparent change in secretory phospholipase A2 enzyme concentrations. Both the secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitor p-bromophenylacyl bromide and the cytosolic phospholipase A2 inhibitor arachidonyl trifluoromethyl ketone decreased basal and interleukin-1beta-stimulated arachidonic acid release. In contrast, only inhibition of cytosolic phospholipase A2 led to a decrease in interleukin-1beta-stimulated prostaglandin E2 release. Basal and interleukin-1beta-stimulated arachidonic acid release appears to be the result of the activity of both cytosolic and secretory phospholipase A2. Interleukin-1beta-stimulated prostaglandin E2 release appears to be dependent on the activity of cytosolic phospholipase A2.

  7. Sulfur mustard primes human neutrophils for increased degranulation and stimulates cytokine release via TRPM2/p38 MAPK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Hwa-Yong; Hong, Chang-Won; Lee, Si-Nae; Kwon, Min-Soo; Kim, Yeon-Ja; Song, Dong-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2′-bis-chloroethyl-sulfide; SM) has been a military threat since the World War I. The emerging threat of bioterrorism makes SM a major threat not only to military but also to civilian world. SM injury elicits an inflammatory response characterized by infiltration of neutrophils. Although SM was reported to prime neutrophils, the mechanism has not been identified yet. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of SM-induced priming in human neutrophils. SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils in a concentration-dependent fashion. Transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 2 inhibitors (clotrimazole, econazole and flufenamic acid) and silencing of TRPM2 by shRNA attenuated SM-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase. SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules in response to activation by fMLP as previously reported. SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, inhibited SM-induced priming. Neither PD98057, an ERK inhibitor, nor SP600215, a JNK inhibitor, inhibited SM-induced priming. In addition, SM enhanced phosphorylation of NF-kB p65 and release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. SB203580 inhibited SM-induced NF-kB phosphorylation and cytokine release. These results suggest the involvement of TRPM2/p38 MAPK pathway in SM-induced priming and cytokines release in neutrophils. -- Highlights: ► SM increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in human neutrophils through TPRM2-mediated calcium influx. ► SM primed degranulation of azurophil and specific granules. ► SM enhanced p38 MAPK and NF-κB p65 phosphorylation in human neutrophils. ► SM enhanced release of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from human neutrophils. ► SB203580 inhibited SM-induced priming, NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and cytokine release.

  8. A New Application for Albumin Dialysis in Extracorporeal Organ Support: Characterization of a Putative Interaction Between Human Albumin and Proinflammatory Cytokines IL-6 and TNFα.

    PubMed

    Pfensig, Claudia; Dominik, Adrian; Borufka, Luise; Hinz, Michael; Stange, Jan; Eggert, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Albumin dialysis in extracorporeal organ support is often performed in the treatment of liver failure as it facilitates the removal of toxic components from the blood. Here, we describe a possible effect of albumin dialysis on proinflammatory cytokine levels in vitro. Initially, albumin samples were incubated with different amounts of cytokines and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Analysis of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) levels indicated that increased concentrations of albumin reduce the measureable amount of the respective cytokines. This led to the hypothesis that the used proinflammatory cytokines may interact with albumin. Size exclusion chromatography of albumin spiked with cytokines was carried out using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The corresponding fractions were evaluated by immunoblotting. We detected albumin and cytokines in the same fractions indicating an interaction of the small-sized cytokines IL-6 and TNFα with the larger-sized albumin. Finally, a two-compartment albumin dialysis in vitro model was used to analyze the effect of albumin on proinflammatory cytokines in the recirculation circuit during 6-h treatment. These in vitro albumin dialysis experiments indicated a significant decrease of IL-6, but not of TNFα, when albumin was added to the dialysate solution. Taken together, we were able to show a putative in vitro interaction of human albumin with the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, but with less evidence for TNFα, and demonstrated an additional application for albumin dialysis in liver support therapy where IL-6 removal might be indicated.

  9. Impact of elvitegravir on human adipocytes: Alterations in differentiation, gene expression and release of adipokines and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Moure, Ricardo; Domingo, Pere; Gallego-Escuredo, José M; Villarroya, Joan; Gutierrez, Maria Del Mar; Mateo, Maria G; Domingo, Joan C; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2016-08-01

    Elvitegravir is a recently developed integrase inhibitor used for antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection. Secondary effects, including disturbances in lipid metabolism and, ultimately, in adipose tissue distribution and function, are common concerns associated with antiretroviral treatments. Here, we provide the first study of the effects of elvitegravir (in comparison with efavirenz, a non-nucleoside analog inhibitor of reverse transcriptase; and raltegravir, another integrase inhibitor) on human adipocyte differentiation, gene expression and secretion of adipokines and cytokines. Elvitegravir impaired adipogenesis and adipocyte metabolism in human SGBS adipocytes in a concentration-dependent manner (delaying acquisition of adipocyte morphology and reducing the expression of adipogenesis marker genes such as PPARγ, glucose transporter GLUT4, lipoprotein lipase, and the adipokines adiponectin and leptin). Compared with efavirenz, the effects of elvitegravir were similar but tended to occur at higher concentrations than those elicited by efavirenz, or were somewhat less intense than those caused by efavirenz at similar concentration. Elvitegravir tended to cause a more moderate induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines than efavirenz. Efavirenz induced a marked concentration-dependent increase in interleukin-8 expression and release whereas elvitregravir had little effect. Raltegravir had totally neutral actions of adipogenesis, adipocyte metabolism-related gene expression and release of adipokines and cytokines. In conclusion, elvitegravir alters adipocyte differentiation and function and promotes induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines similarly to efavirenz, but several effects were less intense. Further assessment of lipid metabolism and adipose tissue function in patients administered elvitegravir-based regimes is advisable considering that totally neutral effects of elvitegravir on lipid homeostasis cannot be anticipated from the current study in vitro.

  10. Pro-inflammatory cytokine dysregulation is associated with novel avian influenza A (H7N9) virus in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chihao; Qi, Xian; Ding, Meng; Sun, Xinlei; Zhou, Zhen; Zhang, Shuo; Zen, Ke; Li, Xihan

    2016-02-01

    Since March 2013, more than 500 laboratory-confirmed human H7N9 influenza A virus infection cases have been recorded, with a case fatality rate of more than 30%. Clinical research has shown that cytokine and chemokine dysregulation contributes to the pathogenicity of the H7N9 virus. Here, we investigated cytokine profiles in primary human macrophages infected with the novel H7N9 virus, using cytokine antibody arrays. The levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly TNF-α, were increased in H7N9-infected macrophages. Induction of the transcriptional and translational levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines by H7N9 virus seemed to be intermediate between those induced by highly pathogenic avian H5N1 and pandemic human H1N1 viruses, which were detected by ELISA and real-time quantitative PCR, respectively. Additionally, compared with H5N1, the upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines caused by H7N9 infection occurred rapidly but mildly. Our results identified the overall profiles of cytokine and chemokine induction by the H7N9 influenza virus in an in vitro cell-culture model, and could provide potential therapeutic targets for the control of severe human H7N9 disease.

  11. Pulmonary infection of mice with human metapneumovirus induces local cytotoxic T-cell and immunoregulatory cytokine responses similar to those seen with human respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Herd, Karen A; Nelson, Michelle; Mahalingam, Suresh; Tindle, Robert W

    2010-05-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a major cause of upper and lower respiratory-tract infection in infants, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Virus-directed cellular immunity elicited by hMPV infection is poorly understood, in contrast to the phylogenetically and clinically related pathogen human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). In a murine model of acute lower respiratory-tract infection with hMPV, we demonstrate the accumulation of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-producing CD8+ T cells in the airways and lungs at day 7 post-infection (p.i.), associated with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) directed to an epitope of the M2-1 protein. This CTL immunity was accompanied by increased pulmonary expression of Th1 cytokines IFN-gamma and interleukin (IL)-12 and antiviral cytokines (IFN-beta), as well as chemokines Mip-1alpha, Mip-1beta, Mig, IP-10 and CX3CL1. There was also a moderate increase in Th2-type cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 compared with uninfected mice. At 21 days p.i., a strong CTL response could be recalled from the spleen. A similar pattern of CTL induction to the homologous M2-1 CTL epitope of hRSV, and of cytokine/chemokine induction, was observed following infection with hRSV, highlighting similarities in the cellular immune response to the two related pathogens.

  12. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in brominated diphenyl ether-47-induced inflammatory cytokine release from human extravillous trophoblasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hae-Ryung Kamau, Patricia W.; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2014-01-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used flame retardant compounds. Brominated diphenyl ether (BDE)-47 is one of the most prevalent PBDE congeners found in human breast milk, serum and placenta. Despite the presence of PBDEs in human placenta, effects of PBDEs on placental cell function are poorly understood. The present study investigated BDE-47-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and its role in BDE-47-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine release in a first trimester human extravillous trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo. Exposure of HTR-8/SVneo cells for 4 h to 20 μM BDE-47 increased ROS generation 1.7 fold as measured by the dichlorofluorescein (DCF) assay. Likewise, superoxide anion production increased approximately 5 fold at 10 and 15 μM and 9 fold at 20 μM BDE-47 with a 1-h exposure, as measured by cytochrome c reduction. BDE-47 (10, 15 and 20 μM) decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential by 47–64.5% at 4, 8 and 24 h as assessed with the fluorescent probe Rh123. Treatment with 15 and 20 μM BDE-47 stimulated cellular release and mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-8 after 12 and 24-h exposures: the greatest increases were a 35-fold increased mRNA expression at 12 h and a 12-fold increased protein concentration at 24 h for IL-6. Antioxidant treatments (deferoxamine mesylate, (±)α-tocopherol, or tempol) suppressed BDE-47-stimulated IL-6 release by 54.1%, 56.3% and 37.7%, respectively, implicating a role for ROS in the regulation of inflammatory pathways in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Solvent (DMSO) controls exhibited statistically significantly decreased responses compared with non-treated controls for IL-6 release and IL-8 mRNA expression, but these responses were not consistent across experiments and times. Nonetheless, it is possible that DMSO (used to dissolve BDE-47) may have attenuated the stimulatory actions of BDE-47 on cytokine responses. Because abnormal activation of proinflammatory responses can disrupt trophoblast functions

  13. A Human In Vitro Whole Blood Assay to Predict the Systemic Cytokine Response to Therapeutic Oligonucleotides Including siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Schwickart, Anna; Putschli, Bastian; Renn, Marcel; Höller, Tobias; Barchet, Winfried

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA and immunostimulatory ligands of Toll-like receptors (TLR) or RIG-I like helicases (RLH) are a promising novel class of drugs. They are in clinical development for a broad spectrum of applications, e.g. as adjuvants in vaccines and for the immunotherapy of cancer. Species-specific immune activation leading to cytokine release is characteristic for therapeutic oligonucleotides either as an unwanted side effect or intended pharmacology. Reliable in vitro tests designed for therapeutic oligonucleotides are therefore urgently needed in order to predict clinical efficacy and to prevent unexpected harmful effects in clinical development. To serve this purpose, we here established a human whole blood assay (WBA) that is fast and easy to perform. Its response to synthetic TLR ligands (R848: TLR7/8, LPS: TLR4) was on a comparable threshold to the more time consuming peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) based assay. By contrast, the type I IFN profile provoked by intravenous CpG-DNA (TLR9 ligand) in humans in vivo was more precisely replicated in the WBA than in stimulated PBMC. Since Heparin and EDTA, but not Hirudin, displaced oligonucleotides from their delivery agent, only Hirudin qualified as the anticoagulant to be used in the WBA. The Hirudin WBA exhibited a similar capacity as the PBMC assay to distinguish between TLR7-activating and modified non-stimulatory siRNA sequences. RNA-based immunoactivating TLR7/8- and RIG-I-ligands induced substantial amounts of IFN-α in the Hirudin-WBA dependent on delivery agent used. In conclusion, we present a human Hirudin WBA to determine therapeutic oligonucleotide-induced cytokine release during preclinical development that can readily be performed and offers a close reflection of human cytokine response in vivo. PMID:23940691

  14. Enhanced production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A. E.; Kunkel, S. L.; Pearce, W. H.; Shah, M. R.; Parikh, D.; Evanoff, H. L.; Haines, G. K.; Burdick, M. D.; Strieter, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    Inflammatory leukocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of human atherosclerotic disease, from early atherogenesis to the late stages of atherosclerosis, such as aneurysm formation. We have shown previously that human abdominal aortic aneurysms are characterized by the presence of numerous chronic inflammatory cells throughout the vessel wall (Am J Pathol 1990, 137: 1199-1213). The signals that attract lymphocytes and monocytes into the aortic wall in aneurysmal disease remain to be precisely defined. We have studied the production of the chemotactic cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) by aortic tissues obtained from 47 subjects. We compared the antigenic production of these cytokines by explants of: 1) human abdominal aneurysmal tissue, 2) occlusive (atherosclerotic) aortas, and 3) normal aortas. IL-8, which is chemotactic for neutrophils, lymphocytes, and endothelial cells was liberated in greater quantities by abdominal aortic aneurysms than by occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, macrophages, and to a lesser degree endothelial cells, were found to be positive for the expression of antigenic IL-8. Similarly, MCP-1, a potent chemotactic cytokine for monocytes/macrophages, was released by explants from abdominal aortic aneurysms in greater quantities than by explants from occlusive or normal aortas. Using immunohistochemistry, the predominant MCP-1 antigen-positive cells were macrophages and to a lesser extent smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate that human abdominal aortic aneurysms produce IL-8 and MCP-1, both of which may serve to recruit additional inflammatory cells into the abdominal aortic wall, hence perpetuating the inflammatory reaction that may result in the pathology of vessel wall destruction and aortic aneurysm formation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8494046

  15. Unique proliferation response in odontoblastic cells derived from human skeletal muscle stem cells by cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase-3

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Hase, Naoko; Kawai, Rie; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Hiyama, Taiki; Kondo, Ayami; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Mogi, Makio

    2015-02-01

    A pro-inflammatory cytokine mixture (CM: interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ) and IL-1β-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 activity have been shown to increase the proliferation of rat dental pulp cells and murine stem cell-derived odontoblast-like cells. This suggests that MMP-3 may regulate wound healing and regeneration in the odontoblast-rich dental pulp. Here, we determined whether these results can be extrapolated to human dental pulp by investigating the effects of CM-induced MMP-3 up-regulation on the proliferation and apoptosis of purified odontoblast-like cells derived from human skeletal muscle stem cells. We used siRNA to specifically reduce MMP-3 expression. We found that CM treatment increased MMP-3 mRNA and protein levels as well as MMP-3 activity. Cell proliferation was also markedly increased, with no changes in apoptosis, upon treatment with CM and following the application of exogenous MMP-3. Endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases were constitutively expressed during all experiments and unaffected by MMP-3. Although treatment with MMP-3 siRNA suppressed cell proliferation, it also unexpectedly increased apoptosis. This siRNA-mediated increase in apoptosis could be reversed by exogenous MMP-3. These results demonstrate that cytokine-induced MMP-3 activity regulates cell proliferation and suppresses apoptosis in human odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines induce MMP-3 activity in human odontoblast-like cells. • Increased MMP-3 activity can promote cell proliferation in odontoblasts. • Specific loss of MMP-3 increases apoptosis in odontoblasts. • MMP-3 has potential as a promising new target for pupal repair and regeneration.

  16. Activated platelets signal chemokine synthesis by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, A S; Elstad, M R; McEver, R P; McIntyre, T M; Moore, K L; Morrissey, J H; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A

    1996-01-01

    Human blood monocytes adhere rapidly and for prolonged periods to activated platelets that display P-selectin, an adhesion protein that recognizes a specific ligand on leukocytes, P-selectin glycoprotein-1. We previously demonstrated that P-selectin regulates expression and secretion of cytokines by stimulated monocytes when it is presented in a purified, immobilized form or by transfected cells. Here we show that thrombin-activated platelets induce the expression and secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and IL-8 by monocytes. Enhanced monokine synthesis requires engagement of P-selectin glycoprotein-1 on the leukocyte by P-selectin on the platelet. Secretion of the chemokines is not, however, directly signaled by P-selectin; instead, tethering of the monocytes by P-selectin is required for their activation by RANTES (regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed presumed secreted), a platelet chemokine not previously known to induce immediate-early gene products in monocytes. Adhesion of monocytes to activated platelets results in nuclear translocation of p65 (RelA), a component of the NF-kappaB family of transcription factors that binds kappaB sequences in the regulatory regions of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-8, and other immediate-early genes. However, expression of tissue factor, a coagulation protein that also has a kappaB sequence in the 5' regulatory region of its gene, is not induced in monocytes adherent to activated platelets. Thus, contact of monocytes with activated platelets differentially affects the expression of monocyte products. These experiments suggest that activated platelets regulate chemokine secretion by monocytes in inflammatory lesions in vivo and provide a model for the study of gene regulation in cell-cell interactions. PMID:8617886

  17. Experimental colitis in rats induces de novo synthesis of cytokines at distant intestinal sites: role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Fadi H; Hamdi, Tamim; Barada, Kassem A; Saadé, Nayef E

    2016-06-01

    Increased levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were observed in various segments of histologically-intact small intestine in animal models of acute and chronic colitis. Whether these cytokines are produced locally or spread from the inflamed colon is not known. In addition, the role of gut innervation in this upregulation is not fully understood. To examine whether cytokines are produced de novo in the small intestine in two rat models of colitis; and to investigate the role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents in the synthesis of these inflammatory cytokines. Colitis was induced by rectal instillation of iodoacetamide (IA) or trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Using reverse transcriptase (RT) and real-time PCR, TNF-α, and IL-10 mRNA expression was measured in mucosal scrapings of the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon at different time intervals after induction of colitis. Capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents (CSPA) were ablated using subcutaneous injections of capsaicin at time 0, 8 and 32 h, and the experiment was repeated at specific time intervals to detect any effect on cytokines expression. TNF-α mRNA expression increased by 3-40 times in the different intestinal segments (p<0.05 to p<0.001), 48h after IA-induced colitis. CSPA ablation completely inhibited this upregulation in the small intestine, but not in the colon. Similar results were obtained in TNBS-induced colitis at 24 h. Intestinal IL-10 mRNA expression significantly decreased at 12 h and then increased by 6-43 times (p<0.05 to p<0.001) 48h after IA administration. This increase was abolished in rats subjected to CSPA ablation except in the colon, where IL-10 further increased by twice (p<0.05). In the TNBS group, there was 4-12- and 4-7-fold increases in small intestinal IL-10 mRNA expression at 1 and 21 days after colitis induction, respectively (both p<0.01). This increase was not observed in rats pretreated with capsaicin. Capsaicin-treated and

  18. Obesity and inflammation: reduced cytokine expression due to resveratrol in a human in vitro model of inflamed adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zagotta, Ivana; Dimova, Elitsa Y.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Wabitsch, Martin; Kietzmann, Thomas; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an inflammatory status and linked with a number of pathophysiological complications among them cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, or the metabolic syndrome. Resveratrol was proposed to improve obesity-related inflammatory problems, but the effect of resveratrol on cytokine expression in obesity is not completely understood. In this study, we used an in vitro model of human adipose tissue inflammation to examine the effects of resveratrol on the production of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1). We found that resveratrol reduced IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 levels in a concentration-dependent manner in adipocytes under inflammatory conditions. Further experiments showed that the action of resveratrol was mainly due to its NFκB inhibitory potential. Thus, our data support the concept that resveratrol can alleviate obesity-induced up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines providing a new insight toward novel treatment options in obesity. PMID:25926797

  19. UVB-induced inflammatory cytokine release, DNA damage and apoptosis of human oral compared with skin tissue equivalents.

    PubMed

    Breger, Joyce; Baeva, Larissa; Agrawal, Anant; Shindell, Eli; Godar, Dianne E

    2013-01-01

    People can get oral cancers from UV (290-400 nm) exposures. Besides high outdoor UV exposures, high indoor UV exposures to oral tissues can occur when consumers use UV-emitting tanning devices to either tan or whiten their teeth. We compared the carcinogenic risks of skin to oral tissue cells after UVB (290-320 nm) exposures using commercially available 3D-engineered models for human skin (EpiDerm™), gingival (EpiGing™) and oral (EpiOral™) tissues. To compare the relative carcinogenic risks, we investigated the release of cytokines, initial DNA damage in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), repair of CPDs and apoptotic cell numbers. We measured cytokine release using cytometric beads with flow cytometry and previously developed a fluorescent immunohistochemical assay to quantify simultaneously CPD repair rates and apoptotic cell numbers. We found that interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and the initial CPDs are significantly higher, whereas the CPD repair rates and apoptotic cell numbers are significantly lower for oral compared with skin tissue cells. Thus, the increased release of the inflammatory cytokine IL-8 along with inefficient CPD repair and decreased death rates for oral compared with skin tissue cells suggests that mutations are accumulating in the surviving population of oral cells increasing people's risks for getting oral cancers.

  20. Propionibacterium acnes and lipopolysaccharide induce the expression of antimicrobial peptides and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in human sebocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, István; Pivarcsi, Andor; Kis, Kornélia; Koreck, Andrea; Bodai, László; McDowell, Andrew; Seltmann, Holger; Patrick, Sheila; Zouboulis, Christos C; Kemény, Lajos

    2006-07-01

    Acne is a common skin disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. In addition to genetic, hormonal and environmental factors, abnormal colonization by Propionibacterium acnes has been implicated in the occurrence of acne via the induction of inflammatory mediators. To gain more insight into the role that sebocytes play in the innate immune response of the skin, particularly in acne, we compared the antimicrobial peptide and proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression at mRNA and protein levels, as well as the viability and differentiation of SZ95 sebocytes in response to co-culture with representative isolates of P. acnes type IA and type IB as well as Escherichia coli-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that, in vitro, P. acnes type IA and IB isolates and LPS induced human beta-defensin-2 and proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine expression, and influenced sebocyte viability and differentiation. Our results provide evidence that sebocytes are capable of producing proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and antimicrobial peptides, which may have a role in acne pathogenesis. Furthermore, since P. acnes types IA and IB differentially affect both the differentiation and viability of sebocytes, our data demonstrate that different strains of P. acnes vary in their capacity to stimulate an inflammatory response within the pilosebaceous follicle.

  1. Human periodontal ligament cells facilitate leukocyte recruitment and are influenced in their immunomodulatory function by Th17 cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Konermann, A; Beyer, M; Deschner, J; Allam, J P; Novak, N; Winter, J; Jepsen, S; Jäger, A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to examine the immunomodulatory impact of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells on the nature and magnitude of the leukocyte infiltrate in periodontal inflammation, particularly with regard to Th17 cells. PDL cells were challenged with pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1ß, IL-17A, and IFN-γ) and analyzed for the expression of cytokines involved in periodontal immunoinflammatory processes (IL-6, MIP-3 alpha, IL-23A, TGFß1, IDO, and CD274). In order to further investigate a direct involvement of PDL cells in leukocyte function, co-culture experiments were conducted. The expression of the immunomodulatory cytokines studied was significantly increased under pro-inflammatory conditions in PDL cells. Although PDL cells did not stimulate leukocyte proliferation or Th17 differentiation, these cells induced the recruitment of leukocytes. The results of our study suggest that PDL cells might be involved in chronic inflammatory mechanisms in periodontal tissues and thus in the transition to an adaptive immune response in periodontitis.

  2. Human memory, but not naive, CD4+ T cells expressing transcription factor T-bet might drive rapid cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Yu, Si-fei; Zhang, Yan-nan; Yang, Bin-yan; Wu, Chang-you

    2014-12-19

    We found that after stimulation for a few hours, memory but not naive CD4(+) T cells produced a large amount of IFN-γ; however, the mechanism of rapid response of memory CD4(+) T cells remains undefined. We compared the expression of transcription factors in resting or activated naive and memory CD4(+) T cells and found that T-bet, but not pSTAT-1 or pSTAT-4, was highly expressed in resting memory CD4(+) T cells and that phenotypic characteristics of T-bet(+)CD4(+) T cells were CD45RA(low)CD62L(low) CCR7(low). After short-term stimulation, purified memory CD4(+) T cells rapidly produced effector cytokines that were closely associated with the pre-existence of T-bet. By contrast, resting naive CD4(+) T cells did not express T-bet, and they produced cytokines only after sustained stimulation. Our further studies indicated that T-bet was expressed in the nuclei of resting memory CD4(+) T cells, which might have important implications for rapid IFN-γ production. Our results indicate that the pre-existence and nuclear mobilization of T-bet in resting memory CD4(+) T cells might be a possible transcriptional mechanism for rapid production of cytokines by human memory CD4(+) T cells.

  3. Human decidual macrophages and NK cells differentially express Toll-like receptors and display distinct cytokine profiles upon TLR stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Duriez, Marion; Quillay, Héloïse; Madec, Yoann; El Costa, Hicham; Cannou, Claude; Marlin, Romain; de Truchis, Claire; Rahmati, Mona; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Nugeyre, Marie-Thérèse; Menu, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Maternofetal pathogen transmission is partially controlled at the level of the maternal uterine mucosa at the fetal implantation site (the decidua basalis), where maternal and fetal cells are in close contact. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) may play an important role in initiating rapid immune responses against pathogens in the decidua basalis, however the tolerant microenvironment should be preserved in order to allow fetal development. Here we investigated the expression and functionality of TLRs expressed by decidual macrophages (dMs) and NK cells (dNKs), the major decidual immune cell populations. We report for the first time that both human dMs and dNK cells express mRNAs encoding TLRs 1-9, albeit with a higher expression level in dMs. TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4 protein expression checked by flow cytometry was positive for both dMs and dNK cells. In vitro treatment of primary dMs and dNK cells with specific TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7/8, and TLR9 agonists enhanced their secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, as well as cytokines and chemokines involved in immune cell crosstalk. Only dNK cells released IFN-γ, whereas only dMs released IL-1β, IL-10, and IL-12. TLR9 activation of dMs resulted in a distinct pattern of cytokine expression compared to the other TLRs. The cytokine profiles expressed by dMs and dNK cells upon TLR activation are compatible with maintenance of the fetotolerant immune environment during initiation of immune responses to pathogens at the maternofetal interface. PMID:25071732

  4. Do mechanical strain and TNF-α interact to amplify pro-inflammatory cytokine production in human annulus fibrosus cells?

    PubMed

    Likhitpanichkul, Morakot; Torre, Olivia M; Gruen, Jadry; Walter, Benjamin A; Hecht, Andrew C; Iatridis, James C

    2016-05-03

    During intervertebral disc (IVD) injury and degeneration, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells experience large mechanical strains in a pro-inflammatory milieu. We hypothesized that TNF-α, an initiator of IVD inflammation, modifies AF cell mechanobiology via cytoskeletal changes, and interacts with mechanical strain to enhance pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Human AF cells (N=5, Thompson grades 2-4) were stretched uniaxially on collagen-I coated chambers to 0%, 5% (physiological) or 15% (pathologic) strains at 0.5Hz for 24h under hypoxic conditions with or without TNF-α (10ng/mL). AF cells were treated with anti-TNF-α and anti-IL-6. ELISA assessed IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 production and immunocytochemistry measured F-actin, vinculin and α-tubulin in AF cells. TNF-α significantly increased AF cell pro-inflammatory cytokine production compared to basal conditions (IL-1β:2.0±1.4-84.0±77.3, IL-6:10.6±9.9-280.9±214.1, IL-8:23.9±26.0-5125.1±4170.8pg/ml for basal and TNF-α treatment, respectively) as expected, but mechanical strain did not. Pathologic strain in combination with TNF-α increased IL-1β, and IL-8 but not IL-6 production of AF cells. TNF-α treatment altered F-actin and α-tubulin in AF cells, suggestive of altered cytoskeletal stiffness. Anti-TNF-α (infliximab) significantly inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine production while anti-IL-6 (atlizumab) did not. In conclusion, TNF-α altered AF cell mechanobiology with cytoskeletal remodeling that potentially sensitized AF cells to mechanical strain and increased TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Results suggest an interaction between TNF-α and mechanical strain and future mechanistic studies are required to validate these observations.

  5. GADS is Required for TCR-Mediated Calcium Influx and Cytokine Release, but not Cellular Adhesion, in Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Mahmood Y.; Zhang, Elizabeth Y.; Dinkel, Brittney; Hardy, Daimon; Yankee, Thomas M.; Houtman, Jon C.D.

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 related adaptor protein downstream of Shc (GADS) is a member of the GRB2 family of adaptors and is critical for TCR-induced signaling. The current model is that GADS recruits SLP-76 to the LAT complex, which facilitates the phosphorylation of SLP-76, the activation of PLC-γ1, T cell adhesion and cytokine production. However, this model is largely based on studies of disruption of the GADS/SLP-76 interaction and murine T cell differentiation in GADS deficient mice. The role of GADS in mediating TCR-induced signals in human CD4+ T cells has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we have suppressed the expression of GADS in human CD4+ HuT78 T cells. GADS deficient HuT78 T cells displayed similar levels of TCR-induced SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 phosphorylation but exhibited substantial decrease in TCR-induced IL-2 and IFN-γ release. The defect in cytokine production occurred because of impaired calcium mobilization due to reduced recruitment of SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 to the LAT complex. Surprisingly, both GADS deficient HuT78 and GADS deficient primary murine CD8+ T cells had similar TCR-induced adhesion when compared to control T cells. Overall, our results show that GADS is required for calcium influx and cytokine production, but not cellular adhesion, in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the current model for T cell regulation by GADS is incomplete. PMID:25636200

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF CYTOKINE-INDUCED MYELOID-DERIVED SUPPRESSOR CELLS FROM NORMAL HUMAN PERIPHERAL BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Melissa G.; Liebertz, Daniel J.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Tumor immune tolerance can derive from the recruitment of suppressor cell populations, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). In cancer patients, increased MDSC correlate with more aggressive disease and a poor prognosis. Experimental Design Expression of 15 immune factors (TGFβ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, GM-CSF, M-CSF, IDO, FLT3L, c-kit L, iNOS, ARG-1, TNFα, COX2, VEGF) by MDSC-inducing human solid tumor cell lines was evaluated by RT-PCR. Based upon these data, cytokine mixtures were then tested for their ability to generate suppressive CD33+ cells from healthy donor PBMC in vitro by measuring their ability to inhibit the proliferation of, and IFNγ production by, fresh autologous human T cells after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Induced MDSC were characterized with respect to their morphology, surface phenotype, and gene expression profile. Results MDSC-inducing cancer cell lines demonstrated multiple pathways for MDSC generation, including over-expression of IL-6, IL-1β, COX2, M-CSF, and IDO. CD33+ cells with potent suppressive capacity were best generated in vitro by GM-CSF and IL-6, and secondarily by GM-CSF + IL-1β, PGE2, TNFα, or VEGF. Characterization studies of cytokine-induced suppressive cells revealed CD33+CD11b+CD66b+HLA-DRlowIL-13Rα2int large mononuclear cells with abundant basophilic cytoplasm. Expression of iNOS, TGFβ, NOX2, VEGF, and/or ARG-1 was also up-regulated and transwell studies showed suppression of autologous T cells to be contact dependent. Conclusion Suppressive CD33+ cells generated from PBMC by GM-CSF and IL-6 were consistent with human MDSC. This study suggests that these cytokines are potential therapeutic targets for the inhibition of MDSC induction in cancer patients. PMID:20644162

  7. Modulation in vitro of human natural cytotoxicity, lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogens and cytokine production by essential fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Purasiri, P; Mckechnie, A; Heys, S D; Eremin, O

    1997-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA) have been shown in animal studies to have a differential effect on various aspects of immune reactivity. However, there have been few studies in humans. Therefore, we elected to investigate the effects of a variety of EFA [gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)] in vitro on human blood lymphocyte reactivity, cytokine secretion and natural cytotoxicity. The proliferative response to polyclonal mitogens (phytohaemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, concanavalin A), as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation into newly synthesized lymphocytes, was inhibited (P < 0.05) by all EFAs tested, in a dose-dependent manner (3-15 micrograms/ml). The greatest inhibition of proliferation was caused by EPA and DHA. Similarly, EPA, DHA and GLA significantly reduced cytotoxic activity [expressed as lytic units, using 51 chromium-release assays natural killer (NK) (K562 cells) and lymphokine-activated (LAK) (Daudi cells) cells] (P < 0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner (5-50 micrograms/ml), without affecting cell viability. EPA and DHA exhibited greater suppression than GLA. Furthermore, the inhibition of cell proliferation and suppression of natural cytotoxicity was associated with marked decrease in cytokine [interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-2, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)] production in vitro. Our findings demonstrate that EFAs (GLA, EPA, DHA) have the potential to inhibit significantly various aspects of human lymphocyte cell-mediated and humoral immune reactivities. PMID:9415022

  8. Extrapituitary growth hormone synthesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ibave, Diana Cristina; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Iram Pablo; Garza-Rodríguez, María de Lourdes; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The gene for pituitary growth hormone (GH-N) in man belongs to a multigene locus located at chromosome 17q24.2, which also harbors four additional genes: one for a placental variant of GH-N (named GH-V) and three of chorionic somatommamotropin (CSH) type. Their tandem arrangement from 5' to 3' is: GH-N, CSH-L, CSH-1, GH-V and CSH-2. GH-N is mainly expressed in the pituitary from birth throughout life, while the remaining genes are expressed in the placenta of pregnant women. Pituitary somatotrophs secrete GH into the bloodstream to act at receptor sites in most tissues. GH participates in the regulation of several complex physiological processes, including growth and metabolism. Recently, the presence of GH has been described in several extrapituitary sites, such as neural, ocular, reproductive, immune, cardiovascular, muscular, dermal and skeletal tissues. It has been proposed that GH has an autocrine action in these tissues. While the body of evidence for its presence is constantly growing, research of its possible function and implications lag behind. In this review we highlight the evidence of extrapituitary synthesis of GH in humans.

  9. Inflammatory Cytokines Induce Expression of Chemokines by Human Retinal Cells: Role in Chemokine Receptor Mediated Age-related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; Kommineni, Vijay K; Ganjbaksh, Nader; Nagineni, Krishnasai K; Hooks, John J; Detrick, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Chemokine reeptor-3 (CCR-3) was shown to be associated with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is a vision threatening retinal disease that affects the aging population world-wide. Retinal pigment epithelium and choroid in the posterior part of the retina are the key tissues targeted in the pathogenesis of CNV in AMD. We used human retinal pigment epithelial (HRPE) and choroidal fibroblast (HCHF) cells, prepared from aged adult human donor eyes, to evaluate the expression of major CCR-3 ligands, CCL-5, CCL -7, CCL-11,CCL-24 and CCL-26. Microarray analysis of gene expression in HRPE cells treated with inflammatory cytokine mix (ICM= IFN-γ+TNF-α+IL-1β) revealed 75 and 23-fold increase in CCL-5 and CCL-7 respectively, but not CCL-11, CCL-24 and CCL-26. Chemokine secretion studies of the production of CCL5 and CCL7 by HRPE corroborated with the gene expression analysis data. When the HRPE cells were treated with either individual cytokines or the ICM, both CCL-5 and CCL-7 were produced in a dose dependent manner. Similar to the gene expression data, the ICM did not enhance HRPE production of CCL-11, CCL-24 and CCL-26. CCL-11 and CCL-26 were increased with IL-4 treatment and this HRPE production was augmented in the presence of TNF-α and IL1β. When HCHF cells were treated with either individual cytokines or the ICM, both CCL-5 and CCL-7 were produced in a dose dependent fashion. IL-4 induced low levels of CCL-11 and CCL-26 in HCHF and this production was significantly enhanced by TNF-α. Under these conditions, neither HRPE nor HCHF were demonstrated to produce CCL-24. These data demonstrate that chronic inflammation triggers CCL-5 and CCL-7 release by HRPE and HCHF and the subsequent interactions with CCR3 may participate in pathologic processes in AMD.

  10. Curcumin Induces Pro-apoptotic Effects Against Human Melanoma Cells and Modulates The Cellular Response to Immunotherapeutic Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Matthew A.; Bakan, Courtney; Benson, Don M.; Fuchs, James; Young, Gregory; Lesinski, Gregory B.

    2009-01-01

    Curcumin has potential as a chemopreventative and chemotherapeutic agent however its interactions with clinically relevant cytokines are poorly characterized. Since cytokine immunotherapy is a mainstay of treatment for malignant melanoma, we hypothesized that curcumin could modulate the cellular responsiveness to interferons and interleukins. As a single agent, curcumin induced a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis of human melanoma cell lines, which was most prominent at doses >10 µM. Immunoblot analysis confirmed that curcumin induced apoptosis and revealed caspase-3 processing, PARP cleavage, reduced Bcl-2 and decreased basal phosphorylated STAT3. Despite its pro-apoptotic effects, curcumin pre-treatment of human melanoma cell lines inhibited the phosphorylation of STAT1 protein and downstream gene transcription following IFN-α and IFN-γ as determined by immunoblot analysis and Real Time PCR, respectively. Pre-treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors with curcumin also inhibited the ability of IFN-α, IFN-γ and IL-2 to phosphorylate STAT proteins critical for their anti-tumor activity (STAT1 and STAT5, respectively) and their respective downstream gene expression as measured by Real Time PCR. Finally, stimulation of natural killer (NK) cells with curcumin reduced the level of IL-12-induced IFN-γ secretion, and production of granzyme b or IFN-γ upon co-culture with A375 melanoma cells or NK sensitive K562 cells as targets. These data demonstrate that although curcumin can induce apoptosis of melanoma cells, it can also adversely affect the responsiveness of immune effector cells to clinically relevant cytokines that possess anti-tumor properties. PMID:19723881

  11. Exposure to wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory cytokine release from human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2006-04-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized to be a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries were studded tires are used. In this work, we investigated the inflammatory effect of PM10 generated from the wear of studded tires on two different types of pavement. As comparison, we also investigated PM10 from a traffic-intensive street, a subway station, and diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Human monocyte-derived macrophages, nasal epithelial cells (RPMI 2650), and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to the different types of particles, and the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-alpha into the culture medium was measured. The results show a significant release of cytokines from macrophages after exposure for all types of particles. When particles generated from asphalt/granite pavement were compared to asphalt/quartzite pavement, the granite pavement had a significantly higher capacity to induce the release of cytokines. The granite pavement particles induced cytokine release at the same magnitude as the street particles did, which was higher than what particles from both a subway station and DEP did. Exposure of epithelial cells to PM10 resulted in a significant increase of TNF-alpha secreted from BEAS-2B cells for all types of particles used (DEP was not tested), and the highest levels were induced by subway particles. None of the particle types were able to evoke detectable cytokine release from RPMI 2650 cells. The results indicate that PM10 generated by the wear of studded tires on the street surface is a large contributor to the cytokine-releasing ability of particles in traffic-intensive areas and that the type of pavement used is important for the level of this contribution

  12. Regulation of IL-13 synthesis in human lymphocytes: implications for asthma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Andreas; Zhang, Meixia; Kuss, Hildegard; Szelenyi, Istvan; Brune, Kay

    2002-01-01

    IL-13 is an important mediator in inflammatory diseases such as asthma. IL-13 is mainly produced by T cells. However, signalling pathways leading to induction of this cytokine are not well-characterized. We analysed the regulation of IL-13 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and CD4+ T cells.Cyclosporine (CsA) and FK-506 inhibited IL-13 synthesis, when cells were stimulated by TPA/ionomycin. However, stimulation by α-CD3/α-CD28 led to an enhanced IL-13 synthesis.NF-κB inhibitor N-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethylketone (TLCK) inhibited IL-13 synthesis more effectively after TPA/ionomycin stimulation. After α-CD3/α-CD28 stimulation, only 300 μM TLCK inhibited IL-13 synthesis. Dexamethasone inhibited IL-13 equally effective after α-CD3/α-CD28 and TPA/ionomycin stimulation.p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 inhibited IL-13 synthesis only partially. MEK inhibitor U0126 inhibited TPA/ionomycin induced IL-13 synthesis very effectively, whereas α-CD3/α-CD28 stimulated IL-13 induction was resistant to this drug.These results were confirmed in purified CD4+ T cells. In difference to PBMCs α-CD3/α-CD28 stimulated IL-13 synthesis was effectively inhibited by CsA, FK-506 and U0126.Therefore U0126 was tested in an animal model of allergic asthma. We could demonstrate for the first time that inhibition of the MEK – ERK cascade is a therapeutic option for asthma. Intraperitoneal administration of 10 mg kg−1 U0126 reduced lung eosinophilia in ovalbumin-challenged Brown Norway rats by 44%.These results demonstrate that different signalling pathways are involved in regulating IL-13 synthesis in primary human T cells. Characterizing highly potent inhibitors of IL-13 synthesis can be exploited to identify new drugs to treat immunological diseases such as asthma. PMID:11959794

  13. Altered cytokine production by specific human peripheral blood cell subsets immediately following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, flow cytometry was used to positively identify the specific lymphocyte subsets exhibiting space flight-induced alterations in cytokine production. Whole blood samples were collected from 27 astronauts at three points (one preflight, two postflight) surrounding four space shuttle missions. Assays performed included serum/urine stress hormones, white blood cell (WBC) phenotyping, and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following space flight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated a decreased percentage of T cells, whereas percentages of B cells and natural killer (NK) cells remained unchanged after flight. Nearly all the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4/CD8 T cell ratio. Assessment of naive (CD45RA+) vs. memory (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was ambiguous, and subjects tended to group within specific missions. Although no significant trend was seen in absolute monocyte levels, a significant decrease in the percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocytes was seen following space flight in all subjects tested. T cell (CD3+) production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) was significantly decreased after space flight, as was IL-2 production by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was not altered by space flight for the CD8+ cell subset, but there was a significant decrease in IFN-gamma production for the CD4+ T cell subset. Serum and urine stress hormone analysis indicated significant physiologic stresses in astronauts following space flight. Altered peripheral leukocyte subsets, altered serum and urine stress hormone levels, and altered T cell cytokine secretion profiles were all observed postflight. In addition, there appeared to be differential susceptibility to space flight regarding cytokine secretion by T cell subsets. These alterations may be the

  14. Depressant effects of ambroxol and erdosteine on cytokine synthesis, granule enzyme release, and free radical production in rat alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yoon Young; Song, Jin Ho; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Han, Eun Sook; Lee, Chung Soo

    2003-04-01

    The present study examined the effects of ambroxol and erdosteine, bronchial expectorants, on the cytokine synthesis, granule enzyme release, and free radical production in rat alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide. Ambroxol and erdosteine significantly decreased the production of tumour necrosis factors-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interleukin-6 in alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide. These drugs significantly reduced the production of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide and the release of acid phosphatase and lysozyme in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages. Ambroxol and erdosteine showed no scavenging effect on superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, whereas both drugs effectively decomposed nitric oxide. The results show that ambroxol and erdosteine may inhibit the responses, including cytokine synthesis and free radical production, in rat alveolar macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide. Unlike the production of reactive oxygen species, the inhibitory effect of ambroxol and erdosteine on the production of nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide-activated alveolar macrophages may be accomplished by a scavenging action on the species and inhibition of the respiratory burst.

  15. Prior TLR5 induction in human T cells results in a transient potentiation of subsequent TCR-induced cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Mikaela M; Bilal, Mahmood Y; Houtman, Jon C D

    2014-02-01

    Activation of TLRs by components required for pathogen viability results in increased inflammation and an enhanced immune response to infection. Unlike their effects on other immune cells, TLR activation in the absence of T cell antigen receptor (TCR) induction has little effect on T cell activity. Instead, the simultaneous induction of TLR and TCR results in increased cytokine release compared to TCR treatment alone. Thus, the current model states that TLRs alter T cell function only if activated at the same time as the TCR. In this study, we tested the novel hypothesis that prior TLR induction can also alter TCR-mediated functions. We found that human T cells responded to ligands for TLR2 and TLR5. However, only prior TLR5 induction potentiated subsequent TCR-mediated cytokine production in human T cells. This response required at least 24h of TLR5 induction and lasted for approximately 24-36h after removal of a TLR5 ligand. Interestingly, prior TLR5 induction enhanced TCR-mediated activation of Akt without increasing Lck, LAT or ERK kinase phosphorylation. Together, our studies show that TLR5 induction leads to a transient increase in the sensitivity of T cells to TCR stimulation by selectively enhancing TCR-mediated Akt function, highlighting that timeframe when TLR5 can potentiate TCR-induced downstream functions are significantly longer that previously appreciated.

  16. [Production of recombinant human interleukin-38 and its inhibitory effect on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in THP-1 cells].

    PubMed

    Yuan, X L; Li, Y; Pan, X H; Zhou, M; Gao, Q Y; Li, M C

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-38 is the latest member of the IL-1 cytokine family. However, as a result of lacking efficient method to generate relatively large quantity of IL-38, its precise functions are poorly understood. In the present study, the cloning, expression, purification, and activity analysis of recombinant human IL-38 was described. Human IL-38 cDNA was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-44. The recombinant IL-38 containing a C-hexahistidine tag was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) which induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside. The expressed fusion protein was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. IL-38 protein was largely found in the soluble fraction. The purified IL-38 appeared a single band on SDS-PAGE, the yield of IL-38 was 4 mg from 1 L of bacterial culture, and the purity was more than 98% with low endotoxin level (<0.1 EU/μg). Western blotting confirmed the identity of the purified protein. Activity analysis showed that IL-38 can inhibit effectively the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-17, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in lipopolysaccharide-activated THP-1 cells. The production and characterization of biologically active IL-38 will be beneficial for its potential role in clinical applications.

  17. Native human interferon-α is a strong inductor of endogenous cytokines involved in the suppression of procollagen type I.

    PubMed

    Santak, G; Santak, M; Forčić, D

    2013-09-01

    Native human interferon-α (nHuIFN-α) has a stronger reductive effect on procollagen type I mRNA expression than recombinant human interferon-α (rHuIFN-α). It is partially due to the additive activity of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which is present in small concentrations in nHuIFN-α. Here, we show that the reductive effect is also the result of the endogenous cytokines induced by the activity of nHuIFN-α. In the culture of MRC5 fibroblasts, we have further found that nHuIFN-α induces endogenous interferons in higher amounts than rHuIFN-α, measured with PCR. That is more pronounced when interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is measured. This result puts a new light on IFN-γ activity in the nHuIFN-α treatment because its role was neglected due to the loss of its activity during the nHuIFN-α preparation process. The findings lead to the conclusion that endogenous cytokines play a significant role in the nHuIFN-α -mediated reduction of procollagen type I mRNA and are therefore an important factor in potential therapeutic usage.

  18. Progesterone promotes maternal-fetal tolerance by reducing human maternal T-cell polyfunctionality and inducing a specific cytokine profile.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, David; Eldershaw, Suzy A; Inman, Charlotte F; Coomarasamy, Aravinthan; Moss, Paul A H; Kilby, Mark D

    2015-10-01

    Progesterone is a steroid hormone essential for the maintenance of human pregnancy, and its actions are thought to include promoting maternal immune tolerance of the semiallogenic fetus. We report that exposure of maternal T cells to progesterone at physiological doses induced a unique skewing of the cytokine production profile of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, with reductions not only in potentially deleterious IFN-γ and TNF-α production but also in IL-10 and IL-5. Conversely, production of IL-4 was increased. Maternal T cells also became less polyfunctional, focussing cytokine production toward profiles including IL-4. This was accompanied by reduced T-cell proliferation. Using fetal and viral antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell clones, we confirmed that this as a direct, nonantigen-specific effect. Yet human T cells lacked conventional nuclear progesterone receptors, implicating a membrane progesterone receptor. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells responded to progesterone in a dose-dependent manner, with subtle effects at concentrations comparable to those in maternal blood, but profound effects at concentrations similar to those at the maternal-fetal interface. This characterization of how progesterone modulates T-cell function is important in understanding the normal biology of pregnancy and informing the rational use of progesterone therapy in pregnancies at risk of fetal loss.

  19. Proinflammatory cytokine secretion is suppressed by TMEM16A or CFTR channel activity in human cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Veit, Guido; Bossard, Florian; Goepp, Julie; Verkman, A. S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.; Hanrahan, John W.; Lukacs, Gergely L.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by the functional expression defect of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel at the apical plasma membrane. Impaired bacterial clearance and hyperactive innate immune response are hallmarks of the CF lung disease, yet the existence of and mechanism accounting for the innate immune defect that occurs before infection remain controversial. Inducible expression of either CFTR or the calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A attenuated the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and CXCL1/2 in two human respiratory epithelial models under air–liquid but not liquid–liquid interface culture. Expression of wild-type but not the inactive G551D-CFTR indicates that secretion of the chemoattractant IL-8 is inversely proportional to CFTR channel activity in cftr∆F508/∆F508 immortalized and primary human bronchial epithelia. Similarly, direct but not P2Y receptor–mediated activation of TMEM16A attenuates IL-8 secretion in respiratory epithelia. Thus augmented proinflammatory cytokine secretion caused by defective anion transport at the apical membrane may contribute to the excessive and persistent lung inflammation in CF and perhaps in other respiratory diseases associated with documented down-regulation of CFTR (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Direct pharmacological activation of TMEM16A offers a potential therapeutic strategy to reduce the inflammation of CF airway epithelia. PMID:22973054

  20. Suppression of human anti-inflammatory plasma cytokines IL-10 and IL-1RA with elevation of proinflammatory cytokine IFN-gamma during the isolation of the Antarctic winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearer, William T.; Lee, Bang-Ning; Cron, Stanley G.; Rosenblatt, Howard M.; Smith, E. O'Brian; Lugg, Desmond J.; Nickolls, Peter M.; Sharp, Robert M.; Rollings, Karl; Reuben, James M.

    2002-01-01

    Cellular immune function has been shown to be decreased and latent virus shedding to be increased in human beings isolated during the Antarctic winter, a model used for assessing some effects of space flight. However, the balance of proinflammatory (IFN-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 and IL-1RA) cytokines has not previously been evaluated. We therefore sought to determine whether isolation during the Antarctic winter would alter the proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. Cytokine levels were measured with ELISA in monthly plasma samples from January through September 1999 in 21 study subjects in the Antarctic and 7 control subjects on Macquarie Island. There was a significant time-dependent increase in plasma IFN-gamma (P =.039) as well as decreases in IL-10 (P =.042) and IL-1RA (P =.053) in the study subjects compared with the control subjects. The study subjects also had significantly increased plasma IFN-gamma levels (P < or =.045) but decreased IL-10 and IL-1RA levels (P < or =.036) at individual time points of isolation. Isolation of human beings in the Antarctic appears to shift the plasma cytokine balance toward a proinflammatory profile. These observations are consistent with T-cell activation that might be due to activation of latent viruses, and they could hold importance for determining the risks of space flight.

  1. Increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines in chronic lesions of human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Melby, P C; Andrade-Narvaez, F J; Darnell, B J; Valencia-Pacheco, G; Tryon, V V; Palomo-Cetina, A

    1994-01-01

    The nature of the host cellular immune response largely determines the expression of disease following infection with the intracellular protozoans Leishmania spp. In experimental animals control and resolution of infection are mediated by gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), whereas disease progression is associated with the production of interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-10, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). We have analyzed the profile of cytokine gene expression directly in the lesions of 13 patients with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania mexicana. All but one patient had a single lesion, and the time of evolution ranged from 8 days to 18 months. Cytokine gene expression was quantitated by reverse transcriptase PCR and interpolation from a standard curve. Gamma interferon, TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-beta gene expression was present in all samples. IL-3 and IL-4 gene expression was barely detectable in 1 and 3 of 13 samples, respectively. IL-2 and IL-5 mRNAs were not found. A significant increase in the expression of IL-1 alpha, TNF-alpha, IL-10, and TGF-beta was observed in late lesions (> or = 4 months) compared with that in early lesions (< or = 2 months). Because of their inhibitory effects on macrophage function, the expression of IL-10 and TGF-beta may play a role in the immunopathogenesis of chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:8112853

  2. Cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17F, and IL-4 Differentially Affect Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bravenboer, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    During the initial stages of bone repair, proinflammatory cytokines are released within the injury site, quickly followed by a shift to anti-inflammatory cytokines. The effect of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines on osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells is controversial. Here, we investigated the effect of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-17F and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells (hASCs). hASCs were treated with TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17F, or IL-4 (10 ng/mL) for 72 h mimicking bone repair. TNF-α reduced collagen type I gene expression but increased hASC proliferation and ALP activity. IL-6 also strongly enhanced ALP activity (18-fold), as well as bone nodule formation by hASCs. IL-8 did not affect proliferation or osteogenic gene expression but reduced bone nodule formation. IL-17F decreased hASC proliferation but enhanced ALP activity. IL-4 enhanced osteocalcin gene expression and ALP activity but reduced RUNX2 gene expression and bone nodule formation. In conclusion, all cytokines studied have both enhancing and reducing effects on osteogenic differentiation of hASCs, even when applied for 72 h only. Some cytokines, specifically IL-6, may be suitable to induce osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells as a strategy for enhancing bone repair. PMID:27667999

  3. Expression and Functional Role of α7 Nicotinic Receptor in Human Cytokine-stimulated Natural Killer (NK) Cells.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Samanta R; Ziblat, Andrea; Torres, Nicolás I; Zwirner, Norberto W; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2016-08-05

    The homomeric α7 nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is one of the most abundant nAChRs in the central nervous system where it contributes to cognition, attention, and working memory. α7 nAChR is also present in lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages and it is emerging as an important drug target for intervention in inflammation and sepsis. Natural killer (NK) cells display cytotoxic activity against susceptible target cells and modulate innate and adaptive immune responses through their interaction with DCs. We here show that human NK cells also express α7 nAChR. α7 nAChR mRNA is detected by RT-PCR and cell surface expression of α7 nAChR is detected by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry using α-bungarotoxin, a specific antagonist. Both mRNA and protein levels increase during NK stimulation with cytokines (IL-12, IL-18, and IL-15). Exposure of cytokine-stimulated NK cells to PNU-282987, a specific α7 nAChR agonist, increases intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) mainly released from intracellular stores, indicating that α7 nAChR is functional. Moreover, its activation by PNU-282987 plus a specific positive allosteric modulator greatly enhances the Ca(2+) responses in NK cells. Stimulation of NK cells with cytokines and PNU-282987 decreases NF-κB levels and nuclear mobilization, down-regulates NKG2D receptors, and decreases NKG2D-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production. Also, such NK cells are less efficient to trigger DC maturation. Thus, our results demonstrate the anti-inflammatory role of α7 nAChR in NK cells and suggest that modulation of its activity in these cells may constitute a novel target for regulation of the immune response.

  4. Aluminium, carbonyls and cytokines in human nipple aspirate fluids: Possible relationship between inflammation, oxidative stress and breast cancer microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Mannello, F; Ligi, D; Canale, M

    2013-11-01

    The human breast is likely exposed to Al (aluminium) from many sources including diet and personal care products. Underarm applications of aluminium salt-based antiperspirant provide a possible long-term source of exposure, especially after underarm applications to shaved and abraded skin. Al research in breast fluids likely reflects the intraductal microenvironment. We found increased levels of aluminium in noninvasively collected nipple aspirate fluids (NAF) from 19 breast cancer patients compared with 16 healthy control subjects (268 vs 131 μg/l, respectively; p < 0.0001). In the same NAF samples we found significantly increased levels of protein oxidative carbonyls in cancer patients compared to healthy women (2.35 vs 0.41 nmol/mg prot, respectively; p < 0.0001). Aluminium content and carbonyl levels showed a significant positive linear correlation (r(2) 0.6628, p < 0.0001). In cancer NAF samples (containing higher amounts of aluminium salts) we also found a significantly increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12 p70, and TNF-α) and chemoattractant CC and CXC chemokines (IL-8, MIP-1α and MCP-1). In 12 invasive cancer NAF samples we found a significant positive linear correlation among aluminium, carbonyls and pro-inflammatory IL-6 cytokine (Y = 64.79x-39.63, r(2) 0.8192, p < 0.0005), as well as pro-inflammatory monocyte chemoattractant MCP-1 cytokine (Y = 2026x-866, r(2) 0.9495, p < 0.0001). In addition to emerging evidence, our results support the possible involvement of aluminium ions in oxidative and inflammatory status perturbations of breast cancer microenvironment, suggesting aluminium accumulation in breast microenvironment as a possible risk factor for oxidative/inflammatory phenotype of breast cells.

  5. Aloe vera downregulates LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine production and expression of NLRP3 inflammasome in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Budai, Marietta M; Varga, Aliz; Milesz, Sándor; Tőzsér, József; Benkő, Szilvia

    2013-12-01

    Aloe vera has been used in traditional herbal medicine as an immunomodulatory agent inducing anti-inflammatory effects. However, its role on the IL-1β inflammatory cytokine production has not been studied. IL-1β production is strictly regulated both at transcriptional and posttranslational levels through the activity of Nlrp3 inflammasome. In this study we aimed to determine the effect of Aloe vera on the molecular mechanisms of Nlrp3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1β production in LPS-activated human THP-1 cells and monocyte-derived macrophages. Our results show that Aloe vera significantly reduced IL-8, TNFα, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in a dose dependent manner. The inhibitory effect was substantially more pronounced in the primary cells. We found that Aloe vera inhibited the expression of pro-IL-1β, Nlrp3, caspase-1 as well as that of the P2X7 receptor in the LPS-induced primary macrophages. Furthermore, LPS-induced activation of signaling pathways like NF-κB, p38, JNK and ERK were inhibited by Aloe vera in these cells. Altogether, we show for the first time that Aloe vera-mediated strong reduction of IL-1β appears to be the consequence of the reduced expression of both pro-IL-1β as well as Nlrp3 inflammasome components via suppressing specific signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, we show that the expression of the ATP sensor P2X7 receptor is also downregulated by Aloe vera that could also contribute to the attenuated IL-1β cytokine secretion. These results may provide a new therapeutic approach to regulate inflammasome-mediated responses.

  6. Mycoplasma fermentans and TNF-β interact to amplify immune-modulating cytokines in human lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Fabisiak, James P.; Gao, Fei; Thomson, Robyn G.; Strieter, Robert M.; Watkins, Simon C.; Dauber, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Mycoplasma can establish latent infections and are associated with arthritis, leukemia, and chronic lung disease. We developed an experimental model in which lung cells are deliberately infected with Mycoplasma fermentans. Human lung fibroblasts (HLF) were exposed to live M. fermentans and immune-modulating cytokine release was assessed with and without known inducers of cytokine production. M. fermentans increased IL-6, IL-8/CXCL8, MCP-1/CCL2, and Gro-α/CXCL1 production. M. fermentans interacted with TNF-β to release more IL-6, CXCL8, and CXCL1 than predicted by the responses to either stimulus alone. The effects of live infection were recapitulated by exposure to M. fermentans-derived macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 (MALP-2), a Toll-like receptor-2- and receptor-6-specific ligand. The synergistic effect of combined stimuli was more pronounced with prolonged incubations. Preexposure to TNF-β sensitized the cells to subsequent MALP-2 challenge, but preexposure to MALP-2 did not alter the IL-6 response to TNF-β. Exposure to M. fermentans or MALP-2 did not enhance nuclear localization, DNA binding, or transcriptional activity of NF-κB and did not modulate early NF-κB activation in response to TNF-β. Application of specific inhibitors of various MAPKs suggested that p38 and JNK/stress-activated protein kinase were involved in early IL-6 release after exposure to TNF-β and M. fermentans, respectively. The combined response to M. fermentans and TNF-β, however, was uniquely sensitive to delayed application of SP-600125, suggesting that JNK/stress-activated protein kinase contributes to the amplification of IL-6 release. Thus M. fermentans interacts with stimuli such as TNF-β to amplify lung cell production of immune-modulating cytokines. The mechanisms accounting for this interaction can now be dissected with the use of this in vitro model. PMID:16751226

  7. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) replacement decreases insulin resistance and lowers inflammatory cytokines in aging humans.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Edward P; Villareal, Dennis T; Fontana, Luigi; Han, Dong-Ho; Holloszy, John O

    2011-05-01

    Plasma dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) decreases ~80% between ages 25 and 75 yr. In a preliminary study, we found that 6 mo of DHEA replacement improved insulin action in elderly individuals. The purpose of the present larger, randomized double-blind study was to determine whether a longer period of DHEA replacement improves glucose tolerance. Fifty-seven men and 68 women aged 65 to 75 yr were randomly assigned to 50 mg DHEA or placebo once daily. Year one was a randomized, double blind trial. Year 2 was an open label continuation. DHEA replacement improved glucose tolerance in participants who had abnormal GT initially, reduced plasma triglycerides, and the inflammatory cytokines IL6 and TNFα.

  8. The effects of exercise withdrawal on mood and inflammatory cytokine responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Poole, Lydia; Hamer, Mark; Wawrzyniak, Andrew J; Steptoe, Andrew

    2011-07-01

    Mechanisms underlying the relationship between exercise and mood are not well understood. This study sought to investigate the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and autonomic balance in determining the impact of exercise withdrawal on negative mood. Healthy men and women who regularly exercised (N = 26, mean age = 25.5 years, SD = 4.5 years) were randomised to exercise withdrawal or exercise maintenance for 2 weeks. Protocol adherence was monitored using accelerometers. Inflammatory markers from plasma (interleukin-6, IL-6; tumour necrosis factor-alpha; interleukin-10; and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist), heart-rate variability (HRV) and measures of mood (General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS)) were assessed at study entry and at 2-week follow-up. Exercise withdrawal resulted in significant increases in negative mood over time on both the GHQ (p = 0.028) and the POMS (p = 0.005). Following the intervention, IL-6 concentration was lower in the exercise withdrawal than exercise maintenance condition (p = 0.05). No intervention effects were observed for other cytokines or HRV. The mood changes were significantly related to changes in IL-6 concentration (β = - 0.50, p = 0.011), indicating that reduction in IL-6 was related to increased negative mood. Our results are consistent with positive effects of exercise on mental health, but further research on inflammatory pathways is warranted.

  9. A human monoclonal IgG1 potently neutralizing the pro-inflammatory cytokine GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Krinner, Eva-Maria; Raum, Tobias; Petsch, Silke; Bruckmaier, Sandra; Schuster, Ioana; Petersen, Laetitia; Cierpka, Ronny; Abebe, Derege; Mølhøj, Michael; Wolf, Andreas; Sørensen, Poul; Locher, Mathias; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Hepp, Julia

    2007-02-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine GM-CSF is aberrantly produced in many autoimmune and chronic inflammatory human diseases. GM-CSF neutralization by antibodies has been shown to have a profound therapeutic effect in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory lung diseases, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. Moreover, the absence of GM-CSF in null mutant mice ameliorates or prevents certain of these diseases. Here we describe the biophysical and biological properties of a human anti-GM-CSF IgG1 antibody designated MT203, which was derived by phage display guided selection. MT203 bound with picomolar affinity to an epitope on human and macaque GM-CSF involved in high-affinity receptor interaction. As a consequence, the antibody potently prevented both GM-CSF-induced proliferation of TF-1 cells with a sub-nanomolar IC50 value and the production of the chemokine IL-8 by U937 cells. MT203 neutralized equally well recombinant (r) human (h) GM-CSF from Escherichia coli and yeast, and also normally glycosylated GM-CSF secreted by human lung epithelial cells in response to IL-1beta stimulation. Furthermore, MT203 significantly reduced both survival and activation of peripheral human eosinophils as may be required for effective treatment of inflammatory lung diseases. The antibody did not show a detectable loss of neutralizing activity after 5 days in human serum at 37 degrees C. Based on its favorable properties, MT203 has been selected for development as a novel anti-inflammatory human monoclonal antibody with therapeutic potential in a multitude of human autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  10. Memory and flexibility of cytokine gene expression as separable properties of human T(H)1 and T(H)2 lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Messi, Mara; Giacchetto, Isabella; Nagata, Kinya; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Natoli, Gioacchino; Sallusto, Federica

    2003-01-01

    CD4+ T cell priming under T helper type I (T(H)1) or T(H)2 conditions gives rise to polarized cytokine gene expression. We found that in these conditions human naive T cells acquired stable histone hyperacetylation at either the Ifng or Il4 promoter. Effector memory T cells showed polarized cytokine gene acetylation patterns in vivo, whereas central memory T cells had hypoacetylated cytokine genes but acquired polarized acetylation and expression after appropriate stimulation. However, hypoacetylation of the nonexpressed cytokine gene did not lead to irreversible silencing because most T(H)1 and T(H)2 cells acetylated and expressed the alternative gene when stimulated under opposite T(H) conditions. Such cytokine flexibility was absent in a subset of T(H)2 cells that failed to up-regulate T-bet and to express interferon-gamma when stimulated under T(H)1 conditions. Thus, most human CD4+ T cells retain both memory and flexibility of cytokine gene expression.

  11. Interferon gamma and interleukin 4 stimulate prolonged expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in human airway epithelium through synthesis of soluble mediators.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, F H; Uetani, K; Haque, S J; Williams, B R; Dweik, R A; Thunnissen, F B; Calhoun, W; Erzurum, S C

    1997-01-01

    Human respiratory epithelium expresses inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) continuously in vivo, however mechanisms responsible for maintenance of expression are not known. We show that IFNgamma is sufficient for induction of iNOS in primary human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) in vitro, and IL-4 potentiates IFNgamma-induced iNOS expression in HAEC through stabilization of iNOS mRNA. IFNgamma/IL-4- induced iNOS expression in HAEC was delayed in onset and prolonged with expression up to 1 wk. Removal of overlying culture media resulted in loss of expression, while transfer of conditioned media induced iNOS mRNA in other HAEC. IFNgamma and IL-4 stimulation activated STAT1 and STAT6 in HAEC, but conditioned media transfer to HAEC produced even higher levels of STAT1 activation than achieved by direct addition of cytokines. Although cytokine induction of iNOS was dependent on new protein synthesis, conditioned media induction of iNOS in HAEC was not. Further, removal of overlying culture media from cells at different times after cytokine stimulation demonstrated that mediator synthesis and/or secretion important for induction and maintenance of iNOS occurs early after cytokine stimulation. In conclusion, a combination of IFNgamma/ IL-4, which occurs naturally in the lung epithelial lining fluid, leads to maintenance of iNOS expression in human airway epithelium through production of soluble mediators and stabilization of mRNA. PMID:9259582

  12. 5-Hydroxytryptamine modulates cytokine and chemokine production in LPS-primed human monocytes via stimulation of different 5-HTR subtypes.

    PubMed

    Dürk, Thorsten; Panther, Elisabeth; Müller, Tobias; Sorichter, Stephan; Ferrari, Davide; Pizzirani, Cinzia; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Myrtek, Daniel; Norgauer, Johannes; Idzko, Marco

    2005-05-01

    The neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), commonly known as serotonin, is released at peripheral sites from activated enterochromaffin cells, mast cells and platelets. In this study we analyzed the biological activity and intracellular signaling of 5-HT in human monocytes. By reverse transcription (RT) and PCR, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of 5-HT receptor 1E (5-HTR(1E)), 5-HTR(2A), 5-HTR(3), 5-HTR(4) and 5-HTR(7) could be revealed. Functional studies showed that 5-HT modulates the release of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8/CXCL8, IL-12p40 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), while it has no effect on the production of IL-18 and IFN-gamma in LPS-stimulated human blood monocytes. Moreover, RT and PCR revealed that 5-HT modulated mRNA levels of IL-6 and IL-8/CXCL8, but did not influence mRNA levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha. Pharmacological studies with isotype-selective receptor agonists allowed us to show that 5-HTR(3) subtype up-regulates the LPS-induced production of IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-8/CXCL8, while it was not involved in TNF-alpha and IL-12p40 secretion. Furthermore, activation of the G(s)-coupled 5-HTR(4) and 5-HTR(7) subtypes increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) and secretion of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-12p40 and IL-8/CXCL8, while, on the contrary, it inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha release. Interestingly, 5-HTR(1) and 5-HTR(2) agonists did not modulate the LPS-induced cytokine production in human monocytes. Our results point to a new role for 5-HT in inflammation by modulating cytokine production in monocytes via activation of 5-HTR(3), 5-HTR(4) and 5-HTR(7) subtypes.

  13. Human Cytokine Genetic Variants Associated With HBsAg Reverse Seroconversion in Rituximab-Treated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Wang, Hao-Yuan; Yang, Ching-Fen; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Liu, Hsiao-Ling; Chang, Wen-Chun; Chen, Po-Min; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chan, Yu-Jiun; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Huang, Yi-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation has been noted in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-seronegative patients with CD20+ B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) undergoing rituximab treatment. Clinically, hepatitis flares are usually associated with the reappearance of HBsAg (reverse seroconversion of HBsAg, HBV-RS). It is unclear whether human genetic factors are related to rituximab-associated HBV reactivation. Unvaccinated HBsAg-seronegative adults (n = 104) with CD20+ NHL who had received rituximab-containing therapy without anti-HBV prophylaxis were enrolled. Eighty-nine candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 49 human cytokine genes were chosen and were analyzed using the iPLEX technique. Competing risk regression was used to identify the factors associated with HBV-RS. Participants had a median age of 66.1 years and 56.7% were male (n = 59). The anti-HBs and anti-HBc positivity rates were 82.4% and 94.1%, respectively, among patients for whom data were available (approximately 81%). A mean of 7.14 cycles of rituximab therapy were administered, and a total of 14 (13.4%) patients developed HBV-RS. Nine SNPs showed significant differences in frequency between patients with or without HBV-RS: CD40 rs1883832, IL4 rs2243248 and rs2243263, IL13 rs1295686, IL18 rs243908, IL20 rs1518108, and TNFSF13B rs12428930 and rs12583006. Multivariate analysis showed that ≥6 cycles of rituximab therapy, IL18 rs243908, and the IL4 haplotype rs2243248∼rs2243263 were independently associated with HBV-RS. The IL4 haplotype rs2243248∼rs2243263 was significantly associated with HBV-RS regardless of anti-HBs status. Polymorphisms in human cytokine genes impact the risk of rituximab-associated HBV-RS. PMID:26986131

  14. Effects of airborne World Trade Center dust on cytokine release by primary human lung cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Payne, J P; Kemp, S J; Dewar, A; Goldstraw, P; Kendall, M; Chen, L C; Tetley, T D

    2004-05-01

    There are continuing concerns regarding the respiratory health effects of airborne particulate matter (PM) after the destruction of the World Trade Centre (WTC). We examined cytokine (interleukin [IL]-8, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha) release by primary human lung alveolar macrophages (AM) and type II epithelial cells after exposure to WTC PM2.5 (indoor and outdoor), PM10-2.5 (indoor), and PM53-10 (outdoor), fractionated from settled dusts within 2 months of the incident. There was an increase in AM cytokine/chemokine release at 5 and/or 50 microg/well WTC PM, which fell at 500 microg/well. Type II cells did not release tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and the increase in IL-8 and IL-6, although significant, was lower than that of AM. Respirable PM generated by the WTC collapse stimulates inflammatory mediator release by lung cells, which may contribute to the increased incidence of respiratory illness since September 11th 2001.

  15. Cytokine Profiles in Human Metapneumovirus Infected Children: Identification of Genes Involved in the Antiviral Response and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Malmo, Jostein; Moe, Nina; Krokstad, Sidsel; Ryan, Liv; Loevenich, Simon; Johnsen, Ingvild B.; Espevik, Terje; Nordbø, Svein Arne; Døllner, Henrik; Anthonsen, Marit W.

    2016-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) causes severe airway infection in children that may be caused by an unfavorable immune response. The nature of the innate immune response to hMPV in naturally occurring infections in children is largely undescribed, and it is unknown if inflammasome activation is implicated in disease pathogenesis. We examined nasopharynx aspirates and blood samples from hMPV-infected children without detectable co-infections. The expression of inflammatory and antiviral genes were measured in nasal airway secretions by relative mRNA quantification while blood plasma proteins were determined by a multiplex immunoassay. Several genes were significantly up-regulated at mRNA and protein level in the hMPV infected children. Most apparent was the expression of the chemokine IP-10, the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18 in addition to the interferon inducible gene ISG54. Interestingly, children experiencing more severe disease, as indicated by a severity index, had significantly more often up-regulation of the inflammasome-associated genes IL-1β and NLRP3. Overall, our data point to cytokines, particularly inflammasome-associated, that might be important in hMPV mediated lung disease and the antiviral response in children with severe infection. Our study is the first to demonstrate that inflammasome components are associated with increased illness severity in hMPV-infected children. PMID:27171557

  16. Multiplex analysis inflammatory cytokines in human blood, breath condensate, and urine matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientific evidence suggests that inflammation is associated with human health effects and health endpoints, yet most studies have focused on human populations that are already considered “unhealthy”.  As such, it is pertinent to measure inflammatory biomarkers in human biologica...

  17. Hematopoietic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2008-01-15

    The production of hematopoietic cells is under the tight control of a group of hematopoietic cytokines. Each cytokine has multiple actions mediated by receptors whose cytoplasmic domains contain specialized regions initiating the various responses-survival, proliferation, differentiation commitment, maturation, and functional activation. Individual cytokines can be lineage specific or can regulate cells in multiple lineages, and for some cell types, such as stem cells or megakaryocyte progenitors, the simultaneous action of multiple cytokines is required for proliferative responses. The same cytokines control basal and emergency hematopoietic cell proliferation. Three cytokines, erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, have now been in routine clinical use to stimulate cell production and in total have been used in the management of many millions of patients. In this little review, discussion will be restricted to those cytokines well established as influencing the production of hematopoietic cells and will exclude newer candidate regulators and those active on lymphoid cells. As requested, this account will describe the cytokines in a historical manner, using a sequential format of discovery, understanding, validation, and puzzlement, a sequence that reflects the evolving views on these cytokines over the past 50 years.

  18. Human intestinal epithelial cells produce proinflammatory cytokines in response to infection in a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft model of amebiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, K B; Li, E; Swanson, P E; Stanley, S L

    1997-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica causes amebic dysentery and amebic liver abscess, diseases associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. E. histolytica infection appears to involve the initial attachment of amebic trophozoites to intestinal epithelial cells, followed by lysis of these cells and subsequent invasion into the submucosa. A recent in vitro study (L. Eckmann, S. L. Reed, J. R. Smith, and M. F. Kagnoff, J. Clin. Invest. 96:1269-1279, 1995) demonstrated that incubation of E. histolytica trophozoites with epithelial cell lines results in epithelial cell production of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-8, suggesting that intestinal epithelial cell production of cytokines might play a role in the inflammatory response and tissue damage seen in intestinal amebiasis. To determine whether intestinal epithelial cell production of IL-1 and IL-8 occurs in response to E. histolytica infection in vivo and as an approach to studying the specific interactions between amebic trophozoites and human intestine, we used a SCID mouse-human intestinal xenograft (SCID-HU-INT) model of disease, where human intestinal xenografts were infected with virulent E. histolytica trophozoites. Infection of xenografts with E. histolytica trophozoites resulted in extensive tissue damage, which was associated with the development of an early inflammatory response composed primarily of neutrophils. Using oligonucleotide primers that specifically amplify human IL-1beta and IL-8, we could demonstrate by reverse transcription PCR that mRNA for both IL-1beta and IL-8 is produced by human intestinal xenografts in response to amebic infection. The increase in human intestinal IL-1beta and IL-8 in response to invasive amebiasis was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for human IL-1beta and IL-8. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that human intestinal epithelial cells were the source of IL-8 in infected xenografts

  19. Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species in Brominated Diphenyl Ether-47-induced Inflammatory Cytokine Release from Human Extravillous Trophoblasts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Ryung; Kamau, Patricia W.; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used flame retardant compounds. Brominated diphenyl ether (BDE)-47 is one of the most prevalent PBDE congeners found in human breast milk, serum and placenta. Despite the presence of PBDEs in human placenta, effects of PBDEs on placental cell function are poorly understood. The present study investigated BDE-47-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and its role in BDE-47-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine release in a first trimester human extravillous trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo. Exposure of HTR-8/SVneo cells for 4 h to 20 μM BDE-47 increased ROS generation 1.7 fold as measured by the dichlorofluorescein (DCF) assay. Likewise, superoxide anion production increased approximately 5 fold at 10 and 15 μM and 9 fold at 20 μM BDE-47 with a 1-h exposure, as measured by cytochrome c reduction. BDE-47 (10, 15 and 20 μM) decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential by 47–64.5% at 4, 8 and 24 h as assessed with the fluorescent probe Rh123. Treatment with 15 and 20 μM BDE-47 stimulated cellular release and mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-8 after 12 and 24 h exposures: the greatest increases were a 35-fold increased mRNA expression at 12 h and a 12-fold increased protein concentration at 24 h for IL-6. Antioxidant treatments (deferoxamine mesylate, (±)α-tocopherol, or tempol) suppressed BDE-47-stimulated IL-6 release by 54.1%, 56.3% and 37.7%, respectively, implicating a role for ROS in regulation of inflammatory pathways in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Solvent (DMSO) controls exhibited statistically significantly decreased responses compared with non-treated controls for IL-6 release and IL-8 mRNA expression, but these responses were not consistent across experiments and times. Nonetheless, it is possible that DMSO (used to dissolve BDE-47) may have attenuated the stimulatory actions of BDE-47 on cytokine responses. Because abnormal activation of proinflammatory responses can disrupt trophoblast functions

  20. Xylosyltransferase-I regulates glycosaminoglycan synthesis during the pathogenic process of human osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Narayanan; Barré, Lydia; Bourhim, Mustapha; Magdalou, Jacques; Mainard, Didier; Netter, Patrick; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Loss of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains of proteoglycans (PGs) is an early event of osteoarthritis (OA) resulting in cartilage degradation that has been previously demonstrated in both huma and experimental OA models. However, the mechanism of GAG loss and the role of xylosyltransferase-I (XT-I) that initiates GAG biosynthesis onto PG molecules in the pathogenic process of human OA are unknown. In this study, we have characterized XT-I expression and activity together with GAG synthesis in human OA cartilage obtained from different regions of the same joint, defined as "normal", "late-stage" or adjacent to "late-stage". The results showed that GAG synthesis and content increased in cartilage from areas flanking OA lesions compared to cartilage from macroscopically "normal" unaffected regions, while decreased in "late-stage" OA cartilage lesions. This increase in anabolic state was associated with a marked upregulation of XT-I expression and activity in cartilage "next to lesion" while a decrease in the "late-stage" OA cartilage. Importantly, XT-I inhibition by shRNA or forced-expression with a pCMV-XT-I construct correlated with the modulation of GAG anabolism in human cartilage explants. The observation that XT-I gene expression was down-regulated by IL-1β and up-regulated by TGF-β1 indicates that these cytokines may play a role in regulating GAG content in human OA. Noteworthy, expression of IL-1β receptor (IL-1R1) was down-regulated whereas that of TGF-β1 was up-regulated in early OA cartilage. Theses observations may account for upregulation of XT-I and sustained GAG synthesis prior to the development of cartilage lesions during the pathogenic process of OA.

  1. Xylosyltransferase-I Regulates Glycosaminoglycan Synthesis during the Pathogenic Process of Human Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Narayanan; Barré, Lydia; Bourhim, Mustapha; Magdalou, Jacques; Mainard, Didier; Netter, Patrick; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie; Ouzzine, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Loss of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains of proteoglycans (PGs) is an early event of osteoarthritis (OA) resulting in cartilage degradation that has been previously demonstrated in both huma and experimental OA models. However, the mechanism of GAG loss and the role of xylosyltransferase-I (XT-I) that initiates GAG biosynthesis onto PG molecules in the pathogenic process of human OA are unknown. In this study, we have characterized XT-I expression and activity together with GAG synthesis in human OA cartilage obtained from different regions of the same joint, defined as “normal”, “late-stage” or adjacent to “late-stage”. The results showed that GAG synthesis and content increased in cartilage from areas flanking OA lesions compared to cartilage from macroscopically “normal” unaffected regions, while decreased in “late-stage” OA cartilage lesions. This increase in anabolic state was associated with a marked upregulation of XT-I expression and activity in cartilage “next to lesion” while a decrease in the “late-stage” OA cartilage. Importantly, XT-I inhibition by shRNA or forced-expression with a pCMV-XT-I construct correlated with the modulation of GAG anabolism in human cartilage explants. The observation that XT-I gene expression was down-regulated by IL-1β and up-regulated by TGF-β1 indicates that these cytokines may play a role in regulating GAG content in human OA. Noteworthy, expression of IL-1β receptor (IL-1R1) was down-regulated whereas that of TGF-β1 was up-regulated in early OA cartilage. Theses observations may account for upregulation of XT-I and sustained GAG synthesis prior to the development of cartilage lesions during the pathogenic process of OA. PMID:22479506

  2. Differences in gene expression and cytokine production by crystalline vs. amorphous silica in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to respirable crystalline silica particles, as opposed to amorphous silica, is associated with lung inflammation, pulmonary fibrosis (silicosis), and potentially with lung cancer. We used Affymetrix/GeneSifter microarray analysis to determine whether gene expression profiles differed in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS 2B) exposed to cristobalite vs. amorphous silica particles at non-toxic and equal surface areas (75 and 150 × 106μm2/cm2). Bio-Plex analysis was also used to determine profiles of secreted cytokines and chemokines in response to both particles. Finally, primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) were used to comparatively assess silica particle-induced alterations in gene expression. Results Microarray analysis at 24 hours in BEAS 2B revealed 333 and 631 significant alterations in gene expression induced by cristobalite at low (75) and high (150 × 106μm2/cm2) amounts, respectively (p < 0.05/cut off ≥ 2.0-fold change). Exposure to amorphous silica micro-particles at high amounts (150 × 106μm2/cm2) induced 108 significant gene changes. Bio-Plex analysis of 27 human cytokines and chemokines revealed 9 secreted mediators (p < 0.05) induced by crystalline silica, but none were induced by amorphous silica. QRT-PCR revealed that cristobalite selectively up-regulated stress-related genes and cytokines (FOS, ATF3, IL6 and IL8) early and over time (2, 4, 8, and 24 h). Patterns of gene expression in NHBE cells were similar overall to BEAS 2B cells. At 75 × 106μm2/cm2, there were 339 significant alterations in gene expression induced by cristobalite and 42 by amorphous silica. Comparison of genes in response to cristobalite (75 × 106μm2/cm2) revealed 60 common, significant gene alterations in NHBE and BEAS 2B cells. Conclusions Cristobalite silica, as compared to synthetic amorphous silica particles at equal surface area concentrations, had comparable effects on the viability of human bronchial epithelial cells

  3. Interferon beta 2/interleukin 6 modulates synthesis of alpha 1-antitrypsin in human mononuclear phagocytes and in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perlmutter, D H; May, L T; Sehgal, P B

    1989-01-01

    The cytokine IFN beta 2/IL-6 has recently been shown to regulate the expression of genes encoding hepatic acute phase plasma proteins. INF beta 2/IL-6 has also been shown to be identical to MGI-2, a protein that induces differentiation of bone marrow precursor cells toward mature granulocytes and monocytes. Accordingly, we have examined the effect of IFN beta 2/IL-6 on expression of the IL-1- and tumor necrosis factor-unresponsive acute phase protein alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1 AT) in human hepatoma-derived hepatocytes and in human mononuclear phagocytes. Purified human fibroblast and recombinant IFN beta 2/IL-6 each mediate a specific increase in steady-state levels of alpha 1 AT mRNA and a corresponding increase in net synthesis of alpha 1 AT in primary cultures of human peripheral blood monocytes as well as in HepG2 and Hep3B cells. Thus, the effect of IFN beta 2/IL-6 on alpha 1 AT gene expression in these cells is primarily due to an increase in accumulation of alpha 1 AT mRNA and can be distinguished from the direct, predominantly translational effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide on expression of this gene in monocytes and macrophages. The results indicate that IFN beta 2/IL-6 regulates acute phase gene expression, specifically alpha 1 AT gene expression, in extrahepatic as well as hepatic cell types. Images PMID:2472425

  4. Pretreatment of activated human CD8 T cells with IL-12 leads to enhanced TCR-induced signaling and cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Vacaflores, Aldo; Freedman, Samantha N; Chapman, Nicole M; Houtman, Jon C D

    2017-01-01

    During the immune response to pathogens and autoantigens, CD8T cells are exposed to numerous inflammatory agents including the cytokine IL-12. Previous studies have focused on how IL-12 regulates T cell functions when present during or after the activation of the T cell receptor (TCR). However, recent studies suggest that prior exposure to IL-12 also alters the TCR responsiveness of murine T cells. Whether similar phenomena occur in human activated CD8T cells and the mechanisms mediating these effects remain unexplored. In this study, we observed that pretreatment of human activated CD8T cells with IL-12 results in increased cytokine mRNA and protein production following subsequent TCR challenge. The potentiation of TCR-mediated cytokine release was transient and required low doses of IL-12 for at least 24h. Mechanistically, prior exposure to IL-12 increased the TCR induced activation of select MAPKs and AKT without altering the activation of more proximal TCR signaling molecules, suggesting that the IL-12 mediated changes in TCR signaling are responsible for the increased production of cytokines. Our data suggest that prior treatment with IL-12 potentiates human CD8T cell responses at sites of infection and inflammation, expanding our understanding of the function of this clinically important cytokine.

  5. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS) molecules on the viability and cytokine profile of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Holban, Alina-Maria; Bleotu, Coralia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Lazar, Veronica

    2014-02-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections represent one of the major threats for injured or transplanted lungs and for their healing. Considering that the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a major tool for the regenerative medicine, including therapy of lung damaging diseases, the aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of P. aeruginosa quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) on human MSCs death signaling pathways and cytokine profile. Our data revealed that N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL), N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS), and its precursor, 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ), significantly impact on several core signaling mechanisms of MSCs in a specific and time-dependent manner. Even if all tested autoinducers interfered with the MSCs apoptotic genes expression, only OdDHL and HHQ significantly promoted MSCs apoptosis, by 14- and 23-fold respectively, this aspect being confirmed by the flow cytometry assay. The tested QSSMs induced a heterogeneous cytokine profile of the treated MSCs. The level of IL-1β was increased by OdDHL, IL-8 production was stimulated by all tested autoinducers, IL-6 was modulated mostly by PQS and IL-10 by HHQ. The significant influence of the purified bacterial autoinducers on the MSCs signaling pathways may suggest that the accumulation of these mediators could interfere with the normal function of these cells in the human body, and eventually, impair or abolish the success of the stem cells therapy during P. aeruginosa infections.

  6. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing (QS) molecules on the viability and cytokine profile of human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Holban, Alina-Maria; Bleotu, Coralia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Lazar, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections represent one of the major threats for injured or transplanted lungs and for their healing. Considering that the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a major tool for the regenerative medicine, including therapy of lung damaging diseases, the aim of this paper was to investigate the effects of P. aeruginosa quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) on human MSCs death signaling pathways and cytokine profile. Our data revealed that N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OdDHL), N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS), and its precursor, 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ), significantly impact on several core signaling mechanisms of MSCs in a specific and time-dependent manner. Even if all tested autoinducers interfered with the MSCs apoptotic genes expression, only OdDHL and HHQ significantly promoted MSCs apoptosis, by 14- and 23-fold respectively, this aspect being confirmed by the flow cytometry assay. The tested QSSMs induced a heterogeneous cytokine profile of the treated MSCs. The level of IL-1β was increased by OdDHL, IL-8 production was stimulated by all tested autoinducers, IL-6 was modulated mostly by PQS and IL-10 by HHQ. The significant influence of the purified bacterial autoinducers on the MSCs signaling pathways may suggest that the accumulation of these mediators could interfere with the normal function of these cells in the human body, and eventually, impair or abolish the success of the stem cells therapy during P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:24398422

  7. Importance of hydroxyapatite particles characteristics on cytokines production by human monocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Laquerriere, Patrice; Grandjean-Laquerriere, Alexia; Jallot, Edouard; Balossier, Gerard; Frayssinet, Patrick; Guenounou, Moncef

    2003-07-01

    Calcium phosphate bioceramics have been applied as bone substitutes for several decades. Aseptic loosening after total joint arthroplasty is a major problem in orthopaedic surgery. Hydroxyapatite particles from materials wear have been reported as the main cause of implant failure. For this reason, an investigation into possible wear particles from materials used in the implant may lead to longevity after arthroplasty. Monocytes are among the first cells to colonize the inflammatory site. In the present study, we have evaluated the inflammatory response after exposition to particles with different characteristics (size, sintering temperature and shape). Our data demonstrate that the most important characteristic was the shape and the size of the particles. The needle shaped particles induced the larger production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 by cells. To a less manner, the smallest particles induced an increase of the expression and production of the cytokines studied (TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10). The sintering temperature appeared to be a less important characteristic even though it was involved in the dissolution/precipitation process.

  8. Amyloid-β(25-35), an amyloid-β(1-42) surrogate, and proinflammatory cytokines stimulate VEGF-A secretion by cultured, early passage, normoxic adult human cerebral astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chiarini, Anna; Whitfield, James; Bonafini, Clara; Chakravarthy, Balu; Armato, Ubaldo; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular angiopathy affects late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) brains by possibly increasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). A expression, thereby stimulating endothelial cell proliferation and migration. Indeed, VEGF-A gene upregulation, with increased VEGF-A protein content of reactive astrocytes and microglia, occurs in LOAD brains, and neovascularization was observed one week after injecting amyloid-β (Aβ)(1-42) into rat hippocampus. We have now found, with cultured 'normoxic' normal adult human astrocytes (NAHAs), that fibrillar Aβ(25-35) (an active Aβ(1-42) fragment) or a cytokine mixture (the (CM)-trio (interleukin [IL]-1β+interferon [IFN]-γ+tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α), or pair (IFN-γ+TNF-α) like those produced in LOAD brains) stimulates the nuclear translocation of stabilized hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α protein and its binding to VEGF-A hypoxia-response elements; the mRNA synthesis for three VEGF-A splice variants (121, 165, 189); and the secretion of VEGF-A165. The CM-trio was the most powerful stimulus, IFN-γ+TNF-α was less potent, and other cytokine pairs or single cytokines or Aβ(35-25) were ineffective. While Aβ(25-35) did not change HIF-1β protein levels, the CM-trio increased both HIF-1α and HIF-1β protein levels, thereby giving an earlier and stronger stimulus to VEGF-A secretion by NAHAs. Thus, increased VEGF-A secretion from astrocytes stimulated by Aβ(1-42) and by microglia-released cytokines might restore angiogenesis and Aβ(1-42) vascular clearance.

  9. Lactodifucotetraose, a human milk oligosaccharide, attenuates platelet function and inflammatory cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; Tanritanir, Ayse C; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Human milk strongly quenches inflammatory processes in vitro, and breastfed infants have lower incidence of inflammatory diseases than those fed artificially. Platelets from neonates, in contrast to those from adults, are less responsive to platelet agonists such as collagen, thrombin, ADP, and epinephrine. Breastfed infants absorb oligosaccharides intact from the human milk in their gut to the circulation. This study was to determine whether these oligosaccharides can attenuate platelet function and platelet secretion of pro-inflammatory proteins, and to identify the active component. The natural mixture of oligosaccharides from human milk and pure individual human milk oligosaccharides were tested for their ability to modulate responses of platelets isolated from human blood following exposure to thrombin, ADP, and collagen. Human milk and the natural mixture of human milk oligosaccharides inhibited platelet release of inflammatory proteins. Of the purified human milk oligosaccharides tested, only lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) significantly inhibited thrombin induced release of the pro-inflammatory proteins RANTES and sCD40L. LDFT also inhibited platelet adhesion to a collagen-coated surface, as well as platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. These data indicate that LDFT may help modulate hemostasis by suppressing platelet-induced inflammatory processes in breastfed infants. This activity suggests further study of LDFT for its potential as a therapeutic agent in infants and adults.

  10. Effects of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors on cytokine-induced adhesion molecule expression by human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    May, M. J.; Wheeler-Jones, C. P.; Pearson, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. Endothelial cells can be stimulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 alpha and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha to express the leukocyte adhesion molecules E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 but the intracellular signalling mechanisms leading to this expression are incompletely understood. We have investigated the role of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) in adhesion molecule expression by cytokine-activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) using the PTK inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A, and the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor sodium orthovanadate. 2. Maximal E-selectin expression induced by incubation of HUVEC for 4 h with IL-1 alpha (100 u ml-1) and TNF alpha (100 u ml-1) was dose-dependently inhibited by genistein and herbimycin A. Although similar effects were seen on phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA)-induced expression, this was not due to inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) activity as the selective inhibitors of PKC, bisindolylmaleimide (BIM), Ro31-7549 or Ro31-8220 did not affect IL-1 alpha- or TNF alpha-induced E-selectin expression at concentrations which maximally inhibited PMA-induced expression. 3. Genistein inhibited VCAM-1 expression induced by incubation of HUVEC for 24 h with TNF alpha or IL-1 alpha whereas it did not affect ICAM-1 expression induced by 24 h incubation with either of these cytokines. Herbimycin A inhibited both VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression induced by TNF alpha. 4. Basal expression of E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 was dose-dependently enhanced by sodium orthovanadate. In contrast, vanadate differentially affected TNF alpha-induced expression of these molecules with maximal E-selectin and ICAM-1 expression being slightly enhanced and VCAM-1 expression dose-dependently reduced. 5. We also studied the effects of PTK and PTP inhibitors on adhesion of the human pre-myeloid cell line U937 to TNF alpha-stimulated HUVEC

  11. Low Level Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Decrease Connexin36 Gap Junction Coupling in Mouse and Human Islets through Nitric Oxide-mediated Protein Kinase Cδ*

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Nikki L.; Walter, Rachelle L.; Hemmati, Alireza; Westacott, Matthew J.; Benninger, Richard K. P.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the decline in islet function during the development of diabetes. Cytokines can disrupt insulin secretion and calcium dynamics; however, the mechanisms underlying this are poorly understood. Connexin36 gap junctions coordinate glucose-induced calcium oscillations and pulsatile insulin secretion across the islet. Loss of gap junction coupling disrupts these dynamics, similar to that observed during the development of diabetes. This study investigates the mechanisms by which pro-inflammatory cytokines mediate gap junction coupling. Specifically, as cytokine-induced NO can activate PKCδ, we aimed to understand the role of PKCδ in modulating cytokine-induced changes in gap junction coupling. Isolated mouse and human islets were treated with varying levels of a cytokine mixture containing TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ. Islet dysfunction was measured by insulin secretion, calcium dynamics, and gap junction coupling. Modulators of PKCδ and NO were applied to determine their respective roles in modulating gap junction coupling. High levels of cytokines caused cell death and decreased insulin secretion. Low levels of cytokine treatment disrupted calcium dynamics and decreased gap junction coupling, in the absence of disruptions to insulin secretion. Decreases in gap junction coupling were dependent on NO-regulated PKCδ, and altered membrane organization of connexin36. This study defines several mechanisms underlying the disruption to gap junction coupling under conditions associated with the development of diabetes. These mechanisms will allow for greater understanding of islet dysfunction and suggest ways to ameliorate this dysfunction during the development of diabetes. PMID:26668311

  12. Altered Cytokine Production By Specific Human Peripheral Blood Cell Subsets Immediately Following Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Cubbage, Michael L.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we have attempted to combine standard immunological assays with the cellular resolving power of the flow cytometer to positively identify the specific cell types involved in spaceflight-induced immune alterations. We have obtained whole blood samples from 27 astronauts collected at three timepoints (L-10, R+0 and R+3) surrounding four recent space shuttle missions. The duration of these missions ranged from 10 to 18 days. Assays performed included serum/urine cortisol, comprehensive subset phenotyping, assessment of cellular activation markers and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following spaceflight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated trends towards a decreased percentage of T cells and an increased percentage of B cells. Nearly all of the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4:CD8 ratio, which was dramatic in some individuals. Assessment of memory (CD45RA+) vs. naive (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was more ambiguous, with subjects tending to group more as a flight crew. All subjects from one mission demonstrated an increased CD45RA:CD45RO ratio, while all subjects from another Mission demonstrated a decreased ratio. While no significant trend was seen in the monocyte population as defined by scatter, a decreased percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset was seen following spaceflight in all subjects tested. In general, most of the cellular changes described above which were assessed at R+O and compared to L-10 trended to pre-flight levels by R+3. Although no significant differences were seen in the expression of the cellular activation markers CD69 and CD25 following exposure to microgravity, significant alterations were seen in cytokine production in response to mitogenic activation for specific subsets. T cell (CD3+) production of IL-2 was significantly decreased

  13. Immune checkpoint inhibitors enhance cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against human myeloid leukaemic blasts.

    PubMed

    Poh, Su Li; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2016-05-01

    We studied whether blockade of inhibitory receptors on cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells by immune checkpoint inhibitors could increase its anti-tumour potency against haematological malignancies. CIK cultures were generated from seven normal donors and nine patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or multiple myeloma (MM). The inhibitory receptors B and T lymphocyte attenuator, CD200 receptor, lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3) and T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-containing-3 (TIM-3) were present at variable percentages in most CIK cultures, while cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), programmed death-1 (PD-1) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR2DL1/2/3) were expressed at low level in most cultures. Without blockade, myeloid leukaemia cells were susceptible to autologous and allogeneic CIK-mediated cytotoxicity. Blockade of KIR, LAG-3, PD-1 and TIM-3 but not CTLA-4 resulted in remarkable increase in killing against these targets, even in those with poor baseline cytotoxicity. ALL and MM targets were resistant to CIK-mediated cytotoxicity, and blockade of receptors did not increase cytotoxicity to a meaningful extent. Combination of inhibitors against two receptors did not further increase cytotoxicity. Interestingly, potentiation of CIK killing by blocking antibodies was not predicted by expression of receptors on CIK and their respective ligands on the targets. Compared to un-activated T and NK cells, blockade potentiated the cytotoxicity of CIK cells to a greater degree and at a lower E:T ratio, but without significant increase in cytotoxicity against normal white cell. Our findings provide the basis for clinical trial combining autologous CIK cells with checkpoint inhibitors for patients with AML.

  14. Pathogenesis of Streptococcus urinary tract infection depends on bacterial strain and β-hemolysin/cytolysin that mediates cytotoxicity, cytokine synthesis, inflammation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sophie Y.; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Ipe, Deepak S.; Smith, Joshua P.; Cripps, Allan W.; Ulett, Glen C.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae can cause urinary tract infection (UTI) including cystitis and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). The early host-pathogen interactions that occur during S. agalactiae UTI and subsequent mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are poorly defined. Here, we define the early interactions between human bladder urothelial cells, monocyte-derived macrophages, and mouse bladder using uropathogenic S. agalactiae (UPSA) 807 and ABU-causing S. agalactiae (ABSA) 834 strains. UPSA 807 adhered, invaded and killed bladder urothelial cells more efficiently compared to ABSA 834 via mechanisms including low-level caspase-3 activation, and cytolysis, according to lactate dehydrogenase release measures and cell viability. Severe UPSA 807-induced cytotoxicity was mediated entirely by the bacterial β-hemolysin/cytolysin (β-H/C) because an β-H/C-deficient UPSA 807 isogenic mutant, UPSA 807ΔcylE, was not cytotoxic in vitro; the mutant was also significantly attenuated for colonization in the bladder in vivo. Analysis of infection-induced cytokines, including IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in vitro and in vivo revealed that cytokine and chemokine responses were dependent on expression of β-H/C that also elicited severe bladder neutrophilia. Thus, virulence of UPSA 807 encompasses adhesion to, invasion of and killing of bladder cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine responses that elicit neutrophil infiltration, and β-H/C-mediated subversion of innate immune-mediated bacterial clearance from the bladder. PMID:27383371

  15. Proliferation and TH1/TH2 cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after treatment with cypermethrin and mancozeb in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, human cell-based assays are gaining attention in assessments of immunomodulatory effects of chemicals. In the study here, the possible effects of cypermethrin and mancozeb on lymphocyte proliferation and proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α) and immunoregulatory cytokine (interferon- (IFN-) γ, interleukins (IL) 2, 4, 6, and 10) formation in vitro were investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and exposed for 6 hr to noncytotoxic doses (0.45-30 µM) of cypermethrin or mancozeb in the presence of activating rat S9 fraction. Cultures were then further incubated for 48 or 72 hr in fresh medium containing phytohemagglutinin (10 µg/mL) to assess, respectively, effects on cell proliferation (BrdU-ELISA method) and cytokine formation (flow cytometric bead immunoassays). Mancozeb induced dose-dependent increases in lymphocyte proliferation, inhibition of production of TNFα and the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10, and an increase in IFNγ (TH1 cytokine) production (at least 2-fold compared to control); mancozeb also induced inhibition of IL-4 (TH2) and stimulated IL-2 (TH1) production, albeit only in dose-related manners for each. In contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant effects on proliferation or cytokine profiles. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of our in vitro findings.

  16. Effects of 10 cigarette smoke condensates on primary human airway epithelial cells by comparative gene and cytokine expression studies.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Gavin; Seagrave, Jeanclare; Boggs, Susan; Polzin, Gregory; Richter, Patricia; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2010-03-01

    Cigarettes vary in tobacco blend, filter ventilation, additives, and other physical and chemical properties, but little is known regarding potential differences in toxicity to a smoker's airway epithelia. We compared changes in gene expression and cytokine production in primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells following treatment for 18 h with cigarette smoke condensates (CSCs) prepared from five commercial and four research cigarettes, at doses of approximately 4 microg/ml nicotine. Nine of the CSCs were produced under a standard International Organization for Standardization smoking machine regimen and one was produced by a more intense smoking machine regimen. Isolated messenger RNA (mRNA) was analyzed by microarray hybridization, and media was analyzed for secreted cytokines and chemokines. Twenty-one genes were differentially expressed by at least 9 of the 10 CSCs by more than twofold, including genes encoding detoxifying and antioxidant proteins. Cytochrome P450, family 1, subfamily A, polypeptide 1 (CYP1A1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (NQO-1) were selected for validation with quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analyses. NQO-1 expression determined with microarrays, qRT-PCR, and Western blotting differed among the CSC types, with good correlation among the different assays. CYP1A1 mRNA levels varied substantially, but there was little correlation with the protein levels. For each CSC, the three most induced and three most repressed genes were identified. These genes may be useful as markers of exposure to that particular cigarette type. Furthermore, differences in interleukin-8 secretion were observed. These studies lay the foundation for future investigations to analyze differences in the responses of in vivo systems to tobacco products marketed with claims of reduced exposure or reduced harm.

  17. The Effects of Cold Exposure on Leukocytes, Hormones and Cytokines during Acute Exercise in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Dominique D.; Gagnon, Sheila S.; Rintamäki, Hannu; Törmäkangas, Timo; Puukka, Katri; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of exercise on total leukocyte count and subsets, as well as hormone and cytokine responses in a thermoneutral and cold environment, with and without an individualized pre-cooling protocol inducing low-intensity shivering. Nine healthy young men participated in six experimental trials wearing shorts and t-shirts. Participants exercised for 60 min on a treadmill at low (LOW: 50% of peak VO2) and moderate (MOD: 70% VO2peak) exercise intensities in a climatic chamber set at 22°C (NT), and in 0°C (COLD) with and without a pre-exercise low-intensity shivering protocol (SHIV). Core and skin temperature, heart rate and oxygen consumption were collected continuously. Blood samples were collected before and at the end of exercise to assess endocrine and immunological changes. Core temperature in NT was greater than COLD and SHIV by 0.4±0.2°C whereas skin temperature in NT was also greater than COLD and SHIV by 8.5±1.4°C and 9.3±2.5°C respectively in MOD. Total testosterone, adenocorticotropin and cortisol were greater in NT vs. COLD and SHIV in MOD. Norepinephrine was greater in NT vs. other conditions across intensities. Interleukin-2, IL-5, IL-7, IL-10, IL-17, IFN-γ, Rantes, Eotaxin, IP-10, MIP-1β, MCP-1, VEGF, PDGF, and G-CSF were elevated in NT vs. COLD and/or SHIV. Furthermore, IFN-γ, MIP-1β, MCP-1, IL-10, VEGF, and PDGF demonstrate greater concentrations in SHIV vs. COLD, mainly in the MOD condition. This study demonstrated that exercising in the cold can diminish the exercise-induced systemic inflammatory response seen in a thermoneutral environment. Nonetheless, prolonged cooling inducing shivering thermogenesis prior to exercise, may induce an immuno-stimulatory response following moderate intensity exercise. Performing exercise in cold environments can be a useful strategy in partially inhibiting the acute systemic inflammatory response from exercise but oppositely, additional body cooling may reverse

  18. Cytokine and satellite cell responses to muscle damage: interpretation and possible confounding factors in human studies.

    PubMed

    van de Vyver, M; Myburgh, K H

    2012-08-01

    It is plausible that multiple muscle biopsies following a muscle damaging intervention can exacerbate the inflammatory and subsequent satellite cell responses. To elucidate confounding effects of muscle biopsy procedure on satellite cell number, indirect markers of damage and the inflammatory response following acute downhill running (DHR) were investigated. 10 healthy male participant were divided into a non-exercising control (n = 4) and DHR (12 × 5min bouts, 10 % decline at 85 % VO(2)max) (n = 6) group. Blood samples were taken pre, post and every 24 h for 9 days. Serum was analysed for creatine kinase (CK), myoglobin (Mb), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10. Muscle biopsies taken on days 1 and 2 post intervention from opposing legs were analysed for Pax7(+) satellite cells. In the DHR group, Mb (536 ± 277 ng mL(-1)), IL-6 (12.6 ± 4.7 pg mL(-1)) and IL-10 (27.3 ± 11.5 pg mL(-1)) peaked immediately post DHR, while CK (2651 ± 1911 U L(-1)), LDH (202 ± 47 U L(-1)) and TNF-α (25.1 ± 8.7 pg mL(-1)) peaked on day 1. A 30 % increase in Pax7(+) satellite cells on day 1 in the DHR group was no longer apparent on day 2. H&E staining show evidence of phagocytosis in the DHR group. No significant changes over time were observed in the control group for any of the variables measured. Events observed in the DHR group were as a result of the intervention protocol and subsequent muscle damage. The relationship between SC proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine release appears to be complex since the IL-6/IL-10 response time differs significantly from the TNF-α response.

  19. Interleukin-27-Mediated Suppression of Human Th17 Cells Is Associated with Activation of STAT1 and Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that interleukin (IL)-27, a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines, antagonizes pathological Th17 effector cell responses. Relatively little is known about the cytokines that regulate human Th17 cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-27 on the differentiation of human Th17 cells and on committed memory Th17 cells. We demonstrate that IL-27 suppresses the development of human Th17 cells by downregulating retinoid orphan nuclear receptor C expression and that this inhibition is associated with the induction of the intracellular signaling factors STAT1 and induction of the suppressor of cytokine signaling protein 1. The IL-27-mediated inhibition of IL-17 is independent of IL-10. We show that IL-27 inhibits differentiation of naïve T cells into IL-17+ T cells under different Th17 polarizing conditions. IL-27 suppresses other Th17 subset cytokines such as IL-22 and IL-21 but not tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, we also show that IL-27 inhibits IL-17 production by committed Th17 memory cells, which is independent of IL-10. These studies show that IL-27 negatively regulates both the developing and committed human Th17 responses and therefore may be a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of Th17-mediated diseases. PMID:21235411

  20. Genetic variants in human CLOCK associate with total energy intake and cytokine sleep factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the importance of total energy intake in circadian system regulation, no study has related human CLOCK gene polymorphisms and food intake measures. The aim of this study was to investigate associations of five CLOCK single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) with food-intake and to explore the p...

  1. [Cytokines and asthma].

    PubMed

    Gani, F; Senna, G; Piglia, P; Grosso, B; Mezzelani, P; Pozzi, E

    1998-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory lung disease in which eosinophils are one of the most important involved cells. These cells accumulate in the lung because of cytokines, which are able to regulate cellular responses. The role of cytokines is well known in allergic asthma: IL4, IL5, IL3, GMCSF are the principally cytokine involved. IL4 regulate IgE synthesis while IL5, (and IL3) cause the activation and accumulation of eosinophils. In non allergic asthma, whilst only IL5 seemed to be important recent data, shows that also IL4 plays an important role. Therefore nowadays no relevant difference seems to exist between allergic and non allergic asthma; instead the primer is different: the allergen in allergic asthma and often an unknown factor in the non allergic asthma. Recently other cytokines have been proved to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma. IL8 is chemotactic not only for neutrophils but also for eosinophils and might cause chronic inflammation in severe asthma. IL13 works like IL4, while RANTES seems to be a more important chemotactic agent than IL5. Finally IL10, which immunoregulates T lymphocyte responses, may reduce asthma inflammation. In conclusion cytokine made us to learn more about the pathogenesis of asthma even if we do not yet know when and how asthma inflammation develops.

  2. Changes in human bone marrow fat content associated with changes in hematopoietic stem cell numbers and cytokine levels with aging.

    PubMed

    Tuljapurkar, Sonal R; McGuire, Timothy R; Brusnahan, Susan K; Jackson, John D; Garvin, Kevin L; Kessinger, Margaret A; Lane, Judy T; O' Kane, Barbara J; Sharp, John G

    2011-11-01

    Hematological deficiencies increase with aging, including anemias, reduced responses to hematopoietic stress and myelodysplasias. This investigation tested the hypothesis that increased bone marrow (BM) fat content in humans with age was associated with decreased numbers of side population (SP) hematopoietic stem cells, and this decrease correlated with changes in cytokine levels. BM was obtained from the femoral head and trochanteric region of the femur removed at surgery for total hip replacement (N = 100 subjects). In addition, BM from cadavers (N = 36), with no evidence of hip disease, was evaluated for fat content. Whole trabecular marrow samples were ground in a sterile mortar and pestle, and cellularity and lipid content determined. Marrow cells were stained with Hoechst dye and SP profiles were acquired. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1 and interleukin (IL)-6 were measured using ELISA. Fat content in the BM of human subjects and cadavers increased with age. The numbers of SP stem cells in BM as well as plasma IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels decreased in correlation with increased BM fat. IL-6 had no relationship to changes in marrow fat. These data suggest that increased BM fat may be associated with a decreased number of SP stem cells and IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels with aging. These data further raise a more general question as to the role of adipose cells in the regulation of tissue stem cells.

  3. Induction of heme oxygenase 1 by arsenite inhibits cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xi; Pi Jingbo; Liu Wenlan; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu Kejian; Feng Changjian

    2009-04-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an oxidative stress responsive gene upregulated by various physiological and exogenous stimuli. Arsenite, as an oxidative stressor, is a potent inducer of HO-1 in human and rodent cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic role of arsenite-induced HO-1 in modulating tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Arsenite pretreatment, which upregulated HO-1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 protein expression by 50% and 40%, respectively. Importantly, knockdown of HO-1 by small interfering RNA abolished the arsenite-induced inhibitory effects. These results indicate that induction of HO-1 by arsenite inhibits the cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC by suppressing adhesion molecule expression. These findings established an important mechanistic link between the functional monocyte adhesion properties of HUVEC and the induction of HO-1 by arsenite.

  4. Cytokine profile of conditioned medium from human tumor cell lines after acute and fractionated doses of gamma radiation and its effect on survival of bystander tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Kumar, Amit; Laskar, S; Pandey, B N

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play pivotal roles in cancer initiation, progression and pathogenesis. Accumulating evidences suggest differences in basal and stress-induced cytokine profiles of cancers with diverse origin. However, a comprehensive investigation characterising the cytokine profile of various tumor types after acute and fractionated doses of gamma-irradiation, and its effect on survival of bystander cells is not well known in literature. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytokine secretion profile of human tumor cell lines (HT1080, U373MG, HT29, A549 and MCF-7) either before (basal) or after acute (2, 6 Gy) and fractionated doses (3×2 Gy) of gamma-irradiation in culture medium obtained from these cells by multiplex bead array/ELISA. Moreover, clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium (CM) on the survival and growth of respective cells. Based on the screening of 28 analytes, our results showed that the basal profiles of these cell lines varied considerably in terms of the number and magnitude of secreted factors, which was minimum in MCF-7. Interestingly, TNF-α, IL-1β, PDGF-AA, TGF-β1, fractalkine, IL-8, VEGF and GCSF were found in CM of all the cell lines. However, secretion of certain cytokines was cell line-specific. Moreover, CM caused increase in clonogenic survival of respective tumor cells (in the order HT1080>U373MG>HT29>A549>MCF-7), which was correlated with the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, GMCSF and VEGF in their CM. After irradiation, the levels of most of the cytokines increased markedly in a dose dependent manner. The fold change in cytokine levels was lower in irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) of tumor cells collected after fractionated than respective acute dose, except in MCF-7. Interestingly, amongst these cell lines, the radiation-induced fold increase in cytokine levels was maximum in ICM of A549 cells. Moreover, bystander A549 cells treated with respective ICM showed dose dependent

  5. Stimulation of the nitric oxide synthase pathway in human hepatocytes by cytokines and endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a short-lived biologic mediator that is shown to be induced in various cell types and to cause many metabolic changes in target cells. Inhibition of tumor cell growth and antimicrobial activity has been attributed to the stimulation of the inducible type of the NO synthase (NOS). However, there is limited evidence for the existence of such inducible NOS in a human cell type. We show here the induction of NO biosynthesis in freshly isolated human hepatocytes (HC) after stimulation with interleukin 1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IFN- gamma, and endotoxin. Increased levels of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) in culture supernatants were associated with NADPH-dependent NOS activity in the cell lysates. The production of NO2- and NO3- was inhibited by NG-monomethyl L-arginine and was associated with an increase in cyclic guanylate monophosphate release. The data presented here provide evidence for the existence of typical inducible NO biosynthesis in a human cell type. PMID:1377225

  6. Cytokines and anti-cytokines as therapeutics--an update.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Vandana; Kalra, Bhupinder Singh

    2008-01-28

    Cytokines which comprise of a family of proteins--interleukins, lymphokines, monokines, interferons, and chemokines, are important components of the immune system. They act in concert with specific cytokine inhibitors and soluble cytokine receptors to regulate the human immune response. Their physiologic role in inflammation and pathologic role in systemic inflammatory states are now well recognized. An imbalance in cytokine production or cytokine receptor expression and/or dysregulation of a cytokine process contributes to various pathological disorders. Research is progressing rapidly in the area of cytokines and their therapeutic targets, the two major therapeutic modalities being the administration of purified recombinant cytokines and the use of their antagonists in various inflammatory disorders. However, given the large number of cytokines, it is disappointing that only relatively few can be used clinically. In the present article, we have made an attempt to review and present a glimpse of the history as well as up to date information that is pertinent to cytokines and anti-cytokine therapies in the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders and various other related diseases.

  7. Identification of (poly)phenol treatments that modulate the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ford, Christopher T; Richardson, Siân; McArdle, Francis; Lotito, Silvina B; Crozier, Alan; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2016-05-28

    Diets rich in fruits and vegetables (FV), which contain (poly)phenols, protect against age-related inflammation and chronic diseases. T-lymphocytes contribute to systemic cytokine production and are modulated by FV intake. Little is known about the relative potency of different (poly)phenols in modulating cytokine release by lymphocytes. We compared thirty-one (poly)phenols and six (poly)phenol mixtures for effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine release by Jurkat T-lymphocytes. Test compounds were incubated with Jurkat cells for 48 h at 1 and 30 µm, with or without phorbol ester treatment at 24 h to induce cytokine release. Three test compounds that reduced cytokine release were further incubated with primary lymphocytes at 0·2 and 1 µm for 24 h, with lipopolysaccharide added at 5 h. Cytokine release was measured, and generation of H2O2 by test compounds was determined to assess any potential correlations with cytokine release. A number of (poly)phenols significantly altered cytokine release from Jurkat cells (P<0·05), but H2O2 generation did not correlate with cytokine release. Resveratrol, isorhamnetin, curcumin, vanillic acid and specific (poly)phenol mixtures reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine release from T-lymphocytes, and there was evidence for interaction between (poly)phenols to further modulate cytokine release. The release of interferon-γ induced protein 10 by primary lymphocytes was significantly reduced following treatment with 1 µm isorhamnetin (P<0·05). These results suggest that (poly)phenols derived from onions, turmeric, red grapes, green tea and açai berries may help reduce the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in people at risk of chronic inflammation.

  8. Determination of in vivo protein synthesis in human palatine tonsil.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Anna; Klaude, Maria; Loré, Karin; Andersson, Jan; Ringdén, Olle; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2005-02-01

    The palatine tonsils are constantly exposed to ingested or inhaled antigens which, in turn, lead to a permanent activation of tonsillar immune cells, even in a basic physiological state. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the immunological activation of the human palatine tonsil is reflected by a high metabolic activity, as determined by in vivo measurement of protein synthesis. The protein synthesis rate of the tonsil was also compared with that of the circulating T-lymphocytes, the total blood mononuclear cells and the whole population of blood leucocytes. Phenotypic characterization of immune-competent cells in tonsil tissue and blood was performed by flow cytometry. Pinch tonsil biopsies were taken after induction of anaesthesia in healthy adult patients (n=12) scheduled for ear surgery, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or nose surgery. Protein synthesis was quantitatively determined during a 90-min period by a flooding-dose technique. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in the palatine tonsils was 22.8+/-5.7%/24 h (mean+/-S.D.), whereas protein synthesis in the circulating T-lymphocytes was 10.7+/-3.4%/24 h, in mononuclear cells was 10.8+/-2.8%/24 h and in leucocytes was 3.2+/-1.2%/24 h. CD3+ lymphocytes were the most abundant cell population in the tonsil. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in human tonsils was higher compared with the circulating immune cells. This high metabolic rate may reflect the permanent immunological activity present in human tonsils, although cell phenotypes and activity markers do not explain the differences.

  9. Exposure of Human CD4 T Cells to IL-12 Results in Enhanced TCR-Induced Cytokine Production, Altered TCR Signaling, and Increased Oxidative Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vacaflores, Aldo; Chapman, Nicole M; Harty, John T; Richer, Martin J; Houtman, Jon C D

    2016-01-01

    Human CD4 T cells are constantly exposed to IL-12 during infections and certain autoimmune disorders. The current paradigm is that IL-12 promotes the differentiation of naïve CD4 T cells into Th1 cells, but recent studies suggest IL-12 may play a more complex role in T cell biology. We examined if exposure to IL-12 alters human CD4 T cell responses to subsequent TCR stimulation. We found that IL-12 pretreatment increased TCR-induced IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-13, IL-4 and IL-10 production. This suggests that prior exposure to IL-12 potentiates the TCR-induced release of a range of cytokines. We observed that IL-12 mediated its effects through both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. IL-12 pretreatment increased the phosphorylation of AKT, p38 and LCK following TCR stimulation without altering other TCR signaling molecules, potentially mediating the increase in transcription of cytokines. In addition, the IL-12-mediated enhancement of cytokines that are not transcriptionally regulated was partially driven by increased oxidative metabolism. Our data uncover a novel function of IL-12 in human CD4 T cells; specifically, it enhances the release of a range of cytokines potentially by altering TCR signaling pathways and by enhancing oxidative metabolism.

  10. A critical function for transforming growth factor-beta, interleukin 23 and proinflammatory cytokines in driving and modulating human T(H)-17 responses.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Elisabetta; Servant, Nicolas; Zollinger, Raphaël; Bogiatzi, Sofia I; Hupé, Philippe; Barillot, Emmanuel; Soumelis, Vassili

    2008-06-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing T helper 17 cells (T(H)-17 cells) have been described as a T helper cell subset distinct from T helper type 1 (T(H)1) and T(H)2 cells, with specific functions in antimicrobial defense and autoimmunity. The factors driving human T(H)-17 differentiation remain controversial. Using a systematic approach combining experimental and computational methods, we show here that transforming growth factor-beta, interleukin 23 (IL-23) and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta and IL-6) were all essential for human T(H)-17 differentiation. However, individual T(H)-17 cell-derived cytokines, such as IL-17, IL-21, IL-22 and IL-6, as well as the global T(H)-17 cytokine profile, were differentially modulated by T(H)-17-promoting cytokines. Transforming growth factor-beta was critical, and its absence induced a shift from a T(H)-17 profile to a T(H)1-like profile. Our results shed new light on the regulation of human T(H)-17 differentiation and provide a framework for the global analysis of T helper responses.

  11. Calcitriol May Down-Regulate mRNA Over-Expression of Toll-Like Receptor-2 and -4, LL-37 and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Cultured Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Mi Sook; Kim, Ji-Yun; Lee, He In

    2014-01-01

    Background Although vitamin D analogs have been used in the topical treatment of psoriasis, their mechanisms of action are not well understand. Calcitriol, the hormonally active vitamin D3 metabolite, has been demonstrated to exert immunomodulatory effects in the skin by down-regulating the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and proinflammatory cytokines. Objective We investigated the effects of calcitriol on the expression of TLR2, TLR4, antimicrobial peptide LL-37, and proinflammatory cytokines in cultured human keratinocytes. Methods The mRNA expression levels of TLR2, TLR4, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and LL-37 in cultured human keratinocytes were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription (RT). Furthermore, we measured supernatant TNF-α levels by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to confirm the effects of calcitriol on TLR2 and TLR4. Results As measured by RT-PCR and real-time PCR, calcitriol was found to suppress the lipopolysaccharide- and ultraviolet B radiation-mediated induction of expression of TLRs, LL-37 and proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β in normal human keratinocytes. The supernatant TNF-α levels measured by ELISA were also suppressed after treatment with calcitriol. Conclusion Calcitriol may down-regulate inflammatory stated over-expression of LL-37 and proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:24966627

  12. Human resistin stimulates the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha} and IL-12 in macrophages by NF-{kappa}B-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Silswal, Nirupama; Singh, Anil K.; Aruna, Battu; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita; Ghosh, Sudip; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z. . E-mail: nas_ehtesham@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    Resistin, a recently discovered 92 amino acid protein involved in the development of insulin resistance, has been associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. The elevated serum resistin in human diabetes is often associated with a pro-inflammatory milieu. However, the role of resistin in the development of inflammation is not well understood. Addition of recombinant human resistin protein (hResistin) to macrophages (both murine and human) resulted in enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-{alpha} and IL-12, similar to that obtained using 5 {mu}g/ml lipopolysaccharide. Both oligomeric and dimeric forms of hResistin were able to activate these cytokines suggesting that the inflammatory action of resistin is independent of its conformation. Heat denatured hResistin abrogated cytokine induction while treatment of recombinant resistin with polymyxin B agarose beads had no effect thereby ruling out the role of endotoxin in the recombinant hResistin mediated cytokine induction. The pro-inflammatory nature of hResistin was further evident from the ability of this protein to induce the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B transcription factor as seen from electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Induction of TNF-{alpha} in U937 cells by hResistin was markedly reduced in the presence of either dominant negative I{kappa}B{alpha} plasmid or PDTC, a pharmacological inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B. A protein involved in conferring insulin resistance is also a pro-inflammatory molecule that has important implications.

  13. Potential of Cells and Cytokines/Chemokines to Regulate Tertiary Lymphoid Structures in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Feifeng

    2016-01-01

    Tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) are ectopic lymphoid tissues involved in chronic inflammation, autoimmune diseases, transplant rejection and cancer. They exhibit almost all the characteristics of secondary lymphoid organs (SLO), which are associated with adaptive immune responses; as such, they contain organized B-cell follicles with germinal centers, distinct areas containing T cells and dendritic cells, high endothelial venules, and lymphatics. In this review, we briefly describe the formation of SLO, and describe the cellular subsets and molecular cues involved in the formation and maintenance of TLS. Finally, we discuss the associations of TLS with human diseases, especially autoimmune diseases, and the potential for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27799872

  14. Anti-human cytomegalovirus activity of cytokines produced by CD4+ T-cell clones specifically activated by IE1 peptides in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Davignon, J L; Castanié, P; Yorke, J A; Gautier, N; Clément, D; Davrinche, C

    1996-01-01

    The control of latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections by the immune system is poorly understood. We have previously shown that CD4+ T cells specific for the human CMV major regulatory protein IE1 are frequent in latently infected healthy blood donors. In order to learn about the possible role of these cells, we have developed IE1-specific CD4+ T-cell clones and, in this study, analyzed their epitope specificity and function in vitro. We measured their cytokine production when stimulated with specific IE1 peptides or whole recombinant IE1 protein. Their cytokine profiles, as deduced from gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-6 production, were of the Th0- and Th1-like phenotypes. Supernatants from IE1-specific clones producing IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were shown to inhibit CMV replication in U373 MG cells. This effect was due, as found by using cytokine-specific neutralizing antibodies, mostly to IFN-gamma, which was secreted at higher levels than TNF-alpha. To better assess the anti-CMV activity of cytokines, recombinant IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were used and shown to have a synergistic effect on the inhibition of CMV replication and protein expression. Thus, IE1-specific CD4+ T cells display in vitro anti-CMV activity through cytokine secretion and may play a role in the control of in vivo latent infections. PMID:8642638

  15. Specific inhibition of T-cell adhesion to extracellular matrix and proinflammatory cytokine secretion by human recombinant galectin-1

    PubMed Central

    RABINOVICH, G A; ARIEL, A; HERSHKOVIZ, R; HIRABAYASHI, J; KASAI, K-I; LIDER, O

    1999-01-01

    The migration of immune cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) towards inflammatory sites is co-ordinated by receptors recognizing ECM glycoproteins, chemokines and proinflammatory cytokines. In this context, galectins are secreted to the extracellular milieu, where they recognize poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains on major ECM glycoproteins, such as fibronectin and laminin. We investigated the possibility that galectin-1 could modulate the adhesion of human T cells to ECM and ECM components. T cells were purified from human blood, activated with interleukin-2 (IL-2), labelled, and incubated further with intact immobilized ECM and ECM glycoproteins in the presence of increasing concentrations of human recombinant galectin-1, or its more stable, related, C2-S molecule obtained by site-directed mutagenesis. The presence of galectin-1 was shown to inhibit T-cell adhesion to intact ECM, laminin and fibronectin, and to a lesser extent to collagen type IV, in a dose-dependent manner. This effect was specifically blocked by anti-galectin-1 antibody and was dependent on the lectin’s carbohydrate-binding properties. The inhibition of T-cell adhesion by galectin-1 correlates with the ability of this molecule to block the re-organization of the activated cell’s actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production was markedly reduced when IL-2-activated T cells were incubated with galectin-1 or its mutant. This effect was prevented by β-galactoside-related sugars. The present study reveals an alternative inhibitory mechanism for explaining the suppressive properties of the galectin-1 subfamily on inflammatory and autoimmune processes. PMID:10447720

  16. A far upstream Oct-1 motif regulates cytokine-induced transcription of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase (hiNOS) gene

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Soo; Guo, Zhong; Shao, Lifang; Du, Qiang; Geller, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of human iNOS (hiNOS) gene is highly complex and requires an orchestrated flow of positive and negative transcription factors that bind to specific cis-acting upstream response elements. Very little specific information exists about the far upstream region of the hiNOS gene. Oct-1 protein belongs to the POU domain transcription factor family and is constitutively expressed in all dividing cells. It's essential for proliferation, differentiation and other key cell processes. However, the role of Oct-1 in regulating human iNOS gene expression has not been reported. In this work, the octamer sequence 5′-ATGCAAAT-3′ at -10.2 kb in the hiNOS promoter was identified as high-affinity Oct-1 binding by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) in vitro and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay in vivo. Mutation of Oct-1 motif at -10.2 kb in the hiNOS promoter decreased cytokine-induced hiNOS promoter activity by 40%. Cytokine-induced hiNOS promoter activity was also significantly reduced by Oct-1 siRNA targeting. Overexpression of Oct-1 increased cytokine-induced hiNOS protein expression in primary human hepatocytes. Furthermore, the Oct-1 motif at -10.2 kb of the hiNOS promoter conferred increased transcriptional activity to the heterologous thymidine kinase (TK) promoter irrespective of cytokine induction. Taken together, this work identifies a far-upstream functional Oct-1 enhancer motif at -10.2 kb in the hiNOS promoter that regulates cytokine-induced hiNOS gene transcription, and further underscores the tight control mechanisms regulating expression of the human iNOS gene. PMID:19467240

  17. The human analog of murine cystein rich protein 61 [correction of 16] is a 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 responsive immediate early gene in human fetal osteoblasts: regulation by cytokines, growth factors, and serum.

    PubMed

    Schütze, N; Lechner, A; Groll, C; Siggelkow, H; Hüfner, M; Köhrle, J; Jakob, F

    1998-04-01

    1Alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) is a potent mediator of differentiation and maintenance of specific functions of osteoblasts. To detect novel targets for 1,25-(OH)2D3 action, we applied differential display PCR to human fetal osteoblast-like cells and identified the human analog of murine cystein rich protein 61 (hCYR61) as a 1,25-(OH)2D3-responsive immediate early gene in differentiated fetal osteoblast-like cells. The murine gene CYR61 is important for cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, and it belongs to an emerging gene family of cysteine-rich proteins. hCYR61 messenger RNA (mRNA) steady-state levels were stimulated 11-fold by 10 nM 1,25-(OH)2D3 by 1 h and declined to control levels by 4 h. This transient stimulation of hCYR61 mRNA was not inhibited by cycloheximide but was prevented by actinomycin D, indicating that the 1,25-(OH)2D3 effect involves transcriptional events and does not require de novo protein synthesis. hCYR61 mRNA stability was not influenced by 1,25(OH)2D3, whereas cycloheximide treatment stabilized hCYR61 mRNA. FCS, as well as growth factors and cytokines such as basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-1, strongly elevated hCYR61 mRNA steady-state levels within 1 h. hCYR61 mRNA was expressed also in primary human osteoblasts and osteosarcoma cell lines. Using a commercial tissue blot, hCYR61 mRNA was only observed in skeletal muscle. The fast and transient response of hCYR 61 to 1,25-(OH)2D3, serum, growth factors, and cytokines suggests an important role of hCYR61 for osteoblast function and differentiation.

  18. Inflammatory Cytokines Induce a Unique Mineralizing Phenotype in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Bone Marrow*

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Elisabeth; Porter, Ryan M.; Wehling, Nathalie; O'Sullivan, Regina P.; Liu, Fangjun; Boskey, Adele; Estok, Daniel M.; Harris, Mitchell B.; Vrahas, Mark S.; Evans, Christopher H.; Wells, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that can differentiate along multiple mesenchymal lineages. In this capacity they are thought to be important in the intrinsic turnover and repair of connective tissues while also serving as a basis for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, little is known of the biological responses of human MSCs to inflammatory conditions. When cultured with IL-1β, marrow-derived MSCs from 8 of 10 human subjects deposited copious hydroxyapatite, in which authenticity was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the production of fine needles of hydroxyapatite in conjunction with matrix vesicles. Alkaline phosphatase activity did not increase in response to inflammatory mediators, but PPi production fell, reflecting lower ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase activity in cells and matrix vesicles. Because PPi is the major physiological inhibitor of mineralization, its decline generated permissive conditions for hydroxyapatite formation. This is in contrast to MSCs treated with dexamethasone, where PPi levels did not fall and mineralization was fuelled by a large and rapid increase in alkaline phosphatase activity. Bone sialoprotein was the only osteoblast marker strongly induced by IL-1β; thus these cells do not become osteoblasts despite depositing abundant mineral. RT-PCR did not detect transcripts indicative of alternative mesenchymal lineages, including chondrocytes, myoblasts, adipocytes, ligament, tendon, or vascular smooth muscle cells. IL-1β phosphorylated multiple MAPKs and activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Certain inhibitors of MAPK and PI3K, but not NF-κB, prevented mineralization. The findings are of importance to soft tissue mineralization, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. PMID:23970554

  19. Cytokines and Blastocyst Hatching.

    PubMed

    Seshagiri, Polani B; Vani, Venkatappa; Madhulika, Pathak

    2016-03-01

    Blastocyst implantation into the uterine endometrium establishes early pregnancy. This event is regulated by blastocyst- and/or endometrium-derived molecular factors which include hormones, growth factors, cell adhesion molecules, cytokines and proteases. Their coordinated expression and function are critical for a viable pregnancy. A rate-limiting event that immediately precedes implantation is the hatching of blastocyst. Ironically, blastocyst hatching is tacitly linked to peri-implantation events, although it is a distinct developmental phenomenon. The exact molecular network regulating hatching is still unclear. A number of implantation-associated molecular factors are expressed in the pre-implanting blastocyst. Among others, cytokines, expressed by peri-implantation blastocysts, are thought to be important for hatching, making blastocysts implantation competent. Pro-inflammatory (IL-6, LIF, GM-CSF) and anti-inflammatory (IL-11, CSF-1) cytokines improve hatching rates; they modulate proteases (MMPs, tPAs, cathepsins and ISP1). However, functional involvement of cytokines and their specific mediation of hatching-associated proteases are unclear. There is a need to understand mechanistic roles of cytokines and proteases in blastocyst hatching. This review will assess the available knowledge on blastocyst-derived pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and their role in potentially regulating blastocyst hatching. They have implications in our understanding of early embryonic loss and infertility in mammals, including humans.

  20. Immunoglobulin expression and synthesis by human haemic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J; Hough, D; Karpas, A; Smith, J L

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-six human cell lines derived from a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies, were investigated for their immunological markers, with special reference to the class of immunoglobulin expressed. Twenty-five of the lines stained positively for surface immunoglobulin and IgD together with IgM proved to be the major immunoglobulin classes on these cells. Six of the lines were chosen for a study of their immunoglobulin synthesis patterns over an 18-h period and the immunoglobulin produced was analysed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patterns obtained from the cell lines were similar to that from normal lymph node lymphocytes and differed markedly to plasma cells. Two of the cell lines had abnormal immunoglobulin synthesis patterns characterized as free light chains in one case. The cell lines are evaluated for their usefulness as models of immunoglobulin synthesis and analogues of normal and neoplastic states. PMID:608682

  1. Bromelain inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production in human THP-1 monocytes via the removal of CD14.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing-Rong; Wu, Chia-Chuan; Hou, Rolis Chien-Wei; Jeng, Kee-Ching

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory mechanism of bromelain is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effect of bromelain on cytokine production from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells. The result showed that bromelain (50-100 microg/ml) significantly and reversibly reduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha interleukin- (IL)-1beta and IL-6 from LPS-induced PBMC and THP-1 cells. This effect was correlated with reduced LPS-induced TNF-alpha mRNA and NF-kappaB activity in THP-1 cells. In addition, bromelain dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced prostaglandin E(2), thromboxane B(2) and COX-2 mRNA but not COX-1 mRNA. Importantly, bromelain degraded TNF-alpha and IL-1beta molecules, reduced the expression of surface marker CD14 but not Toll-like receptor 4 from THP-1 cells. Taken together, the results suggest that the suppression of signaling pathways by bromelain's proteolytic activity may contribute to the anti-inflammatory activity of bromelain.

  2. Curcumin modulation of IFN-β and IL-12 signalling and cytokine induction in human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, Angela J; Adrian Robins, R; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from the dietary spice turmeric. It possesses diverse anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Curcumin has been shown to exhibit an inhibitory effect on the production of inflammatory cytokines by human monocytes and has inhibited the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in association with a decrease in interleukin 12 (IL-12) production and signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) activation. The type I interferon (IFN) IFN-has the ability to suppress IL-12. Both IL-12 and IFN-α/β signal through the activation by phosphorylation of STAT4. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curcumin on the ability of T cells to respond to IL-12 or IFN-α/β. We report that curcumin decreases IL-12-induced STAT4 phosphorylation, IFN-γ production, and IL-12 Rβ1 and β2 expression. IFN-β-induced STAT4 phosphorylation, IL-10 production and IFN receptor (IFNAR) subunits 1 and 2 expression were enhanced by curcumin. Curcumin increased IFN-α-induced IL-10 and IFNAR1 expression. Prior exposure to curcumin decreased IFN-α-induced IFNAR2 expression and did not modify the level of IFN-α-induced pSTAT4 generation. Thus, the effect of curcumin on STAT4 activation in T cells is dependent upon the stimulus to which the T cells have been exposed. PMID:17979888

  3. The in vitro interaction of Sporothrix schenckii with human endothelial cells is modulated by cytokines and involves endothelial surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Camila Castro; De Lima, Osana Cunha; De Carvalho, Laís; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila Maria; Morandi, Verônica

    2004-04-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is the etiological agent of sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis that can evolve to systemic complications in immunocompromised patients. Interactions with endothelium are thought to be essential for systemic infections. In the present work, we studied the interaction between S. schenckii and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). S. schenckii interacts with HUVECs in a time-dependent manner. Morphological analysis showed that yeasts locate to interendothelial junctions. Ultrastructural studies showed that internalized yeasts were found inside endocytic vacuoles as early as 2 h, without causing any detectable damage to HUVECs after 24 h of infection. The viability of infected HUVECs was confirmed by the MTT assay. When HUVECs were treated with different concentrations of Interleukin-1beta or transforming growth factor-beta, a significant dose-dependent increase in cell-associated yeasts was observed. The preliminary analysis of the endothelial surface ligands for S. schenckii cells revealed two major molecules, with Mr of approximately 90 and 135 kDa. The interaction of endothelial cell surface molecules with S. schenckii yeast cells was modulated by divalent cations. This is the first demonstration that S. schenckii is able to adhere and invade endothelial cells without significantly affect cellular integrity. Our results suggest the contribution of cytokine-modulated calcium-dependent molecules to this process.

  4. Age-dependent variation in cytokines, chemokines, and biologic analytes rinsed from the surface of healthy human skin

    PubMed Central

    Kinn, Patrick M.; Holdren, Grant O.; Westermeyer, Brittney A.; Abuissa, Mousa; Fischer, Carol L.; Fairley, Janet A.; Brogden, Kim A.; Brogden, Nicole K.

    2015-01-01

    In the skin, aging is associated with overall epidermal thinning, decreased barrier function, and gradual deterioration of the epidermal immune response. However, the presence and role of cytokines, chemokines, and biologic analytes (CCBAs) in immunosenescence are not known. Here we identified age-related changes in skin properties and CCBAs from stratum corneum of healthy human subjects, providing a means to utilize CCBAs as benchmarks for aging skin health. Transepidermal water loss and a(*) (skin redness) decreased in an age-dependent manner, and were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in Groups 2 (56.6 ± 4.6 years) and 3 (72.9 ± 3.0 years) vs. Group 1 (24.3 ± 2.8 years). In skin wash fluid, 48 CCBAs were detected; seven were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in Groups 2 and 3: EGF, FGF-2, IFNα2, IL-1RA, HSA, keratin-6, and involucrin; cortisol was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in Groups 2 and 3. Our results correspond with the pro-inflammatory shift that occurs with immunosenescence and also provides basis for understanding the inflammatory changes in normal aging skin. PMID:26035055

  5. MicroRNA-146a modulates human bronchial epithelial cell survival in response to the cytokine-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiangde Nelson, Amy; Wang Xingqi; Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Kim, Miok; Sato, Tadashi; Nakanishi, Masanori; Li Yingji; Sun Jianhong; Michalski, Joel; Patil, Amol; Basma, Hesham; Rennard, Stephen I.

    2009-02-27

    MicroRNA plays an important role in cell differentiation, proliferation and cell death. The current study found that miRNA-146a was up-regulated in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) in response to stimulation by TGF-ss1 plus cytomix (a mixture of IL-1ss, IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha}). TGF-ss1 plus cytomix (TCM) induced apoptosis in HBECs (3.4 {+-} 0.6% of control vs 83.1 {+-} 4.0% of TCM treated cells, p < 0.01), and this was significantly blocked by the miRNA-146a mimic (8.8 {+-} 1.5%, p < 0.01). In contrast, a miRNA-146a inhibitor had only a modest effect on cell survival but appeared to augment the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in response to the cytokines. The MicroRNA-146a mimic appears to modulate HBEC survival through a mechanism of up-regulating Bcl-XL and STAT3 phosphorylation, and by this mechanism it could contribute to tissue repair and remodeling.

  6. Human eosinophils can express the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, J J; Matossian, K; Resnick, M B; Beil, W J; Wong, D T; Gordon, J R; Dvorak, A M; Weller, P F; Galli, S J

    1993-01-01

    By in situ hybridization, 44-100% of the blood eosinophils from five patients with hypereosinophilia and four normal subjects exhibited intense hybridization signals for TNF-alpha mRNA. TNF-alpha protein was detectable by immunohistochemistry in blood eosinophils of hypereosinophilic subjects, and purified blood eosinophils from three atopic donors exhibited cycloheximide-inhibitable spontaneous release of TNF-alpha in vitro. Many blood eosinophils (39-91%) from hypereosinophilic donors exhibited intense labeling for macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) mRNA, whereas eosinophils of normal donors demonstrated only weak or undetectable hybridization signals for MIP-1 alpha mRNA. Most tissue eosinophils infiltrating nasal polyps were strongly positive for both TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha mRNA. By Northern blot analysis, highly enriched blood eosinophils from a patient with the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome exhibited differential expression of TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha mRNA. These findings indicate that human eosinophils represent a potential source of TNF-alpha and MIP-1 alpha, that levels of expression of mRNA for both cytokines are high in the blood eosinophils of hypereosinophilic donors and in eosinophils infiltrating nasal polyps, that the eosinophils of normal subjects express higher levels of TNF-alpha than MIP-1 alpha mRNA, and that eosinophils purified from the blood of atopic donors can release TNF-alpha in vitro. Images PMID:8514874

  7. Directed evolution of a soluble human DR3 receptor for the inhibition of TL1A induced cytokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Itay; Zaretsky, Marianna; Aharoni, Amir

    2017-01-01

    TNF-like 1A (TL1A) is a cytokine belonging to the TNF superfamily that promotes inflammation in autoimmune diseases. Inhibiting the interaction of TL1A with the endogenous death-domain receptor 3 (DR3) offers a therapeutic approach for treating TL1A-induced autoimmune diseases. Here, we generated improved DR3 variants showing increased TL1A binding affinity and stability using a directed evolution approach. Given the high cysteine content and post-translational modification of DR3, we employed yeast surface display and expression in mammalian cell lines for screening, expression and characterization of improved DR3 variants. A cell-based assay performed with the human TF-1 cell line and CD4+ T cells showed that two improved DR3 mutants efficiently inhibited TL1A-induced cell death and secretion of IFN-γ, respectively. These DR3 mutants can be used as drug candidates for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases and for other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatic arthritis and asthma. PMID:28278297

  8. Regulation of the human ADAMTS-4 promoter by transcription factors and cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Thirunavukkarasu, Kannan . E-mail: kannan@lilly.com; Pei, Yong; Moore, Terry L.; Wang, He; Yu, Xiao-peng; Geiser, Andrew G.; Chandrasekhar, Srinivasan

    2006-06-23

    ADAMTS-4 (aggrecanase-1) is a metalloprotease that plays a role in aggrecan degradation in the cartilage extracellular matrix. In order to understand the regulation of ADAMTS-4 gene expression we have cloned and characterized a functional 4.5 kb human ADAMTS-4 promoter. Sequence analysis of the promoter revealed the presence of putative binding sites for nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and Runx family of transcription factors that are known to regulate chondrocyte maturation and differentiation. Using promoter-reporter assays and mRNA analysis we have analyzed the role of chondrocyte-expressed transcription factors NFATp and Runx2 and have shown that ADAMTS-4 is a potential downstream target of these two factors. Our results suggest that inhibition of the expression/function of NFATp and/or Runx2 may enable us to modulate aggrecan degradation in normal physiology and/or in degenerative joint diseases. The ADAMTS-4 promoter would serve as a valuable mechanistic tool to better understand the regulation of ADAMTS-4 expression by signaling pathways that modulate cartilage matrix breakdown.

  9. Activation of the human. beta. sub 2 -interferon/hepatocyte-stimulating factor/interleukin 6 promoter by cytokines, viruses, and second messenger agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, A.; Tatter, S.B.; May, L.T.; Sehgal, P.B. )

    1988-09-01

    The hallmark of {beta}{sub 2}-interferon (IFN-{beta}{sub 2})/hepatocyte-stimulating factor/interleukin 6 gene expression is its inducibility in different types of human cells (fibroblasts, monocytes, epithelial cells, and endothelial cells) by different stimuli, which include cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1 (IL-1) and platelet-derived growth factor, different viruses, and bacterial products such as endotoxin. The activation by cytokines, viruses, and second messenger agonists of the IFN-{beta}{sub 2} promoter linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was studied after transfection into HeLa cells. A chimeric gene containing IFN-{beta}{sub 2} DNA from -1180 to +13 linked to the CAT gene was inducible {approx}10-fold by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), followed, in decreasing order, by pseudorabies and Sendai viruses; serum; the cytokines tumor necrosis factor, IL-1, and epidermal growth factor; the cAMP agonists BrcAMP and forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine; poly(I){center dot}poly(C); 1,2-diacylglycerol and the calcium ionophore A23187. The region between -225 and -113 in IFN-{beta}{sub 2}, which contains DNA motifs similar to the regulatory elements in the human c-fos gene, appears to contain the major cis-acting regulatory elements responsible for the activation of the IFN-{beta}{sub 2} promoter by several different cytokines, viruses, and second messenger agonists.

  10. Effect of lipopolysaccharide and cytokines on synthesis and secretion of leukotrienes from endometrial epithelial cells of pigs.

    PubMed

    Jana, Barbara; Czarzasta, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, effects were studied of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-4 and IL-10 on the mRNA and protein expression of 5-lipooxygenase (5-LO), leukotriene (LT)A4 hydrolase (LTAH) and LTC4 synthase (LTCS), and secretion of LTB4 and LTC4 from endometrial epithelial cells of pigs, as well as on viability of these cells. Cells were incubated for 24h with LPS (10 or 100ng/ml of medium), TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-4 or IL-10 (each cytokine: 1 or 10ng/ml of medium). Larger doses of TNF-α and IL-10 and both doses of IL-1β increased the relative abundance of mRNA/protein of 5-LO in the cells. A similar effect was exerted by the smaller dose of LPS on 5-LO mRNA content. Smaller doses of LPS and IL-4, and the larger dose of IL-10 increased the relative abundance of mRNA/protein LTAH, while both doses of TNF-α and the larger dose of IL-1β increased the protein content of this enzyme. Relative abundance of the mRNA/protein of LTCS was greater with the smaller dose of LPS, both doses of TNF-α and greater doses of IL-1β and IL-10, while relative abundance of LTCS mRNA was greater in response to the larger dose of LPS and both doses of IL-4. The LTB4 and LTC4 release was increased by the smaller dose of LPS, both doses of TNF-α and larger doses of IL-1β and IL-10. The IL-4 at the smaller dose exerted a stimulatory effect on LTB4 release. Larger doses of TNF-α and IL-4 enhanced cell viability. Interactions with LPS and cytokines revealed in this study may represent mechanisms important for the regulation of endometrium functions of pigs under physiological or pathological conditions.

  11. Influence of cetirizine and levocetirizine on two cytokines secretion in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, Mei-Yin; Hsu, Jeng-Yuan; Weng, Yueh-Shan; Fu, Lin-Shien

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that several second-generation antihistamines can modulate various inflammatory reactions besides their H(1)-receptor antagonism. The antihistamine cetirizine is a racemic mixture of levocetirizine and dextrocetirizine. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of these two antihistamines (cetirizine and levocetirizine) on granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-8 secretion in A549 human airway epithelial cells. A549 cells were preincubated with cetirizine (0.1, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 microM) or levocetirizine (0.1, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 microM) individually for 16 hours and were then stimulated with IL-1beta for 8 hours. The levels of GM-CSF and IL-8 in cultured supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our data showed that cetirizine (5 and 10 microM) and levocetirizine (2.5, 5, and 10 microM) significantly suppressed GM-CSF secretion from A549 cells stimulated with IL-1beta (p<0.05). Cetirizine (10 microM) and levocetirizine (5 and 10 microM) significantly suppressed IL-8 secretion after A549 was stimulated. The suppressive effect was comparable between levocetirizine, 2.5 microM, and cetirizine, 5 microM, as well as levocetirizine, 5 microM, and cetirizine, 10 microM. Moreover, levocetirizine, 5 microM, was better than cetirizine, 5 microM, on suppressing IL-8 secretion, but such a difference did not appear in other conditions. Our results suggest that cetirizine and levocetirizine at higher concentrations can reduce the release of GM-CSF and IL-8 from A549 cells stimulated with IL-1beta. These observations indicate that the two second-generation antihistamines may exert anti-inflammatory effects beyond histamine H(1)-receptor antagonist, and levocetirizine plays a major role in terms of this activity.

  12. Synthesis of Human Haemoglobin by Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyesom, I.

    2006-01-01

    Haemoglobin, Hb is the red, protein pigment in blood that transports oxygen round the body. Decreased quantity could lead to anaemia, and when the anaemic condition turns severe, blood transfusion becomes inevitable. However, the safety of human source has become questionable in recent times, and this has aroused the interest of scientists to…

  13. Synthesis of immunoglobulins by human endocervix in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, M. E.; Buchan, A.; Skinner, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis of immunoglobulins by the uterine cervix was investigated in an endocervical organ-culture system. Using Ouchterlony immunodiffusion gels immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin A and secretory piece were detected in washings of endocervical explants and in explant incubation medium. Synthesis of immunoglobulin in the organ-culture system was investigated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of radiolabelled polypeptides; 2 polypeptides co-migrated with the heavy and light chains of a reference polyclonal immunoglobulin G and were confirmed, by use of anti-human globulin and iodinated staphylococcal protein A, to be the heavy and light chains of immunoglobulin G. This experimental system will provide a useful model in future investigations of the efficacy of a local vaccine in human subjects. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6803822

  14. Synthesis of immunoglobulins by human endocervix in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Cowan, M E; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1982-04-01

    The synthesis of immunoglobulins by the uterine cervix was investigated in an endocervical organ-culture system. Using Ouchterlony immunodiffusion gels immunoglobulin G, immunoglobulin A and secretory piece were detected in washings of endocervical explants and in explant incubation medium. Synthesis of immunoglobulin in the organ-culture system was investigated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of radiolabelled polypeptides; 2 polypeptides co-migrated with the heavy and light chains of a reference polyclonal immunoglobulin G and were confirmed, by use of anti-human globulin and iodinated staphylococcal protein A, to be the heavy and light chains of immunoglobulin G. This experimental system will provide a useful model in future investigations of the efficacy of a local vaccine in human subjects.

  15. Up-Regulation of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokine Production in Avian Influenza H9N2 Virus-Infected Human Lung Epithelial Cell Line (A549).

    PubMed

    Farzin, Hamidreza; Toroghi, Reza; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Influenza H9N2 virus mostly infects avian species but poses a potential health risk to humans. Little is known about the mammalian host immune responses to H9N2 virus. To obtain insight into the innate immune responses of human lung epithelial cells to the avian H9N2 virus, the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine in the human airway epithelial cells infected with avian H9N2 virus were examined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). H9N2 virus was able to cultivate in the human lung epithelial cell line (A549) and stimulate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) and chemokine (IL-8). Expressions of cytokine genes were up-regulated to a significantly higher level for IL-1β (p < 0.01), IL-6 (p < 0.01 after 12 hours and p < 0.05 after 24 hours) and IL-8 (p < 0.01 after 12 hours and p < 0.001 after 24 hours) in virus-cultured A549 cells as compared with non-virus-cultured cells. The amount of IL-6 and IL-1β proteins secreted into the culture medium was also increased after virus culture infection of A549 cell line compared to non-virus-cultured A549 cells and were significant in both IL-1β (p < 0.05 in 18 hours and p < 0.001 in 24-48 hours harvested supernatant) and IL-6 (p < 0.001). Silencing the p65 component of NF-κB in A549 cells suppressed the stimulatory effects of influenza virus on secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine. The findings in this study will broaden our understanding of host innate immune mechanisms and the pathogenesis of H9N2 influenza viruses in human respiratory epithelium.

  16. Cynomolgus macaques naturally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi-I exhibit an overall mixed pro-inflammatory/modulated cytokine signature characteristic of human Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Mattoso-Barbosa, Armanda Moreira; Gouin, Nicolas; Perdigão-de-Oliveira, Marcelo; Valério-dos-Reis, Leydiane; Costa, Ronaldo Peres; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Gomes, Matheus de Souza; do Amaral, Laurence Rodrigues; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Dick, Edward J.; Hubbard, Gene B.; VandeBerg, Jane F.; VandeBerg, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Non-human primates have been shown to be useful models for Chagas disease. We previously reported that natural T. cruzi infection of cynomolgus macaques triggers clinical features and immunophenotypic changes of peripheral blood leukocytes resembling those observed in human Chagas disease. In the present study, we further characterize the cytokine-mediated microenvironment to provide supportive evidence of the utility of cynomolgus macaques as a model for drug development for human Chagas disease. Methods and findings In this cross-sectional study design, flow cytometry and systems biology approaches were used to characterize the ex vivo and in vitro T. cruzi-specific functional cytokine signature of circulating leukocytes from TcI-T. cruzi naturally infected cynomolgus macaques (CH). Results showed that CH presented an overall CD4+-derived IFN-γ pattern regulated by IL-10-derived from CD4+ T-cells and B-cells, contrasting with the baseline profile observed in non-infected hosts (NI). Homologous TcI-T. cruzi-antigen recall in vitro induced a broad pro-inflammatory cytokine response in CH, mediated by TNF from innate/adaptive cells, counterbalanced by monocyte/B-cell-derived IL-10. TcIV-antigen triggered a more selective cytokine signature mediated by NK and T-cell-derived IFN-γ with modest regulation by IL-10 from T-cells. While NI presented a cytokine network comprised of small number of neighborhood connections, CH displayed a complex cross-talk amongst network elements. Noteworthy, was the ability of TcI-antigen to drive a complex global pro-inflammatory network mediated by TNF and IFN-γ from NK-cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, regulated by IL-10+CD8+ T-cells, in contrast to the TcIV-antigens that trigger a modest network, with moderate connecting edges. Conclusions Altogether, our findings demonstrated that CH present a pro-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine signature similar to that observed in human Chagas disease. These data bring additional

  17. Human eosinophils are direct targets to nanoparticles: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO) delay apoptosis and increase the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-8.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luis Rafael; Girard, Denis

    2016-09-30

    Zinc oxide NPs (ZnO) have been recently proposed as novel candidates for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases. Paradoxically, recent data suggested that ZnO could cause eosinophilic airway inflammation in rodents. Despite the above observations, there are currently no studies reporting direct interaction between a given NP and human eosinophils themselves. In this study, freshly isolated human eosinophils were incubated with ZnO and several cellular functions were studied. We found that ZnO delay human eosinophil apoptosis, partially by inhibiting caspases and by preventing caspase-4 and Bcl-xL degradation. ZnO do not induce production of reactive oxygen species but increase de novo protein synthesis. In addition, ZnO were found to increase the production of the proinflammatory IL-1β and IL-8 cytokines. Using a pharmacological approach, we demonstrated that inhibition of caspase-1 reversed the ability of ZnO to induce IL-1β and IL-8 production, whereas inhibition of caspase-4 only reversed that of IL-8. Our results indicate the necessity of conducting studies to determine the potential of using NP as nanotherapies, particularly in diseases in which eosinophils may be involved. We conclude that, indeed, human eosinophils represent potential new direct targets to NPs, ZnO in the present case.

  18. UVA phototransduction drives early melanin synthesis in human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Nadine L; Chan, Jason W; Najera, Julia A; Ciriello, Jonathan M; Oancea, Elena

    2011-11-22

    Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a powerful carcinogen [1] comprising ~95% ultraviolet A (UVA) and ~5% ultraviolet B (UVB) at the Earth's surface, promotes melanin synthesis in epidermal melanocytes [2, 3], which protects skin from DNA damage [4, 5]. UVB causes DNA lesions [6] that lead to transcriptional activation of melanin-producing enzymes, resulting in delayed skin pigmentation within days [7]. In contrast, UVA causes primarily oxidative damage [8] and leads to immediate pigment darkening (IPD) within minutes, via an unknown mechanism [9, 10]. No receptor protein directly mediating phototransduction in skin has been identified. Here we demonstrate that exposure of primary human epidermal melanocytes (HEMs) to UVA causes calcium mobilization and early melanin synthesis. Calcium responses were abolished by treatment with G protein or phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitors or by depletion of intracellular calcium stores. We show that the visual photopigment rhodopsin [11] is expressed in HEMs and contributes to UVR phototransduction. Upon UVR exposure, significant melanin production was measured within one hour; cellular melanin continued to increase in a retinal- and calcium-dependent manner up to 5-fold after 24 hr. Our findings identify a novel UVA-sensitive signaling pathway in melanocytes that leads to calcium mobilization and melanin synthesis and may underlie the mechanism of IPD in human skin.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Profiles of Cytokine, Chemokine, and Growth Factors Produced by Human Decidual Cells Are Altered by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Supernatant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yang, Siwen; Kim, Sung O.; Reid, Gregor; Challis, John R. G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 supernatant (GR-1SN) on secretion profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors from primary cultures of human decidual cells. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased the output of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, interferon gamma [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]); anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1RN, IL-4, IL-9, and IL-10); chemokines (IL-8, eotaxin, IFN-inducible protein 10 [IP-10], monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], macrophage inflammatory protein-1α [MIP-1α], macrophage inflammatory protein-1β [MIP-1β], and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES]); and growth factors (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [CSF] 3, CSF-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor A [VEGFA]). Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1SN alone significantly increased CSF-3, MIP-1α MIP-1β, and RANTES but decreased IL-15 and IP-10 output. The GR-1SN also significantly or partially reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2 IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17, and IP-10; partially reduced LPS-induced anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1RN, IL-4 and IL-10, and LPS-induced VEGFA output but did not affect CSF-3, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, IL-8, and IL-9. Our results demonstrate that GR-1SN attenuates the inflammatory responses to LPS by human decidual cells, suggesting its potential role in ameliorating intrauterine infection. PMID:24429676

  20. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Profiles of Cytokine, Chemokine, and Growth Factors Produced by Human Decidual Cells Are Altered by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 Supernatant.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yang, Siwen; Kim, Sung O; Reid, Gregor; Challis, John R G; Bocking, Alan D

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 supernatant (GR-1SN) on secretion profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors from primary cultures of human decidual cells. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased the output of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1B, IL-2, IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, interferon gamma [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]); anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1RN, IL-4, IL-9, and IL-10); chemokines (IL-8, eotaxin, IFN-inducible protein 10 [IP-10], monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], macrophage inflammatory protein-1α [MIP-1α], macrophage inflammatory protein-1β [MIP-1β], and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES]); and growth factors (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [CSF] 3, CSF-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor A [VEGFA]). Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1SN alone significantly increased CSF-3, MIP-1α MIP-1β, and RANTES but decreased IL-15 and IP-10 output. The GR-1SN also significantly or partially reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-2 IL-6, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17, and IP-10; partially reduced LPS-induced anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1RN, IL-4 and IL-10, and LPS-induced VEGFA output but did not affect CSF-3, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, IL-8, and IL-9. Our results demonstrate that GR-1SN attenuates the inflammatory responses to LPS by human decidual cells, suggesting its potential role in ameliorating intrauterine infection.

  1. Potent immune responses and in vitro pro-inflammatory cytokine suppression by a novel adenovirus vaccine vector based on rare human serotype 28.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Christoph A; Bonnell, Jessica; Hiriyanna, Suja; Fultz, Megan; Nyberg-Hoffman, Cassandra; Chen, Ping; King, C Richter; Gall, Jason G D

    2010-08-09

    Adenovirus vaccine vectors derived from rare human serotypes have been shown to be less potent than serotype 5 (Ad5) at inducing immune responses to encoded antigens. To identify highly immunogenic adenovirus vectors, we assessed pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, binding to the CD46 receptor, and immunogenicity. Species D adenoviruses uniquely suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokines and induced high levels of type I interferon. Thus, it was unexpected that a vector derived from a representative serotype, Ad28, induced significantly higher transgene-specific T cell responses than an Ad35 vector. Prime-boost regimens with Ad28, Ad35, Ad14, or Ad5 significantly boosted T cell and antibody responses. The seroprevalence of Ad28 was confirmed to be <10% in the United States. Together, this shows that a rare human serotype-based vector can elicit strong immune responses, which was not predicted by in vitro results.

  2. Biologically Active Chorionic Gonadotropin: Synthesis by the Human Fetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, W. G.; Kuhn, R. W.; Jaffe, R. B.

    1983-04-01

    The kidney, and to a slight extent the liver, of human fetuses were found to synthesize and secrete the α subunit common to glycoprotein hormones. Fetal lung and muscle did not synthesize this protein. Since fetal kidney and liver were previously found to synthesize β chorionic gonadotropin, their ability to synthesize bioactive chorionic gonadotropin was also determined. The newly synthesized hormone bound to mouse Leydig cells and elicited a biological response: namely, the synthesis of testosterone. These results suggest that the human fetus may participate in metabolic homeostasis during its development.

  3. Particle Pollution in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Increase and Decrease of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 in Human Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cotto, Rosa I.; Ortiz-Martínez, Mario G.; Rivera-Ramírez, Evasomary; Mateus, Vinicius L.; Amaral, Beatriz S.; Jiménez-Vélez, Braulio D.; Gioda, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Particle pollution from urban and industrialized regions in Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Brazil was analyzed for toxic and pro-inflammatory (cytokines: IL-6, IL-8, IL-10) responses in human bronchial epithelial cells. Trace elements contribution was studied. Airborne particulate matter was collected at: three industrial sites Ind-1 (PM10) and Ind-2a and 2b (PM2.5); Centro urban area (PM10) and two rural sites (PM2.5, PM10). PM10 acetone extracts were toxic and did not elicit cytokine release; aqueous extracts were less toxic and stimulated the release of IL-6 and IL-8. PM2.5 aqueous extracts from Ind-2 decreased the release of IL-6 and IL-8. Zinc concentration was higher at the industrial and rural reference sites (Ref-1-2) although metals were not associated to cytokines changes. These results demonstrate that PM from RJ can either increase or decrease cytokine secretion in vitro while being site specific and time dependent. PMID:25106047

  4. Human eosinophil activin A synthesis and mRNA stabilization are induced by the combination of IL-3 plus TNF

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Esnault, Stephane; Johnson, Sean H.; Liu, Lin Ying; Malter, James S.; Burnham, Mandy E.; Jarjour, Nizar N.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils contribute to immune regulation and wound healing/fibrosis in various diseases including asthma. Growing appreciation for the role of activin A in such processes led us to hypothesize that eosinophils are a source of this TGF-β superfamily member. TNFα (TNF) induces activin A by other cell types and is often present at the site of allergic inflammation along with the eosinophil activating common β (βc) chain-signaling cytokines (IL-5, IL-3, GM-CSF). Previously, we established that the combination of TNF plus a βc chain-signaling cytokine synergistically induces eosinophil synthesis of the remodeling enzyme MMP-9. Therefore, eosinophils were stimulated ex vivo by these cytokines and in vivo through an allergen-induced airway inflammatory response. In contrast to IL-5+TNF or GM-CSF+TNF, the combination of IL-3+TNF synergistically induced activin A synthesis and release by human blood eosinophils. IL-3+TNF enhanced activin A mRNA stability, which required sustained signaling of pathways downstream of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. In vivo, following segmental airway allergen challenge of subjects with mild allergic asthma, activin A mRNA was upregulated in airway eosinophils compared to circulating eosinophils, and ex vivo, circulating eosinophils tended to release activin A in response to IL-3+TNF. These data provide evidence that eosinophils release activin A and that this function is enhanced when eosinophils are present in an allergen-induced inflammatory environment. Moreover, these data provide the first evidence for post-transcriptional control of activin A mRNA. We propose that, an environment rich in IL-3+TNF will lead to eosinophil–derived activin A, which plays an important role in regulating inflammation and/or fibrosis. PMID:27001469

  5. The non-antibiotic macrolide EM900 inhibits rhinovirus infection and cytokine production in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lusamba Kalonji, Nadine; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Sato, Takeya; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Ōmura, Satoshi; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of macrolides may be associated with a reduced frequency of exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, because the long-term use of antibiotics may promote the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, the development of a treatment to prevent COPD exacerbation with macrolides that do not exert anti-bacterial effects is necessary. Additionally, the inhibitory effects of nonantibiotic macrolides on the replication of rhinovirus (RV), which is the major cause of COPD exacerbation, have not been demonstrated. Primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells and nasal epithelial cells were pretreated with the nonantibiotic macrolide EM900 for 72 h prior to infection with a major group RV type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) and were further treated with EM900 after infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection reduced RV14 titers in the supernatants and viral RNA within the cells. Moreover, cytokine levels, including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, were reduced in the supernatants following RV14 infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection also reduced the mRNA and protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the receptor for RV14, after infection and reduced the activation of the nuclear factor kappa-B protein p50 in nuclear extracts after infection. Pretreatment with EM900 reduced the number and fluorescence intensity of the acidic endosomes through which RV RNA enters the cytoplasm. Thus, pretreatment with EM900 may inhibit RV infection by reducing the ICAM-1 levels and acidic endosomes and thus modulate the airway inflammation associated with RV infections. PMID:26462747

  6. Human cytomegalovirus UL7, a homologue of the SLAM-family receptor CD229, impairs cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Engel, Pablo; Pérez-Carmona, Natàlia; Albà, M Mar; Robertson, Kevin; Ghazal, Peter; Angulo, Ana

    2011-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), the β-herpesvirus prototype, has evolved a wide spectrum of mechanisms to counteract host immunity. Among them, HCMV uses cellular captured genes encoding molecules capable of interfering with the original host function or of fulfilling new immunomodulatory tasks. Here, we report on UL7, a novel HCMV heavily glycosylated transmembrane protein, containing an Ig-like domain that exhibits remarkable amino acid similarity to CD229, a cell-surface molecule of the signalling lymphocyte-activation molecule (SLAM) family involved in leukocyte activation. The UL7 Ig-like domain, which is well-preserved in all HCMV strains, structurally resembles the SLAM-family N-terminal Ig-variable domain responsible for the homophilic and heterophilic interactions that trigger signalling. UL7 is transcribed with early-late kinetics during the lytic infectious cycle. Using a mAb generated against the viral protein, we show that it is constitutively shed, through its mucine-like stalk, from the cell-surface. Production of soluble UL7 is enhanced by PMA and reduced by a broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor. Although UL7 does not hold the ability to interact with CD229 or other SLAM-family members, it shares with them the capacity to mediate adhesion to leukocytes, specifically to monocyte-derived DCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that UL7 expression attenuates the production of proinflammatory cytokines TNF, IL-8 and IL-6 in DCs and myeloid cell lines. Thus, the ability of UL7 to interfere with cellular proinflammatory responses may contribute to viral persistence. These results enhance our understanding of those HCMV-encoded molecules involved in sustaining the balance between HCMV and the host immune system.

  7. Human and viral interleukin-6 and other cytokines in Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus-associated multicentric Castleman disease

    PubMed Central

    Uldrick, Thomas S.; Wang, Victoria; Aleman, Karen; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Marshall, Vickie; Pittaluga, Stefania; O’Mahony, Deirdre; Whitby, Denise; Tosato, Giovanna; Steinberg, Seth M.; Little, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV)-associated multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a polyclonal B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Human (h) IL-6 and a KSHV-encoded homolog, viral IL-6, have been hypothesized to contribute to its pathogenesis, but their relative contributions to disease activity is not well understood. We prospectively characterized KSHV viral load (VL), viral (v) and hIL-6, and other cytokines during KSHV-MCD flare and remission in 21 patients with 34 flares and 20 remissions. KSHV-VL, vIL-6, hIL-6, IL-10, and to a lesser extent TNF-α, and IL-1β were each elevated during initial flares compared with remission. Flares fell into 3 distinct IL-6 profiles: those associated with elevations of vIL6-only (2 flares, 6%), hIL-6 elevations only (17 flares, 50%), and elevations in both hIL-6 and vIL-6 (13 flares, 38%). Compared with hIL-6–only flares, flares with elevated hIL-6 plus vIL-6 exhibited higher C-reactive protein (CRP) (P = .0009); worse hyponatremia (P = .02); higher KSHV VL (P = .016), and higher IL-10 (P = .012). This analysis shows vIL-6 and hIL-6 can independently or together lead to KSHV-MCD flares, and suggests that vIL-6 and hIL-6 may jointly contribute to disease severity. These findings have implications for the development of novel KSHV-MCD therapies targeting IL-6 and its downstream signaling. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT099073. PMID:24174627

  8. Whole Cigarette Smoke Increased the Expression of TLRs, HBDs, and Proinflammory Cytokines by Human Gingival Epithelial Cells through Different Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Semlali, Abdelhabib; Witoled, Chmielewski; Alanazi, Mohammed; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    The gingival epithelium is becoming known as a regulator of the oral innate immune responses to a variety of insults such as bacteria and chemicals, including those chemicals found in cigarette smoke. We investigated the effects of whole cigarette smoke on cell-surface-expressed Toll-like receptors (TLR)-2, −4 and −6, human β-defensin (HBD) and proinflammatory cytokine expression and production in primary human gingival epithelial cells. Whole cigarette smoke was shown to increase TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 expression. Cigarette smoke led to ERK1/2, p38 and JNK phosphorylation in conjunction with nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) translocation into the nucleus. TLR expression following cigarette smoke exposure was down regulated by the use of ERK1/2, p38, JNK MAP kinases, and NFκB inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of these signaling pathways in the cellular response against cigarette smoke. Cigarette smoke also promoted HBD2, HBD3, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression through the ERK1/2 and NFκB pathways. Interestingly, the modulation of TLR, HBD, and cytokine expression was maintained long after the gingival epithelial cells were exposed to smoke. By promoting TLR, HBDs, and proinflammatory cytokine expression and production, cigarette smoke may contribute to innate immunity dysregulation, which may have a negative effect on human health. PMID:23300722

  9. Whole cigarette smoke increased the expression of TLRs, HBDs, and proinflammory cytokines by human gingival epithelial cells through different signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Semlali, Abdelhabib; Witoled, Chmielewski; Alanazi, Mohammed; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    The gingival epithelium is becoming known as a regulator of the oral innate immune responses to a variety of insults such as bacteria and chemicals, including those chemicals found in cigarette smoke. We investigated the effects of whole cigarette smoke on cell-surface-expressed Toll-like receptors (TLR)-2, -4 and -6, human β-defensin (HBD) and proinflammatory cytokine expression and production in primary human gingival epithelial cells. Whole cigarette smoke was shown to increase TLR2, TLR4 and TLR6 expression. Cigarette smoke led to ERK1/2, p38 and JNK phosphorylation in conjunction with nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) translocation into the nucleus. TLR expression following cigarette smoke exposure was down regulated by the use of ERK1/2, p38, JNK MAP kinases, and NFκB inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of these signaling pathways in the cellular response against cigarette smoke. Cigarette smoke also promoted HBD2, HBD3, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression through the ERK1/2 and NFκB pathways. Interestingly, the modulation of TLR, HBD, and cytokine expression was maintained long after the gingival epithelial cells were exposed to smoke. By promoting TLR, HBDs, and proinflammatory cytokine expression and production, cigarette smoke may contribute to innate immunity dysregulation, which may have a negative effect on human health.

  10. Stat6-Dependent Inhibition of Mincle Expression in Mouse and Human Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Th2 Cytokine IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Hupfer, Thomas; Schick, Judith; Jozefowski, Katrin; Voehringer, David; Ostrop, Jenny; Lang, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) Mincle, Mcl, and Dectin-2 bind mycobacterial and fungal cell wall glycolipids and carbohydrates. Recently, we described that expression of these CLR is downregulated during differentiation of human monocytes to dendritic cells (DC) in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4. Here, we demonstrate that the Th2 cytokine IL-4 specifically inhibits expression of Mincle, Mcl, and Dectin-2 in human antigen-presenting cells (APC). This inhibitory effect of IL-4 was observed across species, as murine macrophages and DC treated with IL-4 also downregulated these receptors. IL-4 blocked upregulation of Mincle and Mcl mRNA expression and cell surface protein by murine macrophages in response to the Mincle ligand Trehalose-6,6-dibehenate (TDB), whereas the TLR4 ligand LPS overcame inhibition by IL-4. Functionally, downregulation of Mincle expression by IL-4 was accompanied by reduced cytokine production upon stimulation with TDB. These inhibitory effects of IL-4 were dependent on the transcription factor Stat6. Together, our results show that the key Th2 cytokine IL-4 exerts a negative effect on the expression of Mincle and other Dectin-2 cluster CLR in mouse and human macrophages and DC, which may render these sentinel cells less vigilant for sensing mycobacterial and fungal ligands. PMID:27790218

  11. Coculturing human endometrial epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts alters cell-specific gene expression and cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph C.; Erikson, David W.; Piltonen, Terhi T.; Meyer, Michelle R.; Barragan, Fatima; McIntire, Ramsey H.; Tamaresis, John S.; Vo, Kim Chi; Giudice, Linda C.; Irwin, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of coculturing endometrial epithelial cells (eEC) with paired endometrial stromal fibroblasts (eSF) on cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion patterns. Design In vitro study. Setting University research laboratory. Patient(s) Endometrial biopsies were obtained from premenopausal women. Intervention(s) Polarized eEC and subject-paired eSF were cultured for 12.5 hours alone (monoculture) or combined in a two-chamber coculture system without cell-cell contact. Cells and conditioned media were analyzed for global gene expression and cytokine secretion, respectively. Purified, endometrial tissue-derived eEC and eSF isolated by fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) were used as noncultured controls. Main Outcome Measure(s) Cell-specific global gene expression profiling and analysis of secreted cytokines in eEC/eSF cocultures and respective monocultures. Result(s) Transepithelial resistance, diffusible tracer exclusion, expression of tight junction proteins, and apical/basolateral vectorial secretion confirmed eEC structural and functional polarization. Distinct transcriptomes of eEC and eSF were consistent with their respective lineages and their endometrial origin. Coculture of eEC with eSF resulted in altered cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion. Conclusion(s) This coculture model provides evidence that interactions between endometrial functionally polarized epithelium and stromal fibroblasts affect cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion underscoring their relevance when modeling endometrium in vitro. PMID:23849844

  12. Response surface methodology to determine optimal cytokine responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after smallpox vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Jenna E.; Dhiman, Neelam; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Poland, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Feasibility, amount of sample aliquots, processing time and cost are critical considerations for optimizing and conducting assays for large-population based studies. Well designed statistical approaches that quickly identify optimal conditions for a given assay could assist efficient completion of the laboratory assays for such studies. For example, assessment of the profile of secreted cytokines is important in understanding the immune response after vaccination. To characterize the cytokine immune response following smallpox vaccination, PBMC obtained from recently vaccinated subjects were stimulated with varying doses of live or UV-inactivated vaccinia virus and cultured for up to 8 days. In this paper, we describe a novel statistical method to identify optimal operating conditions for length in culture and virus MOI in order to measure a panel of secreted Th1, Th2, and inflammatory cytokines. This statistical method is comprised of two components. It first identifies a subset of the possible time in culture by virus MOI combinations to be studied. It then utilizes response surface analysis techniques to predict the optimal operating conditions for the measurement of each secreted cytokine. This method was applied, and the predicted optimal combinations of length in culture and virus MOI for maximum vaccinia-specific cytokine secretion were identified. The use of the response surface methodology can be applied to the optimization of other laboratory assays; especially when the number of PBMC available limits the testing of all possible combinations of parameters. PMID:19038260

  13. Cell-free culture supernatant of Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 decreases pro-inflammatory cytokines in human dendritic cells challenged with Salmonella typhi through TLR activation.

    PubMed

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Muñoz-Quezada, Sergio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Matencio, Esther; Bernal, Maria J; Romero, Fernando; Gil, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) constitute the first point of contact between gut commensals and our immune system. Despite growing evidence of the immunomodulatory effects of probiotics, the interactions between the cells of the intestinal immune system and bacteria remain largely unknown. Indeed,, the aim of this work was to determine whether the probiotic Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and its cell-free culture supernatant (CFS) have immunomodulatory effects in human intestinal-like dendritic cells (DCs) and how they respond to the pathogenic bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, and also to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in these interactions. Human DCs were directly challenged with B. breve/CFS, S. typhi or a combination of these stimuli for 4 h. The expression pattern of genes involved in Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway and cytokine secretion was analyzed. CFS decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human intestinal DCs challenged with S. typhi. In contrast, the B. breve CNCM I-4035 probiotic strain was a potent inducer of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines tested, i.e., TNF-α, IL-8 and RANTES, as well as anti-inflammatory cytokines including IL-10. CFS restored TGF-β levels in the presence of Salmonella. Live B.breve and its supernatant enhanced innate immune responses by the activation of TLR signaling pathway. These treatments upregulated TLR9 gene transcription. In addition, CFS was a more potent inducer of TLR9 expression than the probiotic bacteria in the presence of S. typhi. Expression levels of CASP8 and IRAK4 were also increased by CFS, and both treatments induced TOLLIP gene expression. Our results indicate that the probiotic strain B. breve CNCM I-4035 affects the intestinal immune response, whereas its supernatant exerts anti-inflammatory effects mediated by DCs. This supernatant may protect immune system from highly infectious agents such as Salmonella typhi and can down-regulate pro

  14. Caspase‐8 regulates the expression of pro‐ and anti‐inflammatory cytokines in human bone marrow‐derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Siv H.; Westhrin, Marita; Zahoor, Muhammad; Nørgaard, Nikolai N.; Hella, Hanne; Størdal, Berit; Sundan, Anders; Nilsen, Nadra J.; Sponaas, Anne‐Marit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Mesenchymal stem cells, also called mesenchymal stromal cells, MSCs, have great potential in stem cell therapy partly due to their immunosuppressive properties. How these cells respond to chronic inflammatory stimuli is therefore of importance. Toll‐like receptors (TLR)s are innate immune receptors that mediate inflammatory signals in response to infection, stress, and damage. Caspase‐8 is involved in activation of NF‐kB downstream of TLRs in immune cells. Here we investigated the role of caspase‐8 in regulating TLR‐induced cytokine production from human bone marrow‐derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSCs). Methods Cytokine expression in hBMCs in response to poly(I:C) and LPS was evaluated by PCR, multiplex cytokine assay, and ELISA. TLR3, TRIF, and caspase‐8 were silenced using siRNA. Caspase‐8 was also inhibited using a caspase‐8 inhibitor, z‐IEDT. Results We found that TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) and TLR4 agonist LPS induced secretion of several pro‐inflammatory cytokines in a TLR‐dependent manner which required the TLR signaling adaptor molecule TRIF. Further, poly(I:C) reduced the expression of anti‐inflammatory cytokines HGF and TGFβ whereas LPS reduced HGF expression only. Notably, caspase‐8 was involved in the induction of IL‐ IL‐1β, IL‐6, CXCL10, and in the inhibition of HGF and TGFβ. Conclusion Caspase‐8 appears to modulate hBMSCs into gaining a pro‐inflammatory phenotype. Therefore, inhibiting caspase‐8 in hBMSCs might promote an immunosuppressive phenotype which could be useful in clinical applications to treat inflammatory disorders. PMID:27621815

  15. Suggestive evidence of a multi-cytokine resistin pathway in humans and its role on cardiovascular events in high-risk individuals

    PubMed Central

    Menzaghi, Claudia; Marucci, Antonella; Antonucci, Alessandra; De Bonis, Concetta; Ortega Moreno, Lorena; Salvemini, Lucia; Copetti, Massimiliano; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Di Paola, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    In cells and tissues resistin affects IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and TNF-α expression, thus suggesting the existence of a multi-cytokine “resistin pathway”. We investigated whether such pathway does exist in humans and, if so, if it is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Serum cytokines were measured in 280 healthy subjects from the Gargano Study 2 (GS2) whose BMI, waist circumference, HOMAIR, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure data were available and in 353 patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease from the Gargano Heart Study (GHS)-prospective design (follow-up 5.4 ± 2.5 years; 71 MACE). In GS2, cytokines mRNA levels in white blood cells were also measured. In GS2, resistin mRNA was correlated with all cytokines expression (all p < 0.001), but IL-12B. Consistently, serum resistin was correlated with all serum cytokines (all p < 0.001), but IL-12. Expression (eRPS) and serum (sRPS) resistin pathway scores (excluding IL-12) were each other correlated (p < 0.001) and both associated with cardiovascular risk factors (all p < 0.01). In GHS, sRPS was independently associated with MACE (HR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.10–1.90). Our data indicate the existence of a resistin pathway, which is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and which strongly and independently predicts MACE. PMID:28290549

  16. Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and cytokine gene expression in myeloid cells by NF-kappa B/Rel transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Roulston, A; Lin, R; Beauparlant, P; Wainberg, M A; Hiscott, J

    1995-01-01

    CD4+ macrophages in tissues such as lung, skin, and lymph nodes, promyelocytic cells in bone marrow, and peripheral blood monocytes serve as important targets and reservoirs for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. HIV-1-infected myeloid cells are often diminished in their ability to participate in chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and intracellular killing. HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells can lead to the expression of surface receptors associated with cellular activation and/or differentiation that increase the responsiveness of these cells to cytokines secreted by neighboring cells as well as to bacteria or other pathogens. Enhancement of HIV-1 replication is related in part to increased DNA-binding activity of cellular transcription factors such as NF-kappa B. NF-kappa B binds to the HIV-1 enhancer region of the long terminal repeat and contributes to the inducibility of HIV-1 gene expression in response to multiple activating agents. Phosphorylation and degradation of the cytoplasmic inhibitor I kappa B alpha are crucial regulatory events in the activation of NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity. Both N- and C-terminal residues of I kappa B alpha are required for inducer-mediated degradation. Chronic HIV-1 infection of myeloid cells leads to constitutive NF-kappa B DNA-binding activity and provides an intranuclear environment capable of perpetuating HIV-1 replication. Increased intracellular stores of latent NF-kappa B may also result in rapid inducibility of NF-kappa B-dependent cytokine gene expression. In response to secondary pathogenic infections or antigenic challenge, cytokine gene expression is rapidly induced, enhanced, and sustained over prolonged periods in HIV-1-infected myeloid cells compared with uninfected cells. Elevated levels of several inflammatory cytokines have been detected in the sera of HIV-1-infected individuals. Secretion of myeloid cell-derived cytokines may both increase virus production and contribute to AIDS

  17. Cytokines and microbicidal molecules regulated by IL-32 in THP-1-derived human macrophages infected with New World Leishmania species

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Jéssica Cristina; Heinhuis, Bas; Gomes, Rodrigo Saar; Damen, Michelle S. M. A.; Real, Fernando; Mortara, Renato A.; Keating, Samuel T.; Dinarello, Charles A.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Ribeiro-Dias, Fátima

    2017-01-01

    Background Interleukin-32 (IL-32) is expressed in lesions of patients with American Tegumentary Leishmaniasis (ATL), but its precise role in the disease remains unknown. Methodology/Principal findings In the present study, silencing and overexpression of IL-32 was performed in THP-1-derived macrophages infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis or L. (Leishmania) amazonensis to investigate the role of IL-32 in infection. We report that Leishmania species induces IL-32γ, and show that intracellular IL-32γ protein production is dependent on endogenous TNFα. Silencing or overexpression of IL-32 demonstrated that this cytokine is closely related to TNFα and IL-8. Remarkably, the infection index was augmented in the absence of IL-32 and decreased in cells overexpressing this cytokine. Mechanistically, these effects can be explained by nitric oxide cathelicidin and β-defensin 2 production regulated by IL-32. Conclusions Thus, endogenous IL-32 is a crucial cytokine involved in the host defense against Leishmania parasites. PMID:28241012

  18. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  19. Steroid synthesis by primary human keratinocytes; implications for skin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hannen, Rosalind F.; Michael, Anthony E.; Jaulim, Adil; Bhogal, Ranjit; Burrin, Jacky M.; Philpott, Michael P.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Primary keratinocytes express the steroid enzymes required for cortisol synthesis. {yields} Normal primary human keratinocytes can synthesise cortisol. {yields} Steroidogenic regulators, StAR and MLN64, are expressed in normal epidermis. {yields} StAR expression is down regulated in eczema and psoriatic epidermis. -- Abstract: Cortisol-based therapy is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory treatments available for skin conditions including psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. Previous studies have investigated the steroidogenic capabilities of keratinocytes, though none have demonstrated that these skin cells, which form up to 90% of the epidermis are able to synthesise cortisol. Here we demonstrate that primary human keratinocytes (PHK) express all the elements required for cortisol steroidogenesis and metabolise pregnenolone through each intermediate steroid to cortisol. We show that normal epidermis and cultured PHK express each of the enzymes (CYP11A1, CYP17A1, 3{beta}HSD1, CYP21 and CYP11B1) that are required for cortisol synthesis. These enzymes were shown to be metabolically active for cortisol synthesis since radiometric conversion assays traced the metabolism of [7-{sup 3}H]-pregnenolone through each steroid intermediate to [7-{sup 3}H]-cortisol in cultured PHK. Trilostane (a 3{beta}HSD1 inhibitor) and ketoconazole (a CYP17A1 inhibitor) blocked the metabolism of both pregnenolone and progesterone. Finally, we show that normal skin expresses two cholesterol transporters, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), regarded as the rate-determining protein for steroid synthesis, and metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) whose function has been linked to cholesterol transport in steroidogenesis. The expression of StAR and MLN64 was aberrant in two skin disorders, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, that are commonly treated with cortisol, suggesting dysregulation of epidermal steroid synthesis in these patients. Collectively these data

  20. Human Lymph Node-Derived Fibroblastic and Double-Negative Reticular Cells Alter Their Chemokines and Cytokines Expression Profile Following Inflammatory Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Severino, Patricia; Palomino, Diana Torres; Alvarenga, Heliene; Almeida, Camila Bononi; Pasqualim, Denise Cunha; Cury, Adriano; Salvalaggio, Paolo Rogério; De Vasconcelos Macedo, Antonio Luiz; Andrade, Maria Claudina; Aloia, Thiago; Bromberg, Silvio; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Rocha, Fernanda Agostini; Marti, Luciana C

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node (LN) is a secondary lymphoid organ with highly organized and compartmentalized structure. LNs harbor B, T, and other cells among fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs). FRCs are characterized by both podoplanin (PDPN/gp38) expression and by the lack of CD31 expression. FRCs are involved in several immune response processes but mechanisms underlying their function are still under investigation. Double-negative cells (DNCs), another cell population within LNs, are even less understood. They do not express PDPN or CD31, their localization within the LN is unknown, and their phenotype and function remain to be elucidated. This study evaluates the gene expression and cytokines and chemokines profile of human LN-derived FRCs and DNCs during homeostasis and following inflammatory stimuli. Cytokines and chemokines secreted by human FRCs and DNCs partially diverged from those identified in murine models that used similar stimulation. Cytokine and chemokine secretion and their receptors expression levels differed between stimulated DNCs and FRCs, with FRCs expressing a broader range of chemokines. Additionally, dendritic cells demonstrated increased migration toward FRCs, possibly due to chemokine-induced chemotaxis since migration was significantly decreased upon neutralization of secreted CCL2 and CCL20. Our study contributes to the understanding of the biology and functions of FRCs and DNCs and, accordingly, of the mechanisms involving them in immune cells activation and migration.

  1. Human Lymph Node-Derived Fibroblastic and Double-Negative Reticular Cells Alter Their Chemokines and Cytokines Expression Profile Following Inflammatory Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Severino, Patricia; Palomino, Diana Torres; Alvarenga, Heliene; Almeida, Camila Bononi; Pasqualim, Denise Cunha; Cury, Adriano; Salvalaggio, Paolo Rogério; De Vasconcelos Macedo, Antonio Luiz; Andrade, Maria Claudina; Aloia, Thiago; Bromberg, Silvio; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Rocha, Fernanda Agostini; Marti, Luciana C.

    2017-01-01

    Lymph node (LN) is a secondary lymphoid organ with highly organized and compartmentalized structure. LNs harbor B, T, and other cells among fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs). FRCs are characterized by both podoplanin (PDPN/gp38) expression and by the lack of CD31 expression. FRCs are involved in several immune response processes but mechanisms underlying their function are still under investigation. Double-negative cells (DNCs), another cell population within LNs, are even less understood. They do not express PDPN or CD31, their localization within the LN is unknown, and their phenotype and function remain to be elucidated. This study evaluates the gene expression and cytokines and chemokines profile of human LN-derived FRCs and DNCs during homeostasis and following inflammatory stimuli. Cytokines and chemokines secreted by human FRCs and DNCs partially diverged from those identified in murine models that used similar stimulation. Cytokine and chemokine secretion and their receptors expression levels differed between stimulated DNCs and FRCs, with FRCs expressing a broader range of chemokines. Additionally, dendritic cells demonstrated increased migration toward FRCs, possibly due to chemokine-induced chemotaxis since migration was significantly decreased upon neutralization of secreted CCL2 and CCL20. Our study contributes to the understanding of the biology and functions of FRCs and DNCs and, accordingly, of the mechanisms involving them in immune cells activation and migration. PMID:28261205

  2. Resistance/susceptibility to Echinococcus multilocularis infection and cytokine profile in humans. I. Comparison of patients with progressive and abortive lesions.

    PubMed

    Godot, V; Harraga, S; Beurton, I; Deschaseaux, M; Sarciron, E; Gottstein, B; Vuitton, D A

    2000-09-01

    To clarify the role of Th1- and Th2-type cytokines in the various outcomes of human alveolar echinococcosis (AE), the cytokine immune response of self-cured patients was studied and compared with those of progressive AE patients and healthy subjects. Self-cured patients were divided into two groups according to the following clinical features: subjects who had positive Echinococcus multilocularis serologies and hepatic calcifications typical of AE were classified as 'abortive AE' patients, and those who had positive E. multilocularis serologies but no hepatic lesions or calcifications detectable by ultrasonography were classified as 'positive serology' subjects. Secretions of IL-5, IL-10 and interferon-gamma, and expression of IL-5 mRNA were evaluated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated in vitro with the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin-C or specific E. multilocularis antigenic preparations. The cytokine profile of abortive AE patients was the opposite of that observed in progressive AE patients. An intermediate profile was observed in positive serology subjects. PBMC from abortive AE patients, whether non-stimulated or stimulated with PHA and antigenic preparations, secreted significantly lower levels of IL-10 than those isolated from progressive AE patients. Our observations seem to confirm the regulatory role of IL-10 in the immunopathology of human AE.

  3. Vaccenic acid-mediated reduction in cytokine production is independent of c9,t11-CLA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Jaudszus, Anke; Jahreis, Gerhard; Schlörmann, Wiebke; Fischer, Janine; Kramer, Ronny; Degen, Christian; Rohrer, Carsten; Roth, Alexander; Gabriel, Holger; Barz, Dagmar; Gruen, Michael

    2012-10-01

    The ruminant trans fatty acid vaccenic acid (tVA) favorably alters markers of inflammation. However, it is not yet clear whether these effects are attributed to its endogenous partial conversion to c9,t11-CLA, which is known to possess anti-inflammatory properties. We compared the cytokine reducing potential of tVA to c9,t11-CLA in human T-helper (Th) cells as a main source of cytokine production during inflammation. Secondly, we assessed whether a bioconversion of tVA to c9,t11-CLA via stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) encoded activity takes place in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in order to relate the outcomes of intracellular cytokine measurement to the degree of conversion. TVA reduced the percentage of both IL-2 and TNF-α expressing Th cells significantly, but to a lesser extent compared to c9,t11-CLA, as determined by flow cytometry after alloreactive stimulation of PBMC. Pre-treatment with the selective PPARγ antagonist T0070907 largely re-established the IL-2 and TNF-α positive Th cell population in both tVA and c9,t11-CLA treated cultures. Interestingly, while the portion of tVA dose-dependently increased within the cellular lipid fraction, the initially marginal amount of c9,t11-CLA remained unaltered. However, SCD mRNA although abundantly expressed in PBMC was not regulated by tVA. Conclusively, these results suggest that the cytokine reducing effect of tVA in human T cells is independent of c9,t11-CLA, since no bioconversion occurred. Moreover, the data provide evidence that tVA mechanistically acts in a manner similar to c9,t11-CLA.

  4. Kinetic interaction analysis of human interleukin 5 receptor alpha mutants reveals a unique binding topology and charge distribution for cytokine recognition.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Tetsuya; Pasut, Gianfranco; Scibek, Jeffery; Chaiken, Irwin

    2004-03-05

    Human interleukin 5 receptor alpha (IL5Ralpha) comprises three fibronectin type III domains (D1, D2, and D3) in the extracellular region. Previous results have indicated that residues in the D1D2 domains are crucial for high affinity interaction with human interleukin 5 (IL5). Yet, it is the D2D3 domains that have sequence homology with the classic cytokine recognition motif that is generally assumed to be the minimum cytokine-recognizing unit. In the present study, we used kinetic interaction analysis of alanine-scanning mutational variants of IL5Ralpha to define the residues involved in IL5 recognition. Soluble forms of IL5Ralpha variants were expressed in S2 cells, selectively captured via their C-terminal V5 tag by anti-V5 tag antibody immobilized onto the sensor chip and examined for IL5 interaction by using a sandwich surface plasmon resonance biosensor method. Marked effects on the interaction kinetics were observed not only in D1 (Asp(55), Asp(56), and Glu(58)) and D2 (Lys(186) and Arg(188)) domains, but also in the D3 (Arg(297)) domain. Modeling of the tertiary structure of IL5Ralpha indicated that these binding residues fell into two clusters. The first cluster consists of D1 domain residues that form a negatively charged patch, whereas the second cluster consists of residues that form a positively charged patch at the interface of D2 and D3 domains. These results suggest that the IL5 x IL5Ralpha system adopts a unique binding topology, in which the cytokine is recognized by a D2D3 tandem domain combined with a D1 domain, to form an extended cytokine recognition interface.

  5. Isoquercitrin suppresses the expression of histamine and pro-inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the activation of MAP Kinases and NF-κB in human KU812 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Guang-Rong; Liu, Chang; Dong, Yin-Mao

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells and basophils are multifunctional effector cells that contain abundant secretory granules in their cytoplasm. Both cell types are involved in a variety of inflammatory and immune events, producing an array of inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines. The aim of the study was to examine whether isoquercitrin modulates allergic and inflammatory reactions in the human basophilic KU812 cells and to elucidate its influence on the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. The KU812 cells were stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate plus the calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI). The inhibitory effects of isoquercitrin on the productions of histamine and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulated KU812 cells were measured using cytokine-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) assays. Western blotting analysis was used to assess the effects of isoquercitrin on the MAPKs and NF-κB protein levels. Our results indicated that the isoquercitrin treatment of PMACI-stimulated KU812 cells significantly reduced the production of histamine and the pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. The treated cells exhibited decreased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), revealing the role of ERK MAPK in isoquercitrin-mediated allergy inhibition. Furthermore, isoquercitrin suppressed the PMACI-mediated activation of NF-κB in the human basophil cells. In conclusion, the results from the present study provide insights into the potential therapeutic use of isoquercitrin for the treatment of inflammatory and allergic reactions.

  6. Temporal induction of pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    PubMed Central

    Kuhnert, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni along with C. coli are major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. So far, the human immune response against Campylobacter is not entirely clear. We hypothesize that it is coordinated by an interaction between pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines which is influenced by bacterial and host-individual differences. Accordingly, we used peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors to study the primary systemic immune response to C. jejuni and C. coli. PBMC were stimulated by different strains of C. jejuni and C. coli for three time points (5, 10, 24 hours). The production of the pro-inflammatory (IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ) and the regulatory (IL-10) cytokines were measured by ELISA. All strains induced higher levels of IL-8 and IL-6 than IFN-γ and IL-10. In contrast to IL-8 and IL-6, IL-10 showed a steeper increase over time. While IFN-γ did not show any further increase between 10 and 24 hours. Interestingly, there was a significant correlation between IL-8 and IL-10 which peaked at 24 hours. Despite the variability of the used bacterial strains, their effect on cytokine production was less pronounced than the inter-person differences. The strongest significant effect of the strain was on the level of IL-10. IL-10 and IL-6 were significantly influenced by strain-person interaction. In conclusion, the systemic immune response to C. coli and C. jejuni is characterized by an early pro-inflammatory reaction with later initiation of regulatory immune response which is influenced mainly by the host, explaining the individual variations in disease severity. Additional work is needed to determine the cellular sources of the produced cytokines as well as the campylobacter molecules that might contribute to this stimulation. PMID:28196097

  7. Differential Induction of Cytokines by Human Neonatal, Adult, and Elderly Monocyte/Macrophages Infected with Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Nereida; Levy, Alegria; Añez, Germán; Marcucci, Rafael; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Immunosuppressive status against infections in monocytes from neonates and elderly subjects has been reported. The interaction between dengue virus and monocytes/macrophages plays an important role during dengue disease. The aim of this study was to determine the cytokine response of monocytes from individuals with different ages after infection with dengue virus. Monocyte/macrophage cultures from neonatal, adult, and elderly subjects (n=10 each group) were incubated with all four dengue virus types (DENV-1 to -4). After 1 and 3 days of culture, cytokine concentrations (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β) were determined in culture supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Increased production of all studied cytokines was induced by the different viral types in monocyte/macrophage cultures regardless of their source. However, lower cytokine concentrations were found in neonatal and elderly monocytes. The relative monocyte/macrophage immunosuppressive status observed in neonates and the elderly could be relevant during dengue infection in those age groups and important in innate and adaptive immunity responses against this virus. PMID:24801946

  8. Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase (NH36) Domains Induce T-Cell Cytokine Responses in Human Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa Santos, Micheli Luize; Nico, Dirlei; de Oliveira, Fabrícia Alvisi; Barreto, Aline Silva; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Iam; Carrillo, Eugenia; Moreno, Javier; de Luca, Paula Mello; Morrot, Alexandre; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Palatnik, Marcos; Bani-Corrêa, Cristiane; de Almeida, Roque Pacheco; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Development of immunoprotection against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) focused on the identification of antigens capable of inducing a Th1 immune response. Alternatively, antigens targeting the CD8 and T-regulatory responses are also relevant in VL pathogenesis and worthy of being included in a preventive human vaccine. We assessed in active and cured patients and VL asymptomatic subjects the clinical signs and cytokine responses to the Leishmania donovani nucleoside hydrolase NH36 antigen and its N-(F1), central (F2) and C-terminal (F3) domains. As markers of VL resistance, the F2 induced the highest levels of IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α and, together with F1, the strongest secretion of IL-17, IL-6, and IL-10 in DTH+ and cured subjects. F2 also promoted the highest frequencies of CD3+CD4+IL-2+TNF-α−IFN-γ−, CD3+CD4+IL-2+TNF-α+IFN-γ−, CD3+CD4+IL-2+TNF-α−IFN-γ+, and CD3+CD4+IL-2+TNF-α+IFN-γ+ T cells in cured and asymptomatic subjects. Consistent with this, the IFN-γ increase was correlated with decreased spleen (R = −0.428, P = 0.05) and liver sizes (R = −0.428, P = 0.05) and with increased hematocrit counts (R = 0.532, P = 0.015) in response to F1 domain, and with increased hematocrit (R = 0.512, P 0.02) and hemoglobin counts (R = 0.434, P = 0.05) in response to F2. Additionally, IL-17 increases were associated with decreased spleen and liver sizes in response to F1 (R = −0.595, P = 0.005) and F2 (R = −0.462, P = 0.04). Conversely, F1 and F3 increased the CD3+CD8+IL-2+TNF-α−IFN-γ−, CD3+CD8+IL-2+TNF-α+IFN-γ−, and CD3+CD8+IL-2+TNF-α+IFN-γ+ T cell frequencies of VL patients correlated with increased spleen and liver sizes and decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit values. Therefore, cure and acquired resistance to VL correlate with the CD4+-Th1 and Th-17 T-cell responses to F2 and F1 domains. Clinical VL outcomes, by contrast, correlate with CD8+ T-cell responses against F3 and F1

  9. Leishmania donovani Nucleoside Hydrolase (NH36) Domains Induce T-Cell Cytokine Responses in Human Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Santos, Micheli Luize; Nico, Dirlei; de Oliveira, Fabrícia Alvisi; Barreto, Aline Silva; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Iam; Carrillo, Eugenia; Moreno, Javier; de Luca, Paula Mello; Morrot, Alexandre; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Palatnik, Marcos; Bani-Corrêa, Cristiane; de Almeida, Roque Pacheco; Palatnik-de-Sousa, Clarisa Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Development of immunoprotection against visceral leishmaniasis (VL) focused on the identification of antigens capable of inducing a Th1 immune response. Alternatively, antigens targeting the CD8 and T-regulatory responses are also relevant in VL pathogenesis and worthy of being included in a preventive human vaccine. We assessed in active and cured patients and VL asymptomatic subjects the clinical signs and cytokine responses to the Leishmania donovani nucleoside hydrolase NH36 antigen and its N-(F1), central (F2) and C-terminal (F3) domains. As markers of VL resistance, the F2 induced the highest levels of IFN-γ, IL-1β, and TNF-α and, together with F1, the strongest secretion of IL-17, IL-6, and IL-10 in DTH(+) and cured subjects. F2 also promoted the highest frequencies of CD3(+)CD4(+)IL-2(+)TNF-α(-)IFN-γ(-), CD3(+)CD4(+)IL-2(+)TNF-α(+)IFN-γ(-), CD3(+)CD4(+)IL-2(+)TNF-α(-)IFN-γ(+), and CD3(+)CD4(+)IL-2(+)TNF-α(+)IFN-γ(+) T cells in cured and asymptomatic subjects. Consistent with this, the IFN-γ increase was correlated with decreased spleen (R = -0.428, P = 0.05) and liver sizes (R = -0.428, P = 0.05) and with increased hematocrit counts (R = 0.532, P = 0.015) in response to F1 domain, and with increased hematocrit (R = 0.512, P 0.02) and hemoglobin counts (R = 0.434, P = 0.05) in response to F2. Additionally, IL-17 increases were associated with decreased spleen and liver sizes in response to F1 (R = -0.595, P = 0.005) and F2 (R = -0.462, P = 0.04). Conversely, F1 and F3 increased the CD3(+)CD8(+)IL-2(+)TNF-α(-)IFN-γ(-), CD3(+)CD8(+)IL-2(+)TNF-α(+)IFN-γ(-), and CD3(+)CD8(+)IL-2(+)TNF-α(+)IFN-γ(+) T cell frequencies of VL patients correlated with increased spleen and liver sizes and decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit values. Therefore, cure and acquired resistance to VL correlate with the CD4(+)-Th1 and Th-17 T-cell responses to F2 and F1 domains. Clinical VL outcomes, by contrast, correlate

  10. Aspergillus Cell Wall Chitin Induces Anti- and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Human PBMCs via the Fc-γ Receptor/Syk/PI3K Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Becker, K. L.; Aimanianda, V.; Wang, X.; Gresnigt, M. S.; Ammerdorffer, A.; Jacobs, C. W.; Gazendam, R. P.; Joosten, L. A. B.; Netea, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chitin is an important cell wall component of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, of which hundreds are inhaled on a daily basis. Previous studies have shown that chitin has both anti- and proinflammatory properties; however the exact mechanisms determining the inflammatory signature of chitin are poorly understood, especially in human immune cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with chitin from Aspergillus fumigatus. Transcription and production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) were measured from the cell culture supernatant by quantitative PCR (qPCR) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Chitin induced an anti-inflammatory signature characterized by the production of IL-1Ra in the presence of human serum, which was abrogated in immunoglobulin-depleted serum. Fc-γ-receptor-dependent recognition and phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized chitin was identified as a novel IL-1Ra-inducing mechanism by chitin. IL-1Ra production induced by chitin was dependent on Syk kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation. In contrast, costimulation of chitin with the pattern recognition receptor (PRR) ligands lipopolysaccharide, Pam3Cys, or muramyl dipeptide, but not β-glucan, had synergistic effects on the induction of proinflammatory cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In conclusion, chitin can have both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties, depending on the presence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and immunoglobulins, thus explaining the various inflammatory signatures reported for chitin. PMID:27247234

  11. [Cytokines in bone diseases. What is cytokine?].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yousuke; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2010-10-01

    Cytokines have an essential role for cell-cell communication. They can regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and function. Interaction of cell surface receptor with cytokines is necessary for control of physiological responses. Activation of cytokine receptors transduces specific signal in the receptor-expressing cells, resulting that cytokines can regulate specific cell population. Thus, cytokines contribute directly or indirectly to morphogenesis, host defense and immune response, play critical roles for homeostasis and development.

  12. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) from human breast milk activates PAR-2 receptors, of the intestinal epithelial cells HT-29, regulating cytokines and defensins.

    PubMed

    Barrera, G J; Tortolero, G Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factors are effector molecules in gastrointestinal tract physiology. Each one improves healing of the gastrointestinal tract. Trefoil factors may be grouped into three classes: the gastric peptides (TFF1), spasmolytic peptide (TFF2) and intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3). Significant amounts of TFF3 are present in human breast milk. Previously, we have reported that trefoil factor 3 isolated from human breast milk produces down regulation of cytokines and promotes human beta defensins expression in intestinal epithelial cells. This study aimed to determine the molecular mechanism involved. Here we showed that the presence of TFF3 strongly correlated with protease activated receptors 2 (PAR-2) activation in human intestinal cells. Intracellular calcium ((Ca2+)i)mobilization was induced by the treatment with: 1) TFF3, 2) synthetic PAR-2 agonist peptide. The co-treatment with a synthetic PAR-2 antagonist peptide and TFF3 eliminates the latter's effect. Additionally, we demonstrated the existence of interactions among TFF3 and PAR-2 receptors through far Western blot and co-precipitation. Finally, down regulation of PAR-2 by siRNA resulted in a decrease of TFF3 induced intracellular (Ca2+)i mobilization, cytokine regulation and defensins expression. These findings suggest that TFF3 activates intestinal cells through PAR-2 (Fig. 4, Ref. 19).

  13. Human and mouse monocytes display distinct signalling and cytokine profiles upon stimulation with FFAR2/FFAR3 short-chain fatty acid receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Zhiwei; Er, Jun Zhi; Tan, Nguan Soon; Lu, Jinhua; Liou, Yih-Cherng; Grosse, Johannes; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2016-01-01

    Knockout mice studies implicate the mammalian short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) receptors, FFAR2 and FFAR3– in colitis, arthritis and asthma. However, the correlation with human biology is uncertain. Here, we detected FFAR2 and FFAR3 expression in human monocytes via immunohistochemistry. Upon treatment with acetate SCFA or FFAR2- and FFAR3-specific synthetic agonists, human monocytes displayed elevated p38 phosphorylation and attenuated C5, CCL1, CCL2, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-1β and ICAM-1 inflammatory cytokine expression. Acetate and FFAR2 agonist treatment also repressed Akt and ERK2 signalling. Surprisingly, mouse monocytes displayed a distinct response to acetate treatment, elevating GM-CSF, IL-1α, and IL-1β cytokine expression. This effect persisted in FFAR2/3-knockout mouse monocytes and was not reproduced by synthetic agonists, suggesting a FFAR2/3 independent mechanism in mice. Collectively, we show that SCFAs act via FFAR2/3 to modulate human monocyte inflammatory responses– a pathway that is absent in mouse monocytes. PMID:27667443

  14. Differential effects of nitro-PAHs and amino-PAHs on cytokine and chemokine responses in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ovrevik, J.; Arlt, V.M.; Oya, E.; Nagy, E.; Mollerup, S.; Phillips, D.H.; Lag, M.; Holme, J.A.

    2010-02-01

    Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) are found in diesel exhaust and air pollution particles. Along with other PAHs, many nitro-PAHs possess mutagenic and carcinogenic properties, but their effects on pro-inflammatory processes and cell death are less known. In the present study we examined the effects of 1-nitropyrene (1-NP), 3-nitrofluoranthene (3-NF) and 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) and their corresponding amino forms, 1-AP, 3-AF and 3-ABA, in human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells. The effects of the different nitro- and amino-PAHs were compared to the well-characterized PAH benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). Expression of 17 cytokine and chemokine genes, measured by real-time PCR, showed that 1-NP and 3-NF induced a completely different cytokine/chemokine gene expression pattern to that of their amino analogues. 1-NP/3-NF-induced responses were dominated by maximum effects on CXCL8 (IL-8) and TNF-alpha expression, while 1-AP-/3-AF-induced responses were dominated by CCL5 (RANTES) and CXCL10 (IP-10) expression. 3-NBA and 3-ABA induced only marginal cytokine/chemokine responses. However, 3-NBA exposure induced considerable DNA damage resulting in accumulation of cells in S-phase and a marked increase in apoptosis. B[a]P was the only compound to induce expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-regulated genes, such as CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, but did not induce cytokine/chemokine responses in BEAS-2B cells. Importantly, nitro-PAHs and amino-PAHs induced both qualitatively and quantitatively different effects on cytokine/chemokine expression, DNA damage, cell cycle alterations and cytotoxicity. The cytokine/chemokine responses appeared to be triggered, at least partly, through mechanisms separate from the other examined endpoints. These results confirm and extend previous studies indicating that certain nitro-PAHs have a considerable pro-inflammatory potential.

  15. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  16. Systemic Cytokine Levels Do Not Predict CD4+ T-Cell Recovery After Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Philip J.; Zhang, Jinbing; Worlock, Andrew; Nair, Sangeetha V.; Anastos, Kathryn; Minkoff, Howard L.; Villacres, Maria C.; Young, Mary; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Desai, Seema; Landay, Alan L.; Gange, Stephen J.; Nugent, C. Thomas; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Keating, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Subjects on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) who do not achieve robust reconstitution of CD4+ T cells face higher risk of complications and death. We studied participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study with good (immunological responder [IR]) or poor (immunological nonresponder [INR]) CD4+ T-cell recovery after suppressive cART (n = 50 per group) to determine whether cytokine levels or low-level viral load correlated with INR status. Methods. A baseline sample prior to viral control and 2 subsequent samples 1 and 2 years after viral control were tested. Serum levels of 30 cytokines were measured at each time point, and low-level human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels were measured 2 years after viral suppression. Results. There were minimal differences in cytokine levels between IR and INR subjects. At baseline, macrophage inflammatory protein-3β levels were higher in IR subjects; after 1 year of suppressive cART, soluble vascular endothelial growth factor-R3 levels were higher in IR subjects; and after 2 years of suppressive cART, interferon gamma-induced protein 10 levels were higher in INR subjects. Very low-level HIV viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels did not differ between IR and INR subjects. Conclusions. These results imply that targeting residual viral replication might not be the optimum therapeutic approach for INR subjects. PMID:26966697

  17. Novel lentiviral vectors displaying "early-acting cytokines" selectively promote survival and transduction of NOD/SCID repopulating human hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Verhoeyen, Els; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Olivier, Delphine; Izac, Brigitte; Trono, Didier; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2005-11-15

    A major limitation of current lentiviral vectors (LVs) is their inability to govern efficient gene transfer into quiescent cells, such as human CD34(+) cells, that reside in the G(0) phase of the cell cycle and that are highly enriched in hematopoietic stem cells. This hampers their application for gene therapy of hematopoietic cells. Here, we designed novel LVs that overcome this restriction by displaying "early-acting cytokines" on their surface. Display of thrombopoietin, stem cell factor, or both cytokines on the LV surface allowed efficient gene delivery into quiescent cord blood CD34(+) cells. Moreover, these surface-engineered LVs preferentially transduced and promoted survival of resting CD34(+) cells rather than cycling cells. Finally, and most importantly, these novel LVs allowed superior gene transfer in the most immature CD34(+) cells as compared to conventional LVs, even when the latter vectors were used to transduce cells in the presence of recombinant cytokines. This was demonstrated by their capacity to promote selective transduction of CD34(+) cell in in vitro derived long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) colonies and of long-term NOD/SCID repopulating cells (SRCs) in vivo.

  18. Automatic acoustic synthesis of human-like laughter.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Shiva; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2007-01-01

    A technique to synthesize laughter based on time-domain behavior of real instances of human laughter is presented. In the speech synthesis community, interest in improving the expressive quality of synthetic speech has grown considerably. While the focus has been on the linguistic aspects, such as precise control of speech intonation to achieve desired expressiveness, inclusion of nonlinguistic cues could further enhance the expressive quality of synthetic speech. Laughter is one such cue used for communicating, say, a happy or amusing context. It can be generated in many varieties and qualities: from a short exhalation to a long full-blown episode. Laughter is modeled at two levels, the overall episode level and at the local call level. The first attempts to capture the overall temporal behavior in a parametric model based on the equations that govern the simple harmonic motion of a mass-spring system is presented. By changing a set of easily available parameters, the authors are able to synthesize a variety of laughter. At the call level, the authors relied on a standard linear prediction based analysis-synthesis model. Results of subjective tests to assess the acceptability and naturalness of the synthetic laughter relative to real human laughter samples are presented.

  19. Suppression of proinflammatory cytokines in monocytes by a tetravalent guanylhydrazone

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    An overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines by activated macrophages/monocytes mediates the injurious sequelae of inflammation, septic shock, tissue injury, and cachexia. We recently synthesized a tetravalent guanylhydrazone compound (CNI-1493) that inhibits cytokine- inducible arginine transport and nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages, and protects mice against lethal endotoxemia and carrageenan-induced inflammation. During these investigations we noticed that CNI-1493 effectively prevented lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- induced NO production, even when added in concentrations 10-fold less than required to competitively inhibit L-arginine uptake, suggesting that the suppressive effects of this guanylhydrazone compound might extend to other LPS-induced responses. Here, we report that CNI-1493 suppressed the LPS-stimulated production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF], interleukins 1beta and 6, macrophage inflammatory proteins 1alpha and 1beta) from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cytokine suppression was specific, in that CNI-1493 did not inhibit either the constitutive synthesis of transforming growth factor beta or the upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II by interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). In contrast to the macrophage suppressive actions of dexamethasone, which are overridden in the presence of IFN-gamma, CNI-1493 retained its suppressive effects even in the presence of IFN-gamma. The mechanism of cytokine- suppressive action by CNI-1493 was independent of extracellular L- arginine content and NO production and is not restricted to induction by LPS. As a selective inhibitor of macrophage activation that prevents TNF production, this tetravalent guanylhydrazone could be useful in the development of cytokine-suppressive agents for the treatment of diseases mediated by overproduction of cytokines. PMID:8642296

  20. Inflammatory Cytokine Expression and Sebum Production after Exposure of Cultured Human Sebocytes to Ultraviolet A Radiation and Light at Wavelengths of 650 nm and 830 nm

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Soo Yuhl; Ryu, Hyo Sub; Jang, Yong Hyun; Lee, Seok-Jong; Kim, Do Won

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, visible light, or infrared light therapy for the treatment of acne is the subject of ongoing scientific debate. Objective This study was conducted to investigate changes in sebum production and the expression of inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), following exposure of cultured human sebocytes to UVA radiation and light at wavelengths of 650 nm and 830 nm. Methods Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays were performed to measure the gene expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α), MMPs (MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-9), and AMPs (psoriasin, hBD-2, hBD-3, and LL-37) in cultured sebocytes after exposure to UVA radiation (2 J/cm2, 3 J/cm2, and 5 J/cm2) and light at wavelengths of 650 nm (14 J/cm2, 29 J/cm2, and 87 J/cm2) and 830 nm (5 J/cm2, 10 J/cm2, and 30 J/cm2). Expression of inflammatory cytokine proteins and sebum production were measured using enzyme-linked immunoassays and a lipid analysis kit, respectively. Results Exposure of cultured sebocytes to UVA radiation and light at wavelengths of 650 nm and 830 nm did not show a significant increase in the expression of inflammatory cytokines, MMPs, or AMPs. Sebum production was not significantly decreased after exposure to UVA radiation and light at both wavelengths. Conclusion We propose that UVA radiation, visible light, and infrared light can be used to target Propionibacterium acnes for the treatment of acne, without an increase in the expression of inflammatory biomarkers and sebum production. PMID:25834355

  1. Hematopoietic factor-induced synthesis of von Willebrand factor by the Dami human megakaryoblastic cell line and by normal human megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S M; Chandrasekhar, C

    1991-01-01

    Identification of hemopoietic factors and the molecular mechanisms by which they regulate the various stages of megakaryocyte development and platelet protein expression has been hampered by the lack of a purified, self-renewing, and responsive biological assay system. Previously, the human megakaryocytic Dami cell line has been shown to differentiate in response to phorbol ester by increasing the expression of platelet membrane glycoproteins Ib, IIb/IIIa, and the platelet protein, von Willebrand Factor (vWF). In this report, we demonstrate that this cell line is a suitable model for investigating the effects of specific cytokines and hemopoietic factors on the terminal differentiation of megakaryocytes as measured by the stimulated biosynthesis of vWF in serum-free culture. Although a low concentration (10 U/ml) of purified recombinant interleukin 3 (IL-3) had no effect, a higher concentration (100 U/ml) stimulated a three- to four fold increase in vWF synthesis. Purified thrombopoiesis-stimulating factor (TSF) alone induced a two- to threefold increase, and when used in combination with 10 U/ml IL-3, TSF induced a synergistic five- to sixfold increase in vWF synthesis. Recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) and human interleukin 6 (IL-6) each induced a twofold increase in vWF, and each acted additively with 10 U/ml IL-3. IL-3 and TSF stimulated similar increases in vWF expression by human megakaryocytes contained in nonadherent bone marrow preparations. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the Dami cell line as a serum-free culture system in which to study the direct effects of purified humoral factors on megakaryocyte and platelet protein synthesis during megakaryocyte maturation.

  2. Influence of growth factors and cytokines on angiogenic function of endothelial progenitor cells: a review of in vitro human studies.

    PubMed

    Peplow, Philip V

    2014-06-01

    Growth factors and cytokines released at sites of injury and inflammation play an important role in stimulating endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) migration to these sites. A comparative analysis of the literature shows under neutral in vitro conditions (pH 7.4), several growth factors and cytokines influenced favorably indices of EPC angiogenic function. They included SDF-1, VEGF, PlGF, FGF-2, NGF and IL-1β. Others, e.g. TNF-α, have an unfavorable influence. SDF-1 and VEGF in combination increased chemotactic cell migration and reduced apoptosis caused by serum starvation. Under acidic conditions (pH 6.5), the biological activity of certain growth factors may be impaired, although TPO, SCF and IL-3 were each able to rescue EPCs from acidic exposure apoptosis, a combination of these three factors stimulated cell proliferation and prevented apoptosis. Possible combinations of growth factors and cytokines together with EPC transplantation may provide for a greater extent of vessel repair and new vessel formation.

  3. Inhibitory effects of amantadine on the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by stimulated in vitro human blood.

    PubMed

    Kubera, Marta; Maes, Michael; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Grygier, Beata; Rogóz, Zofia; Lasoń, Władysław

    2009-01-01

    Treatment with amantadine (AMA), an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist and antidepressant drug, increased the antidepressant activity of subsequent drugs in experimental studies and in patients suffering from treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Recent evidence indicates that depression may be accompanied by activation of an inflammatory response. These data indicate that pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a role in the etiology of depression, particularly in TRD. The present in vitro study shows the ability of AMA, used at concentrations between 10(-7) to 10(-5) M, to reduce the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, specifically interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). In addition, AMA treatment increased the production of the negative immunoregulator, interleukin-10 (IL-10). Furthermore, the combined treatment of AMA with fluoxetine (FLU), but not imipramine (IMI), had a stronger immunomodulatory effect on cytokine production than AMA alone. The above data provide additional rationale for the treatment of patients suffering from depression with a combination of AMA and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

  4. Oligodeoxynucleotide inhibition of Toll-like receptors 3, 7, 8, and 9 suppresses cytokine production in a human rheumatoid arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Sacre, Sandra; Lo, Alexandra; Gregory, Bernard; Stephens, Matthew; Chamberlain, Giselle; Stott, Philip; Brennan, Fionula

    2016-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate immune receptors that respond to both exogenous and endogenous stimuli and are suggested to contribute to the perpetuation of chronic inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, the endosomal TLRs 3, 7, 8, and 9 have more recently been postulated to be of importance in RA pathogenesis. In this study, pan inhibition of the endosomal TLRs by a phosphorothioate-modified inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) is demonstrated in primary human B cells, macrophages, and RA fibroblasts. Inhibition of TLR8 was of particular interest as TLR8 has been associated with RA pathogenesis in both human and murine arthritis models. ODN1411 competitively inhibited TLR8 signaling and was observed to directly bind to a purified TLR8 ectodomain, suggesting inhibition was through a direct interaction with the receptor. Addition of ODN1411 to human RA synovial membrane cultures significantly inhibited spontaneous cytokine production from these cultures, suggesting a potential role for one or more of the endosomal TLRs in inflammatory cytokine production in RA and the potential for inhibitory ODNs as novel therapies.

  5. Extensive characterization of the immunophenotype and pattern of cytokine production by distinct subpopulations of normal human peripheral blood MHC II+/lineage− cells

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, J; Bueno, C; Alguero, M C; Sanchez, M L; Cañizo, M C; Fernandez, M E; Vaquero, J M; Laso, F J; Escribano, L; San Miguel, J F; Orfao, A

    1999-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) represent the most powerful professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the immune system. The aim of the present study was to analyse, on a single-cell basis by multiparametric flow cytometry with simultaneous four-colour staining and a two-step acquisition procedure, the immunophenotypic profile and cytokine production of DC from 67 normal whole peripheral blood (PB) samples. Two clearly different subsets of HLA-II+/lineage− were identified on the basis of their distinct phenotypic characteristics: one DC subset was CD33strong+ and CD123dim+ (0.16 ± 0.06% of the PB nucleated cells and 55.9 ± 11.9% of all PB DC) and the other, CD33dim+ and CD123strong+ (0.12 ± 0.04% of PB nucleated cells and 44.53 ± 11.5% of all PB DC). Moreover, the former DC subpopulation clearly showed higher expression of the CD13 myeloid-associated antigen, the CD29 and CD58 adhesion molecules, the CD2, CD5 and CD86 costimulatory molecules, the CD32 IgG receptor and the CD11c complement receptor. In addition, these cells showed stronger HLA-DR and HLA-DQ expression and a higher reactivity for the IL-6 receptor α-chain (CD126) and for CD38. In contrast, the CD123strong+/CD33dim+ DC showed a stronger reactivity for the CD4 and CD45RA molecules, whereas they did not express the CD58, CD5, CD11c and CD13 antigens. Regarding cytokine production, our results show that while the CD33strong+/CD123dim+ DC are able to produce significant amounts of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β (97 ± 5% of positive cells), IL-6 (96 ± 1.1% of positive cells), IL-12 (81.5 ± 15.5% of positive cells) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (84 ± 22.1% of positive cells) as well as chemokines such as IL-8 (99 ± 1% of positive cells), the functional ability of the CD123strong+/CD33dim+ DC subset to produce cytokines under the same conditions was almost null. Our results therefore clearly show the presence of two distinct subsets of DC in normal human PB, which differ not only in

  6. Heat-killed probiotic bacteria differentially regulate colonic epithelial cell production of human β-defensin-2: dependence on inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Habil, N; Abate, W; Beal, J; Foey, A D

    2014-12-01

    The inducible antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial products is essential to antipathogen responses of gut epithelial cells. Commensal and probiotic bacteria can augment such mucosal defences. Probiotic use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, however, may have adverse effects, boosting inflammatory responses. The aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of selected probiotic strains on hBD-2 production by epithelial cells induced by pathologically relevant pro-inflammatory cytokines and the role of cytokine modulators in controlling hBD-2. Caco-2 colonic intestinal epithelial cells were pre-incubated with heat-killed probiotics, i.e. Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) or Lactobacillus fermentum strain MS15 (LF), followed by stimulation of hBD-2 by interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the absence or presence of exogenous IL-10 or anti-IL-10 neutralising antibody. Cytokines and hBD-2 mRNA and protein were analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. LcS augmented IL-1β-induced hBD-2, whereas LF enhanced TNF-α- and suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. LF enhanced TNF-α-induced TNF-α and suppressed IL-10, whereas augmented IL-1β-induced IL-10. LcS upregulated IL-1β-induced TNF-α mRNA and suppressed IL-10. Endogenous IL-10 differentially regulated hBD-2; neutralisation of IL-10 augmented TNF-α- and suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. Exogenous IL-10, however, suppressed both TNF-α- and IL-1β-induced hBD-2; LcS partially rescued suppression in TNF-α- and IL-1β-stimulation, whereas LF further suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. It can be concluded that probiotic strains differentially regulate hBD-2 mRNA expression and protein secretion, modulation being dictated by inflammatory stimulus and resulting cytokine environment.

  7. Acanthamoeba castellanii Genotype T4 Stimulates the Production of Interleukin-10 as Well as Proinflammatory Cytokines in THP-1 Cells, Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, and Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mattana, Antonella; Sanna, Manuela; Cano, Antonella; Delogu, Giuseppe; Erre, Giuseppe; Roberts, Craig W; Henriquez, Fiona L; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2016-10-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba can cause severe and chronic infections in humans, mainly localized in immune privileged sites, such as the brain and the eye. Monocytes/macrophages are thought to be involved in Acanthamoeba infections, but little is known about how these facultative parasites influence their functions. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of Acanthamoeba on human monocytes/macrophages during the early phase of infection. Here, THP-1 cells, primary human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood, and human monocyte-derived macrophages were either coincubated with trophozoites of a clinical isolate of Acanthamoeba (genotype T4) or stimulated with amoeba-derived cell-free conditioned medium. Production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-12), anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), and chemokine (IL-8) was evaluated at specific hours poststimulation (ranging from 1.5 h to 23 h). We showed that both Acanthamoeba trophozoites and soluble amoebic products induce an early anti-inflammatory monocyte-macrophage phenotype, characterized by significant production of IL-10; furthermore, challenge with either trophozoites or their soluble metabolites stimulate both proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine production, suggesting that this protozoan infection results from the early induction of coexisting, opposed immune responses. Results reported in this paper confirm that the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by monocytes and macrophages can play a role in the development of the inflammatory response during Acanthamoeba infections. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Acanthamoeba stimulates IL-10 production in human innate immune cells, which might both promote the immune evasion of Acanthamoeba and limit the induced inflammatory response.

  8. Acanthamoeba castellanii Genotype T4 Stimulates the Production of Interleukin-10 as Well as Proinflammatory Cytokines in THP-1 Cells, Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, and Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Manuela; Cano, Antonella; Delogu, Giuseppe; Erre, Giuseppe; Roberts, Craig W.; Henriquez, Fiona L.; Fiori, Pier Luigi; Cappuccinelli, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Free-living amoebae of the genus Acanthamoeba can cause severe and chronic infections in humans, mainly localized in immune privileged sites, such as the brain and the eye. Monocytes/macrophages are thought to be involved in Acanthamoeba infections, but little is known about how these facultative parasites influence their functions. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of Acanthamoeba on human monocytes/macrophages during the early phase of infection. Here, THP-1 cells, primary human monocytes isolated from peripheral blood, and human monocyte-derived macrophages were either coincubated with trophozoites of a clinical isolate of Acanthamoeba (genotype T4) or stimulated with amoeba-derived cell-free conditioned medium. Production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and IL-12), anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), and chemokine (IL-8) was evaluated at specific hours poststimulation (ranging from 1.5 h to 23 h). We showed that both Acanthamoeba trophozoites and soluble amoebic products induce an early anti-inflammatory monocyte-macrophage phenotype, characterized by significant production of IL-10; furthermore, challenge with either trophozoites or their soluble metabolites stimulate both proinflammatory cytokines and chemokine production, suggesting that this protozoan infection results from the early induction of coexisting, opposed immune responses. Results reported in this paper confirm that the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by monocytes and macrophages can play a role in the development of the inflammatory response during Acanthamoeba infections. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Acanthamoeba stimulates IL-10 production in human innate immune cells, which might both promote the immune evasion of Acanthamoeba and limit the induced inflammatory response. PMID:27481240

  9. An optimized chemical synthesis of human relaxin-2.

    PubMed

    Barlos, Kostas K; Gatos, Dimitrios; Vasileiou, Zoe; Barlos, Kleomenis

    2010-04-01

    Human gene 2 relaxin (RLX) is a member of the insulin superfamily and is a multi-functional factor playing a vital role in pregnancy, aging, fibrosis, cardioprotection, vasodilation, inflammation, and angiogenesis. RLX is currently applied in clinical trials to cure among others acute heart failure, fibrosis, and preeclampsia. The synthesis of RLX by chemical methods is difficult because of the insolubility of its B-chain and the required laborious and low yielding site-directed combination of its A (RLXA) and B (RLXB) chains. We report here that oxidation of the Met(25) residue of RLXB improves its solubility, allowing its effective solid-phase synthesis and application in random interchain combination reactions with RLXA. Linear Met(O)(25)-RLX B-chain (RLXBO) reacts with a mixture of isomers of bicyclic A-chain (bcRLXA) giving exclusively the native interchain combination. Applying this method Met(O)(25)-RLX (RLXO) was obtained in 62% yield and was easily converted to RLX in 78% yield, by reduction with ammonium iodide.

  10. DNA sequencing of 13 cytokine gene fragments of Aotus infulatus and Saimiri sciureus, two non-human primate models for malaria.

    PubMed

    Alves, F A; Souza, M T; Gonçalves, E C; Schneider, M P C; Marinho, A M; Muniz, J A P C; Fragoso, S P; Krieger, M A; Goldenberg, S; Daniel-Ribeiro, C T; Carvalho, L J M

    2010-12-01

    Aotus and Saimiri are non-human primate models recommended by the World Health Organization for experimental studies in malaria, especially for vaccine pre-clinical trials. However, research using these primates is hindered by the lack of specific reagents to evaluate immune responses to infection or vaccination. As a step toward developing molecular tools for cytokine expression studies in these species, primer pairs for 18 cytokine gene fragments were designed based on human DNA sequences and used to amplify the corresponding genes in Aotus infulatus and Saimiri sciureus genomic DNA samples. IFNγ, TNFα, LTA, IL2, IL3, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL13, CSF2 and TGFβ2 gene fragments were amplified and sequenced. Primer pairs for IL8, IL17, IL18, IL27 and MIF failed to generate amplification products. When compared to the available corresponding human and non-human primate sequences, most--except IL3 and IL4--showed identity degrees above 90%. Small variations in sequence can help to explain the failure to amplify certain genes or the amplification only at lower annealing temperatures as compared to human DNA samples for several primer pairs. The sequences made available provide the basis for designing molecular tools such as primers for real time PCR specific for A. infulatus and/or S. sciureus. The nucleotide sequences reported in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank nucleotide sequence database and have been assigned accession numbers DQ985386 to DQ985389, DQ989356 to DQ989369, FJ89020 to FJ89024, and FJ89029.

  11. Expression, subcellular localization and cytokinic modulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in normal human keratinocytes: TLR2 up-regulation in psoriatic skin.

    PubMed

    Begon, Edouard; Michel, Laurence; Flageul, Béatrice; Beaudoin, Isabelle; Jean-Louis, Francette; Bachelez, Hervé; Dubertret, Louis; Musette, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the research described here was to investigate the expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in normal human keratinocytes, to study its modulation by proinflammatory cytokines, and to characterize the function of the latter within the epidermis. Our results demonstrate that normal human keratinocytes may present an intra-cytoplasmic expression of TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4. Exposure of keratinocytes to IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha increased intra-cytoplasmic expression and led to partial translocation at the cell surface. Keratinocyte activation by TLR2, TLR3, and TLR4 ligands led to the nuclear translocation of NF-kappab and the release of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-8. In immunochemistry analysis, psoriatic skin showed a strong over-expression of TLR2 in the epidermis compared with normal skin. Our results thus demonstrate large TLR expression in keratinocytes and the functionality of TLRs 2, 3, and 4. TLR2 over-expression in psoriatic skin provides new insights into TLR implication in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, through inappropriate stimulation by infectious or endogen ligands.

  12. A novel lectin from Artocarpus lingnanensis induces proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion through CD45 signaling pathway in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bo; Li, Lu; Zeng, Qiyan; Lin, Faquan; Yin, Lijun; Liao, Liejun; Huang, Min; Wang, Jingping

    2017-04-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins and have been used for purification and characterization of glycoproteins. In this study, a novel 58.9-kDa tetrameric lectin from Artocarpus lingnanensis seeds was purified, characterized, and its mitogenic potential was evaluated. The hemagglutination inhibition assay indicated that Artocarpus lingnanensis lectin (ALL) showed specificity toward galactose. ALL was effectively purified in a single-step using affinity chromatography on a galactose-Sepharose column. ALL showed pH optima between 5.0 and 9.0, and optimal temperature between 20 and 40 °C. ALL triggered proliferation and activation of human T lymphocytes (e.g., CD4(+) T lymphocytes). Flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed binding of ALL to T cells and colocalized with CD45. Affinity chromatography and Western blot suggested that CD45 isolated from human T cell membrane fraction may be the major receptor of ALL. CD45 blocking antibody attenuated the binding and proliferation of T cells induced by ALL. CD45-PTPase inhibitor dephostatin reduced ALL-induced T cells proliferation and expression of CD25 and pZAP-70. Furthermore, secretion of ALL-induced Th1/Th2 cytokines was blocked with dephostatin. Also, dephostatin inhibited phosphorylation of ALL-mediated activation of ERK and p38MAPK. This study demonstrates the involvement of CD45-mediated signaling in ALL-induced T lymphocyte proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion through activation of p38 and ERK.

  13. Synthesis of catechol estrogens by human uterus and leiomyoma

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, V.V.; Hanjani, P.; Rajan, R.

    1981-02-01

    Homogenates of human endometrial, myometrial and leiomyoma tissues were incubated with (2,4,6,7-/sub 3/H)-estradiol and tritiated catechol estrogens were isolated and identified. Though 2- and 4-hydroxylations were about the same in endometrium, 4-hydroxylation was two to four fold higher than 2-hydroxylation in myometrium and leiomyoma. However, endometrium showed greater capacity to form both 2- and 4-hydroxyestrogens than the other two tissues. Both 2- and 4-hydroxylations were significantly less than in myometrium. In view of the reports indicating that inhibitors of catechol 0-methyl transferase (COMT) might act as antineoplastic agents due to their interference with t-RNA methylases and since catechol estrogens inhibit COMT, the present results suggest that endogenous synthesis of catechol estrogens may play an important role in the pathophysiology of uterine leiomyoma.

  14. Study of HLA-DR synthesis in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wikner, N E; Huff, J C; Norris, D A; Boyce, S T; Cary, M; Kissinger, M; Weston, W L

    1986-11-01

    Within the normal human epidermis only Langerhans and indeterminate cells express HLA-DR. Human keratinocytes (HK), however, may also express HLA-DR in certain disease states characterized by mononuclear cell infiltrates. Previous studies have shown that HK synthesize HLA-DR in response to stimulation by interferon gamma (INF-gamma). The purposes of this study were to define conditions under which cultured HK might express HLA-DR and to compare the HLA-DR synthesis of HK with that of monocytes. HLA-DR expression by HK as determined by indirect immunofluorescence of HK cultures was absent under standard low calcium conditions and remained absent with the addition of calcium, serum, mitogens, and supernatants from Pam-212 cells containing epidermal thymocyte-activating factor. HLA-DR expression in HK was induced by cocultivation with concanavalin A-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), but not unstimulated PBMC. This effect was time-dependent and directly related to the number of PBMC. HLA-DR expression was also induced in a time- and dose-dependent manner by addition of supernatant from stimulated PBMC (SS) or by addition of recombinant INF-gamma but not by addition of interleukin (IL)-1 or IL-2. Induction by either SS or INF-gamma was blocked by an antiserum to INF-gamma. As determined by a semiquantitative immunoprecipitation technique, HLA-DR synthesis by HK was directly related to INF-gamma concentration. The pattern of HLA-DR peptides produced by HK was similar to that of monocytes, but the relative quantity synthesized was far less than that of monocytes.

  15. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in human macrophages, leading to the release of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Shenker, Bruce J; Ojcius, David M; Walker, Lisa P; Zekavat, Ali; Scuron, Monika Damek; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is produced from a number of bacteria capable of causing infection and inflammatory disease. Our previous studies with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cdt demonstrate not only that the active toxin subunit functions as a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) phosphatase but also that macrophages exposed to the toxin were stimulated to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We now demonstrate that the Cdt-induced proinflammatory response involves the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Specific inhibitors and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were employed to demonstrate requirements for NLRP3 and ASC as well as caspase-1. Furthermore, Cdt-mediated inflammasome activation is dependent upon upstream signals, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Cdt-induced increases in extracellular ATP levels. Increases in extracellular ATP levels contribute to the activation of the P2X7 purinergic receptor, leading to K+ efflux. The relationship between the abilities of the active toxin subunit CdtB to function as a lipid phosphatase, activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, and induce a proinflammatory cytokine response is discussed. These studies provide new insight into the virulence potential of Cdt in mediating the pathogenesis of disease caused by Cdt-producing organisms such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

  16. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Macrophages, Leading to the Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Ojcius, David M.; Walker, Lisa P.; Zekavat, Ali; Scuron, Monika Damek; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is produced from a number of bacteria capable of causing infection and inflammatory disease. Our previous studies with Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Cdt demonstrate not only that the active toxin subunit functions as a phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3) phosphatase but also that macrophages exposed to the toxin were stimulated to produce proinflammatory cytokines. We now demonstrate that the Cdt-induced proinflammatory response involves the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Specific inhibitors and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were employed to demonstrate requirements for NLRP3 and ASC as well as caspase-1. Furthermore, Cdt-mediated inflammasome activation is dependent upon upstream signals, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and Cdt-induced increases in extracellular ATP levels. Increases in extracellular ATP levels contribute to the activation of the P2X7 purinergic receptor, leading to K+ efflux. The relationship between the abilities of the active toxin subunit CdtB to function as a lipid phosphatase, activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, and induce a proinflammatory cytokine response is discussed. These studies provide new insight into the virulence potential of Cdt in mediating the pathogenesis of disease caused by Cdt-producing organisms such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:25644004

  17. Submerged cultivation of Ganoderma lucidum and the effects of its polysaccharides on the production of human cytokines TNF-α, IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17.

    PubMed

    Habijanic, Jožica; Berovic, Marin; Boh, Bojana; Plankl, Mojca; Wraber, Branka

    2015-01-25

    An original strain of Ganoderma lucidum (W.Curt.:Fr.) Lloyd, MZKI G97 isolated from Slovenian habitats was grown by a submerged liquid substrate cultivation in a laboratory stirred tank reactor. Five fractions of extracellular and cell-wall polysaccharides were obtained by extraction, ethanol precipitation, and purification by ion-exchange, gel and affinity chromatography. The capacity of isolated polysaccharide fractions to induce innate inflammatory cytokines, and to modulate cytokine responses of activated lymphocytes was investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were activated in vitro with polysaccharide fractions, in order to induce innate inflammatory cytokines: tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL) 12 and interferon gamma (IFN-γ). For the immunomodulation capacity, polysaccharide fractions were cultured with ionomycine and phorbol myristate acetate (IONO+PMA) activated PBMC, and the concentrations of induced IL-2, IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 were measured. The results showed that polysaccharides from G. lucidum induced moderate to high amounts of innate inflammatory cytokines. Fungal cell-wall polysaccharides were stronger innate inflammatory cytokines inducers, while extracellular polysaccharides demonstrated a higher capacity to modulate cytokine responses of IONO+PMA induced production of IL-17. The results indicate that G. lucidum polysaccharides enhance Th1 response with high levels of IFN-γ and IL-2, and display low to no impact on IL-4 production. A similar pattern was observed at regulatory cytokine IL-10. All of the polysaccharide fractions tested induced IL-17 production at different concentration levels.

  18. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Herbal Preparations STW5 and STW5-II in Cytokine-Challenged Normal Human Colon Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Mathias; Efferth, Thomas; Abdel-Aziz, Heba

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic relapsing intestinal disorders characterized by up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines followed by invasion of immune cells to the intestinal lamina propria. Standard therapies consist of anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive drugs. Since clinical efficiency is not satisfactory and the established drugs have massive side effects, new strategies to treat IBD are required. Herein, we investigate the protective effect of the fixed combination herbal preparations STW5 and STW5-II and the contribution of the corresponding single components in an in vitro inflammation model. The normal human colon epithelial cell line, NCM460, was treated with STW5, STW5-II or their single components for 4 h followed by experimental conditions comparable to induction of colitis. A pro-inflammatory cytokine cocktail consisting of TNF-α, IL-β, and IFN-γ was used to simulate inflammatory stimuli normally caused by immune cells. The effects on NCM460 cells were investigated by enzyme-linked immunoassay and Proteome Profiler®. Levels of IP-10, MCP-1, I-TAC, Groα, and IL-8 were elevated in chemokine-treated cells compared to untreated cells, but significantly reduced upon pretreatment with STW5 or STW5-II. However, the single compounds revealed only little effects on protein expression. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of both combination preparations on pro-inflammatory transcription factors of the STAT family using Western blot. In addition, we tested the effects on upstream MAPK p38. Both, STW5 and STW5-II did not show any effect on MAPK p38, but were effective in reducing phosphorylated levels of STAT1. In conclusion, both combination preparations act in an anti-inflammatory manner by influencing cytokine secretion via reduced activity of the JAK/STAT1 pathway. Relevant differences between STW5 and STW5-II were not found indicating similar efficacies. PMID:27833553

  19. Effect of Blood Component Coatings of Enosseal Implants on Proliferation and Synthetic Activity of Human Osteoblasts and Cytokine Production of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hulejova, Hana; Bartova, Jirina; Riedel, Tomas; Pesakova, Vlasta

    2016-01-01

    The study monitored in vitro early response of connective tissue cells and immunocompetent cells to enosseal implant materials coated by different blood components (serum, activated plasma, and plasma/platelets) to evaluate human osteoblast proliferation and synthetic activity and inflammatory response presented as a cytokine profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) under conditions imitating the situation upon implantation. The cells were cultivated on coated Ti-plasma-sprayed (Ti-PS), Ti-etched (Ti-Etch), Ti-hydroxyapatite (Ti-HA), and ZrO2 surfaces. The plasma/platelets coating supported osteoblast proliferation only on osteoconductive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch whereas activated plasma enhanced proliferation on all surfaces. Differentiation (BAP) and IL-8 production remained unchanged or decreased irrespective of the coating and surface; only the serum and plasma/platelets-coated ZrO2 exhibited higher BAP and IL-8 expression. RANKL production increased on serum and activated plasma coatings. PBMCs produced especially cytokines playing role in inflammatory phase of wound healing, that is, IL-6, GRO-α, GRO, ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, EGF, and MCP-1. Cytokine profiles were comparable for all tested surfaces; only ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, and MCP-1 expression depended on materials and coatings. The activated plasma coating led to uniformed surfaces and represented a favorable treatment especially for bioinert Ti-PS and ZrO2 whereas all coatings had no distinctive effect on bioactive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch. PMID:27651560

  20. Sulodexide down-regulates the release of cytokines, chemokines, and leukocyte colony stimulating factors from human macrophages: role of glycosaminoglycans in inflammatory pathways of chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Mannello, Ferdinando; Ligi, Daniela; Canale, Matteo; Raffetto, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic venous disease (CVeD) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. The condition can result in varicose veins, or advance to severe skin changes and venous ulceration. The fundamental basis for CVeD is inflammation within the venous circulation and that it is subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure resulting in increased ambulatory venous pressure. The inflammation involves leukocytes, in particular macrophages and monocytes, inflammatory modulators and chemokines, cytokine expression, growth factors, metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, and many regulatory pathways that perpetuate inflammation. Sulodexide (SDX) is a glycosaminoglycan with pro-fibrinolytic and anti-thrombotic properties. We have previously demonstrated that SDX inhibits the secretion of pro-zymogen MMP-9 from human leukocytes without displacing high molecular complexes of MMP-9. The anti-inflammatory properties of SDX on activated leukocytes have not been well established. We hypothesized that SDX will reduce the secretion of inflammatory mediators from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of SDX on LPS-stimulated macrophage secretion of various inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and colony stimulating factors. We used microplatebased multiplex immunoassays. LPS-stimulated macrophages in vitro caused a substantial increase of interleukins, tumor necrosis factor, interferon, chemokines and colony stimulating factors. The addition of SDX caused both a dose-dependent and dose-independent decrease in nearly all of the inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and colony stimulating factors. These findings suggest that SDX has a significant effect on the release of inflammatory mediators from macrophages, and may be useful in the treatment of early and advanced CVeD.

  1. Cytokine Requirements for the Differentiation and Expansion of IL-17A- and IL-22-producing Human Vγ2Vδ2 T Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Ness-Schwickerath, Kristin J.; Jin, Chenggang; Morita, Craig T.

    2010-01-01

    Human γδ T cells expressing the Vγ2Vδ2 TCR play important roles in immune responses to microbial pathogens by monitoring prenyl pyrophosphate isoprenoid metabolites. Most adult Vγ2Vδ2 cells are memory cytotoxic cells that produce IFN-γ. Recently, murine γδ T cells were found to be major sources of IL-17A in anti-microbial and autoimmune responses. To determine if primate γδ T cells play similar roles, we characterized IL-17A and IL-22 production by Vγ2Vδ2 cells. IL-17A-producing memory Vγ2Vδ2 cells exist at low but significant frequencies in adult humans (1:2,762 T cells) and at even higher frequencies in adult rhesus macaques. Higher levels of Vγ2Vδ2 cells produce IL-22 (1:1,864 T cells) although few produce both IL-17A and IL-22. Unlike adult humans where many IL-17A+ Vγ2Vδ2 cells also produce IFN-γ (Tγδ1/17), the majority of adult macaques IL-17A+ Vδ2 cells (Tγδ17) do not produce IFN-γ. To define the cytokine requirements for Tγδ17 cells, we stimulated human neonatal Vγ2Vδ2 cells with the bacterial antigen, HMBPP, and various cytokines and mAbs in vitro. We find that IL-6, IL-1β, and TGF-β are required to generate Tγδ17 cells in neonates whereas Tγδ1/17 cells additionally required IL-23. In adults, memory Tγδ1/17 and Tγδ17 cells required IL-23, IL-1β, and TGF-β but not IL-6. IL-22-producing cells showed similar requirements. Both neonatal and adult IL-17A+ Vγ2Vδ2 cells expressed elevated levels of RORγt. Our data suggest that, like Th17 αβ T cells, Vγ2Vδ2 T cells can be polarized into Tγδ17 and Tγδ1/17 populations with distinct cytokine requirements for their initial polarization and later maintenance. PMID:20483730

  2. Human mucosal leishmaniasis: neutrophils infiltrate areas of tissue damage that express high levels of Th17-related cytokines.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Viviane S; Santos, Claire S; Cardoso, Cristina R; de Andrade, José; Dos Santos, Washington L C; Clarêncio, Jorge; Silva, João S; Borges, Valeria M; Barral-Netto, Manoel; Brodskyn, Claudia I; Barral, Aldina

    2010-10-01

    Mucosal leishmaniasis (ML) is characterised by severe tissue destruction. Herein, we evaluated the involvement of the IL-17-type response in the inflammatory infiltrate of biopsy specimens from 17 ML patients. IL-17 and IL-17-inducing cytokines (IL-1β, IL-23, IL-6 and TGF-β) were detected by immunohistochemistry in ML patients. IL-17(+) cells exhibited CD4(+), CD8(+) or CD14(+) phenotypes, and numerous IL-17(+) cells co-expressed the CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6). Neutrophils, a hallmark of Th17-mediated inflammation, were regularly detected in necrotic and perinecrotic areas and stained positive for neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and MMP-9. Taken together, these observations demonstrate the existence of Th17 cells in ML lesions associated with neutrophils in areas of tissue injury and suggest that IL-17 is involved in ML pathogenesis.

  3. Anti-Diabetic Agent Sodium Tungstate Induces the Secretion of Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines by Human Kidney Cells.

    PubMed

    Bertinat, Romina; Westermeier, Francisco; Silva, Pamela; Shi, Jie; Nualart, Francisco; Li, Xuhang; Yáñez, Alejandro J

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the major cause of end stage renal disease. Sodium tungstate (NaW) exerts anti-diabetic and immunomodulatory activities in diabetic animal models. Here, we used primary cultures of renal proximal tubule epithelial cells derived from type-2-diabetic (D-RPTEC) and non-diabetic (N-RPTEC) subjects as in vitro models to study the effects of NaW on cytokine secretion, as these factors participate in intercellular regulation of inflammation, cell growth and death, differentiation, angiogenesis, development, and repair, all processes that are dysregulated during DKD. In basal conditions, D-RPTEC cells secreted higher levels of prototypical pro-inflammatory IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 than N-RPTEC cells, in agreement with their diabetic phenotype. Unexpectedly, NaW further induced IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 secretion in both N- and D-RPTEC, together with lower levels of IL-1 RA, IL-4, IL-10, and GM-CSF, suggesting that it may contribute to the extent of renal damage/repair during DKD. Besides, NaW induced the accumulation of IκBα, the main inhibitor protein of one major pathway involved in cytokine production, suggesting further anti-inflammatory effect in the long-term. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the interplay between the anti-diabetic and immunomodulatory properties of NaW will facilitate future studies about its clinical relevance. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 355-362, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cooperative Effects of Corticosteroids and Catecholamines upon Immune Deviation of the Type-1/Type-2 Cytokine Balance in Favor of Type-2 Expression in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salicru, A. N.; Sams, Clarence F.; Marshall, G. D.

    2007-01-01

    A growing number of studies show strong associations between stress and altered immune function. In vivo studies of chronic and acute stress have demonstrated that cognitive stressors are strongly correlated with high levels of catecholamines (CT) and corticosteroids (CS). Although both CS and CT individually can inhibit the production of T-helper 1 (TH1, type-1 like) cytokines and simultaneously promote the production of T-helper 2 (TH2, type-2 like) cytokines in antigen-specific and mitogen stimulated human leukocyte cultures in vitro, little attention has been focused on the effects of combination CT and CS in immune responses that may be more physiologically relevant. We therefore investigated the combined effects of in vitro CT and CS upon the type-1/type-2 cytokine balance of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a model to study the immunomodulatory effects of superimposed acute and chronic stress. Results demonstrated a significant decrease in type-1 cytokine production (IFN-gamma) and a significant increase in type-2 cytokine production (IL-4, IL-10) in our CS+CT incubated cultures when compared to either CT or CS agents alone. Furthermore, variable enhancement of type-1/type-2 immune deviation occurred depending upon when the CT was added. The data suggest that CS can increase the sensitivity of PBMC to the immunomodulatory effects of CT and establishes an in vitro model to study the combined effects of in vivo type-1/type-2 cytokine alterations observed in acute and chronic stress.

  5. Effects of AV119, a natural sugar from avocado, on Malassezia furfur invasiveness and on the expression of HBD-2 and cytokines in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, Giovanna; Buommino, Elisabetta; Baroni, Adone; Auricchio, Lucia; De Filippis, Anna; Cozza, Valentina; Msika, Philippe; Piccardi, Nathalie; Tufano, Maria Antonietta

    2007-11-01

    AV119 is a patented blend of two sugars from avocado that can induce human beta-defensin-2 production by normal human keratinocytes. In this study, we analysed the effect of AV119 on growth and invasiveness of Malassezia furfur, a dimorphic, lipid-dependent yeast that is part of the normal human cutaneous commensal flora. The ability to modulate the expression of the proinflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines in normal human keratinocytes was also investigated. Microbiological assay demonstrated that this sugar induced the aggregation of yeast cells and inhibited the invasiveness of M. furfur, without affecting its growth. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that AV119 was able to modulate the HBD-2 response in treated keratinocytes, reaching a maximum after 48-h treatment, and to induce the recovery of a satisfactory proinflammatory response in human keratinocytes. As AV119 can induce aggregation of yeast cells, thus inhibiting their penetration into the keratinocytes, the sugar could be used in the preparation of cosmetics or pharmacological drugs to inhibit colonization of the skin by pathogenic strains of M. furfur.

  6. A generative sketch model for human hair analysis and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Zhu, Song-Chun

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, we present a generative sketch model for human hair analysis and synthesis. We treat hair images as 2D piecewise smooth vector (flow) fields and, thus, our representation is view-based in contrast to the physically-based 3D hair models in graphics. The generative model has three levels. The bottom level is the high-frequency band of the hair image. The middle level is a piecewise smooth vector field for the hair orientation, gradient strength, and growth directions. The top level is an attribute sketch graph for representing the discontinuities in the vector field. A sketch graph typically has a number of sketch curves which are divided into 11 types of directed primitives. Each primitive is a small window (say 5 x 7 pixels) where the orientations and growth directions are defined in parametric forms, for example, hair boundaries, occluding lines between hair strands, dividing lines on top of the hair, etc. In addition to the three level representation, we model the shading effects, i.e., the low-frequency band of the hair image, by a linear superposition of some Gaussian image bases and we encode the hair color by a color map. The inference algorithm is divided into two stages: 1) We compute the undirected orientation field and sketch graph from an input image and 2) we compute the hair growth direction forthe sketch curves and the orientation field using a Swendsen-Wang cut algorithm. Both steps maximize a joint Bayesian posterior probability. The generative model provides a straightforward way for synthesizing realistic hair images and stylistic drawings (rendering) from a sketch graph and a few Gaussian bases. The latter can be either inferred from a real hair image or input (edited) manually using a simple sketching interface. We test our algorithm on a large data set of hair images with diverse hair styles. Analysis, synthesis, and rendering results are reported in the experiments.

  7. Cytokine-independent growth and clonal expansion of a primary human CD8+ T-cell clone following retroviral transduction with the IL-15 gene

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cary; Jones, Stephanie A.; Cohen, Cyrille J.; Zheng, Zhili; Kerstann, Keith; Zhou, Juhua; Robbins, Paul F.; Peng, Peter D.; Shen, Xinglei; Gomes, Theotonius J.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Munroe, David J.; Stewart, Claudia; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wangsa, Danny; Ried, Thomas; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Malignancies arising from retrovirally transduced hematopoietic stem cells have been reported in animal models and human gene therapy trials. Whether mature lymphocytes are susceptible to insertional mutagenesis is unknown. We have characterized a primary human CD8+ T-cell clone, which exhibited logarithmic ex vivo growth in the absence of exogenous cytokine support for more than 1 year after transduction with a murine leukemia virus–based vector encoding the T-cell growth factor IL-15. Phenotypically, the clone was CD28−, CD45RA−, CD45RO+, and CD62L−, a profile consistent with effector memory T lymphocytes. After gene transfer with tumor-antigen–specific T-cell receptors, the clone secreted IFN-γ upon encountering tumor targets, providing further evidence that they derived from mature lymphocytes. Gene-expression analyses revealed no evidence of insertional activation of genes flanking the retroviral insertion sites. The clone exhibited constitutive telomerase activity, and the presence of autocrine loop was suggested by impaired cell proliferation following knockdown of IL-15Rα expression. The generation of this cell line suggests that nonphysiologic expression of IL-15 can result in the long-term in vitro growth of mature human T lymphocytes. The cytokine-independent growth of this line was a rare event that has not been observed in other IL-15 vector transduction experiments or with any other integrating vector system. It does not appear that the retroviral vector integration sites played a role in the continuous growth of this cell clone, but this remains under investigation. PMID:17353346

  8. Cytokine-independent growth and clonal expansion of a primary human CD8+ T-cell clone following retroviral transduction with the IL-15 gene.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Cary; Jones, Stephanie A; Cohen, Cyrille J; Zheng, Zhili; Kerstann, Keith; Zhou, Juhua; Robbins, Paul F; Peng, Peter D; Shen, Xinglei; Gomes, Theotonius J; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Munroe, David J; Stewart, Claudia; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wangsa, Danny; Ried, Thomas; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2007-06-15

    Malignancies arising from retrovirally transduced hematopoietic stem cells have been reported in animal models and human gene therapy trials. Whether mature lymphocytes are susceptible to insertional mutagenesis is unknown. We have characterized a primary human CD8(+) T-cell clone, which exhibited logarithmic ex vivo growth in the absence of exogenous cytokine support for more than 1 year after transduction with a murine leukemia virus-based vector encoding the T-cell growth factor IL-15. Phenotypically, the clone was CD28(-), CD45RA(-), CD45RO(+), and CD62L(-), a profile consistent with effector memory T lymphocytes. After gene transfer with tumor-antigen-specific T-cell receptors, the clone secreted IFN-gamma upon encountering tumor targets, providing further evidence that they derived from mature lymphocytes. Gene-expression analyses revealed no evidence of insertional activation of genes flanking the retroviral insertion sites. The clone exhibited constitutive telomerase activity, and the presence of autocrine loop was suggested by impaired cell proliferation following knockdown of IL-15R alpha expression. The generation of this cell line suggests that nonphysiologic expression of IL-15 can result in the long-term in vitro growth of mature human T lymphocytes. The cytokine-independent growth of this line was a rare event that has not been observed in other IL-15 vector transduction experiments or with any other integrating vector system. It does not appear that the retroviral vector integration sites played a role in the continuous growth of this cell clone, but this remains under investigation.

  9. Effect of probiotics Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on gut-derived lipopolysaccharides and inflammatory cytokines: an in vitro study using a human colonic microbiota model.

    PubMed

    Rodes, Laetitia; Khan, Afshan; Paul, Arghya; Coussa-Charley, Michael; Marinescu, Daniel; Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Shao, Wei; Kahouli, Imen; Prakash, Satya

    2013-04-01

    Gut-derived lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are critical to the development and progression of chronic low-grade inflammation and metabolic diseases. In this study, the effects of probiotics Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on gut-derived lipopolysaccharide and inflammatory cytokine concentrations were evaluated using a human colonic microbiota model. Lactobacillus reuteri, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum, Bifidobacterium animalis, B. bifidum, B. longum, and B. longum subsp. infantis were identified from the literature for their anti-inflammatory potential. Each bacterial culture was administered daily to a human colonic microbiota model during 14 days. Colonic lipopolysaccharides, and Gram-positive and negative bacteria were quantified. RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were stimulated with supernatant from the human colonic microbiota model. Concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-4 cytokines were measured. Lipopolysaccharide concentrations were significantly reduced with the administration of B. bifidum (-46.45 +/- 5.65%), L. rhamnosus (-30.40 +/- 5.08%), B. longum (-42.50 +/- 1.28%), and B. longum subsp. infantis (-68.85 +/- 5.32%) (p < 0.05). Cell counts of Gram-negative and positive bacteria were distinctly affected by the probiotic administered. There was a probiotic strain-specific effect on immunomodulatory responses of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. B. longum subsp. infantis demonstrated higher capacities to reduce TNF-alpha concentrations (-69.41 +/- 2.78%; p < 0.05) and to increase IL-4 concentrations (+16.50 +/- 0.59%; p < 0.05). Colonic lipopolysaccharides were significantly correlated with TNF-alpha and IL-1beta concentrations (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that specific probiotic bacteria, such as B. longum subsp. infantis, might decrease colonic lipopolysaccharide concentrations, which might reduce the proinflammatory tone. This study has noteworthy applications in the field of biotherapeutics for the prevention and/or treatment of inflammatory and metabolic

  10. Molecular farming of human cytokines and blood products from plants: challenges in biosynthesis and detection of plant-produced recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Nicolau B; Vianna, Giovanni R; da Almeida Lima, Thaina; Rech, Elíbio

    2014-01-01

    Plants have emerged as an attractive alternative to the traditional mammalian cell cultures or microbial cell-based systems system for the production of valuable recombinant proteins. Through recombinant DNA technology, plants can be engineered to produce large quantities of pharmaceuticals and industrial proteins of high quality at low costs. The recombinant production, by transgenic plants, of therapeutic proteins normally present in human plasma, such as cytokines, coagulation factors, anticoagulants, and immunoglobulins, represents a response to the ongoing challenges in meeting the demand for therapeutic proteins to treat serious inherited or acquired bleeding and immunological diseases. As the clinical utilization of fractionated plasma molecules is limited by high production costs, using recombinant biopharmaceuticals derived from plants represents a feasible alternative to provide efficient treatment. Plant-derived pharmaceuticals also reduce the potential risks to patients of infection with pathogens or unwanted immune responses due to immunogenic antigens. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in molecular farming of cytokines. We also examine the technological basis, upcoming challenges, and perspectives for the biosynthesis and detection of these molecules in different plant production platforms.

  11. Effects of benidipine, a dihydropyridine-Ca2+ channel blocker, on expression of cytokine-induced adhesion molecules and chemoattractants in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Kazuhide

    2004-09-13

    Benidipine hydrochloride (benidipine) is a dihydropyridine-Ca2+ channel blocker with antioxidant properties. We examined the effects of benidipine on cytokine-induced expression of adhesion molecules and chemokines, which play important roles in the adhesion of monocytes to endothelium. Pretreatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) with benidipine (0.3-10 micromol/l) for 24 h significantly suppressed cytokine-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA and protein expression, resulting in reduced adhesion of THP-1 monocytes. Benidipine also suppressed induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and interleukin-8. Benidipine inhibited redox-sensitive transcriptional nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway, as determined by Western blotting of inhibitory kappaB (IkappaB) phosphorylation and luciferase reporter assay. Results of analysis using optical isomers of benidipine and antioxidants suggested that these inhibitory effects were dependent on pharmacological effects other than Ca2+ antagonism such as antioxidant effects. Benidipine may thus have anti-inflammatory properties and benefits for in the treatment of atherosclerosis.

  12. The Effect of Therapeutic Blockades of Dust Particles-Induced Ca2+ Signaling and Proinflammatory Cytokine IL-8 in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ju Hee; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells are the first barrier of defense against respiratory pathogens. Dust particles as extracellular stimuli are associated with inflammatory reactions after inhalation. It has been reported that dust particles induce intracellular Ca2+ signal, which subsequently increases cytokines production such as interleukin- (IL-) 8. However, the study of therapeutic blockades of Ca2+ signaling induced by dust particles in human bronchial epithelial cells is poorly understood. We investigated how to modulate dust particles-induced Ca2+ signaling and proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 expression. Bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to PM10 dust particles and subsequent mediated intracellular Ca2+ signaling and reactive oxygen species signal. Our results show that exposure to several inhibitors of Ca2+ pathway attenuated the PM10-induced Ca2+ response and subsequent IL-8 mRNA expression. PM10-mediated Ca2+ signal and IL-8 expression were attenuated by several pharmacological blockades such as antioxidants, IP3-PLC blockers, and TRPM2 inhibitors. Our results show that blockades of PLC or TRPM2 reduced both of PM10-mediated Ca2+ signal and IL-8 expression, suggesting that treatment with these blockades should be considered for potential therapeutic trials in pulmonary epithelium for inflammation caused by environmental events such as seasonal dust storm. PMID:26640326

  13. Regulation of cytokine production in human alveolar macrophages and airway epithelial cells in response to ambient air pollution particles: Further mechanistic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Susanne; Mundandhara, Sailaja; Devlin, Robert B.; Madden, Michael . E-mail: madden.michael@epa.gov

    2005-09-01

    In order to better understand how ambient air particulate matter (PM) affect lung health, the two main airway cell types likely to interact with inhaled particles, alveolar macrophages (AM) and airway epithelial cells have been exposed to particles in vitro and followed for endpoints of inflammation, and oxidant stress. Separation of Chapel Hill PM 10 into fine and coarse size particles revealed that the main proinflammatory response (TNF, IL-6, COX-2) in AM was driven by material present in the coarse PM, containing 90-95% of the stimulatory material in PM10. The particles did not affect expression of hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), a sensitive marker of oxidant stress. Primary cultures of normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE) also responded to the coarse fraction with higher levels of IL-8 and COX-2, than induced by fine or ultrafine PM. All size PM induced oxidant stress in NHBE, while fine PM induced the highest levels of HO-1 expression. The production of cytokines in AM by both coarse and fine particles was blocked by the toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist E5531 involved in the recognition of LPS and Gram negative bacteria. The NHBE were found to recognize coarse and fine PM through TLR2, a receptor with preference for recognition of Gram positive bacteria. Compared to ambient PM, diesel PM induced only a minimal cytokine response in both AM and NHBE. Instead, diesel suppressed LPS-induced TNF and IL-8 release in AM. Both coarse and fine ambient air PM were also found to inhibit LPS-induced TNF release while silica, volcanic ash or carbon black had no inhibitory effect. Diesel particles did not affect cytokine mRNA induction nor protein accumulation but interfered with the release of cytokine from the cells. Ambient coarse and fine PM, on the other hand, inhibited both mRNA induction and protein production. Exposure to coarse and fine PM decreased the expression of TLR4 in the macrophages. Particle-induced decrease in TLR4 and hyporesponsiveness to LPS

  14. Salivary histatin 3 inhibits heat shock cognate protein 70-mediated inflammatory cytokine production through toll-like receptors in human gingival fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Salivary histatins are bioactive peptides related to the innate immune system associated with antimicrobial activities. However, very little is known about the physiological and biological functions of histatins against host cells or their role in oral cell inflammation. Histatin 3 binds to heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70, a constitutively expressed heat shock protein (HSP)). It is unclear whether HSC70 is involved in the inflammatory response in oral cells. Injured oral cells release some intracellular proteins including HSC70. It is possible that released HSC70 induces toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, just as extracellular HSP70 (a stress inducible HSP) does, and that histatin 3 affects this process. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that HSC70 activates TLR signaling and histatin 3 inhibits this activation and inflammatory cytokine production. Methods A nuclear factor (NF)-κB-dependent luciferase reporter plasmid was transfected into HEK293 cells stably expressing TLR2 with coreceptor CD14 (293-TLR2/CD14 cells) or stably expressing TLR4 with CD14 and the accessory molecule MD2 (293-TLR4/MD2-CD14 cells). The cells were stimulated with HSC70 in the presence or absence of histatin 3, and examined using luciferase assays. We also stimulated human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) with HSC70 with or without histatin 3. Then, we analyzed the levels of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8) in the culture media. Cell proteins were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting with antibodies of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α, respectively. Histatin 3-bound form of HSC70 was analyzed using limited V8 protease proteolysis. Results HSC70 induced NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner in 293-TLR2/CD14 and 293-TLR4/MD2-CD14 cells, and histatin 3 inhibited this process and when histatin 3 binding to HSC70 was precluded by 15-deoxyspergualin, which augmented NF

  15. Induction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in human glial cells after proinflammatory cytokines stimulation: effect of IFNgamma, IL1beta, and TNFalpha on differentiation and chemokine production in glial cells.

    PubMed

    Janabi, N; Di Stefano, M; Wallon, C; Hery, C; Chiodi, F; Tardieu, M

    1998-08-01

    Although evidence for human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) presence in the central nervous system (CNS) of infected patients is well established, the intensity of viral replication within the brain is not usually known. In vitro, human embryonic microglial cells internalized HIV-1 through a CD4-dependent pathway but were not permissive to viral replication. We observed that HIV replication was induced when CNS cell cultures were stimulated for 14 days by a combination of proinflammatory cytokines including IFNgamma, IL1beta, and TNFalpha. After long-term cytokine stimulation, morphologically differentiated glial cells appeared, in which HIV-1 tat antigen was detected after infection. Thus, variations in the stage of maturation/activation of CNS cells under inflammatory conditions probably play a major role in facilitating massive production of HIV-1. We then studied the effect of prolonged cytokine stimulation on the secretion of inflammatory mediators by glial cells. An early increased secretion of prostaglandin F2alpha and chemokines (RANTES>MIP-1alpha>MIP-1beta) was observed, due to both microglia and astrocytes. In contrast to persistent PGF2alpha production, an extinction of RANTES and MIP-1beta but not of MIP-1alpha secretion occurred during the 14 days of stimulation and was inversely correlated with the ability of glial cells to replicate HIV-1. The study of the secretory factors produced in response to a persistent inflammation could provide a better understanding of the modulation of HIV replication in glial cells.

  16. Production of MMP-9 and inflammatory cytokines by Trypanosoma cruzi-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    de Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; da Silva, Wellington Seguins; de Castro Côrtes, Luzia Monteiro; da Silva Vasconcelos Sousa, Periela; de Araujo Soares, Renata Oliveira; Alves, Carlos Roberto

    2014-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) constitute a large family of Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) dependent endopeptidases implicated in tissue remodeling and chronic inflammation. MMPs also play key roles in the activation of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines produced by many cell types, including lymphocytes, granulocytes, and, in particular, activated macrophages. Their synthesis and secretion appear to be important in a number of physiological processes, including the inflammatory process. Here, we investigated the interaction between human and mouse macrophages with T. cruzi Colombian and Y strains to characterize MMP-9 and cytokine production in this system. Supernatants and total extract of T. cruzi infected human and mouse macrophages were obtained and used to assess MMP-9 profile and inflammatory cytokines. The presence of metalloproteinase activity was determined by zymography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting assays. The effect of cytokines on MMP-9 production in human macrophages was verified by previous incubation of cytokines on these cells in culture, and analyzed by zymography. We detected an increase in MMP-9 production in the culture supernatants of T. cruzi infected human and mouse macrophages. The addition of IL-1β or TNF-α to human macrophage cultures increased MMP-9 production. In contrast, MMP-9 production was down-modulated when human macrophage cultures were treated with IFN-γ or IL-4 before infection. Human macrophages infected with T. cruzi Y or Colombian strains produced increased levels of MMP-9, which was related to the production of cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6.

  17. IL22 regulates human urothelial cell sensory and innate functions through modulation of the acetylcholine response, immunoregulatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptides: assessment of an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Le, Phong T; Pearce, Meghan M; Zhang, Shubin; Campbell, Edward M; Fok, Cynthia S; Mueller, Elizabeth R; Brincat, Cynthia A; Wolfe, Alan J; Brubaker, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Human urinary disorders are generally studied in rodent models due to limitations of functional in vitro culture models of primary human urothelial cells (HUCs). Current HUC culture models are often derived from immortalized cancer cell lines, which likely have functional characteristics differ from healthy human urothelium. Here, we described a simple explant culture technique to generate HUCs and assessed their in vitro functions. Using transmission electron microscopy, we assessed morphology and heterogeneity of the generated HUCs and characterized their intercellular membrane structural proteins relative to ex vivo urothelium tissue. We demonstrated that our cultured HUCs are free of fibroblasts. They are also heterogeneous, containing cells characteristic of both immature basal cells and mature superficial urothelial cells. The cultured HUCs expressed muscarinic receptors (MR1 and MR2), carnitine acetyltransferase (CarAT), immunoregulatory cytokines IL7, IL15, and IL23, as well as the chemokine CCL20. HUCs also expressed epithelial cell-specific molecules essential for forming intercellular structures that maintain the functional capacity to form the physiological barrier of the human bladder urothelium. A subset of HUCs, identified by the high expression of CD44, expressed the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) along with its co-receptor CD14. We demonstrated that HUCs express, at the mRNA level, both forms of the IL22 receptor, the membrane-associated (IL22RA1) and the secreted soluble (IL22RA2) forms; in turn, IL22 inhibited expression of MR1 and induced expression of CarAT and two antimicrobial peptides (S100A9 and lipocalin-2). While the cellular sources of IL22 have yet to be identified, the HUC cytokine and chemokine profiles support the concept that IL22-producing cells are present in the human bladder mucosa tissue and that IL22 plays a regulatory role in HUC functions. Thus, the described explant technique is clearly capable of generating functional HUCs

  18. IL22 Regulates Human Urothelial Cell Sensory and Innate Functions through Modulation of the Acetylcholine Response, Immunoregulatory Cytokines and Antimicrobial Peptides: Assessment of an In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Le, Phong T.; Pearce, Meghan M.; Zhang, Shubin; Campbell, Edward M.; Fok, Cynthia S.; Mueller, Elizabeth R.; Brincat, Cynthia A.; Wolfe, Alan J.; Brubaker, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Human urinary disorders are generally studied in rodent models due to limitations of functional in vitro culture models of primary human urothelial cells (HUCs). Current HUC culture models are often derived from immortalized cancer cell lines, which likely have functional characteristics differ from healthy human urothelium. Here, we described a simple explant culture technique to generate HUCs and assessed their in vitro functions. Using transmission electron microscopy, we assessed morphology and heterogeneity of the generated HUCs and characterized their intercellular membrane structural proteins relative to ex vivo urothelium tissue. We demonstrated that our cultured HUCs are free of fibroblasts. They are also heterogeneous, containing cells characteristic of both immature basal cells and mature superficial urothelial cells. The cultured HUCs expressed muscarinic receptors (MR1 and MR2), carnitine acetyltransferase (CarAT), immunoregulatory cytokines IL7, IL15, and IL23, as well as the chemokine CCL20. HUCs also expressed epithelial cell-specific molecules essential for forming intercellular structures that maintain the functional capacity to form the physiological barrier of the human bladder urothelium. A subset of HUCs, identified by the high expression of CD44, expressed the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) along with its co-receptor CD14. We demonstrated that HUCs express, at the mRNA level, both forms of the IL22 receptor, the membrane-associated (IL22RA1) and the secreted soluble (IL22RA2) forms; in turn, IL22 inhibited expression of MR1 and induced expression of CarAT and two antimicrobial peptides (S100A9 and lipocalin-2). While the cellular sources of IL22 have yet to be identified, the HUC cytokine and chemokine profiles support the concept that IL22-producing cells are present in the human bladder mucosa tissue and that IL22 plays a regulatory role in HUC functions. Thus, the described explant technique is clearly capable of generating functional HUCs

  19. Systematic Review of Membrane Components of Gram-Positive Bacteria Responsible as Pyrogens for Inducing Human Monocyte/Macrophage Cytokine Release

    PubMed Central

    Rockel, Christoph; Hartung, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Fifty years after the elucidation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxin) as the principal structure of Gram-negative bacteria activating the human immune system, its Gram-positive counterpart is still under debate. Pyrogen tests based on the human monocyte activation have been validated for LPS detection as an alternative to the rabbit test and, increasingly, the limulus amebocyte lysate test. For full replacement, international validations with non-endotoxin pyrogens are in preparation. Following evidence-based medicine approaches, a systematic review of existing evidence as to the structural nature of the Gram-positive pyrogen was undertaken. For the three major constituents suggested, i.e., peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acids (LTA), and bacterial lipoproteins (LP), the questions to be answered and a search strategy for relevant literature was developed, starting in MedLine. The evaluation was based on the Koch–Dale criteria for a mediator of an effect. A total of 380 articles for peptidoglycan, 391 for LP, and 285 for LTA were retrieved of which 12, 8, and 24, respectively, fulfilled inclusion criteria. The compiled data suggest that for peptidoglycan two Koch–Dale criteria are fulfilled, four for LTA, and two for bacterial LP. In conclusion, based on the best currently available evidence, LTA is the only substance that fulfills all criteria. LTA has been isolated from a large number of bacteria, results in cytokine release patterns inducible also with synthetic LTA. Reduction in bacterial cytokine induction with an inhibitor for LTA was shown. However, this systematic review cannot exclude the possibility that other stimulatory compounds complement or substitute for LTA in being the counterpart to LPS in some Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:22529809

  20. Human cytokines interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-6 affect the growth and insulin binding of the unicellular organism Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Kovács, P; Falus, A

    1995-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-6 significantly increase the growth rate of the unicellular organism, Tetrahymena. The effect elicited by IL-3 is long lasting as it was also detectable after 20 generations. Effect of IL-6 was detectable as long as the substance was present in the cell culture. Pretreatment with IL-3 did not enhance the proliferative response to subsequent IL-3 treatment, but the second exposure to IL-3 considerably depressed the active proliferation of Tetrahymena cells. However, a positive 'priming effect' elicited by IL-6 resulted in an increased growth rate following repeated IL-6 stimulation. Insulin binding to the plasma membrane of Tetrahymena was increased by IL-6 but not by IL-3 after 24 hours, and this enhancement appeared even after one hour incubation. If the cells were pretreated with insulin, IL-6 did not influence insulin binding, while an inhibition by IL-3 was observed. These results direct attention to the similarities of actions induced by IL-3 and IL-6 at different levels of phylogeny probably due to the presence of cytokine receptor-like structures on this unicellular organism.

  1. Triiodothyronine regulates angiogenic growth factor and cytokine secretion by isolated human decidual cells in a cell-type specific and gestational age-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Vasilopoulou, E.; Loubière, L.S.; Lash, G.E.; Ohizua, O.; McCabe, C.J.; Franklyn, J.A.; Kilby, M.D.; Chan, S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does triiodothyronine (T3) regulate the secretion of angiogenic growth factors and cytokines by human decidual cells isolated from early pregnancy? SUMMARY ANSWER T3 modulates the secretion of specific angiogenic growth factors and cytokines, with different regulatory patterns observed amongst various isolated subpopulations of human decidual cells and with a distinct change between the first and second trimesters of pregnancy. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Maternal thyroid dysfunction during early pregnancy is associated with complications of malplacentation including miscarriage and pre-eclampsia. T3 regulates the proliferation and apoptosis of fetal-derived trophoblasts, as well as promotes the invasive capability of extravillous trophoblasts (EVT). We hypothesize that T3 may also have a direct impact on human maternal-derived decidual cells, which are known to exert paracrine regulation upon trophoblast behaviour and vascular development at the uteroplacental interface. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This laboratory-based study used human decidua from first (8–11 weeks; n = 18) and second (12–16 weeks; n = 12) trimester surgical terminations of apparently uncomplicated pregnancies. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Primary cultures of total decidual cells, and immunomagnetic bead-isolated populations of stromal-enriched (CD10+) and stromal-depleted (CD10−) cells, uterine natural killer cells (uNK cells; CD56+) and macrophages (CD14+) were assessed for thyroid hormone receptors and transporters by immunocytochemistry. Each cell population was treated with T3 (0, 1, 10, 100 nM) and assessments were made of cell viability (MTT assay) and angiogenic growth factor and cytokine secretion (immunomediated assay). The effect of decidual cell-conditioned media on EVT invasion through Matrigel® was evaluated. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Immunocytochemistry showed the expression of thyroid hormone transporters (MCT8, MCT10) and receptors (TRα1

  2. Use of a SCID mouse/human lymphoma model to evaluate cytokine-induced killer cells with potent antitumor cell activity

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    C.B-17 severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice, which lack functional B and T lymphocytes, allow xenografts and, therefore, can be used to study the biology of human malignancies. Two different human B cell lymphoma cell lines, SU-DHL-4 and OCI-Ly8, which both harbor the t(14;18) chromosomal translocation, were injected into C.B-17 SCID mice. Mice injected intravenously or intraperitoneally developed tumors and died in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of tumor cells in various murine tissues could be demonstrated by a clonogenic tumor assay, staining of frozen sections with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against a human B cell antigen (CD19), and with the polymerase chain reaction technique. A protocol using cytotoxic effector cells was developed and used to selectively deplete the tumor cells from bone marrow. These cells were developed by growing peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), anti- CD3 mAb, and interleukin 2 (IL-2). The timing of IFN-gamma treatment was critical and optimal if IFN-gamma was added before IL-2 treatment. The cells that were stimulated by IFN-gamma, followed by IL-2, could be expanded by treatment with a mAb directed against CD3. These cells could be further activated by IL-1, but not by tumor necrosis factor alpha. With this protocol, a tumor cell kill of 3 logs was obtained as measured by a clonogenic assay. Interestingly, despite their high cytotoxic activity against lymphoma cells, these cells had little toxicity against a subset of normal human hematopoietic precursor cells (granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming units). These cells were further tested by treating murine bone marrow contaminated with the human lymphoma cell line SU-DHL-4, and injecting these cells into SCID mice to assay for tumor growth in vivo. The animals injected with bone marrow contaminated with SU-DHL-4 cells had enhanced survival if the bone marrow was treated with the cytokine-induced killer cells before

  3. Some aspects of adenosine triphosphate synthesis from adenine and adenosine in human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Whittam, R.; Wiley, J. S.

    1968-01-01

    1. The synthesis of ATP has been studied in human erythrocytes. Fresh cells showed no net synthesis of ATP when incubated with adenine or adenosine, although labelled adenine was incorporated into ATP in small amounts. 2. Cold-stored cells (3-6 weeks old) became progressively depleted of adenine nucleotides but incubation with adenosine or adenine plus inosine restored the ATP concentration to normal within 4 hr. Incorporation of labelled adenine or adenosine into the ATP of incubated stored cells corresponded to net ATP synthesis by these cells. 3. Synthesis of ATP from adenosine plus adenine together was 75% derived from adenine and only 25% from adenosine, indicating that nucleotide synthesis from adenine inhibits the simultaneous synthesis of nucleotide from adenosine. PMID:5723519

  4. Effect of anti-inflammatory drugs on sulphated glycosaminoglycan synthesis in aged human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, L S; Horsburgh, B A; Ghosh, P; Taylor, T K

    1976-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory drugs, sodium salicylate, indomethacin, hydrocortisone, ibuprofen, and flurbiprofen, were examined for their effects on sulphated glycosaminoglycan synthesis in aged human cartilage in vitro. Cartilage was obtained from femoral heads removed during surgery and drug effects were found to vary significantly from one head to another. Statistical analysis of the results showed that sodium salicylate exhibits concentration-dependent inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis over the concentration range used. Indomethacin, hydrocortisone, and ibuprofen, at concentrations comparable to those attained in man, caused a statistically significant depression of sulphated glycosaminoglycan synthesis in cartilage from some femoral heads but not others, reflecting the variable response of human articular cartilage to anti-inflammatory drugs. Sodium salicylate and indomethacin at higher doses produced significant (Pless than 0-005) inhibition of sulphated glycosaminoglycan synthesis in all femoral heads studied. The results for flurbiprofen were less conclusive; this compound appears not to inhibit glycosaminoglycan synthesis over the concentration range used. PMID:1008617

  5. Illumination from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) disrupts pathological cytokines expression and activates relevant signal pathways in primary human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ye; Xie, Chen; Gu, Yangshun; Li, Xiuyi; Tong, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the aged people. The latest systemic review of epidemiological investigations revealed that excessive light exposure increases the risk of AMD. With the drastically increasing use of high-energy light-emitting diodes (LEDs) light in our domestic environment nowadays, it is supposed to pose a potential oxidative threat to ocular health. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major ocular source of pathological cytokines, which regulate local inflammation and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that high-energy LED light might disrupt the pathological cytokine expression of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD. Primary human RPE cells were isolated from eyecups of normal eye donors and seeded into plate wells for growing to confluence. Two widely used multichromatic white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with correlated color temperatures (CCTs) of 2954 and 7378 K were used in this experiment. The confluent primary RPE cells were under white LEDs light exposure until 24 h. VEGF-A, IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 proteins and mRNAs were measured using an ELISA kit and RT-PCR, respectively. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Akt, Janus kinase (JAK)2 and Nuclear factor (NF)-κB signal pathways after LEDs illumination were evaluated by western blotting analysis. The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using chloromethyl- 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Inhibitors of relevant signal pathways and anti-oxidants were added to the primary RPE cells before LEDs illumination to evaluate their biological functions. We found that 7378 K light, but not 2954 K upregulated the VEGF-A, IL-6, IL-8 and downregulated MCP-1 proteins and mRNAs levels in a time-dependent manner. In parallel, initial activation of MAPKs and NF-κB signal pathways were also observed after 7378 K light exposure. Mechanistically, antioxidants for eliminating reactive oxygen

  6. Lipidomic evidence that lowering the typical dietary palmitate to oleate ratio in humans decreases the leukocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines and muscle expression of redox-sensitive genes.

    PubMed

    Kien, C Lawrence; Bunn, Janice Y; Fukagawa, Naomi K; Anathy, Vikas; Matthews, Dwight E; Crain, Karen I; Ebenstein, David B; Tarleton, Emily K; Pratley, Richard E; Poynter, Matthew E

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported that lowering the high, habitual palmitic acid (PA) intake in ovulating women improved insulin sensitivity and both inflammatory and oxidative stress. In vitro studies indicate that PA can activate both cell membrane toll-like receptor-4 and the intracellular nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptor protein (NLRP3). To gain further insight into the relevance to human metabolic disease of dietary PA, we studied healthy, lean and obese adults enrolled in a randomized, crossover trial comparing 3-week, high-PA (HPA) and low-PA/high-oleic-acid (HOA) diets. After each diet, both hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivities were measured, and we assessed cytokine concentrations in plasma and in supernatants derived from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as well as proinflammatory gene expression in skeletal muscle. Insulin sensitivity was unaffected by diet. Plasma concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α was higher during the HPA diet. Lowering the habitually high PA intake by feeding the HOA diet resulted in lower secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α by PBMCs, as well as lower relative mRNA expression of cJun and NLRP3 in muscle. Principal components analysis of 156 total variables coupled to analysis of covariance indicated that the mechanistic pathway for the differential dietary effects on PBMCs involved changes in the PA/OA ratio of tissue lipids. Our results indicate that lowering the dietary and tissue lipid PA/OA ratio resulted in lower leukocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines and muscle expression of redox-sensitive genes, but the relevance to diabetes risk is uncertain.

  7. CD45-mediated signaling pathway is involved in Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL)-induced proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion in human PBMC

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Radha; Eligar, Sachin M.; Kumar, Natesh; Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Inamdar, Shashikala R.; Swamy, Bale M.; Shastry, Padma

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL, a potent mitogenic and complex N-glycan specific lectin binds to CD45 on PBMC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL triggers CD45-mediated signaling involved in activation of p38MAPK and STAT-5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of CD45 PTPase signaling blocks RBL-induced ZAP70 phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBL-CD45 mediated signaling is crucial for RBL-induced immunodulatory activities. -- Abstract: We earlier reported the mitogenic and immunostimulatory activities of Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin (RBL), purified from phytopathogenic fungus R. bataticola in human PBMC. The lectin demonstrates specificity towards glycoproteins containing complex N-glycans. Since CD45-protein tyrosine phosphatase that abundantly expresses N-glycans is important in T-cell signaling, the study aimed to investigate the involvement of CD45 in the immunomodulatory activities of RBL. Flowcytometry and confocal microscopy studies revealed that RBL exhibited binding to PBMC and colocalized with CD45. The binding was comparable in cells expressing different CD45 isoforms-RA, -RB and -RO. CD45 blocking antibody reduced the binding and proliferation of PBMC induced by RBL. CD45-PTPase inhibitor dephostatin inhibited RBL-induced proliferation, expression of CD25 and pZAP-70. RBL-induced secretion of Th1/Th2 cytokines were significantly inhibited in presence of dephostatin. Also, dephostatin blocked phosphorylation of p38MAPK and STAT-5 that was crucial for the biological functions of RBL. The study demonstrates the involvement of CD45-mediated signaling in RBL-induced PBMC proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine secretion through activation of p38MAPK and STAT-5.

  8. Prednisolone phosphate-containing TRX-20 liposomes inhibit cytokine and chemokine production in human fibroblast-like synovial cells: a novel approach to rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Harigai, Takashi; Hagiwara, Hitomi; Ogawa, Yumi; Ishizuka, Takanobu; Kaneda, Shinichi; Kimura, Junji

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of using prednisolone phosphate (PSLP)-containing 3,5-dipentadecyloxybenzamidine hydrochloride (TRX-20) liposomes to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we examined their ability to bind human fibroblast-like synovial (HFLS) cells and their effects in these cells. To test for binding, Lissamine rhodamine B-1, 2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (rhodamine)-labelled PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes were added to HFLS cells, and the fluorescence intensity of the rhodamine bound to the cells was evaluated. Rhodamine-labelled PSLP-containing liposomes without TRX-20 were used as a negative control. To evaluate the uptake of liposomes by the HFLS cells, we used TRX-20 liposomes containing 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS) and p-xylene-bis-pyridinium bromide (DPX), and observed the cells by fluorescence microscopy. The effects of the PSLP in TRX-20 liposomes on HFLS cells were assessed by the inhibition of the production of two inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) and one inflammatory chemokine (interleukin 8). The interaction of the PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes with HFLS cells was approximately 40 times greater than that of PSLP-containing liposomes without TRX-20. PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes bound to HFLS cells primarily via chondroitin sulfate. TRX-20 liposomes taken up by the cell were localized to acidic compartments. Furthermore, the PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes inhibited the production of the inflammatory cytokines and the chemokine more effectively than did the PSLP-containing liposomes without TRX-20. These results indicate that PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes show promise as a novel drug delivery system that could enhance the clinical use of glucocorticoids for treating RA.

  9. Resistance/susceptibility to Echinococcus multilocularis infection and cytokine profile in humans. II. Influence of the HLA B8, DR3, DQ2 haplotype.

    PubMed

    Godot, V; Harraga, S; Beurton, I; Tiberghien, P; Sarciron, E; Gottstein, B; Vuitton, D A

    2000-09-01

    Differences have been shown between HLA characteristics of patients with different courses of alveolar echinococcosis (AE). Notably the HLA B8, DR3, DQ2 haplotype was associated with more severe forms of this granulomatous parasitic disease. We compared IL-10, IL-5, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from eight HLA-DR3+, DQ2+, B8+ AE patients and from 10 HLA-DR3-, DQ2-, B8- patients after non-specific mitogenic and specific Echinococcus multilocularis antigenic in vitro stimulation. PBMC from seven HLA-DR3+, DQ2+, B8+ healthy subjects and nine HLA-DR3-, DQ2-, B8- subjects were also studied as controls. PBMC from AE patients with HLA DR3+, DQ2+ haplotype secreted higher levels of IL-10 without any stimulation and after specific antigenic stimulation than did patients without this haplotype. Higher levels of IL-5 and IFN-gamma were also produced by these patients' PBMC after stimulation with non-purified parasitic antigenic preparations; however, the specific alkaline phosphatase antigen extracted from E. multilocularis induced only Th2-type cytokine secretion. A spontaneous secretion of TNF by HLA DR3+, DQ2+ B8+ AE patients was also found. These results suggest that HLA characteristics of the host can influence immune-mediated mechanisms, and thus the course of AE in humans; specific antigenic components of E. multilocularis could contribute to the preferential Th2-type cytokine production favoured by the genetic background of the host.

  10. Adhering maternal platelets can contribute to the cytokine and chemokine cocktail released by human first trimester villous placenta.

    PubMed

    Blaschitz, A; Siwetz, M; Schlenke, P; Gauster, M

    2015-11-01

    Placental villous explant culture has been increasingly recognized as suitable model to study secretion of inflammatory and immune modulating factors by human placenta. Most of these factors likely derive from the syncytiotrophoblast, whereas extraplacental sources such as maternal peripheral blood cells are rarely considered. Due to their small size and absence of a nucleus, platelets adhering to perivillous fibrinoid of normal placenta are frequently ignored in routine immunohistochemistry. Here we demonstrate adhering maternal platelets on first trimester placental villi after explant culture and point out that platelet-derived factors must be considered when analyzing the inflammatory secretion profile of human placenta.

  11. Circadian Rhythm in Cytokines Administration.

    PubMed

    Trufakin, Valery A; Shurlygina, Anna V

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, a number of diseases involving immune system dysfunction have appeared. This increases the importance of research aimed at finding and developing optimized methods for immune system correction. Numerous studies have found a positive effect in using cytokines to treat a variety of diseases, yet the clinical use of cytokines is limited by their toxicity. Research in the field of chronotherapy, aimed at designing schedules of medicine intake using circadian biorhythms of endogenous production of factors, and receptors' expression to the factors on the target cells, as well as chronopharmacodynamics and chronopharmacokinetics of medicines may contribute to the solution of this problem. Advantages of chronotherapy include a greater effectiveness of treatment, reduced dose of required drugs, and minimized adverse effects. This review presents data on the presence of circadian rhythms of spontaneous and induced cytokine production, as well as the expression of cytokine receptors in the healthy body and in a number of diseases. The article reviews various effects of cytokines, used at different times of the day in humans and experimental animals, as well as possible mechanisms underlying the chronodependent effects of cytokines. The article presents the results of chronotherapeutic modes of administering IL-2, interferons, G-CSF, and GM-CSF in treatment of various types of cancer as well as in experimental models of immune suppression and inflammation, which lead to a greater effectiveness of therapy, the possibility of reducing or increasing the dosage, and reduced drug toxicity. Further research in this field will contribute to the effectiveness and safety of cytokine therapy.

  12. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    PubMed

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity.

  13. Effect of natural porcine surfactant in Staphylococcus aureus induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species generation in monocytes and neutrophils from human blood.

    PubMed

    de Guevara, Yuliannis Lugones Ladrón; Hidalgo, Odalys Blanco; Santos, Sidnéia Sousa; Brunialti, Milena Karina Colo; Faure, Roberto; Salomao, Reinaldo

    2014-08-01

    Surfacen® is a clinical surfactant preparation of porcine origin. In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of Surfacen® in the modulation of oxidative burst in monocytes and neutrophils in human blood and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was measured in monocytes and neutrophils by flow cytometry using 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) as substrate, while, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 levels were estimated in PBMC supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Our results show that Staphylococcus aureus-induced ROS level was slightly affected by Surfacen® added to whole blood monocytes and neutrophils. The time course experiments of pre-incubation with Surfacen® showed no significant increase of ROS level at 2h; however, the ROS level decreased when pre incubated for 4h and 6h with Surfacen®. Pre-incubation of PBMC cells with Surfacen® at 0.125 and 0.5mg/mL showed a dose-dependent suppression of TNF-α levels measured after 4h of S. aureus stimulation, an effect less impressive when cells were stimulated for 24h. A similar behavior was observed in IL-6 release. In summary, the present study provides experimental evidence supporting an anti-inflammatory role of Surfacen® in human monocytes and neutrophils in vitro.

  14. A human endogenous retrovirus K dUTPase triggers a TH1, TH17 cytokine response: does it have a role in psoriasis?

    PubMed

    Ariza, Maria-Eugenia; Williams, Marshall V

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory immune disease of the skin characterized by a complex interplay between multiple risk genes and their interactions with environmental factors. Recent haplotype analyses have suggested that deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) encoded by a human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) may be a candidate gene for the psoriasis susceptibility 1 locus. However, no functional studies have been conducted to determine the role of HERV-K dUTPase in psoriasis. For this purpose, we constructed an HERV-K dUTPase wild-type sequence, as well as specific mutations reflecting the genotype characteristic of high- and low-risk haplotypes, purified the recombinant proteins, and evaluated whether they could modulate innate and/or adaptive immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that wild-type and mutant HERV-K dUTPase proteins induce the activation of NF-κB through Toll-like receptor 2, independent of enzymatic activity. Proteome array studies revealed that treatment of human primary cells with wild-type and mutant HERV-K dUTPase proteins triggered the secretion of T(H)1 and T(H)17 cytokines involved in the formation of psoriatic plaques, including IL-12p40, IL-23, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-8, and CCL20, in dendritic/Langerhans-like cells and to a lesser extent in keratinocytes. These data support HERV-K dUTPase as a potential contributor to psoriasis pathophysiology.

  15. Preliminary Study on Gene Expression of Chitinase-Like Cytokines in Human Airway Epithelial Cell Under Chitin and Chitosan Microparticles Treatment.

    PubMed

    Alimohammadi, Masumeh; Yeganeh, Farshid; Haji Molla Hoseini, Mostafa

    2016-06-01

    Small-sized chitin and chitosan microparticles (MPs) reduce allergic inflammation. We examined the capacity of these glycans to stimulate A549 human airway epithelial cells to determine the feasibility of using of these glycans as allergic therapeutic modality. A549 cells were treated with MPs and then expressions levels of chitinase domain-containing 1 (CHID1) and chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) genes were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. IL-6 production was measured by ELISA. Chitin MPs resulted in upregulation of CHI3L1 expression by 35.7-fold while mRNA expression did not change with chitosan MPs. Compared to the untreated group, production of IL-6 was significantly decreased in the chitosan MPs-treated group, but chitin MPs treatment cause elevation of IL-6 level. This study demonstrates that chitin potently induces CHI3L1 expression, but chitosan is relatively inert. This effect and inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-6) suggest that chitosan MPs may possess more potential for therapeutic uses in human airway allergic inflammation.

  16. ADP and Other Metabolites Released from Acanthamoeba castellanii Lead to Human Monocytic Cell Death through Apoptosis and Stimulate the Secretion of Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, A.; Cappai, V.; Alberti, L.; Serra, C.; Fiori, P. L.; Cappuccinelli, P.

    2002-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are thought to be involved in Acanthamoeba infections. The aim of this work was to study whether soluble metabolites (ADP and other compounds) released by Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites could induce morphological and biochemical changes in human monocytic cells in vitro. We demonstrate here that ADP constitutively released in the medium by A. castellanii, interacting with specific P2y2 purinoceptors expressed on the monocytic cell membrane, caused a biphasic rise in [Ca2+]i, morphological changes characteristics of cells undergoing apoptosis, caspase-3 activation, and secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The same results were found in monocytes exposed to purified ADP. Cell damage and TNF-α release induced by amoebic ADP were blocked by the P2y2 inhibitor suramin. Other metabolites contained in amoebic cell-free supernatants, with molecular masses of, respectively, >30 kDa and between 30 and 10 kDa, also caused morphological modifications and activation of intracellular caspase-3, characteristics of programmed cell death. Nevertheless, mechanisms by which these molecules trigger cell damage appeared to differ from that of ADP. In addition, other amoebic thermolable metabolites with molecular masses of <10 kDa caused the secretion of interleukin-1β. These findings suggest that pathogenic free-living A. castellanii by release of ADP and other metabolites lead to human monocytic cell death through apoptosis and stimulate the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:12117953

  17. Circulating follicular T helper cells and cytokine profile in humans following vaccination with the rVSV-ZEBOV Ebola vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Fouzia; Beck, Kevin; Paolino, Kristopher M.; Phillips, Revell; Waters, Norman C.; Regules, Jason A.; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S.

    2016-01-01

    The most recent Zaire Ebolavirus (ZEBOV) outbreak was the largest and most widespread in recorded history, emphasizing the need for an effective vaccine. Here, we analyzed human cellular immune responses induced by a single dose of the rVSV-ZEBOV vaccine candidate, which showed significant protective efficacy in endemic populations in Guinea. This is the first in-depth characterization of ZEBOV-GP specific, circulating follicular T cells (cTfh). Since antibody titers correlated with protection in preclinical models of ZEBOV infection, Tfh were predicted to correlate with protection. Indeed, the ZEBOV-specific cTfh data correlated with antibody titers in human vaccines and unexpectedly with the Tfh17 subset. The combination of two cutting edge technologies allowed the immuno-profiling of rare cell populations and may help elucidate correlates of protection for a variety of vaccines. PMID:27323685

  18. Rifampin Increases Cytokine-Induced Expression of the CD1b Molecule in Human Peripheral Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tentori, L.; Graziani, G.; Porcelli, S. A.; Sugita, M.; Brenner, M. B.; Madaio, R.; Bonmassar, E.; Giuliani, A.; Aquino, A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that a nonclassical, major histocompatibility complex-independent system (i.e., CD1-restricted T-cell responses) is involved in T-cell immunity against nonpeptide antigens. The CD1 system appears to function by presenting microbial lipid antigens to specific T cells, and the antigens so far identified include several known constituents of mycobacterial cell walls. Among the four known human CD1 isoforms, the CD1b protein is the best characterized with regard to its antigen-presenting function. Expression of CD1b is upregulated on human blood monocytes upon exposure to granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor, alone or in combination with interleukin-4 (IL-4) (S. A. Porcelli, Adv. Immunol. 59:1–98, 1995). Rifampin (RFP) and its derivatives are widely used for chemoprophylaxis or chemotherapy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, this agent was found to reduce the mitogen responsiveness of human B and T lymphocytes, chemotaxis, and delayed-type hypersensitivity. The present study extends the immunopharmacological profile of RFP by examining its effects on CD1b expression by human peripheral blood monocytes exposed to GM-CSF plus IL-4. The results showed that clinically attainable concentrations (i.e., 2 or 10 μg/ml for 24 h) of the agent produced a marked increase in CD1b expression on the plasma membrane, as evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, whereas it had no effect on cytosolic fractions, as indicated by Western blot analysis. This was found to be the result of increased CD1b gene expression, as shown by Northern blot analysis of CD1b mRNA. These results suggest that RFP could be of potential value in augmenting the CD1b-restricted antigen recognition system, thereby enhancing protective cellular immunity to M. tuberculosis. PMID:9517931

  19. Recognition of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides by human Toll-like receptor 9 and subsequent cytokine induction.

    PubMed

    Suwarti, Suwarti; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Svetlana, Chechetka; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2013-01-25

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes a synthetic ligand, oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) containing cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG). Activation of TLR9 by CpG ODN induces a signal transduction cascade that plays a pivotal role in first-line immune defense in the human body. The three-dimensional structure of TLR9 has not yet been reported, and the ligand-binding mechanism of TLR9 is still poorly understood; therefore, the mechanism of human TLR9 (hTLR9) ligand binding needs to be elucidated. In this study, we constructed several hTLR9 mutants, including truncated mutants and single mutants in the predicted CpG ODN-binding site. We used these mutants to analyze the role of potential important regions of hTLR9 in receptor signaling induced by phosphorothioate (PTO)-modified CpG ODN and CpG ODNs only consist entirely of a phosphodiester (PD) backbone, CpG ODN2006x3-PD that we developed. We found truncated mutants of hTLR9 lost the signaling activity, indicating that both the C- and N-termini of the extracellular domain (ECD) are necessary for the function of hTLR9. We identified residues, His505, Gln510, His530, and Tyr554, in the C-terminal of hTLR9-ECD that are essential for hTLR9 activation. These residues might form positive charged clusters with which negatively charged CpG ODN could interact. Furthermore, we observed ODN-PD induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) through TLR9 in a CpG-sequence-dependent manner in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and B cells, whereas ODN-PTO induced IL-6 in a CpG-sequence-independent manner. These finding are relevant for the mechanism of hTLR9 activation by CpG ODNs.

  20. Optimizing the measurement of mitochondrial protein synthesis in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Burd, Nicholas A; Tardif, Nicolas; Rooyackers, Olav; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of mitochondrial protein synthesis after food ingestion, contractile activity, and/or disease is often used to provide insight into skeletal muscle adaptations that occur in the longer term. Studies have shown that protein ingestion stimulates mitochondrial protein synthesis in human skeletal muscle. Minor differences in the stimulation of mitochondrial protein synthesis occur after a single bout of resistance or endurance exercise. There appear to be no measurable differences in mitochondrial protein synthesis between critically ill patients and aged-matched controls. However, the mitochondrial protein synthetic response is reduced at a more advanced age. In this paper, we discuss the challenges involved in the measurement of human skeletal muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis rates based on stable isotope amino acid tracer methods. Practical guidelines are discussed to improve the reliability of the measurement of mitochondrial protein synthesis rates. The value of the measurement of mitochondrial protein synthesis after a single meal or exercise bout on the prediction of the longer term skeletal muscle mass and performance outcomes in both the healthy and disease populations requires more work, but we emphasize that the measurements need to be reliable to be of any value to the field.

  1. RNA and protein synthesis in cultured human fibroblasts derived from donors of various ages.

    PubMed

    Chen, J J; Brot, N; Weissbach, H

    1980-07-01

    RNA synthesis in human fibroblasts from donors of various ages was studied in fibroblasts made permeable to nucleoside triphosphates with the nonionic detergent Nonidet P40. Cells from donors of 11 years and older showed a 30-40% decline in total RNA synthesis. The decrease in RNA synthesis was primarily due to a lowering of RNA polymerase II activity (alpha-amanitin sensitive). Studies on the incorporation of leucine into protein also showed a 30-40% decrease in cells from older donors.

  2. Cytokines in sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Krueger, J M; Takahashi, S; Kapás, L; Bredow, S; Roky, R; Fang, J; Floyd, R; Renegar, K B; Guha-Thakurta, N; Novitsky, S

    1995-01-01

    The central thesis of this essay is that the cytokine network in brain is a key element in the humoral regulation of sleep responses to infection and in the physiological regulation of sleep. We hypothesize that many cytokines, their cellular receptors, soluble receptors, and endogenous antagonists are involved in physiological sleep regulation. The expressions of some cytokines are greatly amplified by microbial challenge. This excess cytokine production during infection induces sleep responses. The excessive sleep and wakefulness that occur at different times during the course of the infectious process results from dynamic changes in various cytokines that occur during the host's response to infectious challenge. Removal of any one somnogenic cytokine inhibits normal sleep, alters the cytokine network by changing the cytokine mix, but does not completely disrupt sleep due to the redundant nature of the cytokine network. The cytokine network operates in a paracrine/autocrine fashion and is responsive to neuronal use. Finally, cytokines elicit their somnogenic actions via endocrine and neurotransmitter systems as well as having direct effects neurons and glia. Evidence in support of these postulates is reviewed in this essay.

  3. Tropism and Induction of Cytokines in Human Embryonic-Stem Cells-Derived Neural Progenitors upon Inoculation with Highly- Pathogenic Avian H5N1 Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Pringproa, Kidsadagon; Rungsiwiwut, Ruttachuk; Tantilertcharoen, Rachod; Praphet, Reunkeaw; Pruksananonda, Kamthorn; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction caused by neurovirulent influenza viruses is a dreaded complication of infection, and may play a role in some neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson-like diseases and encephalitis lethargica. Although CNS infection by highly pathogenic H5N1 virus has been demonstrated, it is unknown whether H5N1 infects neural progenitor cells, nor whether such infection plays a role in the neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. To pursue this question, we infected human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) differentiated from human embryonic stem cells in vitro with H5N1 virus, and studied the resulting cytopathology, cytokine expression, and genes involved in the differentiation. Human embryonic stem cells (BG01) were maintained and differentiated into the neural progenitors, and then infected by H5N1 virus (A/Chicken/Thailand/CUK2/04) at a multiplicity of infection of 1. At 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours post-infection (hpi), cytopathic effects were observed. Then cells were characterized by immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, supernatants quantified for virus titers, and sampled cells studied for candidate genes.The hNPCs were susceptible to H5N1 virus infection as determined by morphological observation and immunofluorescence. The infection was characterized by a significant up-regulation of TNF-α gene expression, while expressions of IFN-α2, IFN-β1, IFN-γ and IL-6 remained unchanged compared to mock-infected controls. Moreover, H5N1 infection did not appear to alter expression of neuronal and astrocytic markers of hNPCs, such as β-III tubulin and GFAP, respectively. The results indicate that hNPCs support H5N1 virus infection and may play a role in the neuroinflammation during acute viral encephalitis.

  4. Picfeltarraenin IA inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokine production by the nuclear factor-κB pathway in human pulmonary epithelial A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong; Wang, Qing; Ouyang, Yang; Wang, Qian; Xiong, Xudong

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of picfeltarraenin IA (IA) on respiratory inflammation by analyzing its effect on interleukin (IL)-8 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. The expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) in human pulmonary adenocarcinoma epithelial A549 cells in culture was also examined. Human pulmonary epithelial A549 cells and the human monocytic leukemia THP-1 cell line were used in the current study. Cell viability was measured using a methylthiazol tetrazolium assay. The production of IL-8 and PGE2 was investigated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of COX2 and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-p65 was examined using western blot analysis. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 µg/ml) resulted in the increased production of IL-8 and PGE2, and the increased expression of COX2 in the A549 cells. Furthermore, IA (0.1-10 µmol/l) significantly inhibited PGE2 production and COX2 expression in cells with LPS-induced IL-8, in a concentration-dependent manner. The results suggested that IA downregulates LPS-induced COX2 expression, and inhibits IL-8 and PGE2 production in pulmonary epithelial cells. Additionally, IA was observed to suppress the expression of COX2 in THP-1 cells, and also to regulate the expression of COX2 via the NF-κB pathway in the A549 cells, but not in the THP-1 cells. These results indicate that IA regulates LPS-induced cytokine release in A549 cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  5. Surface structure characterization of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia mutated in the melanin synthesis pathway and their human cellular immune response.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Beaussart, Audrey; Dufrêne, Yves F; Sharma, Meenu; Bansal, Kushagra; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Brakhage, Axel A; Kaveri, Srini V; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Beauvais, Anne

    2014-08-01

    In Aspergillus fumigatus, the conidial surface contains dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin. Six-clustered gene products have been identified that mediate sequential catalysis of DHN-melanin biosynthesis. Melanin thus produced is known to be a virulence factor, protecting the fungus from the host defense mechanisms. In the present study, individual deletion of the genes involved in the initial three steps of melanin biosynthesis resulted in an altered conidial surface with masked surface rodlet layer, leaky cell wall allowing the deposition of proteins on the cell surface and exposing the otherwise-masked cell wall polysaccharides at the surface. Melanin as such was immunologically inert; however, deletion mutant conidia with modified surfaces could activate human dendritic cells and the subsequent cytokine production in contrast to the wild-type conidia. Cell surface defects were rectified in the conidia mutated in downstream melanin biosynthetic pathway, and maximum immune inertness was observed upon synthesis of vermelone onward. These observations suggest that although melanin as such is an immunologically inert material, it confers virulence by facilitating proper formation of the A. fumigatus conidial surface.

  6. Age-related decline in prostacyclin synthesis by human aortic endothelial cells. Qualitative and quantitative analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, O.; Yamada, T.; Fan, J. L.; Watanabe, T.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the functional alteration of human aortic endothelial cells with aging, prostacyclin synthesis was qualitatively and quantitatively examined. The endothelial cells of human aortas and umbilical veins or inferior vena cavae were immunohistochemically examined and found positive for prostacyclin, but the intensity of aortic endothelial cells from older subjects was low. In addition to the endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells in the thickened intima, not the media, of the aorta were also immunoreactive. Endothelial cells were successfully cultured from human aortas obtained from infants through aged subjects and were subdivided into three groups: young, middle, and old. Prostacyclin synthesis by endothelial cells from all types of blood vessels was extremely great at the primary culture, but decreased abruptly in the following subcultures. Among the aortic endothelial cells, the young group synthesized the largest amount of prostacyclin in a conventional culture condition, with synthesis progressively decreasing in the older groups. The in vitro prostacyclin biosynthesis was supported by the qualitative analysis on the tissue sections. These results indicate that prostacyclin synthesis of the aortic endothelial cells decreases with age, but intimal smooth muscle cells potentially have a back-up mechanism and substitute this synthesis to some extent. The decreased synthesis of prostacyclin with age may play an important role in the development and advancement of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1707240

  7. A new method to produce monoPEGylated dimeric cytokines shown with human interferon-α2b.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Hsing; Rossi, Edmund A; Cardillo, Thomas M; Nordstrom, Diane L; McBride, William J; Goldenberg, David M

    2009-10-21

    We have adapted the dock-and-lock (DNL) method into a novel PEGylation technology using human interferon-α2b (IFN-α2b) as an example. Central to DNL is a pair of distinct protein domains involved in the natural association between cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). These domains serve as linkers for site-specific conjugation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to a dimeric form of IFN-α2b. The combination of a fusion protein comprising IFN-α2b and the dimerization-and-docking domain (DDD) of PKA with a PEG-derivatized anchoring domain (AD) of an interactive AKAP results in facile formation of a trimeric complex containing two copies of IFN-α2b and a single site-specifically linked PEG chain. Three such monoPEGylated dimers of IFN-α2b have been generated, the first with a 20 kDa linear PEG, referred to as α2b-362, the second with a 30 kDa linear PEG (α2b-413), and the third with a 40 kDa branched PEG (α2b-457). All three retained antiviral and antitumor activity in vitro and showed improved pharmacokinetic properties in mice, which translated into potent and prolonged therapeutic efficacy in the Daudi human lymphoma xenograft model. We anticipate wide applicability of the DNL method for developing long-acting therapeutics that are dimeric and monoPEGylated with the increased bioavailability allowing for less frequent dosing.

  8. Stimulation of glycogen synthesis by insulin in human erythroleukemia cells requires the synthesis of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol.

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, D F; Knez, J J; Medof, M E; Cuatrecasas, P; Saltiel, A R

    1994-01-01

    Although the insulin-dependent hydrolysis of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) may play an important role in insulin action, an absolute requirement for this glycolipid has not been demonstrated. Human K562 cells were mutated to produce a cell line (IA) incapable of the earliest step in PI glycosylation, the formation of PI-GlcNAc. Another cell line (IVD) was deficient in the deacetylation of PI-GlcNAc to form PI-GlcN and subsequent mannosylated species. Each line was transfected with wild-type human insulin receptors. Similar insulin-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation was observed in all three lines, along with a nearly identical increase in the association of phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate 1 with endogenous PI 3-kinase. Both normal and GPI-defective lines also displayed a similar 2- to 3-fold increase in phosphorylation of the Shc protein and its association with growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 in response to insulin. In contrast to these results, striking differences were noted in insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis. In normal cells, glycogen synthesis was significantly increased by insulin, whereas no insulin stimulation was observed in GPI-deficient IA cells, and only a trace of stimulation was detected in IVD cells. These results indicate that tyrosine phosphorylation produced by insulin is not dependent on GPI synthesis, and this effect is not sufficient to elicit at least some of the metabolic effects of the hormone. In contrast, GPI synthesis is required for the stimulation of glycogen synthesis by insulin in these cells. These findings support the existence of divergent pathways in the action of insulin. Images PMID:7524086

  9. A proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP) isolated from ovine colostrum. Modulation of H2O2 and cytokine induction in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Zabłocka, Agnieszka; Janusz, Maria; Macała, Józefa; Lisowski, Józef

    2007-07-01

    A proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP) has immunoregulatory properties and also shows beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is known that the unregulated activation of microglial cells in AD may result in chronic inflammatory response. There is a link between the activation of immune cells on the periphery and in the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, we studied the effect of the PRP on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated by LPS with PHA (LP) or PMA as proinflammatory activators. PRP and its nonapeptide fragment (NP) inhibited by 40-60% production of H(2)O(2) induced by PMA. The peptides also inhibited activity of superoxide dismutase. Both peptide preparations showed differential effects on the secretion of cytokines. NP induced TNF-alpha only while PRP induced IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-alpha. On the other hand, the release of TNF-alpha and IL-10 induced by LP in PBMCs was inhibited by PRP while NP inhibited the release of IFN-gamma and IL-10. The results obtained showed that PRP may affect not only adaptive immunity but also innate immunity and thus may regulate secretions of mediators of inflammation. The regulatory effect of the PRP on the innate immunity may shed some light on understanding the beneficial effects of this polypeptide complex in AD patients.

  10. Protective efficacy of VP1-specific neutralizing antibody associated with a reduction of viral load and pro-inflammatory cytokines in human SCARB2-transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsuen-Wen; Lin, Yi-Wen; Ho, Hui-Min; Lin, Min-Han; Liu, Chia-Chyi; Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Chong, Pele; Sia, Charles; Chow, Yen-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Hand-foot-mouth diseases (HFMD) caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus 16 (CVA16) in children have now become a severe public health issue in the Asian-Pacific region. Recently we have successfully developed transgenic mice expressing human scavenger receptor class B member 2 (hSCARB2, a receptor of EV71 and CVA16) as an animal model for evaluating the pathogenesis of enterovirus infections. In this study, hSCARB2-transgenic mice were used to investigate the efficacy conferred by a previously described EV71 neutralizing antibody, N3. A single injection of N3 effectively inhibited the HFMD-like skin scurfs in mice pre-infected with clinical isolate of EV71 E59 (B4 genotype) or prevented severe limb paralysis and death in mice pre-inoculated with 5746 (C2 genotype). This protection was correlated with remarkable reduction of viral loads in the brain, spinal cord and limb muscles. Accumulated viral loads and the associated pro-inflammatory cytokines were all reduced. The protective efficacy of N3 was not observed in animals challenged with CVA16. This could be due to dissimilarity sequences of the neutralizing epitope found in CVA16. These results indicate N3 could be useful in treating severe EV71 infections and the hSCARB2-transgenic mouse could be used to evaluate the protective efficacy of potential anti-enterovirus agent candidates.

  11. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from smokers release higher levels of IL-1-like cytokines after exposure to combustion-generated ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    De Falco, Gianluigi; Terlizzi, Michela; Sirignano, Mariano; Commodo, Mario; D'Anna, Andrea; Aquino, Rita P; Pinto, Aldo; Sorrentino, Rosalinda

    2017-02-22

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) generated by combustion processes are often associated with adverse health effects. However, little is known about the inflammatory processes generated by UFP that may underlie their toxicological activity. Murine macrophages (J774.1 cells) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to evaluate the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-inflammatory activity of UFP. The addition of soot particles to J774.1 cells induced a concentration-dependent release of IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-33 This effect was not associated with cell death and, in contrast to literature, was pronounced at very low concentrations (5-100 pg/ml). Similarly, UFP induced the release of IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 by PBMCs. However, this effect was solely observed in PBMCs obtained from smokers, as the PBMCs from non-smokers instead released higher levels of IL-10. The release of these cytokines after UFP exposure was caspase-1- and NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent in PBMCs from healthy smokers, whereas IL-1α release was calpain-dependent. These results show that UFP at very low concentrations are able to give rise to an inflammatory process that is responsible for IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 release, which is pronounced in PBMCs from smokers, confirming that these individuals are especially susceptible to inflammatory-based airway diseases once exposed to air pollution.

  12. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from smokers release higher levels of IL-1-like cytokines after exposure to combustion-generated ultrafine particles

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Gianluigi; Terlizzi, Michela; Sirignano, Mariano; Commodo, Mario; D’Anna, Andrea; Aquino, Rita P.; Pinto, Aldo; Sorrentino, Rosalinda

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) generated by combustion processes are often associated with adverse health effects. However, little is known about the inflammatory processes generated by UFP that may underlie their toxicological activity. Murine macrophages (J774.1 cells) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to evaluate the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-inflammatory activity of UFP. The addition of soot particles to J774.1 cells induced a concentration-dependent release of IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-33 This effect was not associated with cell death and, in contrast to literature, was pronounced at very low concentrations (5–100 pg/ml). Similarly, UFP induced the release of IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 by PBMCs. However, this effect was solely observed in PBMCs obtained from smokers, as the PBMCs from non-smokers instead released higher levels of IL-10. The release of these cytokines after UFP exposure was caspase-1- and NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent in PBMCs from healthy smokers, whereas IL-1α release was calpain-dependent. These results show that UFP at very low concentrations are able to give rise to an inflammatory process that is responsible for IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 release, which is pronounced in PBMCs from smokers, confirming that these individuals are especially susceptible to inflammatory-based airway diseases once exposed to air pollution. PMID:28223692

  13. [Effect of cetirizine hydrochloride on the expression of substance P receptor and cytokines production in human epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji-Yong; Zhao, Yong-Zhe; Peng, Cheng; Li, Feng-Qian; Zhu, Quan-Gang; Hu, Jin-Hong

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the effect of cetirizine hydrochloride on the expression of neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1R) and cytokines production induced by substance P (SP) in HaCaT cells (a human epidermal keratinocyte cell line) and dermal fibroblasts. The effect of cetirizine on the expression of NK-1R protein was detected by flow cytometry and Western blotting analysis. The modulation of cetirizine on the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-8 in HaCaT cells and fibroblasts was measured by ELISA. The results showed that cetirizine significantly inhibited the expression of NK-1R in HaCaT cells and fibroblasts. SP induced the production of IFN-gamma, IL-1beta and IL-8 in both cell types. Cetirizine 1-100 micromol x L(-1) inhibited SP-induced IL-1beta and IL-8 production in HaCaT cells and fibroblasts, while had no effect on the production of IFN-gamma in both cells. Both SP and cetirizine had no effect on the secretion of IL-6 in HaCaT cells and fibroblasts. These findings suggest that cetirizine may be involved in the treatment of SP-induced skin inflammation by inhibiting the expression of substance P receptor and regulation the production of IL-1beta and IL-8 in epidermal keratinocyte and dermal fibroblasts.

  14. Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentially Inhibit Cytokine Production by Peripheral Blood Monocytes Subpopulations and Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Laranjeira, Paula; Gomes, Joana; Pedrosa, Monia; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Domingues, Rosario; Abecasis, Manuel; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-01

    The immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) rendered them an attractive therapeutic approach for immune disorders and an increasing body of evidence demonstrated their clinical value. However, the influence of MSC on the function of specific immune cell populations, namely, monocyte subpopulations, is not well elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of human bone marrow MSC on the cytokine and chemokine expression by peripheral blood classical, intermediate and nonclassical monocytes, and myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), stimulated with lipopolysaccharide plus interferon (IFN)γ. We found that MSC effectively inhibit tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α and macrophage inflammatory protein- (MIP-) 1β protein expression in monocytes and mDC, without suppressing CCR7 and CD83 protein expression. Interestingly, mDC exhibited the highest degree of inhibition, for both TNF-α and MIP-1β, whereas the reduction of TNF-α expression was less marked for nonclassical monocytes. Similarly, MSC decreased mRNA levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β and IL-6 in classical monocytes, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10 in classical and nonclassical monocytes, and IL-1β and CXCL10 in mDC. MSC do not impair the expression of maturation markers in monocytes and mDC under our experimental conditions; nevertheless, they hamper the proinflammatory function of monocytes and mDC, which may impede the development of inflammatory immune responses. PMID:26060498

  15. Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentially Inhibit Cytokine Production by Peripheral Blood Monocytes Subpopulations and Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Paula; Gomes, Joana; Pedreiro, Susana; Pedrosa, Monia; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Domingues, Rosario; Abecasis, Manuel; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-01

    The immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) rendered them an attractive therapeutic approach for immune disorders and an increasing body of evidence demonstrated their clinical value. However, the influence of MSC on the function of specific immune cell populations, namely, monocyte subpopulations, is not well elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of human bone marrow MSC on the cytokine and chemokine expression by peripheral blood classical, intermediate and nonclassical monocytes, and myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), stimulated with lipopolysaccharide plus interferon (IFN)γ. We found that MSC effectively inhibit tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α and macrophage inflammatory protein- (MIP-) 1β protein expression in monocytes and mDC, without suppressing CCR7 and CD83 protein expression. Interestingly, mDC exhibited the highest degree of inhibition, for both TNF-α and MIP-1β, whereas the reduction of TNF-α expression was less marked for nonclassical monocytes. Similarly, MSC decreased mRNA levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β and IL-6 in classical monocytes, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10 in classical and nonclassical monocytes, and IL-1β and CXCL10 in mDC. MSC do not impair the expression of maturation markers in monocytes and mDC under our experimental conditions; nevertheless, they hamper the proinflammatory function of monocytes and mDC, which may impede the development of inflammatory immune responses.

  16. New Genome-Wide Algorithm Identifies Novel In-Vivo Expressed Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Antigens Inducing Human T-Cell Responses with Classical and Unconventional Cytokine Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Commandeur, Susanna; Dolganov, Gregory; Kramnik, Igor; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Comas, Inaki; Lund, Ole; Prins, Corine; van den Eeden, Susan J. F.; Korsvold, Gro E.; Oftung, Fredrik; Geluk, Annemieke; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2016-01-01

    New strategies are needed to develop better tools to control TB, including identification of novel antigens for vaccination. Such Mtb antigens must be expressed during Mtb infection in the major target organ, the lung, and must be capable of eliciting human immune responses. Using genome-wide transcriptomics of Mtb infected lungs we developed data sets and methods to identify IVE-TB (in-vivo expressed Mtb) antigens expressed in the lung. Quantitative expression analysis of 2,068 Mtb genes from the predicted first operons identified the most upregulated IVE-TB genes during in-vivo pulmonary infection. By further analysing high-level conservation among whole-genome sequenced Mtb-complex strains (n = 219) and algorithms predicting HLA-class-Ia and II presented epitopes, we selected the most promising IVE-TB candidate antigens. Several of these were recognized by T-cells from in-vitro Mtb-PPD and ESAT6/CFP10-positive donors by proliferation and multi-cytokine production. This was validated in an independent cohort of latently Mtb-infected individuals. Significant T-cell responses were observed in the absence of IFN-γ-production. Collectively, the results underscore the power of our novel antigen discovery approach in identifying Mtb antigens, including those that induce unconventional T-cell responses, which may provide important novel tools for TB vaccination and biomarker profiling. Our generic approach is applicable to other infectious diseases. PMID:27892960

  17. Proliferation, behavior, and cytokine gene expression of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells in response to different titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    An, Na; Schedle, Andreas; Wieland, Marco; Andrukhov, Oleh; Matejka, Michael; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2010-04-01

    Success of dental implantation is initially affected by wound healing of both, hard and soft tissues. Endothelial cells (ECs) are involved as crucial cells in the angiogenesis and inflammation process of wound healing. In the present study, proliferation, mobility, cluster formation, and gene expression of angiogenesis-related molecules of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated on titanium surfaces with different roughnesses: acid-etched (A), coarse-grit-blasted and acid-etched (SLA) surfaces, as well as on hydrophilic modified modA and modSLA surfaces. Cell behaviors were analyzed by proliferation assay and time-lapse microscopy, gene expression was analyzed by real time PCR. Results showed that cell proliferation, mobility, and cluster formation were highest on modA surfaces compared with all other surfaces. HUVECs moved slowly and exhibited seldom cell aggregation on SLA and modSLA surfaces during the whole observing period of 120 h. The gene expressions of the angiogenesis-related factors von Willebrand factor, thrombomodulin, endothelial cell protein C receptor, and adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin were most enhanced on modSLA surfaces. These results suggest that modA surface is optimal for proliferation and angiogenic behavior of ECs. However, modSLA surface seems to promote ECs to express angiogenesis-related factor genes, which play essential roles in controlling inflammation and revascularization of wound healing.

  18. Anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody-stimulated cytokines released from blood suppress CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 in human hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Czerwiński, Maciej; Kazmi, Faraz; Parkinson, Andrew; Buckley, David B

    2015-01-01

    Like most infections and certain inflammatory diseases, some therapeutic proteins cause a cytokine-mediated suppression of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes, which may lead to pharmacokinetic interactions with small-molecule drugs. We propose a new in vitro method to evaluate the whole blood-mediated effects of therapeutic proteins on drug-metabolizing enzymes in human hepatocytes cocultured with Kupffer cells. The traditional method involves treating hepatocyte cocultures with the therapeutic protein, which detects hepatocyte- and macrophage-mediated suppression of cytochrome P450 (P450). The new method involves treating whole human blood with a therapeutic protein to stimulate the release of cytokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), after which plasma is prepared and added to the hepatocyte coculture to evaluate P450 enzyme expression. In this study, human blood was treated for 24 hours at 37°C with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or ANC28.1, an antibody against human T-cell receptor CD28. Cytokines were measured in plasma by sandwich immunoassay with electrochemiluminescense detection. Treatment of human hepatocyte cocultures with LPS or with plasma from LPS-treated blood markedly reduced the expression of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4. However, treatment of hepatocyte cocultures with ANC28.1 did not suppress P450 expression, but treatment with plasma from ANC28.1-treated blood suppressed CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 activity and mRNA levels. The results demonstrated that applying plasma from human blood treated with a therapeutic protein to hepatocytes cocultured with Kupffer cells is a suitable method to identify those therapeutic proteins that suppress P450 expression by an indirect mechanism-namely, the release of cytokines from PBMCs.

  19. The novel inflammatory cytokine high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) is expressed by human term placenta

    PubMed Central

    Holmlund, Ulrika; Wähämaa, Heidi; Bachmayer, Nora; Bremme, Katarina; Sverremark-Ekström, Eva; Palmblad, Karin

    2007-01-01

    High mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) was previously considered a strict nuclear protein, but lately data are accumulating on its extranuclear functions. In addition to its potent proinflammatory capacities, HMGB1 has a prominent role in a number of processes of specific interest for the placenta. Our overall aim was to investigate the expression of HMGB1 in human term placenta and elucidate a potential difference in HMGB1 expression comparing vaginal deliveries with elective Caesarean sections. In addition, placentas from normal pregnancies were compared with placentas from pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia. Twenty-five placentas, 12 from normal term pregnancies and 13 from pregnancies complicated by pre-eclampsia were analysed with immunohistochemistry for HMGB1 and its putative receptors; receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4. We present the novel finding that in addition to a strong nuclear HMGB1 expression in almost all cells in investigated placentas, an individual variation of cytoplasmic HMGB1 expression was detected in the syncytiotrophoblast covering the peripheral chorionic villi, by cells in the decidua and in amnion. Production of HMGB1 was confirmed by in situ hybridization. Although labour can be described as a controlled inflammatory-like process no differences in HMGB1 expression could be observed comparing active labour and elective Caesarean sections. However, a tendency towards a higher expression of cytoplasmic HMGB1 in the decidua from women with pre-eclampsia was demonstrated. The abundant expression of the receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4 implicates a local capability to respond to HMGB1, although the precise role in the placenta remains to be elucidated. PMID:17617154

  20. Leukocytes, cytokines, growth factors and hormones in human skeletal muscle and blood after uphill or downhill running

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Christer; Sjödin, Bertil; Sjöberg, Berit; Lenkei, Rodica; Renström, Per; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Ekblom, Björn

    2004-01-01

    Muscular adaptation to physical exercise has previously been described as a repair process following tissue damage. Recently, evidence has been published to question this hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate inflammatory processes in human skeletal muscle and epimysium after acute physical exercise with large eccentric components. Three groups of subjects (n= 19) performed 45 min treadmill running at either 4 deg (n= 5) or 8 deg (n= 9) downhill or 4 deg uphill (n= 5) and one group served as control (n= 9). One biopsy was taken from each subject 48 h post exercise. Blood samples were taken up to 7 days post exercise. Compared to the control group, none of the markers of inflammation in muscle and epimysium samples was different in any exercised group. Only subjects in the Downhill groups experienced delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) and increased serum creatine kinase activity (CK). The detected levels of immunohistochemical markers for T cells (CD3), granulocytes (CD11b), leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1β (HIF-1β) were greater in epimysium from exercised subjects with DOMS ratings >3 (0–10 scale) compared to exercised subjects without DOMS but not higher than controls. Eccentric physical exercise (downhill running) did not result in skeletal muscle inflammation 48 h post exercise, despite DOMS and increased CK. It is suggested that exercise can induce DOMS by activating inflammatory factors present in the epimysium before exercise. Repeated physical training may alter the content of inflammatory factors in the epimysium and thus reduce DOMS. PMID:14766942

  1. Hormone and Cytokine Responses to Repeated Endotoxin Exposures-No Evidence of Endotoxin Tolerance After 5 Weeks in Humans.

    PubMed

    Rittig, Nikolaj; Thomsen, Henrik H; Bach, Ermina; Jørgensen, Jens Otto L; Møller, Niels

    2015-07-01

    Endotoxin administrations are used in experimental models of inflammatory disease. Short-term endotoxin tolerance in response to repeated endotoxin exposure is well known, but the duration of endotoxin tolerance in humans remains unknown. The main purpose of this study was to test whether endotoxin tolerance is present in vivo when separating endotoxin exposures with more than 5 weeks, a time span often used between individual investigations in clinical experimental studies. Seventeen healthy young men were exposed twice to Escherichia coli endotoxin. The inflammatory response was calculated as area under the curve between the first and second endotoxin exposures for heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, temperature, cortisol, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10. The median interval between exposures was 90 days (range, 37-244). The ratio between the inflammatory responses during the second and the first endotoxin exposures was 0.89 ± 0.09 (P = 0.28) for tumor necrosis factor α, 0.96 ± 0.07 (P = 0.53) for IL-1β, 0.97 ± 0.11 (P = 0.78) for IL-6, 1.30 ± 0.18 (P = 0.12) for IL-10, and 0.92 ± 0.04 (P = 0.10) for cortisol. Our data do not show evidence of in vivo tolerance to repeated endotoxin exposure when administrations are separated with at least 5 weeks. This observation is important in the planning and interpretation of future experimental endotoxin studies.

  2. Human CD4+ central and effector memory T cells produce IL-21: effect on cytokine-driven proliferation of CD4+ T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Tadashi; Rahman, Mizanur; Nara, Hidetoshi; Araki, Akemi; Makabe, Koki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Kumagai, Izumi; Kudo, Toshio; Ishii, Naoto; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Asao, Hironobu

    2007-10-01

    IL-21 regulates certain functions of T cells, B cells, NK cells and dendritic cells. Although activated CD4(+) T cells produce IL-21, data identifying the specific CD4(+) T cell subsets that produce IL-21 are conflicting. In a previous study, mouse IL-21 message was detected in T(H)2, whereas human IL-21 (hIL-21) message was found in both T(H)1 and follicular helper T cells. To identify the IL-21-secreting cell populations in human, we established a hybridoma cell line producing an anti-hIL-21 mAb. Intracellular hIL-21-staining experiments showed that hIL-21 was mainly expressed in activated CD4(+) central memory T cells and in activated CD4(+) effector memory T cells, but not in activated CD4(+) naive T cells. Moreover, IL-21 was produced upon activation by some IFN-gamma-producing T(H)1-polarized cells and some IL-17-producing T(H)17-polarized cells, but not by IL-4-producing T(H)2-polarized cells. These results suggest that specific CD4(+) T cell populations produce IL-21. In the functional analysis, we found that IL-21 significantly enhanced the cytokine-driven proliferation of CD4(+) helper T cells synergistically with IL-7 and IL-15 without T cell activation stimuli. Taken together, IL-21 produced from CD4(+) memory T cells may have a supportive role in the maintenance of CD4(+) T cell subsets.

  3. Expression of cytokines by human astrocytomas following stimulation by C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins: specific increase in interleukin-6 mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Sayah, S; Ischenko, A M; Zhakhov, A; Bonnard, A S; Fontaine, M

    1999-06-01

    C3a and C5a anaphylatoxins are two proinflammatory peptides generated during complement activation that act through distinct Gi protein-coupled receptors named C3aR and C5aR, respectively. We have demonstrated previously that human astrocytes expressed C3aR and C5aR constitutively and were able to produce a functional complement. In this study, we examined the effect of an anaphylatoxin stimulation on cytokine expression by human astrocyte cell lines. Interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta mRNA expression was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Whereas IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and transforming growth factor-beta mRNA levels remained unchanged, stimulation of astrocytoma cells (T98G, CB193, U118MG) by C3a, C5a, and peptidic C3aR and C5aR agonists induced an increase in the IL-6 mRNA level. The amount of IL-6 was markedly increased at 3 and 6 h and returned to the basal level at 9 h of stimulation. This response was specific, because pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin or with polyclonal anti-C3aR or anti-C5aR antibodies completely blocked the IL-6 mRNA increase. The IL-6 response was also investigated at the protein level, but IL-6 protein was detected neither in cell lysates nor in supernatants of stimulated cells. The anaphylatoxin-mediated transcriptional activation of IL-6 gene suggests that C3a and C5a could play a role in priming glial cells during the inflammatory process in the brain.

  4. Epstein-Barr Virus Interferes with the Amplification of IFNα Secretion by Activating Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 3 in Primary Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, François; Coulombe, François; Gaudreault, Eric; Paquet-Bouchard, Carine; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek; Gosselin, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Background Epstein-Barr virus is recognized to cause lymphoproliferative disorders and is also associated with cancer. Evidence suggests that monocytes are likely to be involved in EBV pathogenesis, especially due to a number of cellular functions altered in EBV-infected monocytes, a process that may affect efficient host defense. Because type I interferons (IFNs) are crucial mediators of host defense against viruses, we investigated the effect of EBV infection on the IFNα pathway in primary human monocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Infection of monocytes with EBV induced IFNα secretion but inhibited the positive feedback loop for the amplification of IFNα. We showed that EBV infection induced the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) and, to a lesser extent, SOCS1, two proteins known to interfere with the amplification of IFNα secretion mediated by the JAK/STAT signal transduction pathway. EBV infection correlated with a blockage in the activation of JAK/STAT pathway members and affected the level of phosphorylated IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7). Depletion of SOCS3, but not SOCS1, by small interfering RNA (siRNA) abrogated the inhibitory effect of EBV on JAK/STAT pathway activation and significantly restored IFNα secretion. Finally, transfection of monocytes with the viral protein Zta caused the upregulation of SOCS3, an event that could not be recapitulated with mutated Zta. Conclusions/Significance We propose that EBV protein Zta activates SOCS3 protein as an immune escape mechanism that both suppresses optimal IFNα secretion by human monocytes and favors a state of type I IFN irresponsiveness in these cells. This immunomodulatory effect is important to better understand the aspects of the immune response to EBV. PMID:20689596

  5. RAGE and TGF-β1 Cross-Talk Regulate Extracellular Matrix Turnover and Cytokine Synthesis in AGEs Exposed Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Andreea Iren; Stanca, Loredana; Geicu, Ovidiu Ionut; Munteanu, Maria Cristina; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2016-01-01

    AGEs accumulation in the skin affects extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover and triggers diabetes associated skin conditions and accelerated skin aging. The receptor of AGEs (RAGE) has an essential contribution to cellular dysfunction driven by chronic inflammatory responses while TGF-β1 is critical in both dermal homeostasis and inflammation. We investigated the contribution of RAGE and TGF-β1 to the modulation of inflammatory response and ECM turnover in AGEs milieu, using a normal fibroblast cell line. RAGE, TGF-β1, collagen I and III gene and protein expression were upregulated after exposure to AGEs-BSA, and MMP-2 was activated. AGEs-RAGE was pivotal in NF-κB dependent collagen I expression and joined with TGF-β1 to stimulate collagen III expression, probably via ERK1/2 signaling. AGEs-RAGE axis induced upregulation of TGF-β1, TNF-α and IL-8 cytokines. TNF-α and IL-8 were subjected to TGF-β1 negative regulation. RAGE’s proinflammatory signaling also antagonized AGEs-TGF-β1 induced fibroblast contraction, suggesting the existence of an inhibitory cross-talk mechanism between TGF-β1 and RAGE signaling. RAGE and TGF-β1 stimulated anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-2 and IL-4 expression. GM-CSF and IL-6 expression appeared to be dependent only on TGF-β1 signaling. Our data also indicated that IFN-γ upregulated in AGEs-BSA milieu in a RAGE and TGF-β1 independent mechanism. Our findings raise the possibility that RAGE and TGF-β1 are both involved in fibrosis development in a complex cross-talk mechanism, while also acting on their own individual targets. This study contributes to the understanding of impaired wound healing associated with diabetes complications. PMID:27015414

  6. Decreasing SMPD1 activity in BEAS-2B bronchial airway epithelial cells results in increased NRF2 activity, cytokine synthesis and neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    MacFadden-Murphy, Elyse; Roussel, Lucie; Martel, Guy; Bérubé, Julie; Rousseau, Simon

    2017-01-22

    Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) type B is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by variable levels of impairment in sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) activity. Lung involvement is the most important prognostic factor in NPD-B, with recurrent respiratory infections starting in infancy being the major cause of morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that decreased SMPD1 activity impaired airway epithelium host defense response. SMPD1 activity was reduced using inducible shRNA. Surprisingly, decreasing SMPD1 activity by 50%, resulted in increased neutrophil recruitment, both at baseline and in response to bacterial stimulation. This correlated with elevated levels of cytokine mRNA shown to contribute to neutrophil recruitment in unstimulated (e.g. IL-8 and GRO-α) and infected cells (e.g. IL-8, GRO-α, GM-CSF and CCL20). Instead of preventing the host defence responses, decreased SMPD1 activity results in an inflammatory response even in the absence of infection. Moreover, decreasing SMPD1 activity resulted in a pro-oxidative shift. Accordingly, expression of an inactive mutant, SMPD1[L225P] but not the WT enzyme increased activation of the antioxidant transcription factor NRF2. Therefore, decreasing SMPD1 activity by 50% in airway epithelial cells, the equivalent of the loss of one allele, results in the accumulation of oxidants that activates NRF2 and a concomitant increased cytokine production as well as neutrophil recruitment. This can result in a chronic inflammatory state that impairs host defence similar to scenarios observe in other chronic inflammatory lung disease such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Cystic Fibrosis.

  7. Production and function of cytokines in natural and acquired immunity to Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ashman, R B; Papadimitriou, J M

    1995-01-01

    Host resistance against infections caused by the yeast Candida albicans is mediated predominantly by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages. Antigens of Candida stimulate lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine synthesis, and in both humans and mice, these cytokines enhance the candidacidal functions of the phagocytic cells. In systemic candidiasis in mice, cytokine production has been found to be a function of the CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. The Th1 subset of these cells, characterized by the production of gamma interferon and interleukin-2, is associated with macrophage activation and enhanced resistance against reinfection, whereas the Th2 subset, which produces interleukins-4, -6, and -10, is linked to the development of chronic disease. However, other models have generated divergent data. Mucosal infection generally elicits Th1-type cytokine responses and protection from systemic challenge, and identification of cytokine mRNA present in infected tissues of mice that develop mild or severe lesions does not show pure Th1- or Th2-type responses. Furthermore, antigens of C. albicans, mannan in particular, can induce suppressor cells that modulate both specific and nonspecific cellular and humoral immune responses, and there is an emerging body of evidence that molecular mimicry may affect the efficiency of anti-Candida responses within defined genetic contexts. PMID:8531890

  8. Antimicrobial decapeptide KSL-W attenuates Candida albicans virulence by modulating its effects on Toll-like receptor, human β-defensin, and cytokine expression by engineered human oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Semlali, A; Leung, K P; Curt, S; Rouabhia, M

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the toxicity of synthetic antimicrobial decapeptide KSL-W on normal human gingival epithelial cell cultures, its effect on Candida albicans adhesion and growth, and the activation of epithelial cell innate immunity. Our results indicate that KSL-W had no toxic effect on cell adhesion or growth, suggesting its safe use with human cells. Pre-treating C. albicans with KSL-W attenuated the yeast's virulence as demonstrated by its reduced adhesion and growth on engineered human oral mucosa epithelium and the subsequent decreased expression of some innate defense molecules by targeted epithelial cells. Indeed, the expression of Toll-like receptors and human β-defensins was reduced in tissues infected with KSL-W-treated Candida. Proinflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-1β and IL-6) by the epithelial cells was also regulated by KSL-W in a manner similar to that of antifungal molecule amphotericin B. These findings therefore show that KSL-W is safe for use with human cells and is able to attenuate Candida virulence by modulating its effects on host innate immunity. This study proposes the potential application of KSL-W peptide as an alternative antifungal agent.

  9. Murine stromal cells counteract the loss of long-term culture-initiating cell potential induced by cytokines in CD34(+)CD38(low/neg) human bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Bennaceur-Griscelli, A; Tourino, C; Izac, B; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L

    1999-07-15

    Evidence has been provided recently that shows that high concentrations of cytokines can fulfill functions previously attributed to stromal cells, such as promote the survival of, and led to a net increase in human primitive progenitors initiating long-term cultures in vitro (LTC-IC) or engrafting NOD-SCID (nonobese diabetic severe-combined immunodeficient) recipients in vivo. These data prompted us to re-evaluate whether stromal cells will further alter the properties of primitive progenitor cells exposed to cytokines. Single CD34(+)CD38(low) and CD38(neg) cells were incubated 10 days in serum-containing or serum-free medium in the presence or in the absence of murine marrow-derived stromal cells (MS-5). Recombinant human cytokines stem cell factor (SCF), pegylated-megakaryocyte growth and differentiation factor (PEG-MGDF), FLT3-L, Interleukin (IL)-3, IL-6, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were systematically added at various concentrations (10 to 300 ng/mL). Cell proliferation and LTC-IC potential were evaluated in each clone after 10 days. A striking and consistent observation was the retention of a high LTC-IC potential in clones exposed to cytokines in the presence of stromal feeders, whereas clones exposed to cytokines alone in the absence of stromal feeders rapidly lost their LTC-IC potential as they proliferated. This was reflected both by the higher proportion of wells containing LTC-IC and by the high numbers of CFC produced after 5 weeks in clones grown with MS-5 during the first 10 days. We further showed by analyzing multiple replicates of a single clone at day 10 that MS-5 cells promoted a net increase in the LTC-IC compartment through self-renewal divisions. Interestingly, these primitive LTC-IC were equally distributed among small and large clones, as counted at day 10, indicating that active proliferation and loss of LTC-IC potential could be dissociated. These observations show that, in primitive cells, stromal cells

  10. Cytokines in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Baliwag, Jaymie; Barnes, Drew H; Johnston, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with an incompletely understood etiology. The disease is characterized by red, scaly and well-demarcated skin lesions formed by the hyperproliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. This hyperproliferation is driven by cytokines secreted by activated resident immune cells, an infiltrate of T cells, dendritic cells and cells of the innate immune system, as well as the keratinocytes themselves. Psoriasis has a strong hereditary character and has a complex genetic background. Genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms within or near a number of genes encoding cytokines, cytokine receptors or elements of their signal transduction pathways, further implicating these cytokines in the psoriasis pathomechanism. A considerable number of inflammatory cytokines have been shown to be elevated in lesional psoriasis skin, and the serum concentrations of a subset of these also correlate with psoriasis disease severity. The combined effects of the cytokines found in psoriasis lesions likely explain most of the clinical features of psoriasis, such as the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, increased neovascularization and skin inflammation. Thus, understanding which cytokines play a pivotal role in the disease process can suggest potential therapeutic targets. A number of cytokines have been therapeutically targeted with success, revolutionizing treatment of this disease. Here we review a number of key cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  11. Human CD4+ T cells require exogenous cystine for glutathione and DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Levring, Trine B; Kongsbak, Martin; Rode, Anna K O; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Geisler, Carsten

    2015-09-08

    Adaptive immune responses require activation and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. Whereas early T cell activation is independent of exogenous cystine (Cys2), T cell proliferation is dependent of Cys2. However, the exact roles of Cys2 in T cell proliferation still need to be determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate why activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 in order to proliferate. We activated purified naïve human CD4+ T cells and found that glutathione (GSH) levels and DNA synthesis were dependent on Cys2 and increased in parallel with increasing concentrations of Cys2. Vice-versa, the GSH synthesis inhibitor L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) and inhibition of Cys2 uptake with glutamate inhibited GSH and DNA synthesis in parallel. We further found that thioredoxin (Trx) can partly substitute for GSH during DNA synthesis. Finally, we show that GSH or Trx is required for the activity of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), the enzyme responsible for generation of the deoxyribonucleotide DNA building blocks. In conclusion, we show that activated human T cells require exogenous Cys2 to proliferate and that this is partly explained by the fact that Cys2 is required for production of GSH, which in turn is required for optimal RNR-mediated deoxyribonucleotide synthesis and DNA replication.

  12. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify a function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in Hs27. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YIGSR peptide enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis both of gene and protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were no changes in cell proliferation and MMP-1 level in YIGSR treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR effect on collagen synthesis mediated activation of FAK, pyk2 and ERK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR-induced FAK and ERK activation was modulated by FAK and MEK inhibitors. -- Abstract: The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the {beta}1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67 kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate

  13. TNF-α and Th2 cytokines induce atopic dermatitis-like features on epidermal differentiation proteins and stratum corneum lipids in human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Danso, Mogbekeloluwa O; van Drongelen, Vincent; Mulder, Aat; van Esch, Jeltje; Scott, Hannah; van Smeden, Jeroen; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2014-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease in which the skin barrier function is disrupted. In this inflammatory AD environment, cytokines are upregulated, but the cytokine effect on the AD skin barrier is not fully understood. We aimed to investigate the influence of Th2 (IL-4, IL-13, IL-31) and pro-inflammatory (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)) cytokines on epidermal morphogenesis, proliferation, differentiation, and stratum corneum lipid properties. For this purpose, we used the Leiden epidermal model (LEM) in which the medium was supplemented with these cytokines. Our results show that IL-4, IL-13, IL-31, and TNF-α induce spongiosis, augment TSLP secretion by keratinocytes, and alter early and terminal differentiation-protein expression in LEMs. TNF-α alone or in combination with Th2 cytokines decreases the level of long chain free fatty acids (FFAs) and ester linked ω-hydroxy (EO) ceramides, consequently affecting the lipid organization. IL-31 increases long chain FFAs in LEMs but decreases relative abundance of EO ceramides. These findings clearly show that supplementation with TNF-α and Th2 cytokines influence epidermal morphogenesis and barrier function. As a result, these LEMs show similar characteristics as found in AD skin and can be used as an excellent tool for screening formulations and drugs for the treatment of AD.

  14. Activin suppresses LPS-induced Toll-like receptor, cytokine and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in normal human melanocytes by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Il; Park, Seung-Won; Kang, In Jung; Shin, Min Kyung; Lee, Mu-Hyoung

    2015-10-01

    Activins are dimeric growth and differentiation factors that belong to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily of structurally related signaling proteins. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms through which activin regulates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcription of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in human melanocytes, as well as the involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Cell proliferation was analyzed by cell viability assay, mRNA expression was detected by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was measured by western blot analysis. LPS increased the mRNA expression of TLRs (TLR1-10) and cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α], as well as the mRNA and protein expression of iNOS. Activin decreased the LPS-induced TLR and cytokine mRNA expression, as well as the LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression. In addition, activin suppressed NF-κB p65 activation and blocked inhibitor of NF-κB (IκBα) degradation in LPS-stimulated melanocytes, and reduced LPS-induced p38 MAPK and MEK/ERK activation. On the whole, our results demonstrated that activin inhibited TLR and cytokine expression in LPS-activated normal human melanocytes and suppressed LPS-induced iNOS gene expression. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory effects of activin were shown to be mediated through the suppression of NF-κB and MAPK signaling, resulting in reduced TLR and iNOS expression, and in the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine expression.

  15. Effect of an extract based on the medicinal mushroom Agaricus blazei murill on release of cytokines, chemokines and leukocyte growth factors in human blood ex vivo and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E; Førland, D T; Saetre, L; Bernardshaw, S V; Lyberg, T; Hetland, G

    2009-03-01

    An immunostimulatory extract based on the medicinal mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill (AbM) has been shown to stimulate mononuclear phagocytes in vitro to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, and to protect against lethal peritonitis in mice. The present aim was to study the effect of AbM on release of several cytokines in human whole blood both after stimulation ex vivo and in vivo after oral intake over several days in healthy volunteers. The 17 signal substances examined were; T helper 1 (Th1) cytokines [interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-12], T helper 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13), pleiotropic (IL-7, IL-17), pro-inflammatory [IL-1beta, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha (main