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Sample records for human elbow flexor

  1. Responses of human elbow flexor muscles to electrically stimulated forced lengthening exercise.

    PubMed

    Nosaka, K; Newton, M; Sacco, P

    2002-02-01

    This study developed an electrical stimulation model for human elbow flexors to examine eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage and adaptation. Male students (n=17) were randomly placed into one of two groups; isometric (ES-ISO, n=8) and eccentric (ES-ECC, n=9). The elbow joint was fixed at 90 degrees (1.57 rad) and the elbow flexors stimulated percutaneously by an electronic muscle stimulator for 5 s through two electrodes placed over the muscles for ES-ISO. In ES-ECC, the muscles were stimulated similarly to the ES-ISO, but the elbow joint was forcibly extended from an elbow flexed (90 degrees 1.57 rad) to a full-extended position (180 degrees, 3.14 rad) in 3 s. Maximal voluntary isometric force, range of motion, upper arm circumference, muscle thickness by ultrasonography, muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase activities were assessed before and for 4 days after exercise. ES-ECC produced significantly larger changes in all criterion measures compared with ES-ISO (P < 0.01). These findings confirmed that eccentric muscle actions induced muscle damage, but isometric contractions resulted in little or no damage. Six subjects from the ES-ECC group repeated the same eccentric exercise (ECC2) 2 weeks after the first bout (ECC1), and changes in the criterion measures were compared between the bouts. Changes in all criterion measures after ECC2 were significantly smaller than ECC1 (P < 0.01). These results suggest that the first eccentric exercise produced a protective effect against muscle damage in the subsequent eccentric exercise bout, which does not involve adaptations in the central nervous system.

  2. Reduced short-interval intracortical inhibition after eccentric muscle damage in human elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Bradley M; Semmler, John G

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to examine the effect of eccentric exercise on short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) after damage to elbow flexor muscles. Nine young (22.5 ± 0.6 yr; mean ± SD) male subjects performed maximal eccentric exercise of the elbow flexor muscles until maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force was reduced by ∼40%. TMS was performed before, 2 h after, and 2 days after exercise under Rest and Active (5% MVC) conditions with motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) recorded from the biceps brachii (BB) muscle. Peripheral electrical stimulation of the brachial plexus was used to assess maximal M-waves, and paired-pulse TMS with a 3-ms interstimulus interval was used to assess changes in SICI at each time point. The eccentric exercise resulted in a 34% decline in strength (P < 0.001), a 41% decline in resting M-wave (P = 0.01), changes in resting elbow joint angle (10°, P < 0.001), and a shift in the optimal elbow joint angle for force production (18°, P < 0.05) 2 h after exercise. This was accompanied by impaired muscle strength (27%, P < 0.001) and increased muscle soreness (P < 0.001) 2 days after exercise, which is indicative of muscle damage. When the test MEP amplitudes were matched between sessions, we found that SICI was reduced by 27% in resting and 23% in active BB muscle 2 h after exercise. SICI recovered 2 days after exercise when muscle pain and soreness were present, suggesting that delayed onset muscle soreness from eccentric exercise does not influence SICI. The change in SICI observed 2 h after exercise suggests that eccentric muscle damage has widespread effects throughout the motor system that likely includes changes in motor cortex.

  3. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, JL; Gandevia, SC

    2005-01-01

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops ∼1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 ± 3% (mean ±s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 ± 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 ± 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1–2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1–4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 ± 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation deficit lies in the

  4. Maximal force, voluntary activation and muscle soreness after eccentric damage to human elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Prasartwuth, O; Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2005-08-15

    Muscle damage reduces voluntary force after eccentric exercise but impaired neural drive to the muscle may also contribute. To determine whether the delayed-onset muscle soreness, which develops approximately 1 day after exercise, reduces voluntary activation and to identify the possible site for any reduction, voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles was examined with both motor cortex and motor nerve stimulation. We measured maximal voluntary isometric torque (MVC), twitch torque, muscle soreness and voluntary activation in eight subjects before, immediately after, 2 h after, 1, 2, 4 and 8 days after eccentric exercise. Motor nerve stimulation and motor cortex stimulation were used to derive twitch torques and measures of voluntary activation. Eccentric exercise immediately reduced the MVC by 38 +/- 3% (mean +/- s.d., n = 8). The resting twitch produced by motor nerve stimulation fell by 82 +/- 6%, and the estimated resting twitch by cortical stimulation fell by 47 +/- 15%. While voluntary torque recovered after 8 days, both measures of the resting twitch remained depressed. Muscle tenderness occurred 1-2 days after exercise, and pain during contractions on days 1-4, but changes in voluntary activation did not follow this time course. Voluntary activation assessed with nerve stimulation fell 19 +/- 6% immediately after exercise but was not different from control values after 2 days. Voluntary activation assessed by motor cortex stimulation was unchanged by eccentric exercise. During MVCs, absolute increments in torque evoked by nerve and cortical stimulation behaved differently. Those to cortical stimulation decreased whereas those to nerve stimulation tended to increase. These findings suggest that reduced voluntary activation contributes to the early force loss after eccentric exercise, but that it is not due to muscle soreness. The impairment of voluntary activation to nerve stimulation but not motor cortical stimulation suggests that the activation

  5. Effect of elbow joint angle on force-EMG relationships in human elbow flexor and extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Doheny, Emer P; Lowery, Madeleine M; Fitzpatrick, David P; O'Malley, Mark J

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of joint angle on the relationship between force and electromyogram (EMG) amplitude and median frequency, in the biceps, brachioradialis and triceps muscles. Surface EMG were measured at eight elbow angles, during isometric flexion and extension at force levels from 10% to 100% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Joint angle had a significant effect on MVC force, but not on MVC EMG amplitude in all of the muscles examined. The median frequency of the biceps and triceps EMG decreased with increasing muscle length, possibly due to relative changes in electrode position or a decrease in muscle fibre diameter. The relationship between EMG amplitude and force, normalised with respect to its maximum force at each angle, did not vary with joint angle in the biceps or brachioradialis muscles over all angles, or in the triceps between 45 degrees and 120 degrees of flexion. These results suggest that the neural excitation level to each muscle is determined by the required percentage of available force rather than the absolute force required. It is, therefore, recommended that when using surface EMG to estimate muscle excitation, force should be normalised with respect to its maximum value at each angle.

  6. Differences in activation patterns in elbow flexor muscles during isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, K; Kawakami, Y; Fukunaga, T; Yano, H; Miyashita, M

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the relative activation of the synergistic muscles during three different types of muscle contraction, the electromyograms (EMG) of two elbow flexor muscles, the biceps brachii (BB) and the brachioradialis (BR), have been compared. To accomplish this eight healthy human subjects performed the following elbow flexions against the same load--concentric, eccentric and isometric contractions. The isometric contractions were performed at three elbow angles: 10, 45 and 90 degrees (0 degree equal to full extension). The EMG were recorded by bipolar surface electrodes, and the relative activation between the two muscles was evaluated as the quotient of mean EMG activities (BR/BB). For the isotonic elbow flexions, BR/BB were calculated at three angle divisions: 0-30 degrees, 30-60 degrees and 60-90 degrees. Results indicated that the relative activation of the BR during the concentric contractions was higher than that of the eccentric contraction, particularly at the extended elbow angles, i.e. the BR/BB of the concentric contractions for the elbow joint angles ranging from 0-30 degrees and 30-60 degrees were significantly greater (P < 0.05) than those of the eccentric contractions. During the isometric and eccentric contractions, the BR/BB at the flexed joint angles tended to be greater than those at the extended angles. In contrast, there were no angle-dependent BR/BB variations during the concentric elbow flexions. Further, changing patterns in the EMG power spectra due to the type of contraction were different between BB and BR. These results indicated that the activation pattern in the two elbow flexor muscles varied with the muscle contraction pattern.

  7. Effects of aging and sex on voluntary activation and peak relaxation rate of human elbow flexors studied with motor cortical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Joery P; McNeil, Chris J; Bredius, Marlous S; Gandevia, Simon C

    2013-08-01

    Data are equivocal on whether voluntary activation is preserved or decreased in old compared to young adults. Further, data are scant on the effect of age on the rate of muscle relaxation when the muscle is contracting voluntarily. Assessment of both measures with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) yields information which cannot be obtained with traditional peripheral nerve stimulation. Hence, voluntary activation and peak relaxation rate of the elbow flexors were assessed with TMS during repeated maximal efforts in 30 men and 28 women between the ages of 22-84 years. Voluntary activation was similar for the two sexes (P = 0.154) and was not affected by age in men (96.2 ± 2.7 %; P = 0.887) or women (95.1 ± 3.0 %; P = 0.546). Men had a significantly faster peak rate of relaxation than women in absolute units (-880.0 ± 223.2 vs. -360.2 ± 78.5 Nm/ s, respectively; P < 0.001) and when normalized to subject strength (-12.5 ± 2.1 vs. -8.7 ± 1.0 s(-1), respectively; P < 0.001). Absolute and normalized relaxation rates slowed with age in men (P = 0.002 and P = 0.006, respectively), but not women (P = 0.142 and P = 0.950, respectively). Across the age range studied, all subjects, regardless of age or sex, were able to achieve high voluntary activation scores for the elbow flexors (~95 %). In contrast, peak relaxation rate was markedly faster in men than women and slowed with age in men but not women. Normalization of relaxation rates to strength did not affect the influence of age or sex.

  8. Effect of strength training on regional hypertrophy of the elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Marcos D M; Szmuchrowski, Leszek A; Goulart, Karine N O; Couto, Bruno P

    2016-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy is the main structural adaptation to strength training. We investigated the chronic effects of strength training on muscle hypertrophy in different regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Eleven untrained men (21.8 ± 1.62 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging to determine the proximal, medial, distal, and mean cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the elbow flexors. The volunteers completed 12 weeks of strength training. The training protocol consisted of 4 sets of 8-10 maximum repetitions of unilateral elbow flexion. The interval between sets was 120 s. The training frequency was 3 sessions per week. The magnetic resonance images verified the presence of significant and similar hypertrophy in the distal, medial, and proximal portions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle hypertrophy may be assessed using only the medial CSA. We should not expect different degrees of hypertrophy among the regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle Nerve 54: 750-755, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Effects of Elbow Joint Angle Change on the Elbow Flexor Muscle Activation in Pulley with Weight Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Taewook; Seo, Youngjoon; Park, Jaehoon; Dong, Eunseok; Seo, Byungdo; Han, Dongwook

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This research investigated the effect of angular variation of flexion of the elbow joint on the muscle activation of elbow flexor muscles. [Subjects] The research subjects were 24 male college students with a dominant right hand who had no surgical or neurological disorders and gave their prior written consent to participation with full knowledge of the method and purpose of this study. [Methods] The subjects' shoulder joints stayed in the resting position, and the elbow joint was positioned at angles of 55°, 70°, and 90°. The angle between the pulley with weights and forearm stayed at 90°. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activities. Three measurements were made at each elbow angle, and every time the angle changed, two minutes rest was given. [Result] The muscle activities of the elbow flexors showed significant changes with change in the elbow joint angle, except for the biceps brachii activities between the angles of 55° and 70° of elbow flexion. The muscle activities of the biceps brachii and brachioradialis showed angle-related changes in the order of 55°, which showed the biggest value, followed by 70° and 90°. [Conclusion] In order to improve muscle strength of the elbow flexor using a pulley system, it seems more effective to have a 90° angle between the pulley with weights and the forearm when the muscle is stretched to a length 20% greater than its resting position. PMID:24259930

  10. The effects of elbow joint angle change on the elbow flexor muscle activation in pulley with weight exercise.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taewook; Seo, Youngjoon; Park, Jaehoon; Dong, Eunseok; Seo, Byungdo; Han, Dongwook

    2013-09-01

    [Purpose] This research investigated the effect of angular variation of flexion of the elbow joint on the muscle activation of elbow flexor muscles. [Subjects] The research subjects were 24 male college students with a dominant right hand who had no surgical or neurological disorders and gave their prior written consent to participation with full knowledge of the method and purpose of this study. [Methods] The subjects' shoulder joints stayed in the resting position, and the elbow joint was positioned at angles of 55°, 70°, and 90°. The angle between the pulley with weights and forearm stayed at 90°. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activities. Three measurements were made at each elbow angle, and every time the angle changed, two minutes rest was given. [Result] The muscle activities of the elbow flexors showed significant changes with change in the elbow joint angle, except for the biceps brachii activities between the angles of 55° and 70° of elbow flexion. The muscle activities of the biceps brachii and brachioradialis showed angle-related changes in the order of 55°, which showed the biggest value, followed by 70° and 90°. [Conclusion] In order to improve muscle strength of the elbow flexor using a pulley system, it seems more effective to have a 90° angle between the pulley with weights and the forearm when the muscle is stretched to a length 20% greater than its resting position.

  11. A Case of Congenital Bilateral Absence of Elbow Flexor Muscles: Review of Differential Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aliu, Oluseyi; Samra, Saleh; Lewis, Eric

    2007-01-01

    A 1-year-old boy presented to us with congenital inability to flex his elbow. He had bilaterally absent biceps brachii and brachialis muscles, a rare condition. We performed pedicle latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flaps to the left and right volar upper arm at 21 and 24 months of age, respectively, to create elbow flexors. By 4 years of age, he had excellent elbow flexion bilaterally with strength grade in excess of 4.5. In addition to discussing our patient’s treatment options, we discuss other potential causes of weak elbow flexion when faced with this clinical dilemma. PMID:18780113

  12. Knee extension fatigue attenuates repeated force production of the elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Israel; Aboodarda, Saied J; Behm, David G

    2014-01-01

    Non-local muscle fatigue has been demonstrated with unilateral activities, where fatiguing one limb alters opposite limb forces. Fewer studies have examined if non-local fatigue occurs with unrelated muscles. The purpose of this study was to investigate if knee extensors fatigue alters elbow flexors force and electromyography (EMG) activity. Eighteen males completed a control and fatiguing session (randomised). Blood lactate was initially sampled followed by three maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) with the elbow flexors and two with the knee extensors. Thereafter, subjects either sat (control) or performed five sets of bilateral dynamic knee extensions to exhaustion using a load equal to the dominant limb MVC (1-min rest between sets). Immediately afterwards, subjects were assessed for blood lactate and unilateral knee extensors MVC, and after 1 min performed a single unilateral elbow flexor MVC. Two minutes later, subjects performed 12 unilateral elbow flexor MVCs (5 s contraction/10 s rest) followed by a third blood lactate test. Compared to control, knee extensor force dropped by 35% (p < 0.001; ES = 1.6) and blood lactate increased by 18% (p < 0.001; ES = 2.8). Elbow flexor forces were lower after the fatiguing protocol only during the last five MVCs (p < 0.05; ES = ∼ 0.58; ∼ 5%). No changes occurred between conditions in EMG. Elbow flexor forces significantly decreased after knee extensors fatigue. The effect was revealed during the later stages of the repeated MVCs protocol, demonstrating that non-local fatigue may have a stronger effect on repeated rather than on single attempts of maximal force production.

  13. Isometric torque-angle relationships of the elbow flexors and extensors in the transverse plane.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Ilona J; Bobbert, Maarten F; van Soest, A J Knoek; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2010-10-01

    Maximal voluntary isometric torque-angle relationships of elbow extensors and flexors in the transverse plane (humerus elevation angle of 90 degrees ) were measured at two different horizontal adduction angles of the humerus compared to thorax: 20 degrees and 45 degrees . For both elbow flexors and extensors, the torque-angle relationship was insensitive to this 25 degrees horizontal adduction of the humerus. The peak in torque-angle relationship of elbow extensors was found at 55 degrees (0 degrees is full extension). This is closer to full elbow extension than reported by researchers who investigated this relationship in the sagittal plane. Using actual elbow angles during contraction, as we did in this study, instead of angles set by the dynamometer, as others have done, can partly explain this difference. We also measured electromyographic activity of the biceps and triceps muscles with pairs of surface electrodes and found that electromyographic activity level of the agonistic muscles was correlated to measured net torque (elbow flexion torque: Pearson's r=0.21 and extension torque: Pearson's r=0.53). We conclude that the isometric torque-angle relationship of the elbow extensors found in this study provides a good representation of the force-length relationship and the moment arm-angle relationship of the elbow extensors, but angle dependency of neural input gives an overestimation of the steepness. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-latency reflexes of elbow and shoulder muscles suggest reciprocal excitation of flexors, reciprocal excitation of extensors, and reciprocal inhibition between flexors and extensors.

    PubMed

    Kurtzer, Isaac; Meriggi, Jenna; Parikh, Nidhi; Saad, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Postural corrections of the upper limb are required in tasks ranging from handling an umbrella in the changing wind to securing a wriggling baby. One complication in this process is the mechanical interaction between the different segments of the arm where torque applied at one joint induces motion at multiple joints. Previous studies have shown the long-latency reflexes of shoulder muscles (50-100 ms after a limb perturbation) account for these mechanical interactions by integrating information about motion of both the shoulder and elbow. It is less clear whether long-latency reflexes of elbow muscles exhibit a similar capability and what is the relation between the responses of shoulder and elbow muscles. The present study utilized joint-based loads tailored to the subjects' arm dynamics to induce well-controlled displacements of their shoulder and elbow. Our results demonstrate that the long-latency reflexes of shoulder and elbow muscles integrate motion from both joints: the shoulder and elbow flexors respond to extension at both joints, whereas the shoulder and elbow extensors respond to flexion at both joints. This general pattern accounts for the inherent flexion-extension coupling of the two joints arising from the arm's intersegmental dynamics and is consistent with spindle-based reciprocal excitation of shoulder and elbow flexors, reciprocal excitation of shoulder and elbow extensors, and across-joint inhibition between the flexors and extensors.

  15. Long-latency reflexes of elbow and shoulder muscles suggest reciprocal excitation of flexors, reciprocal excitation of extensors, and reciprocal inhibition between flexors and extensors

    PubMed Central

    Meriggi, Jenna; Parikh, Nidhi; Saad, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Postural corrections of the upper limb are required in tasks ranging from handling an umbrella in the changing wind to securing a wriggling baby. One complication in this process is the mechanical interaction between the different segments of the arm where torque applied at one joint induces motion at multiple joints. Previous studies have shown the long-latency reflexes of shoulder muscles (50–100 ms after a limb perturbation) account for these mechanical interactions by integrating information about motion of both the shoulder and elbow. It is less clear whether long-latency reflexes of elbow muscles exhibit a similar capability and what is the relation between the responses of shoulder and elbow muscles. The present study utilized joint-based loads tailored to the subjects' arm dynamics to induce well-controlled displacements of their shoulder and elbow. Our results demonstrate that the long-latency reflexes of shoulder and elbow muscles integrate motion from both joints: the shoulder and elbow flexors respond to extension at both joints, whereas the shoulder and elbow extensors respond to flexion at both joints. This general pattern accounts for the inherent flexion-extension coupling of the two joints arising from the arm's intersegmental dynamics and is consistent with spindle-based reciprocal excitation of shoulder and elbow flexors, reciprocal excitation of shoulder and elbow extensors, and across-joint inhibition between the flexors and extensors. PMID:26864766

  16. Reconstruction of medial collateral ligament defects with a flexor-pronator fascia patch in complete open release of stiff elbows.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Yan, Hede; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Mei; Hildebrand, Kevin A; Fan, Cun-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Because medial elbow stability is essential for stiff elbow release, surgical techniques have been reported for reconstructing medial elbow stability. However, medial collateral ligament (MCL) defects, caused by inevitable detachment and resection performed for complete release, make the reconstruction more challenging. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the outcomes after using a flexor-pronator fascia patch in medial elbow reconstruction for open release of stiff elbows. We hypothesized that this technique is effective for repairing MCL defects. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 10 patients. The MCL defects were all reconstructed with a flexor-pronator fascia patch. An external fixator was used in all patients. One patient could not be contacted and was thus excluded from the study. Outcome measures included stability, range of motion, Mayo Elbow Performance Score, ulnar nerve symptoms, power grip, and radiographic findings. The mean follow-up period was 19.6 months; all elbows were stable by the last follow-up. One patient presented with moderate elbow instability and then regained stability 3 months after the external fixator was removed. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score improved from 58 points to 94 points, and the mean flexion arc improved from 40° to 133°. No radiographic manifestations of elbow dislocation or suture anchor looseness were observed. A flexor-pronator fascia patch provides sufficient stability for repairing MCL defects without restricting the range of motion gained during arthrolysis. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.

  17. [Elbow contracture caused by increased tonus of the flexor muscles].

    PubMed

    Glaesener, J J; Rosnau, S; Petersen, W

    1995-01-01

    Increased muscle tone leads occasionally to fixed flexion and supination deformities of the elbow in tetraplegics and subsequently to additional restriction of function. The incidence, course, remaining functions and therapeutic measures were studied retrospectively in 22 patients (37 arms). Muscle hypertonus was found to start during the first 12 weeks after spinal cord lesion and to provoke a flexion contracture of 35 to 95 degrees in 40% of the cases despite therapy. Due to the failure of physical therapy and operative measures, prophylaxis through the prevention of shoulder-pain, early use of adequate splinting of the upper extremity and electrical stimulation of the triceps brachii should be carried out.

  18. Terrible triad elbow fracture-dislocation with triceps and flexor-pronator mass avulsion.

    PubMed

    Gajendran, Varun K; Bishop, Julius A

    2015-02-01

    Terrible triad elbow injuries, consisting of fractures of the radial head and coronoid with ulnohumeral dislocation, are challenging to treat. They require a comprehensive understanding of the complex anatomy of the elbow to effectively treat all of the pathology and create a stable, congruent joint. The authors present a case of a terrible triad injury with avulsion of the triceps and flexor-pronator mass after a low-energy fall in a young patient. Although most terrible triad fracture-dislocations can be successfully treated with coronoid fixation, radial head fixation or replacement, and repair of the lateral collateral ligament complex, this case involved a completely circumferential injury to the elbow. The coronoid and anterior capsule were disrupted anteriorly, the radial head and lateral collateral ligament complex were disrupted laterally, the triceps was disrupted posteriorly, and the flexor-pronator mass was disrupted medially. Although the authors prefer to address most terrible triad injuries through a lateral approach, they suspected a circumferential injury preoperatively and elected to use a single posterior incision to address all of the pathology conveniently. This injury required treatment of all disrupted structures, because the elbow remained unstable until the triceps and flexor-pronator mass avulsions were ultimately repaired. With any elbow fracture-dislocation, surgeons should look for evidence of additional injuries that do not fit the commonly described patterns, because they may necessitate modifications to the treatment plan. Given the relatively common complications of stiffness and instability despite modern surgical techniques, additional injuries may further compromise functional outcomes unless they are addressed properly.

  19. Assessment of Muscle Pain Induced by Elbow-Flexor Eccentric Exercise.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wing Yin; Blazevich, Anthony J; Newton, Michael J; Wu, Sam Shi Xuan; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-11-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a common muscle pain that many people experience and is often used as a model of acute muscle pain. Researchers have reported the effects of various interventions on DOMS, but different DOMS assessment protocols used in these studies make it difficult to compare the effects. To investigate DOMS characteristics after elbow-flexor eccentric exercise to establish a standardized DOMS assessment protocol. Descriptive laboratory study. Research laboratory. Ten healthy, untrained men (21-39 years). Participants performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Indirect muscle-damage markers were maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, range of motion, and serum creatine kinase activity. Muscle pain was assessed before exercise, immediately postexercise, and 1 to 5 days postexercise using (1) a visual analog scale (VAS), (2) a category ratio-10 scale (CR-10) when applying static pressure and palpation at different sites (3, 9, and 15 cm above the elbow crease), and (3) pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) at 50 sites (pain mapping). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction and range of motion decreased and creatine kinase activity increased postexercise, indicating muscle damage. Palpation induced greater pain than static pressure, and longitudinal and transverse palpations induced greater pain than circular palpation (P < .05). The PPT was lower in the medial region before exercise, but the pain-sensitive regions shifted to the central and distal regions of the biceps brachii at 1 to 3 days postexercise (P < .05). The VAS was correlated with the CR-10 scale (r = 0.91, P < .05) but not with the PPT (r = -0.28, P = .45). The way in which muscles are assessed affects the pain level score. This finding suggests that pain level and pain threshold cannot be used interchangeably and that the central and distal regions of the biceps brachii should be included in DOMS assessment using the VAS, CR-10

  20. Firing of antagonist small-diameter muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and torque of elbow flexors

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2013-01-01

    During muscle fatigue, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents can decrease voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle. However, these afferents may have a more widespread effect on other muscles in the exercising limb. We examined if the firing of fatigue-sensitive afferents from elbow extensor muscles in the same arm reduces torque production and voluntary activation of elbow flexors. In nine subjects we examined voluntary activation of elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex during brief (2–3 s) maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Inflation of a blood pressure cuff following a 2-min sustained MVC blocked blood flow to the fatigued muscle and maintained firing of small-diameter afferents. After a fatiguing elbow flexion contraction, maximal flexion torque was lower (26.0 ± 4.4%versus 67.9 ± 5.2% of initial maximal torque; means ±s.d.; P < 0.001) and superimposed twitches were larger (4.1 ± 1.1%versus 1.8 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC, P= 0.01) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing elbow extensor contraction, maximal flexion torque was also reduced (82.2 ± 4.9%versus 91.4 ± 2.3% of initial maximal torque; P= 0.007), superimposed twitches were larger (2.7 ± 0.7%versus 1.3 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC; P= 0.02) and voluntary activation lower (81.6 ± 8.2%versus 95.5 ± 6.9%; P= 0.04) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing contraction, voluntary drive to the fatigued muscles is reduced with continued input from small-diameter muscle afferents. Furthermore, fatigue of the elbow extensor muscles decreases voluntary drive to unfatigued elbow flexors of the same arm. Therefore, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents from one muscle can affect voluntary activation and hence torque generation of another muscle in the same limb. PMID:23652589

  1. Assessment of Muscle Pain Induced by Elbow-Flexor Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wing Yin; Blazevich, Anthony J.; Newton, Michael J.; Wu, Sam Shi Xuan; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Context: Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a common muscle pain that many people experience and is often used as a model of acute muscle pain. Researchers have reported the effects of various interventions on DOMS, but different DOMS assessment protocols used in these studies make it difficult to compare the effects. Objective: To investigate DOMS characteristics after elbow-flexor eccentric exercise to establish a standardized DOMS assessment protocol. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy, untrained men (21–39 years). Intervention(s): Participants performed 10 sets of 6 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors. Main Outcome Measure(s): Indirect muscle-damage markers were maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, range of motion, and serum creatine kinase activity. Muscle pain was assessed before exercise, immediately postexercise, and 1 to 5 days postexercise using (1) a visual analog scale (VAS), (2) a category ratio-10 scale (CR-10) when applying static pressure and palpation at different sites (3, 9, and 15 cm above the elbow crease), and (3) pressure-pain thresholds (PPTs) at 50 sites (pain mapping). Results: Maximal voluntary isometric contraction and range of motion decreased and creatine kinase activity increased postexercise, indicating muscle damage. Palpation induced greater pain than static pressure, and longitudinal and transverse palpations induced greater pain than circular palpation (P < .05). The PPT was lower in the medial region before exercise, but the pain-sensitive regions shifted to the central and distal regions of the biceps brachii at 1 to 3 days postexercise (P < .05). The VAS was correlated with the CR-10 scale (r = 0.91, P < .05) but not with the PPT (r = −0.28, P = .45). Conclusions: The way in which muscles are assessed affects the pain level score. This finding suggests that pain level and pain threshold cannot be used

  2. Perceived exertion responses to novel elbow flexor eccentric action in women and men.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Patrick J; Poudevigne, Melanie S; Pasley, Jeffrey D

    2002-05-01

    The primary aim was to describe perceived exertion responses to different intensities of eccentric exercise in women and men. 42 adults (21 men and 21 women, 7 per condition) completed elbow extension exercises with a weight corresponding to 80%, 100%, or 120% of maximal voluntary concentric strength. Total work was equated by manipulating the number of repetitions in the 80% (N = 45), 100% (N = 36), and 120% (N = 30) conditions. A two-way ANOVA showed significant main effects for the intensity and sex factors. Perceived exertion ratings were strongly dependent on exercise intensity, and women reported lower RPEs than men. A separate three-way mixed model ANOVA that included a repetition factor showed that perceived exertion ratings increased similarly across the first 30 repetitions in all exercise conditions. Significant partial correlations were found between mean RPE during the eccentric exercise bout, and the mean intensity of delayed-onset muscle pain measured from 12- to 72-h postexercise after controlling for the relative exercise intensity (r12.3 = 0.28) or the maximum concentric strength of the elbow flexors (r12.3 = 0.33). 1) for both women and men, there is a positive association between the intensity of eccentric exercise performed with the elbow flexors and RPE; 2) perceived exertion ratings increase significantly then plateau when repeated eccentric muscle actions are performed at constant, submaximal absolute intensities; 3) women rate eccentric exercise performed at the same intensity (relativized to MVC-C) as being less effortful compared with men; and 4) RPE during eccentric exercise can account for a small but significant amount of variability in delayed-onset muscle pain after statistically controlling for differences in strength or relative intensity.

  3. Increased rate of force development of elbow flexors by antagonist conditioning contraction.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Takashi; Yoshioka, Koichi; Ito, Susumu; Kusakabe, Tatsumi

    2009-08-01

    The effects of isometric antagonist conditioning contraction (ACC) at various durations and intensities on the contractile force, electromyographic (EMG) amplitude, and their rates of rise of elbow flexor muscles were examined in healthy participants. In particular, we focused on the change in the maximum rate of initial force development of agonists (dFagonist/dt(max)), which was evaluated by subtracting antagonist force decaying from apparent initial force development. While the ACC caused no statistically significant effect on the average force during elbow flexion, dFagonist/dt(max) was significantly increased by the ACC of short durations (1-2s) and large intensities. Similarly, the ACC did not affect the root mean square EMG amplitude of biceps brachii during elbow flexion, but significantly increased the maximum rate of rise of the absolute EMG amplitude (dE/dt(max)). These results suggested that facilitating effects of the ACC could be observed in the initial phase of agonist action in healthy participants, and ACC of shorter durations might be more effective. The increased dE/dt(max) suggested that increased neural activities might contribute to the antagonist conditioned facilitation of force development.

  4. Older adults use a unique strategy to lift inertial loads with the elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Graves, A E; Kornatz, K W; Enoka, R M

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of age on the ability to exert steady forces and to perform steady flexion movements with the muscles that cross the elbow joint. An isometric task required subjects to exert a steady force to match a target force that was displayed on a monitor. An anisometric task required subjects to raise and lower inertial loads so that the angular displacement around the elbow joint matched a template displayed on a monitor. Steadiness was measured as the coefficient of variation of force and as the normalized standard deviation of wrist acceleration. For the isometric task, steadiness as a function of target force decreased similarly for old adults and young adults. For the anisometric task, steadiness increased as a function of the inertial load and there were significant differences caused by age. Old adults were less steady than young adults during both shortening and lengthening contractions with the lightest loads. Furthermore, old adults were least steady when performing lengthening contractions. These behaviors appear to be associated with the patterns of muscle activation. These results suggest that different neural strategies are used to control isometric and anisometric contractions performed with the elbow flexor muscles and that these strategies do not change in parallel with advancing age.

  5. Inter-Rater Reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale and Modified Modified Ashworth Scale in Assessing Poststroke Elbow Flexor Spasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Taciser; Goksel Karatepe, Altinay; Gunaydin, Rezzan; Koc, Aysegul; Altundal Ercan, Ulku

    2011-01-01

    The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) is commonly used in clinical practice for grading spasticity. However, it was modified recently by omitting grade "1+" of the MAS and redefining grade "2". The aim of this study was to investigate the inter-rater reliability of MAS and modified MAS (MMAS) for the assessment of poststroke elbow flexor spasticity.…

  6. Inter-Rater Reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale and Modified Modified Ashworth Scale in Assessing Poststroke Elbow Flexor Spasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Taciser; Goksel Karatepe, Altinay; Gunaydin, Rezzan; Koc, Aysegul; Altundal Ercan, Ulku

    2011-01-01

    The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) is commonly used in clinical practice for grading spasticity. However, it was modified recently by omitting grade "1+" of the MAS and redefining grade "2". The aim of this study was to investigate the inter-rater reliability of MAS and modified MAS (MMAS) for the assessment of poststroke elbow flexor spasticity.…

  7. Increases in M-wave latency of biceps brachii after elbow flexor eccentric contractions in women.

    PubMed

    Kouzaki, Karina; Nosaka, Kazunori; Ochi, Eisuke; Nakazato, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Eccentric contractions (ECCs) induce muscle damage that is indicated by prolonged loss of muscle function and delayed onset muscle soreness. It is possible that ECCs affect motor nerves, and this may contribute to the prolonged decreases in force generating capability. The present study investigated the hypothesis that M-wave latency of biceps brachii would be increased after maximal elbow flexor ECCs resulting in prolonged loss of muscle strength. Fifteen women performed exercise consisting of 60 maximal ECCs of the elbow flexors using their non-dominant arm. M-wave latency was assessed by the time taken from electrical stimulation applied to the Erb's point to the onset of M-wave of the biceps brachii before, immediately after, and 1-4 days after exercise. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque, range of motion (ROM) and muscle soreness using a numerical rating scale were also assessed before and after exercise. Prolonged decreases in MVC torque (1-4 days post-exercise: -54 to -15 %) and ROM (1-2 days: -32 to -22 %), and increased muscle soreness (peak: 4.2 out of 10) were evident after exercise (p < 0.05). The M-wave latency increased (p < 0.01) from 5.8 ± 1.0 ms before exercise to 6.5 ± 1.7 ms at 1 day and 7.2 ± 1.5 ms at 2 days after exercise for the exercised arm only. No significant changes in M-wave amplitude were evident after exercise. The increased M-wave latency did not fully explain the prolonged decreases in MVC torque after eccentric exercise, but may indicate reversible motor nerve impairment.

  8. Difference in the magnitude of muscle damage between elbow flexors and knee extensors eccentric exercises

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga; Akova, Bedrettin; Yazici, Zeynep; Sekir, Ufuk; Gür, Hakan; Ozarda, Yesim

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the difference in the magnitude of muscle damage between maximal eccentric exercises of the elbow flexors (EF) and knee extensors (KE). Twelve sedentary male volunteers participated in the study. Range of motion (ROM), isometric peak torque (IPT), delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS), creatine kinase activity (CK), and myoglobin concentration (Mb) were evaluated before, immediately after, and on the 1st , 2nd, 3rd , and 7th days following exercise. Total work (TW) during exercises was recorded and corrected by muscle volume (TWc). TWc was greater (p < 0.01) for EF [24 (2) joule·cm-3] than for KE [7 (0.4) joule·cm-3]. Increases in CK on the 2nd , 3rd , and 7th days (p < 0.01) and increases in Mb on the 1st , 2nd , 3rd , and 7th days were significantly (p<0.01) larger for EF than for KE. The decline in IPT was greater (p < 0.05- 0.01) for EF at all test occasions compared with KE. The results of this study demonstrate that the magnitude of muscle damage is greater and the recovery is slower following maximal eccentric exercise of the EF than of the KE for sedentary males. Key points The magnitude of muscle damage is greater and the recovery is slower following maximal eccentric exercise of the EF than of the KE for sedentary males. This may be because of the higher total eccentric work per muscle unit in elbow flexors. PMID:24150563

  9. Is Enhanced-Eccentric Resistance Training Superior to Traditional Training for Increasing Elbow Flexor Strength?

    PubMed Central

    Barstow, Ian K.; Bishop, Mark D.; Kaminski, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    Protocols for strengthening muscle are important for fitness, rehabilitation, and the prevention of myotendinous injuries. In trained individuals, the optimal method of increasing strength remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a traditional method of strengthening with a method that allowed for enhanced-eccentric training, on changes in elbow flexor strength in trained subjects. Thirty-nine (8 male, 31 female) trained subjects with normal elbow function participated in this study. Subjects were rank-ordered according to isometric force production and randomly assigned to one of three training groups: control (CONT), traditional concentric/eccentric (TRAD), and concentric/enhanced-eccentric (NEG). The training groups completed 24 training sessions. An evaluator blinded to training group performed all testing. Mixed model ANOVA techniques were used to determine if differences existed in concentric one repetition maximum strength, and isometric force production among groups. Changes in peak and average isokinetic force production were also compared. Type 1 error was maintained at 5%. While both groups improved concentric one repetition maximum (NEG = 15.5%, TRAD = 13.8%) neither training group statistically differed from changes demonstrated by the CONT group. Nor did either training group show significant improvements in isometric or isokinetic force production over the CONT group. These results do not support the superiority of enhanced-eccentric training for increasing force production in trained subjects. PMID:24616612

  10. Effect of eccentric contraction velocity on muscle damage in repeated bouts of elbow flexor exercise.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Renato; Roschel, Hamilton; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Araújo, Rubens; Nosaka, Kazunori; Tricoli, Valmor

    2010-08-01

    Eccentric exercise induces muscle damage, but controversy exists concerning the effect of contraction velocity on the magnitude of muscle damage, and little is known about the effect of contraction velocity on the repeated-bout effect. This study examined slow (60 degrees.s(-1)) and fast (180 degrees.s(-1)) velocity eccentric exercises for changes in indirect markers of muscle damage following 3 exercise bouts that were performed every 2 weeks. Fifteen young men were divided into 2 groups based on the velocity of eccentric exercise: 7 in the Ecc60 (60 degrees.s(-1)) group, and 8 in the Ecc180 (180 degrees.s(-1)) group. The exercise consisted of 30 maximal eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors at each velocity, in which the elbow joint was forcibly extended from 60 degrees to 180 degrees (full extension) on an isokinetic dynamometer. Changes in maximal voluntary isometric contraction strength, range of motion, muscle soreness, and plasma creatine kinase activity before and for 4 days after the exercise were compared in the 2 groups using a mixed-model analysis (groupxboutxtime). No significant differences between groups were evident for changes in any variables following exercise bouts; however, the changes were significantly smaller (p<0.05) after the second and third bouts than after the first bout. These results indicate that the contraction velocity does not influence muscle damage or the repeated-bout effect.

  11. Assessment of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage of the elbow flexors by tensiomyography.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Angus M; Galloway, Stuart D R; Smith, Iain J; Tallent, Jamie; Ditroilo, Massimiliano; Fairweather, Malcolm M; Howatson, Glyn

    2012-06-01

    Exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) impairs maximal torque production which can cause a decline in athletic performance and/or mobility. EIMD is commonly assessed by using maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), creatine kinase (CK) and muscle soreness. We propose as an additional technique, tensiomyography (TMG), recently introduced to measure mechanical and muscle contractile characteristics. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of TMG in detecting changes in maximal torque following EIMD. Nineteen participants performed eccentric elbow flexions to achieve EIMD on the non- dominant arm and used the dominant elbow flexor as a control. TMG parameters, MVC and rate of torque development (RTD) were measured prior to EIMD and repeated for another six consecutive days. Creatine kinase, muscle soreness and limb girth were also measured during this period. Twenty four hours after inducing EIMD, MVC torque, RTD and TMG maximal displacement had significantly (p<0.01) declined by 37%, 44% and 31%, respectively. By day 6 MVC, RTD and TMG recovered to 12%, 24% and 17% of respective pre-EIMD values. In conclusion, as hypothesised TMG maximal displacement significantly followed other standard EIMD responses. This could therefore be useful in detecting muscle damage from impaired muscle function and its recovery following EIMD.

  12. The effects of eccentric velocity on activation of elbow flexors: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kulig, K; Powers, C M; Shellock, F G; Terk, M

    2001-02-01

    To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity changes in the primary elbow flexors during two isotonic exercise protocols varying in eccentric velocity and the ratio of eccentric to concentric activity. Twelve men performed two exercise protocols. The right and left arms were randomly assigned to one of two protocols that had the same workload (60% 1RM) and same total time of exercise (144 s) but differed in the velocity and ratio of eccentric to concentric activity (1:1 and 5:1 for the fast and slow protocols, respectively). MRI signal intensity changes were quantified pre- and post-exercises using an inversion recovery sequence with a 1.5T MRI system (TR = 2500 ms, TE = 90 ms, TI = 140 ms). Percent change in MRI signal intensity, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), and delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) were recorded and analyzed. The biceps brachii was found to be preferentially recruited during the fast protocol compared with the brachialis, whereas the brachialis was found to be preferentially recruited during the slow protocol (P < 0.05). The fast exercise protocol was perceived as being more strenuous (RPE = 8.3 +/- 2.1) than the slow (RPE = 5.4 +/- 1.5, P < 0.05) and produced DOMS in 58% of the tested subjects. These results suggest that agonists respond to various loading conditions nonhomogeneously. These findings may have implications with respect to exercise prescriptions for specific muscles.

  13. Effects of prior dynamic leg exercise on static effort of the elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Yates, J W; Gladden, L B; Cresanta, M K

    1983-09-01

    The isometric endurance of the elbow flexors was determined in a control condition and subsequent to a maximal effort exercise bout on a cycle ergometer in seven subjects. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), peak rate of tension development (+dP/dt), peak rate of tension relaxation (-dP/dt), one-half contraction time, and one-half relaxation time were also measured. Each subject was tested on four occasions: two control and two experimental sessions. During the control sessions each subject held 40% of MVC to exhaustion, whereas the experimental session included a 1-min maximal effort exercise bout on a cycle ergometer 6 min prior to the isometric endurance task. Arterialized blood samples were drawn and analyzed for lactate, pH, PCO2, and PO2. Plasma bicarbonate was calculated from the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Subsequent to the cycle ergometer bout, blood lactate concentration rose from 0.8 to 11 mM, pH decreased from 7.43 to 7.20, PCO2 decreased from 40 to 32 Torr, and plasma bicarbonate decreased from 26 to 12 mM. When compared with the control values, no significant changes were evident for any muscle contractile properties following the cycle ergometer bout. However, isometric endurance was significantly reduced from 115.0 +/- 7.2 to 86.3 +/- 7.3 s.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Dynamic stability of the elbow: electromyographic analysis of the flexor pronator group and the extensor group in pitchers with valgus instability.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, C D; Glousman, R E; Jobe, F W; Brault, J; Pink, M; Perry, J

    1996-01-01

    The medical collateral ligament is a common site of injury in baseball pitchers, causing substantial morbidity and loss of pitching time. Twenty-six skilled baseball pitchers with medial collateral ligament insufficiency were studied before surgery with high-speed cinematography and fine-wire electromyography of eight muscles around the elbow. Data from the pitchers with injured elbows were compared with data obtained from uninjured pitchers. The flexor carpi radialis muscle in the pitchers with medial collateral ligament deficiencies revealed significantly decreased firing during the acceleration and deceleration phase of the fastball when compared with that of the pitchers with normal elbows, and the flexor carpi radialis muscle was significantly depressed during the early cocking and deceleration phases. The extensor muscles revealed slightly increased activity in the injured elbows; however, this was not statistically significant. Although the muscles of the flexor pronator group (especially the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and the flexor digitorum superficialis muscles) are anatomically positioned to provide dynamic stability of the elbow, they did not demonstrate increased electrical activity in pitchers with medial collateral ligament deficiencies. This finding suggests that the muscles on the medial side of the elbow do not supplant the role of the medial collateral ligament during the fastball pitch.

  15. Age and sex differences in steadiness of elbow flexor muscles with imposed cognitive demand.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Hugo M; Spears, Vincent C; Schlinder-Delap, Bonnie; Yoon, Tejin; Nielson, Kristy A; Hunter, Sandra K

    2015-06-01

    These studies determined (1) age- and sex-related differences in steadiness of isometric contractions when high cognitive demand was imposed across a range of forces with the elbow flexor muscles (study 1) and; (2) sex differences in steadiness among older adults when low cognitive demand was imposed (study 2). 36 young adults (18-25 years; 18 women) and 30 older adults (60-82 years; 17 women) performed isometric contractions at 5, 30 and 40 % of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Study 1 involved a high-cognitive demand session (serial subtractions by 13 during the contraction) and a control session (no mental math). Study 2 (older adults only) involved a low-cognitive demand session (subtracting by 1s). Older individuals exhibited greater increases in force fluctuations (coefficient of variation of force, CV) with high cognitive demand than young adults, with the largest age difference at 5 % MVC (P = 0.01). Older adults had greater agonist EMG activity with high-cognitive demand and women had greater coactivation than men (P < 0.05). In study 2, CV of force increased with low cognitive demand for the older women but not for the older men (P = 0.03). Older adults had reduced steadiness and increased muscle activation when high cognitive demand was imposed while low cognitive demand induced increased force fluctuations in older women but not older men. These findings have implications for daily and work-related tasks that involve cognitive demand performed simultaneously during submaximal isometric contractions in an aging workforce.

  16. Age and sex differences in steadiness of elbow flexor muscles with imposed cognitive demand

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Hugo M.; Spears, Vincent C.; Schlinder-Delap, Bonnie; Yoon, Tejin; Nielson, Kristy A.; Hunter, Sandra K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose These studies determined (1) age and sex-related differences in steadiness of isometric contractions when high cognitive demand was imposed across a range of forces with the elbow flexor muscles (study 1) and, (2) sex differences in steadiness among older adults when low cognitive demand was imposed (study 2). Methods 36 young adults (18–25 years; 18 women) and 30 older adults (60–82 years; 17 women) performed isometric contractions at 5%, 30% and 40% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Study 1 involved a high-cognitive demand session (serial subtractions by 13 during the contraction) and a control session (no mental math). Study 2 (older adults only) involved a low-cognitive demand session (subtracting by 1s). Results Older individuals exhibited greater increases in force fluctuations (coefficient of variation of force, CV) with high cognitive demand than young adults, with the largest age difference at 5% MVC (P = 0.01). Older adults had greater agonist EMG activity with high-cognitive demand and women had greater coactivation than men (P<0.05). In study 2, CV of force increased with low cognitive demand for the older women but not for the older men (P = 0.03). Conclusion Older adults had reduced steadiness and increased muscle activation when high cognitive demand was imposed while low cognitive demand induced increased force fluctuations in older women but not older men. These findings have implications for daily and work-related tasks that involve cognitive demand performed simultaneously during submaximal isometric contractions in an aging workforce. PMID:25633070

  17. Eight-Week Vibration Training of the Elbow Flexors by Force Modulation: Effects on Dynamic and Isometric Strength.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Cardinale, Marco; Rabotti, Chiara; Beju, Bogdan; Mischi, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Vibration exercise (VE) has been suggested as an effective method to improve strength and power capabilities. However, the underlying mechanisms in response to VE are still unclear. A pulley-like VE system, characterized by sinusoidal force applications has been developed and tested for proof of concept in a previous study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of such force modulation on elbow flexors strength and compare it with conventional methods. Forty subjects were randomly divided into 4 groups of 10: the vibration group (VG), the no-vibration group (NVG), the dumbbell group (DG), and the control group (CG). Biceps curl exercises were used to train the elbow flexors 2 times a week for 8 weeks. Subjects in the VG were trained using a ramp-up baseline with superimposed 30 Hz sinusoidal vibration whereas the subjects in the NVG were trained using the same baseline but without vibration. Subjects in the DG were trained using dumbbells, and the subjects in the CG were not trained. The isometric break force (IBF) and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) of the subject's dominant arm were assessed before and after the 8-week training period. The VG achieved 1RM improvement (22.7%) larger than the NVG (10.8%) and comparable with the DG (22.3%). Differences in IBF gains following the training period among the training groups were found to be not significant. Our results support the inclusion of the proposed VE in strength training programs aimed at improving dynamic strength on the elbow flexors.

  18. Vascular perfusion of a flexor carpi ulnaris muscle turnover pedicle flap for posterior elbow soft tissue reconstruction: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Payne, Diane E S; Kaufman, Adam M; Wysocki, Robert W; Richard, Marc J; Ruch, David S; Leversedge, Fraser J

    2011-02-01

    The use of a pedicled flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscle proximal turnover flap has been described previously for soft tissue reconstruction at the posterior elbow. Whereas consistent arterial supply to the FCU has been reported, the reliability of distal flap perfusion has not been confirmed. This study evaluated the vascular perfusion of an FCU turnover flap, based on the most proximal primary vascular pedicle that would permit a proximal turnover flap reconstruction to include the olecranon tip. In 12 fresh-frozen, proximal humeral human amputation specimens, the FCU flap was elevated from distal to proximal, preserving the most proximal primary vascular pedicle to the muscle belly that would permit flap coverage of the olecranon tip. The axillary artery was injected with India ink after ligation of radial and ulnar arteries at the wrist. After injection, each specimen was sectioned transversely at 0.5-cm increments to assess vascular perfusion of the muscle using loupe magnification. The distance from the olecranon tip to the distal FCU muscle belly was 25.9 cm. The primary vascular pedicle that would facilitate creation of a proximal turnover flap was, on average, 5.9 cm distal to the olecranon tip. Perfusion of FCU muscle as measured distal to this primary pedicle was present in 50% to 100% of the muscle belly at an average of 8.9 cm beyond the pedicle. Perfusion of 25% to 50% of the FCU muscle belly was present at an average of 11.1 cm beyond the pedicle. Perfusion became less consistent (<25%) within the muscle belly at an average distance of 11.6 cm. Use of a proximally based, pedicled FCU muscle turnover flap provides a reliable option for soft tissue reconstruction at the posterior elbow. We observed consistent arterial perfusion of the muscle flap when preserving a proximal vascular pedicle 5.9 cm distal to the olecranon tip. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Flexor bias of joint position in humans during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Goulet, C.; Boorman, G. I.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2003-01-01

    The ability to estimate ankle and elbow joint position was tested before, during, and after a 17-day spaceflight. Subjects estimated targeted joint angles during isovelocity (IsoV) joint movements with agonist muscle groups either active or relaxed. These movements included elbow extension (EE) and elbow flexion (EF), and plantarflexion (PF) and dorsiflexion (DF) of the ankle. Subjects also estimated these joint positions while moving the dynamometer at their chosen (variable) velocity (VarV) during EE and PF. For IsoV tests, no differences were observed between active and passive movements for either the ankle or elbow. Compared with those of pre-flight test days, estimates of targeted elbow joint angles were approximately 5 degrees to 15 degrees more flexed in-flight, and returned toward the pre-flight values during recovery. The spaceflight effects for the ankle were inconsistent and less prevalent than those for the elbow. The VarV PF test condition for the 120 degrees target angle at the ankle exhibited approximately 5 degrees to 7 degrees more DF target angle estimates in-flight compared with those pre- or post-flight. In contrast, during IsoV PF there was a tendency for ankle estimates to be approximately 2 degrees to 3 degrees more PF after 2-3 days exposure to spaceflight. These data indicate that during spaceflight the perception of elbow extension is greater than actuality, and are consistent with the interpretation that microgravity induced a flexor bias in the estimation of the actual elbow joint position. Moreover, these effects in joint proprioception during spaceflight were observed in individual isolated single-joint movements during tasks in which vestibular function in maintaining posture were minimal.

  20. Flexor bias of joint position in humans during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Goulet, C.; Boorman, G. I.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2003-01-01

    The ability to estimate ankle and elbow joint position was tested before, during, and after a 17-day spaceflight. Subjects estimated targeted joint angles during isovelocity (IsoV) joint movements with agonist muscle groups either active or relaxed. These movements included elbow extension (EE) and elbow flexion (EF), and plantarflexion (PF) and dorsiflexion (DF) of the ankle. Subjects also estimated these joint positions while moving the dynamometer at their chosen (variable) velocity (VarV) during EE and PF. For IsoV tests, no differences were observed between active and passive movements for either the ankle or elbow. Compared with those of pre-flight test days, estimates of targeted elbow joint angles were approximately 5 degrees to 15 degrees more flexed in-flight, and returned toward the pre-flight values during recovery. The spaceflight effects for the ankle were inconsistent and less prevalent than those for the elbow. The VarV PF test condition for the 120 degrees target angle at the ankle exhibited approximately 5 degrees to 7 degrees more DF target angle estimates in-flight compared with those pre- or post-flight. In contrast, during IsoV PF there was a tendency for ankle estimates to be approximately 2 degrees to 3 degrees more PF after 2-3 days exposure to spaceflight. These data indicate that during spaceflight the perception of elbow extension is greater than actuality, and are consistent with the interpretation that microgravity induced a flexor bias in the estimation of the actual elbow joint position. Moreover, these effects in joint proprioception during spaceflight were observed in individual isolated single-joint movements during tasks in which vestibular function in maintaining posture were minimal.

  1. Relation between torque history, firing frequency, decruitment levels and force balance in two flexors of the elbow.

    PubMed

    van Groeningen, C J; Nijhof, E J; Vermeule, F M; Erkelens, C J

    1999-12-01

    By means of intramuscular electromyographic recordings, we studied the firing frequencies and recruitment/decruitment thresholds of individual motor units in two elbow flexors, the biarticular biceps brachii muscle and the monoarticular brachioradialis muscle. Subjects had to perform isometric contractions with increasing elbow flexion torque until a specific peak torque level was reached. The torque level was kept constant for 6 s during which firing frequencies were measured. Then the torque was decreased to a lower level and, after 3 s, firing frequencies were again measured for 6 s. By repeating this procedure, the torque level was decreased stepwise until the motor unit under study stopped firing. The last level before the unit stopped firing was considered to be the decruitment torque level. We measured the firing frequency at recruitment and decruitment, the torque-frequency relationship and the recruitment and decruitment torque thresholds after various levels of peak torque. In the biceps, both the firing frequencies at a specific torque level and the decruitment torque level itself were independent of the peak torque. In the brachioradialis, however, firing frequencies at a specific torque level decreased and decruitment torque levels increased after subjects generated higher peak torques. Thus, in this muscle firing frequencies as well as decruitment thresholds show hysteresis effects. The result indicates a shift of force from the brachioradialis muscle during recruitment to the biceps muscle during decruitment. This shift is smaller than was concluded from previous studies in which decruitment threshold levels for the brachioradialis muscle were assumed to be independent of force history. Moreover, we found that in both muscles decruitment firing frequencies were lower than recruitment frequencies and they were independent of the peak torque level. In order to analyse the effect of the peak torque level on the distribution of force over the two muscles

  2. Evaluation of the peak torque, total work, average power of flexor-estensor and prono-supinator muscles of the elbow in baseball players.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Cosimo; Vaienti, Enrico; Pogliacomi, Francesco

    2003-08-01

    The Authors, after a short analysis on biomechanics of the elbow during throwing in baseball, show the movements of the elbow during the different phases of the throw and the stabilizing action of the ulnar collateral ligament, flexor-pronator muscles of the wrist, anconeus and brachial triceps muscles. Aim of this study is the evaluation of the peak torque, total work and average power of the flexor-extensor and pronator-supinator muscles of the elbows in professional baseball players. Isokinetic test data show that a mayor peak torque in flexo-extension at power and resistance test in the pitchers compared to the strikers. Whereas the strikers show a higher peak torque in pronation at the resistance test. This may happen because during a baseball match the ball is hit many times by the bat and the pronator muscle of the wrist are notably stimulated and reinforced.

  3. The origin of activity in the biceps brachii muscle during voluntary contractions of the contralateral elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Zijdewind, Inge; Butler, Jane E; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2006-11-01

    During strong voluntary contractions, activity is not restricted to the target muscles. Other muscles, including contralateral muscles, often contract. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to analyse the origin of these unintended contralateral contractions (termed "associated" contractions). Subjects (n = 9) performed maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) with their right elbow-flexor muscles followed by submaximal contractions with their left elbow flexors. Electromyographic activity (EMG) during the submaximal contractions was matched to the associated EMG in the left biceps brachii during the right MVC. During contractions, TMS was delivered to the motor cortex of the right or left hemisphere and excitatory motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and inhibitory (silent period) responses recorded from left biceps. Changes at a spinal level were investigated using cervicomedullary stimulation to activate corticospinal paths (n = 5). Stimulation of the right hemisphere produced silent periods of comparable duration in associated and voluntary contractions (218 vs 217 ms, respectively), whereas left hemisphere stimulation caused a depression of EMG but no EMG silence in either contraction. Despite matched EMG, MEPs elicited by right hemisphere stimulation were approximately 1.5-2.5 times larger during associated compared to voluntary contractions (P < 0.005). Similar inhibition of the associated and matched voluntary activity during the silent period suggests that associated activity comes from the contralateral hemisphere and that motor areas in this (right) hemisphere are activated concomitantly with the motor areas in the left hemisphere. Comparison of the MEPs and subcortically evoked potentials implies that cortical excitability was greater in associated contractions than in the matched voluntary efforts.

  4. Impaired neuromuscular function during isometric, shortening, and lengthening contractions after exercise-induced damage to elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Turner, Tanya S; Tucker, Kylie J; Rogasch, Nigel C; Semmler, John G

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise-induced damage of the elbow flexor muscles on steady motor performance during isometric, shortening, and lengthening contractions. Ten healthy individuals (age 22+/-4 yr) performed four tasks with the elbow flexor muscles: a maximum voluntary contraction, a one repetition maximum (1 RM), an isometric task at three joint angles (short, intermediate, and long muscle lengths), and a constant-load task during slow (approximately 7 degrees/s) shortening and lengthening contractions. Task performance was quantified as the fluctuations in wrist acceleration (steadiness), and electromyography was obtained from the biceps and triceps brachii muscles at loads of 10, 20, and 40% of 1 RM. Tasks were performed before, immediately after, and 24 h after eccentric exercise that resulted in indicators of muscle damage. Maximum voluntary contraction force and 1-RM load declined by approximately 45% immediately after exercise and remained lower at 24 h ( approximately 30% decrease). Eccentric exercise resulted in reduced steadiness and increased biceps and triceps brachii electromyography for all tasks. For the isometric task, steadiness was impaired at the short compared with the long muscle length immediately after exercise (P<0.01). Furthermore, despite no differences before exercise, there was reduced steadiness for the shortening compared with the lengthening contractions after exercise (P=0.01), and steadiness remained impaired for shortening contractions 24 h later (P=0.01). These findings suggest that there are profound effects for the performance of these types of fine motor tasks when recovering from a bout of eccentric exercise.

  5. Maximal Voluntary Activation of the Elbow Flexors Is under Predicted by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Compared to Motor Point Stimulation Prior to and Following Muscle Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Cadigan, Edward W J; Collins, Brandon W; Philpott, Devin T G; Kippenhuck, Garreth; Brenton, Mitchell; Button, Duane C

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic (TMS) and motor point stimulation have been used to determine voluntary activation (VA). However, very few studies have directly compared the two stimulation techniques for assessing VA of the elbow flexors. The purpose of this study was to compare TMS and motor point stimulation for assessing VA in non-fatigued and fatigued elbow flexors. Participants performed a fatigue protocol that included twelve, 15 s isometric elbow flexor contractions. Participants completed a set of isometric elbow flexion contractions at 100, 75, 50, and 25% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) prior to and following fatigue contractions 3, 6, 9, and 12 and 5 and 10 min post-fatigue. Force and EMG of the bicep and triceps brachii were measured for each contraction. Force responses to TMS and motor point stimulation and EMG responses to TMS (motor evoked potentials, MEPs) and Erb's point stimulation (maximal M-waves, Mmax) were also recorded. VA was estimated using the equation: VA% = (1-SITforce/PTforce) × 100. The resting twitch was measured directly for motor point stimulation and estimated for both motor point stimulation and TMS by extrapolation of the linear regression between the superimposed twitch force and voluntary force. MVC force, potentiated twitch force and VA significantly (p < 0.05) decreased throughout the elbow flexor fatigue protocol and partially recovered 10 min post fatigue. VA was significantly (p < 0.05) underestimated when using TMS compared to motor point stimulation in non-fatigued and fatigued elbow flexors. Motor point stimulation compared to TMS superimposed twitch forces were significantly (p < 0.05) higher at 50% MVC but similar at 75 and 100% MVC. The linear relationship between TMS superimposed twitch force and voluntary force significantly (p < 0.05) decreased with fatigue. There was no change in triceps/biceps electromyography, biceps/triceps MEP amplitudes, or bicep MEP amplitudes throughout the fatigue protocol at 100% MVC. In

  6. Limb position sense, proprioceptive drift and muscle thixotropy at the human elbow joint

    PubMed Central

    Tsay, A; Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2014-01-01

    These experiments on the human forearm are based on the hypothesis that drift in the perceived position of a limb over time can be explained by receptor adaptation. Limb position sense was measured in 39 blindfolded subjects using a forearm-matching task. A property of muscle, its thixotropy, a contraction history-dependent passive stiffness, was exploited to place muscle receptors of elbow muscles in a defined state. After the arm had been held flexed and elbow flexors contracted, we observed time-dependent changes in the perceived position of the reference arm by an average of 2.8° in the direction of elbow flexion over 30 s (Experiment 1). The direction of the drift reversed after the arm had been extended and elbow extensors contracted, with a mean shift of 3.5° over 30 s in the direction of elbow extension (Experiment 2). The time-dependent changes could be abolished by conditioning elbow flexors and extensors in the reference arm at the test angle, although this led to large position errors during matching (±10°), depending on how the indicator arm had been conditioned (Experiments 3 and 4). When slack was introduced in the elbow muscles of both arms, by shortening muscles after the conditioning contraction, matching errors became small and there was no drift in position sense (Experiments 5 and 6). These experiments argue for a receptor-based mechanism for proprioceptive drift and suggest that to align the two forearms, the brain monitors the difference between the afferent signals from the two arms. PMID:24665096

  7. Limb position sense, proprioceptive drift and muscle thixotropy at the human elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Tsay, A; Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2014-06-15

    These experiments on the human forearm are based on the hypothesis that drift in the perceived position of a limb over time can be explained by receptor adaptation. Limb position sense was measured in 39 blindfolded subjects using a forearm-matching task. A property of muscle, its thixotropy, a contraction history-dependent passive stiffness, was exploited to place muscle receptors of elbow muscles in a defined state. After the arm had been held flexed and elbow flexors contracted, we observed time-dependent changes in the perceived position of the reference arm by an average of 2.8° in the direction of elbow flexion over 30 s (Experiment 1). The direction of the drift reversed after the arm had been extended and elbow extensors contracted, with a mean shift of 3.5° over 30 s in the direction of elbow extension (Experiment 2). The time-dependent changes could be abolished by conditioning elbow flexors and extensors in the reference arm at the test angle, although this led to large position errors during matching (±10°), depending on how the indicator arm had been conditioned (Experiments 3 and 4). When slack was introduced in the elbow muscles of both arms, by shortening muscles after the conditioning contraction, matching errors became small and there was no drift in position sense (Experiments 5 and 6). These experiments argue for a receptor-based mechanism for proprioceptive drift and suggest that to align the two forearms, the brain monitors the difference between the afferent signals from the two arms.

  8. Human flexor tendon tissue engineering: decellularization of human flexor tendons reduces immunogenicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Shyam S; Woon, Colin Y L; Kraus, Armin; Megerle, Kai; Choi, Matthew S S; Pridgen, Brian C; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2012-04-01

    In mutilating hand injuries, tissue engineered tendon grafts may provide a reconstructive solution. We have previously described a method to decellularize cadaveric human flexor tendons while preserving mechanical properties and biocompatibility. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the immunogenicity and strength of these grafts when implanted into an immunocompetent rat model. Cadaveric human flexor tendons were divided into two groups. Group 1 was untreated, and Group 2 was decellularized by treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and peracetic acid (PAA). Both groups were then analyzed for the presence of major histocompatibility complexes by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Pair-matched tendons from each group were then placed into the dorsal subcutaneous tissue and anchored to the spinal ligaments of Wistar rats for 2 or 4 weeks, and harvested. The infiltration of B-cells and macrophages was determined using IHC. The explants where then subjected to mechanical testing to determine the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) and elastic modulus (EM). Statistical analysis was performed using a paired Student's t-test. The decellularization protocol successfully removed cells and MHC-1 complexes. At 2 weeks after implantation, there was increased infiltration of B-cells in Group 1 (untreated) compared with Group 2 (acellular), both in the capsule and tendon substance. There was improved ultimate tensile stress (UTS, 42.7 ± 8.3 vs. 22.8 ± 7.8 MPa, p<0.05) and EM (830.2 ± 206.7 vs. 421.2 ± 171.3 MPa, p<0.05) in tendons that were decellularized. At 4 weeks, there was continued B-cell infiltration in Group 1 (untreated) compared with Group 2 (acellular). There was no appreciable difference in macrophage infiltration at both time points. At 4 weeks Group 2 (acellular) demonstrated persistently greater UTS (40.5 ± 9.1 vs. 14.6 ± 4.2 MPa, p<0.05) and EM (454.05 ± 101.5 vs. 204.6 ± 91.3 MPa, p<0.05) compared with Group 1

  9. The triceps–flexor carpi ulnaris (TRIFCU) approach to the elbow

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, DE; Deshmukh, SC

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intra-articular fractures of the distal humerus frequently require internal fixation. Several approaches have been described, with the posterior approaches being most common. We present a new approach to the distal humerus via the lateral border of the triceps muscle. PATIENTS AND METHODS The senior author has used this technique for fixation of intra-articular fractures of the distal humerus in 12 patients. RESULTS The approach is equally useful for intra- and extra-articular fractures. No cases of postoperative ulna nerve neuropraxia have been encountered. There have been no postoperative wound complications. The exposure has allowed sufficient access to allow anatomically contoured plates to be easily applied to both sides of the distal humerus with confirmation of intra-articular fracture reduction. CONCLUSIONS The approach has the advantages of leaving the muscular bed of the ulna nerve undisturbed, whilst still providing excellent exposure of the distal humerus. The triceps mechanism is not divided or split allowing rapid recovery of extensor function. Additionally, because of the natural carrying angle of the elbow, repositioning of the reflected triceps aponeurosis is easy. PMID:20412674

  10. Prior Heat Stress Effects Fatigue Recovery of the Elbow Flexor Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Masaki; Shields, Richard K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Long-lasting alterations in hormones, neurotransmitters and stress proteins after hyperthermia may be responsible for the impairment in motor performance during muscle fatigue. Methods Subjects (n = 25) performed a maximal intermittent fatigue task of elbow flexion after sitting in either 73 or 26 deg C to examine the effects of prior heat stress on fatigue mechanisms. Results The heat stress increased the tympanic and rectal temperatures by 2.3 and 0.82 deg C, respectively, but there was full recovery prior to the fatigue task. While prior heat stress had no effects on fatigue-related changes in volitional torque, EMG activity, torque relaxation rate, MEP size and SP duration, prior heat stress acutely increased the pre-fatigue relaxation rate and chronically prevented long-duration fatigue (p < 0.05). Discussion These findings indicate that prior passive heat stress alone does not alter voluntary activation during fatigue, but prior heat stress and exercise produce longer-term protection against long-duration fatigue. PMID:21674526

  11. Prior heat stress effects fatigue recovery of the elbow flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Masaki; Shields, Richard K

    2011-07-01

    Long-lasting alterations in hormones, neurotransmitters, and stress proteins after hyperthermia may be responsible for the impairment in motor performance during muscle fatigue. Subjects (n = 25) performed a maximal intermittent fatigue task of elbow flexion after sitting in either 73° or 26°C to examine the effects of prior heat stress on fatigue mechanisms. The heat stress increased the tympanic and rectal temperatures by 2.3° and 0.82°C, respectively, but there was full recovery prior to the fatigue task. Although prior heat stress had no effects on fatigue-related changes in volitional torque, electromyographic (EMG) activity, torque relaxation rate, motor evoked potential (MEP) size, and silent period (SP) duration, prior heat stress acutely increased the pre-fatigue relaxation rate and chronically prevented long-duration fatigue (P < 0.05). These findings indicate that prior passive heat stress alone does not alter voluntary activation during fatigue, but prior heat stress and exercise produce longer-term protection against long-duration fatigue. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Flexor tendon tissue engineering: acellularization of human flexor tendons with preservation of biomechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Pridgen, Brian C; Woon, Colin Y L; Kim, Maxwell; Thorfinn, Johan; Lindsey, Derek; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2011-08-01

    Acellular human tendons are a candidate scaffold for tissue engineering flexor tendons of the hand. This study compared acellularization methods and their compatibility with allogeneic human cells. Human flexor tendons were pretreated with 0.1% ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) for 4  h followed by 24  h treatments of 1% Triton X-100, 1% tri(n-butyl)phosphate, or 0.1% or 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in 0.1% EDTA. Outcomes were assessed histologically by hematoxylin and eosin and SYTO green fluorescent nucleic acid stains and biochemically by a QIAGEN DNeasy kit, Sircol collagen assay, and 1,9 dimethylmethylene blue glycosaminoglycan assay. Mechanical data were collected using a Materials Testing System to pull to failure tendons acellularized with 0.1% SDS. Acellularized tendons were re-seeded in a suspension of human dermal fibroblasts. Attachment of viable cells to acellularized tendon was assessed biochemically by a cell viability assay and histologically by a live/dead stain. Data are reported as mean±standard deviation. Compared with the DNA content of fresh tendons (551±212  ng DNA/mg tendon), only SDS treatments significantly decreased DNA content (1% SDS [202.8±37.4  ng DNA/mg dry weight tendon]; 0.1% SDS [189±104  ng DNA/mg tendon]). These findings were confirmed by histology. There was no decrease in glycosaminoglycans or collagen following acellularization with SDS. There was no difference in the ultimate tensile stress (55.3±19.2 [fresh] vs. 51.5±6.9 [0.1% SDS] MPa). Re-seeded tendons demonstrated attachment of viable cells to the tendon surface using a viability assay and histology. Human flexor tendons were acellularized with 0.1% SDS in 0.1% EDTA for 24  h with preservation of mechanical properties. Preservation of collagen and glycoaminoglycans and re-seeding with human cells suggest that this scaffold is biocompatible. This will provide a promising scaffold for future human flexor tendon tissue engineering studies to

  13. Magnetic versus electrical stimulation in the interpolation twitch technique of elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulou, Sofia I; Nowicky, Alexander V; Marston, Louise

    2012-01-01

    The study compared peripheral magnetic with electrical stimulation of the biceps brachii m. (BB) in the single pulse Interpolation Twitch Technique (ITT). 14 healthy participants (31±7 years) participated in a within-subjects repeated-measures design study. Single, constant-current electrical and magnetic stimuli were delivered over the motor point of BB with supramaximal intensity (20% above maximum) at rest and at various levels of voluntary contraction. Force measurements from right elbow isometric flexion and muscle electromyograms (EMG) from the BB, the triceps brachii m. (TB) and the abductor pollicis brevis m. (APB) were obtained. The twitch forces at rest and maximal contractions, the twitch force-voluntary force relationship, the M-waves and the voluntary activation (VA) of BB between magnetic and electrical stimulation were compared. The mean amplitude of the twitches evoked at MVC was not significantly different between electrical (0.62 ± 0.49 N) and magnetic (0.81 ± 0.49 N) stimulation (p > 0.05), and the maximum VA of BB was comparable between electrical (95%) and magnetic (93%) stimulation (p > 0. 05). No differences (p >0.05) were revealed in the BB M-waves between electrical (13.47 ± 0.49 mV.ms) and magnetic (12.61 ± 0.58 mV.ms) stimulation. The TB M-waves were also similar (p > 0.05) but electrically evoked APB M-waves were significantly larger than those evoked by magnetic stimulation (p < 0.05). The twitch-voluntary force relationship over the range of MVCs was best described by non-linear functions for both electrical and magnetic stimulation. The electrically evoked resting twitches were consistently larger in amplitude than the magnetically evoked ones (mean difference 3.1 ± 3.34 N, p < 0.05). Reduction of the inter-electrodes distance reduced the twitch amplitude by 6.5 ± 6.2 N (p < 0.05). The fundamental similarities in voluntary activation assessment of BB with peripheral electrical and magnetic stimulation point towards a promising

  14. Bilateral Knee Extensor Fatigue Modulates Force and Responsiveness of the Corticospinal Pathway in the Non-fatigued, Dominant Elbow Flexors

    PubMed Central

    Šambaher, Nemanja; Aboodarda, Saied Jalal; Behm, David George

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-induced fatigue affects muscle performance and modulates corticospinal excitability in non-exercised muscles. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of bilateral knee extensor fatigue on dominant elbow flexor (EF) maximal voluntary force production and corticospinal excitability. Transcranial magnetic, transmastoid electrical and brachial plexus electrical stimulation (BPES) were used to investigate corticospinal, spinal, and muscle excitability of the dominant EF before and after a bilateral knee extensor fatiguing protocol or time matched rest period (control). For both sessions three stimuli were delivered every 1.5 s during the three pre-test time points and during the 1st, 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th post-test 5 s EF isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). In both conditions, overall, EF MVC force (p < 0.001) decreased progressively from repetition #1 to #12 during the post-test MVC protocol. EF MVC force (p < 0.001, ES = 0.9, Δ10.3%) decrements were more pronounced in the knee extensor fatigue intervention condition. In addition, there were no significant differences between conditions for biceps brachii electromyographic (EMG) activity (p = 0.43), motor evoked potentials (MEPs) amplitude (p = 0.908) or MEP silent period (SP; p = 0.776). However, the fatigue condition exhibited a lower MEP/cervicomedullary MEP (CMEP) ratio (p = 0.042, ES = 2.5, Δ25%) and a trend toward higher CMEP values (p = 0.08, ES = 0.5, Δ20.4%). These findings suggest that bilateral knee extensor fatigue can impair performance and modulate corticospinal excitability of the EF. PMID:26869902

  15. Changes in electrical pain threshold of fascia and muscle after initial and secondary bouts of elbow flexor eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wing Yin; Blazevich, Anthony J; Newton, Michael J; Wu, Sam Shi Xuan; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated changes in electrical pain threshold (EPT) after repeated eccentric exercise bouts to test the hypothesis that fascia would become more sensitive than muscle when greater delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is induced. Ten young men performed two eccentric exercise bouts (ECC1, ECC2) consisting of ten sets of six maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with the same arm separated by 4 weeks. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction torque, range of motion, muscle soreness assessed by a visual analogue scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were measured before, immediately after and 1-5 days after exercise. EPT was assessed in the biceps brachii fascia (BBF), biceps brachii muscle, and brachialis fascia (BF) 1 day before, immediately after, and 1, 2 and 4 days after exercise. All measures showed smaller changes (P < 0.05) after ECC2 than ECC1. EPT decreased after both bouts and the largest decreases were evident at 2 days post-exercise (P < 0.05). The decreases in EPT after ECC1 were greater (P < 0.05) for both BBF (Baseline: 1.45 ± 0.23 mA, 2 days post-exercise: 0.13 ± 0.11 mA) and BF (1.64 ± 0.29 mA, 0.26 ± 0.2 mA) than muscle (1.56 ± 0.29 mA, 0.69 ± 0.33 mA). Changes in EPT were correlated with the changes in PPT (r = 0.63-0.87, P ≤ 0.05) but not with VAS (r = -0.01 to 0.50). These results show that fascia becomes more sensitive than muscle to electrical stimulation after the initial eccentric exercise, suggesting that damage inflammation to fascia than muscle fibres is more associated with DOMS.

  16. Differences in post-exercise T2 relaxation time changes between eccentric and concentric contractions of the elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Eisuke; Tsuchiya, Yosuke; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2016-12-01

    This study compared maximal eccentric (ECC) and concentric (CON) contractions of the elbow flexors for changes in transverse relaxation time (T2) and indirect markers of muscle damage. Twelve young men performed five sets of six maximal isokinetic (30°/s) ECC with one arm followed by CON with the other arm. Magnetic resonance images to assess T2 and cross-sectional area (CSA) of biceps brachii, brachialis, and brachioradialis, and measurements of maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque, range of motion (ROM), and muscle soreness were taken before, immediately after, and 1, 3, and 5 days after each exercise. MVC torque and ROM decreased greater after ECC than CON (p < 0.05), and muscle soreness developed only after ECC. Biceps brachii and brachialis CSA increased immediately after CON, but delayed increases in brachialis CSA were found only after ECC (p < 0.05). T2 of the muscles increased greater after CON (27-34 %) than ECC (16-18 %) immediately post-exercise (p < 0.05), but returned to baseline by 1 day after CON. The biceps brachii and brachialis T2 increased by 9-29 % at 1-5 days after ECC (p < 0.05). The post-ECC T2 changes showed no significant correlations with the changes in MVC torque, muscle soreness, and CSA, but the T2 increase immediately post-ECC was correlated with the peak T2 in 1-5-day post-ECC (r = 0.63, p < 0.05). These results suggest that muscle activity during exercise was lower in ECC than CON, and the T2 changes after ECC do not necessarily relate to the changes in other indirect markers of muscle damage.

  17. Effects of a single whole body cryotherapy (-110°C) bout on neuromuscular performance of the elbow flexors during isokinetic exercise.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Junior, J B; Vieira, C A; Soares, S R S; Guedes, R; Rocha Junior, V A; Simoes, H G; Brown, L E; Bottaro, M

    2014-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that body cooling may decrease neuromuscular performance. However, the effect of a single session of whole body cryotherapy (-110°C) on neuromuscular performance has not been well documented. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a single exposure of WBC on elbow flexor neuromuscular performance. Thirteen physically active, healthy young men (age=27.9±4.2 years, mass=79.4±9.7 kg, height=176.7±5.2 cm) were randomly exposed to 2 different experimental conditions separated by a minimum of 72 h: 1) whole body cryotherapy- 3 min at -110°C; 2) control- 3 min at 21°C. All subjects were tested for maximal isokinetic elbow flexion at 60°.s(-1) 30 min before and 10 min after each condition. There were no significant differences in peak torque, average power, total work or muscle activity between conditions. Peak torque was lower at post-test compared to pre-test in both conditions (F=6.58, p=0.025). However, there were no differences between pre-test and post-test for any other variables. These results indicate that strength specialists, athletic trainers and physical therapists might utilize whole body cryotherapy before training or rehabilitation without compromising neuromuscular performance of the elbow flexors.

  18. Low-Frequency Fatigue Assessed as Double to Single Twitch Ratio after Two Bouts of Eccentric Exercise of the Elbow Flexors

    PubMed Central

    Janecki, Damian; Jaskólska, Anna; Marusiak, Jarosław; Jaskólski, Artur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess low-frequency fatigue as a double to single twitch ratio after repeated eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors. Maximal isometric torque, single and double twitch responses and low-frequency fatigue were assessed on the elbow flexors in 16 untrained male volunteers before, immediately after, 24 and 48 hours following two bouts of eccentric exercise consisted of 30 repetitions of lowering a dumbbell adjusted to ~75% of each individual’s maximal isometric torque. Maximal isometric torque and electrically evoked responses decreased significantly in all measurements after the first bout of eccentric exercise (p < 0.05). In measurements performed at 24 and 48 hours after the second bout both maximal voluntary isometric torque and electrically evoked contractions were significantly higher than in measurements performed after the first bout (p < 0.05). Although low-frequency fatigue significantly increased up to 48 hours after each bout of eccentric exercise, its values at 24 and 48 hours after the second bout were significantly lower than at respective time points after the first bout (p < 0.05). Double to single twitch ratio could be used as a sensitive tool in the evaluation of muscle recovery and adaptation to repeated eccentric exercise. Key points First bout of eccentric (ECC) exercise of the elbow flexors muscles induced repeated bout effect that lead to faster recovery of the low-frequency fatigue, the maximal torque of voluntary and electrically evoked contractions, and smaller soreness sensation, when the exercise are repeated 2-3 weeks later. Double (DT) to single twitch (ST) ratio could be used as a sensitive tool in the evaluation of muscle recovery and adaptation to repeated eccentric exercise. The single twitch and DT to ST ratios seem to be more susceptible for minimal force deficits that could occur even after repeated ECC where repeated bout effect should confer the protection after subsequent muscle damage. PMID

  19. Development of an equation to predict muscle volume of elbow flexors for men and women with a wide range of age.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ryota; Takai, Yohei; Kato, Emika; Wakahara, Taku; Ohta, Megumi; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2010-03-01

    The present study examined the age-related changes in muscle thickness (MT) and volume (MV) of elbow flexors and developed a prediction equation of the MV based on the MT applicable to men and women with a wide range of age. The MT and MV were determined from a single ultrasonographic image and multiple magnetic resonance imaging scans, respectively, in 72 men and 75 women aged 19-77 year. As a result of examining the age-MT and age-MV relationships by calculation of partial correlation coefficients with the control variable of gender, MV was decreased with aging whereas the corresponding decline in MT was not significant. The subjects were randomly separated into either a validation (38 men and 42 women) or a cross-validation (34 men and 33 women) group, and a multiple regression equation to estimate MV using not only MT but also upper arm length (L), age and gender as independent variables [MV (cm(3)) = 60.8 x MT (cm) + 6.48 x L (cm) - 0.709 x age (year) + 51.4 x gender (0 women, 1 men) - 187.4] was validated and cross-validated. Thus, the prediction equation for MV of elbow flexors newly developed was shown to be applicable to men and women with a wide range of age.

  20. Low-Frequency Fatigue Assessed as Double to Single Twitch Ratio after Two Bouts of Eccentric Exercise of the Elbow Flexors.

    PubMed

    Janecki, Damian; Jaskólska, Anna; Marusiak, Jarosław; Jaskólski, Artur

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess low-frequency fatigue as a double to single twitch ratio after repeated eccentric exercise of the elbow flexors. Maximal isometric torque, single and double twitch responses and low-frequency fatigue were assessed on the elbow flexors in 16 untrained male volunteers before, immediately after, 24 and 48 hours following two bouts of eccentric exercise consisted of 30 repetitions of lowering a dumbbell adjusted to ~75% of each individual's maximal isometric torque. Maximal isometric torque and electrically evoked responses decreased significantly in all measurements after the first bout of eccentric exercise (p < 0.05). In measurements performed at 24 and 48 hours after the second bout both maximal voluntary isometric torque and electrically evoked contractions were significantly higher than in measurements performed after the first bout (p < 0.05). Although low-frequency fatigue significantly increased up to 48 hours after each bout of eccentric exercise, its values at 24 and 48 hours after the second bout were significantly lower than at respective time points after the first bout (p < 0.05). Double to single twitch ratio could be used as a sensitive tool in the evaluation of muscle recovery and adaptation to repeated eccentric exercise.

  1. Position sense at the human elbow joint measured by arm matching or pointing.

    PubMed

    Tsay, Anthony; Allen, Trevor J; Proske, Uwe

    2016-10-01

    Position sense at the human elbow joint has traditionally been measured in blindfolded subjects using a forearm matching task. Here we compare position errors in a matching task with errors generated when the subject uses a pointer to indicate the position of a hidden arm. Evidence from muscle vibration during forearm matching supports a role for muscle spindles in position sense. We have recently shown using vibration, as well as muscle conditioning, which takes advantage of muscle's thixotropic property, that position errors generated in a forearm pointing task were not consistent with a role by muscle spindles. In the present study we have used a form of muscle conditioning, where elbow muscles are co-contracted at the test angle, to further explore differences in position sense measured by matching and pointing. For fourteen subjects, in a matching task where the reference arm had elbow flexor and extensor muscles contracted at the test angle and the indicator arm had its flexors conditioned at 90°, matching errors lay in the direction of flexion by 6.2°. After the same conditioning of the reference arm and extension conditioning of the indicator at 0°, matching errors lay in the direction of extension (5.7°). These errors were consistent with predictions based on a role by muscle spindles in determining forearm matching outcomes. In the pointing task subjects moved a pointer to align it with the perceived position of the hidden arm. After conditioning of the reference arm as before, pointing errors all lay in a more extended direction than the actual position of the arm by 2.9°-7.3°, a distribution not consistent with a role by muscle spindles. We propose that in pointing muscle spindles do not play the major role in signalling limb position that they do in matching, but that other sources of sensory input should be given consideration, including afferents from skin and joint.

  2. Effect of Creatine Supplementation on Muscle Damage and Repair Following Eccentrically-Induced Damage to the Elbow Flexor Muscles

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Neal B.; Graham, Mitchell T.; Tiidus, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated effects of creatine (Cr) supplementation (CrS) on exercise-induced muscle damage. Untrained males and females (N = 27) ages 18-25, with no CrS history in the past 4 months, were randomly assigned to CrS (creatine and carbohydrate) (n = 9), placebo (P) (carbohydrate only) (n = 9), or control (C) (no supplements) groups (n = 9). Participants followed a 5-day Cr loading protocol of 40 g·day-1, divided for 5 days prior to exercise, reduced to 10 g g·day-1 for 5 days following exercise. Testing consisted of 5 maximal isometric contractions at 90 arm flexion with the preferred arm on a CYBEX NORM dynamometer, assessed prior to, immediately following, and 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours post muscle-damaging procedures. Damage was induced to the elbow flexor muscles using 6 sets of 10 eccentric contractions at 75 °/sec, 90 °/sec and 120 °/sec. Participants were asked to rate their muscle soreness on a scale of 1-10. Data was analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA, with an alpha of 0.05. No significant differences were found between muscle force loss and rate of recovery or muscle soreness between groups over the 96 hr recovery period (p > 0.05). Across all 3 experimental groups an initial decrease in force was observed, followed by a gradual recovery. Significant differences were found between baseline and all others times (p = 0.031,0 .022, 0.012, 0.001 respectively), and between the 48 hour and 96 hour time periods (p = 0.034). A weak negative correlation between subjectively rated muscle soreness and mean peak isometric force loss (R2 = 0.0374 at 96 hours), suggested that muscle soreness and muscle force loss may not be directly related. In conclusion, 5 days of Cr loading, followed by a Cr maintenance protocol did not reduce indices of muscle damage or speed recovery of upper body muscles following eccentrically induced muscle damage. Key points Creatine supplementation has been suggested as a means to diminish exercise induced muscle damage and speed

  3. Combined flexor-pronator mass and ulnar collateral ligament injuries in the elbows of older baseball players.

    PubMed

    Osbahr, Daryl C; Swaminathan, Swarup S; Allen, Answorth A; Dines, Joshua S; Coleman, Struan H; Altchek, David W

    2010-04-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction techniques have afforded baseball players up to a reported 90% return to prior or higher level of play. A subpopulation exists with less impressive clinical outcomes potentially related to the presence of a concomitant flexor-pronator mass injury. Combined flexor-pronator and ulnar collateral ligament injuries occur in older players, and results in this group are inferior to those reported for isolated ulnar collateral ligament reconstructions. Case Series; Level of evidence, 4. All baseball players who had ulnar collateral ligament reconstructions by 1 surgeon over a 6-year period were identified, and the authors studied those treated for a combined flexor-pronator and ulnar collateral ligament injury. The ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction was accomplished using the docking technique, and the flexor-pronator injury was treated with debridement if tendinotic or reattachment if torn. A 2-sample t test was conducted to evaluate the likelihood of developing the combined flexor-pronator/ulnar collateral ligament compared with ulnar collateral ligament injury based on age, while a Pearson chi(2) test was used to evaluate the likelihood of a patient being > or =30 years of age in the combined flexor-pronator/ulnar collateral ligament versus ulnar collateral ligament groups. Outcome was assessed using a modified Conway classification. A total of 187 male baseball players between 14 and 42 years of age (mean, 20.7 years) had an ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction by 1 surgeon. Eight (4%) of 187 baseball players were treated for the combined flexor-pronator/ulnar collateral ligament injury. There was a statistically significant difference in age between the ulnar collateral ligament group (20.1 years) and the flexor-pronator/ulnar collateral ligament group (33.4 years) (P < .001). Age > or =30 years was a statistically significant age limit to predict the presence of a combined flexor-pronator/ulnar collateral ligament

  4. A Comparison of Total and Intrinsic Muscle Stiffness Among Flexors and Extensors of the Ankle, Knee and Elbow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Sandra M.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined 3 methods that assessed muscle stiffness. Muscle stiffness has been quantified by tissue reactive force (transverse stiffness), vibration, and force (or torque) over displacement. Muscle stiffness also has two components: reflex (due to muscle sensor activity) and intrinsic (tonic firing of motor units, elastic nature of actin and myosin cross bridges, and connective tissue). This study compared three methods of measuring muscle stiffness of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs of the ankle, knee and elbow.

  5. A Comparison of Total and Intrinsic Muscle Stiffness Among Flexors and Extensors of the Ankle, Knee and Elbow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Sandra M.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined 3 methods that assessed muscle stiffness. Muscle stiffness has been quantified by tissue reactive force (transverse stiffness), vibration, and force (or torque) over displacement. Muscle stiffness also has two components: reflex (due to muscle sensor activity) and intrinsic (tonic firing of motor units, elastic nature of actin and myosin cross bridges, and connective tissue). This study compared three methods of measuring muscle stiffness of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs of the ankle, knee and elbow.

  6. Convergence of flexor reflex and corticospinal inputs on tibialis anterior network in humans.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Ann S; Uttaro, Denise; McDonough, Maureen P; Krivis, Lisa I; Knikou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Integration between descending and ascending inputs at supraspinal and spinal levels is a key characteristic of neural control of movement. In this study, we characterized convergence of the flexor reflex and corticospinal inputs on the tibialis anterior (TA) network in healthy human subjects. Specifically, we characterized the modulation profiles of the spinal TA flexor reflex following subthreshold and suprathreshold transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We also characterized the modulation profiles of the TA motor evoked potentials (MEPs) following medial arch foot stimulation at sensory and above reflex threshold. TA flexor reflexes were evoked following stimulation of the medial arch of the foot with a 30 ms pulse train at innocuous intensities. TA MEPs were evoked following TMS of the leg motor cortex area. TMS at 0.7 and at 1.2 MEP resting threshold increased the TA flexor reflex when TMS was delivered 40-100 ms after foot stimulation, and decreased the TA flexor reflex when TMS was delivered 25-110 ms before foot stimulation. Foot stimulation at sensory and above flexor reflex threshold induced a similar time-dependent modulation in resting TA MEPs, that were facilitated when foot stimulation was delivered 40-100 ms before TMS. The flexor reflex and MEPs recorded from the medial hamstring muscle were modulated in a similar manner to that observed for the TA flexor reflex and MEP. Cutaneomuscular afferents from the distal foot can increase the output of the leg motor cortex area. Descending motor volleys that directly or indirectly depolarize flexor motoneurons increase the output of the spinal FRA interneuronal network. The parallel facilitation of flexor MEPs and flexor reflexes is likely cortical in origin. Afferent mediated facilitation of corticospinal excitability can be utilized to strengthen motor cortex output in neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  7. Locomotor training alters the behavior of flexor reflexes during walking in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In humans, a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs the excitability of pathways mediating early flexor reflexes and increases the excitability of late, long-lasting flexor reflexes. We hypothesized that in individuals with SCI, locomotor training will alter the behavior of these spinally mediated reflexes. Nine individuals who had either chronic clinically motor complete or incomplete SCI received an average of 44 locomotor training sessions. Flexor reflexes, elicited via sural nerve stimulation of the right or left leg, were recorded from the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before and after body weight support (BWS)-assisted treadmill training. The modulation pattern of the ipsilateral TA responses following innocuous stimulation of the right foot was also recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they stepped at 25% BWS to investigate whether body unloading during walking affects the behavior of these responses. Healthy subjects did not receive treadmill training. We observed a phase-dependent modulation of early TA flexor reflexes in healthy subjects with reduced body weight during walking. The early TA flexor reflexes were increased at heel contact, progressively decreased during the stance phase, and then increased throughout the swing phase. In individuals with SCI, locomotor training induced the reappearance of early TA flexor reflexes and changed the amplitude of late TA flexor reflexes during walking. Both early and late TA flexor reflexes were modulated in a phase-dependent pattern after training. These new findings support the adaptive capability of the injured nervous system to return to a prelesion excitability and integration state.

  8. Elevations in ostensibly anabolic hormones with resistance exercise enhance neither training-induced muscle hypertrophy nor strength of the elbow flexors

    PubMed Central

    West, Daniel W. D.; Burd, Nicholas A.; Tang, Jason E.; Moore, Daniel R.; Staples, Aaron W.; Holwerda, Andrew M.; Baker, Steven K.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine whether resistance exercise-induced elevations in endogenous hormones enhance muscle strength and hypertrophy with training. Twelve healthy young men (21.8 ± 1.2 yr, body mass index = 23.1 ± 0.6 kg/m2) trained their elbow flexors independently for 15 wk on separate days and under different hormonal milieu. In one training condition, participants performed isolated arm curl exercise designed to maintain basal hormone concentrations (low hormone, LH); in the other training condition, participants performed identical arm exercise to the LH condition followed immediately by a high volume of leg resistance exercise to elicit a large increase in endogenous hormones (high hormone, HH). There was no elevation in serum growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), or testosterone after the LH protocol but significant (P < 0.001) elevations in these hormones immediately and 15 and 30 min after the HH protocol. The hormone responses elicited by each respective exercise protocol late in the training period were similar to the response elicited early in the training period, indicating that a divergent postexercise hormone response was maintained over the training period. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) increased by 12% in LH and 10% in HH (P < 0.001) with no difference between conditions (condition × training interaction, P = 0.25). Similarly, type I (P < 0.01) and type II (P < 0.001) muscle fiber CSA increased with training with no effect of hormone elevation in the HH condition. Strength increased in both arms, but the increase was not different between the LH and HH conditions. We conclude that exposure of loaded muscle to acute exercise-induced elevations in endogenous anabolic hormones enhances neither muscle hypertrophy nor strength with resistance training in young men. PMID:19910330

  9. Elevations in ostensibly anabolic hormones with resistance exercise enhance neither training-induced muscle hypertrophy nor strength of the elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel W D; Burd, Nicholas A; Tang, Jason E; Moore, Daniel R; Staples, Aaron W; Holwerda, Andrew M; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Stuart M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine whether resistance exercise-induced elevations in endogenous hormones enhance muscle strength and hypertrophy with training. Twelve healthy young men (21.8 +/- 1.2 yr, body mass index = 23.1 +/- 0.6 kg/m(2)) trained their elbow flexors independently for 15 wk on separate days and under different hormonal milieu. In one training condition, participants performed isolated arm curl exercise designed to maintain basal hormone concentrations (low hormone, LH); in the other training condition, participants performed identical arm exercise to the LH condition followed immediately by a high volume of leg resistance exercise to elicit a large increase in endogenous hormones (high hormone, HH). There was no elevation in serum growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), or testosterone after the LH protocol but significant (P < 0.001) elevations in these hormones immediately and 15 and 30 min after the HH protocol. The hormone responses elicited by each respective exercise protocol late in the training period were similar to the response elicited early in the training period, indicating that a divergent postexercise hormone response was maintained over the training period. Muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) increased by 12% in LH and 10% in HH (P < 0.001) with no difference between conditions (condition x training interaction, P = 0.25). Similarly, type I (P < 0.01) and type II (P < 0.001) muscle fiber CSA increased with training with no effect of hormone elevation in the HH condition. Strength increased in both arms, but the increase was not different between the LH and HH conditions. We conclude that exposure of loaded muscle to acute exercise-induced elevations in endogenous anabolic hormones enhances neither muscle hypertrophy nor strength with resistance training in young men.

  10. Changes in the Muscle Strength of the Elbow Flexors Following a Six-week Experimental Procedure in Adolescents Monitored Through Isokinetic and Motor Tests.

    PubMed

    Vuksanovic, Vladimir; Handjiski, Zoran; Handjiska, Eli

    2014-06-01

    A group of 7 subjects underwent an experimental procedure which studied the potential changes in the maximal strength of the non-dominant arm elbow flexors. The programme duration was limited to 6 weeks during which the subjects practiced exercises 3 times a week, 3 series, on a Scott bench. Individual approach was applied to the external load and it was designed so that the weight being lifted would increase if the number of lifts in one series would exceed 3. The subjects were monitored through the one-repetition maximum 1 RM motor test and the isokinetic tests performed on biodex system, tested in 3 time periods (at the beginning, after 3 weeks, and after the 6th week). Of the 6 isokinetic tests, only the test for the maximum torque and the time for achieving the maximum torque have shown statistically important changes in terms of reduction in values, which was not expected. The one-repetition maximum test, unlike the isokinetic tests, has shown statistically important increase of the maximal muscle strength of 32.1% after the third week of exercising, and 46.8% after the six weeks of exercising. The statistical test for the correlation between the two variables has shown low correlation between these two tests. The values of the data of the two test types have not shown any correspondence among the subjects possibly due to the type of performance of the maximal muscle load during exercises, performed in conditions identical to the one-repetition maximum test, with similar and yet different conditions in the case of isokinetic tests. Most probably, due to the conditions in which the exercises and the tests took place, there is difference in the obtained results.

  11. Functional anatomy of the human digital flexor pulley system.

    PubMed

    Lin, G T; Amadio, P C; An, K N; Cooney, W P

    1989-11-01

    The anatomy of 55 cadaver digits was studied, both statistically and with simulated active motion using weights attached to the flexor tendons. The modified description of Doyle and Blythe accurately described the anatomy observed. Serial pulley sectioning showed two types of bowstringing, both of which affected the relationship of tendon excursion to joint motion. The most constant, resulting in 15% loss of motion for a fixed tendon excursion, occurred over the concave surfaces of the proximal and middle phalanges. Bowstringing at the proximal interphalangeal joint was present only after 30 degrees of flexion had occurred, because of the convexity of the phalangeal condyles.

  12. Inhibitory action of forearm flexor muscle afferents on corticospinal outputs to antagonist muscles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bertolasi, Laura; Priori, Alberto; Tinazzi, Michele; Bertasi, Valeria; Rothwell, John C

    1998-01-01

    To find out whether muscle afferents influence the excitability of corticospinal projections to antagonist muscles, we studied sixteen healthy subjects and one patient with a focal brain lesion. Using transcranial magnetic and electrical brain stimulation we tested the excitability of corticomotoneuronal connections to right forearm muscles at rest after conditioning stimulation of the median nerve at the elbow. Somatosensory potentials evoked by median nerve stimulation were also recorded in each subject. Test stimuli delivered at 13–19 ms after median nerve stimulation significantly inhibited EMG responses elicited in forearm extensor muscles by transcranial magnetic stimulation, but did not inhibit responses to electrical stimulation. In contrast, magnetically and electrically elicited responses in forearm flexor muscles were suppressed to the same extent. The higher the intensity of the test shocks, the smaller was the amount of median nerve-elicited inhibition. Inhibition in extensor muscles was also smaller during tonic wrist extension, or if the induced electrical stimulating current in the brain flowed from posterior to anterior over the motor strip rather than vice versa. Test responses evoked by magnetic transcranial stimulation in the first dorsal interosseous and in brachioradialis muscles were not inhibited after median nerve stimulation at the elbow. Stimulation of digital nerves failed to inhibit motor potentials in extensor muscles. Test stimuli delivered at 15 and 17 ms after radial nerve stimulation significantly inhibited EMG responses elicited in forearm flexor muscles by magnetic transcranial stimulation. In the patient with a focal thalamic lesion, who had dystonic postures and an absent N20 component of the somatosensory-evoked potentials but normal strength, median nerve stimulation failed to inhibit magnetically evoked responses in forearm extensor muscles. We propose that activation of median nerve muscle afferents can suppress the

  13. Development of digastric muscles in human fetuses: a review and findings in the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Jin, Zhe Wu; Zhao, Peng; Murakami, Gen; Li, Xiang Wu; Jin, Yu

    2017-09-04

    The digastricus and omohyoideus muscles are digastric muscles with two muscle bellies. An insertion tendon of the posterior belly becomes an intermediate tendon in digastricus muscles, whereas a single band-like muscle in omohyoideus muscles may later be interrupted by an intermediate tendon, possibly due to muscle cell death caused by mechanical stress. In human fetuses, an intermediate tendon provides the temporal origins of the tensor veli palatini and tensor tympani muscles. Some reptiles, including snakes, carry multiple series of digastric-like axial muscles, in which each intersegmental septum is likely to become an intermediate tendon. These findings indicate that many pathways are involved in the development of digastric muscles. A review of these morphologies suggested that the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle was a digastric muscle, although the intermediate tendon may not be visible in the surface view in adults. The present observations support the hypothesis that the proximal anlage at the elbow develops into a deep muscle slip to a limited finger, while the distal anlage at the wrist develops into the other slips. The findings suggest that, in the FDS muscle, the proximal and distal bellies of the embryonic digastric muscle fuse together to form a laminar structure, in which muscle slips accumulate from the palmar to the deep side of the forearm.

  14. Intramuscular EMG from the hip flexor muscles during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Andersson, E A; Nilsson, J; Thorstensson, A

    1997-11-01

    The purpose was to investigate the activation pattern of five major hip flexor muscles and its adaptation to changing speed and mode of progression. A total of 11 healthy subjects performed walking and running on a motor-driven treadmill at speeds ranging from 1.0 to 6.0 m s-1. Intramuscular fine-wire electrodes were used to record myoelectric signals from the iliacus, psoas, sartorius, rectus femoris and tensor fascia latae muscles. The basic pattern, with respect to number of activation periods, remained the same irrespective of speed and mode of progression. However, differences in the relative duration and timing of onset of activation occurred between individual muscles. Over the speed range in walking, a progressively earlier onset was generally seen for the activation period related to hip flexion. Changes in EMG amplitude were measured in the iliacus and psoas muscles and showed a marked increase and difference between walking and running at speeds above 2.0 m s-1. Thus, the alternating flexion-extension movements at the hip during locomotion appear to be governed by a rather fixed 'neural program' which normally only needs minor modulations to accomplish the adjustments accompanying an increase in speed of progression as well as a change from walking to running.

  15. Turkey model for flexor tendon research: in vitro comparison of human, canine, turkey, and chicken tendons.

    PubMed

    Kadar, Assaf; Thoreson, Andrew R; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Amadio, Peter C; Moran, Steven L; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2017-08-01

    Flexor tendon injuries are one of the most common hand injuries and remain clinically challenging for functional restoration. Canine and chicken have been the most commonly used animal models for flexor tendon-related research but possess several disadvantages. The purpose of this study was to explore a potential turkey model for flexor tendon research. The third digit from human cadaveric hands, canine forepaws, turkey foot, and chicken foot were used for this study. Six digits in each of four species were studied in detail, comparing anatomy of the flexor apparatus, joint range of motioņ tendon excursion, tendon cross-sectional area, work of flexion, gliding resistance at the level of the A2 pulley, modulus of elasticity, suture retention strength, and histology across species. Anatomically, the third digit in the four species displayed structural similarities; however, the tendon cross-sectional area of the turkey and human were similar and larger than canine and chicken. Furthermore, the turkey digit resembles the human's finger with the lack of webbing between digits, similar vascularization, tendon excursion, work of flexion, gliding resistance, mechanical properties, and suture holding strength. More importantly, human and turkey tendons were most similar in histological appearance. Turkey flexor tendons have many properties that are comparable to human flexor tendons which would provide a clinically relevant, economical, nonhuman companion large animal model for flexor tendon research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The senses of force and heaviness at the human elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jack; Allen, Trevor J; Proske, Uwe

    2013-05-01

    The present-day view of the neural basis for the senses of muscle force and heaviness is that they are generated centrally, within the brain, from copies of motor commands. A corollary of the motor discharge generates a sense of effort which underlies these sensations. In recent experiments on force and heaviness sensations using thumb flexor muscles, a rather different explanation has been invoked: Subjects were proposed to rely predominantly on inputs of a peripheral origin, in particular, the signals of muscle spindles. The present experiments have been carried out at the elbow joint to determine whether these new ideas apply more widely. The effects of fatigue of elbow flexor muscles have been studied in force and heaviness matching tasks using three exercise regimes, a sustained maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), a maintained contraction of 35 % MVC, and a maintained contraction of 35 % MVC combined with muscle vibration at 80 Hz. In force-matching experiments, subjects were required to contract both arms and while the reference arm generated the target force under visual control, it was matched by the indicator arm without visual feedback. During the 100 % MVC exercise, force in the exercising reference arm fell rapidly to almost a half of its original value over 90 s while force in the indicator did not fall, leading to a significant overestimation of the reference force. During the 35 % MVC exercise, subjects also overestimated the reference force and this persisted at 5 and 10 min after the exercise. When 35 % MVC was combined with vibration, the amount by which the indicator arm overestimated the reference force was significantly reduced. In heaviness matching experiments, subjects could move their arms through a small range. The reference arm was loaded with a weight, and weights were added or removed from the indicator until heaviness felt the same in the two arms. There was a small, but significant fall in the matching weight used after 100 % MVC

  17. Development of a physical model of the human elbow joint using polyacrylonitrile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Roger V.; Thielman, Jeffrey L.

    1998-07-01

    A physical model of the human elbow joint was designed using the polymer fiber polyacrylonitrile (PAN), developed at the University of New Mexico. The elbow model uses six PAN fiber bundles, as artificial muscles, to create the forces needed for elbow movement. These six fiber bundles were designed to imitate the major muscles that cross the human elbow joint. Four distinct movement tasks (elbow flexion/extension and forearm pronation/supination) were designed into the physical mode. Several steps were taken to meet this objective. First, the mechanical properties of the PAN fibers were characterized using the techniques developed by A. V. Hill, and compared with his results. The results show that the fiber mechanical properties have similarities to human muscle properties, and thus permitting a realistic elbow model to be developed. Second, a method of encasing the individual bundles of fibers was developed. The encasing lengthens and shortens with the fibers, prevents fluid leakage, and does not deteriorate given the acid and base fluid components. Third, a method of supplying and removing the activating fluids was developed. This system is chemically resistant, provides a method for controlling inlet and exit fluid flow, and allows for complete fluid exchange in less than 5 seconds. Finally, a microcontroller was incorporated to provide joint position and velocity control based on joint potentiometers and provide real-time feedback of joint positions. Using these components, a human elbow joint system was developed that allows movement in two degrees of freedom. Due to the characteristics of the PAN fiber bundles, the elbow joint was slower and weaker than originally designed. System improvements relate closely to increasing fiber bundle force and decreasing the reaction time constant.

  18. On the long-latency reflex responses of the human flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P B; Miles, T S

    1988-01-01

    1. Electromyography (surface and intramuscular) has been used to study the reflex responses of the human flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) to angular rotation of the distal interphalangeal joint of the 4th finger. This has been done with the hand in three separate positions which, owing to the arrangement of the various tendons, allow the movement to be transmitted to (a) both the flexor and extensor muscles, (b) FDP alone (extensors disengaged) and (c) neither flexor nor extensor muscles (all muscles disengaged, but cutaneous and joint receptors still potentially activated). The stimuli were applied while the subject was voluntarily contracting FDP to produce a constant level of EMG activity; this remained possible when the muscle was disengaged from the joint. 2. With all muscles connected, FDP behaved similarly to the analogous long flexor of the thumb. 'Stretch' elicited a prolonged complex response starting with a short-latency component corresponding to the tendon jerk. Unloading of the contracting muscle caused a pronounced reduction of its on-going EMG activity. The latency of this latter effect was approximately 20 ms greater than that of the initial stretch-evoked response, thereby demonstrating that it was not due to a disfacilitation via the short-latency pathway (on reduction of the tonic spindle afferent firing from FDP as it shortened). 3. With all muscles disengaged, movement of the joint in either direction evoked simply a weak, variable excitatory response, with a latency somewhat greater than that of the normal unloading response. This was attributed to the activation of cutaneous and/or joint receptors. The effectiveness of the disengagement of the flexor was demonstrated by the abolition of its normal stretch-evoked short-latency response. 4. With the flexor engaged and the extensors disengaged both stretch and release evoked their normal types of response. In control experiments, surface EMG recordings from the interosseus muscles confirmed

  19. Vortical flow in human elbow joints: a three-dimensional computed tomography modeling study.

    PubMed

    Adikrishna, Arnold; Kekatpure, Aashay L; Tan, Jun; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Deslivia, Maria Florencia; Jeon, In-Ho

    2014-10-01

    The human elbow joint has been regarded as a loose hinge joint, with a unique helical motion of the axis during extension-flexion. This study was designed to identify the helical axis in the ulnohumeral joint during elbow extension-flexion by tracking the midpoint between the coronoid tip and the olecranon tip of the proximal ulna in a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) image model. The elbows of four volunteers were CT-scanned at four flexion angles (0°, 45°, 90°, and 130°) at neutral rotation with a custom-made holding device to control any motion during scanning. Three-dimensional models of each elbow were reconstructed and a 3D ulnohumeral joint at 45°, 90°, and 130° was superimposed onto a fully extended joint (0°) by rotating and translating each 3D ulnohumeral joint along the axes. The midpoints of the olecranon and coronoid tips were interpolated using cubic spline technique and the dynamic elbow motion was plotted to determine the motion of the helical axis. The means and standard deviations were subsequently calculated. The average midpoint pattern of joint motion from extension to flexion was elliptical-orbit-like when projected onto a sagittal plane and continuously translated a mean 2.14 ± 0.34 mm (range, 1.83-2.52 mm) to the lateral side during elbow extension-flexion. In 3D space, the average midpoint pattern of the ulnohumeral joint resembles a vortical flow, spinning along an imaginary axis, with an inconsistent radius from 0° to 130° flexion. The ulnohumeral joint axis both rotates and translates during elbow extension-flexion, with a vortex-flow motion occurring during flexion in 3D model analysis. This motion should be considered when performing hinged external fixation, total elbow replacement and medial collateral ligament reconstruction surgery. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  20. Interlimb communication to the knee flexors during walking in humans

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Andrew J T; Geertsen, Svend S; Andersen, Jacob B; Sinkjær, Thomas; Nielsen, Jens B; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    A strong coordination between the two legs is important for maintaining a symmetric gait pattern and adapting to changes in the external environment. In humans as well as animals, receptors arising from the quadriceps muscle group influence the activation of ipsilateral muscles. Moreover, strong contralateral spinal connections arising from quadriceps and hamstring afferents have been shown in animal models. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to assess if such connections also exist in humans and to elucidate on the possible pathways. Contralateral reflex responses were investigated in the right leg following unexpected unilateral knee joint rotations during locomotion in either the flexion or extension direction. Strong reflex responses in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) muscle with a mean onset latency of 76 ± 6 ms were evoked only from ipsilateral knee extension joint rotations in the late stance phase. To investigate the contribution of a transcortical pathway to this response, transcranial magnetic and electrical stimulation were applied. Motor evoked potentials elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation, but not transcranial electrical stimulation, were facilitated when elicited at the time of the cBF response to a greater extent than the algebraic sum of the cBF reflex and motor evoked potentials elicited separately, indicating that a transcortical pathway probably contributes to this interlimb reflex. The cBF reflex response may therefore be integrated with other sensory input, allowing for responses that are more flexible. We hypothesize that the cBF reflex response may be a preparation of the contralateral leg for early load bearing, slowing the forward progression of the body to maintain dynamic equilibrium during walking. PMID:23918771

  1. Thumb and finger forces produced by motor units in the long flexor of the human thumb

    PubMed Central

    Yu, W S; Kilbreath, S L; Fitzpatrick, R C; Gandevia, S C

    2007-01-01

    The uncommonly good proprioceptive performance of the long flexor of the thumb, flexor pollicis longus (FPL), may add significantly to human manual dexterity. We investigated the forces produced by FPL single motor units during a weak static grip involving all digits by spike-triggered averaging from single motor units, and by averaging from twitches produced by intramuscular stimulation. Nine adult subjects were studied. The forces produced at each digit were used to assess how forces produced in FPL are distributed to the fingers. Most FPL motor units produced very low forces on the thumb and were positively correlated with the muscle force at recruitment. Activity in FPL motor units commonly loaded the index finger (42/55 units), but less commonly the other fingers (P < 0.001). On average, these motor units produced small but significant loading forces on the index finger (∼5.3% of their force on the thumb) with the same time-to-peak force as the thumb (∼50 ms), but had no significant effect on other fingers. However, intramuscular stimulation within FPL did not produce significant forces in any finger. Coherence at 2–10 Hz between the thumb and index finger force was twice that for the other finger forces and the coherence to the non-index fingers was not altered when the index finger did not participate in the grasp. These results indicate that, within the long-term coordinated forces of all digits during grasping, FPL motor units generate forces highly focused on the thumb with minimal peripheral transfer to the fingers and that there is a small but inflexible neural coupling to the flexors of the index finger. PMID:17656436

  2. Human flexor tendon tissue engineering: in vivo effects of stem cell reseeding.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Taliah; Fox, Paige M; Woon, Colin Y; Farnebo, Simon J; Bronstein, Joel A; Behn, Anthony; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2013-10-01

    Tissue-engineered human flexor tendons may be an option to aid in reconstruction of complex upper extremity injuries with significant tendon loss. The authors hypothesize that human adipose-derived stem cells remain viable following reseeding on human tendon scaffolds in vivo and aid in graft integration. Decellularized human flexor tendons harvested from fresh-frozen cadavers and reseeded with green fluorescent protein-labeled pooled human adipose-derived stem cells were examined with bioluminescent imaging and immunohistochemistry. Reseeded repaired tendons were compared biomechanically with unseeded controls following implantation in athymic rats at 2 and 4 weeks. The ratio of collagen I to collagen III at the repair site was examined using Sirius red staining. To confirm cell migration, reseeded and unseeded tendons were placed either in contact or with a 1-mm gap for 12 days. Green fluorescent protein signal was then detected. Following reseeding, viable cells were visualized at 12 days in vitro and 4 weeks in vivo. Biomechanical testing revealed no significant difference in ultimate load to failure and 2-mm gap force. Histologic evaluation showed host cell invasion and proliferation of the repair sites. No increase in collagen III was noted in reseeded constructs. Cell migration was confirmed from reseeded constructs to unseeded tendon scaffolds with tendon contact. Human adipose-derived stem cells reseeded onto decellularized allograft scaffolds are viable over 4 weeks in vivo. The movement of host cells into the scaffold and movement of adipose-derived stem cells along and into the scaffold suggests biointegration of the allograft.

  3. Human ankle plantar flexor muscle–tendon mechanics and energetics during maximum acceleration sprinting

    PubMed Central

    Schache, Anthony G.; Brown, Nicholas A. T.; Pandy, Marcus G.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon elastic strain energy is the dominant contributor to muscle–tendon work during steady-state running. Does this behaviour also occur for sprint accelerations? We used experimental data and computational modelling to quantify muscle fascicle work and tendon elastic strain energy for the human ankle plantar flexors (specifically soleus and medial gastrocnemius) for multiple foot contacts of a maximal sprint as well as for running at a steady-state speed. Positive work done by the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicles decreased incrementally throughout the maximal sprint and both muscles performed more work for the first foot contact of the maximal sprint (FC1) compared with steady-state running at 5 m s−1 (SS5). However, the differences in tendon strain energy for both muscles were negligible throughout the maximal sprint and when comparing FC1 to SS5. Consequently, the contribution of muscle fascicle work to stored tendon elastic strain energy was greater for FC1 compared with subsequent foot contacts of the maximal sprint and compared with SS5. We conclude that tendon elastic strain energy in the ankle plantar flexors is just as vital at the start of a maximal sprint as it is at the end, and as it is for running at a constant speed. PMID:27581481

  4. Tennis Elbow

    MedlinePlus

    Tennis elbow Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is a painful condition that occurs when tendons in your elbow are overloaded, usually by repetitive motions of the wrist and ...

  5. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  6. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... flexor - aftercare; Hip flexor injury - aftercare; Hip flexor tear - aftercare; Iliopsoas strain - aftercare; Strained iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Torn iliopsoas muscle - aftercare; Psoas strain - aftercare

  7. Paired Associative Stimulation Induces Change in Presynaptic Inhibition of Ia Terminals in Wrist Flexors in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Russmann, Heike; Shamim, Ejaz A.; Meunier, Sabine; Hallett, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Enhancements in the strength of corticospinal projections to muscles are induced in conscious humans by paired associative stimulation (PAS) to the motor cortex. Although most of the previous studies support the hypothesis that the increase of the amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) by PAS involves long-term potentiation (LTP)-like mechanism in cortical synapses, changes in spinal excitability after PAS have been reported, suggestive of parallel modifications in both cortical and spinal excitability. In a first series of experiments (experiment 1), we confirmed that both flexor carpi radialis (FCR) MEPs and FCR H reflex recruitment curves are enhanced by PAS. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for this change in the H reflex amplitude, we tested, using the same subjects, the hypothesis that enhanced H reflexes are caused by a down-regulation of the efficacy of mechanisms controlling Ia afferent discharge, including presynaptic Ia inhibition and postactivation depression. To address this question, amounts of both presynaptic Ia inhibition of FCR Ia terminals (D1and D2 inhibitions methods; experiment 2) and postactivation depression (experiment 3) were determined before and after PAS. Results showed that PAS induces a significant decrease of presynaptic Ia inhibition of FCR terminals, which was concomitant with the facilitation of the H reflex. Postactivation depression was unaffected by PAS. It is argued that enhancement of segmental excitation by PAS relies on a selective effect of PAS on the interneurons controlling presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals. PMID:20538768

  8. Efficiency of the flexor tendon pulley system in human cadaver hands.

    PubMed

    Rispler, D; Greenwald, D; Shumway, S; Allan, C; Mass, D

    1996-05-01

    The efficiency of the flexor tendon system was examined in a human cadaver model. Pulleys were randomly sectioned, and the results were evaluated on the basis of the tendon excursion, force generated at the fingertip, and the work (force multiplied by distance) involved, as compared to the intact pulley system. When a single minor pulley (A1 or A5) was cut, there was no statistical difference in work efficiency or excursion efficiency from controls. Cutting all minor pulleys (A1, A3, A5) lead to a significant loss in excursion efficiency. The intact three pulley systems of A2, A3, and A4 were near normal and statistically better than A2 and A4 together for work efficiency. Cutting one of the major pulleys (A2, A4) resulted in significant changes in efficiency, but what was unexpected was to find an 85% loss of both work and excursion efficiency for the loss of A4 but only an excursion difference of 94% for the loss of A2. Our findings demonstrated that in this model, with the influence of the skin removed, A4 absence produced the largest biomechanically measured efficiency changes and that a combination of A2, A3, and A4 was necessary to preserve both work and excursion efficiency.

  9. Comparison of elasticity of human tendon and aponeurosis in knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2005-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the elasticity of tendon and aponeurosis in human knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo and to examine whether the maximal strain of tendon was correlated to that of aponeurosis. The elongation of tendon and aponeurosis during isometric knee extension (n = 23) and ankle plantar flexion (n = 22), respectively, were determined using a real-time ultrasonic apparatus, while the participants performed ramp isometric contractions up to voluntary maximum. To calculate the strain values from the measured elongation, we measured the respective length of tendon and aponeurosis. For the knee extensors, the maximal strain of aponeurosis (12.1 +/- 2.8 %) was significantly greater than that of the patella tendon (8.3 +/- 2.4 %), p < 0.001. On the contrary, the maximal strain of Achilles tendon (5.9 +/- 1.4 %) was significantly greater than that of aponeurosis in ankle plantar flexors (2.7 +/- 1.4 %), p < 0.001. Furthermore, for both knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors there was no significant correlation between maximal strain of tendon and aponeurosis. These results would be important for understanding the different roles of tendon and aponeurosis during human movements and for more accurate muscle modeling.

  10. Enhanced propriospinal excitation from hand muscles to wrist flexors during reach-to-grasp in humans.

    PubMed

    Giboin, Louis-Solal; Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Burke, David; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique

    2012-01-01

    In humans, propriospinal neurons located at midcervical levels receive peripheral and corticospinal inputs and probably participate in the control of grip tasks, but their role in reaching movements, as observed in cats and primates, is still an open question. The effect of ulnar nerve stimulation on flexor carpi radialis (FCR) motor evoked potential (MEP) was tested during reaching tasks and tonic wrist flexion. Significant MEP facilitation was observed at the end of reach during reach-to-grasp but not during grasp, reach-to-point, or tonic contractions. MEP facilitation occurred at a longer interstimulus interval than expected for convergence of corticospinal and afferent volleys at motoneuron level and was not paralleled by a change in the H-reflex. These findings suggest convergence of the two volleys at propriospinal level. Ulnar-induced MEP facilitation was observed when conditioning stimuli were at 0.75 motor response threshold (MT), but not 1 MT. This favors an increased excitability of propriospinal neurons rather than depression of their feedback inhibition, as has been observed during tonic power grip tasks. It is suggested that the ulnar-induced facilitation of FCR MEP during reach may be due to descending activation of propriospinal neurons, assisting the early recruitment of large motoneurons for rapid movement. Because the feedback inhibitory control is still open, this excitation can be truncated by cutaneous inputs from the palmar side of the hand during grasp, thus assisting movement termination. It is concluded that the feedforward activation of propriospinal neurons and their feedback control may be involved in the internal model, motor planning, and online adjustments for reach-to-grasp movements in humans.

  11. 21 CFR 888.3170 - Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis. 888.3170 Section 888.3170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow)...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3170 - Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis. 888.3170 Section 888.3170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow)...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3170 - Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis. 888.3170 Section 888.3170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3170 - Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis. 888.3170 Section 888.3170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3170 - Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis. 888.3170 Section 888.3170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-elbow) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint radial (hemi-elbow) polymer...

  16. Relative longitudinal motion of the finger flexors, subsynovial connective tissue, and median nerve before and after carpal tunnel release in a human cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Taihei; Osamura, Naoki; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2008-01-01

    The normal gliding environment in the carpal tunnel is complex. The median nerve and flexor tendons are surrounded by a multilayered subsynovial tissue. To date, observations of the relative motions of the flexor tendon, median nerve and multilayered subsynovial tissue have been through a surgically released open carpal tunnel. The purpose of this study was to compare the motions of these tissues in an intact and open carpal tunnel. We measured the relative motion of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon, its surrounding subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) and the median nerve in 8 human cadavers. The flexor retinaculum was used as a fixed reference point. The motions were compared for simulated isolated middle finger and simulated fist motion as measured fluoroscopically in the closed carpal tunnel and directly in the open carpal tunnel. While the simulated isolated finger motion produced significantly less SSCT and median nerve motion (p<.05), there was no difference in flexor digitorum superficialis, SSCT, or nerve motion when comparing the fluoroscopic measurements in the closed carpal tunnel with the direct visual measurements in the open carpal tunnel. Relative motion of the flexor tendons, SSCT, and median nerve within the carpal tunnel follows a certain pattern, which may indicate the physiological state of the SSCT. This relative motion pattern was not affected by flexor retinaculum release.

  17. Distribution of the forces produced by motor unit activity in the human flexor digitorum profundus

    PubMed Central

    Kilbreath, S L; Gorman, R B; Raymond, J; Gandevia, S C

    2002-01-01

    In humans, the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), which is a multi-tendoned muscle, produces forces that flex the four distal interphalangeal joints of the fingers. We determined whether the force associated with activity in a single motor unit in the FDP was confined to a single finger or distributed to more than one finger during a natural grasp. The discharge of single low-threshold motor units (n = 69) was recorded at sites across the muscle during weak voluntary grasping involving all fingers and spike-triggered averaging of the forces under each of the finger pads was used to assess the distribution pattern. Spike-triggered averaging revealed that time-locked changes in force occurred under the ‘test’ finger (that finger on which the unit principally acted) as well as under the ‘non-test’ fingers. However, for the index-, middle- and ring-finger units, the changes in force under non-test fingers were typically small (< 20 % of those under the test finger). For little-finger units, the mean changes in force under the adjacent ring finger were large (>50 % of those under the test finger). The distribution of forces by little-finger units differed significantly from that for each of the other three fingers. Apart from increases in force under non-test fingers, there was occasional unloading of adjacent fingers (22/267 combinations), usually affecting the index finger. The increases in force under the test finger correlated significantly with the background force for units acting on the middle, ring and little fingers. During a functional grasp, the activity of single units in the FDP allows for a relatively selective control of forces at the tips of the index, middle and ring fingers, but this is limited for little-finger units. PMID:12181299

  18. Monitoring elbow isometric contraction by novel wearable fabric sensing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Tao, Xiaoming; So, Raymond C. H.; Shu, Lin; Yang, Bao; Li, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Fabric-based wearable technology is highly desirable in sports, as it is light, flexible, soft, and comfortable with little interference to normal sport activities. It can provide accurate information on the in situ deformation of muscles in a continuous and wireless manner. During elbow flexion in isometric contraction, upper arm circumference increases with the contraction of elbow flexors, and it is possible to monitor the muscles’ contraction by limb circumferential strains. This paper presents a new wireless wearable anthropometric monitoring device made from fabric strain sensors for the human upper arm. The materials, structural design and calibration of the device are presented. Using an isokinetic testing system (Biodex3®) and the fabric monitoring device simultaneously, in situ measurements were carried out on elbow flexors in isometric contraction mode with ten subjects for a set of positions. Correlations between the measured values of limb circumferential strain and normalized torque were examined, and a linear relationship was found during isometric contraction. The average correlation coefficient between them is 0.938 ± 0.050. This wearable anthropometric device thus provides a useful index, the limb circumferential strain, for upper arm muscle contraction in isometric mode.

  19. Nursemaid's elbow

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. Nursemaid's elbow is a dislocation of a bone in the elbow called the radius. Dislocation means the bone slips out of its normal position. The injury is also called radial head dislocation. Causes Nursemaid's elbow is a common condition in young children. It generally affects ...

  20. In vivo measurement of fascicle length and pennation of the human anconeus muscle at several elbow joint angles.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Daniel E; Smith, Cameron B; Harwood, Brad; Rice, Charles L

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound imaging has facilitated the reliable measure of the architectural variables fascicle length (LF ) and pennation angle (PA), at rest and during static and dynamic contractions in many human skeletal muscles in vivo. Despite its small size and very modest contribution to elbow extension torque, the anconeus muscle has proven a useful model for the study of neuromuscular function in health and disease. Recent single motor unit (MU) studies in the anconeus have reported discrete and identifiable individual trains of MU potentials from intramuscular electromyography (EMG) recordings during dynamic elbow extensions. It is unknown whether the anconeus has unique architectural features related to alterations in LF and PA throughout the elbow joint range of motion that may help explain these high-quality recordings. Previous anatomical studies have investigated this muscle in cadavers and at mainly one elbow joint angle. The purpose of this study was to measure in vivo PA and LF of the anconeus muscle in a relaxed state at different degrees of elbow flexion using ultrasonography. Ultrasound images were collected from 10 healthy males (25 ± 3 years) at 135°, 120°, 90°, 45°, and 0° of elbow flexion. Average values of LF decreased by 6 mm (10%), 6 mm (12%), and 4 mm (9%) from 135-120°, 120-90°, and 90-45° of elbow flexion, respectively, whereas average PA values increased by 1° (9%), 1° (8%), and 2° (14%) from 135-120°, 120-90°, and 45-0°, respectively. The results indicate that anconeus muscle architecture is dynamic, undergoing moderate changes with elbow joint excursion that are similar to other limb muscles reported elsewhere. The data obtained here are more comprehensive and representative of architectural changes at various elbow joint positions than those data reported in cadaveric studies. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that despite experiencing similar relative changes in muscle architecture to other skeletal muscles

  1. Task dependent gain regulation of spinal circuits projecting to the human flexor carpi radialis.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Timothy J; Baldwin, Evan R L; Collins, David F

    2005-03-01

    In humans, the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscles act as antagonists during wrist flexion-extension and as functional synergists during radial deviation. In contrast to the situation in most antagonist muscle pairs, Renshaw cells innervated by the motor neurons of each muscle inhibit the motoneurons, but not Ia inhibitory interneurons, of the opposite motor pool. Here we compared gain regulation of spinal circuits projecting to FCR motoneurons during two tasks: flexion and radial deviation of the wrist. We also investigated the functional consequences of this organisation for maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs). Electromyographic (EMG) recordings were taken from FCR, ECR longus and ECR brevis using fine-wire electrodes and electrical stimulation was delivered to the median and radial nerves. Ten volunteers participated in three experiments. 1. To study the regulation of the Renshaw cell-mediated, inhibitory pathway from ECR to FCR motoneurons, forty stimuli were delivered to the radial nerve at 50% of the maximal M-wave amplitude for ECR brevis. Stimuli were delivered during both isometric wrist flexions and radial deviation actions with an equivalent EMG amplitude in FCR (approximately 5% wrist flexion MVC). 2. To explore the homonymous Ia afferent pathway to FCR motoneurons, 50 stimuli were delivered to the median nerve at intensities ranging from below motor threshold to at least two times that which evoked a maximal M-wave during wrist flexion and radial deviation (matched FCR EMG at approximately 5% wrist flexion MVC). 3. EMG amplitude was measured during MVCs in wrist flexion, extension and radial deviation. There was no significant difference in the inhibition of FCR EMG induced via ECR-coupled Renshaw cells between radial deviation and wrist flexion. However, the mean FCR H-reflex amplitude was significantly (P<0.05) greater during wrist flexion than radial deviation. Furthermore, EMG amplitude in FCR and ECR brevis was

  2. Friction between human finger flexor tendons and pulleys at high loads.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, A; Frank, O; Ochsner, P E; Jacob, H A C

    2003-01-01

    A method was developed to indirectly measure friction between the flexor tendons and pulleys of the middle and ring finger in vivo. An isokinetic movement device to determine maximum force of wrist flexion, interphalangeal joint flexion (rolling in and out) and isolated proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint flexion was built. Eccentric and concentric maximum force of these three different movements where gliding of the flexor tendon sheath was involved differently (least in wrist flexion) was measured and compared. Fifty-one hands in 26 male subjects were evaluated. The greatest difference between eccentric and concentric maximum force (29.9%) was found in flexion of the PIP joint. Differences in the rolling in and out movement (26.8%) and in wrist flexion (14.5%) were significantly smaller. The force of friction between flexor tendons and pulleys can be determined by the greater difference between eccentric and concentric maximum force provided by the same muscles in overcoming an external force during flexion of the interphalangeal joints and suggests the presence of a non-muscular force, such as friction. It constitutes of 9% of the eccentric flexion force in the PIP joint and therefore questions the low friction hypothesis at high loads. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Elbow arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Christopher C; Nho, Shane J; Williams, Riley J; Altchek, David W

    2008-10-01

    Arthroscopy of the elbow was originally considered to be an unsafe procedure because of the small size of the elbow joint capsule and its proximity to several crucial neurovascular structures. Over the past decade, however, the procedure has become safer and more effective. These improvements can be attributed to a better understanding of elbow anatomy and of the disorders about the elbow as well as to advances in arthroscopic equipment and surgical technique. The most common indications for elbow arthroscopy include removal of loose bodies, synovectomy, débridement and/or excision of osteophytes, capsular release, and the assessment and treatment of osteochondritis dissecans. More recent advances have expanded the indications of elbow arthroscopy to include fracture management (eg, radial head fractures) and the treatment of lateral epicondylitis.

  4. Functional isokinetic strength ratios in baseball players with injured elbows.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yin-Chou; Thompson, Angela; Kung, Jung-Tang; Chieh, Liang-Wei; Chou, Shih-Wei; Lin, Jung-Charng

    2010-02-01

    Elbow injuries are widely reported among baseball players. The elbow is susceptible to injury when elbow-flexor and -extensor forces are imbalanced during pitching or throwing. Assessment of muscle-strength ratios may prove useful for diagnosing elbow injury. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between the elbow-flexor and -extensor functional isokinetic ratios and elbow injury in baseball players. Retrospective study. Biomechanics laboratory. College baseball players with (n = 9) and without (n = 12) self-reported elbow pain or loss of strength were recruited. Trials were conducted using a dynamometer to assess dominant-arm flexor and extensor concentric and eccentric strength at angular velocities of 60 degrees and 240 degrees/s. Functional isokinetic ratios were calculated and compared between groups. Regression analysis revealed that a ratio of biceps concentric to triceps concentric strength greater than 0.76 (the median value) significantly predicted elbow injury (P = .01, odds ratio of injury = 24). No other ratios or variables (including position played) were predictive of injury status. These findings suggest that the ratio of biceps concentric to triceps concentric functional strength strongly predicts elbow-injury status in baseball players. Assessment of this ratio may prove useful in a practical setting for training purposes and both injury diagnosis and rehabilitation.

  5. [Elbow pain].

    PubMed

    Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Miintyselkii, Pekka; Havulinna, Jouni

    2010-01-01

    Pain and disability in the elbow are not as common as in the neck, shoulder or wrist, for example. The elbow may, however, present disorders that may in a prolonged state be difficult and cause significant loss of working capacity. These include epicondylitis, osteoarthritis and entrapment of the ulnar nerve.

  6. Revisiting the anatomy and biomechanics of the anconeus muscle and its role in elbow stability.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Barry P

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have designated the anconeus muscle as an option for use as a pedicled flap for covering soft tissue defects about the elbow, with reported minimal risk of morbidity. This has raised the question as to the importance of the anconeus muscle and as to whether this is truly an accessory muscle that can be sacrificed, or whether the anconeus muscle significantly contributes to elbow and forearm stability? This study revisits the anatomy and biomechanics of the anconeus muscle and aims to investigate the neuromuscular compartments of the anconeus muscle and to determine the changes in the muscle length, fibre length and moment arm over a range of elbow flexion angles for each compartment. An anatomical study on 8 human cadavers (51-77 years of age) was done and a 2-dimensional kinematic elbow model developed to determine changes in the muscle length and moment arm of the muscle related to changes in elbow flexion angles. The muscle was modelled with two possible lines of action, one along the posterior and another on the anterior edge of the muscle as they had different muscle fibre lengths (posterior: average of 32 mm, anterior: average of 20 mm). The anterior edge also had an aponeurosis which was 70% of its length. From 0 to 120° elbow flexion, the length of the posterior and anterior edges increased with a maximum change recorded at 90° elbow flexion (31.7±1.0 mm and 65.3±1.4 mm, respectively). The moment arm is 14-mm at 0° flexion, but between the posterior and anterior edges it decreases at different rates with increasing elbow flexion angle. Beyond 80°, the anterior edge behaves as an elbow flexor, while the posterior edge remains an elbow extensor. The study demonstrates that the anconeus muscle has two neuromuscular compartments each with distinct intramuscular innervations and muscle fibre lengths. The posterior and deep aspect of the muscle functions as an elbow extensor decreasing in influence with increasing elbow flexion angle. The

  7. [Elbow dislocation].

    PubMed

    de Pablo Márquez, B; Castillón Bernal, P; Bernaus Johnson, M C; Ibañez Aparicio, N M

    2017-03-09

    Elbow dislocation is the most frequent dislocation in the upper limb after shoulder dislocation. Closed reduction is feasible in outpatient care when there is no associated fracture. A review is presented of the different reduction procedures.

  8. Elbow replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask your provider for help. Smoking can slow wound healing. Tell your surgeon if you develop a cold, ... follow instructions on how to care for your wound and elbow. Physical therapy will be needed to help you gain strength ...

  9. Golfer's Elbow

    MedlinePlus

    ... curling the wrists during a biceps exercise, can overload the elbow muscles and tendons. In addition, any ... an instructor to check your form to avoid overload on muscles. Use the right equipment. If you' ...

  10. Cortical excitability is not depressed in movement-modulated stretch response of human thumb flexor.

    PubMed

    Wallace, C J; Miles, T S

    2001-08-01

    There is strong evidence that the predominant pathway of the long-latency stretch reflex for flexor pollicis longus crosses the motor cortex. This reflex response is diminished during active thumb movements. We tested the hypothesis that this could be due to a decrease in the excitability of the transcortical component during movement. During isometric, concentric and eccentric thumb movements, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex was given at a time when the reflex signal was traversing the motor cortex. TMS was also given earlier in separate runs when the signal was traversing the spinal cord under each of the three contractile conditions. The electromyogram was analysed for non-linear summation between stretch responses and the potential evoked by the cortical stimulus. The response to TMS alone was uniform across the three types of contraction, and the lack of cortical involvement in the short-latency reflex was confirmed. The TMS-evoked response summed in a non-linear manner with the long-latency reflex response, confirming that the excitability of the motor cortex was increased as the reflex signal passed through it. The long-latency response was markedly depressed during isotonic compared with isometric contractions. However, the non-linear summation was not greater during the isometric contractions. Thus, the depressed reflex responses during isotonic movements do not stem from reduced motor cortical responsiveness or afferent input to the transcortical pathway, and may instead reflect modulation of cutaneous reflexes during isotonic contractions.

  11. Animal Models for Tendon Repair Experiments: A Comparison of Pig, Sheep and Human Deep Flexor Tendons in Zone II.

    PubMed

    Peltz, Tim Sebastian; Hoffman, Stuart William; Scougall, Peter James; Gianoutsos, Mark Peter; Savage, Robert; Oliver, Rema Antoinette; Walsh, William Robert

    2017-09-01

    This laboratory study compared pig, sheep and human deep flexor tendons in regards to their biomechanical comparability. To investigate the relevant biomechanical properties for tendon repair experiments, the tendons resistance to cheese-wiring (suture drag/splitting) was assessed. Cheese-wiring of a suture through a tendon is an essential factor for repair gapping and failure in a tendon repair. Biomechanical testing showed that forces required to pulling a uniform suture loop through sheep or pig tendons in Zone II were higher than in human tendons. At time point zero of testing these differences did not reach statistical significance, but differences became more pronounced when forces were measured beyond initial cheese-wiring (2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm). The stronger resistance to cheese-wiring was more pronounced in the pig tendons. Also regarding size and histology, sheep tendons were more comparable to human tendons than pig tendons. Differences in tendon bio-properties should be kept in mind when comparing and interpreting the results of laboratory tendon experiments.

  12. Human upper-limb force capacities evaluation with robotic models for ergonomic applications: effect of elbow flexion.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Vincent; Rezzoug, Nasser; Jacquier-Bret, Julien; Gorce, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply models derived from the robotics field to evaluate the human upper-limb force generation capacity. Four models were compared: the force ellipsoid (FE) and force polytope (FP) based on unit joint torques and the scaled FE (SFE) and scaled FP (SFP) based on maximum isometric joint torques. The four models were assessed from four upper-limb postures with varying elbow flexion (40°, 60°, 80° and 100°) measured by an optoelectronic system and their corresponding isometric joint torques. Ten subjects were recruited. Three specific ellipsoids and polytopes parameters were compared: isotropy, principal force orientation and volume. Isotropy showed that the ellipsoids and polytopes were elongated. The angle between the two ellipsoids main axis and the two polytopes remained low but increased with the elbow flexion. The FE and FP volumes increased and those of SFE and SFP decreased with the elbow flexion. The interest and limits of such models are discussed in the framework of ergonomics and rehabilitation.

  13. The role of human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon interaction and architecture in maximal vertical jumping examined in vivo.

    PubMed

    Farris, Dominic James; Lichtwark, Glen A; Brown, Nicholas A T; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2016-02-01

    Humans utilise elastic tendons of lower limb muscles to store and return energy during walking, running and jumping. Anuran and insect species use skeletal structures and/or dynamics in conjunction with similarly compliant structures to amplify muscle power output during jumping. We sought to examine whether human jumpers use similar mechanisms to aid elastic energy usage in the plantar flexor muscles during maximal vertical jumping. Ten male athletes performed maximal vertical squat jumps. Three-dimensional motion capture and a musculoskeletal model were used to determine lower limb kinematics that were combined with ground reaction force data in an inverse dynamics analysis. B-mode ultrasound imaging of the lateral gastrocnemius (GAS) and soleus (SOL) muscles was used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles during jumping. Our results highlighted that both GAS and SOL utilised stretch and recoil of their series elastic elements (SEEs) in a catapult-like fashion, which likely serves to maximise ankle joint power. The resistance of supporting of body weight allowed initial stretch of both GAS and SOL SEEs. A proximal-to-distal sequence of joint moments and decreasing effective mechanical advantage early in the extension phase of the jumping movement were observed. This facilitated a further stretch of the SEE of the biarticular GAS and delayed recoil of the SOL SEE. However, effective mechanical advantage did not increase late in the jump to aid recoil of elastic tissues. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Simple Elbow Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, April

    2015-11-01

    Simple elbow dislocation refers to those elbow dislocations that do not involve an osseous injury. A complex elbow dislocation refers to an elbow that has dislocated with an osseous injury. Most simple elbow dislocations are treated nonoperatively. Understanding the importance of the soft tissue injury following a simple elbow dislocation is a key to being successful with treatment.

  15. Effect of wrist and interphalangeal thumb movement on zone T2 flexor pollicis longus tendon tension in a human cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Patricia O; Thoreson, Andrew R; Yang, Tai-Hua; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Rappaport, Stephen M; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Therapy after flexor pollicis longus (FPL) repair typically mimics finger flexor management, but this ignores anatomic and biomechanical features unique to the FPL. We measured FPL tendon tension in zone T2 to identify biomechanically appropriate exercises for mobilizing the FPL. Eight human cadaver hands were studied to identify motions that generated enough force to achieve FPL movement without exceeding hypothetical suture strength. With the carpometacarpal and metacarpophalangeal joints blocked, appropriate forces were produced for both passive interphalangeal (IP) motion with 30° wrist extension and simulated active IP flexion from 0° to 35° with the wrist in the neutral position. This work provides a biomechanical basis for safely and effectively mobilizing the zone T2 FPL tendon. Our cadaver study suggests that it is safe and effective to perform early passive and active exercise to an isolated IP joint. NA. Copyright © 2015 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential displacement of the human soleus and medial gastrocnemius aponeuroses during isometric plantar flexor contractions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Hansen, Philip; Aagaard, Per; Svantesson, Ulla; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter

    2004-11-01

    The human triceps surae muscle-tendon complex is a unique structure with three separate muscle compartments that merge via their aponeuroses into the Achilles tendon. The mechanical function and properties of these structures during muscular contraction are not well understood. The purpose of the study was to investigate the extent to which differential displacement occurs between the aponeuroses of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus (Sol) muscles during plantar flexion. Eight subjects (mean +/- SD; age 30 +/- 7 yr, body mass 76.8 +/- 5.5 kg, height 1.83 +/- 0.06 m) performed maximal isometric ramp contractions with the plantar flexor muscles. The experiment was performed in two positions: position 1, in which the knee joint was maximally extended, and position 2, in which the knee joint was maximally flexed (125 degrees ). Plantarflexion moment was assessed with a strain gauge load cell, and the corresponding displacement of the MG and Sol aponeuroses was measured by ultrasonography. Differential shear displacement of the aponeurosis was quantified by subtracting displacement of Sol from that of MG. Maximal plantar flexion moment was 36% greater in position 1 than in position 2 (132 +/- 20 vs. 97 +/- 11 N.m). In position 1, the displacement of the MG aponeurosis at maximal force exceeded that of the Sol (12.6 +/- 1.7 vs. 8.9 +/- 1.5 mm), whereas in position 2 displacement of the Sol was greater than displacement of the MG (9.6 +/- 1.0 vs. 7.9 +/- 1.2 mm). The amount and "direction" of shear between the aponeuroses differed significantly between the two positions across the entire range of contraction, indicating that the Achilles tendon may be exposed to intratendinous shear and stress gradients during human locomotion.

  17. Position sense at the human forearm after conditioning elbow muscles with isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    Tsay, A; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2015-09-01

    These experiments were designed to test the idea that, in a forearm position-matching task, it is the difference in afferent signals coming from the antagonist muscles of the forearm that determines the perceived position of the arm. In one experiment, flexor and then extensor muscles of the reference arm were conditioned by isometric voluntary contractions while the arm was held at the test angle, approximately 45° from the horizontal. At the same time, indicator arm flexor muscles were contracted while the arm was flexed, or extensors were contracted while it was extended. After an indicator flexor contraction, during matching, subjects made large errors in the direction of flexion, by 9.3° relative to the reference arm and after an indicator extensor contraction by 7.4° in the direction of extension. In the second experiment, with reference muscles conditioned as before, slack was introduced in indicator muscles by a combination of muscle contraction and stretch. This was expected to lower levels of afferent activity in indicator muscles. The subsequent matching experiment yielded much smaller errors than before, 1.4° in the direction of flexion. In both experiments, signal levels coming from the reference arm remained the same and what changed was the level of indicator signal. The fact that matching errors were small when slack was introduced in indicator muscles supported the view that the signal coming from reference muscles was also small. It was concluded that the brain is concerned with the signal difference from the antagonist pair of each arm and with the total signal difference between the two arms.

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation and repetitive freeze-thaw cycles on the biomechanical properties of human flexor digitorum superficialis tendons.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dejie; Sun, Kang; Tian, Shaoqi; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Cailong; Wang, Wenhao; Huang, Hongjie; Zhang, Jihua; Deng, Yujie

    2012-01-10

    An increasing number of tissue banks have begun to focus on gamma irradiation and freeze-thaw in the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligaments using allografts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties of human tendons after exposure to gamma radiation and repeated freeze-thaw cycles and to compare them with fresh specimens. Forty flexor digitorum superficialis tendons were surgically procured from five fresh cadavers and divided into four groups: fresh tendon, gamma irradiation, freeze-thaw and gamma irradiation+freeze-thaw. The dose of gamma irradiation was 25 kGy. Each freeze-thaw cycle consisted of freezing at -80 °C for 7 day and thawing at 25 °C for 6 h. These tendons underwent 4 freeze-thaw cycles. Biomechanical properties were analyzed during load-to-failure testing. The fresh tendons were found to be significantly different in ultimate load, stiffness and ultimate stress relative to the other three groups. The tendons of the gamma+freeze-thaw group showed a significant decrease in ultimate load, ultimate stress and stiffness compared with the other three groups. Gamma irradiation and repeated freezing-thawing (4 cycles) can change the biomechanical properties. However, no significant difference was found between these two processes on the effect of biomechanical properties. It is recommended that gamma irradiation (25 kGy) and repetitive freeze-thaw cycles (4 cycles) should not be adopted in the processing of the allograft tendons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo moment generation and architecture of the human plantar flexors after different shortening-stretch cycles velocities.

    PubMed

    De Monte, Gianpiero; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the moment generation of the human plantar flexors and the architecture of the gastrocnemius medialis muscle during and after shortening-stretch cycles in vivo. Fourteen male subjects (30+/-7 years, 177+/-7 cm, 80+/-9 kg) performed a series of electro-stimulated shortening-stretch plantar flexion contractions. The shortening-stretch cycles were performed at three constant angular velocities (25 degrees /s, 50 degrees /s, 100 degrees /s), two amplitudes (15 degrees and 25 degrees ankle angle changes) and at two different stimulation frequencies (30 Hz and 85 Hz). The resultant ankle joint moments were calculated through inverse dynamics. Pennation angle and fascicle length of the m. gastrocnemius medialis at rest and during contractions were measured using ultrasonography. The corresponding ankle moments, kinematics and changes in muscle architecture were analysed at seven time intervals. A three-way analysis of variance (amplitudexvelocityxstimulation frequency) and post-hoc test with Bonferroni correction were used to check the amplitude, velocity and stimulation level related effects on moment enhancement (alpha=0.05). The results show an ankle joint moment enhancement after shortening-stretch cycles influenced by muscle architectural changes. We found 2-3% isometric ankle joint moment enhancement at steady state, 1.5-2.0 s after the shortening-stretch cycle. However, the observed alteration in muscle architecture after the imposed perturbation, could lead to an underestimation (1-3%) of joint moment enhancement due to the force-length relationship of the triceps surae. Furthermore, the enhancement observed was independent of the shortening-stretch amplitude, velocity and stimulation frequency.

  20. Evaluation of biomechanical properties: are porcine flexor tendons and bovine extensor tendons eligible surrogates for human tendons in in vitro studies?

    PubMed

    Domnick, C; Wieskötter, B; Raschke, M J; Schulze, M; Kronenberg, D; Wefelmeier, M; Langer, M F; Herbort, M

    2016-10-01

    Porcine flexor tendons, bovine extensor tendons, and human (semitendinosus) tendons are frequently used as substitutes for human ACL grafts in biomechanical in vitro studies. This study compares the biomechanical properties and structural differences of these tendons. In this biomechanical study, fresh-frozen porcine flexor tendons, bovine extensor tendons, and human semitendinosus tendons were used (n = 36). The tendons were mounted in a uniaxial testing machine (Zwick/Roell) with cryo-clamps, leaving a 60 mm tendon part free between the two clamps. Specimens have been loaded to failure to evaluate the biomechanical parameters stiffness, yield load, and maximum load. A Total Collagen Assay Kit was used to detect differences in the total collagen type I concentration (n = 30). A one-way ANOVA was performed to detect differences in the means. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. There were no significant differences in the stiffness between the groups (bovine 194 ± 43 N/mm, porcine 211 ± 63 N/mm, and human cadaveric 208 ± 58 N/mm). The yield and maximum loads were high (>1000 N) in all groups, but they were significantly increased in both animal specimens (means of 1681-1795 N) compared with human cadaveric specimen (means of 1289-1406 N; p < 0.01). No difference in the collagen type I concentration was detected (N.S.). Porcine flexor and bovine extensor tendons are eligible substitutes with similar stiffness and high failure loads compared with human cadaveric semitendinosus tendons in in vitro studies.

  1. Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

    MedlinePlus

    .org Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis) Page ( 1 ) Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondyliti s, is a painful condition of the elbow caused by overuse. Not surprisingly, playing tennis or other racquet sports can cause ...

  2. MR imaging of the elbow in the injured athlete.

    PubMed

    Wenzke, Daniel R

    2013-03-01

    This article summarizes key MR imaging findings in common athletic elbow injuries including little leaguer's elbow, Panner disease, osteochondritis dissecans, olecranon stress fracture, occult fracture, degenerative osteophyte formation, flexor-pronator strain, ulnar collateral ligament tear, lateral ulnar collateral ligament and radial collateral ligament tear, lateral epicondylitis, medial epicondylitis, biceps tear, bicipitoradial bursitis, triceps tear, olecranon bursitis, ulnar neuropathy, posterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and radial tunnel syndrome. The article also summarizes important technical considerations in elbow MR imaging that enhance image quality and contribute to the radiologist's success.

  3. Elbow tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Michael E; Seidenberg, Peter H; Bader, Dov A

    2014-07-01

    Overuse injuries of the lateral and medial elbow are common in sport, recreational activities, and occupational endeavors. They are commonly diagnosed as lateral and medial epicondylitis; however, the pathophysiology of these disorders demonstrates a lack of inflammation. Instead, angiofibroblastic degeneration is present, referred to as tendinosis. As such, a more appropriate terminology for these conditions is epicondylosis. This is a clinical diagnosis, and further investigations are only performed to rule out other clinical entities after conventional therapy has failed. Yet, most patients respond to conservative measures with physical therapy and counterforce bracing. Corticosteroid injections are effective for short-term pain control but have not demonstrated long-term benefit.

  4. [Elbow tendinopathy].

    PubMed

    Dumusc, A; Zufferey, P

    2015-03-11

    The lateral and medial epicondylitis is often manifested in a professional or in a sport context leading to repetitive wrist movements. The diagnosis is primarily clinical. Additional tests are indicated in chronic evolution and in searching for differential diagnoses. Elbow X-ray can be completed with ultrasound or MRI, the most efficient but expensive diagnostic procedure. There is no consensus on treatment. After a period of rest, stretching then strengthening exercises are recommended. Corticosteroid injections may provide a short-term beneficial effect. Platelet-Rich Plasma injections have recently gained notoriety. In case of failure of treatment, surgery is possible, but only in a minority of patients.

  5. Tennis Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Bullard, J. A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Certain types of activity, particularly the wielding of a tennis racquet, put undue stress on the muscles of the forearm. The result can be extremely incapacitating as well as resistant to treatment. The earlier specific measures are introduced, the greater the success of conservative treatment. To provide this approach the physician must be aware of the multiple factors involved in the game. The backhand stroke appears to cause more problems than the forehand. Inexperienced players use the power of their elbows far more than the power of their whole bodies. Changes of technique or equipment may therefore be necessary. PMID:21286104

  6. The ulnar collateral ligament of the human elbow joint. Anatomy, function and biomechanics.

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, F K

    1991-01-01

    The posterior portion of the ulnar collateral ligament, which arises from the posterior surface of the medial epicondyle, is taut in maximal flexion. The anterior portion, which takes its origin from the anterior and inferior surfaces of the epicondyle, contains three functional fibre bundles. One of these is taut in maximal extension, another in intermediate positions between middle position and full flexion while the third bundle is always taut and serves as a guiding bundle. Movements of the elbow joint are checked by the ligaments well before the bony processes forming the jaws of the trochlear notch lock into the corresponding fossae on the humerus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2050566

  7. [Viscosity determination of synovial fluids from the canine hip and elbow joint as well as the human knee joint].

    PubMed

    Helms, Gabriele; Rittmann, Pia; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Windhagen, Henning; Pressel, Thomas; Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Nolte, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    The development of pathological changes in both human and canine hip joints is mainly caused by a lack of synovial fluid lubrication. This results in an increased joint abrasion. Even after implantation of joint prosthesis, inadequate lubrication can lead to abrasion in the tribological pair. This can finally result in aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. In spite of the enormous number of studies that have been performed on human, only little knowledge about the tribological properties of the joints in dogs is available in the literature. For this reason the viscosities of synovial fluid, derived from physiological and pathologically changed canine elbow joints were measured. The viscosities were determined by the use of a cone-plate viscometer at different temperatures and shear rates. The obtained values were compared with the viscosity values of pathologically changed synovial fluids from human knee joints as well as with pathological samples from the canine hip joint. The results show that the viscosity values vary within a series of measurements and are inversely proportional to the temperature of the sample and the shear rate. The differences between the average viscosities of canine and human synovial fluids taken from pathologically changed joints are below 4% (22.5 s(-1) at theta1 = 25 degrees C). The findings of this study are being implemented in a FE-Model for the computation of actual forces in the hip joint during different movements. This would represent a contribution to an improved prosthetic treatment of canine and human hips.

  8. Electromyographic comparison of various exercises to improve elbow flexion following intercostal nerve transfer.

    PubMed

    Chalidapong, P; Sananpanich, K; Klaphajone, J

    2006-05-01

    We compared the quantitative electromyographic activity of the elbow flexors during four exercises (forced inspiration, forced expiration, trunk flexion and attempted elbow flexion), following intercostal nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in 32 patients who had sustained root avulsion brachial plexus injuries. Quantitative electromyographic evaluation of the mean and maximum amplitude was repeated three times for each exercise. We found that mean and maximum elbow flexor activity was highest during trunk flexion, followed by attempted elbow flexion, forced inspiration and finally forced expiration. The difference between each group was significant (p < 0.001), with the exception of the difference between trunk flexion and attempted elbow flexion. Consequently, we recommend trunk flexion exercises to aid rehabilitation following intercostal nerve transfer.

  9. Electromyographic reflexes evoked in human wrist flexors by tendon extension and by displacement of the wrist joint.

    PubMed Central

    Cody, F W; Plant, T

    1989-01-01

    1. The electromyographic (EMG) reflexes evoked in the wrist flexor muscle, flexor carpi radialis (FCR), by percutaneous extension of its tendon and by forcible extension of the wrist joint have been studied. Reflexes were elicited during steadily maintained voluntary flexor contraction of 10% of each subject's maximum. 2. Tendon extension, using 'ramp and hold' displacements, evoked fairly prolonged (ca 50 ms) increases in EMG activity. These responses were usually subdivided into two main excitatory peaks of respectively short (SL, ca 20 ms) and long (LL, ca 45 ms) latency. This pattern contrasted with that observed following brief tendon taps when only a single, SL peak was elicited. 3. 'Stretch' reflexes evoked by 'ramp and hold' wrist extensions, as has been noted by numerous earlier investigators, were also protracted and comprised two main excitatory components. These responses resembled those produced by tendon extension both in their general form and in their behaviour upon altering the velocity of mechanical stimuli. Quantitatively, however, two main differences were evident. The reflexes evoked by wrist extension, including their SL and LL peaks, were generally somewhat larger. Additionally, when parameters of the two modes of stimulation were adjusted to elicit SL responses of equivalent amplitude, the LL responses elicited by tendon extension were regularly smaller and of shorter duration than those elicited by wrist extension. 4. Termination of the two forms of mechanical stimulation, by releasing tendon or wrist extension, each elicited a SL reduction in EMG activity. Such troughs were more pronounced and more consistently observed upon release of wrist extension. 5. Neither local anaesthesia of the skin overlying the flexor tendons at the wrist nor ischaemia of the hand and lower forearm produced any systematic modification of reflex response patterns. 6. It is concluded that intramuscular receptors (presumably muscle spindles) in FCR mediate both

  10. Acellular flexor tendon allografts: a new horizon for tendon reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Drake, David B; Tilt, Alexandra C; DeGeorge, Brent R

    2013-12-01

    Flexor tendon injuries continue to pose a significant challenge to the hand surgeon. In particular, chronic tendon ruptures with adhesions of the tendons and sheath, damage or loss of the intrasynovial flexor tendons in zone II, and combined soft tissue and bone injuries present especially difficult problems for restoring satisfactory digital function. This challenge in flexor tendon reconstruction has motivated hand surgeons to explore and develop novel solutions for nearly a century. Recent advances and techniques in processing and decellularizing allograft human flexor tendon constructs may prove to be a new horizon for tendon reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of forearm fatigue on baseball fastball pitching, with implications about elbow injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Hwa; Lo, Kuo-Cheng; Jou, I-Ming; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Tai, Ta-Wei; Su, Fong-Chin

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of flexor muscles to the forearm through fatigue; therefore, the differences in forearm mechanisms on the pitching motion in fastball were analysed. Fifteen baseball pitchers were included in this study. Ultrasonographical examination of participants' ulnar nerve in the cubital tunnel with the elbow extended and at 45°, 90° and 120° of flexion was carried. A three-dimensional motion analysis system with 14 reflective markers attached on participants was used for motion data collection. The electromyography system was applied over the flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles of the dominant arm. Flexor carpi ulnaris muscle activity showed a significant difference during the acceleration phase, with a peak value during fastball post-fatigue (P = 0.02). Significant differences in the distance between ulnar nerve and medial condyle on throwing arm and non-throwing arm were observed as the distance increased with the elbow movement from 0° to 120° of flexion (P = 0.01). The significant increase of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle activity might be responsible for maintaining the stability of the wrist joint. The increased diameter might compress the ulnar nerve and cause several pathological changes. Therefore, fatigue in baseball pitchers still poses a threat to the ulnar nerve because the flexor carpi ulnaris and flexor carpi radialis all originate from the medial side of the elbow, and the swelling tendons after fatigue might be a key point.

  12. Contribution of central vs. peripheral factors to the force loss induced by passive stretch of the human plantar flexors.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Gabriel S; Seitz, Laurent; Nosaka, Kasunori; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2013-07-15

    The purpose of the present research was to identify the contribution of central vs. peripheral factors to the force loss after passive muscle stretching. Thirteen men randomly performed both a 5-min constant-torque stretch of the plantar flexors on an isokinetic dynamometer and a resting condition on 2 separate days. The triceps surae electromyogram (EMG) was recorded simultaneously with plantar flexor isometric torque. Measures of central drive, including the EMG amplitude normalized to the muscle compound action potential amplitude (EMG/M), percent voluntary activation and first volitional wave amplitude, and measures of peripheral function, including the twitch peak torque, 20-to-80-Hz tetanic torque ratio and torque during 20-Hz stimulation preceded by a doublet, were taken before and immediately and 15 min after each condition. Peak torque (-15.7%), EMG/M (-8.2%), and both twitch (-9.4%) and 20-Hz peak torques (-11.5%) were reduced immediately after stretch but recovered by 15 min. There were strong correlations between the torque loss and the reductions in central drive parameters (r = 0.65-0.93). Torque recovery was also strongly correlated with the recovery in EMG/M and percent voluntary activation (r = 0.77-0.81). The moderate decreases in measures of peripheral function were not related to the torque loss or recovery. These results suggest that 1) central factors were strongly related to the torque reduction immediately after stretch and during torque recovery; and 2) the muscle's contractile capacity was moderately reduced, although these changes were not associated with the torque reduction, and changes in excitation-contraction coupling efficiency were not observed.

  13. [Arthroscopy of the elbow].

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Ivan; Smoljanović, Tomislav; Mahnik, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Elbow arthroscopy has become an indispensable method of surgical care of injuries and their consequences and damages that affect the elbow. The advantages of elbow arthroscopy in comparison to classical open surgery are multiple. Primarily, arthroscopy allows an excellent view of intra-articular structures and thus a detailed overview of the entire joint which enables us to perform complete surgery without opening the joint. Furthermore, morbidity is significantly smaller, rehabilitation is faster, and return to daily activities is also faster. Basic requirements for successful application of elbow arthroscopy are careful planning of the procedure, very good knowledge of regional anatomy of the elbow, strictly following the rules of performing the procedure, good technique and an experienced surgeon. Pathologies that can currently be addressed arthroscopically include osteochondritis dissecans of elbow, lateral epicondylitis, synovial plica syndrome, elbow osteoarthritis, elbow contracture, as well as the diseases where the synovectomy is needed, such as rheumatoid arthritis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, synovial chondromatosis and hemophiliac synovitis.

  14. Elbow Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Many things can make your elbow hurt. A common cause is tendinitis, an inflammation or injury to the tendons that attach muscle to bone. Tendinitis of the elbow is a sports injury, often from playing tennis or golf. You ...

  15. Tennis elbow surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Lateral epicondylitis - surgery; Lateral tendinosis - surgery; Lateral tennis elbow - surgery ... Adams JE, Steinmann SP. Elbow tendinopathies and tendon ruptures. In: Wolfe SW, Hotchkiss RN, Pederson WC, Kozin SH, Cohen MS, eds. Green's Operative Hand Surgery . 7th ed. ...

  16. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Lateral epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... Adams JE, Steinmann SP. Elbow tendinopathies and tendon ruptures. In: ... SH, Cohen MS, eds. Green's Operative Hand Surgery . 7th ed. ...

  17. The contribution of motor commands to position sense differs between elbow and wrist.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lee D; Proske, Uwe; Allen, Trevor J; Gandevia, Simon C

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that centrally generated motor commands contribute to the perception of position and movement at the wrist, but not at the elbow. Because the wrist and elbow experiments used different methods, this study was designed to resolve the discrepancy. Two methods were used to test both the elbow and wrist (20 subjects each). For the wrist, subjects sat with their right arm strapped to a device that restricted movement to the wrist. Before each test, voluntary contraction of wrist flexor or extensor muscles controlled for muscle spindle thixotropy. After relaxation, the wrist was moved to a test angle. Position was indicated either with a pointer, or by matching with the contralateral wrist, under two conditions: when the reference wrist was relaxed or when its muscles were contracted isometrically (30% maximum). The elbow experiment used the same design to measure position sense in the passive elbow and with elbow muscles contracting (30% maximum). At the wrist when using a pointer, muscle contraction altered significantly the perceived wrist angle in the direction of contraction by 7 deg [3 deg, 12 deg] (mean [95% confidence interval]) with a flexor contraction and 8 deg [4 deg, 12 deg] with an extensor contraction. Similarly, in the wrist matching task, there was a change of 13 deg [9 deg, 16 deg] with a flexor contraction and 4 deg [1 deg, 8 deg] with an extensor contraction. In contrast, contraction of elbow flexors or extensors did not alter significantly the perceived position of the elbow, compared with rest. The contribution of central commands to position sense differs between the elbow and the wrist.

  18. Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Density MR with arrows The clinical differential diagnosis of plica syndrome includes lateral epicondylitis (aka tennis elbow ), loose bodies... Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Radiology Corner Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Guarantor: CPT Amit Sanghi, USA, MC FS Contributors: CPT Amit...the case of a 17 year old female with elbow synovial fold syndrome (aka plica synovialis). The etiology is thought to be related to repetitive

  19. Electrically Driven Prosthetic Elbow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The invention relates to an improved electrically driven prosthetic elbow wherein the elbow is capable of being rigidly locked into place in any...desired position, and upon driving the arm to the fully extended position, the elbow is automatically unlocked.

  20. Nursemaid's Elbow (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... move of the arm. A child with nursemaid's elbow has some arm pain when the injury happens, but it doesn't ... t cause deformity or swelling. An arm or elbow injury that causes severe pain might be a sign of an elbow fracture ( ...

  1. Elbow fractures and dislocations.

    PubMed

    Little, Kevin J

    2014-07-01

    Elbow fractures are common in pediatric patients. Most injuries to the pediatric elbow are stable and require simple immobilization; however, more severe fractures can occur, often requiring operative stabilization and/or close monitoring. This article highlights the common fractures and dislocations about the pediatric elbow and discusses the history, evaluation, and treatment options for specific injuries.

  2. Tendinopathies Around the Elbow Part 2: Medial Elbow, Distal Biceps and Triceps Tendinopathies.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Oliver; Vannet, Nicola; Gosens, Taco; Kulkarni, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    In the second part of this review article the management of medial elbow tendinopathy, distal biceps and distal triceps tendinopathy will be discussed. There is a scarcity of publications concerning any of these tendinopathies. This review will summarise the current best available evidence in their management. Medial elbow tendinopathy, also known as Golfer's elbow, is up to 6 times less common than lateral elbow tendinopathy. The tendinopathy occurs in the insertion of pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis. Diagnosis is usually apparent through a detailed history and examination but care must be made to exclude other conditions affecting the ulnar nerve or less commonly the ulnar collateral ligament complex. If doubt exists then MRI/US and electrophysiology can be used. Treatment follows a similar pattern to that of lateral elbow tendinopathy. Acute management is with activity modification and topical NSAIDs. Injection therapy and surgical excision are utilised for recalcitrant cases. Distal biceps and triceps tendinopathies are very rare and there is limited evidence published. Sequelae of tendinopathy include tendon rupture and so it is vital to manage these tendinopathies appropriately in order to minimise this significant complication. Their management and that of partial tears will be considered.

  3. Rheumatoid flexor tenosynovitis and rupture.

    PubMed

    Ferlic, D C

    1996-08-01

    Rheumatoid flexor tenosynovitis at the wrist can cause locking, limitation of motion, nerve compression, and rupture of tendons. To prevent and treat these conditions, a flexor tenosynovectomy, combined with nerve decompression and tendon reconstruction as indicated, is necessary. If tendons are ruptured, the flexor pollicis longus and profundus to the index finger are most commonly affected. On the fingers flexor tenosynovitis can also cause locking, decrease in range of motion and rupture tendons. Flexor tenosynovitis of the fingers should be treated with decompression of the tendons health with preservation of the pulley system.

  4. Elbow joint adductor moment arm as an indicator of forelimb posture in extinct quadrupedal tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Shin-ichi; Hutchinson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Forelimb posture has been a controversial aspect of reconstructing locomotor behaviour in extinct quadrupedal tetrapods. This is partly owing to the qualitative and subjective nature of typical methods, which focus on bony articulations that are often ambiguous and unvalidated postural indicators. Here we outline a new, quantitatively based forelimb posture index that is applicable to a majority of extant tetrapods. By determining the degree of elbow joint adduction/abduction mobility in several tetrapods, the carpal flexor muscles were determined to also play a role as elbow adductors. Such adduction may play a major role during the stance phase in sprawling postures. This role is different from those of upright/sagittal and sloth-like creeping postures, which, respectively, depend more on elbow extensors and flexors. Our measurements of elbow muscle moment arms in 318 extant tetrapod skeletons (Lissamphibia, Synapsida and Reptilia: 33 major clades and 263 genera) revealed that sprawling, sagittal and creeping tetrapods, respectively, emphasize elbow adductor, extensor and flexor muscles. Furthermore, scansorial and non-scansorial taxa, respectively, emphasize flexors and extensors. Thus, forelimb postures of extinct tetrapods can be qualitatively classified based on our quantitative index. Using this method, we find that Triceratops (Ceratopsidae), Anhanguera (Pterosauria) and desmostylian mammals are categorized as upright/sagittally locomoting taxa. PMID:22357261

  5. Elbow joint adductor moment arm as an indicator of forelimb posture in extinct quadrupedal tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Shin-ichi; Hutchinson, John R

    2012-07-07

    Forelimb posture has been a controversial aspect of reconstructing locomotor behaviour in extinct quadrupedal tetrapods. This is partly owing to the qualitative and subjective nature of typical methods, which focus on bony articulations that are often ambiguous and unvalidated postural indicators. Here we outline a new, quantitatively based forelimb posture index that is applicable to a majority of extant tetrapods. By determining the degree of elbow joint adduction/abduction mobility in several tetrapods, the carpal flexor muscles were determined to also play a role as elbow adductors. Such adduction may play a major role during the stance phase in sprawling postures. This role is different from those of upright/sagittal and sloth-like creeping postures, which, respectively, depend more on elbow extensors and flexors. Our measurements of elbow muscle moment arms in 318 extant tetrapod skeletons (Lissamphibia, Synapsida and Reptilia: 33 major clades and 263 genera) revealed that sprawling, sagittal and creeping tetrapods, respectively, emphasize elbow adductor, extensor and flexor muscles. Furthermore, scansorial and non-scansorial taxa, respectively, emphasize flexors and extensors. Thus, forelimb postures of extinct tetrapods can be qualitatively classified based on our quantitative index. Using this method, we find that Triceratops (Ceratopsidae), Anhanguera (Pterosauria) and desmostylian mammals are categorized as upright/sagittally locomoting taxa.

  6. Cortical and Spinal Excitability during and after Lengthening Contractions of the Human Plantar Flexor Muscles Performed with Maximal Voluntary Effort

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Daniel; Hoffman, Ben W.; Carroll, Timothy J.; Cresswell, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the sites of potential specific modulations in the neural control of lengthening and subsequent isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) versus purely isometric MVCs of the plantar flexor muscles, when there is enhanced torque during and following stretch. Ankle joint torque during maximum voluntary plantar flexion was measured by a dynamometer when subjects (n = 10) lay prone on a bench with the right ankle tightly strapped to a foot-plate. Neural control was analysed by comparing soleus motor responses to electrical nerve stimulation (M-wave, V-wave), electrical stimulation of the cervicomedullary junction (CMEP) and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex (MEP). Enhanced torque of 17±8% and 9±8% was found during and 2.5–3 s after lengthening MVCs, respectively. Cortical and spinal responsiveness was similar to that in isometric conditions during the lengthening MVCs, as shown by unchanged MEPs, CMEPs and V-waves, suggesting that the major voluntary motor pathways are not subject to substantial inhibition. Following the lengthening MVCs, enhanced torque was accompanied by larger MEPs (p≤0.05) and a trend to greater V-waves (p≤0.1). In combination with stable CMEPs, increased MEPs suggest an increase in cortical excitability, and enlarged V-waves indicate greater motoneuronal output or increased stretch reflex excitability. The new results illustrate that neuromotor pathways are altered after lengthening MVCs suggesting that the underlying mechanisms of the enhanced torque are not purely mechanical in nature. PMID:23166794

  7. A model of open-loop control of equilibrium position and stiffness of the human elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Dinant A; Van Soest, Arthur J; Bobbert, Maarten F

    2007-03-01

    According to the equilibrium point theory, the control of posture and movement involves the setting of equilibrium joint positions (EP) and the independent modulation of stiffness. One model of EP control, the alpha-model, posits that stable EPs and stiffness are set open-loop, i.e. without the aid of feedback. The purpose of the present study was to explore for the elbow joint the range over which stable EPs can be set open-loop and to investigate the effect of co-contraction on intrinsic low-frequency elbow joint stiffness (K (ilf)). For this purpose, a model of the upper and lower arm was constructed, equipped with Hill-type muscles. At a constant neural input, the isometric force of the contractile element of the muscles depended on both the myofilamentary overlap and the effect of sarcomere length on the sensitivity of myofilaments to [Ca2+] (LDCS). The musculoskeletal model, for which the parameters were chosen carefully on the basis of physiological literature, captured the salient isometric properties of the muscles spanning the elbow joint. It was found that stable open-loop EPs could be achieved over the whole range of motion of the elbow joint and that K (ilf), which ranged from 18 to 42 N m.rad(-1), could be independently controlled. In the model, LDCS contributed substantially to K (ilf) (up to 25 N m.rad(-1)) and caused K (ilf) to peak at a sub-maximal level of co-contraction.

  8. Posttraumatic stiff elbow

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Posttraumatic stiff elbow is a frequent and disabling complication and poses serious challenges for its management. In this review forty studies were included to know about the magnitude of the problem, causes, pathology, prevention, and treatment of posttraumatic stiff elbow. These studies show that simple measures such as internal fixation, immobilization in extension, and early motion of elbow joint are the most important steps that can prevent elbow stiffness. It also supports conservative treatment in selected cases. There are no clear guidelines about the choice between the numerous procedures described in literature. However, this review article disproves two major beliefs-heterotopic ossification is a bad prognostic feature, and passive mobilization of elbow causes elbow stiffness. PMID:28216745

  9. Flexor tendon injuries. Part 5. Flexor tenolysis, rehabilitation and results.

    PubMed

    Strickland, J W

    1987-03-01

    In this five-part series, we have attempted to review our current understanding of flexor tendon anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, healing and adhesion formation around a repaired tendon. The methods of acute flexor tendon repair, conventional free tendon grafting, staged flexor tendon reconstruction and pulley restoration have been discussed as well as flexor tenolysis, rehabilitation and results. From these articles it may be seen that flexor tendon surgery is a complex and difficult art which requires a thorough appreciation of the normal flexor tendon system, the exact status of that system following injury and a strong understanding of the techniques which may be best utilized to restore flexor tendon function. The procedures described require both technical skill and experience and postoperative therapy programs must be carefully instituted based on the unique status of each patient. With the important advances occurring in many areas of flexor tendon surgery, it is realistic to believe that in the near future the techniques described in these articles may be substantially altered and modified. Results will continue to improve until the patient and surgeon can realistically expect to return most digits to nearly full function after flexor tendon interruption.

  10. Chronically unreduced elbow dislocations.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Robert P; Armstrong, April

    2008-02-01

    This article focuses on various methods to treat the chronically unreduced elbow. There are only a few small series published in the literature on which to base treatment options. Anatomic features pertinent to the discussion of the chronically unstable elbow are highlighted. The spectrum of treatment options includes open reduction, internal fixation and ligament reconstruction, external fixation, and elbow arthroplasty. The indications, operative technique, and results of each treatment modality are explored.

  11. Irreducible posterolateral elbow dislocation.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Cameron T; Pappas, Nick D; Lee, Donald H

    2014-02-01

    Elbow dislocations are a high-energy traumatic event resulting in loss of congruence of a stable joint. The majority of elbow dislocations can be reduced by closed means and treated conservatively. We present a case of an irreducible elbow dislocation with reduction blocked by the radial head buttonholed through the lateral ligamentous complex. We performed open reduction with release followed by repair of the lateral ligamentous complex. Clinicians need to understand this unique variant of an elbow dislocation to appropriately treat this operative injury.

  12. "Popeye muscle" morphology in OBPI elbow flexion contracture.

    PubMed

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Maizlin, Zeev V; DeMatteo, Carol; Gjertsen, Deborah; Bain, James R

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of elbow flexion contracture (EFC) in obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI) is not established. In basic science models, neonatal denervation leads to impaired muscle growth. In clinical studies, diminished growth is correlated with extent of denervation, and improved with surgical repair. In EFC, the biceps are clinically short and round vs the contralateral size, termed the "Popeye muscle". The objective of this study was to determine if the biceps morphology (muscle belly and tendon length) in arms with EFC secondary to OBPI is different vs the contralateral. This is a retrospective matched-cohort study. Patients with unilateral EFC (>20°) secondary to OBPI were identified (median = 6.6 years, range = 4.7-16.8). A blinded radiologist used computed tomography to measure length of the biceps short head muscle belly, and tendon bilaterally using standardised anatomical landmarks. Twelve patients were analyzed. The biceps muscle belly in the injured arm was shorter in all patients vs contralateral, mean difference = 3.6 cm (80%), p < 0.001. The biceps tendon in the injured arm was longer in all patients vs contralateral, mean difference = 1.13 cm (127%), p < 0.001. The total biceps length in the injured arm was shorter in all patients vs contralateral, mean difference = 2.5 cm (89%), p < 0.001. This is the first human study confirming growth discrepancy of an elbow flexor in EFC. Distinct biceps morphology is demonstrated, with a significantly shorter muscle belly and overall length, but longer tendon vs normal. This is termed the "Popeye muscle" for its irregular morphology. Findings are consistent with impaired limb growth in denervation.

  13. Post-exercise leg and forearm flexor muscle cooling in humans attenuates endurance and resistance training effects on muscle performance and on circulatory adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Motoi; Teruya, Hiroyasu; Nakano, Masataka; Ogai, Ryuji; Ohnishi, Norikazu; Kosaka, Mitsuo

    2006-03-01

    The influence of regular post-exercise cold application to exercised muscles trained by ergometer cycling (leg muscles) or handgrip exercise using a weight-loaded handgrip ergometer (forearm flexor muscles) was studied in human volunteers. Muscle loads were applied during exercise programs three to four times a week for 4-6 weeks. Besides measuring parameters characterizing muscle performance, femoral and brachial artery diameters were determined ultrasonographically. Training effects were identified by comparing pre- and post-training parameters in matched groups separately for the trained limbs cooled after exercise by cold-water immersion and the corresponding trained limbs kept at room temperature. Significant training effects were three times more frequent in the control than in the cold group, including increases in artery diameters in the control but not in the cold group. It is concluded that training-induced molecular and humoral adjustments, including muscle hyperthermia, are physiological, transient and essential for training effects (myofiber regeneration, muscle hypertrophy and improved blood supply). Cooling generally attenuates these temperature-dependent processes and, in particular, hyperthermia-induced HSP formation. This seems disadvantageous for training, in contrast to the beneficial combination of rest, ice, compression and elevation in the treatment of macroscopic musculo-tendinous damage.

  14. Closed flexor tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Netscher, David T; Badal, Justin J

    2014-11-01

    We review different causes, diagnoses, and treatment options of closed flexor tendon disruptions in the hand. A classification of closed tendon ruptures based on their mechanism includes traumatic tendon avulsion, spontaneous midsubstance rupture, attrition rupture, infiltrative tenosynovial rupture, and iatrogenic. Certain conditions result in tendon disruption inflicted by more than 1 of these etiologies. In rheumatoid arthritis, tendon rupture may result from attrition on an exposed rough surface, proliferative tenosynovial tendon infiltration, or steroid use. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Flexor Pollicis Longus Tendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2017-02-01

    The deep palmar spaces of the hand include the midpalmar space, the hypothenar space, the thenar space, space of Parona, and the interdigital web spaces. There are various communications between different spaces. These communications are of clinical importance in explaining the spread of inflammatory, infectious, and even neoplasic processes that involve this region. Surgical incision and drainage of all potentially communicating spaces and compartments is mandatory in deep hand infections. The purpose of this technical note is to describe the minimally invasive approach of endoscopic drainage and debridement of the flexor pollicis longus tendon sheath, radial bursa, and thenar space.

  16. A neuromusculoskeletal model to simulate the constant angular velocity elbow extension test of spasticity.

    PubMed

    Koo, Terry K K; Mak, Arthur F T

    2006-01-01

    We developed a neuromusculoskeletal model to simulate the stretch reflex torque induced during a constant angular velocity elbow extension by tuning a set of physiologically-based parameters. Our model extended past modeling efforts in the investigation of elbow spasticity by incorporating explicit musculotendon, muscle spindle, and motoneuron pool models in each prime elbow flexor. We analyzed the effects of changes in motoneuron pool and muscle spindle properties as well as muscle mechanical properties on the biomechanical behavior of the elbow joint observed during a constant angular velocity elbow extension. Results indicated that both motoneuron pool thresholds and gains could be substantially different among muscles. In addition, sensitivity analysis revealed that spindle static gain and motoneuron pool threshold were the most sensitive parameters that could affect the stretch reflex responses of the elbow flexors during a constant angular velocity elbow extension, followed by motoneuron pool gain, and spindle dynamic gain. It is hoped that the model will contribute to the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of spasticity after validation by more elaborate experiments, and will facilitate the future development of more specific treatment of spasticity.

  17. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, Andrew R.; Rodgers, John C.; Ortiz, Carlos A.; Nelson, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  18. Topsy-turvy locomotion: biomechanical specializations of the elbow in suspended quadrupeds reflect inverted gravitational constraints

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Shin-ichi; Endo, Hideki; Hutchinson, John R

    2011-01-01

    Some tetrapods hang upside down from tree branches when moving horizontally. The ability to walk in quadrupedal suspension has been acquired independently in at least 14 mammalian lineages. During the stance (supportive) phase of quadrupedal suspension, the elbow joint flexor muscles (not the extensors as in upright vertebrates moving overground) are expected to contract to maintain the flexed limb posture. Therefore muscular control in inverted, suspended quadrupeds may require changes of muscle control, and even morphologies, to conditions opposite to those in upright animals. However, the relationships between musculoskeletal morphologies and elbow joint postures during the stance phase in suspended quadrupeds have not been investigated. Our analysis comparing postures and skeletal morphologies in Choloepus (Pilosa), Pteropus (Chiroptera), Nycticebus (Primates) and Cynocephalus (Dermoptera) revealed that the elbow joints of these animals were kept at flexed angles of 70–100 ° during the stance phase of quadrupedal suspension. At these joint angles the moment arms of the elbow joint flexors were roughly maximized, optimizing that component of antigravity support. Our additional measurements from various mammalian species show that suspended quadrupeds have relatively small extensor/flexor ratios in both muscle masses and maximum moment arms. Thus, in contrast to the pattern in normal terrestrial quadrupeds, suspended quadrupeds emphasize flexor over extensor muscles for body support. This condition has evolved independently multiple times, attendant with a loss or reduction of the ability to move in normal upright postures. PMID:21477151

  19. Elbow joint angle and elbow movement velocity estimation using NARX-multiple layer perceptron neural network model with surface EMG time domain parameters.

    PubMed

    Raj, Retheep; Sivanandan, K S

    2017-01-01

    Estimation of elbow dynamics has been the object of numerous investigations. In this work a solution is proposed for estimating elbow movement velocity and elbow joint angle from Surface Electromyography (SEMG) signals. Here the Surface Electromyography signals are acquired from the biceps brachii muscle of human hand. Two time-domain parameters, Integrated EMG (IEMG) and Zero Crossing (ZC), are extracted from the Surface Electromyography signal. The relationship between the time domain parameters, IEMG and ZC with elbow angular displacement and elbow angular velocity during extension and flexion of the elbow are studied. A multiple input-multiple output model is derived for identifying the kinematics of elbow. A Nonlinear Auto Regressive with eXogenous inputs (NARX) structure based multiple layer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) model is proposed for the estimation of elbow joint angle and elbow angular velocity. The proposed NARX MLPNN model is trained using Levenberg-marquardt based algorithm. The proposed model is estimating the elbow joint angle and elbow movement angular velocity with appreciable accuracy. The model is validated using regression coefficient value (R). The average regression coefficient value (R) obtained for elbow angular displacement prediction is 0.9641 and for the elbow anglular velocity prediction is 0.9347. The Nonlinear Auto Regressive with eXogenous inputs (NARX) structure based multiple layer perceptron neural networks (MLPNN) model can be used for the estimation of angular displacement and movement angular velocity of the elbow with good accuracy.

  20. The elbow and its disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Morrey, B.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 49 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Diagnostic Radiographic Techniques of the Elbow; Radiography of the Pediatric Elbow; Muscle and Tendon Trauma: Tennis Elbow; Nerve Injuries; Tendon Injurires about the Elbow; and Ligamentous and Articular Injuries in the Athlete.

  1. Revision Total Elbow Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Miguel A; Cheung, Emilie V; Murthi, Anand M

    2017-08-01

    Despite recent technologic advances, total elbow arthroplasty has complication rates higher than that of total joint arthroplasty in other joints. With new antirheumatic treatments, the population receiving total elbow arthroplasty has shifted from patients with rheumatoid arthritis to those with posttraumatic arthritis, further compounding the high complication rate. The most common reasons for revision include infection, aseptic loosening, fracture, and component failure. Common mechanisms of total elbow arthroplasty failure include infection, aseptic loosening, fracture, component failure, and instability. Tension band fixation, allograft struts with cerclage wire, and/or plate and screw constructs can be used for fracture stabilization.

  2. Medial epicondylitis - golfer's elbow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Painters Plumbers Construction workers Cooks Assembly-line workers Computer users Butchers Symptoms Symptoms of golfer's elbow include: ... time you play. If you work on a computer, ask your manager about making changes to your ...

  3. Tennis elbow: a review.

    PubMed

    Noteboom, T; Cruver, R; Keller, J; Kellogg, B; Nitz, A J

    1994-06-01

    Tennis elbow is a common yet sometimes complex musculoskeletal condition affecting many patients treated by physical therapists. The purpose of this article is to review the anatomy, clinical examination, differential diagnosis, conservative care, and surgical treatment for tennis elbow or lateral epicondylitis. Particular attention is given to determining the precise pathological cause of lateral epicondylitis, with consideration of intrinsic and extrinsic factors associated with this condition. This information should assist health care practitioners who treat patients with this disorder.

  4. The reconstructive strategy for improving elbow function in late obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Chuang, David Chwei-Chin; Hattori, Yasunori; Ma And, Hae-Shya; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2002-01-01

    Children with previously untreated obstetric brachial plexus palsy frequently have abnormal elbow function because of motor recovery with aberrant reinnervation, or because of paresis or paralysis. From 1988 to 1997 (9-year period), 62 children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy with resulting elbow deformity underwent various methods of palliative reconstruction to improve elbow function. For motor recovery with aberrant reinnervation, release of aberrantly reinnervated antagonistic muscles and augmentation of paretic muscles form the basis of surgical intervention. The surgical procedures included triceps-to-biceps transfer, biceps-to-triceps transfer, brachialis-to-triceps transfer, or combined biceps- and brachialis-to-triceps transfer. Choice of procedures was individualized and randomly determined on the basis of the degree and pattern of aberrant reinnervation between elbow flexors and extensors. In patients' motor recovery with paresis or paralysis, persistently weak elbow flexion was salvaged with a functioning free muscle transplantation or Steindler's flexorplasty, or regional shoulder muscle transfer. In addition, patients with aberrant reinnervation between shoulder abductors and elbow flexors underwent anterior deltoid-to-biceps transfer with a fascia lata graft. All patients had a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Results are assessed and discussed and a reconstructive algorithm is recommended. In general, reconstruction of elbow extension should precede that of elbow flexion. Biceps-to-triceps transfer with preservation of an intact brachialis muscle, or brachialis-to-triceps transfer with preservation of an intact biceps, allows 50 percent of these patients to achieve acceptable elbow flexion and extension in a single-stage procedure.

  5. Incidence and morphology of accessory heads of flexor pollicis longus and flexor digitorum profundus (Gantzer's muscles)

    PubMed Central

    JONES, M.; ABRAHAMS, P. H.; SAÑUDO, J. R.; CAMPILLO, M.

    1997-01-01

    In 1813 Gantzer described 2 accessory muscles in the human forearm which bear his name (Wood, 1868; Macalister, 1875; Testut, 1884; Le Double, 1897). The more frequent of the 2 accessory muscles or ‘accessorius ad pollicem’ was found to arise from the coronoid process of the ulna, coursing distally to attach into the flexor pollicis longus muscle (flexor pollicis longus accessory head, FPLah). The less frequently observed or ‘accessorius ad flexorem profundum digitorum’ was again found to arise from the coronoid process and course to join into the flexor digitorum profundus (flexor digitorum profundus accessory head, FDPah). Since their initial description, they have been examined in further detail by a number of authors (Wood, 1868; Macalister, 1875; Le Double, 1897; Dykes & Anson, 1944; Mangini, 1960; Malhotra et al. 1982; Dellon & McKinnon, 1987; Kida, 1988). These studies, most of them focusing on the FPLah, all show different results of prevalence, origin, insertion, relations and nerve supply. We undertook this study with the aim of providing a more accurate account of the detailed morphology of both accessory muscles because of the above-mentioned inconsistent anatomical descriptions and the lack of information as to important aspects such as vascular supply, morphology (shape and length) and the coexistence of both accessory heads. PMID:9419002

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Elbow Procedures.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Walter I; Williams, Christopher J; Mautner, Ken

    2016-08-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography can help clinicians visualize key anatomic structures of the elbow and guide periarticular and intra-articular injections. Historically, most procedures done around the elbow have been done using landmark guidance, and few studies have reported the accuracy of ultrasonography-guided injections in the elbow region. This article reviews common musculoskeletal disorders about the elbow that can be evaluated with ultrasonography, reviews the literature on ultrasonography-guided injections of the elbow region, and describes the senior author's preferred approach for the most commonly performed elbow region injections.

  7. Flexion synergy overshadows flexor spasticity during reaching in chronic moderate to severe hemiparetic stroke.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael D; Schut, Ingrid; Dewald, Julius P A

    2017-07-01

    Pharmaceutical intervention targets arm flexor spasticity with an often-unsuccessful goal of improving function. Flexion synergy is a related motor impairment that may be inadvertently neglected. Here, flexor spasticity and flexion synergy are disentangled to determine their contributions to reaching dysfunction. Twenty-six individuals participated. A robotic device systematically modulated shoulder abduction loading during ballistic reaching. Elbow muscle electromyography data were partitioned into windows delineated by elbow joint velocity allowing for the separation of synergy- and spasticity-related activation. Reaching velocity decreased with abduction loading (p<0.001) such that velocity was 30% slower when lifting the arm at 50% of abduction strength compared to when arm weight was supported. Abnormal flexion synergy increased with abduction loading (p<0.001) such that normalized activation ranged from a median (interquartile range) of 0.07 (0.03-0.12) when arm weight was supported to 0.19 (0.12-0.40) when actively lifting (large effect size, d=0.59). Flexor spasticity was detected during reaching (p=0.016) but only when arm weight was supported (intermediate effect size, d=0.33). Flexion synergy is the predominant contributor to reaching dysfunction while flexor spasticity appears only relevant during unnaturally occurring passively supported movement. Interventions targeting flexion synergy should be leveraged in future stroke recovery trials. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Elbow Pain After a Fall: Nursemaid's Elbow or Fracture?

    PubMed

    Cohen-Rosenblum, Anna; Bielski, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Nursemaid's elbow and elbow fractures are both common causes of acute elbow pain, but the mechanism of injury is quite different. In children, falls frequently go unwitnessed and children are often inaccurate when recounting the sequences of a fall, making the mechanism difficult to ascertain. A common clinical mistake is to treat all elbow injuries as a nursemaid's elbow. When the mechanism of injury is unknown, radiographs should be used to help make the diagnosis. Occult fractures, also known as "hairline" elbow fractures, may not be visible on initial X-rays, but clues to the diagnosis, especially the posterior fat pad, can be helpful in evaluation. When an occult fracture is suspected based on history and radiographic findings, the patient's elbow should be immobilized, not manipulated. This article also reviews successful reduction maneuvers for nursemaid's elbow. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(6):e214-e217.].

  9. Biceps Brachii Long Head Overactivity Associated with Elbow Flexion Contracture in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Lindsey C.; Lattanza, Lisa; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; James, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The etiology of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy remains unclear. We hypothesized that the long head of the biceps brachii muscle assists with shoulder stabilization in children with brachial plexus birth palsy and that overactivity of the long head during elbow and shoulder activity is associated with an elbow flexion contracture. Methods: Twenty-one patients with brachial plexus birth palsy-associated elbow flexion contracture underwent testing with surface electromyography. Twelve patients underwent repeat testing with fine-wire electromyography. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle belly, and fine-wire electrodes were inserted bilaterally into the long and short heads of the biceps brachii. Patients were asked to perform four upper extremity tasks: elbow flexion-extension, hand to head, high reach, and overhead ball throw. The mean duration of muscle activity in the affected limb was compared with that in the contralateral, unaffected limb, which was used as a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis, surface dynamometry, and validated function measures were used to evaluate upper extremity kinematics, elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, and function. Results: The mean activity duration of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly higher in the affected limb as compared with the contralateral, unaffected limb during hand-to-head tasks (p = 0.02) and high-reach tasks (p = 0.03). No significant differences in mean activity duration were observed for the short head of the biceps brachii muscle between the affected and unaffected limbs. Isometric strength of elbow flexion was not significantly higher than that of elbow extension in the affected limb (p = 0.11). Conclusions: Overactivity of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is associated with and may contribute to the development of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Elbow flexion

  10. Biceps brachii long head overactivity associated with elbow flexion contracture in brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Sheffler, Lindsey C; Lattanza, Lisa; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; James, Michelle A

    2012-02-15

    The etiology of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy remains unclear. We hypothesized that the long head of the biceps brachii muscle assists with shoulder stabilization in children with brachial plexus birth palsy and that overactivity of the long head during elbow and shoulder activity is associated with an elbow flexion contracture. Twenty-one patients with brachial plexus birth palsy-associated elbow flexion contracture underwent testing with surface electromyography. Twelve patients underwent repeat testing with fine-wire electromyography. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle belly, and fine-wire electrodes were inserted bilaterally into the long and short heads of the biceps brachii. Patients were asked to perform four upper extremity tasks: elbow flexion-extension, hand to head, high reach, and overhead ball throw. The mean duration of muscle activity in the affected limb was compared with that in the contralateral, unaffected limb, which was used as a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis, surface dynamometry, and validated function measures were used to evaluate upper extremity kinematics, elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, and function. The mean activity duration of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly higher in the affected limb as compared with the contralateral, unaffected limb during hand-to-head tasks (p = 0.02) and high-reach tasks (p = 0.03). No significant differences in mean activity duration were observed for the short head of the biceps brachii muscle between the affected and unaffected limbs. Isometric strength of elbow flexion was not significantly higher than that of elbow extension in the affected limb (p = 0.11). Overactivity of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is associated with and may contribute to the development of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Elbow flexion contracture may not be associated with an elbow

  11. The thrower's elbow.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ronak M; Lynch, T Sean; Amin, Nirav H; Calabrese, Gary; Gryzlo, Stephen M; Schickendantz, Mark S

    2014-07-01

    Overhead throwing activities expose the elbow to tremendous valgus stress, making athletes vulnerable to a specific constellation of injuries. Although baseball players, in particular pitchers, are the athletes affected most commonly, overhead throwing athletes in football, volleyball, tennis, and javelin tossing also are affected. The purpose of this review is to review the anatomy, biomechanics, pathophysiology, and treatment of elbow disorders related to overhead throwing athletes. Although focus is on management of ulnar collateral ligament injuries, all common pathologies are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Archery-related injuries of the hand, forearm, and elbow.

    PubMed

    Rayan, G M

    1992-10-01

    The five patients reported herein had various archery-related injuries of the upper extremities. Acute injuries included arrow laceration of a digital nerve and artery, contusion of forearm skin and subcutaneous tissue, and compression neuropathy of digital nerves from the bowstring. Chronic injuries included bilateral medial epicondylitis and median nerve compression at the wrist, de Quervain's tenosynovitis, and median nerve compression at the elbow. Essential measures for archery safety include use of archery protective gear, use of a light-weight bow, conditioning of the forearm flexor muscles, and modifications in drawing the bowstring.

  13. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

    1994-08-16

    The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

  14. Lateral Elbow Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bhabra, Gev; Wang, Allan; Ebert, Jay R.; Edwards, Peter; Zheng, Monica; Zheng, Ming H.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral elbow tendinopathy, commonly known as tennis elbow, is a condition that can cause significant functional impairment in working-age patients. The term tendinopathy is used to describe chronic overuse tendon disorders encompassing a group of pathologies, a spectrum of disease. This review details the pathophysiology of tendinopathy and tendon healing as an introduction for a system grading the severity of tendinopathy, with each of the 4 grades displaying distinct histopathological features. Currently, there are a large number of nonoperative treatments available for lateral elbow tendinopathy, with little guidance as to when and how to use them. In fact, an appraisal of the clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses studying these treatment modalities reveals that no single treatment reliably achieves outstanding results. This may be due in part to the majority of clinical studies to date including all patients with chronic tendinopathy rather than attempting to categorize patients according to the severity of disease. We relate the pathophysiology of the different grades of tendinopathy to the basic science principles that underpin the mechanisms of action of the nonoperative treatments available to propose a treatment algorithm guiding the management of lateral elbow tendinopathy depending on severity. We believe that this system will be useful both in clinical practice and for the future investigation of the efficacy of treatments. PMID:27833925

  15. Multiple forearm robotic elbow configuration

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A dual forearmed robotic elbow configuration comprises a main arm having a double elbow from which two coplanar forearms depend, two actuators carried in the double elbow for moving the forearms, and separate, independent end effectors, operated by a cable carried from the main arm through the elbow, is attached to the distal end of each forearm. Coiling the cables around the actuators prevents bending or kinking when the forearms are rotated 360 degrees. The end effectors can have similar or different capabilities. Actuator cannisters within the dual elbow are modular for rapid replacement or maintenance. Coarse and fine resolver transducers within the actuators provide accurate position referencing information.

  16. Prosthetic elbow joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An artificial, manually positionable elbow joint for use in an upper extremity, above-elbow, prosthetic is described. The prosthesis provides a locking feature that is easily controlled by the wearer. The instant elbow joint is very strong and durable enough to withstand the repeated heavy loadings encountered by a wearer who works in an industrial, construction, farming, or similar environment. The elbow joint of the present invention comprises a turntable, a frame, a forearm, and a locking assembly. The frame generally includes a housing for the locking assembly and two protruding ears. The forearm includes an elongated beam having a cup-shaped cylindrical member at one end and a locking wheel having a plurality of holes along a circular arc on its other end with a central bore for pivotal attachment to the protruding ears of the frame. The locking assembly includes a collar having a central opening with a plurality of internal grooves, a plurality of internal cam members each having a chamfered surface at one end and a V-shaped slot at its other end; an elongated locking pin having a crown wheel with cam surfaces and locking lugs secured thereto; two coiled compression springs; and a flexible filament attached to one end of the elongated locking pin and extending from the locking assembly for extending and retracting the locking pin into the holes in the locking wheel to permit selective adjustment of the forearm relative to the frame. In use, the turntable is affixed to the upper arm part of the prosthetic in the conventional manner, and the cup-shaped cylindrical member on one end of the forearm is affixed to the forearm piece of the prosthetic in the conventional manner. The elbow joint is easily adjusted and locked between maximum flex and extended positions.

  17. Elbow Biomechanics of Pitching

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, Shayne; Damrow, Derek; Kilian, Christopher; Lyon, Roger; Liu, Xue-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elbow pain and elbow injuries are common in youth baseball players. It is not clear whether pitching experience and/or age creates biomechanical differences at the elbow and whether these differences place an athlete at greater risk. Hypotheses: (1) Youth pitchers will have differing elbow kinematics with regard to flexion/extension, internal/external rotation, and pronation/supination when compared with nonbaseball athletes and (2) younger youth pitchers will have differing elbow kinematics when compared with older youth pitchers. Study Design: Case-control study. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Twenty-seven healthy male youths age 10 to 18 years were recruited and divided into an experience group (n = 18 pitchers) and a no experience group (n = 9 nonbaseball athletes). The experience group was subdivided by age into the younger experience subgroup (n = 10 pitchers) and the older experience subgroup (n = 8 pitchers). Biomechanics were recorded using an electromagnetic motion tracking system. Subjects from each group were averaged together, and a Mann-Whitney U test was utilized for statistical analysis. Results: The experience group had greater external rotation during late cocking (−47.8° vs 5.8°) and greater flexion during early cocking (112.8° vs 100.1°). The younger experience subgroup had greater range of motion with supination-pronation during early cocking (21.9° vs 11.2°) and late cocking (5.9° vs 2.0°). Conclusion: Youth athletes with pitching experience had an increase in maximal external rotation in late cocking and maximal flexion in early cocking, which suggests experience may be a factor to these parameters. The age of experienced baseball pitchers may be a factor due to differences observed with supination and pronation. Clinical Relevance: Learning to throw is a skill that leads to changes in elbow motion; however, these changes may be stable once athletes reach grade school age. Minimal differences were noted between the

  18. Management of tennis elbow

    PubMed Central

    Chesterton, Linda S; Mallen, Christian D; Hay, Elaine M

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question What is the best treatment for tennis elbow? Results Despite a wealth of research, there is no true consensus on the most efficacious management of tennis elbow especially for effective long-term outcomes. Corticosteroid injections do show large pain-relieving effects in the short term but are associated with risks of adverse events and long-term reoccurrence. Advice with a “wait and see” approach is recommended as the first-line treatment in primary care for most cases. In the medium term physiotherapy and or low-level laser therapy may be effective. Implementation Rule out alternative diagnosis. Onward referral may be indicated if the condition does not resolve after 12 months. PMID:24198571

  19. Biomechanical Reactions of Exoskeleton Neurorehabilitation Robots in Spastic Elbows and Wrists.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyung Seok; Koh, Sukgyu; Kim, Yoon Jae; Beom, Jaewon; Lee, Woo Hyung; Lee, Shi-Uk; Kim, Sungwan

    2017-06-09

    Spasticity is an important factor in designing wearable and lightweight exoskeleton neurorehabilitation robots. The proposed study evaluates biomechanical reactions of an exoskeleton robot to spasticity and establishes relevant guidelines for robot design. A two-axis exoskeleton robot is used to evaluate a group of 20 patients post-stroke with spastic elbow and/or wrist joints. All subjects are given isokinetic movements at various angular velocities within the capable range of motion for both joints. The resistance torque and corresponding angular position at each joint are recorded continuously. Maximal resistance torques caused by low (modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) 0, 1), intermediate (MAS 1+), and high (MAS 2, 3) grade spasticity were 3.68 ± 2.42, 5.94 ± 2.55, and 8.25 ± 3.35 Nm for the elbow flexor (p<0.001, between each grades) and 4.23 ± 1.75, 5.68 ± 1.96, and 5.44 ± 2.02 Nm for the wrist flexor (p<0.001, for low vs intermediate, low vs high grade spasticity). The angular velocity did not significantly influence maximal resistance torque in either joint. The catch occurred more quickly at higher velocities for low and intermediate elbow flexor spasticity (p<0.01). Spasticity caused considerable resistance to the robots during mechanically actuated movements. The resistance range according to the degree of spasticity should be considered when designing practical neurorehabilitation robots.

  20. New technique of reconstruction for medial elbow instability.

    PubMed

    Slullitel, Miguel Hector; Andres, Glasberg Ernesto

    2010-12-01

    This study reports a new substitution technique as a choice to repair both acute and chronic injuries of the ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow. Different researchers have described different techniques to reconstruct the medial ligament complex with similar results (with the use of grafts). There is a shared variable in the latest reports, the interpretation of the anterior bundle as the most important structure, for medial elbow stability and the only structure to be repaired as well. The approach to the medial structures of the elbow is similar to most of the surgical techniques. It consists of an incision on the medial aspect of the elbow, centered on the epicondyle, of length 4 inches. The reconstruction uses a strip of the aponeurosis of the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) reinforced with Kracow stitches. The graft is harvested using the strong aponeurosis of the FCU, a vascularized structure, a viable option and with sufficient resistance to bear the tension of the inner aspect of the elbow. The surgical morbidity is also reduced as the graft is not taken from other zones. As the distal insertion of the neo-ligament, the proximal fixation of the FCU is used in the sublime tubercle, inverting the direction of the fibers of this strip from distal to proximal. The proximal fixation of this ligament is an osseous tunnel in the epitroclea secured with an interference screw. Common complications are those resulting from the approach and the ulnar nerve manipulation. Owing to the satisfactory stability outcome achieved by this technique, early rehabilitation may start without inconveniences.

  1. MR Imaging of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Binaghi, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    Almost all movements of the upper extremities during routine daily life and many athletic activities require a painless and stable elbow joint. Studying the elbow is a diagnostic challenge because of its complex anatomy. MR imaging is an extremely important tool in the evaluation of common elbow disorders, the spectrum of which ranges from obvious acute lesions to chronic overuse injuries whose imaging manifestations can be subtle.

  2. A musculoskeletal model of the elbow joint complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Roger V.; Barr, Ronald E.; Abraham, Lawrence D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a musculoskeletal model that represents human elbow flexion-extension and forearm pronation-supination. Musculotendon parameters and the skeletal geometry were determined for the musculoskeletal model in the analysis of ballistic elbow joint complex movements. The key objective was to develop a computational model, guided by optimal control, to investigate the relationship among patterns of muscle excitation, individual muscle forces, and movement kinematics. The model was verified using experimental kinematic, torque, and electromyographic data from volunteer subjects performing both isometric and ballistic elbow joint complex movements. In general, the model predicted kinematic and muscle excitation patterns similar to what was experimentally measured.

  3. Clinical biomechanics of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Lockard, Margary

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the biomechanics of the articulations of the elbow joint that is relevant to therapists who design rehabilitation programs for patients following injuries or surgeries to the elbow. Individual and combined joint movements required for function such as activities of daily living are discussed, including normal arthrokinematics and the components that contribute to joint stability. The strain behavior of the nerves that cross the elbow is also reviewed. Therapists will understand the complexities of the biomechanics of the elbow that is necessary to design safe and effective rehabilitation programs.

  4. Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis in children.

    PubMed

    Luria, Shai; Haze, Amir

    2011-08-01

    Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is an uncommon, emergent hand infection. The literature lacks any description of the disease and the variability of its manifestations in young children. We describe 3 cases. Two cases were diagnosed and treated promptly, and the third presented late, with atypical clinical signs, causing a delay in his diagnosis and treatment and stressing the caution to be taken with the evaluation of these children with signs of hand infection.

  5. Muscle stiffness, strength loss, swelling and soreness following exercise-induced injury in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, J N; Chleboun, G; Conatser, R

    1993-01-01

    1. In order to study injury-related changes in muscle stiffness, injury to the elbow flexors of thirteen human subjects was induced by a regimen of eccentric exercise. 2. Passive stiffness over an intermediate range of elbow angles was measured with a device which held the relaxed arm of the subject in the horizontal plane and stepped it through the range of elbow angles from 90 deg to near full extension at 180 deg. The relation between static torque and elbow angle was quite linear over the first 50 deg and was taken as stiffness. 3. Stiffness over this range of angles more than doubled immediately after exercise and remained elevated for about 4 days, and may result from low level myofibrillar activation induced by muscle stretch. 4. Arm swelling was biphasic; arm circumference increased by about 3% immediately after exercise, fell back toward normal, then increased by as much as 9% and remained elevated for as long as 9 days. 5. Ultrasound imaging showed most of the swelling immediately following the exercise to be localized to the flexor muscle compartment; subsequent swelling involved other tissue compartments as well. 6. Muscle strength declined by almost 40% after the exercise and recovery was only slight 10 days later; the half-time of recovery appeared to be as long as 5-6 weeks. PMID:8229798

  6. Total elbow arthroplasty for the treatment of distal humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Gallucci, G L; Larrondo Calderón, W; Boretto, J G; Castellaro Lantermo, J A; Terán, J; de Carli, P

    2016-01-01

    To report the clinical-functional outcomes of the treatment of humeral distal fractures with a total elbow prosthesis. This retrospective study was performed in two surgical centres. A total of 23patients were included, with a mean age of 79years, and of which 21 were women. The inclusion criteria were: patients with humeral distal fractures, operated on using a Coonrad-Morrey prosthesis, and with a follow-up of more than one year. According to AO classification, 15fractures were type C3, 7 C2 and 1 A2. All patients were operated on without de-insertion of the extensor mechanism. The mean follow-up was 40 months. Flexor-extension was 123-17°, with a total mobility arc of 106° (80% of the contralateral side). Pain, according to a visual analogue scale was 1. The Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI) was 83 points. Excellent results were obtained in 8 patients, good in 13, medium in 1, and poor in 1. The mean DASH (disability) score was 24 points. Treatment of humeral distal fractures with total elbow arthroplasty could be a good treatment option, but indications must be limited to patients with complex fractures, poor bone quality, with osteoporosis and low functional demands. In younger patients, the use is limited to serious cases where there is no other treatment option. Level of Evidence IV. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis leading to an amputation.

    PubMed

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Iyer, Srinivasan

    2012-08-24

    Flexor tenosynovitis is an aggressive closed-space infection of the digital flexor tendon sheaths of the hand. We present a case of pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis in an immunocompromised patient and discuss the importance of early diagnosis and referral to a specialist hand surgery unit. A 61-year-old man visited his general practitioner because of swelling and tenderness of his left index finger. The patient was discharged on oral antibiotics but returned 4 days after because of deterioration of his symptoms and was referred to a plastic surgery unit. A diagnosis of flexor tenosynovitis was made and the patient required multiple debridements in theatre, resulting in the amputation of the infected finger. Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is a relatively common but often misdiagnosed hand infection. Patients with suspected flexor tenosynovitis should be referred and treated early to avoid significant morbidity, especially when risk factors for poor prognosis are present.

  8. The effects of denervation, reinnervation, and muscle imbalance on functional muscle length and elbow flexion contracture following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Weekley, Holly; Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Eismann, Emily; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2012-08-01

    The pathophysiology of paradoxical elbow flexion contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) is incompletely understood. The current study tests the hypothesis that this contracture occurs by denervation-induced impairment of elbow flexor muscle growth. Unilateral forelimb paralysis was created in mice in four neonatal (5-day-old) BPI groups (C5-6 excision, C5-6 neurotomy, C5-6 neurotomy/repair, and C5-T1 global excision), one non-neonatal BPI group (28-day-old C5-6 excision), and two neonatal muscle imbalance groups (triceps tenotomy ± C5-6 excision). Four weeks post-operatively, motor function, elbow range of motion, and biceps/brachialis functional lengths were assessed. Musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) denervation and reinnervation were assessed immunohistochemically. Elbow flexion motor recovery and elbow flexion contractures varied inversely among the neonatal BPI groups. Contracture severity correlated with biceps/brachialis shortening and MCN denervation (relative axon loss), with no contractures occurring in mice with MCN reinnervation (presence of growth cones). No contractures or biceps/brachialis shortening occurred following non-neonatal BPI, regardless of denervation or reinnervation. Neonatal triceps tenotomy did not cause contractures or biceps/brachialis shortening, nor did it worsen those following neonatal C5-6 excision. Denervation-induced functional shortening of elbow flexor muscles leads to variable elbow flexion contractures depending on the degree, permanence, and timing of denervation, independent of muscle imbalance. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  9. Gliding Resistance and Strength of a Braided Polyester/Monofilament Polyethylene Composite (FiberWire®) Suture in Human Flexor Digitorum Profundus Tendon Repair: An In-Vitro Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jose M.; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Zobitz, Mark E.; Amadio, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose While the strength of a tendon repair is clearly important, the friction of the repair is also a relevant consideration. The purpose of this study was to characterize the frictional coefficient, gliding resistance and breaking strength of suture materials and a suture construct commonly used for flexor tendon repair. Methods We measured the friction coefficients of 3-0 braided nylon enclosed in a smooth nylon outer shell (Supramid, S. Jackson, Alexandria, VA), 3-0 braided polyester coated with polybutilate (Ethibond, Ethicon, Somerville, NJ), and a 3-0 braided polyester/monofilament polyethylene composite (FiberWire, Arthrex, Naples, FL) sutures. We also measured the gliding resistance, linear breaking strength and resistance to gapping of zone 2 modified Pennington tendon repairs with the two lowest friction sutures in 20 human cadaveric flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons. Results The braided polyester/monofilament polyethylene composite had a significantly lower friction coefficient (0.054) than either the coated polyester (0.076) or nylon (0.130) sutures (p<0.001). The gliding resistances of the repaired tendons with braided/monofilament polyethylene composite suture and coated, braided polyester were similar (p> 0.05). The strength of the two repairs, force to produce a 2mm gap, and resistance to gap formation than coated, braided polyester repairs were also not significantly different. Conclusion Braided polyester composite is a low friction suture material. However, when this suture was used for tendon repair with a locking suture technique, it did not show a significant effect on the gliding resistance and repair strength compared with the same repair using coated polyester suture. PMID:19121735

  10. Concerns on Little League Elbow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Michael J.; Bell, Gerald W.

    1995-01-01

    Little league elbow is a common overuse injury resulting from repetitive valgus stress on the elbow during overhead throwing. Prevention and treatment should emphasize education of athletes, parents, and coaches about its etiology. The paper examines bone development, noting that the condition is highly treatable if diagnosed in early development.…

  11. Pediatric complex divergent elbow dislocation.

    PubMed

    van Wagenberg, Jan-Maarten F; van Huijstee, Pieter J; Verhofstad, Michiel H J

    2011-01-01

    A divergent dislocation of the elbow is a very rare injury, and only a few cases have been described in the literature. It is characterized as a dorsal dislocation of the ulnohumeral joint combined with a lateral dislocation of the proximal radius. All three articulations of the elbow joint are involved. Like in our case, it can be accompanied by an avulsion fracture of the coronoid and a distal radius fracture. For correct understanding of the injury, proper radiographic studies are imperative. In contrast to some earlier reports that advise a conservative approach, we performed a very aggressive operative treatment. To ensure anatomic reconstruction of the elbow, surgical exposure of the various injuries was performed first. After gross reduction of the joint dislocation, definitive osteosynthesis of the distal radius fracture was performed. Subsequently, the coronoid process and lateral collateral ligament could be repaired anatomically, improving the stability of the elbow. An uneventful recovery with excellent elbow motion and stability was achieved.

  12. Soft-tissue coverage of olecranon with musculocutaneous flexor carpi ulnaris flap.

    PubMed

    Andre, A; Bonnevialle, N; Grolleau, J-L; Mansat, P

    2014-12-01

    Coverage of the olecranon area is always challenging in traumatology. Because of the superficial situation of the bone, the absence of muscle, the thinness of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue locally, skin defects are not uncommon and can lead to exposure of hardware or prostheses. We report an original surgical technique using a musculocutaneous flap from the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) with a proximal pedicle to cover the olecranon area, detailing its limits and indications. The FCU flap has become our first-choice procedure to cover olecranon skin defects because of its low morbidity, its reliability, and its straightforward procedure, obviating the need for any microsurgery technique. Furthermore, it allows moving the elbow, immediately decreasing the risk of elbow stiffness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Terrible triad of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Seth D; Fishler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The terrible triad of the elbow is a difficult injury with historically poor outcomes. Improved experience, techniques, and implants have advanced to the point where restoration of elbow stability can be expected. Careful attention to each destabilizing element of the injury pattern is essential and places high demands on the surgeon's mastery of the anatomic complexity of the elbow. Technically, the surgeon must bring every skill to bear, as soft tissue techniques, fracture repair, and joint arthroplasty are routinely required to adequately treat these complex constellations of injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Elbow arthroscopy: indications, techniques, outcomes, and complications.

    PubMed

    Adams, Julie E; King, Graham J W; Steinmann, Scott P; Cohen, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    Elbow arthroscopy is a tool useful for the treatment of a variety of pathologies about the elbow. The major indications for elbow arthroscopy include débridement for septic elbow arthritis, synovectomy for inflammatory arthritis, débridement for osteoarthritis, loose body extraction, contracture release, treatment of osteochondral defects and selected fractures or instability, and tennis elbow release. To achieve favorable outcomes after elbow arthroscopy, the surgeon should be aware of contraindications, technical considerations, anatomic principles, and the need for proper patient positioning and portal selection. Elbow arthroscopy is an effective procedure for the treatment of inflammatory arthritis, osteoarthritis, and lateral epicondylitis.

  15. Elbow arthroscopy: indications, techniques, outcomes, and complications.

    PubMed

    Adams, Julie E; King, Graham J W; Steinmann, Scott P; Cohen, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    Elbow arthroscopy is a tool useful for the treatment of a variety of pathologies about the elbow. The major indications for elbow arthroscopy include débridement for septic elbow arthritis, synovectomy for inflammatory arthritis, débridement for osteoarthritis, loose body extraction, contracture release, treatment of osteochondral defects and selected fractures or instability, and tennis elbow release. Contraindications, technical considerations, and favorable outcomes following treatment with elbow arthroscopy require careful patient evaluation, a thorough understanding of anatomic principles, and proper patient positioning and portal selection to guide preoperative planning and overall patient care. Elbow arthroscopy is an effective procedure for the treatment of inflammatory arthritis, osteoarthritis, and lateral epicondylitis.

  16. Calcific periarthritis of the elbow presenting as acute tennis elbow.

    PubMed

    Jawad, F; Jawad, A S M

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presented with sudden acute lateral epicondylitis. There was no history of preceding trauma or repetitive use of the arm. Because of the acute onset and signs of acute inflammation, an X-ray was arranged. The X-ray showed a hyperdense calcified elongated globule distal to the lateral epicondyle. A diagnosis of calcific periarthritis (calcium apatite) of the elbow was made. Calcific periarthritis has rarely been reported as a cause of acute elbow pain.

  17. Increase in flexor but not extensor corticospinal motor outputs following ischemic nerve block.

    PubMed

    Vallence, Ann-Maree; Hammond, Geoffrey R; Reilly, Karen T

    2012-06-01

    Human motor cortex is capable of rapid and long-lasting reorganization, evident globally, as shifts in body part representations, and at the level of individual muscles as changes in corticospinal excitability. Representational shifts provide an overview of how various body parts reorganize relative to each other but do not tell us whether all muscles in a given body part reorganize in the same manner and to the same extent. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) provides information about individual muscles and can therefore inform us about the uniformity of plastic changes within a body part. We used TMS to investigate changes in corticospinal excitability of forearm flexors and extensors after inflation of a tourniquet around the wrist. Motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes and input/output (I/O) curves were obtained from wrist flexors and extensors simultaneously before and during block. TMS was delivered to the optimal site for eliciting MEPs in flexors in experiment 1, extensors in experiment 2, and both flexors and extensors in experiment 3. In all experiments flexor MEP amplitude increased during block while extensor MEP amplitude showed no systematic change, and the slope of flexor but not extensor I/O curves increased. Flexor H-reflex amplitude normalized to maximal M wave showed negligible changes during block, suggesting that the increase in corticospinal excitability in the flexors cannot be completely explained by increased excitability at the spinal cord level. These findings show that forearm flexors and extensors differ in their potential for plastic changes, highlight the importance of investigating how experimentally induced plasticity affects anatomically close, but functionally distinct, muscle groups, and suggest that rehabilitation interventions aiming to alter cortical organization should consider the differential sensitivity of various muscle groups to plasticity processes.

  18. Simultaneous shoulder and elbow dislocation.

    PubMed

    Cobanoğlu, Mutlu; Yumrukcal, Feridun; Karataş, Cengiz; Duygun, Fatih

    2014-05-23

    Ipsilateral shoulder and elbow dislocation is very rare and only six articles are present in the literature mentioning this kind of a complex injury. With this presentation we aim to emphasise the importance of assessing the adjacent joints in patients with trauma in order not to miss any accompanying pathologies. We report a case of a 43-year-old female patient with ipsilateral right shoulder and elbow dislocation treated conservatively. The patient reported elbow pain when first admitted to emergency service but she was diagnosed with simultaneous ipsilateral shoulder and elbow injury and treated conservatively. As a more painful pathology may mask the additional ones, one should hasten to help before performing a complete evaluation. Any harm caused to the patient due to this reason would not be a complication but a malpractice.

  19. Simultaneous shoulder and elbow dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Çobanoğlu, Mutlu; Yumrukcal, Feridun; Karataş, Cengiz; Duygun, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Ipsilateral shoulder and elbow dislocation is very rare and only six articles are present in the literature mentioning this kind of a complex injury. With this presentation we aim to emphasise the importance of assessing the adjacent joints in patients with trauma in order not to miss any accompanying pathologies. We report a case of a 43-year-old female patient with ipsilateral right shoulder and elbow dislocation treated conservatively. The patient reported elbow pain when first admitted to emergency service but she was diagnosed with simultaneous ipsilateral shoulder and elbow injury and treated conservatively. As a more painful pathology may mask the additional ones, one should hasten to help before performing a complete evaluation. Any harm caused to the patient due to this reason would not be a complication but a malpractice. PMID:24859563

  20. Management of the elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Heim, M; Beeton, K; Blamey, G; Goddard, N

    2012-07-01

    The elbow is a complex joint that is prone to bleeding episodes. These features as well as the close proximity of the ulnar nerve and the need to use the elbow in many activities of daily living can lead to a range of symptoms including recurrent bleeds, pain, instability or loss of range of movement and nerve compression. Conservative management includes splinting and proprioceptive retraining monitored by a physiotherapist who is a musculoskeletal expert in hemophilia care. In the event that conservative measures are not successful a range of surgical options may be indicated including elbow replacement. These approaches continue to be evaluated in both the short and long term in order to determine the most effective treatment for the symptomatic elbow.

  1. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Luis Alfredo Gómez; Dal Molin, Fabio Farina; Visco, Adalberto; Fernandes, Luis Filipe Daneu; dos Santos, Murilo Cunha Rafael; Cardozo Filho, Nivaldo Souza; Gómez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    To present the arthroscopic surgical technique and the evaluation of the results from this technique for treating elbow stiffness. Methods: Between April 2007 and January 2010, ten elbows of ten patients with elbow stiffness underwent arthroscopic treatment to release the range of motion. The minimum follow-up was 11 months, with an average of 27 months. All the patients were male and their average age was 32.8 years (ranging from 22 to 48 years). After the arthroscopic treatment, they were followed up weekly in the first month and every three months thereafter. The clinical evaluation was made using the criteria of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Results: All the patients were satisfied with the results from the arthroscopic treatment. The average UCLA score was 33.8 points. Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment for elbow stiffness is a minimally invasive surgical technique that was shown to be efficient for treating this complication. PMID:27027027

  2. Anconeus epitrochlearis as a source of medial elbow pain in baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinning; Dines, Joshua S; Gorman, Matthew; Limpisvasti, Orr; Gambardella, Ralph; Yocum, Lou

    2012-07-01

    Medial elbow pain is reported in 18% to 69% of baseball players aged of 9 and 19 years. This is due to the large valgus stresses focused on the medial side of the elbow during overhead activities. In overhead throwers and pitchers, pain can be attributed to valgus extension overload with resultant posteromedial impingement, overuse of the flexor-pronator musculature resulting in medial epicondylitis, or occasional muscle tears or ruptures. The anconeus epitrochlearis is a known cause of cubital tunnel syndrome and has been postulated as a source of medial elbow pain in overhead athletes. This article describes the cases of 3 right-handed baseball pitchers with persistent right-sided medial elbow pain during throwing despite a prolonged period of rest, physical therapy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Two patients had symptoms of cubital tunnel syndrome as diagnosed by electromyogram and nerve conduction studies and the presence of the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle per magnetic resonance imaging. All patients underwent isolated release of the anconeus muscle without ulnar nerve transposition and returned to their previous levels of activity. The diagnosis and treatment of pitchers who present with medial-sided elbow pain can be complex. The differential should include an enlarged or inflamed anconeus epitrochlearis muscle as a possible cause. Conservative management should be the first modality. However, surgical excision with isolated release of the muscle can be successful in returning patients with persistent pain despite a trial of conservative management to their previous levels of function.

  3. Computing muscle, ligament, and osseous contributions to the elbow varus moment during baseball pitching

    PubMed Central

    Buffi, James H.; Werner, Katie; Kepple, Tom; Murray, Wendy M.

    2014-01-01

    Baseball pitching imposes a dangerous valgus load on the elbow that puts the joint at severe risk for injury. The goal of this study was to develop a musculoskeletal modeling approach to enable evaluation of muscle-tendon contributions to mitigating elbow injury risk in pitching. We implemented a forward dynamic simulation framework that used a scaled biomechanical model to reproduce a pitching motion recorded from a high school pitcher. The medial elbow muscles generated substantial, protective, varus elbow moments in our simulations. For our subject, the triceps generated large varus moments at the time of peak valgus loading; varus moments generated by the flexor digitorum superficialis were larger, but occurred later in the motion. Increasing muscle-tendon force output, either by augmenting parameters associated with strength and power or by increasing activation levels, decreased the load on the ulnar collateral ligament. Published methods have not previously quantified the biomechanics of elbow muscles during pitching. This simulation study represents a critical advancement in the study of baseball pitching and highlights the utility of simulation techniques in the study of this difficult problem. PMID:25281409

  4. Surgical management of unstable elbow dislocation without intra-articular fracture

    PubMed Central

    Micic, Ivan; Kim, Shin-Yoon; Park, Il-Hyung; Kim, Poong-Taek

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe soft tissue injury patterns and report the clinical results of primary ligament repair with use of protected early mobilisation in unstable elbow dislocations with pure capsulo-ligamentous injuries. Twenty-four patients who presented with traumatic unstable elbow dislocation without associated intra-articular fracture were reviewed. Anatomical repair was performed using metal anchor screws and the bone tunnel method. Ligament avulsion was noted in 55% for the medial collateral ligament, 80% for the lateral collateral ligament, 60% for the flexor tendon and 80% for the extensor tendon. The overall mean Mayo Elbow Performance Score was 93.2. Brachial artery injuries occurred in two elbows. Heterotopic calcification was noted in 14 patients and there was one severe traumatic arthrosis. This study showed a high incidence of reattachable avulsion injuries to ligaments, tendon/muscle and capsule in unstable elbow dislocations. Primary ligament repair coupled with early rehabilitation provided satisfactory outcomes at two to four years postoperatively. PMID:18677481

  5. Elbow flexion reconstruction by Steindler flexorplasty in obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, M M

    2005-08-01

    The results of Steindler flexorplasty in nine patients with obstetric brachial plexus palsy are reported. There were 5 girls and 4 boys with a mean age of 6 (range 2-13) years. Selection criteria for the procedure included strong (at least M4) grip strength and wrist and elbow extension, as well as the presence of the "Steindler effect". Pre-operatively, elbow flexion was rated as M0 or M1 in three patients and M2 in the remaining six patients. Intra-operatively, the detached common flexor origin was advanced 5 to 7 cm and fixation was done to the anterior humerus either with direct suture to the periosteum (in younger children) or suturing into a drill hole in the humerus (in older children). Postoperatively, the elbow was immobilized in flexion and supination for 6 weeks. At a mean follow-up of 5 years, the results in eight patients were good with mean active elbow flexion against resistance of 110 degrees and a mean elbow flexion contracture of 35 degrees. The result in the remaining patient was poor (unsuccessful transfer). It is concluded that the results of the Steindler flexorplasty in obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients are good and reliable, provided patient selection is careful.

  6. Computing muscle, ligament, and osseous contributions to the elbow varus moment during baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Buffi, James H; Werner, Katie; Kepple, Tom; Murray, Wendy M

    2015-02-01

    Baseball pitching imposes a dangerous valgus load on the elbow that puts the joint at severe risk for injury. The goal of this study was to develop a musculoskeletal modeling approach to enable evaluation of muscle-tendon contributions to mitigating elbow injury risk in pitching. We implemented a forward dynamic simulation framework that used a scaled biomechanical model to reproduce a pitching motion recorded from a high school pitcher. The medial elbow muscles generated substantial, protective, varus elbow moments in our simulations. For our subject, the triceps generated large varus moments at the time of peak valgus loading; varus moments generated by the flexor digitorum superficialis were larger, but occurred later in the motion. Increasing muscle-tendon force output, either by augmenting parameters associated with strength and power or by increasing activation levels, decreased the load on the ulnar collateral ligament. Published methods have not previously quantified the biomechanics of elbow muscles during pitching. This simulation study represents a critical advancement in the study of baseball pitching and highlights the utility of simulation techniques in the study of this difficult problem.

  7. [Injuries of the elbow joint].

    PubMed

    Lill, H; Voigt, C

    2004-10-01

    Injuries of the elbow joint increase along with increased athletic activity and life expectancy. Knowledge of anatomy and biomechanics is important for understanding injury patterns, specific diagnosis, and therapy. Here we classify the most frequent elbow injuries such as dislocation, ligamentous instability, and fracture of the radial head, processus coronoideus, olecranon, and distal humerus based on joint anatomy, biomechanics, clinical examination, and imaging. Specific therapies are described.

  8. Current concepts in elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Daniel; Cil, Akin

    2017-04-01

    Distal humeral replacement and the total elbow are two commonly-used arthroplastiesEach prosthesis has evolving indications and surgical techniquesRecent changes in device design and implantation methods are due to biomechanical and clinical outcome-based researchNew prostheses and methods provide: better elbow kinematics, more durable bearings and longer-lasting joint replacement potential Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:83-88. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160064.

  9. Elbow isokinetic strength characteristics among collegiate baseball players.

    PubMed

    Laudner, Kevin G; Wilson, James T; Meister, Keith

    2012-05-01

    To compare the bilateral strength characteristics of the wrist flexors, extensors, pronators, and supinators among baseball players. Cross-sectional. Laboratory. 30 collegiate baseball players with no recent history of upper extremity injury. Bilateral pronation, supination, wrist flexion, and wrist extension peak torque (PT) and peak torque to body weight (PT/BW) strength were measured at speeds of 90 and 180°/second. Paired t-tests showed that the throwing arm of baseball players produced significantly less PT/BW strength for supination at 90°/second compared to the non-throwing arm (P = .001). The throwing arm produced significantly more PT/BW strength for pronation (P = .001) at 180°/second compared to the non-throwing arm. Furthermore, the throwing arm had more PT and PT/BW strength for wrist extension (P < .005) at 180°/second. Conversely, the throwing arm had less PT and PT/BW strength for supination (P < .004) and wrist flexion (P < .004) at 180°/second compared to the non-throwing arm. Significant bilateral strength differences exist in pronation, supination, wrist flexion, and wrist extension among collegiate baseball players. With the steady increase in ulnar collateral ligament injuries of the elbow among baseball players and the proven resistance to valgus force provided by the flexor-pronator mass of the elbow, the results of this study may prove beneficial in the prevention, evaluation, and rehabilitation of such dysfunctions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. TENNIS ELBOW IN INDUSTRY

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, A.

    1965-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the present state of knowledge concerning the various factors involved in the aetiology of tennis elbow and the possible pathological lesions underlying the condition. Two series of cases are considered in greater detail. The first series, consisting of 37 cases, was treated by physical methods only, viz., manipulation, ultrasonic radiation, and short wave diathermy. The results were disappointing since little more than half the number were improved by sonation although subsequent diathermy did improve the majority of those who did not respond. But physical treatment is shown to be time consuming and variable in its results. The second series was treated by local infiltration of the painful area by hydrocortisone and, of the 38 cases, only one proved unsuccessful after one or two injections. The reduction in treatment-time and the fact that no special equipment is necessary are some of the obvious advantages in this form of treatment. The paper concludes with a discussion on the rationale of treatment and some additional aetiological factors which are in favour of an inflammatory, rather than a traumatic, basis for the condition. PMID:14278802

  11. A physiological dynamic testing machine for the elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Kiene, Johannes; Wendlandt, Robert; Heinritz, Marcus; Schall, Angelika; Schulz, Arndt-Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a test setup combining realistic force transmission with physiological movement patterns at a frequency that mimicked daily use of the elbow, to assess implants in orthopedic joint reconstruction and trauma surgery. In a multidisciplinary approach, an in vitro biomechanical testing machine was developed and manufactured that could simulate the repetitive forceful movement of the human elbow joint. The construction involved pneumatic actuators. An aluminum forearm module enabled movements in 3 degrees of freedom, while motions and forces were replicated via force and angular sensors that were similar to in vivo measurements. In the initial testing, 16 human elbow joint specimens were tested at 35 Nm in up to 5000 cycles at a range of 10° extension to 110° flexion. The transmitted forces led to failure in 9 out of the 16 tested specimens, significantly more often in females and small specimens. It is possible to construct a testing machine to simulate nearly physiological repetitive elbow motions. The prototype has a number of technical deficiencies that could be modified. When testing implants for the human elbow with cadaver specimens, the specimen has to be chosen according to the intended use of the implant under investigation.

  12. [Flexor pulleys of the fingers. Anatomy, biomechanics, reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Hahn, P; Lanz, U

    1996-09-01

    Primary or secondary flexor tendon surgery occasionally leads to damaged flexor pulleys. Insufficient pulley reconstruction causes loss of finger function by bow stringing of the flexor tendon. This paper reviews the anatomy and biomechanics of the flexor pulley system. Different techniques of reconstruction are discussed.

  13. Case report: accessory head of the deep forearm flexors

    PubMed Central

    JONES, M.; ABRAHAMS, P. H.; SAÑUDO, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    In 1813 Gantzer described 2 accessory muscles in the human forearm which bear his name (Wood, 1868; Macalister, 1875) and these have subsequently been reported with variable attachments (Wood, 1868; Macalister, 1875; Turner, 1879; Schäfer & Thane, 1894; Le Double, 1897; Dykes & Anson, 1944; Mangini, 1960; Malhotra et al. 1982; Kida, 1988; Tountas & Bergman, 1993). The accessory heads of the deep flexors of the forearm (Gantzer's muscles) have been described as 2 different small bellies which insert either into FPL or FDP. There are no previous reports which have mentioned the existence of an accessory muscle which inserts into both of the 2 deep flexors of the forearm as in the case presented here. PMID:9306208

  14. Pyogenic Flexor Tenosynovitis Caused by Shewanella algae.

    PubMed

    Fluke, Erin C; Carayannopoulos, Nikoletta L; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2016-07-01

    Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is an orthopedic emergency most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci and occasionally, when associated with water exposure, Mycobacterium marinum. Shewanella algae, a gram-negative bacillus found in warm saltwater environments, has infrequently been reported to cause serious soft tissue infections and necrosis. In this case, S. algae caused complicated flexor tenosynovitis requiring open surgical irrigation and debridement. Flexor tenosynovitis caused by S. algae rapidly presented with all 4 Kanavel cardinal signs as well as subcutaneous purulence, ischemia, and necrosis, thus meeting the requirements for Pang et al group III classification of worst prognosis. Because of its rarity and virulence, S. algae should always be considered in cases of flexor tenosynovitis associated with traumatic water exposure to treat and minimize morbidity appropriately.

  15. Flexor tendon repair in zone III.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M

    2011-01-01

    There is a paucity of the literature on the outcome of zone III flexor tendon injuries. In this paper, we report on the results of zone III flexor tendon repair in 35 consecutive adult patients with clean cut lacerations of both flexor tendons in 42 fingers. There were 25 men and 10 women with an average age of 32 years. Repair of both flexor tendons was performed using 'figure of eight' core sutures and a continuous epitendinous suture. Postoperatively, an immediate active range of motion protocol was applied to ensure full active extension of the interphalangeal joints. The results were assessed using the Strickland-Glogovac grading system. There were no ruptures. One patient with two injured fingers developed complex regional pain syndrome and the final outcome was fair in both fingers. In the remaining 34 patients (40 fingers), 33 patients (38 fingers) had an excellent outcome and the remaining patient (two fingers) had a good outcome.

  16. Ultrasound assessment of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Radunovic, Goran; Vlad, Violeta; Micu, Mihaela C; Nestorova, Rodina; Petranova, Tzvetanka; Porta, Francesco; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2012-06-01

    Ultrasonography of the elbow is a very helpful and reliable diagnostic procedure for a broad spectrum of rheumatic and orthopedic conditions, representing a possible substitute to magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of soft tissues of the elbow. Musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) shows many advantages over other imaging modalities, probably the most important being its capability to perform a dynamic assessment of musculoskeletal elements with patient's partnership and observation during examination. In addition, ultrasonography is cost effective, easy available, and has excellent and multiplanar capability to visualize superficial soft tissue structures. Among all imaging procedures, US is highly accepted by patients. US assessment of the elbow requires good operator experience in the assessment of normal anatomy, and suitable high-quality equipment. US of the elbow provides detailed information including joint effusions, medial and lateral epicondylitis, tears of the distal biceps and triceps tendons, radial and ulnar collateral ligament tears, ulnar nerve entrapment, cubital or olecranon bursitis and intra-articular loose bodies. The aim of this paper is to review the screening technique and the basic normal and pathological findings in elbow US.

  17. Haptic Recreation of Elbow Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonghyun; Damiano, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a haptic device capable of presenting standardized recreation of elbow spasticity. Using the haptic device, clinicians will be able to repeatedly practice the assessment of spasticity without requiring patient involvement, and these practice opportunities will help improve accuracy and reliability of the assessment itself. Haptic elbow spasticity simulator (HESS) was designed and prototyped according to mechanical requirements to recreate the feel of elbow spasticity. Based on the data collected from subjects with elbow spasticity, a mathematical model representing elbow spasticity is proposed. As an attempt to differentiate the feel of each score in Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), parameters of the model were obtained respectively for three different MAS scores 1, 1+, and 2. The implemented haptic recreation was evaluated by experienced clinicians who were asked to give MAS scores by manipulating the haptic device. The clinicians who participated in the study were blinded to each other’s scores and to the given models. They distinguished the three models and the MAS scores given to the recreated models matched 100% with the original MAS scores from the patients. PMID:22275660

  18. Significance of elbow extension in reconstruction of prehension with reinnervated free-muscle transfer following complete brachial plexus avulsion.

    PubMed

    Doi, K; Shigetomi, M; Kaneko, K; Soo-Heong, T; Hiura, Y; Hattori, Y; Kawakami, F

    1997-08-01

    Thirty-one patients with complete avulsion of the brachial plexus underwent reconstruction of elbow extension by intercostal nerve transfer following reconstruction of prehension with either a single or double free-muscle transfer. Long-term results of elbow extension were evaluated in 24 patients. Reinnervation of the triceps muscle took longer than that of the transferred muscle on serial electromyographic examinations, and the eventual strength of the triceps muscle was weak. None attained M5 grade, 2 achieved M4 grade, 4 achieved M3 grade, 8 achieved M2 grade, 5 achieved M1 grade, and another 5 achieved M0 grade. However, despite the weak recovery, 14 patients were able to obtain useful functional recovery of the triceps muscle, enabling it to stabilize the elbow joint against the transferred muscle, which acted as simultaneous elbow flexor and wrist or finger extensor. Elbow stability is imperative in order to obtain voluntary finger function following free-muscle transfer. Should the triceps muscle fail to recover following intercostal nerves neurotization, transferring the reinnervated infraspinatus to the triceps is an optional procedure to provide stabilization of the elbow.

  19. Evaluation of the numeric rating scale for perception of effort during isometric elbow flexion exercise.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulou, Sofia; Nowicky, Alexander V

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the reliability and validity of the numerical rating scale (0-10 NRS) for rating perception of effort during isometric elbow flexion in healthy people. 33 individuals (32 ± 8 years) participated in the study. Three re-test measurements within one session and three weekly sessions were undertaken to determine the reliability of the scale. The sensitivity of the scale following 10 min isometric fatiguing exercise of the elbow flexors as well as the correlation of the effort with the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the flexor muscles were tested. Perception of effort was tested during isometric elbow flexion at 10, 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100% MVC. The 0-10 NRS demonstrated an excellent test-retest reliability [intra class correlation (ICC) = 0.99 between measurements taken within a session and 0.96 between 3 consecutive weekly sessions]. Exploratory curve fitting for the relationship between effort ratings and voluntary force, and underlying EMG showed that both are best described by power functions (y = ax ( b )). There were also strong correlations (range 0.89-0.95) between effort ratings and EMG recordings of all flexor muscles supporting the concurrent criterion validity of the measure. The 0-10 NRS was sensitive enough to detect changes in the perceived effort following fatigue and significantly increased at the level of voluntary contraction used in its assessment (p < 0.001). These findings suggest the 0-10 NRS is a valid and reliable scale for rating perception of effort in healthy individuals. Future research should seek to establish the validity of the 0-10 NRS in clinical settings.

  20. Conservative therapy for tennis elbow.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E

    1992-01-01

    Tennis elbow is a common overuse syndrome. It is accompanied by degenerative changes in the enthesis of the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle. It may be best diagnosed clinically by eliminating other possible causes of lateral elbow pain. Physical methods should always be selected as initial treatment. Immobilisation is the initial advice that most doctors give: ultrasound has been shown to be effective in a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial, and low energy laser has been found to reduce objective but not subjective symptoms. Other forms of physical treatment like electrotherapy, thermotherapy and massages can be tried, even though proof of their efficacy needs to be established more firmly. When physical treatments have failed, steroid injections can help. If symptoms still persist, then surgery is called for. There are still many open questions surrounding the syndrome of tennis elbow. Research into this common soft tissue disease should be intensified.

  1. Elbow disorders in throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Gerbino, Peter G

    2003-07-01

    Skeletally immature throwing athletes are injured when they throw too frequently or use throwing styles and pitches that overstress their elbows. Despite safety guidelines for throwing that recommend throwing more than 300, but less than 600, pitches per season, compliance is almost impossible to monitor, given multiple opportunities for throwing abuse away from organized, supervised league play. All throwers should avoid the side-arm throwing style. Pitchers should not play in multiple leagues, should not play hard-throwing positions when not pitching, and should not pitch when having elbow or shoulder pain. When the elbow becomes painful, pitching should cease and a thorough evaluation performed. Once the diagnosis is made, appropriate nonoperative treatment is undertaken. Operative intervention in this age group uncommonly is needed. Rehabilitation includes identifying and eliminating causative risk factors. Educating the athlete, coach, and parents results in a longer, pain-free throwing career and enhanced enjoyment of the sport.

  2. 21 CFR 888.3180 - Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3180 Section 888.3180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3180 - Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3180 Section 888.3180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3180 - Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3180 Section 888.3180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3180 - Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3180 Section 888.3180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3180 - Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3180 Section 888.3180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint humeral (hemi-elbow) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of...

  7. Endoscopic Ganglionectomy of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Resection of the ganglion of the elbow is indicated if the size or location of the cyst impairs function or causes significant pain. Arthroscopic decompression or endoscopic resection of the cyst is the minimally invasive surgical option. It has the potential advantage of better cosmetic results and less soft-tissue dissection. Endoscopic resection is indicated if the cyst is not communicating with the joint or the communication is not identifiable arthroscopically or if there is a long and narrow communication placing the cyst away from the elbow joint. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is essential for surgical planning.

  8. Inverse Kinematics for a Parallel Myoelectric Elbow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    Inverse Kinematics for a Parallel Myoelectric Elbow A. Z. Escudero, Ja. Álvarez, L. Leija. Center of Research and Advanced Studies of the IPN...replacement above elbow are serial mechanisms driven by a DC motor and they include only one active articulation for the elbow [1]. Parallel mechanisms...are rather scarce [2]. The inverse kinematics model of a 3-degree of freedom parallel prosthetic elbow mechanism is reported. The mathematical

  9. Electromyography and mechanomyography of elbow agonists and antagonists in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Marusiak, Jarosław; Jaskólska, Anna; Jarocka, Ewa; Najwer, Wojciech; Kisiel-Sajewicz, Katarzyna; Jaskólski, Artur

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the electromyographic (EMG) and mechanomyographic (MMG) activities of agonist and antagonist muscles in Parkinson disease patients during maximal isometric elbow contraction in flexion and extension. Ten elderly females with Parkinson disease (average age 75 years) and 10 age-matched healthy females were tested. The torque and the EMG and MMG signals from biceps brachii and triceps brachii were recorded during sustained maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the elbow flexors and extensors. There were no intergroup differences in the EMG and MMG activities of agonist and antagonist muscles or in torque. This might be because the Parkinson subjects were tested during their medication "ON" phase, or perhaps maximal isometric contraction (MVC) induced greater active muscle stiffness that affected the MMG signal. Muscle Nerve 40: 240-248, 2009.

  10. Responsiveness of the Liverpool Elbow Score in elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Vishwanathan, Karthik; Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Kemp, Graham J; Frostick, Simon P

    2013-03-01

    Responsiveness and floor and ceiling effect are important parameters for evaluating the sensitivity of an outcome instrument in detecting the changes in the clinical condition of patients after an intervention as well as evaluating the content validity of the instrument. The aim of this prospective observational study was to assess these parameters for the Liverpool Elbow Score (LES) in total elbow replacement (TER). The study included 121 cemented TER cases with linked elbow prosthesis (Discovery Elbow, Biomet Orthopaedics, Swindon, UK) for various conditions, including inflammatory arthritis, noninflammatory arthritis, trauma, and loosening. The proportion of patients with the lowest score (0 points; floor effect) and maximum score (10 points; ceiling effect) was checked preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. Distribution-based methods (effect size [ES], standardized response mean [SRM], Guyatt responsiveness ratio [GRR]) and anchor-based methods (receiver operating characteristic [ROC] curve and Spearman correlation coefficient) were used to assess responsiveness. Patient satisfaction after TER was used as an external anchor. Patients were a mean age of 63 years (range, 20-86 years). Large ES (1.64), SRM (1.25), and GRR (1.69) were found during the follow-up period. Area under the ROC curve was 0.71 (95% confidence interval, 0.56-0.87; P = .03). There was significant positive correlation (Spearman correlation coefficient, 0.35; P = .004) between changes in LES and satisfaction level. LES showed no floor and ceiling effect preoperatively and at 1 year postoperatively. LES is a responsive measure and has no floor and ceiling effect. This encourages its use as an outcome instrument for TER. Basic Science Study, Development or Validation of Outcome Instruments. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Elbow extension in the C5 quadriplegic using functional neuromuscular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Miller, L J; Peckham, P H; Keith, M W

    1989-07-01

    A system has been designed to provide overhead reach in C5/6 quadriplegic subjects using functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) for control of the triceps muscle. The system uses the position of the arm in space as the input command, relieving the user from having to supply a conscious command signal. By measuring the position of the arm, the magnitude of the gravitational and passive torques opposing elbow extension can be calculated. This torque is counteracted by electrical activation of the triceps muscle, with the appropriate stimulus parameters determined from the recruitment characteristics of each electrode. Sufficient stimulus is applied to produce full elbow extension. Intermediate elbow angles are achieved using voluntary elbow flexor torque to counteract the effects of the stimulation. System performance was tested in two subjects. Subjects were asked to reach targets with and without stimulation, with loads up to 500 g in the hand. Using the FNS system, subjects were able to successfully reach the target positions above the horizontal that were inaccessible without stimulation.

  12. Physical examination of the athlete's elbow.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Stephanie H; Moen, Todd C; Levine, William N; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2012-03-01

    Elbow injury is encountered less frequently than are other joint conditions. The bony architecture, muscle, ligament, and nerve anatomy are complex, and the forces leading to injury in the athlete's elbow are unique. Appreciating the pathomechanics leading to injury and a detailed knowledge of elbow anatomy are the foundation for conducting a directed history and physical examination that achieves an accurate diagnosis. Recent advances in physical examination have improved our ability to accurately diagnose and treat athletic elbow disorders. This article reviews general and focused physical examination maneuvers of the elbow in a systematic anatomic fashion.

  13. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral distal radius fracture

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Trikha, Vivek; Kumar, Rakesh; Saini, Pramod; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral distal radius fracture is a rare pattern of injury, although it is common for elbow dislocation and forearm fractures to occur separately. We report a rare case of a 20-year-old male who had a posterior elbow dislocation and ipsilateral distal radius fracture. Elbow dislocation was first reduced in extension and distal radius fracture was then reduced in flexion. Both the injuries were conservatively managed. At 6 months follow-up, the patient had no pain in his elbow and minimal pain in his wrist on heavy lifting and had resumed his work as a laborer. PMID:24082758

  14. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Trikha, Vivek; Kumar, Rakesh; Saini, Pramod; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral distal radius fracture is a rare pattern of injury, although it is common for elbow dislocation and forearm fractures to occur separately. We report a rare case of a 20-year-old male who had a posterior elbow dislocation and ipsilateral distal radius fracture. Elbow dislocation was first reduced in extension and distal radius fracture was then reduced in flexion. Both the injuries were conservatively managed. At 6 months follow-up, the patient had no pain in his elbow and minimal pain in his wrist on heavy lifting and had resumed his work as a laborer.

  15. Atraumatic Flexor tendon retrieval- a simple method

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Zone 2 flexor tendon injuries still represent a challenging problem to hand surgeons despite the well developed surgical techniques and suture materials. Meticulous surgical repair with atraumatic handling of the severed tendon stumps and minimal damage to the tendon sheath are particularly important to prevent postoperative adhesions and ruptures in this area. In zone 2 flexor tendon injuries proximal to the vinculas, the cut ends of the flexor tendons retract to the palm with muscle contraction. To retrieve the severed proximal flexor tendon under tendon sheath and pulley system is very difficult without damaging these structures. Many techniques are described in the literature for the delivery of the retracted proximal tendon stump to the repair site. Methods In this report we would like to present a simple and relatively atraumatic technique that facilitates passing of the retracted flexor tendon through the pulleys in zone 2. We sutured the proximal tendon stump at the distal palmar crease with 3–0 polypropylene suture and used a 14 gauge plastic feeding tube, acting like a conduit for the passage of straightened needle to the finger. Results We have used this technique 21 times without any complication in our clinic. We have not seen any suture breakage during the passage or needle breakage due to the bending of the needle. Conclusions We have found this technique is very simple and very effective in retrieving the retracted tendon stump without causing undue damage to the tendon stump or tendon sheath. PMID:24040913

  16. Management of Elbow Trauma: Anatomy and Exposures.

    PubMed

    Barco, Raul; Antuña, Samuel A

    2015-11-01

    The elbow is a complex joint from the anatomic and biomechanical point of view. A thorough understanding of elbow anatomy greatly aids the surgeon in dealing with elbow trauma. The close vicinity of neurovascular structures should always be kept in mind when selecting a surgical approach. Any approach to the elbow needs to be safe and versatile. Knowledge of the attachment and orientation of elbow ligaments reduces the risk of inadvertent intraoperative injury and/or postoperative instability. Surgeons dealing with elbow trauma should have a good working understanding of elbow anatomy and the available approaches to effectively and efficiently conduct the surgical procedure to maximize outcomes and minimize complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Review of management of unstable elbow fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ozel, Omer; Demircay, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Stable and painless elbow motion is essential for activities of daily living. The elbow joint is the second most commonly dislocated joint in adults. The goals of treatment are to perform a stable fixation of all fractures, to achieve concentric and stable reduction of the elbow and to provide early motion. The treatment modality for complex elbow instability is almost always surgical. The treatment objectives are anatomic reduction, stable fixation, and early rehabilitation of the elbow. The common complications of these unstable fractures include recurrent instability, stiffness, myositis ossifications, heterotopic calcification, and neurovascular dysfunction. We analyzed the management of complex elbow fractures and instabilities on the basis of recent literature and suggested possible guidelines for the treatment in this paper. In conclusion, recognition of the injury pattern and restoration of the joint stability are the prerequisites for any successful treatment of an unstable elbow injury. PMID:26807356

  18. Elbow and Shoulder Lesions of Baseball Players*

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    George Eli Bennett was born in Claryville, NY, in the Catskill Mountains, in 1885 [3]. His parents both died by the time he was 11, leaving him the need to work while going to school, but he excelled in school and sports. He played semipro baseball at the age of 16. After high school he work in various jobs in the Midwest before he could afford to attend the University of Maryland Medical School, from which he graduated in 1908. At the age of 25 in 1910, he joined the staff at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he remained until his resignation in 1947. Dr. Bennett was one of a few men who served as President of both the American Orthopaedic Association and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. While Dr. Bennett made many contributions to orthopaedic surgery, including children’s and nonoperative orthopaedics, he was best known for his work in sports medicine (undoubtedly related to his being a gifted athlete). His fame extended well beyond the orthopaedic community, for he treated many famous athletes. Sports Illustrated recognized him upon his death in an article entitled, “Mender of Immortals” [4]. His intimate knowledge of sports undoubtedly contributed to his sage judgments. At an emotional dinner in 1958 many famous athletes sometimes tearfully paid tribute to Dr. Bennett. Joe Garagiola commented on the occasion, “After listening to that all-star team of players Dr. Bennett has mended, I’m sorry I didn’t break my leg” [4]. Among Dr. Bennett’s many publications, including those related to sports, we have chosen one [2] of two articles [1,2] he wrote on elbow and shoulder problems in baseball players. He described the now well-known degenerative changes and periarticular calcific deposits that occur in the elbows and shoulders of pitchers. Some of these, he suggested, were not symptomatic and he advised against treatment. Dr. Bennett commented, however, “Since professional athletes are human beings, not supermen, general health often

  19. [Primary flexor tendons repair in zone 2].

    PubMed

    Bellemère, P; Ardouin, L

    2014-12-01

    Primary flexor tendon repair is still challenging even in the most experienced hands. With atraumatic surgery, the goal is to suture the tendon in a way that it will be strong enough to allow for tendon gliding without the risk of rupture or adhesions during the 12 weeks needed for the tendon to heal. After reviewing the zone 2 anatomy, the authors describe the state of art for flexor tendon repair along with their personal preferences. Although suture methods and postoperative rehabilitation programs are not universal, most specialized teams now use multistrand suturing techniques with at least 4 stands along with protected and controlled early active mobilization. Although the published rates of failure of the repair or postoperative adhesions with stiffness have decreased, these complications are still a concern. They will continue to pose a challenge for scientists performing research into the mechanics and biology of flexor tendon repairs, especially in zone 2.

  20. Flexor Tendon Pulley Injuries in Rock Climbers.

    PubMed

    King, Elizabeth A; Lien, John R

    2017-02-01

    Closed pulley ruptures are rare in the general population but occur more frequently in rock climbers due to biomechanical demands on the hand. Injuries present with pain and swelling over the affected pulley, and patients may feel or hear a pop at the time of injury. Sequential pulley ruptures are required for clinical bowstringing of the flexor tendons. Ultrasound confirms diagnosis of pulley rupture and evaluates degree of displacement of the flexor tendons. Isolated pulley ruptures frequently are treated conservatively with early functional rehabilitation. Sequential pulley ruptures require surgical reconstruction. Most climbers are able to return to their previous activity level.

  1. Acute flexor tendon repairs in zone II.

    PubMed

    Coats, Robert W; Echevarría-Oré, Julio C; Mass, Daniel P

    2005-05-01

    Flexor tendon repair in zone II is still a technically demanding procedure, but the outcomes have become more predictable and satisfying. Of keystone importance for obtaining the goals of normal strength and gliding of repaired flexor tendons are an atraumatic surgical technique, an appropriate suture material, a competent pulley system, and the use of early motion rehabilitation protocols. The overall goal of hand and finger function also implies timely addressing of neurovascular injuries. New devices such as the TenoFix (Ortheon Medical; Winter Park, Florida) have shown adequate strength in the laboratory but are bulky and untested for work of flexion. Insufficient clinical data and high cost may prevent widespread use.

  2. Friction between finger flexor tendons and the pulley system in the crimp grip position.

    PubMed

    Moor, Beat K; Nagy, Ladislav; Snedeker, Jess G; Schweizer, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of the finger flexor tendon pulleys are the most often occurring injury in rock climbers due to bowstringing of tendons during crimp grip position. The aim of this study was to quantify friction between the flexor tendons and pulleys and the influence of high load and speed of movement as a potential factor of pulley disruption. Friction between the flexor tendons and pulleys of eight human cadaver fingers was indirectly determined using an isokinetic movement device. During flexion and extension movement with rotational speed from 30 to 210 deg/s in the proximal interphalangeal joint and with load from 20 to 100 N to the flexor tendons the flexion force at the tip of the finger was measured. With 40 N loaded flexor tendons the force at the fingertip was 14.5 N (SD1.5) during extension and 12.6N (SD1.3) during flexion movement. Corresponding force difference of 12.9% and 3.77 N (SD0.6) force of friction can be calculated. Friction peaked at 85.8 degrees (SD2.05) of flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint. Different speed of motion and load to the flexor tendons did not influence force difference other than linear. Considerable friction between flexor tendons and pulleys is apparent and therefore may have an influence on pulley injuries. Particularly during the crimp grip position where the proximal interphalangeal joint is flexed about 90 degrees shows the greatest amount of friction. However there was no change of friction during high speed motion and no other than linear increase during high load.

  3. Plantar flexor moment arm and muscle volume predict torque-generating capacity in young men.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Josh R; Piazza, Stephen J

    2014-03-01

    Muscle volume is known to correlate with maximal joint torque in humans, but the role of muscle moment arm in determining maximal torque is less clear. Moderate correlations have been reported between maximal isometric knee extensor torque and knee extensor moment arm, but no such observations have been made for the ankle joint. It has been suggested that smaller muscle moment arms may enhance force generation at high rates of joint rotation, but this has not yet been observed for ankle muscles in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to correlate plantar flexor moment arm and plantar flexor muscle volume with maximal plantar flexor torque measured at different rates of plantar flexion. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify the plantar flexor moment arm and muscle volume of the posterior compartment in 20 healthy young men. Maximal plantar flexor torque was measured isometrically and at three plantar flexion speeds using an isokinetic dynamometer. Plantar flexor torque was significantly correlated with muscle volume (0.222 < R(2) < 0.322) and with muscle moment arm at each speed (0.323 < R(2) < 0.494). While muscle volume was strongly correlated with body mass and stature, moment arm was not. The slope of the torque-moment arm regression line decreased as the rate of joint rotation increased, indicating that subjects with small moment arms experienced smaller reductions in torque at high speeds. The findings of this study suggest that plantar flexor moment arm is a determinant of joint strength that is at least as important as muscle size.

  4. Sensory-motor equivalence: manual aiming in C6 tetraplegics following musculotendinous transfer surgery at the elbow.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark A; Hayes, Spencer J; Bennett, Simon J; Barton, Gabor J; Elliott, Digby

    2010-09-01

    Cervical spinal lesions at C6 result in paralysis of the triceps brachii while leaving deltoid and elbow flexor function intact. We examined the spatial-temporal characteristics of goal-directed aiming movements performed by C6 tetraplegics who had undergone musculotendinous transfer surgery in which the posterior deltoid replaces the triceps as the elbow extensor. On some trials, liquid crystal goggles were used to eliminate vision of the limb and target upon movement initiation. Although tetraplegic participants achieved the same degree of movement accuracy/consistency as control participants, their movement times were longer regardless of whether the movements were made away from (elbow extension) or towards the body (elbow flexion). Longer movement times were related to lower peak velocities, and not the symmetry of the aiming profiles. The tetraplegic participants were no more dependent on visual feedback for limb regulation than control participants. Although the characteristics of the movement trajectories were surprisingly similar, in both vision conditions, tetraplegics required more real and proportional time to reduce spatial variability in the limb's trajectory for elbow extensions. Our results indicate that the sensorimotor system is adaptable and that the representations governing limb control are not muscle specific.

  5. Lateral epicondylitis of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Tosti, Rick; Jennings, John; Sewards, J Milo

    2013-04-01

    Lateral epicondylitis, or "tennis elbow," is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Repetitive occupational or athletic activities involving wrist extension and supination are thought to be causative. The typical symptoms include lateral elbow pain, pain with wrist extension, and weakened grip strength. The diagnosis is made clinically through history and physical examination; however, a thorough understanding of the differential diagnosis is imperative to prevent unnecessary testing and therapies. Most patients improve with nonoperative measures, such as activity modification, physical therapy, and injections. A small percentage of patients will require surgical release of the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon. Common methods of release may be performed via percutaneous, arthroscopic, or open approaches.

  6. Elbow arthroscopy for posttraumatic arthrosis.

    PubMed

    Geib, Timothy M; Savoie, Felix H

    2009-01-01

    Posttraumatic stiffness is a common complication after injury to the elbow. The loss of motion may significantly limit an individual's ability to perform normal activities of daily living. If conservative measures including medication, physical therapy, static splinting, and selective injection fail to restore functional range of motion, surgical intervention may be warranted. Open procedures have been described with reasonable success in restoring motion. However, arthroscopic techniques may provide several advantages in these patients who have often undergone previous extensive open surgery.

  7. Modulation of cutaneous flexor responses induced in man by vibration-elicited proprioceptive or exteroceptive inputs.

    PubMed

    Martin, B J; Roll, J P; Hugon, M

    1990-10-01

    The effects of muscle tendon or skin vibration on the early and late components of polyphasic cutaneous responses elicited in the flexor carpi radialis by electrical stimulation of the radial nerve at the wrist were studied in the human, with all muscles at rest. Both early and late flexor responses were enhanced by flexor vibration and depressed by extensor vibration; facilitation was accompanied by a reduction of latency. Furthermore, when an "antagonist vibration response" was present, inhibition of the flexor reflexes was replaced by a facilitation. Palm skin vibration depressed both components of the flexor reflex, while dorsal or "back-hand" skin vibration induced either a facilitation or an inhibition. In addition, back-hand vibration modified the location of the sensations evoked by electrical stimulation of the nerve. In all cases, vibratory stimulus attenuated the perceived intensity of the electrical stimulus. These observations indicate that proprioceptive or exteroceptive information can modulate the gain of the cutaneous reflex loops in a flexible way, under supraspinal control. These data also suggest a possible impairment of the protective withdrawal reflex under vibratory environmental conditions at rest and eventually in active muscles.

  8. [Flexor tendon pulley system: anatomy, pathology, treatment].

    PubMed

    Moutet, F

    2003-02-01

    Flexor tendon pulley has been very early noticed and described. Terminology usually accepted recognizes 6 arcifom pulleys (A0 to A5) and 3 cruciform pulleys (C1 to C3). Anatomy and physiology of this flexor tendon gliding and reflection system at the level of the digital sheet are exposed. The integrity necessity of this system became obvious regarding the flexor tendons repair. Four main pathologies may be concerned: the trigger finger congenital or progressive, due to a chondroid metaplasia of the A1 pulley; tenosynovial ganglions arising at the weak point between A1 and A2 pulley; lesions of the flexor tendon sheet during traumatic lacerations or surgical repairs; quite experimental lesions creating isolated ruptures of one or several pulleys which occur during sport practice, especially high level rock climbing. The repair techniques are exposed to allow to graduate and hierarchy the reparation technique regarding the pathology. A2 and A4 repair is always indicated. The best reconstruction material is an extensor retinaculum graft. But its poor surface available often draws to use conventional palmaris longus free graft.

  9. The elbow: diagnosis and treatment of common injuries.

    PubMed

    Sellards, Robb; Kuebrich, Chris

    2005-03-01

    This article deals with common injuries to the elbow. Elbow anatomy is reviewed. Diagnosis and treatment of pronator syndrome,lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow), radial tunnel syndrome, posterior interosseous nerve syndrome, medial epicondylitis (golfer's elbow), ulnar collateral ligament injury, cubital tunnel syndrome,posterolateral rotatory instability, distal biceps injuries, tricepstendon injuries, and posterior elbow impingement are discussed.

  10. Intercostal nerve crossing to restore elbow flexion and sensibility of the hand for a root avulsion type of brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Ogino, T; Naito, T

    1995-01-01

    Ten patients with a root avulsion type of brachial plexus injury were treated with simultaneous intercostal nerve crossing to the musculocutaneous and median nerves, and nine cases were followed for more than 40 months. The average interval from injury to surgery was 2.7 months. The average age at operation was 18.6 years. The elbow flexor was M4 in six patients, M3 in two patients, and M1 in one patient. The wrist flexor was more than M3 in six patients and less than M2 in four patients. The finger flexor was more than M3 in four patients and less than M2 in five patients. Protective sensation in the areas innervated by the musculocutaneous and median nerves was restored in all cases.

  11. DESIGN OF AN ELECTRICALLY POWERED PROSTHETIC ELBOW.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The electrically powered elbow design effort was initiated to develop a useful prosthetic component for severely handicapped persons. Preliminary...minimum static capacity of 300 pound-inches, and a no-load lifting velocity of ten revolutions per minute. In addition, the elbow was to provide continuous...the design criteria were not fulfilled but several elbow units were built for clinical evaluation. Recommendations for future design efforts are given. (Author)

  12. Surgical management of posttraumatic elbow arthrofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ehsan, Amirhesam; Huang, Jerry I; Lyons, Matt; Hanel, Douglas P

    2012-05-01

    Functional loss of motion is a frequent complication after elbow trauma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of open elbow release in restoring functional elbow motion. A retrospective chart review of 177 adult patients who underwent open elbow release at our institution by the senior surgeon (D.P.H.) from 2003 to 2010 was performed. Seventy-seven of the elbow contracture releases were performed for posttraumatic elbow stiffness, with loss of flexion-extension. Burns and isolated proximal radioulnar exostosis resections were excluded. The mean age of patients was 45 years (range, 20-76 years), with 68 patients demonstrating radiographic evidence of heterotopic ossification (HO). The mean preoperative flexion-extension arc was 51 degrees. All patients were treated with the same surgical protocol, which included circumferential elbow capsulectomy, HO excision, hardware removal, and ulnar nerve neurolysis with submuscular anterior transposition. At a mean follow-up of 12 months (range, 3-56 months), the mean elbow flexion-extension arc was 109 degrees representing a mean gain of 58 degrees. Sixty-nine percent (53 of 77 patients) achieved a minimum 100-degree functional elbow arc of motion. Six patients (8%) developed recurrent HO, with four undergoing secondary HO excision. One additional patient required manipulation under anesthesia in the early postoperative period. Complications included five infections, one postoperative fracture, one postoperative hematoma, and one radial head implant loosening. Open elbow contracture release and HO excision is an effective means of restoring functional elbow range of motion with a low complication rate. Furthermore, recurrent HO formation and elbow arthrofibrosis respond well to repeat surgical excision and contracture release. IV, therapeutic study.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kathryn J

    2010-05-01

    Elbow pain is frequently encountered in clinical practice and can result in significant morbidity, particularly in athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent diagnostic imaging tool for the evaluation of soft tissue and osteochondral pathology around the elbow. Recent advances in magnetic field strength and coil design have lead to improved spatial resolution and superior soft tissue contrast, making it ideal for visualization of complex joint anatomy. This article describes the normal imaging appearances of anatomy around the elbow and reviews commonly occurring ligamentous, myotendinous, neural, and bursal pathology around the elbow.

  14. Changes in motor cortical excitability during human muscle fatigue.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J L; Butler, J E; Allen, G M; Gandevia, S C

    1996-01-01

    1. The excitability of the motor cortex was investigated during fatiguing con of the elbow flexors in human subjects. During sustained contractions at 30 and 1 voluntary force (MVC), the short-latency electromyographic responses (EMG) evoke brachii and brachioradialis by transcranial magnetic stimulation increased in si EMG in the elbow flexors following the evoked muscle potential (silent period), duration during a sustained MVC but not during 30% MVCs nor during a sustained M muscle (adductor pollicis). 2. When the blood supply to brachioradialis was blocked with sphygmomanometer cuff sustained MVC, the changes in EMG responses to transcranial stimulation rapidly control values, This suggests that changes in these responses during fatigue wer small-diameter muscle afferents. 3. Tendon vibration during sustained MVCs indicated that the changes in the resp cortial stimulation were not mediated by reduced muscle spindle inputs. 4. Muscle action potentials evoked in brachioradialis by electrical stimulation cervicomedullary junction did not increase in size during sustained MVCs. Thus, cortically evoked responses during sustained MVCs reflects a change in cortical Although the silent period following cervicomedullary stimulation lengthened, it substantially shorter than the cortically evoked silent period. 5. The altered EMG responses to transcranial stimulation during fatigue suggest exitation and increased inhibition in the motor cortex. As these changes were un manipulation of afferent input they presumably result from intrinsic cortical pr altered voluntary drive to the motor cortex. Images Figure 1 PMID:8821148

  15. Flexor Tendon Sheath Engineering Using Decellularized Porcine Pericardium.

    PubMed

    Megerle, Kai; Woon, Colin; Kraus, Armin; Raghavan, Shyam; Pham, Hung; Chang, James

    2016-10-01

    The flexor tendon sheath is an ideal target for tissue engineering because it is difficult to reconstruct by conventional surgical methods. The authors hypothesized that decellularized porcine pericardium can be used as a scaffold for engineering a biologically active tendon sheath. The authors' protocol removed cellular material from the pericardium and preserved the structural architecture in addition to the collagen and glycosaminoglycan content. The scaffold was successfully reseeded with human sheath synoviocytes and human adipose-derived stem cells. Cells were evaluated for 8 weeks after reseeding. The reseeded construct demonstrated continuous production of hyaluronic acid, the main component of synovial fluid. After being seeded on the membrane, adipose-derived stem cells demonstrated down-regulation of collagen I and III and up-regulation of hyaluronan synthase 2. The results indicate that decellularized porcine pericardium may be a potential scaffold for engineering a biologically active human tendon sheath.

  16. Effects of apomorphine on flexor reflex and periodic limb movement.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Guillermo; Khan, Farooq; Chen, Robert

    2002-05-01

    It has been suggested that periodic leg movements (PLM) and spinal flexor reflex (FR) share common mechanisms. Although dopaminergic agents improve PLM in humans and strongly influence spinal FR circuitry in animal studies, its effects on FR have not been documented in humans. We describe a 65-year-old man with PLM after overnight withdrawal of dopaminergic agents. The electromyographic pattern of spontaneous PLM closely resembled that of the FR elicited by medial plantar nerve stimulation. Thirty minutes after subcutaneous injection of apomorphine, both PLM and FR were completely abolished. These findings demonstrate that dopaminergic agents can suppress exaggerated FR in humans, and support the hypothesis of common mechanisms for PLM and FR.

  17. Salvage of elbow function in chronic complex elbow fracture dislocation with total elbow arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Muthu; Foead, Agus Iwan; Ali, Anuar Bin; Devadasan, Benard

    2013-08-01

    In patients with an elbow fracture dislocation the incidence of radial head fracture is 36%, where as coronoid process fractures occur in 13%, and olecranon fractures in 4% of patients. Combination of all these fractures with a 'terrible triad' is rarely reported in the literature. We describe a 40 year old lady involved in a polytrauma who had head injury, pnuemothorax and an open fracture dislocation of the left elbow. The Injury Severity Score initially on admission was 44. She presented with chronic elbow instability with pain 1 year later. A semi constrained total elbow arthroplasty (TEA) with a Coonrad-Morrey prosthesis was performed in this complex injury involving fractures of the coronoid, olecranon, proximal third of the ulna and radial head malunion with heterotrophic ossification around the elbow joint. Although the survivorship of total elbow replacements has improved, it is still a procedure reserved to older patients with low functional demand. At 1-year follow-up, the patient had full range in flexion and extension. The Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) was 100. TEA is a procedure which gains function and stability in a terrible triad elbow.

  18. [Secondary replacement operations for reconstruction of elbow joint function after lesion of the brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Berger, A; Hierner, R; Becker, M H

    1997-07-01

    Elbow flexion plays a key role in the overall function of the upper extremity. In the case of unilateral complete brachial plexus lesion, restoration of elbow flexion will dramatically increase the patient's chances of regaining bimanual prehension. Furthermore, depending on the type of reconstruction, stability of the glenohumeral joint as well as some supination function of the forearm can be restored to a varying degree at the same time. Depending on the level of brachial plexus lesion and/or reinnervation, different reconstructive procedures are available. In order to select the best treatment option for the patient it is necessary to known the extent of the lesion of the brachial plexus and/or ventral upper arm muscles, to time the operation appropriately, to be aware of all treatment possibilities and to recall the special problems of tendon transfer for brachial plexus patients. Our concept is based on our experience with more than 1100 patients presenting a brachial plexus lesion between 1981 and 1996 and treated in our institution. There were 528 operative revisions of the brachial plexus. Some 225 patients underwent secondary muscle/tendon transfers. In 35 patients elbow flexion was reconstructed by bipolar latissimus dorsi transfer (n = 10), triceps-to-biceps transfer (n = 15), modified flexor/pronator muscle mass proximalization (n = 6) and the multiple-stage free functional muscle transfer after intercostal nerve transfer (n = 4).

  19. Pseudoelastic Nitinol-Based Device for Relaxation of Spastic Elbow in Stroke Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viscuso, S.; Pittaccio, S.; Caimmi, M.; Gasperini, G.; Pirovano, S.; Villa, E.; Besseghini, S.; Molteni, F.

    2009-08-01

    A compliant brace (EDGES) promoting spastic elbow relaxation was designed to investigate the potentialities of pseudoelastic NiTi in orthotics. By exploiting its peculiar characteristics, EDGES could improve elbow posture without constraining movements and thus avoiding any pain to the patient. A commercial Ni50.7-Ti49.3 alloy heat treated at 400 °C 1 h + WQ was selected for this application. A prototype of EDGES was assembled with two thermoplastic shells connected by polycentric hinges. Four 2-mm-diameter NiTi bars were encastred in the upper-arm shell and let slide along tubular fixtures on the forearm. Specially designed bending tests demonstrated suitable moment-angle characteristics. Two post-stroke subjects (aged 62 and 64, mild elbow flexors spasticity) wore EDGES for 1 week, at least 10 h a day. No additional treatment was applied during this period or the following week. A great improvement (20° ± 5°) of the resting position was observed in both patients as early as 3 h after starting the treatment. Acceptability was very good. A slight decrease in spasticity was also observed in both subjects. All the effects disappeared 1 week after discontinuation. EDGES appears to be a good alternative to traditional orthoses in terms of acceptability and effectiveness in improving posture, especially whenever short-term splinting is planned.

  20. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE USAMBRL ELECTRIC ELBOW.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A laboratory evaluation was conducted on the United States Army Medical Biomechanical Research Laboratory’s electric elbow including cyclic and...functional tests. During the course of this evaluation a number of deficiencies were revealed; however, the overall results were acceptable. Finally, by introducing some modifications the elbow was considerably improved. (Author)

  1. Tee shirt management of nursemaid's elbow.

    PubMed

    Kohlhaas, A R; Roeder, J

    1995-01-01

    Subluxation of the radial head, or "nursemaid's elbow," is a common injury among children aged 1 to 4 years. The authors present a technique for flexed-elbow stabilization designed especially for very young children, which provides adequate immobilization without the use of a sling.

  2. Recurrent elbow dislocation--an uncommon presentation.

    PubMed

    Sunderamoorthy, D; Smith, A; Woods, D A

    2005-09-01

    A 58 year old female attended our A&E department following a fall in the garden with swelling and bruising of the right arm and the elbow. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were interpreted as showing a normal elbow joint. A diagnosis of soft tissue injury to the elbow was made and the patient was discharged with advice. She returned 2 days later, did not have an x ray, and again given advice. Three weeks later she was referred back to A&E by the general practitioner with persistent swelling of the elbow. Further radiographs showed a posterolateral dislocation of the elbow. The elbow was reduced under sedation but was subsequently dislocated at follow up, and was treated by external fixator and transolecranon pin. The fixator was removed at 4 weeks and the elbow was then stable. This case highlights that recurrent elbow dislocations due to significant ligament injuries can present in joint and subsequently dislocate. A high index of suspicion is necessary and appropriate referral to the specialist must be made to avoid the morbidity associated with recurrent dislocation. It also emphasises the need to always assess the patient on his or her own merits despite previously normal investigations.

  3. Pediatric elbow arthroscopy: indications and safety.

    PubMed

    Andelman, Steven M; Meier, Kristen M; Walsh, Amanda L; Kim, Joung Heon; Hausman, Michael R

    2017-10-01

    Elbow arthroscopy is a minimally invasive means by which to treat a variety of acute and chronic elbow conditions. Although the safety and efficacy is well documented in the adult population, comparatively little information is available about the role of elbow arthroscopy in the pediatric population. This study reports the indications for and safety of elbow arthroscopy in a series of pediatric patients. A retrospective review was performed from 2001 to 2015 of a surgical database at a single institution. All elbow arthroscopies performed in patients aged 18 years and younger were reviewed. Indications for surgery, perioperative and postoperative complications, further surgical intervention, and descriptive demographic information were recorded. We identified 64 elbow arthroscopic procedures in 59 patients. The average age at the time of surgery was 11.8 years. Indications for the arthroscopic surgery included contracture release (45.3%), closed reduction and fixation for fracture (20.3%), treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (20.3%), diagnostic arthroscopy (7.8%), and débridement (6.3%). The overall complication rate was 17.2%, with a major and minor complication rate of 6.3% and 10.9%, respectively. Elbow arthroscopy has applications in the pediatric population with an acceptable safety profile. The techniques and indications continue to evolve. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Humeral windows in revision total elbow arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Peach, Chris A; Salama, Amir; Stanley, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of cortical windows for revision elbow arthroplasty has not previously been widely reported. Their use aids safe revision of a well fixed humeral prosthesis and can be used in the setting of dislocation, periprosthetic fracture or aseptic loosening of the ulnar component. We describe our technique and results of cortical windows in the distal humerus for revision elbow arthroplasty surgery.

  5. Unilateral congenital elbow luxation in a dachshund

    PubMed Central

    Fafard, Alain R.

    2006-01-01

    Congenital elbow luxation was diagnosed in a 12-week-old, intact male, dachshund with a lateral elbow prominence and mild lameness of the right forelimb. Closed reduction of the radial head, ulnar ostectomy, and external stabilization of the joint were performed. Function was returned to the limb, but radial head and ulnar subluxation persisted. PMID:17017659

  6. Lateral epicondylitis of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Vaquero-Picado, Alfonso; Barco, Raul; Antuña, Samuel A

    2016-11-01

    Lateral epicondylitis, also known as 'tennis elbow', is a very common condition affecting mainly middle-aged patients.The pathogenesis remains unknown but there appears to be a combination of local tendon pathology, alteration in pain perception and motor impairment.The diagnosis is usually clinical but some patients may benefit from additional imaging for a specific differential diagnosis.The disease has a self-limiting course of between 12 and 18 months, but in some patients, symptoms can be persistent and refractory to treatment.Most patients are well-managed with non-operative treatment and activity modification. Many surgical techniques have been proposed for patients with refractory symptoms.New non-operative treatment alternatives with promising results have been developed in recent years. Cite this article: Vaquero-Picado A, Barco R, Antuña SA. Lateral epicondylitis of the elbow. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:391-397. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000049.

  7. Surgery of the rheumatoid elbow.

    PubMed Central

    Souter, W A

    1990-01-01

    I suggest that for too long the problem of the rheumatoid elbow, particularly the need for surgical intervention, has been underestimated. Where the latter has been advocated the philosophy has been adopted that synovectomy and debridement with excision of the head of the radius is probably all that is required, or that in the late case excision arthroplasty may yield an adequate result. I suggest that these approaches are no longer tenable. Synovectomy and debridement with or without excision of the head of the radius does indeed retain an extremely valuable place in the management of stage 1, 2, and early stage 3 disease. In the later stages of the disease, however, serious consideration must now be given to total joint replacement, the results of which can be remarkably successful and durable, and the complications from which can now be contained within acceptable limits provided that the operating team is fully experienced. It must also be stressed how necessary it is in the medical or combined clinic to pursue careful clinical and radiological monitoring of the rheumatoid elbow so that signs of dangerous deterioration can be recognised early, and surgery applied at a time when optimal conditions for the particular surgical weapons to be used still exist. Images PMID:2241304

  8. Biomechanics of the elbow in sports.

    PubMed

    Loftice, Jeremy; Fleisig, Glenn S; Zheng, Nigel; Andrews, James R

    2004-10-01

    In throwing activities, the elbow is sometimes stressed to its biomechanical limits. In this article, forces, torques, angular velocities, and muscle activity about the elbow are reviewed for the baseball pitch, the football pass, the javelin throw, the windmill softball pitch, the tennis serve, and the golf swing. The elbow goes through rapid extension in baseball pitching (about 2400 degrees/s) and rapid flexion in the javelin throw (about 1900 degrees/s). During baseball pitching, the elbow joint is subject to a valgus torque reaching 64 Nm, and requires proximal forces as high as 1000 N to prevent elbow distraction. The ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) rupture in baseball pitching, lateral epicondylitis in the tennis backhand, and other injury mechanisms are also discussed.

  9. History and examination of the thrower's elbow.

    PubMed

    Cain, E Lyle; Dugas, Jeffrey R

    2004-10-01

    Overhead throwing motion imparts enormous forces on the elbow. Repetitive near-failure loads lead to chronic adaptive changes and occasionally acute injury to bone, ligaments, and the elbow's muscle-tendon complexes. Physicians treating the thrower must thoroughly understand the complex anatomy and function of the elbow joint and throwing biomechanics to diagnose and treat elbow pathology. Evaluation of elbow pain begins with a thorough, detailed throwing history, including symptom duration, location of pain, timing during phases of throwing motion, and associated symptoms. Physical examination should include inspection, range of motion, palpation, and specific tests to better define the pathology. A detailed history and physical examination often lead the astute clinician to the proper diagnosis and treatment without reliance on ancillary testing.

  10. Ultrasonographic Differentiation of Lateral Elbow Pain

    PubMed Central

    Obuchowicz, R.; Bonczar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral elbow pain is often attributed to degenerative or posttraumatic impairment of the common extensor tendon. Ultrasonography assesses the soft tissue structures of the lateral elbow, allowing the differentiation between various underlying processes, including angiofibroblastic degeneration, hyaline degeneration, and inflammation, and exclusion of other possible causes of pain such as posterior interosseous and lateral antebrachial nerve compression. Furthermore, the real-time imaging nature of ultrasonography enables the detection of impingement of the lateral synovial fold, degenerative changes in the elbow recess, and elbow posterolateral instability during dynamic maneuvers. Ultrasonography is widely accessible and well tolerated by patients, making it a perfect method for establishing an initial diagnosis and monitoring the healing process. This review describes the possible causes of lateral elbow pain and their ultrasonographic differentiation. PMID:27689169

  11. A biomechanical study of the flexor digitorum superficialis: effects of digital pulley excision and loss of the flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Hamman, J; Ali, A; Phillips, C; Cunningham, B; Mass, D P

    1997-03-01

    Many reports have been devoted to characterizing the significance of the pulleys for the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP). However, no comparable work has been published on the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS). This study characterized the FDS in a human cadaver model. Eleven fresh-frozen cadaver hands were used. By using a tensiometer, data were gathered for tendon excursion, tendon load, and work of flexion. Changes in efficiency were caused by excision of annular pulleys A1, A2, A3, and the palmar aponeurotic pulley. We also measured the effect of FDP excision on FDS efficiency. Sectioning of the A2 and A3 pulleys together caused statistically significant losses of efficiency in all three parameters (work, load, and excursion). When the FDP was removed from a finger with an intact pulley system, losses in both work and excursion efficiencies were significant. Removing the FDP while cutting different pulleys caused significant decrease in FDS excursion efficiency. We conclude that A2 and A3 are the most important pulleys for maintaining normal FDS function, and that the presence of the FDP in the digital sheath is essential for optimal FDS excursion efficiency.

  12. Impact of physiotherapy on the functional status of elbow and knee joints and quality of life in patients with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Wojna, Dorota; Anwajler, Joanna; Mladzka, Irena; Ostrowska, Bozena; Skolimowski, Tadeusz

    2006-06-30

    Background. The objective of our research was to assess the impact of physiotherapy on the frequency of intraarticular and intramuscular hemorrhages and on elbow and knee joint function, in hemophilic patients. Material and methods. We examined 22 boys, 6-14 years of age, suffering from hemophilia A. The research program included patient history in respect to intraarticular hemorrhages in elbows and knees before therapy, observation of intra-articular bleeding during physiotherapy, goniometric measurements of the range of movement in the elbow and knee, measurement of the circumference of the arm, forearm, thigh and calf, and momentum dynamometric measurements of the relative and absolute force of the flexors and extensors of the lower leg at the knee joints and of the forearm at the elbow joints, in static conditions. The treatment program included deficit coagulant agent replacement therapy, physiotherapy, and kinesitherapy. Results. The physiotherapy program we applied resulted in a considerable improvement in mobility, as well as increased muscle strength and mass. Conclusions. Our research showed that, due to the application of the appropriate replacement treatment, there was a decrease in the frequency and size of intraarticular hemorrhages, despite intense rehabilitation and physical activity.

  13. Elbow Position Affects Distal Radioulnar Joint Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Eric; Li, Guoan; Souer, Sebastiaan; Lozano-Calderon, Santiago; Herndon, James H.; Jupiter, Jesse B.; Chen, Neal C.

    2009-01-01

    Previous in vivo and in vitro studies of forearm supination/pronation suggest that distal radioulnar joint kinematics may be affected by elbow flexion. The primary hypotheses tested by this study were that in vivo: 1) ulnar variance changes with elbow flexion and forearm rotation and 2) the arc of forearm rotation changes in relationship to elbow flexion. Materials and Methods Changes in radioulnar kinematics during forearm supination/pronation and elbow flexion (0–90°) were studied in five uninjured subjects using computed tomography, dual-orthogonal fluoroscopy, and three-dimensional modeling. Analysis of variance and post-hoc testing was performed. Results Proximal translation of the radius was greatest with the elbow flexed to 90° with the arm in mid-pronation. With the arm in mid-pronation, the translation of the radius was significantly greater at 0° versus 45° of elbow flexion (0.82 ± 0.59 mm v. 0.65 ± 0.80 mm, F: 4.49, Post Hoc: 0.055; p = 0.05), and significantly smaller at 45° versus 90° of elbow flexion (0.65 ± 0.80 mm v. 0.97 ± 0.35 mm, F: 4.49, Post Hoc: 0.048; p = 0.05). Proximal translation of the radius in mid-pronation was significantly greater than when the forearm was in a supinated position when the elbow was at 0° or 90° flexion (F: 14.90, post-hoc: < 0.01; p < 0.01, F: 19.11, post-hoc: < 0.01, p < 0.01). The arc of forearm rotation was significantly decreased at 0° compared to 90° of elbow flexion (129.3 ± 22.2° v 152.8 ± 14.4°, F: 3.29, post-hoc: 0.79; p = 0.09). The center of rotation shifted volarly and ulnarly with increasing elbow extension. Discussion Elbow position affects the kinematics of the distal radioulnar joint. The kinematics of the distal radioulnar joint are primarily affected by forearm rotation and secondarily affected by elbow flexion. These findings have clinical relevance to our understanding of ulnar impaction, and how elbow position affects the proximal-distal translation of the radius. These

  14. Post-traumatic elbow rotational stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Samuel KK; Faan, Yan Sui; Lui, Paulina WY; Ngai, Wai Kit

    2014-01-01

    Background The elbow is an important but complex structure, with movement in both the sagittal plane in flexion and extension, as well as the rotational plane in forearm supination and pronation. Trauma is a common cause of elbow stiffness, which significantly hampers daily function. There are currently no gold-standard management guidelines for post-traumatic elbow stiffness, and most of the published literature focuses solely on the sagittal plane of motion. Methods This is a retrospective case series reviewing all patients who underwent a surgical release for treatment of post-traumatic elbow stiffness during a 36-month period. Motion range and the shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores were serially measured and analyzed. Results The results obtained showed that both the sagittal and rotational range of motion directly influenced upper limb function; however, the relationship between these two motion planes was weak, meaning that both sagittal and rotational motion in the elbow need be addressed individually. Post-traumatic elbow stiffness could be aptly managed by various surgical approaches, including arthroscopic-assisted procedures; these were all effective in increasing both the sagittal and rotational range of motion. More importantly, this gain in range translated to a statistically significant improvement in upper limb function. Conclusions Management of elbow stiffness needs to be tackled in both the sagittal and rotational motion planes. PMID:27582925

  15. High temperature lined conduits, elbows and tees

    DOEpatents

    De Feo, Angelo; Drewniany, Edward

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature lined conduit comprising, a liner, a flexible insulating refractory blanket around and in contact with the liner, a pipe member around the blanket and spaced therefrom, and castable rigid refractory material between the pipe member and the blanket. Anchors are connected to the inside diameter of the pipe and extend into the castable material. The liner includes male and female slip joint ends for permitting thermal expansion of the liner with respect to the castable material and the pipe member. Elbows and tees of the lined conduit comprise an elbow liner wrapped with insulating refractory blanket material around which is disposed a spaced elbow pipe member with castable refractory material between the blanket material and the elbow pipe member. A reinforcing band is connected to the elbow liner at an intermediate location thereon from which extend a plurality of hollow tubes or pins which extend into the castable material to anchor the lined elbow and permit thermal expansion. A method of fabricating the high temperature lined conduit, elbows and tees is also disclosed which utilizes a polyethylene layer over the refractory blanket after it has been compressed to maintain the refractory blanket in a compressed condition until the castable material is in place. Hot gases are then directed through the interior of the liner for evaporating the polyethylene and setting the castable material which permits the compressed blanket to come into close contact with the castable material.

  16. Spontaneous "spaghetti" flexor tendon ruptures in the rheumatoid wrist.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keiichiro; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Inoue, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman who had been treated for rheumatoid arthritis for 12 years developed spontaneous multiple flexor tendon ruptures during a 5-month period. Radiography revealed volar subluxation of the lunate bone. Surgery was performed 5 months after the first onset of tendon rupture. All eight flexors, except the flexor pollicis longus tendons, had ruptured, and the damage resembled spaghetti. Four flexor digitorum profundus tendons were reconstructed by bridge graft using their respective sublimis tendons. Wrist joint fusion and tenolysis were performed 3 months after the first operation. Each finger achieved a good range of motion 2 years and 6 months after the second operation.

  17. Flexor tendon tissue engineering: acellularized and reseeded tendon constructs.

    PubMed

    Chong, Alphonsus K S; Riboh, Jonathan; Smith, R Lane; Lindsey, Derek P; Pham, Hung M; Chang, James

    2009-06-01

    Tissue engineering of flexor tendons requires scaffolds with adequate strength and biocompatibility. The biomechanical properties of acellularized and reseeded flexor tendon scaffolds are unknown. Acellularized tendons and reseeded constructs were tested to determine whether the treatment process had altered their biomechanical properties. Rabbit flexor tendons were acellularized using a freeze-thaw cycle followed by trypsin and Triton-X treatment. Complete acellularization of the tendon samples was confirmed by histology and by attempting to obtain viable cells by trypsin treatment of acellularized tendon. Reseeded constructs were obtained by incubating acellularized tendons in a tenocyte suspension. Tensile testing was performed to compare the ultimate tensile stress and elastic modulus of acellularized tendons and reseeded flexor tendon constructs to control flexor tendons. The treatment protocol successfully acellularized flexor tendons. No cells were seen within the tendon on histologic assessment, and no viable cells could be obtained from acellularized tendon. Acellularized tendon was successfully reseeded with tenocytes, although cell adhesion was limited to the surface of the tendon scaffold. Tensile testing showed that acellularized tendon had the same ultimate stress and elastic modulus as normal tendons. Reseeded tendons had the same elastic modulus as normal tendons, but hind-paw tendon constructs showed a decrease in ultimate stress compared with normal tendons (50.09 MPa versus 66.01 MPa, p = 0.026). Acellularized flexor tendons are a potential high-strength scaffold for flexor tendon tissue engineering. This approach of acellularization and reseeding of flexor tendons may provide additional intrasynovial graft material for hand reconstruction.

  18. Rupture of all digital flexors following Colles' fracture.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Srinivasan; Basu, Indraneil; Kaba, Rahim; Pabari, Amit

    2012-10-01

    Flexor tendon rupture following a Colles' fracture is a rare complication with only a handful of cases reported since the initial report in 1932. We present a case in which all digital flexor tendons ruptured within 6 months of a Colles' fracture. Previous reported cases have demonstrated rupture of either the radial or ulnar digital flexors but this case is the first in which all the digital flexors have been involved. This case report highlights the clinical implications of this rare occurrence and stresses the importance of accurate reduction and thorough clinical examination following bony injuries to the wrist.

  19. Lateral epicondylitis of the elbow

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Picado, Alfonso; Barco, Raul; Antuña, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral epicondylitis, also known as ‘tennis elbow’, is a very common condition affecting mainly middle-aged patients. The pathogenesis remains unknown but there appears to be a combination of local tendon pathology, alteration in pain perception and motor impairment. The diagnosis is usually clinical but some patients may benefit from additional imaging for a specific differential diagnosis. The disease has a self-limiting course of between 12 and 18 months, but in some patients, symptoms can be persistent and refractory to treatment. Most patients are well-managed with non-operative treatment and activity modification. Many surgical techniques have been proposed for patients with refractory symptoms. New non-operative treatment alternatives with promising results have been developed in recent years. Cite this article: Vaquero-Picado A, Barco R, Antuña SA. Lateral epicondylitis of the elbow. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:391-397. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000049. PMID:28461918

  20. LATERAL EPICONDYLITIS OF THE ELBOW.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Marcio; da Rocha Motta Filho, Geraldo

    2012-01-01

    Lateral epicondylitis, also known as tennis elbow, is a common condition that is estimated to affect 1% to 3% of the population. The word epicondylitis suggests inflammation, although histological analysis on the tissue fails to show any inflammatory process. The structure most commonly affected is the origin of the tendon of the extensor carpi radialis brevis and the mechanism of injury is associated with overloading. Nonsurgical treatment is the preferred method, and this includes rest, physiotherapy, cortisone infiltration, platelet-rich plasma injections and use of specific immobilization. Surgical treatment is recommended when functional disability and pain persist. Both the open and the arthroscopic surgical technique with resection of the degenerated tendon tissue present good results in the literature.

  1. LATERAL EPICONDYLITIS OF THE ELBOW

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Marcio; da Rocha Motta Filho, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Lateral epicondylitis, also known as tennis elbow, is a common condition that is estimated to affect 1% to 3% of the population. The word epicondylitis suggests inflammation, although histological analysis on the tissue fails to show any inflammatory process. The structure most commonly affected is the origin of the tendon of the extensor carpi radialis brevis and the mechanism of injury is associated with overloading. Nonsurgical treatment is the preferred method, and this includes rest, physiotherapy, cortisone infiltration, platelet-rich plasma injections and use of specific immobilization. Surgical treatment is recommended when functional disability and pain persist. Both the open and the arthroscopic surgical technique with resection of the degenerated tendon tissue present good results in the literature. PMID:27047843

  2. Outcomes evaluation of the athletic elbow.

    PubMed

    Freehill, Michael T; Mannava, Sandeep; Safran, Marc R

    2014-09-01

    The high-level athletic population poses difficulty when evaluating outcomes in orthopedic surgery, given generally good overall health and high function at baseline. Subtle differences in performance following injury or orthopedic surgery are hard to detect in high-performance athletes using standard outcome metrics; however, attaining these subtle improvements after injury or surgery are key to an athletes' livelihood. Outcome measures serve as the cornerstone for critical evaluation of clinical outcomes following orthopedic surgery or injury. In the age of "evidence-based medicine" and "pay-for-performance" accountability for surgical intervention, understanding clinically relevant outcome measures is essential for careful review of the published literature, as well as one's own critical review of surgical performance. The purpose of this manuscript is to evaluate clinical outcome measures in the context of the athletic elbow. An emphasis will be placed on evaluation of the 5 most clinically relevant outcome measures for sports-related elbow outcomes: (1) American Shoulder and Elbow Committee; (2) Mayo Elbow Performance Index; (3) Andrews-Timmerman [and its precursor the (4) Andrews-Carson]; and (5) Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic overhead athlete score. A final outcome measure that will be analyzed is "return to play" statistics, which has been published in various studies of athletes' recovery from elbow surgery, as well as, the outcomes metric known as the "Conway-Jobe scale." Although there is no perfect outcomes score for the athletic elbow, the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic score is the only outcomes tool developed and validated for outcomes for elbow injuries in the overhead athlete, as compared with the Andrew-Timmerman and Conway-Jobe metrics, which were not validated outcome measures for the elbow in this patient population. Despite the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, Hand (DASH) (and DASH-Sport module) being validated in the general population, this

  3. Pressure Loss in Ducts with Compound Elbows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-02-01

    Report LOSS IN DUCTS WITH COMPOUND ELBOWS By John R. Weske Case School of Applied Science NACA N A c JI LE&.lJ/J \\ 9 **Y @woti AERONAUT WASHINGTON...AEROHATJTICS ADVANCE RESTRICTED REPORT ● -. PRESWRE U)SS IN DUCTS WITH C-ND ELBOWS By John R; Weske SUMMARY . Results are presented of’measurmneut of the...pressure drop and, h some oases, of the velooity distribution in ocxupound elbows WRS undertaken for the purposo of furnishing to the designer of duetIng

  4. Finite Element Analysis of Pipe Elbows.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    AD-AO81 077 DAVD TAYLOR NAVAL SHIP RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CE--ETC F/B 13/11 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF PIPE ELBOWS .(U) FE SO M S MARCUS, B C...TAYLOR NAVAL SHIP i RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER Bethesda, Md. 20084 4 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF PIPE ELBOWS by 0 Melvyn S. Marcus and Gordon C...a 90-degree pipe elbow to determine principal stresses due to internal pressure, inplane bending, out-of-plane bending, and torsion moment loadings

  5. Irreducible posterolateral elbow dislocation: a rare injury.

    PubMed

    Fenelon, Christopher; Zafar, Muhammed M; Sheridan, Gerard Anthony; Kearns, Stephen

    2016-12-30

    Posterolateral dislocation of the elbow is an injury commonly treated in the emergency department by closed reduction. Very rarely it can be irreducible and require open reduction. Only four cases of irreducible posterolateral elbow dislocation have been described in the literature over the past 50 years. We report the case of a 20-year-old man who sustained such an injury. Open reduction was performed and revealed the radial head protruding or 'buttonholing' through the lateral collateral ligament complex. This case highlights that continued closed reduction of the elbow should not be attempted, as a mechanical block to reduction can occur making reduction impossible.

  6. Amputation of finger by horse bite with complete avulsion of both flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Koren, Lior; Stahl, Shalom; Rovitsky, Alexey; Peled, Eli

    2011-08-08

    Amputation of fingers with tendon avulsion occurs through a traction injury, and most occur through a ring avulsion mechanism. Usually the flexor digitorum profundus is torn out with the amputated finger. Replantation usually is recommended only when the amputation is distal to the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion. Animal bites are relatively common, with a decreasing order of frequency of dogs, cats, and humans. Horse bites are relatively infrequent but are associated with crush injuries and tissue loss when they occur. This article describes a 23-year-old man with amputation of his middle finger at the level of the proximal phalanx after being bitten by a horse. The amputated stump was avulsed with the middle finger flexor digitorum profundus and flexor digitorum superficialis torn from the muscle-tendon junction from approximately the middle of the forearm. The patient had no other injuries, and he was able to move his other 4 fingers with only mild pain. As the amputated digit was not suitable for replantation, the wound was irrigated and debrided. The edges of the phalanx were trimmed, and the edges of the wound were sutured. Tetanus toxoid and rabies vaccine were administered, along with intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. The patient was discharged from the hospital 2 days later, with no sign of infection of the wound or compartment syndrome of the forearm. This case demonstrates the weakest point in the myotendinous junction and emphasizes the importance of a careful physical examination in patients with a traumatic amputation. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Chitosan prevents adhesion during rabbit flexor tendon repair via the sirtuin 1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lu, Hui; Yang, Hu

    2015-09-01

    Chitosan has been demonstrated to exert potent anti-adhesive activity during tendon repair; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the preventive effects of chitosan on adhesion in rabbit tendon repair, and to investigate the role of the sirtuin (SIRT)1 signaling pathway in this process. A total of 30 rabbits were divided randomly into three equal groups: Group 1, saline treatment; group 2, chitosan treatment; and group 3, chitosan + nicotinamide treatment. The flexor tendon of each of the rabbits was injured, and subsequently each rabbit was injected with the one of the reagents. Six weeks post‑surgery, all of the rabbits were sacrificed and their flexor tendons were harvested for subsequent evaluation of adhesion. Western blotting was used to determine the protein expression levels of specific signaling molecules. An MTT assay was conducted to evaluate the viability of human tenocytes and flow cytometry was used to analyze the apoptotic rate of the cells. The present study demonstrated that treatment with chitosan relieved adhesion in the rabbits with flexor tendon injuries. In addition, chitosan treatment increased SIRT1 expression, and reduced acetylated p65 and p53 expression in the tendons. The effects of chitosan on the tendons were attenuated by treatment with nicotinamide (a SIRT1 inhibitor). In the human tenocytes, pretreatment with chitosan resulted in an inhibition of interleukin (IL)‑1β‑induced apoptosis. Furthermore, chitosan reversed the IL‑1β‑induced downregulation of SIRT1 and upregulation of acetylated p65 and p53. Furthermore, downregulation of Sirt1 by RNA interference abrogated the effects of chitosan on the levels of p65 and p53 acetylation, and the rate of tenocyte apoptosis. In conclusion, chitosan treatment prevented adhesion via the SIRT1 signaling pathway during rabbit flexor tendon repair. These results indicate that SIRT1 may be targeted for therapeutic

  8. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx.

  9. Fibromatosis of the flexor pollicus longus tendon

    PubMed Central

    Damkat-Thomas, L; Black, CE; Herbert, K

    2010-01-01

    An unusual case of fibromatosis of the dominant left flexor pollicus longus (FPL) in a thirteen year old schoolboy. Initially presenting with pain in the thenar eminence and difficulty flexing the metacarpal phalangeal joint (MPJ), other symptoms include locking, triggering and difficulty writing. MRI showed a 4cm segment of thickened abnormal tendon. Intra-operatively three 1cm nodules were excised from the FPL while preserving the tendon. Histopathology reported the nodules as fibromatosis. A literature search revealed that this has not previously been reported although symptomatic tendon sheath fibromas have. Our patient achieved a good result following surgical intervention and the two year review has shown no complications. PMID:24946359

  10. Management of tennis elbow by Agnikarma.

    PubMed

    Mahanta, Vyasadeva; Dudhamal, Tukaram S; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Tennis elbow is a painful condition and causes restricted movement of forearm which requires treatment for long period. Till date only symptomatic treatments are available like use of anti-inflammatory analgesic drugs, steroids injection, physiotherapy, exercise etc. But none of these provide satisfactory result. Long term use of anti-inflammatory, analgesic drugs and steroids injection is also not free from the adverse effects. Usually, 'wait-and-see policy' of treatment guideline is recommended in most of medical texts. According to Ayurveda, snayugata vata can be correlated with the condition of tennis elbow. Sushruta has advised Agnikarma for disorders of snayu (ligaments and tendons), asthi (bone), siddhi (joints) etc. Hence, in this study a case of tennis elbow (snayugata vata) was treated by Agnikarma, along with administration of powder of Ashwagandha and Navajivana Rasa orally, for a period of 03 weeks. This combination therapy provided considerable relief in pain and movement of the elbow joint.

  11. Management of tennis elbow by Agnikarma

    PubMed Central

    Mahanta, Vyasadeva; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Tennis elbow is a painful condition and causes restricted movement of forearm which requires treatment for long period. Till date only symptomatic treatments are available like use of anti-inflammatory analgesic drugs, steroids injection, physiotherapy, exercise etc. But none of these provide satisfactory result. Long term use of anti-inflammatory, analgesic drugs and steroids injection is also not free from the adverse effects. Usually, ‘wait-and-see policy’ of treatment guideline is recommended in most of medical texts. According to Ayurveda, snayugata vata can be correlated with the condition of tennis elbow. Sushruta has advised Agnikarma for disorders of snayu (ligaments and tendons), asthi (bone), siddhi (joints) etc. Hence, in this study a case of tennis elbow (snayugata vata) was treated by Agnikarma, along with administration of powder of Ashwagandha and Navajivana Rasa orally, for a period of 03 weeks. This combination therapy provided considerable relief in pain and movement of the elbow joint. PMID:23741162

  12. Elbow dislocation with irreparable fracture radial head

    PubMed Central

    Tanna, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Background: Treatment of elbow dislocation with irreparable radial head fracture needs replacement of radial head to achieve stability of elbow. An alternate method in cases of elbow dislocation with radial head fracture can be resection of radial head with repair of medial collateral ligament. We report a retrospective analysis of cases of elbow dislocation with irreparable radial head treated by excision head of radius and repair of MCL. Materials and Methods: Nine patients of elbow dislocation with associated irreparable fractures of the head of the radius were included in this analysis (6 F:3 M, Age: 35-47 years). Radial head excision was done through the lateral approach and MCL was sutured using no 3 Ethibond using medial approach. Above elbow plaster was given for 6 weeks and gradual mobilization was done thereafter. All patients were assessed at final followup using Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS). Results: Mean followup was 19.55 ± 7.12 months (range 14-36 months). There was no extension deficit when compared to opposite side with mean range of flexion of 138.8° ± 6.97° (range 130 -145°). Mean pronation was 87.7° ± 4.4° (range 80-90°) and mean supination was 87.7 ± 4.62° (range 80-90°). The mean MEPS was 98.8 ± 3.33 (range 90-100). No patient had pain, sensory complaints, subluxation or redislocation. All were able to carry out their daily activities without disability. Conclusion: Radial head excision with MCL repair is an acceptable option for treatment of patients with elbow dislocation and irreparable radial head fracture. PMID:23798760

  13. Elbow Imaging in Sport: Sports Imaging Series.

    PubMed

    Bucknor, Matthew D; Stevens, Kathryn J; Steinbach, Lynne S

    2016-04-01

    Elbow pain is a frequent presenting symptom in athletes, particularly athletes who throw. The elbow can be injured as a result of acute trauma, such as a direct blow or a fall onto an outstretched hand or from chronic microtrauma. In particular, valgus extension overload during the throwing motion can precipitate a cascade of chronic injuries that can be debilitating for both casual and high-performance athletes. Prompt imaging evaluation facilitates accurate diagnosis and appropriate targeted interventions.

  14. Miscellaneous conditions about the elbow in athletes.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Edward G; Gill, Harpreet S; Laporte, Dawn M; Streiff, Michael

    2004-10-01

    This article reviews some of the conditions about the elbow in athletes or active individuals. The conditions discussed are synovial plica of elbow, radiocapitellar arthritis, congenital dislocation of the radial head, radio-ulnar synostosis, hemophilia and rheumatoid arthritis. In the past, people who had these conditions were instructed to avoid athletic activities; however, they are now being counseled to remain active and to try to exercise on a regular basis.

  15. Functional anatomy of the lateral collateral ligament of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Hackl, M; Bercher, M; Wegmann, K; Müller, L P; Dargel, J

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the functional anatomy of the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) and the surrounding forearm extensors. Using 81 human cadaveric upper extremities, the anatomy of the forearm extensors-especially the anconeus, supinator and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU)-was analyzed. After removal of aforementioned extensors the functional anatomy of the LCLC was analyzed. The origin of the LCLC was evaluated for isometry. The insertion types of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL) were analyzed and classified. The ECU runs parallel to the RCL to dynamically preserve varus stability. The supinator and anconeus muscle fibers coalesce with the LCLC and lengthen during pronation. The anconeus fibers run parallel to the LUCL in full flexion. The LCLC consists of the annular ligament (AL) and the isometric radial collateral ligament (RCL). During elbow flexion, its posterior branches (LUCL) tighten while the anterior branches loosen. When performing a pivot shift test, the loosened LUCL fibers do not fully tighten in full extension. The LUCL inserts along with the AL at the supinator crest. Three different insertion types could be observed. The LUCL represents the posterior branch of the RCL rather than a distinct ligament. It is non-isometric and lengthens during elbow flexion. The RCL was found to be of vital importance for neutralization of posterolateral rotatory forces. Pronation of the forearm actively stabilizes the elbow joint as the supinator, anconeus and biceps muscle work in unison to increase posterolateral rotatory stability.

  16. The Effects of Elbow Bracing on Medial Elbow Joint Space Gapping Associated With Repetitive Throwing in High School Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Hiroshi; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Takei, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Mitsuru

    2017-04-01

    Throwing athletes risk medial elbow injury from extreme valgus stress generated across the medial elbow during throwing. Braces have been developed to protect the elbow joint; however, no previous study has investigated the effects of elbow bracing on medial elbow joint space gapping associated with repetitive throwing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of elbow bracing on medial elbow joint space gapping during repetitive throwing. Our hypothesis was that an elbow brace may reduce mechanical stress on the elbow by reducing medial elbow joint space gapping. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-five high school baseball players participated in this study. Each subject pitched 100 times under 2 conditions: control (without elbow brace) and elbow brace. The ulnohumeral joint space was measured ultrasonically before pitching and after every block of 20 pitches. Measurement of the ulnohumeral joint space was carried out using ultrasound with the forearm hanging by the side. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc tests were used to compare ulnohumeral joint space with repeated pitching and between the elbow brace and control conditions. In the control condition, ulnohumeral joint space after 60 pitches was significantly greater than that before pitching (P < .01). In contrast, in the elbow brace condition, ulnohumeral joint space was not significantly different after repeated pitching. When comparing these 2 conditions, ulnohumeral joint space in the control condition was significantly greater than that in the elbow brace condition after 60 pitches (P < .01). An elbow brace has the effect of preventing medial elbow joint space gapping with repeated throwing when determined ultrasonically by measuring the ulnohumeral joint space under gravity load. An elbow brace worn during baseball pitching practice may help reduce mechanical stress on the elbow by reducing medial elbow joint space gapping.

  17. The Effects of Elbow Bracing on Medial Elbow Joint Space Gapping Associated With Repetitive Throwing in High School Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Hiroshi; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Takei, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Mitsuru

    2017-01-01

    Background: Throwing athletes risk medial elbow injury from extreme valgus stress generated across the medial elbow during throwing. Braces have been developed to protect the elbow joint; however, no previous study has investigated the effects of elbow bracing on medial elbow joint space gapping associated with repetitive throwing. Hypothesis/Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of elbow bracing on medial elbow joint space gapping during repetitive throwing. Our hypothesis was that an elbow brace may reduce mechanical stress on the elbow by reducing medial elbow joint space gapping. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-five high school baseball players participated in this study. Each subject pitched 100 times under 2 conditions: control (without elbow brace) and elbow brace. The ulnohumeral joint space was measured ultrasonically before pitching and after every block of 20 pitches. Measurement of the ulnohumeral joint space was carried out using ultrasound with the forearm hanging by the side. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance and post hoc tests were used to compare ulnohumeral joint space with repeated pitching and between the elbow brace and control conditions. Results: In the control condition, ulnohumeral joint space after 60 pitches was significantly greater than that before pitching (P < .01). In contrast, in the elbow brace condition, ulnohumeral joint space was not significantly different after repeated pitching. When comparing these 2 conditions, ulnohumeral joint space in the control condition was significantly greater than that in the elbow brace condition after 60 pitches (P < .01). Conclusion: An elbow brace has the effect of preventing medial elbow joint space gapping with repeated throwing when determined ultrasonically by measuring the ulnohumeral joint space under gravity load. Clinical Relevance: An elbow brace worn during baseball pitching practice may help reduce mechanical stress

  18. Should we think about wrist extensor after flexor tendon repair?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline M; Tanaka, Denise M; Barbosa, Rafael I; Marcolino, Alexandre M; Elui, Valeria MC; Mazzer, Nilton

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the activity of wrist extensor muscle, correlating with wrist motion during gripping after flexor tendon repair. Design: Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Setting: Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Subjects: A total of 11 patients submitted to rehabilitation by early passive motion of the fingers with wrist flexion position were evaluated after 8 weeks of fingers flexor tendon repair and 11 healthy volunteers, all ranging from 20 to 37 years of age. Intervention: Volunteers performed an isometric standardized gripping task. Main measures: We used electrogoniometry to analyze wrist range of motion and surface electromyography, considering 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis. Results: Patients with flexor tendon repair showed co-activation deficit between wrist extensor (extensor carpi radialis) and flexor finger muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis) during gripping in the intermediate phase of rehabilitation, despite some recovering mobility for wrist extension (p ≤ 0.05). A moderate correlation between range of motion and extensor carpi radialis was present only for injured group (r = 0.32). Total active motion score, which represents finger active excursion, was regular or poor in 65% of cases, all with nerve repair associated. Conclusion: Wrist extensors have an important synergist role at handgrip, although some imbalance can be present after flexor tendon repair. These preliminary findings suggest that emphasis could be directed to add synergistic wrist motion in rehabilitation protocols after flexor tendon repair. Future studies with early active rehabilitation are necessary. PMID:26770674

  19. Bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy in 2 cats.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Maureen A; Laverty, Peter H; Soiderer, Emily E

    2005-03-01

    Two cats presented with bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy. This previously unreported complication proved to be painful and debilitating. Deep digital flexor tenectomy successfully resolved the problem. Twelve months after surgery, the first cat remains free of complications. The second cat recovered full limb function, but died of unrelated causes.

  20. Bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy in 2 cats

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Two cats presented with bilateral flexor tendon contracture following onychectomy. This previously unreported complication proved to be painful and debilitating. Deep digital flexor tenectomy successfully resolved the problem. Twelve months after surgery, the first cat remains free of complications. The second cat recovered full limb function, but died of unrelated causes. PMID:15884646

  1. Stenosing flexor tenosynovitis following a rattlesnake bite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lydia; Yao, Jeffrey

    2010-07-13

    Snakebite victims have been described previously in orthopedic literature in regard to complications such as compartment syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome. We introduce a previously unreported complication of stenosing flexor tenosynovitis in a patient bitten by a rattlesnake. After being bitten in her right forearm, the patient experienced mild systemic symptoms of fever and nausea and was assessed at an outside hospital, where it was determined that she did not suffer from envenomation and therefore did not require antivenin therapy. She presented to our institution 1 week later with signs and symptoms of acute, new-onset right thumb flexor tenosynovitis, with pain and tenderness at the level of the A1 pulley of the thumb, with intermittent triggering. She also presented the following week with ipsilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The patient reported no such symptoms prior to the snakebite. Given the recent development of these conditions after her snakebite, in addition to her history of endocrine disorders, we believe that our patient suffered from envenomation that led to these complications. Nonoperative measures including splinting and steroid injections were taken, with mixed results, and surgical intervention was necessary. While the proper management of snakebites is controversial, especially in regard to the administration of antivenin, we believe our patient would have benefitted from immediate evaluation and consideration for antivenin. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Evaluation of elbow pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Kane, Shawn F; Lynch, James H; Taylor, Jonathan C

    2014-04-15

    The elbow is a complex joint designed to withstand a wide range of dynamic exertional forces. The location and quality of elbow pain can generally localize the injury to one of the four anatomic regions: anterior, medial, lateral, or posterior. The history should include questions about the onset of pain, what the patient was doing when the pain started, and the type and frequency of athletic and occupational activities. Lateral and medial epicondylitis are two of the more common diagnoses and often occur as a result of occupational activities. Patients have pain and tenderness over the affected tendinous insertion that are accentuated with specific movements. If lateral and medial epicondylitis treatments are unsuccessful, ulnar neuropathy and radial tunnel syndrome should be considered. Ulnar collateral ligament injuries occur in athletes participating in sports that involve overhead throwing. Biceps tendinopathy is a relatively common source of pain in the anterior elbow; history often includes repeated elbow flexion with forearm supination and pronation. Olecranon bursitis is a common cause of posterior elbow pain and swelling. It can be septic or aseptic, and is diagnosed based on history, physical examination, and bursal fluid analysis if necessary. Plain radiography is the initial choice for the evaluation of acute injuries and is best for showing bony injuries, soft tissue swelling, and joint effusions. Magnetic resonance imaging is the preferred imaging modality for chronic elbow pain. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography allows for an inexpensive dynamic evaluation of commonly injured structures.

  3. Open Galeazzi fracture with ipsilateral elbow dislocation.

    PubMed

    Adanır, Oktay; Yüksel, Serdar; Beytemur, Ozan; Güleç, M Akif

    2016-08-01

    Combination of the Galeazzi fracture and dislocation of the elbow joint in same extremity is very rare. In this article, we report a 26-year-old male patient with a posterolateral dislocation of the elbow and ipsilateral volar type Galeazzi fracture. We performed closed reduction for the elbow dislocation during admission to the emergency department. Patient was taken to the operating room in the sixth hour of his application to emergency department and open wound on the ulnovolar region of the wrist was closed primarily after irrigation and debridement. We performed open reduction and internal fixation of the radial fracture with a dynamic compression plate. After fixation, we evaluated the stability of the elbow joint and distal radioulnar joint. Distal radioulnar joint was unstable under fluoroscopic examination and fixed with one 1.8 mm Kirschner wire in a pronated position. Then, elbow joint was stable. One year after surgery, patient had no pain or sings of instability. At the last follow-up, range of motion of the elbow was 10°-135° and forearm pronation and supination were 70°.

  4. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex induces opposite modulation of reciprocal inhibition in wrist extensor and flexor.

    PubMed

    Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra; Klomjai, Wanalee; Bussel, Bernard; Katz, Rose; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-09-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is used as a noninvasive tool to modulate brain excitability in humans. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that tDCS applied over the motor cortex also modulates spinal neural network excitability and therefore can be used to explore the corticospinal control acting on spinal neurons. Previously, we showed that reciprocal inhibition directed to wrist flexor motoneurons is enhanced during contralateral anodal tDCS, but it is likely that the corticospinal control acting on spinal networks controlling wrist flexors and extensors is not similar. The primary aim of the study was to explore the effects of anodal tDCS on reciprocal inhibition directed to wrist extensor motoneurons. To further examine the supraspinal control acting on the reciprocal inhibition between wrist flexors and extensors, we also explored the effects of the tDCS applied to the ipsilateral hand motor area. In healthy volunteers, we tested the effects induced by sham and anodal tDCS on reciprocal inhibition pathways innervating wrist muscles. Reciprocal inhibition directed from flexor to extensor muscles and the reverse situation, i.e., reciprocal inhibition, directed from extensors to flexors were studied in parallel with the H reflex technique. Our main finding was that contralateral anodal tDCS induces opposing effects on reciprocal inhibition: it decreases reciprocal inhibition directed from flexors to extensors, but it increases reciprocal inhibition directed from extensors to flexors. The functional result of these opposite effects on reciprocal inhibition seems to favor wrist extension excitability, suggesting an asymmetric descending control onto the interneurons that mediate reciprocal inhibition.

  5. AIDS and the lung. 1--AIDS, aprons, and elbow grease: preventing the nosocomial spread of human immunodeficiency virus and associated organisms.

    PubMed

    Hanson, P J; Collins, J V

    1989-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) other than by direct inoculation or sexual contact is extremely rare. HIV has, however, been found on fibreoptic bronchoscopes used on patients with AIDS and there is a clear theoretical risk of transmission by bronchoscopy. Applied experiments have underlined the importance of cleaning equipment thoroughly and have shown the limitations of disinfection. Infection control policies should be revised to meet the following four basic requirements: (1) all precautions should apply to all patients alike--that is, whether infectious or not; (2) equipment should be cleaned thoroughly in detergent immediately after use to remove body secretions and reduce contamination; (3) staff who may be exposed to body secretions should wear simple barrier clothing routinely; and (4) contaminated bronchoscopes should be disinfected for 20 minutes in 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde after cleaning.

  6. AIDS and the lung. 1--AIDS, aprons, and elbow grease: preventing the nosocomial spread of human immunodeficiency virus and associated organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, P J; Collins, J V

    1989-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) other than by direct inoculation or sexual contact is extremely rare. HIV has, however, been found on fibreoptic bronchoscopes used on patients with AIDS and there is a clear theoretical risk of transmission by bronchoscopy. Applied experiments have underlined the importance of cleaning equipment thoroughly and have shown the limitations of disinfection. Infection control policies should be revised to meet the following four basic requirements: (1) all precautions should apply to all patients alike--that is, whether infectious or not; (2) equipment should be cleaned thoroughly in detergent immediately after use to remove body secretions and reduce contamination; (3) staff who may be exposed to body secretions should wear simple barrier clothing routinely; and (4) contaminated bronchoscopes should be disinfected for 20 minutes in 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde after cleaning. PMID:2688178

  7. Elbow spasticity during passive stretch-reflex: clinical evaluation using a wearable sensor system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spasticity is a prevalent chronic condition among persons with upper motor neuron syndrome that significantly impacts function and can be costly to treat. Clinical assessment is most often performed with passive stretch-reflex tests and graded on a scale, such as the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). However, these scales are limited in sensitivity and are highly subjective. This paper shows that a simple wearable sensor system (angle sensor and 2-channel EMG) worn during a stretch-reflex assessment can be used to more objectively quantify spasticity in a clinical setting. Methods A wearable sensor system consisting of a fibre-optic goniometer and 2-channel electromyography (EMG) was used to capture data during administration of the passive stretch-reflex test for elbow flexor and extensor spasticity. A kinematic model of unrestricted passive joint motion was used to extract metrics from the kinematic and EMG data to represent the intensity of the involuntary reflex. Relationships between the biometric results and clinical measures (MAS, isometric muscle strength and passive range of motion) were explored. Results Preliminary results based on nine patients with varying degrees of flexor and extensor spasticity showed that kinematic and EMG derived metrics were strongly correlated with one another, were correlated positively (and significantly) with clinical MAS, and negatively correlated (though mostly non-significant) with isometric muscle strength. Conclusions We conclude that a wearable sensor system used in conjunction with a simple kinematic model can capture clinically relevant features of elbow spasticity during stretch-reflex testing in a clinical environment. PMID:23782931

  8. Monosynaptic Ia projections from intrinsic hand muscles to forearm motoneurones in humans

    PubMed Central

    Marchand-Pauvert, V; Nicolas, G; Pierrot-Deseilligny, E

    2000-01-01

    Heteronymous Ia excitatory projections from intrinsic hand muscles to human forearm motoneurones (MNs) were investigated. Changes in firing probability of single motor units (MUs) in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU), flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) were studied after electrical stimuli were applied to the median and ulnar nerve at wrist level and to the corresponding homonymous nerve at elbow level.Homonymous facilitation, occurring at the same latency as the H reflex, and therefore attributed to monosynaptic Ia EPSPs, was found in all the sampled units. In many MUs an early facilitation was also evoked by heteronymous low-threshold afferents from intrinsic hand muscles. The low threshold (between 0.5 and 0.6 times motor threshold (MT)) and the inability of a pure cutaneous stimulation to reproduce this effect indicate that it is due to stimulation of group I muscle afferents.Evidence for a similar central delay (monosynaptic) in heteronymous as in homonymous pathways was accepted when the difference in latencies of the homonymous and heteronymous peaks did not differ from the estimated supplementary afferent conduction time from wrist to elbow level by more than 0.5 ms (conduction velocity in the fastest Ia afferents between wrist and elbow levels being equal to 69 m s−1).A statistically significant heteronymous monosynaptic Ia excitation from intrinsic hand muscles supplied by both median and ulnar nerves was found in MUs belonging to all forearm motor nuclei tested (although not in ECU MUs after ulnar stimulation). It was, however, more often found in flexors than in extensors, in wrist than in finger muscles and in muscles operating in the radial than in the ulnar side.It is argued that the connections of Ia afferents from intrinsic hand muscles to forearm MNs, which are stronger and more widely distributed than in the cat, might

  9. Quantifying elbow extension and elbow hyperextension in cricket bowling: a case study of Jenny Gunn.

    PubMed

    King, Mark A; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2012-05-01

    In this study a method for determining elbow extension and elbow abduction for a cricket bowling delivery was developed and assessed for Jenny Gunn who has hypermobility in both elbows and whose bowling action has been repeatedly queried by umpires. Bowling is a dynamic activity which is assessed visually in real time in a cricket match by an umpire. When the legality of a bowler's action is questioned by an umpire a quantitative analysis is undertaken using a marker based motion analysis system. This method of quantifying elbow extension should agree with a visual assessment of when the arm is "straight" and should minimise the effects of marker movement. A set of six markers on the bowling arm were used to calculate elbow angles. Differences of up to 1° for elbow extension and up to 2° for elbow abduction were found when angles calculated from the marker set for static straight arm trials were compared with measurements taken by a chartered sports physiotherapist. In addition comparison of elbow extension angles at ball release calculated from the markers during bowling trials with those measured from high speed video also showed good agreement with mean differences of 0°±2°.

  10. The effects of eye coordination during deep cervical flexor training on the thickness of the cervical flexors

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hyun-Ju; Goo, Bong-Oh; Kwon, Hae-Yeon; Jang, Jun-Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify changes in the thicknesses of the cervical flexors according to eye coordination during deep cervical flexor training. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty normal adults were randomly selected, and during their deep cervical flexor training and eye tracking, the thicknesses of the longus colli and the sternocleidomastoid were measured using ultrasonic waves. [Results] The thickness of the longus colli statistically significantly increased when deep cervical flexor training and eye coordination were performed simultaneously. However, the thickness of the sternocleidomastoid did not show statistically significant differences according to eye coordination. [Conclusion] Eye coordination during deep cervical flexor training is likely to increase the thickness of the longus colli selectively. PMID:26834355

  11. Measurement of creep strain of flexor tendons during low-force high-frequency activities such as computer keyboard use.

    PubMed

    Smutz, W P; France, E P; Bloswick, D S

    1995-03-01

    The aim of this study was to measure tendon strain during low-force, high-frequency activities such as computer keyboard use. Prior to creep strain testing an estimate of flexor tendon force during keyboard use was made. Tendon force was measured indirectly by comparing electromyographic activity of the flexor and extensor digitorum muscles in five human volunteers for various hand activities. Results of the electromyographic study showed that flexor tendon forces during keyboard use may be as high as 60 N. Sixty eight flexor digitorum tendons from 17 fresh-frozen cadaver hands were used for the creep strain tests. Three loading conditions (static, 1 Hz cyclic, (1/4) Hz cyclic) and four load levels (10, 20, 50, 100 N) were used. Results of the creep study showed that for a flexor tendon force of 60 N the total strain of the tendon would be approximately 1.8%. This does not appear to be enough strain to cause permanent damage to the tendon according to current cumulative strain models. RELEVANCE: Recent studies have shown an increase in hand and wrist tendinitis among computer users. At the present time the aetiology is unknown, but risk factors commonly associated with tendinitis are hand forces, wrist postures, and frequency of finger movements. This research looks at tendon creep due to repeated force as a possible aetiology.

  12. Primary total elbow replacement in a patient with old unreduced complex posterior elbow dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kanakaraddi, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old female presented with history of a fall on an outstretched hand 2 months back and with complaints of pain, limitation of movement of right elbow, and inability to carry out her daily routine activities. On examination, there was swelling and tenderness at the elbow, three point relation was altered, had fixed flexion deformity of 50° with range of motion from 50° to 60°. Radiographs showed neglected old unreduced posterior elbow dislocation, fractures of radial head, and coronoid process. Patient was treated with total elbow replacement using 3rd generation sloppy hinged elbow prosthesis. At 3 weeks, range of motion was from 30° to 120°. At 6 weeks follow-up, patient was able to do her routine activities independently with ROM of 20° to 140° and minimum pain.

  13. Endoscopic Adhesiolysis of Flexor Hallucis Longus Muscle.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2017-04-01

    Adhesion of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) muscle to the distal tibia can occur after distal tibial fracture, distal fibular fracture, low tibial osteotomy, soft-tissue injury at the posterior ankle, subclinical compartment syndrome of the distal deep posterior compartment of the leg, or Volkmann contracture after deep posterior compartment syndrome of the leg. The purpose of this Technical Note is to report the endoscopic approach of FHL muscle adhesiolysis. It is indicated in patients with symptomatic adhesion of the FHL muscle and contraindicated if there is entrapment of the FHL muscle or tendon in the fracture callus or if there is extensive fibrosis and contracture of the FHL muscle as a result of Volkmann contracture after deep posterior compartment syndrome of the leg.

  14. An Overview of the Management of Flexor Tendon Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, M; Hindocha, S; Jordan, D; Saleh, M; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries still remain a challenging condition to manage to ensure optimal outcome for the patient. Since the first flexor tendon repair was described by Kirchmayr in 1917, several approaches to flexor tendon injury have enabled successful repairs rates of 70-90%. Primary surgical repair results in better functional outcome compared to secondary repair or tendon graft surgery. Flexor tendon injury repair has been extensively researched and the literature demonstrates successful repair requires minimal gapping at the repair site or interference with tendon vascularity, secure suture knots, smooth junction of tendon end and having sufficient strength for healing. However, the exact surgical approach to achieve success being currently used among surgeons is still controversial. Therefore, this review aims to discuss the results of studies demonstrating the current knowledge regarding the optimal approach for flexor tendon repair. Post-operative rehabilitation for flexor tendon surgery is another area, which has caused extensive debate in hand surgery. The trend to more active mobilisation protocols seems to be favoured but further study in this area is needed to find the protocol, which achieves function and gliding but avoids rupture of the tendons. Lastly despite success following surgery complications commonly still occur post surgery, including adhesion formation, tendon rupture and stiffness of the joints. Therefore, this review aims to discuss the appropriate management of these difficulties post surgery. New techniques in management of flexor tendon will also be discussed including external laser devices, addition of growth factors and cytokines. PMID:22431948

  15. Severe injury of bilateral elbow joints with unilateral terrible triad of the elbow and unilateral suspected terrible triad of the elbow complicated with olecranon fracture: one case report

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Guoqing; Niu, Xiaofeng; Yu, Weiguang; Xiao, Liangbao

    2015-01-01

    Terrible triad of the elbow is characterized as posterior dislocation of the elbow joint accompanied by the fractures of the radial head and coronoid process of the ulna, which is rarely seen in clinical practice, especially because the mild fracture is barely detected by imaging method In this study, we reported one case of serious complex bilateral elbow injury, presenting with unilateral typical terrible triad of the elbow and suspected terrible triad of the elbow complicated with olecranon fracture on the other side. Clinical experience was obtained during the diagnosis and treatment procedures. PMID:26550399

  16. Microsurgical anatomy of branches of musculocutaneous nerve: clinical relevance for spastic elbow surgery.

    PubMed

    Thieffry, C; Chenin, L; Foulon, P; Havet, E; Peltier, J

    2017-07-01

    The neurotomy of musculocutaneous nerve is a treatment for patients who suffer from spastic elbow flexion when medical and reeducative treatments have failed. It consists in sectioning motor branches of musculocutaneous nerve which are destined to the biceps brachii and brachialis muscles, both being the main elbow flexor muscles. The aim of this study was to analyse the distance, where each motor branch arises from the musculocutaneous nerve to both biceps brachii and brachialis muscles, to establish precisely the localisation and length of the necessary incision to reach its branches for surgery. Eighteen musculocutaneous nerves from ten cadavers were dissected. None of them reported with a previous pathology. The cadavers were laid on the back with 30-35° of abduction, a complete extension, and supination of the upper limb. The localization of motor branches was to be found in the middle third of the upper arm, with an average from the base of the humeral major tubercle of 11.46, 12.40, and 12.87 cm for the biceps brachii and 16.36, 19.10, and 16.88 cm for the brachialis muscle. The incision needed to reach the motor branches of the musculocutaneous nerve should be localised between 10 and 20 cm from the major humeral tubercle and may be shorter than usual.

  17. Musculoskeletal ultrasound: elbow imaging and procedures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kenneth S; Rosas, Humberto G; Craig, Joseph G

    2010-09-01

    Elbow injuries, both acute and chronic sports-related cases, have increased over the last decade. With one in every four members of a household participating in sports, both clinics and radiology departments are seeing more patients with elbow pain. High-resolution ultrasound is well suited for evaluating the elbow. Ultrasound is growing in popularity and fast becoming another modality that the radiologist can use to help diagnose elbow pathology. With advancing transducer technology and accessibility, ultrasound offers focused and real-time high-resolution imaging of tendons, ligaments, and nerve structures. Its advantages include the use of safe nonionizing radiation, accessibility, and cost effectiveness. Another unique advantage is its ability for dynamic assessment of tendon and ligament structures such as in cases of partial tears of the medial ulnar collateral ligament or ulnar nerve dislocation. It is also easy to assess the contralateral side as a control. Ultrasound is also useful in therapeutic guided injections for its multiplanar capability and clear visualization of major vessels and nerves. We discuss the unique application of ultrasound in evaluating common elbow pathology and in advanced ultrasound-guided treatments such as dextrose prolotherapy and platelet-rich plasma.

  18. Advances in the healing of flexor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Sammer, Douglas M; Chung, Kevin C

    2014-05-01

    The intrasynovial flexor tendons of the hand are critical for normal hand function. Injury to these tendons can result in absent finger flexion, and a subsequent loss of overall hand function. The surgical techniques used to repair these tendons have improved in the past few decades, as have the postoperative rehabilitation protocols. In spite of these advances, intrasynovial flexor tendon repairs continue to be plagued by postoperative scar formation, which limits tendon gliding and prevents a full functional recovery. This paper describes the current challenges of flexor tendon repair, and evaluates the most recent advances and strategies for achieving an excellent functional outcome. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  19. Measuring dynamic in-vivo elbow kinematics: description of technique and estimation of accuracy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Colin P; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize the translational and rotational accuracy of a model-based tracking technique for quantifying elbow kinematics and to demonstrate its in vivo application. The accuracy of a model-based tracking technique for quantifying elbow kinematics was determined in an in vitro experiment. Biplane X-ray images of a cadaveric elbow were acquired as it was manually moved through flexion-extension. The 3D position and orientation of each bone was determined using model-based tracking. For comparison, the position and orientation of each bone was also determined by tracking the position of implanted beads with dynamic radiostereometric analysis. Translations and rotations were calculated for both the ulnohumeral and radiohumeral joints, and compared between measurement techniques. To demonstrate the in vivo application of this technique, biplane X-ray images were acquired as a human subject extended their elbow from full flexion to full extension. The in vitro validation demonstrated that the model-based tracking technique is capable of accurately measuring elbow motion, with reported errors averaging less than ±1.0 mm and ±1.0 deg. For the in vivo application, the carrying angle changed from an 8.3 ± 0.5 deg varus position in full flexion to an 8.4 ± 0.5 deg valgus position in full extension. Model-based tracking is an accurate technique for measuring in vivo, 3D, dynamic elbow motion. It is anticipated that this experimental approach will enhance our understanding of elbow motion under normal and pathologic conditions.

  20. Focused and Radial Shock Wave Therapy in the Treatment of Tennis Elbow: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Król, Piotr; Franek, Andrzej; Durmała, Jacek; Błaszczak, Edward; Ficek, Krzysztof; Król, Barbara; Detko, Ewa; Wnuk, Bartosz; Białek, Lidia; Taradaj, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of radial and focused shock wave therapies applied to treat tennis elbow. Patients with tennis elbow were randomized into two comparative groups: focused shock wave therapy (FSWT; n=25) and radial shock wave therapy (RSWT; n=25). Subjects in the FSWT and RSWT groups were applied with a focused shock wave (3 sessions, 2000 shocks, 4 Hz, 0.2 mJ/mm2) and a radial shock wave (3 sessions, 2000 + 2000 shocks, 8 Hz, 2.5 bar), respectively. The primary study endpoints were pain relief and functional improvement (muscle strength) one week after therapy. The secondary endpoint consisted of the results of the follow-up observation (3, 6 and 12 weeks after the study). Successive measurements showed that the amount of pain patients felt decreased in both groups. At the same time grip strength as well as strength of wrist extensors and flexors of the affected extremity improved significantly. Both focused and radial shock wave therapies can comparably and gradually reduce pain in subjects with tennis elbow. This process is accompanied by steadily improved strength of the affected extremity. PMID:26557197

  1. Focused and Radial Shock Wave Therapy in the Treatment of Tennis Elbow: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Król, Piotr; Franek, Andrzej; Durmała, Jacek; Błaszczak, Edward; Ficek, Krzysztof; Król, Barbara; Detko, Ewa; Wnuk, Bartosz; Białek, Lidia; Taradaj, Jakub

    2015-09-29

    The purpose of this article was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of radial and focused shock wave therapies applied to treat tennis elbow. Patients with tennis elbow were randomized into two comparative groups: focused shock wave therapy (FSWT; n=25) and radial shock wave therapy (RSWT; n=25). Subjects in the FSWT and RSWT groups were applied with a focused shock wave (3 sessions, 2000 shocks, 4 Hz, 0.2 mJ/mm(2)) and a radial shock wave (3 sessions, 2000 + 2000 shocks, 8 Hz, 2.5 bar), respectively. The primary study endpoints were pain relief and functional improvement (muscle strength) one week after therapy. The secondary endpoint consisted of the results of the follow-up observation (3, 6 and 12 weeks after the study). Successive measurements showed that the amount of pain patients felt decreased in both groups. At the same time grip strength as well as strength of wrist extensors and flexors of the affected extremity improved significantly. Both focused and radial shock wave therapies can comparably and gradually reduce pain in subjects with tennis elbow. This process is accompanied by steadily improved strength of the affected extremity.

  2. Phrenic nerve transfer for elbow flexion and intercostal nerve transfer for elbow extension.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mou-Xiong; Xu, Wen-Dong; Qiu, Yan-Qun; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2010-08-01

    To explore long-term recovery of elbow flexion and extension after transferring the phrenic nerve and intercostal nerves, respectively, in adults with global brachial plexus avulsion injuries. Seven adults with global brachial plexus avulsion injuries had the phrenic nerve transferred to the musculocutaneous nerve (or to the anterior division of upper trunk) and intercostal nerves transferred to the triceps branch of the radial nerve at our hospital 7 to 12 years ago. The results of elbow motor strength testing using the Medical Research Council grading scale, and electrodiagnostic findings using electromyogram examinations, were studied retrospectively. Pulmonary function tests were also performed at final visits. Functional elbow flexion was obtained in most of the 7 cases (M2, 1; M3, 3; M4, 2; and M5, 1) but elbow extension was absent or insufficient in all subjects (M0, 1; M1, 3; and M2, 3). Electrical results showed successful biceps reinnervation in 6 patients and successful triceps reinnervation in 5. No patient experienced breathing problems, and pulmonary function results were within normal range. In the long term, after brachial plexus avulsion injury in most patients who underwent both phrenic nerve and intercostal nerve transfer to achieve elbow flexion and extension eventually obtained satisfactory elbow flexion but poor elbow extension. We recommend against transferring the intercostal nerves to the triceps branch of radial nerve in conjunction with primary phrenic to musculocutaneous nerve transfer. Therapeutic IV. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of marker placement around the elbow on calculated elbow extension during bowling in cricket.

    PubMed

    Yeadon, Maurice R; King, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    The elbow extension angle during bowling in cricket may be calculated from the positions of markers attached around the shoulder, elbow and wrist using an automated laboratory-based motion analysis system. The effects of two elbow-marker sets were compared. In the first, a pair of markers was placed medially and laterally close to the condyles while in the second a triad of markers was placed on the back of the upper arm close to the elbow. The root mean square (RMS) difference in elbow extension angle between the two methods at four key instants was 8° for 12 fast bowlers and 4° for 12 spin bowlers. When evaluated against video estimates of the elbow extension angle for the fast bowlers, the elbow extension angle calculated using the pair method had an RMS error of 2° while the triad method had an RMS error of 8°. The corresponding errors for the spin bowlers were 3° and 5°, respectively. It is thought that the greater errors associated with the triad is a consequence of soft tissue movement in this dynamic activity. This is consistent with the finding of greater error for the fast bowlers compared with the spin bowlers.

  4. Preservation of active range of motion after acute elbow trauma predicts absence of elbow fracture.

    PubMed

    Darracq, Michael A; Vinson, David R; Panacek, Edward A

    2008-09-01

    Previous studies indicate that an inability to fully extend the elbow after elbow trauma is indicative of fracture. We hypothesized that maintenance of active range of motion (ROM) of the elbow in flexion, extension, pronation, and supination after elbow trauma is very specific for the absence of fracture or effusion, and limitation of ROM is sensitive for fracture or effusion. This was a prospective observational study with convenience sampling of a carefully selected patient population. This would allow certain types of patients to be excluded from the study. Patients with elbow injury receiving radiographs and meeting enrollment criteria were enrolled between June 2006 and March 2007 at 4 emergency departments in the local region. Demographics, active ROM, and presence of point tenderness at the olecranon, epicondyles, and radial head were recorded by enrolling clinicians. All enrolled patients received standard elbow radiographs. Radiographs were reviewed by blinded radiologists for the presence of fracture and effusion. Sensitivity, specificity, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of examination findings were calculated. One hundred thirteen patients were enrolled. Limitation of active ROM was 100% (95% CI, 0.93-1.00) sensitive for fracture or effusion. Preservation of active ROM was 97% (95% CI, 0.89-1.00) specific for the absence of fracture. Point tenderness was also highly sensitive but not specific. Individuals with preservation of active ROM after acute elbow trauma have a very low risk of associated fracture and may not require radiographic studies.

  5. Ultrasonography of the hand, wrist, and elbow.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Marko; Fullerton, Brad

    2010-08-01

    High-frequency diagnostic ultrasonography of the hand, wrist and elbow has significant potential to improve the quality of diagnosis and care provided by neuromuscular and musculoskeletal specialists. In patients referred for weakness, pain and numbness of the hand, wrist or elbow, diagnostic ultrasonography can be an adjunct to electrodiagnosis and help in identifying ruptured tendons and treating conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome or trigger finger. Use of a small high-frequency (>10-15 MHz) transducer, an instrument with a blunt pointed tip to enhance sonopalpation and a model of the hand, wrist and elbow is advised to enhance visualization of small anatomical structures and complex bony contours. A range of conditions, including tendon and ligament ruptures, trigger finger, de Quervain tenosynovitis, intersection syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and osteoarthritis, is described along with detailed ultrasonography-guided injection techniques for carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger.

  6. Chronic Elbow Dislocation: Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Kenneth W; Mehlhoff, Thomas L

    2016-07-01

    Chronic elbow dislocation is defined as a dislocation that has remained unreduced for >2 weeks. The soft-tissue and skeletal changes that develop during this time usually prevent successful closed reduction. These changes include the development of extensive intra-articular fibrotic tissue, as well as contracture of the triceps, collateral ligaments, and elbow capsule. Ulnar nerve involvement and associated fractures may also be present. Because treatment of chronic elbow dislocation is challenging, a stepwise approach is used in the evaluation and management of this condition. No large series of data are available to guide treatment. Most patients are treated on the basis of the surgeon's anecdotal experience. Treatment typically involves open reduction, often with the use of hinged external fixators. The role of triceps lengthening or primary collateral ligament reconstruction remains a topic of debate.

  7. Acute traumatic posterior elbow dislocation in children.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Justus; Zundel, Sabine M; Luithle, Tobias; Fuchs, Jörg; Kirschner, Hans-Joachim

    2012-09-01

    Traumatic posterior dislocation of the elbow is often associated with significant morbidity and incomplete recovery. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyse the outcome of 33 children (median age 10.8 years). Patients underwent reduction and assessment of stability under general anaesthesia. Pure dislocations (n=10) were immobilized, whereas unstable fractures (n=23) were stabilized. Refixation of ligaments was performed if stability was not achieved by fracture stabilization alone. Immobilization was continued for 26 (pure dislocations) or 35 days (associated injuries), respectively. Results were excellent (n=9) or good (n=1) after pure dislocation. Results were excellent (n=15), good (n=7) or poor (n=1) in children with associated injuries. Accurate diagnosis, concentric stable reduction of the elbow as well as stable osteosynthesis of displaced fractures are associated with good results in children with acute posterior elbow dislocations.

  8. Posterolateral rotatory instability of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Anakwenze, Oke A; Kancherla, Vamsi K; Iyengar, Jaicharan; Ahmad, Christopher S; Levine, William N

    2014-02-01

    Symptomatic posterolateral rotatory instability (PLRI) results from a lateral collateral ligament complex injury and presents with pain, clicking, and subluxation within the flexion and extension arcs of elbow motion. Often, symptoms and examination characteristics are subtle and can be easily misdiagnosed. Therefore, a thorough history and provocative physical examination maneuvers are important to correctly establish the diagnosis. Patients frequently have a history of elbow trauma such as an episode(s) of elbow dislocation, prior surgery, or previous cortisone injections. Radiographs and advanced imaging can aid in the diagnosis, and examination under anesthesia, manipulation with arthroscopic visualization, and/or stress radiographs can be confirmatory. Symptomatic cases of PLRI can be effectively treated with a repair or isometric ligament reconstruction.

  9. Tennis elbow: incidence in local league players.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, R.

    1981-01-01

    Seventy-four local league players were surveyed through a questionnaire and interview to establish the incidence of tennis elbow, the perceived causes, preventive measures taken and their perceived effectiveness. Of these 35% suffered from tennis elbow, 77% of those critically. The tennis racquet used, technique and timing and the condition of the court were perceived as the main causes, whilst playing tennis frequently was seen as the main contributory factor. The effectiveness of both medical treatment and non-medical measures are noted, but only 5 cases of complete recovery from the injury are reported. Medical help was not sought in almost 50% of the cases, and lack of faith in the GP's interest or advice was noted. Information about tennis elbow did not appear to be easily accessible. More sports injury clinics and wider dissemination of information are suggested. The American research is reviewed. PMID:7317723

  10. Ulnar Nerve Entrapment at the Elbow (Cubital Tunnel Syndrome)

    MedlinePlus

    ... boney ridge of the medial epicondyle. Because this stretching can irritate the nerve, keeping your elbow bent ... from getting caught on the bony ridge and stretching when you bend your elbow. This procedure is ...

  11. Wind swept elbow: injury pattern and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Kagan; Ipaktchi, Kyros

    2013-01-01

    Sweeping injuries of the elbow characterized by traumatic loss of medial or lateral epicondyles, collateral ligaments, and surrounding soft tissue result in loss of joint stability. Reconstruction of medial or lateral collateral ligaments is challenging due to loss of the cortical bone and the resultant difficulty in identifying the isometric attachment point. We describe a unique injury pattern and a surgical technique to restore joint stability using a bone tendon (Achilles) allograft. The technique was applied to 4 consecutive patients with a mean age of 35 (22-57) years and a mean follow-up of 20 months. Three patients with the lateral sweep injury had losses of the lateral epicondyle, lateral collateral ligament along with radial nerve palsy in 2. One patient with the medial sweep injury lost the medial epicondyle, medial collateral ligament, and had ulnar nerve palsy. All patients had an unstable ulnohumeral joint and underwent bone-tendon allograft (Achilles) reconstruction. The elbow joint was covered with a rotational radial forearm flap in 1 patient: myofasciocutaneous-free gracilis flap in 1 and rotational fasciomyocutaneous latissimus dorsi flap in 2 patients. One patient had an open reduction and internal fixation of distal third humerus shaft fracture, intercalary nerve grafting to the ulnar nerve, and repair of the brachial artery. At the final follow-up, average elbow motion was 115 degrees. Radiographic bone-to-bone healing was achieved in all patients. According to the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon's Assessment; average patient rated pain, function, and satisfaction scores were 3.4, 2.3, and 5, respectively. The average Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire score was 25. The use of bone-tendon allograft to reconstruct collateral ligaments of the elbow restored the elbow stability with a satisfactory functional outcome (evidence: level 4).

  12. Radiographic Evaluation of Common Pediatric Elbow Injuries

    PubMed Central

    DeFroda, Steven F.; Hansen, Heather; Gil, Joseph A.; Hawari, Ashraf H.; Cruz, Aristides I.

    2017-01-01

    Normal variations in anatomy in the skeletally immature patient may be mistaken for fracture or injury due to the presence of secondary centers of ossification. Variations in imaging exist from patient to patient based on sex, age, and may even vary from one extremity to the other on the same patient. Despite differences in the appearance of the bony anatomy of the elbow there are certain landmarks and relationships, which can help, distinguish normal from abnormal. We review common radiographic parameters and pitfalls associated in the evaluation of pediatric elbow imaging. We also review common clinical diagnoses in this population. PMID:28286625

  13. Elbow dislocation with complete triceps avulsion.

    PubMed

    Karuppiah, S V; Knox, D

    2014-01-01

    Radio-ulnar Fracture dislocation of the elbow is a high-energy trauma which can be associated with significant ligamentous injury in adults. We report an unusual triad of injury in a patient with avulsion injury of the triceps. This injury can be thought of as a variant of "terrible triad" with dislocation of radio-ulnar joint, radial head fracture, and medial collateral ligament injury with avulsion of the triceps. Elbow has to be stabilized with early repair of the ligaments for a successful outcome.

  14. Elbow Dislocation with Complete Triceps Avulsion

    PubMed Central

    Karuppiah, S. V.; Knox, D.

    2014-01-01

    Radio-ulnar Fracture dislocation of the elbow is a high-energy trauma which can be associated with significant ligamentous injury in adults. We report an unusual triad of injury in a patient with avulsion injury of the triceps. This injury can be thought of as a variant of “terrible triad” with dislocation of radio-ulnar joint, radial head fracture, and medial collateral ligament injury with avulsion of the triceps. Elbow has to be stabilized with early repair of the ligaments for a successful outcome. PMID:24876982

  15. Terrible Triad Injuries of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Neal C; Ring, David

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of terrible triad injuries of the elbow continues to evolve. Radial head fixation and arthroplasty, coronoid process fixation, and repair of the lateral collateral ligament continue to be the mainstays of treatment. In the elbow with persistent instability after repair of these elements, application of a static external fixation, hinged external fixation, ulnohumeral joint pinning, or an internal hinge may be needed. In patients who undergo treatment after the acute injury period, the coronoid may require reconstruction using radial head autograft, iliac crest autograft, olecranon autograft, or allograft.

  16. Total Elbow Arthroplasty for Distal Humerus Fractures.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Luke S; Sanchez-Sotelo, Joaquin

    2015-11-01

    Total elbow arthroplasty is a good treatment alternative for selected patients with distal humerus fractures. Its attractiveness is related to several factors, including the possibility of performing the procedure; leaving the extensor mechanism intact; faster, easier rehabilitation compared with internal fixation; and overall good outcomes reported in terms of both pain relief and function. Implant failure leading to revision surgery does happen, and patients must comply with certain limitations to extend the longevity of their implant. Development of high-performance implants may allow expanding the indications of elbow arthroplasty for fractures.

  17. Tips to avoid nerve injury in elbow arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hilgersom, Nick F J; Oh, Luke S; Flipsen, Mark; Eygendaal, Denise; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2017-01-01

    Elbow arthroscopy is a technical challenging surgical procedure because of close proximity of neurovascular structures and the limited articular working space. With the rising number of elbow arthroscopies being performed nowadays due to an increasing number of surgeons performing this procedure and a broader range of indications, a rise in complications is foreseen. With this editorial we hope to create awareness of possible complications of elbow arthroscopy, particularly nerve injuries, and provide a guideline to avoid complications during elbow arthroscopy. PMID:28251060

  18. Vascularized dorsal digital fascial flap improves flexor tendon repairs.

    PubMed

    Sun, L-Q; Zhao, G; Gao, S-H; Chen, C

    2014-09-01

    We report a new method of flexor tendon repair in zone II using a standard modified Kessler technique combined with a vascularized dorsal fascial flap from the finger pedicled on a dorsal cutaneous branch of the proper digital artery, which is placed as a mechanical barrier between the flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus tendons. The functional outcomes of 14 patients (Group A) with flexor tendon repairs in zone II by this new technique were compared with those of 32 patients (Group B) with flexor tendon repairs in zone II using a standard modified Kessler technique only. Patients in Group A had a higher proportion of excellent results (on the modified Strickland system) and more movement in the distal interphalangeal joint than the patients in Group B.

  19. Flexor Tendon Ruptures After Distal Scaphoid Excision for Scaphotrapeziotrapezoid Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Deren, Matthew E; Mitchell, Charles H; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2017-09-01

    Distal scaphoid excision is one treatment option for osteoarthritis of the scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joint following failure of conservative measures. Potential complications of this procedure include injury to the carpal ligaments, cartilage, and radial artery. A single case was identified by the senior author, and the medical record was reviewed for surgical notes, progress notes, and radiographs. A 68-year-old male sustained ruptures of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) and flexor digitorum profundus to the index finger 3 years following a distal scaphoid excision for symptomatic STT osteoarthritis. He required a flexor tendon reconstruction using the remaining FDS tendon for graft incorporated with a Pulvertaft weave. His midcarpal pain continued after recovery of his index finger function, eventually requiring a 4-corner fusion of the wrist. Flexor tendon rupture is a previously unreported complication of distal scaphoid excision for STT arthritis.

  20. Zone III flexor tendon injuries - A proposed modification to rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Chinchalkar, Shrikant J; Pipicelli, Joey G; Agur, Anne; Athwal, George S

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, these authors have utilized years of clinical experience to suggest rehabilitation modifications for Zone III flexor tendon injuries. - VictoriaPriganc, PhD, OTR, CHT, CLT, Practice Forum Editor.

  1. Development of a motion-controlled in vitro elbow testing system.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Cynthia E; Gordon, Karen D; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A

    2003-05-01

    Joint simulators can be used to study motion pathways of a human joint, to investigate changes in joint stability following injury, and to formulate improved reconstructive and rehabilitative procedures. Our objectives were: to develop a laboratory-based, motion-controlled elbow testing apparatus capable of simulating tendon (muscle) loading and displacement in a cadaveric specimen; to describe its performance while testing stable and unstable elbows; and to compare its operation to that of a previously designed load-controlled device. Velocity control of a pneumatic actuator was achieved using a custom-written, closed-loop feedback controller. This actuator was incorporated into an elbow testing system that used additional pneumatic actuators and a combination of motion- and load-control to achieve desired motions. Simulations achieved with this apparatus demonstrated small magnitudes of error in actuator position and highly repeatable flexion pathways with the specimens positioned in vertical, varus, and valgus orientations. The repeatability in motion pathways generated in both a stable and unstable elbow model was equivalent to or better than for similar tests performed using the load-controlled system, and the velocity of the resulting elbow motion was more reproducible.

  2. Clinical Outcomes Study of the Nexel Total Elbow

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-10

    Elbow Joint Destruction; Post-traumatic Lesions; Ankylosed Joints; Advanced Rheumatoid Arthritis; Joint Instability or Loss of Motion; Acute Comminuted Articular Fracture of Elbow Joint Surfaces; Bone Loss Contributing to Elbow Instability; Bilateral Ankylosis From Causes Other Than Active Sepsis; Post-traumatic, or Degenerative Arthritis With Incapacitating Pain

  3. Static analysis of a piping system with elbows

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, B.J.

    1994-03-01

    Vibration tests of elbows to failure were performed in Japan in the early 1970s. The piping system included two elbows and an eccentric mass. Tests were run both pressurized and unpressurized. This report documents a static analysis of the piping system in which the elbows are subjected to out of plane bending. The effects of internal pressure and material plasticity are investigated.

  4. MRI in flexor tendon rupture after collagenase injection.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Shruti; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Chhabra, Avneesh; Amirlak, Bardia

    2017-02-01

    Flexor tendon rupture is an unusual complication following collagenase injection to relieve contractures. These patients require a close follow-up and in the event of tendon rupture, a decision has to be made whether to repair the tendon or manage the complication conservatively. The authors report the utility of MRI in the prognostication and management of a patient with Dupuytren's contracture, who underwent collagenase injection and subsequently developed flexor digitorum profundus tendon rupture.

  5. [Tenolysis of the flexor tendons in the hand].

    PubMed

    Pillukat, T; Fuhrmann, R; Windolf, J; van Schoonhoven, J

    2015-10-01

    Properly gliding flexor tendons is mandatory for the normal functioning of the finger and thumb. Any damage to tendons, tendon sheath or adjacent tissue can lead to the formation of adhesions that inhibit the normal gliding function. If adhesions limit the digital function and adequate hand therapy does not provide further progress, then surgical intervention should be considered. The authors' strategy and treatment algorithm for flexor tenolysis are presented in the context of the current literature. There is no absolute indication for flexor tenolysis. The decision should be made in a motivated patient who has access to adequate postoperative hand therapy. It should be based on healed fractures and osteotomies, mature soft tissue coverage, intact tendons and gliding tissues, and a full range of passive flexion, and preferably extension of the affected joints. The principle of flexor tenolysis is the consequent resection of all adhesive tissue around the tendon inside and outside the tendon sheath, with preservation of as many pulley sections as possible. Therefore, extensive approaches are frequently necessary. Arthrolysis and the resolution of unfavorable scars, the resection of scarred lumbricals, and pulley reconstruction are additional procedures that are frequently performed. In the literature, improvement in the range of motion is between 59 and 84 %. Good and excellent functional results are reported in 60-80 % of the cases. Nevertheless, in selected cases, functional deterioration occurs. Flexor tendon ruptures after tenolysis were observed in 0-8 % of the patients. With regard to complications such as secondary tendon ruptures, loss of pulleys, and scar formation, flexor tenolysis is part of a reconstructive ladder that includes further procedures. In the case of failure or complications, salvage procedures such as arthrodesis, amputation, and ray resection or staged flexor tendon reconstruction including tendon grafting are recommended. After

  6. Nomenclatural review of long digital forelimb flexors in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Spoor, C F; Badoux, D M

    1986-12-01

    A hitherto-unknown atavistic muscle in the dog initiated a review of the literature on the homologies and nomenclature of the forelimb flexors in carnivores and man. A consequence is that we recommend a revision of the nomenclature in the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria (Ithaca, New York, 1983) so that it is in agreement with the Nomina Anatomica (Wilkins, Baltimore, 1983). This revision mainly consists of the incorporation of the terms M. palmaris longus and Mm. flexores breves manus.

  7. The flexor tendon pulley system and rock climbing.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Timothy P

    2012-06-01

    Rock climbing has increased in popularity over the past two decades. Closed traumatic rupture of the finger flexor tendon pulleys is rare among the general population but is seen much more commonly in rock climbers. This article reviews the anatomy and biomechanics of the finger flexor tendon pulleys, how they may be injured in rock climbing and how these injuries are best diagnosed and managed.

  8. Arthroscopic Synovectomy for Zone 2 Flexor Hallucis Longus Tenosynovitis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Tenosynovitis of the flexor hallucis longus tendon is a condition typically found in ballet dancers and sometimes in soccer players and is related to chronic overuse. It mostly involves the portion of the tendon behind the ankle joint. However, the portion of the tendon under the sustentaculum tali can also be involved. Open synovectomy requires extensive dissection. We report the technique of arthroscopic synovectomy of the deep portion of the flexor hallucis longus.

  9. Development and evaluation of a musculoskeletal model of the elbow joint complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Roger V.; Hutchins, E. L.; Barr, Ronald E.; Abraham, Lawrence D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a musculoskeletal model that represents human elbow flexion-extension and forearm pronation-supination. The length, velocity, and moment arm for each of the eight musculotendon actuators were based on skeletal anatomy and position. Musculotendon parameters were determined for each actuator and verified by comparing analytical torque-angle curves with experimental joint torque data. The parameters and skeletal geometry were also utilized in the musculoskeletal model for the analysis of ballistic elbow joint complex movements. The key objective was to develop a computational model, guided by parameterized optimal control, to investigate the relationship among patterns of muscle excitation, individual muscle forces, and movement kinematics. The model was verified using experimental kinematic, torque, and electromyographic data from volunteer subjects performing ballistic elbow joint complex movements.

  10. Spontaneous Flexor Tendon Rupture Due to Atraumatic Chronic Carpal Instability

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, B. H.; Cerovac, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Spontaneous flexor tendon rupture is considered to be invariably associated with previous hand/wrist injury or systemic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. Case Description A 54-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of mild ulnar wrist pain and spontaneous left little finger flexion loss in the absence of distant/recent trauma and systemic arthropathy. Surgical exploration confirmed a zone IV left little finger flexor digitorum profundus (FDP5) attritional rupture (100%), ring finger flexor digitorum profundus (FDP4) attenuation (40%) and a disrupted lunotriquetral ligament and volar-ulnar wrist capsule. Volar subluxation of the narrowed carpal tunnel resulted in flexor tendon attrition against the hamate hook. A side-to-side tendon transfer was performed along with a lunotriquetral ligament repair and temporary Kirschner wire fixation. At 6 months the patient had full active, synchronous flexion of the ring and little fingers and reduced wrist pain. Literature Review Traumatic flexor tendon ruptures have been reported following distal radius/hamate hook fractures, from carpal bone osteophytes, accessory carpal bones and intraosseous ganglia. Attritional ruptures caused by chronic, degenerative carpal pathology are less common. Clinical Relevance This case highlights an unusual cause of flexor tendon rupture due to chronic carpal instability. PMID:25032080

  11. Flexor origin slide for contracture of spastic finger flexor muscles: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Thevenin-Lemoine, Camille; Denormandie, Philippe; Schnitzler, Alexis; Lautridou, Christine; Allieu, Yves; Genêt, François

    2013-03-06

    Contracture of the wrist and extrinsic finger flexor and pronator muscles is a common consequence of central nervous system disorders. The proximal release of the extrinsic flexor and pronator muscles was first described by Page and Scaglietti for a Volkmann contracture. The aim of the present study was to assess the amount of increase in extension and the improvements in global hand function that can be expected following this lengthening procedure in patients with central nervous system disorders. A single-center retrospective review of patients with central nervous system lesions and contractures of the wrist and extrinsic finger flexor and forearm pronator muscles, causing aesthetic, hygienic, or functional impairment, was carried out. The Page-Scaglietti technique was used for all interventions. Before the operation, motor nerve blocks were used to distinguish between spasticity and contractures with surgical intervention only for contractures. The Zancolli and House classifications were used to evaluate improvements. Data from fifty-four hands and fifty patients (thirty-five men and fifteen women) were evaluated. The mean duration of follow-up (and standard deviation) was 26 ± 21 months (range, three to 124 months). The mean gain (and standard deviation) in wrist extension with fingers extended was 67° ± 25° (range, -10° to 110°). Preoperatively, no hands were classified as Zancolli Group 1, whereas twenty-five hands were classified as Zancolli Group 1 at the latest follow-up review. Ten nonfunctional hands (rated as House Group 0 or Group 1) became functional as a supporting hand postoperatively. Zancolli and House classifications increased significantly (p < 0.01) postoperatively. In twelve cases, a partial recurrence of the deformity occurred. In seven of these cases, surgery unmasked spasticity or contracture of the intrinsic muscles, which required further intervention. The Page-Scaglietti technique appears to improve range of motion and function

  12. Ulnohumeral chondral and ligamentous overload: biomechanical correlation for posteromedial chondromalacia of the elbow in throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Osbahr, Daryl C; Dines, Joshua S; Breazeale, Nathan M; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Altchek, David W

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies have documented increased posteromedial contact forces with the elbow at lower flexion angles associated with valgus extension overload; however, the authors believe that posteromedial elbow impingement in association with valgus laxity is a complex pathological process that may occur throughout the entire throwing motion in the form of ulnohumeral chondral and ligamentous overload. Valgus laxity with the elbow at 90° of flexion may lead to chondromalacia secondary to a subtle shift in the contact point between the tip of the olecranon and the distal humeral trochlea. Controlled laboratory study. Six fresh human cadaveric elbows were dissected and subjected to a static valgus load. Pressure-sensitive Fuji film measured the contact pressure, contact area, and shift in contact area across the posteromedial elbow before and after sectioning the anterior bundle of the ulnar collateral ligament. The contact pressure between the tip of the olecranon process and the medial crista of the posterior humeral trochlea significantly increased, from an average of 0.27 ± 0.06 kg/cm² to 0.40 ± 0.08 kg/cm². The contact area also significantly decreased, from an average of 30.34 ± 9.17 mm² to 24.59 ± 6.44 mm², and shifted medially on the medial humeral crista, which corresponds to the position of the posteromedial chondral lesions that was observed in throwing athletes in the authors' clinical practice. While simulating the early acceleration phase of the throwing motion with the elbow in 90° of flexion, the results illustrate that abnormal contact may occur as a result of valgus laxity through increased contact pressures across the posteromedial elbow between the medial tip of the olecranon and medial crista of the humeral trochlea. In addition, congruency of the ulnohumeral joint changed, as there was a statistically significant medial shift of the olecranon on the posterior humeral trochlea with the elbow at 90° of flexion after sectioning the anterior

  13. Flexor and extensor muscle tone evaluated using the quantitative pendulum test in stroke and parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han-Wei; Ju, Ming-Shaung; Lin, Chou-Ching K

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexor and extensor muscle tone of the upper limbs in patients with spasticity or rigidity and to investigate the difference in hypertonia between spasticity and rigidity. The two experimental groups consisted of stroke patients and parkinsonian patients. The control group consisted of age and sex-matched normal subjects. Quantitative upper limb pendulum tests starting from both flexed and extended joint positions were conducted. System identification with a simple linear model was performed and model parameters were derived. The differences between the three groups and two starting positions were investigated by these model parameters and tested by two-way analysis of variance. In total, 57 subjects were recruited, including 22 controls, 14 stroke patients and 21 parkinsonian patients. While stiffness coefficient showed no difference among groups, the number of swings, relaxation index and damping coefficient showed changes suggesting significant hypertonia in the two patient groups. There was no difference between these two patient groups. The test starting from the extended position constantly manifested higher muscle tone in all three groups. In conclusion, the hypertonia of parkinsonian and stroke patients could not be differentiated by the modified pendulum test; the elbow extensors showed a higher muscle tone in both control and patient groups; and hypertonia of both parkinsonian and stroke patients is velocity dependent.

  14. Measurement of cervical flexor endurance following whiplash.

    PubMed

    Kumbhare, Dinesh A; Balsor, Brad; Parkinson, William L; Harding Bsckin, Peter; Bedard, Michel; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D

    2005-07-22

    To investigate measurement properties of a practical test of cervical flexor endurance (CFE) in whiplash patients including inter-rater reliability, sensitivity to clinical change, criterion related validity against the Neck Disability Index (NDI), and discriminant validity for injured versus uninjured populations. Two samples were recruited, 81 whiplash patients, and a convenience sample of 160 subjects who were not seeking treatment and met criteria for normal pain and range of motion. CFE was measured using a stopwatch while the subject, in crook lying, held their head against gravity to fatigue. Inter-rater reliability in whiplash patients was in a range considered 'almost perfect' (Intraclass Correlation=0.96). CFE had greater inter-subject variability than the NDI or range of motion in any of three planes. However, the effect size for improvement in CFE over treatment was as large as the effect sizes for all of those measures. In multivariate regression, CFE changes accounted for changes on the NDI better than the three ranges of motion. CFE discriminated whiplash patients who were within six months of injury (n=71) from age and gender matched normals with high effect size (ES=1.5). These findings provide evidence of reliability and validity for CFE measurement, and demonstrate that CFE detects clinical improvements. Variance on CFE emphasizes the need to consider inter-, and intra-subject standard deviations to interpret scores.

  15. Mechanical compromise of partially lacerated flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Kondratko, Jaclyn; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2013-01-01

    Tendons function to transmit loads from muscle to move and stabilize joints and absorb impacts. Functionality of lacerated tendons is diminished, however clinical practice often considers surgical repair only after 50% or more of the tendon is lacerated, the "50% rule." Few studies provide mechanical insight into the 50% rule. In this study cyclic and static stress relaxation tests were performed on porcine flexor tendons before and after a 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 2.75 mm deep transverse, midsubstance laceration. Elastic and viscoelastic properties, such as maximum stress, change in stress throughout each test, and stiffness, were measured and compared pre- and post-laceration. Nominal stress and stiffness parameters decreased, albeit disproportionately in magnitude, with increasing percent loss of cross-sectional area. Conversely, mean stress at the residual area (determined using remaining intact area at the laceration cross section) exhibited a marked increase in stress concentration beginning at 47.2% laceration using both specified load and constant strain analyses. The marked increase in stress concentration beginning near 50% laceration provides mechanical insight into the 50% rule. Additionally, a drastic decrease in viscoelastic stress parameters after only an 8.2% laceration suggests that time-dependent mechanisms protecting tissues during impact loadings are highly compromised regardless of laceration size.

  16. "Chiefs for Change" Elbows into Policy Fight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Amid the cacophony of special interests fighting to be heard in statehouses and on Capitol Hill, a cadre of current and former chief state school officers is elbowing its way into the nation's education debate at a time when states are taking more control of K-12 education. A little more than a year old, Chiefs for Change is an invitation-only…

  17. Medial elbow injury in young throwing athletes

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Bonnie; Nyland, John

    2013-01-01

    Summary This report reviews the anatomy, overhead throwing biomechanics, injury mechanism and incidence, physical examination and diagnosis, diagnostic imaging and conservative treatment of medial elbow injuries in young throwing athletes. Based on the information a clinical management decision-making algorithm is presented. PMID:23888291

  18. Gliding resistance of flexor tendon associated with carpal tunnel pressure: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon was measured with the following six conditions: (1) as a baseline, before balloon insertion; (2) balloon with 0 mmHg pressure; (3) 30 mmHg; (4) 60 mmHg; (5) 90 mmHg; (6) 120 mmHg. The gliding resistance of flexor tendon gradually increased as the carpal tunnel pressure was elevated. At pressures above 60 mmHg, the increase in gliding resistance became significant compared to the baseline condition. This study helps us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure, which is elevated in the patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and tendon gliding resistance, which is a component of the work of flexion. These findings suggest that patients with CTS may have to expend more energy to accomplish specific motions, which may in turn affect symptoms of hand pain, weakness and fatigue, seen commonly in such patients. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  19. Gliding Resistance of Flexor Tendon Associated with Carpal Tunnel Pressure: A Biomechanical Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M.; Berglund, Lawrence J.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carpal tunnel pressure on the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel. Eight fresh human cadaver wrists and hands were used. A balloon was inserted into the carpal tunnel to elevate the pressure. The mean gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon was measured with the following six conditions 1) as a baseline, before balloon insertion; 2) balloon with 0 mmHg pressure; 3) 30 mmHg; 4) 60 mmHg; 5) 90 mmHg; 6) 120 mmHg. The gliding resistance of flexor tendon gradually increased as the carpal tunnel pressure was elevated. At pressures above 60 mmHg, the increase in gliding resistance became significant compared to the baseline condition. This study helps us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel pressure, which is elevated in the patient with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and tendon gliding resistance, which is a component of the work of flexion. These findings suggest that patients with CTS may have to expend more energy to accomplish specific motions, which may in turn affect symptoms of hand pain, weakness and fatigue, seen commonly in such patients. PMID:20661935

  20. Electromyography of wrist and finger flexor muscles in olive baboons (Papio anubis).

    PubMed

    Patel, Biren A; Larson, Susan G; Stern, Jack T

    2012-01-01

    Some non-human primates use digitigrade hand postures when walking slowly on the ground. As a component of an extended limb, a digitigrade posture can help minimize wrist joint moments thereby requiring little force production directly from wrist flexors (and/or from the assistance of finger flexors) to maintain limb posture. As a consequence, less active muscle volume would be required from these anti-gravity muscles and overall metabolic costs associated with locomotion could be reduced. To investigate whether the use of digitigrade hand postures during walking in primates entails minimal use of anti-gravity muscles, this study examined electromyography (EMG) patterns in both the wrist and finger flexor muscles in facultatively digitigrade olive baboons (Papio anubis) across a range of speeds. The results demonstrate that baboons can adopt a digitigrade hand posture when standing and moving at slow speeds without requiring substantial EMG activity from distal anti-gravity muscles. Higher speed locomotion, however, entails increasing EMG activity and is accompanied by a dynamic shift to a more palmigrade-like limb posture. Thus, the ability to adopt a digitigrade hand posture by monkeys is an adaptation for ground living, but it was never co-opted for fast locomotion. Rather, digitigrady in primates appears to be related to energetic efficiency for walking long distances.

  1. Decreased Brain Neurokinin-1 Receptor Availability in Chronic Tennis Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Catana, Ciprian; Svärdsudd, Kurt; Appel, Lieuwe; Engler, Henry; Långström, Bengt; Sörensen, Jens; Furmark, Tomas; Fredrikson, Mats; Borsook, David; Peterson, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Substance P is released in painful and inflammatory conditions, affecting both peripheral processes and the central nervous system neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor. There is a paucity of data on human brain alterations in NK1 expression, how this system may be affected by treatment, and interactions between central and peripheral tissue alterations. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis) were selected out of a larger (n = 120) randomized controlled trial evaluating graded exercise as a treatment for chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis). These ten subjects were examined by positron emission tomography (PET) with the NK1-specific radioligand 11C-GR205171 before, and eight patients were followed up after treatment with graded exercise. Brain binding in the ten patients before treatment, reflecting NK1-receptor availability (NK1-RA), was compared to that of 18 healthy subjects and, longitudinally, to the eight of the original ten patients that agreed to a second PET examination after treatment. Before treatment, patients had significantly lower NK1-RA in the insula, vmPFC, postcentral gyrus, anterior cingulate, caudate, putamen, amygdala and the midbrain but not the thalamus and cerebellum, with the largest difference in the insula contralateral to the injured elbow. No significant correlations between brain NK1-RA and pain, functional severity, or peripheral NK1-RA in the affected limb were observed. In the eight patients examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in everyone, but there were no significant changes in NK1-RA. These findings indicate a role for the substance P (SP) / NK1 receptor system in musculoskeletal pain and tissue healing. As neither clinical parameters nor successful treatment response was reflected in brain NK1-RA after treatment, this may reflect the diverse function of the SP/NK1 system in CNS and peripheral tissue, or a change too small or slow to capture over the three-month treatment. PMID:27658244

  2. Current treatment concepts for "terrible triad" injuries of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Kevin; Ipaktchi, Kyros; Livermore, Meryl; Cao, Jue; Banegas, Rodrigo

    2014-12-01

    Elbow fracture-dislocations destabilize the elbow, preventing functional rehabilitation. If left untreated, they commonly result in functional compromise and poor outcomes. The "terrible triad" injury is classically described as a combination of a coronoid process and radial head fractures, as well as a posterolateral elbow dislocation. Surgical treatment to restore stable elbow range of motion has evolved in the past few decades based on increased understanding of elbow biomechanics and the anatomy of these injuries. This article highlights current concepts in the treatment of these complicated injuries.

  3. Reduced elbow extension torque during vibrations.

    PubMed

    Friesenbichler, Bernd; Coza, Aurel; Nigg, Benno M

    2012-08-31

    Impact sports and vibration platforms trigger vibrations within soft tissues and the skeleton. Although the long-term effects of vibrations on the body have been studied extensively, the acute effects of vibrations are little understood. This study determined the influence of acute vibrations at different frequencies and elbow angles on maximal isometric elbow extension torque and muscle activity. Vibrations were generated by a pneumatic vibrator attached to the lever of a dynamometer, and were applied on the forearm of 15 healthy female subjects. The subjects were instructed to push maximally against the lever at three different elbow angles, while extension torque and muscle activity were quantified and compared between vibration and non-vibration (control) conditions. A change in vibration frequency had no significant effects on torque and muscle activity although vibrations in general decreased the maximal extension torque relative to the control by 1.8% (±5.7%, p>0.05), 7.4% (±7.9%, p<0.01), and 5.0% (±8.2%, p<0.01) at elbow angles of 60°, 90°, and 120°, respectively. Electromyographic activity increased significantly between ∼30% and 40% in both triceps and biceps with vibrations. It is speculated that a similar increase in muscle activity between agonist and antagonist, in combination with an unequal increase in muscle moment arms about the elbow joint, limit the maximal extension torque during exposure to vibrations. This study showed that maximal extension torque decreased during vibration exposure while muscle activity increased and suggests that vibrations may be counterproductive during activities requiring maximal strength but potentially beneficial for strength training.

  4. Flexor Digitorum Longus (FDL) or Flexor Hallucis Longus (FHL) Harvesting: Technical Tip and Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Bruce; Nyska, Meir; Ip, Wing; Huynh, Em; Palmanovich, Ezequiel

    2017-09-01

    Harvesting of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) or the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) is a procedure used when tendon transfer is needed. It is commonly used in tibialis posterior reconstruction and Achilles tendon reconstruction. Harvesting of these tendons is sometimes difficult and time-consuming. It is important to obtain sufficient length to make a loop around the navicular bone or anchor it in the calcaneus. We describe a technique in which a loop is passed from proximal identification of the FDL or FHL through the tendon sheath, harvesting it from a minimal plantar approach. After using this technique, we evaluated 10 consecutive patients for neurovascular damage. We found no postoperative neurovascular injuries. The technique described enables the surgeon to find the FDL/FHL tendon through the medial approach and obtain sufficient length for the procedure by cutting the distal portion of the tendon through an additional plantar incision. Our technical tip for passing the loop facilitates harvest of the tendon easily and safely using the plantar approach. IV, case series.

  5. Flexor Tendon Repair With Looped Suture: 1 Versus 2 Knots.

    PubMed

    Gil, Joseph A; Skjong, Christian; Katarincic, Julia A; Got, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    To assess the strength of flexor tendon repair with looped suture. We hypothesized that, after passing the intact looped suture in the desired repair configuration, splitting the loop and tying 2 independent knots would increase the strength of flexor tendon repair. Thirty-two flexor tendons were harvested and were sharply transected in zone II. The tendons were repaired with a 4-strand core suture repair using 3-0 looped nonabsorbable nylon suture. The harvested tendons were randomly assigned and repaired with either a 1- or a 2-knot construct. The repaired flexor tendons were fixed in a servohydraulic material testing system and were loaded to failure either with uniaxial tension or cyclically. The average force at failure was 43 N for the 1-knot repair and 28 N for the 2-knot repair. The mode of failure of 15 of the flexor tendon repairs that were cyclically loaded to failure was suture pull-out. The average number of cycles and force in cyclic testing that caused failure of flexor tendon repairs was 134 cycles and 31 N for tendons repaired with looped 3-0 suture tied with 1 knot and 94 cycles and 33 N for tendons repaired with looped 3-0 suture tied with 2 knots. Our hypothesis was disproved by the results of this study. This study suggests that, when using looped suture, tying 2 independent knots instead of tying a single knot does not increase the strength of the flexor tendon repair. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in carpal tunnel compliance with incremental flexor retinaculum release.

    PubMed

    Ratnaparkhi, Rubina; Xiu, Kaihua; Guo, Xin; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-04-13

    Flexor retinaculum transection is a routine surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome, yet the biomechanical and clinical sequelae of the procedure remain unclear. We investigated the effects of flexor retinaculum release on carpal tunnel structural compliance using cadaveric hands. The flexor retinaculum was incrementally and sequentially released with transections of 25, 50, 75, and 100 % of the transverse carpal ligament, followed by the distal aponeurosis and then the antebrachial fascia. Paired outward 10 N forces were applied to the insertion sites of the transverse carpal ligament at the distal (hamate-trapezium) and proximal (pisiform-scaphoid) levels of the carpal tunnel. Carpal tunnel compliance was defined as the change in carpal arch width normalized to the constant 10 N force. With the flexor retinaculum intact, carpal tunnel compliance at the proximal level, 0.696 ± 0.128 mm/N, was 13.6 times greater than that at the distal level, 0.056 ± 0.020 mm/N. Complete release of the transverse carpal ligament was required to achieve a significant gain in compliance at the distal level (p < 0.05). Subsequent release of the distal aponeurosis resulted in an appreciable additional increase in compliance (43.0 %, p = 0.052) at the distal level, but a minimal increase (1.7 %, p = 0.987) at the proximal level. Complete flexor retinaculum release provided a significant gain in compliance relative to transverse carpal ligament release alone at both proximal and distal levels (p < 0.05). Overall, complete flexor retinaculum release increased proximal compliance by 52 % and distal compliance by 332 %. The increase in carpal tunnel compliance with complete flexor retinaculum release helps explain the benefit of carpal tunnel release surgery for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

  7. Correction of elbow flexion contracture in late obstetric brachial plexus palsy through arthrodiatasis of the elbow (Ioannina method).

    PubMed

    Vekris, Marios D; Pafilas, Dimitrios; Lykissas, Marios G; Soucacos, Panayiotis N; Beris, Alexandros E

    2010-03-01

    Inadequate elbow extension is a recognized sequela after obstetric brachial plexus injury because of muscle imbalance and adversely affects the ability to perform sufficiently most daily living activities. The various methods that have been used to correct this deformity do not offer a satisfactory outcome in the long term and show a tendency for gradual recurrence. We present a new technique of a closed gradual arthrodiatasis using a unilateral hinged elbow external fixator. The technique was applied in 10 patients with elbow flexion contracture as a sequela of brachial plexus birth palsy. Loss of elbow extension measured 55 degrees at average. With a mean device application of 8.8 weeks all patients gained full elbow extension. No major complications were noted. All patients were satisfied with the outcome. This novel technique (closed gradual arthrodiatasis of the elbow joint) has a definite role in the treatment of elbow flexion contracture in late cases of obstetric palsy, given the otherwise limited surgical options.

  8. Measurement of fatigue in knee flexor and extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Y; Senda, M; Oka, T; Yagata, Y; Takahara, Y; Nagashima, H; Inoue, H

    2000-04-01

    In order to examine fatigue of the knee flexor and extensor muscles and to investigate the characteristics of muscular fatigue in different sports, a Cybex machine was used to measure muscle fatigue and recovery during isokinetic knee flexion and extension. Eighteen baseball players, 12 soccer players and 13 marathon runners were studied. Each subject was tested in the sitting position and made to perform 50 consecutive right knee bends and stretches at maximum strength. This was done 3 times with an interval of 10 min between each series. The peak torque to body weight ratio and the fatigue rate were determined in each case. In all subjects, the peak torque to body weight ratio was higher for extensors than flexors. Over the 3 trials, the fatigue rate of extensors showed little change, while that of flexors had a tendency to increase. In each subject, knee extensors showed a high fatigue rate but a quick recovery, while knee flexors showed a low fatigue rate but a slow recovery. As the marathon runners had the smallest fatigue rates for both flexors and extensors, we concluded that marathon runners had more stamina than baseball players and soccer players.

  9. The Cellular Biology of Flexor Tendon Adhesion Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason K.F.; Lui, Yin H.; Kapacee, Zoher; Kadler, Karl E.; Ferguson, Mark W. J.; McGrouther, Duncan A.

    2009-01-01

    Intrasynovial flexor tendon injuries of the hand can frequently be complicated by tendon adhesions to the surrounding sheath, limiting finger function. We have developed a new tendon injury model in the mouse to investigate the three-dimensional cellular biology of intrasynovial flexor tendon healing and adhesion formation. We investigated the cell biology using markers for inflammation, proliferation, collagen synthesis, apoptosis, and vascularization/myofibroblasts. Quantitative immunohistochemical image analysis and three-dimensional reconstruction with cell mapping was performed on labeled serial sections. Flexor tendon adhesions were also assessed 21 days after wounding using transmission electron microscopy to examine the cell phenotypes in the wound. When the tendon has been immobilized, the mouse can form tendon adhesions in the flexor tendon sheath. The cell biology of tendon healing follows the classic wound healing response of inflammation, proliferation, synthesis, and apoptosis, but the greater activity occurs in the surrounding tissue. Cells that have multiple “fibripositors” and cells with cytoplasmic protrusions that contain multiple large and small diameter fibrils can be found in the wound during collagen synthesis. In conclusion, adhesion formation occurs due to scarring between two damaged surfaces. The mouse model for flexor tendon injury represents a new platform to study adhesion formation that is genetically tractable. PMID:19834058

  10. Epidemiology of shoulder and elbow pain in youth baseball players.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suzue, Naoto; Iwame, Toshiyuki; Arisawa, Kokichi; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    There are relatively few published epidemiological studies examining the differences in the risk of shoulder and elbow pain in young baseball players. The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors for shoulder and elbow pain in child and adolescent baseball players. A total of 1563 players aged 7 to 12 years participated in this investigation. Subjects were asked whether they had experienced episodes of shoulder or elbow pain. We investigated the following risk factors for shoulder and elbow pain: age, position, years of baseball experience, and training hours per week. Data from the groups with and without shoulder and elbow pain were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models. Among the 1563 participants, 15.9% and 29.2% reported episodes of shoulder and elbow pain, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that shoulder pain was associated with age 10, 11, and 12 years, and that elbow pain was associated with age 10, 11, and 12 years, playing catcher, and >2 years of baseball experience. Training hours per week were not associated with either shoulder or elbow pain. In over 1000 baseball players aged 7 to 12 years, 15.9% reported episodes of shoulder pain, while 29.2% reported elbow pain in the throwing arm. The associated risk factors were different for each type of pain. Shoulder pain was associated with increased age while elbow pain was associated with increased age, increased years of baseball experience, and playing catcher.

  11. Biomechanics of the elbow during baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Werner, S L; Fleisig, G S; Dillman, C J; Andrews, J R

    1993-06-01

    By understanding pitching biomechanics, therapists can develop better preventive and rehabilitative programs for pitchers. The purpose of this study was to quantify and explain the joint motions, loads, and muscle activity that occur at the elbow during baseball pitching. Seven healthy, adult pitchers were examined with synchronized high-speed video digitization and surface electromyography. Elbow extension before ball release corresponded with a decrease in biceps activity and an increase in triceps activity. A varus torque of 120 Nm, acting to resist valgus stress, occurred near the time of maximum shoulder external rotation. Previous cadaveric research showed that the ulnar collateral ligament by itself cannot withstand a valgus load of this magnitude. Triceps, wrist flexorpronator, and anconeus activity during peak valgus stress suggests that these muscles may act as dynamic stabilizers to assist the ulnar collateral ligament in preventing valgus extension overload.

  12. The biceps muscle from shoulder to elbow.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Kathryn; Kwak, Andrew; Poplawski, Stephen

    2012-09-01

    The biceps brachii plays an integral role in movement of the shoulder and elbow, and pathology can occur in athletes of all ages. Injuries of the proximal biceps tendon can be seen in overhead athletes as a result of chronic impingement, tendon instability, or tensile overload, often with accompanying lesions of the labrum or rotator cuff. Presentation may be insidious or can be precipitated by an acute event. Injuries to the distal biceps are more common in athletes involved in strength training such as weightlifters, or occasionally in contact sports. Although injury to the proximal and distal biceps can often be diagnosed clinically, MRI is an excellent imaging modality to evaluate the extent of disease and involvement of adjacent structures. This article reviews the anatomy of the biceps brachii from the shoulder to elbow and discusses commonly occurring pathology of the biceps and adjacent anatomical structures.

  13. Above-elbow arm replantation during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Haws, M J; Erdmann, D; Brown, R E

    1996-01-01

    We report a successful replantation of an above-elbow amputated left arm in a 26-year-old female with a good, functional, long-term result. The patient was at 18 weeks estimated gestational age at the time of surgery. Major upper extremity replantation during pregnancy has not been previously described in the literature. Current operative and perioperative aspects, including considerations that favored microsurgical replantation in this unusual case, are discussed.

  14. Spastic Paralysis of the Elbow and Forearm

    PubMed Central

    Gharbaoui, Idris; Kania, Katarzyna; Cole, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    As the physiologic recovery period concludes, the patient is evaluated for surgical procedures that may rebalance muscle function and correct deformity. Upper extremity function is the product of complex and highly sophisticated mechanisms working in unison, and a careful, systematic preoperative evaluation is critical. A good function of the hand cannot be achieved without adequate position of the shoulder, elbow, forearm, and wrist. The goals of surgery must be practical and clearly understood by the patient and the family. PMID:26869862

  15. No man's land revisited: the primary flexor tendon repair controversy.

    PubMed

    Newmeyer, William L; Manske, Paul R

    2004-01-01

    New surgical procedures, novel concepts, and/or the presentation of very good results with an apparently discredited technique meet varying degrees of resistance among the establishment of any profession. In hand surgery this phenomenon was exemplified in a striking fashion with the presentation of a controversial report entitled, "Primary repair of flexor tendons in no man's land" by Kleinert, Kutz, Ashbell, and Martinez of Louisville, KY, at the 1967 American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) annual meeting. The discussant, Joseph Boyes, expressed such skepticism that a special ASSH committee was appointed to go to Louisville and review the results to determine if they were as good as claimed. They were, and today primary flexor tendon repair is the procedure of choice for most flexor tendon lacerations.

  16. Chronic medial instability of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Felix H; O'Brien, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Damage to the medial collateral ligament of the elbow from an instability episode usually heals with non-operative treatment. In some cases, residual instability may occur, leading to functional impairment.Non-operative management can be successful when bracing, taping and therapy are used to stabilise the elbow.A recent report detailing the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma in effectively treating ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries in throwers has shown promise. However, there remain specific groups that should be considered for repair or reconstruction. These may include throwing athletes, wrestlers and some individuals involved in highly active physical activity which demands stability of the elbow.The results of surgical repair and reconstruction allowing a return to sports are quite good, ranging from 84% to 94%. Complications are generally low and mostly centred on ulnar nerve injuries.This report represents a review of the literature concerning valgus instability over the past five years, supplemented by selective older articles where relevant. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:1-6. DOI:10.1302/2058-5241.2.160037.

  17. Radiofrequency Microtenotomy for Elbow Epicondylitis: Midterm Results.

    PubMed

    Tasto, James P; Richmond, John M; Cummings, Jeffrey R; Hardesty, Renee; Amiel, David

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, nonrandomized, single-center clinical study to evaluate the safety and midterm effectiveness of microtenotomy using a radiofrequency probe to treat chronic tendinosis of the elbow. All patients had failed conservative treatment for 6 months. The radiofrequency-based microtenotomy was performed using the Topaz Microdebrider (ArthroCare). Patients were followed annually for up to 9 years postoperatively. Pain status was documented using a visual analog scale self-reported measure. Eighty consecutive patients with tendinosis of the elbow were enrolled; 69 patients were treated for lateral epicondylitis and 11 for medial epicondylitis. The duration of follow-up ranged from 6 months to 9 years (mean, 2.5 years). Ninety-one percent of the patients reported a successful outcome. Within the lateral epicondylitis group, the preoperative visual analog scale improved from 6.9 to 1.3 postoperatively and demonstrated an 81% improvement (P ≤ .01). For the medial epicondylitis patients, the preoperative visual analog scale improved from 6.1 to 1.3 after surgery, a 79% improvement (P ≤ .01). No complications were reported. Radiofrequency-based microtenotomy is a safe and effective procedure for elbow epicondylitis. The results are durable with successful outcomes observed at 9 years after surgery.

  18. Reliability of a measurement of neck flexor muscle endurance.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kevin D; Heer, Darren M; Roy, Tanja C; Santos, Diane M; Whitman, Julie M; Wainner, Robert S

    2005-12-01

    Neck flexor muscle endurance has been negatively correlated with cervical pain and dysfunction. The purposes of this study were to determine rater reliability in subjects both with and without neck pain and to determine whether there was a difference in neck flexor muscle endurance between the 2 groups. Forty-one subjects with and without neck pain were enrolled in this repeated-measures reliability study. Two raters used an isometric neck retraction test to assess neck flexor muscle endurance for all subjects during an initial session, and subjects without neck pain returned for testing 1 week later. For the group without neck pain, intrarater reliability was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC(3,1)]=.82-.91), and interrater reliability was moderate to good (ICC[2,1]=.67-.78). The associated standard error of measurement (SEM) ranged from 8.0 to 11.0 seconds and from 12.6 to 15.3 seconds, respectively. For the group with neck pain, interrater reliability was moderate (ICC[2,1]=.67, SEM=11.5). Neck flexor muscle endurance test results for the group without neck pain (mean=38.95 seconds, SD=26.4) and the group with neck pain (mean=24.1 seconds, SD=12.8) were significantly different. Reliability coefficients differed between the 2 groups and ranged from moderate to excellent and improved after the first test session. The interrater reliability of data obtained with the neck flexor muscle endurance test in people with neck pain must be improved in order for clinicians to distinguish a clinically meaningful change from measurement error. Neck flexor muscle endurance was both statistically and clinically greater for subjects without neck pain than for those with neck pain.

  19. A variant of flexor carpi ulnaris causing ulnar nerve compression.

    PubMed Central

    al-Qattan, M M; Duerksen, F

    1992-01-01

    Anatomical variations of the muscles and nerves around the wrist are common. Knowledge of such variations is derived from 2 sources: anatomical dissections and clinically reported cases. We present a case of duplication of the tendon of flexor carpi ulnaris with splitting of the ulnar nerve. The ulnar slip of the tendon was inserted into the pisiform bone and the radial slip into the proximal phalanx of the ring finger. The anatomical literature and the clinically reported cases of variations of the flexor carpi ulnaris are reviewed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:1452475

  20. Superficialis Sling (Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Tenodesis) for Swan Neck Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wei, David H; Terrono, Andrew L

    2015-10-01

    Swan neck deformity, or hyperextension of the proximal interphalangeal joint, may occur secondary to trauma, rheumatoid arthritis, cerebral palsy, or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and can be treated with tenodesis of one slip of the flexor digitorum sublimis tendon. This technique has several variations, differing primarily in the specific location and method that a single slip of the flexor digitorum sublimis tendon is secured, but they all serve to create a static volar restraint against hyperextension. Options include tunneling the tendon through the bone of the proximal phalanx, attaching the tendon to the A1 or A2 pulley, or securing the tendon with bone anchors in the proximal phalanx.

  1. Primary flexor tendon surgery: the search for a perfect result.

    PubMed

    Elliot, David; Giesen, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Repair of the divided flexor tendon to achieve normal, or near normal, function is an unsolved problem, with each result still uncertain. The authors believe the way forward in primary flexor tendon surgery clinically is by use of strengthened but simpler sutures, appropriate venting of the pulley system, and maintaining early rehabilitation. However, there needs also be consideration of patient factors and other aspects. Research needs to continue more widely, in both the laboratory and the clinical environment, to find ways of better modifying adhesions after surgical repair of the tendon.

  2. Terrible triad injury of the elbow: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Paul K; Athwal, George S; King, Graham J W

    2009-03-01

    Fracture-dislocations of the elbow remain among the most difficult injuries to manage. Historically, the combination of an elbow dislocation, a radial head fracture, and a coronoid process fracture has had a consistently poor outcome; for this reason, it is called the terrible triad. An elbow dislocation associated with a displaced fracture of the radial head and coronoid process almost always renders the elbow unstable, making surgical fixation necessary. The primary goal of surgical fixation is to stabilize the elbow to permit early motion. Recent literature has improved our understanding of elbow anatomy and biomechanics along with the pathoanatomy of this injury, thereby allowing the development of a systematic approach for treatment and rehabilitation. Advances in knowledge combined with improved implants and surgical techniques have contributed to better outcomes.

  3. Elbow magnetic resonance imaging: imaging anatomy and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Jennifer; English, Collette; Murphy, Darra

    2015-04-01

    The elbow is a complex joint. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often the imaging modality of choice in the workup of elbow pain, especially in sports injuries and younger patients who often have either a history of a chronic repetitive strain such as the throwing athlete or a distinct traumatic injury. Traumatic injuries and alternative musculoskeletal pathologies can affect the ligaments, musculotendinous, cartilaginous, and osseous structures of the elbow as well as the 3 main nerves to the upper limb, and these structures are best assessed with MRI.Knowledge of the complex anatomy of the elbow joint as well as patterns of injury and disease is important for the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis in the setting of elbow pain. This chapter will outline elbow anatomy, basic imaging parameters, compartmental pathology, and finally applications of some novel MRI techniques.

  4. Gross anatomy of the elbow capsule: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Lee M; Morales, Omar A

    2013-01-01

    The elbow is an inherently stable joint because of its bony articulation and surrounding capsuloligamentous structures. Anatomic and biomechanical studies have focused on the medial and lateral collateral ligamentous contributions to stability. In 1918, Gray provided a qualitative description of the elbow capsule and its fibers. Our study was performed to detail the gross anatomy of the elbow capsule. We evaluated the elbow capsule of 6 paired, fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens to detail gross capsular anatomy. We identified 3 distinct bands within the anterior capsule and 3 distinct bands within the posterior capsule. Further study is needed to delineate the functional meaning of these anatomic findings. Greater understanding of elbow capsule gross anatomy may lead to improved understanding of acute and chronic elbow pathoanatomy and treatment modalities. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ligamentous and capsular restraints to experimental posterior elbow joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Søren R; Olsen, Bo S; Jensen, Steen L; Tyrdal, Stein; Sneppen, Otto

    2003-10-01

    Pathological external forearm rotation (PEFR) relates to posterolateral elbow joint instability, and is considered a possible requisite step in a simple posterior elbow joint dislocation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capsuloligamentous restraint to PEFR. In all, 18 elbow joint specimens were examined in a joint analysis system developed for experimental elbow dislocation. Sequential cutting of capsule and ligaments followed by stability testing provided specific data relating to each capsuloligamentous structure. The primary stabilizers against PEFR in the extended elbow were the anterior capsule and the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC), whereas in the flexed elbow the anterior capsule did not have a stabilizing effect. In flexed joint positions, the LCLC seems to be the only immediate stabilizer against PEFR, and thereby against posterolateral instability and possibly against posterior dislocation. The medial collateral ligament did not have any immediate stabilizing effect, but it prevented the final step of the posterior dislocation.

  6. Pectoralis major transfer for paralysis of elbow flexion in children.

    PubMed

    Atkins, R M; Bell, M J; Sharrard, W J

    1985-08-01

    Seven pectoralis major transfers in children suffering from bilateral paralysis of elbow flexion due to arthrogryposis or to trauma are reported. A technique is described in which the muscle is mobilised from the clavicle to allow the tendon of insertion to be attached to the biceps tendon at the elbow. The biceps tendon was found to be present and could be mobilised forwards in all the arthrogrypotic elbows. Subjectively, the results were considered by patients or parents to be very good in six cases and fair in one. Elbow flexion power against gravity and against some resistance was achieved in all patients except one. The overall function was very good in one elbow, good in two, fair in three and poor in only one. The merits of the various procedures described for the restoration of elbow flexion in arthrogryposis are discussed. It is concluded that total pectoralis major transfer by the method described here has given the best results.

  7. Tennis elbow: blending basic science with clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Fedorczyk, Jane M

    2006-01-01

    Tennis elbow defines a condition of varying degrees of pain or point tenderness on or near the lateral epicondyle. It is prevalent in individuals who perform a combination of forceful and repetitive activities including athletes and wheelchair users. The most common work-related disorder at the elbow is tennis elbow. Histopathological findings indicate that tennis elbow is a degenerative condition, called tendinosis, of the common extensor tendon, with the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon more commonly implicated as the primary location of tendinosis. Despite the absence of inflammation, patients with tennis elbow still present with pain. Neurochemicals including glutamate, substance P, and calcitonin gene-related peptide have been identified in patients with chronic tennis elbow and in animal models of tendinopathy. Their presence provides an alternative mechanism for pain mediation. Based on what is known about tissue changes within chronic tendinopathies, implications for therapy including examination and interventions are discussed.

  8. Correlation of torque and elbow injury in professional baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Anz, Adam W; Bushnell, Brandon D; Griffin, Leah Passmore; Noonan, Thomas J; Torry, Michael R; Hawkins, Richard J

    2010-07-01

    During the pitching motion, velocity is generated by the upper extremity kinetic chain on internal rotation of the shoulder and trunk translational/rotational motion. This generation of power places significant forces and torques on the elbow and shoulder. Elbow valgus torque and shoulder rotational torque are theoretically linked to elbow injury. Pitchers experiencing higher levels of elbow valgus torque and shoulder external rotation torque throughout the pitching motion are more likely to suffer elbow injury than pitchers with lower levels of torque. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. With an established biomechanical analysis model, 23 professional baseball pitchers were videotaped during spring training games and followed prospectively for the next 3 seasons for elbow injury. A mixed statistical model using differences of least squares means and analysis of variance was used to analyze the association between elbow injury and torque levels throughout the pitching motion as well as at each major event within the pitching motion. There were overall statistical trends relating elbow injury with both higher elbow valgus torque (P = .0547) and higher shoulder external rotation torque (P = .0548) throughout the entire pitching motion. More importantly, there was an individual significant correlation of elbow injury with both higher elbow valgus torque (P = .0130) and higher shoulder external rotation torque (P = .0018) at the late cocking phase (pitching event of maximum external rotation of the shoulder). This study provides information that supports existing theories about how and why certain injuries occur during the throwing motion in baseball. The late cocking phase appears to be the critical point in the pitching motion, where higher levels of torque at the shoulder and elbow can result in increased risk of injury. Manipulation of pitching mechanics to alter these torque levels or using these measures to identify pitchers at risk may help decrease injury

  9. Injury Criteria for Dynamic Hyperextension of the Female Elbow Joint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    1 INJURY CRITERIA FOR DYNAMIC HYPEREXTENSION OF THE FEMALE ELBOW JOINT Stefan M. Duma*, Gail A. Hansen, Eric A. Kennedy, Joel D. Stitzel...Laboratory Fort Rucker, AL 36362 ABSTRACT This paper describes an analysis to develop dynamic hyperextension injury criteria for the female elbow ...joint. Dynamic hyperextension tests were performed on 24 female cadaver elbow joints. The energy source was a drop tower utilizing a three-point

  10. Natural course in tennis elbow--lateral epicondylitis after all?

    PubMed

    Zeisig, Eva

    2012-12-01

    Tennis elbow is a common and difficult-to-treat condition largely because of lack of evidence. The natural history is unknown, but the condition is described as self-limiting. The objective of this case report is to describe the natural course of two control participants (pain free), who later developed tennis elbow, patient history, clinical findings, and ultrasound and colour Doppler examination before, during and after a period of tennis elbow.

  11. Elbow instability secondary to lateral epicondylar nounion in an adult.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Maria; Barco, Raul; Antuña, Samuel A

    2013-12-01

    Symptomatic nonunion of the lateral epicondyle of the elbow is a rare injury. We present the case of a 36-year-old woman who complained of elbow pain and instability several months after a conservatively treated lateral epicondyle fracture that evolved into nonunion. In order to reestablish elbow stability, the patient underwent removal of the nonunited epicondylar fragment and ligament repair, with excellent clinical outcome.

  12. Impingement of Droplets in 60 Deg Elbows with Potential Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Paul T.; Saper, Paul G.; Kadow, Charles F.

    1956-01-01

    Trajectories were determined for water droplets or other aerosol particles in air flowing through 600 elbows especially designed for two-dimensional potential motion. The elbows were established by selecting as walls of each elbow two streamlines of a flow field produced by a complex potential function that establishes a two-dimensional flow around. a 600 bend. An unlimited number of elbows with slightly different shapes can be established by selecting different pairs of streamlines as walls. Some of these have a pocket on the outside wall. The elbows produced by the complex potential function are suitable for use in aircraft air-inlet ducts and have the following characteristics: (1) The resultant velocity at any point inside the elbow is always greater than zero but never exceeds the velocity at the entrance. (2) The air flow field at the entrance and exit is almost uniform and rectilinear. (3) The elbows are symmetrical with respect to the bisector of the angle of bend. These elbows should have lower pressure losses than bends of constant cross-sectional area. The droplet impingement data derived from the trajectories are presented along with equations so that collection efficiency, area, rate, and distribution of droplet impingement can be determined for any elbow defined by any pair of streamlines within a portion of the flow field established by the complex potential function. Coordinates for some typical streamlines of the flow field and velocity components for several points along these streamlines are presented in tabular form. A comparison of the 600 elbow with previous calculations for a comparable 90 elbow indicated that the impingement characteristics of the two elbows were very similar.

  13. Nirschl tennis elbow release with or without drilling

    PubMed Central

    Khashaba, A

    2001-01-01

    Nirschl release appears to be a very successful technique for surgically suitable cases of tennis elbow. However, although the drilling or decortication aspect of the procedure was thought to be of benefit to the immediate outcome, this has not actually been confirmed. This randomised double blind comparative prospective trial shows that drilling confers no benefit and actually causes more pain, stiffness, and wound bleeding than not drilling. Key Words: Nirschl release; lateral epicondyle; tennis elbow; elbow; epicondylitis PMID:11375883

  14. Successful Closed Reduction of a Lateral Elbow Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzawa, Takuma; Mitsui, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present a case of lateral elbow dislocation treated with closed reduction. Lateral elbow dislocation is rare, and a closed reduction is reported with even less frequency. The reduction can be hindered by swelling and soft tissue interposition, and we describe the use of a nonoperative reduction technique performed under mild sedation with early physiotherapy to avoid joint stiffness. No additional complication was observed, and the normal range of elbow movement and function was obtained by early physiotherapy. PMID:28097029

  15. Successful Closed Reduction of a Lateral Elbow Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenya; Fukuzawa, Takuma; Mitsui, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present a case of lateral elbow dislocation treated with closed reduction. Lateral elbow dislocation is rare, and a closed reduction is reported with even less frequency. The reduction can be hindered by swelling and soft tissue interposition, and we describe the use of a nonoperative reduction technique performed under mild sedation with early physiotherapy to avoid joint stiffness. No additional complication was observed, and the normal range of elbow movement and function was obtained by early physiotherapy.

  16. [Bilateral elbow dislocation related to Essex-Lopresti injury].

    PubMed

    Romero Pérez, B; Marcos García, A; Medina Henríquez, J A; Muratore Moreno, G

    2012-01-01

    Elbow dislocation is second in frequency, after the shoulder, whereas bilateral dislocation is uncommon, even less than dislocations with concurrent associated fractures. One of the least frequent associations is the Essex-Lopresti injury which consists of a fracture of the radial head affecting the distal radioulnar joint with injury to the interosseous membrane. This is a case of bilateral elbow dislocation, one of the elbows associated with the Essex-Lopresti injury. During treatment, the premature closed reduction prevails, previously making sure the elbow is stable, the premise which will determine the orthopedic or surgical treatment of the injury.

  17. Biepicondylar fracture presenting with elbow dislocation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Biepicondylar fracture of the elbow is very rare, and to date there have only been three reports of this injury and its treatment in the English scientific literature. This case report evaluates the surgical internal fixation of a biepicondylar fracture of the elbow with an associated dislocation. Case presentation We report the case of a 15-year-old Turkish girl with a biepicondylar fracture dislocation of the left elbow. Open reduction and an internal fixation operation were applied. There were no complications. Conclusion In these injuries, open reduction and internal fixation appear to be a good method to restore elbow stability and function. PMID:22938048

  18. Antibody elbow angles are influenced by their light chain class

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, R; Zemla, A; Wilson, I; Rupp, B

    2006-01-12

    We have examined the elbow angles for 365 different Fab fragments, and observe that Fabs with lambda light chains have adopted a wider range of elbow angles than their kappa-chain counterparts, and that the lambda light chain Fabs are frequently found with very large (>195{sup o}) elbow angles. This apparent hyperflexibility of lambda-chain Fabs may be due to an insertion in their switch region, which is one residue longer than in kappa chains, with glycine occurring most frequently at the insertion position. A new, web-based computer program that was used to calculate the Fab elbow angles is also described.

  19. Comparison Between Corrosion Behavior of Copper and Stainless Steel 90° Elbow and Failure Investigation of 90° Copper Elbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouad, Mohamed Ahmed; Zewail, Taghreed Mohamed; Amine, Nieven Abbas; El-Tawail, Yehia Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    Frequently found in elbow, erosion failures may lead to the leakage of pipes and even damage the whole system. Erosion is a form of material degradation that involves electrochemical corrosion and mechanical wear processes encountered on the surface of metal pipes. Research on the erosion-corrosion mechanism indicates that the erosion mainly results from the interactions between the elbow surface and the fluid traveling along the surface. Corrosion behavior of 90° copper and stainless steel elbow was studied. Scanning electron microscopy was processed on the 90° copper elbow to show the surface morphology of the failed copper elbow. Failure investigation was carried out on 90° copper elbow to determine failure location and failure causes.

  20. A mechanism for elbow exoskeleton for customised training.

    PubMed

    Manna, Soumya K; Dubey, Venketesh N

    2017-07-01

    It is well proven that repetitive extensive training consisting of active and passive therapy is effective for patients suffering from neuromuscular deficits. The level of difficulty in rehabilitation should be increased with time to improve the neurological muscle functions. A portable elbow exoskeleton has been designed that will meet these requirements and potentially offers superior outcomes than human-assisted training. The proposed exoskeleton can provide both active and passive rehabilitation in a single structure without changing its configuration. The idea is to offer three levels of rehabilitation; namely active, passive and stiffness control in a single device using a single actuator. The mechanism also provides higher torque to weight ratio making it an energy efficient mechanism.

  1. Septic flexor tendonitis and suspensory desmitis in an alpaca.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Barbara G; Semevolos, Stacy A

    2013-07-01

    A 2-year-old male Suri alpaca was referred for evaluation of severe right forelimb lameness of 2 weeks' duration following a traumatic episode. Examination of the distal aspect of the metacarpus revealed 4 wounds exuding purulent material. On weight bearing, the metacarpophalangeal joint was severely hyperextended with the palmar surface touching the ground. Ultrasonography of the palmar surface of the metacarpus revealed desmitis of the proximal suspensory ligament, a large core lesion of the deep digital flexor tendon at mid-metacarpus, and complete loss of fiber pattern within the deep digital flexor tendon and lateral aspect of the superficial digital flexor tendon distally. The alpaca was treated systemically with antimicrobials and anti-inflammatory drugs and underwent repeated antimicrobial intraosseous regional limb perfusion. A bandage and splint were applied to stabilize the affected forelimb in an anatomically correct position, and the alpaca underwent prolonged stall confinement. At the time of hospital discharge 5 days after initial evaluation, clinical evidence of infection at the wound sites was absent. Three months following treatment, the alpaca was moving freely in a small paddock and had moderate hyperextension of the metacarpophalangeal joint. Treatment of septic flexor tendonitis and suspensory desmitis with antimicrobial intraosseous regional limb perfusion in combination with systemic treatment with antimicrobials and orthopedic support resulted in an excellent outcome in this alpaca. Antimicrobial intraosseous regional limb perfusion is simple to perform and has the potential to be beneficial in the treatment of infections in the distal portion of a limb in camelids.

  2. Clinical outcome after percutaneous flexor tenotomy in forefoot surgery.

    PubMed

    Debarge, Romain; Philippot, Rémy; Viola, Jérémy; Besse, Jean Luc

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of the percutaneous flexor tenotomy. We compared the results of two groups. The first group included 23 patients who underwent forefoot surgery without percutaneous flexor tenotomy, and the second group included 50 patients who underwent the same procedure combined with percutaneous flexor tenotomy for claw toe deformities, secondary to shortening metatarsal Scarf osteotomy. The average follow-up was 11.6 months. Three algoneurodystrophies were noted. No delayed wound healing was observed. Functional dissatisfaction rate (18% vs.17.4%) and toe pulp contact defect (12% vs. 8.7%) were not significantly different in the two groups. Toe grasping defect rate (10% vs. 4.3%) was superior in the tenotomy group. Five recurring claw toe deformities of the second toe were noted in the tenotomy group. Percutaneous flexor tenotomy is a simple, rapid, and efficient method to correct reducible secondary claw toe deformities. However, despite a significant postoperative loss of toe grasping function, no patient reported major dissatisfaction.

  3. History and Nomenclature of Multistrand Repairs in Digital Flexor Tendons.

    PubMed

    Savage, Robert; Tang, Jin Bo

    2016-02-01

    Multistrand core suture repairs have become the mainstay of digital flexor tendon repair in recent decades. Here we briefly describe the history of the development of these multistrand repair methods and their correct nomenclature. A historical account, their evolution, the correct use of nomenclature, and some technical points are reviewed.

  4. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  5. Flexor Tendon Repair Postoperative Rehabilitation: The Saint John Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The Saint John Protocol describes a rehabilitation program of up to half a fist of protected true active finger flexion beginning 3 to 5 days after flexor tendon repair. We no longer use full fist place and hold. We illustrate with film and text the reasons for these changes. PMID:27975032

  6. Multimodality Imaging of the Painful Elbow: Current Imaging Concepts and Image-Guided Treatments for the Injured Thrower's Elbow.

    PubMed

    Gustas, Cristy N; Lee, Kenneth S

    2016-09-01

    Elbow pain in overhead sport athletes is not uncommon. Repetitive throwing can lead to chronic overuse and/or acute injury to tendons, ligaments, bones, or nerves about the elbow. A thorough history and physical examination of the thrower's elbow frequently establishes the diagnosis for pain. Imaging can provide additional information when the clinical picture is unclear or further information is necessary for risk stratification and treatment planning. This article focuses on current imaging concepts and image-guided treatments for injuries commonly affecting the adult throwing athlete's elbow.

  7. Changes in elbow joint's musculo-articular mechanical properties do not alter reaching-related action-perception coupling.

    PubMed

    Daviaux, Yannick; Deschamps, Thibault; Cornu, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    Perception of action capabilities can be altered by changes in sensorimotor processes, as showed in previous works in populations dealing with regular and pathological sensorimotor deficits. Misestimating changes in performance ability could lead to risky behavior, injury, and/or reduced performance. However, the relationship between sensorimotor processes, the action-perception coupling, and the related anatomical structures is still a matter of debate. We investigated whether changes in the muscle-tendon system's mechanical properties experimentally induced by eccentric contractions could alter the action-perception coupling (APC) in a reaching-to-grasp task, in which the participants estimated the maximal distance they predicted that they would able to reach a glass. Based on their repartition, volunteers performed a conditioning session the first day: a series of isokinetic elbow extension in passive condition (control group, n = 11) or when performing elbow flexors eccentric contractions (eccentric group, n = 11). Performance estimates and actual performances in a reaching-to-grasp task were completed before, and immediately, 24 hours and 48 hours after the conditioning session. Alterations of musculo-articular mechanical properties were assessed through global joint stiffness (joint passive torque through load/unload cycles) and local stiffness (muscle elastography). The results showed that the APC related to reaching-to-grasp performance was not impacted by post-exercise changes in mechanical properties of the musculo-articular system. These findings emphasize the central dimension of sensorimotor processing instead of peripheral structures to investigate the APC for an altered sensorimotor environment.

  8. Plantar forces in flexor hallucis longus versus flexor digitorum longus transfer in adult acquired flatfoot deformity.

    PubMed

    Spratley, E Meade; Arnold, John M; Owen, John R; Glezos, Christopher D; Adelaar, Robert S; Wayne, Jennifer S

    2013-09-01

    Flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon transfers are frequently used to restore the function of a deficient tibialis posterior tendon in stage II adult acquired flatfoot deformity (AAFD). Either transfer causes some loss in toe flexion force, although the decision to tenodese the cut tendon to restore associated function remains controversial. This study quantified changes in plantar force before and after tendon transfer and with or without distal tenodesis in a cadaveric model. The plantar force distribution of 10 matched pairs of statically loaded cadaveric lower extremities was investigated. Each foot was tested when it was intact, after FDL/FHL tendon transfer, and after tendon transfer + tenodesis. Transfer of either FHL or FDL showed a statistically significant decrease in flexion force of the great toe (P < .01) and lesser toes (P < .001), respectively. Subsequent tenodesis in either tendon demonstrated an ability to restore flexion force in the great (P < .05) and lesser (P < .01) toes, respectively, with the FHL transfer + tenodesis restoring great toe loading to near pretransfer levels. Following either transfer, plantar force increased in the medial forefoot; this was sustained with FDL transfer + tenodesis but reduced under FHL transfer + tenodesis. Lateral forefoot force increased modestly (8%) with FHL transfer (P < .05) but returned to near intact levels with tenodesis. FDL transfer + tenodesis resulted in increased medial midfoot and heel loading. FHL or FDL transfer notably reduces associated toe flexion force. This loss can be restored to near normal levels with tenodesis for FHL transfer. As increased lateral forefoot loading is commonly associated with AAFD corrective procedures, FHL tenodesis may mitigate the unintended increases caused by the tendon transfer. The medial midfoot and heel loading with FDL transfer + tenodesis underscores that tendon transfers alone do not reestablish the passive architecture of

  9. Acute Traumatic Musculotendinous Avulsion of the Flexor Pollicis Longus Tendon Treated with Primary Flexor Digitorum Superficialis Transfer: A Novel Technique of Management

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, P. Kiran; Mahapatra, Swagath; Raj Pallapati, Samuel C.; Thomas, Binu P.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic musculotendinous junction avulsions are rare injuries except in avulsion amputations. They pose a significant challenge to the treating surgeon. We present a 24-year-old male who sustained an open musculotendinous avulsion of the flexor pollicis longus tendon. He was treated with primary tendon transfer using the flexor digitorum superficialis of ring finger, in flexor zone 3. The functional result at 10 months following surgery was excellent. PMID:27019757

  10. Deriving the East Riding Elbow Rule (ER2): a maximally sensitive decision tool for elbow injury.

    PubMed

    Arundel, David; Williams, Paul; Townend, Will

    2014-05-01

    To derive a maximally sensitive decision rule for clinical practice to rule out the need for x-ray examination after elbow injury in adults and children. Emergency department patients with acute elbow injury were recruited. Practitioners used their usual judgement to assess whether x-ray examination was required. Radiographs were reported on by radiologists blind to clinical assessment. Patients not x-rayed were followed-up at 7 days by telephone interview, and those with ongoing pain were recalled for assessment. Recursive partitioning was used to derive a maximally sensitive decision tool. Inter-rater variability for significant discriminators was subsequently evaluated by a cohort of 20 emergency department clinicians. 492 patients were recruited (May 2006-November 2008): 50.4% were male; 26.8% were children; 444 (90.2%) had an x-ray; 167 (37.6%) showed abnormality. A follow-up telephone interview was conducted with 28; none were recalled. Thirteen could not be contacted, none of whom returned within 3 months. Sixteen patients with fractures were able to fully extend their elbow. The sensitivity of elbow extension alone was 84% (95% CI 77% to 88%), with specificity of 54% (95% CI 53% to 58%). A 100% sensitive (95% CI 97% to 100%) decision rule for adults (n=348) was derived based on (1) inability to fully extend the elbow, (2) tenderness over radial head, olecranon or medial epicondyle, and (3) presence of bruising (specificity 24% (95% CI 19% to 30%)). A similar rule for children could not be derived. A simple and highly sensitive clinical decision rule for adult elbow fracture was derived in our cohort. A validation study in a second population is now required. At present, we are unable to recommend a rule-out strategy for elbow injuries in children. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Accuracy of Visual Estimates of Partial Flexor Tendon Lacerations.

    PubMed

    Pritsch, Tamir; Wong, Corrine; Sammer, Douglas M

    2015-12-01

    To determine whether hand surgeons could accurately and consistently estimate the size of partial flexor tendon lacerations. Thirty-two partial flexor tendon lacerations were made in the flexor digitorum profundus tendons of a fresh-frozen cadaveric hand. Four hand surgeons and 5 residents estimated the size of the lacerations. Estimates were repeated 3 days later. Magnified images of the laceration cross-section were used to calculate the true size of each laceration. Inter- and intrarater reliability were calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient. Accuracy was measured with the mean bias error and the mean absolute error. Interrater and intrarater reliabilities were both high. There was a high level of consistency for both surgeons and residents. In terms of accuracy, there was a 3% bias toward underestimation. The mean absolute error was 11%. There was no statistically significant difference between the accuracy of attending hand surgeons and that of residents. Participants were less accurate when estimating lacerations close to a 60% laceration threshold for surgical repair (lacerations in the 50%-70% range). For lacerations within this range, an incorrect management decision would have been made 17% of the time, compared with 7% of the time for lacerations outside that range. The accuracy and reliability of surgeon estimates of partial flexor tendon laceration size were high for surgeons and residents. Accuracy was lower for lacerations close to the threshold for repair. Visual estimation is acceptable for evaluating partial flexor tendon lacerations, but it may be less reliable for lacerations near the threshold for repair. Therefore, surgeons should be cautious when deciding whether or not to repair partial lacerations in the borderline range. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomechanical Study of the Digital Flexor Tendon Sliding Lengthening Technique.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ken; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Takane; Hiwatari, Ryo; Matsuura, Yusuke; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-10-01

    To compare the mechanical properties of sliding lengthening (SL) and Z-lengthening (ZL) for flexor tendon elongation used for conditions such as Volkmann contracture, cerebral palsy, and poststroke spasticity. We harvested 56 flexor tendons, including flexor pollicis longus tendons, flexor digitorum superficialis tendons (zones II to IV), and flexor digitorum profundus tendons (zones II to V) from 24 upper limbs of 12 fresh cadavers. Each tendon was harvested together with its homonymous tendon from the opposite side of the cadaver and paired. We used 28 pairs of tendons and divided them randomly into 4 groups depending on the lengthening distance (20 or 30 mm) and type of stitching (single or double mattress sutures). Then we divided each pair into either the SL or ZL group. Each group was composed of 7 specimens. The same surgeon lengthened all tendons and stitched them with 2-0 polyester sutures. We tested biomechanical tensile strength immediately after completing lengthening and suturing in each group. Ultimate tensile strengths were: 23 N for the SL 20-mm lengthening and single mattress suture and 7 N for the ZL; 25 N for the SL 20-mm lengthening and double mattress suture and 10 N for the ZL; 15 N for the SL 30-mm lengthening and single mattress suture and 8 N for the ZL; and 18 N for the SL 30-mm lengthening and double mattress suture and 10 N for the ZL. The SL technique may be a good alternative to the ZL technique because it provides higher ultimate tensile strength. Because of its higher ultimate tensile strength, the SL technique may allow for earlier rehabilitation and reduced risk of postoperative complications. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Erosion resistant elbow for solids conveyance

    DOEpatents

    Everett, J.W.

    1984-10-23

    An elbow and process for fabrication for use in particulate material conveyancing comprises a curved outer pipe, a curved inner pipe having the same radius of curvature as the outer pipe, concentric with and internal to the outer pipe, comprising an outer layer comprised of a first material and an inner layer comprised of a second material wherein said first material is characterized by high erosion resistance when impinged by particulate material and wherein said second material is characterized by high tensile strength and flexibility, and an inner pipe supporting means for providing support to said inner pipe, disposed between said inner pipe and said outer pipe. 4 figs.

  14. Erosion resistant elbow for solids conveyance

    DOEpatents

    Everett, James W.

    1984-10-23

    An elbow and process for fabrication for use in particulate material conveyancing comprising a curved outer pipe, a curved inner pipe having the same radius of curvature as the outer pipe, concentric with and internal to the outer pipe, comprising an outer layer comprised of a first material and an inner layer comprised of a second material wherein said first material is characterized by high erosion resistance when impinged by particulate material and wherein said second material is characterized by high tensile strength and flexibility, and an inner pipe supporting means for providing support to said inner pipe, disposed between said inner pipe and said outer pipe.

  15. POST-TRAUMATIC STIFFNESS OF THE ELBOW

    PubMed Central

    Filh, Geraldo Motta; Galvão, Marcus Vinicius

    2015-01-01

    Elbow stiffness is a common problem after joint trauma, causing functional impairment of the upper limb. The severity of the dysfunction depends on the nature of the initial trauma and the treatment used. Appropriate clinical evaluation and complementary examinations are essential for therapeutic planning. Several surgical techniques are now available and the recommendation must be made in accordance with patient characteristics, degree of joint limitation and the surgeon's skill. Joint incongruence and degeneration have negative effects on the prognosis, but heterotrophic ossification alone has been correlated with a favorable surgical prognosis. PMID:27022563

  16. Shoulder-elbow exoskeleton as rehabilitation exerciser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianoşi, A.; Dimitrova, A.; Noveanu, S.; Tătar, O. M.; Mândru, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a 2 degree of freedom exoskeleton designed for the rehabilitation of the shoulder and elbow movement in the sagittal plane; a semi-portable design strategy was chosen, which enables an easy attachment to a standard medical chair as well as the patient upper limb. A dedicated driver enables the control from a graphical user interface, which also provides the option of customized rehabilitation exercises. The potential of future improvements is assessed, and recommendations of research direction are made in order to broaden the usability of the proposed device.

  17. Lateral elbow tendinopathy: Evidence of physiotherapy management

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos

    2016-01-01

    Lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET) is a common musculoskeletal/sports injury. A plethora of physiotherapy techniques has been proposed in the management of LET. The exercise programme is the most common treatment in the management of LET. The optimal protocol of exercise programme is still unknown. The effectiveness of the exercise programme is low when it is applied as monotherapy. Therefore, exercise programme is combined with other physiotherapy modalities such as soft tissue techniques, external support, acupuncture, manual therapy and electrotherapy, in the treatment of LET. Future research is needed to determine which treatment strategy combined with exercise programme will provide the best results in LET rehabilitation. PMID:27622145

  18. Comparing Biomechanical Properties, Repair Times, and Value of Common Core Flexor Tendon Repairs.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Aakash; Schimoler, Patrick; Miller, Mark C; Kharlamov, Alexander; Merrell, Gregory A; Palmer, Bradley A

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare biomechanical strength, repair times, and repair values for zone II core flexor tendon repairs. A total of 75 fresh-frozen human cadaveric flexor tendons were harvested from the index through small finger and randomized into one of 5 repair groups: 4-stranded cross-stitch cruciate (4-0 polyester and 4-0 braided suture), 4-stranded double Pennington (2-0 knotless barbed suture), 4-stranded Pennington (4-0 double-stranded braided suture), and 6-stranded modified Lim-Tsai (4-0 looped braided suture). Repairs were measured in situ and their repair times were measured. Tendons were linearly loaded to failure and multiple biomechanical values were measured. The repair value was calculated based on operating room costs, repair times, and suture costs. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc statistical analysis were used to compare repair data. The braided cruciate was the strongest repair ( P > .05) but the slowest ( P > .05), and the 4-stranded Pennington using double-stranded suture was the fastest ( P > .05) to perform. The total repair value was the highest for braided cruciate ( P > .05) compared with all other repairs. Barbed suture did not outperform any repairs in any categories. The braided cruciate was the strongest of the tested flexor tendon repairs. The 2-mm gapping and maximum load to failure for this repair approached similar historical strength of other 6- and 8-stranded repairs. In this study, suture cost was negligible in the overall repair cost and should be not a determining factor in choosing a repair.

  19. Simultaneous bilateral elbow dislocation in an international gymnast

    PubMed Central

    Syed, A. A.; O'Flanagan, J.

    1999-01-01

    Elbow dislocation is a rare injury in elite athletes. We report an unusual case of simultaneous bilateral elbow dislocations with a unilateral radial head fracture in an international female athlete competing on the asymmetrical bars. These injuries require prompt reduction and immediate mobilisation if an abrupt end to a promising career is to be prevented. 




 PMID:10205699

  20. Metallic radial head arthroplasty improves valgus stability of the elbow.

    PubMed

    King, G J; Zarzour, Z D; Rath, D A; Dunning, C E; Patterson, S D; Johnson, J A

    1999-11-01

    The stabilizing influence of radial head arthroplasty was studied in eight medial collateral ligament deficient anatomic specimen elbows. An elbow testing apparatus, which used computer controlled pneumatic actuators to apply tendon loading, was used to simulate active elbow flexion. The motion pathways of the elbow were measured using an electromagnetic tracking device, with the forearm in supination and pronation. As a measure of stability, the maximum varus to valgus laxity over the range of elbow flexion was determined from the difference between varus and valgus gravity loaded motion pathways. After transection of the medial collateral ligament, the radial head was excised and replaced with either a silicone or one of three metallic radial head prostheses. Medial collateral ligament transection caused a significant increase in the maximum varus to valgus laxity to 18.0 degrees +/- 3.2 degrees. After radial head excision, this laxity increased to 35.6 degrees +/- 10.3 degrees. The silicone implant conferred no increase in elbow stability, with a maximum varus to valgus laxity of 32.5 degrees +/- 15.5 degrees. All three metallic implants improved the valgus stability of the medial collateral ligament deficient elbow, providing stability similar to the intact radial head. The use of silicone arthroplasty to replace the radial head in the medial collateral ligament deficient elbow must be questioned. Metallic radial head arthroplasty provides improved valgus stability, approaching that of an intact radial head.

  1. MR imaging of the elbow in baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Hugue; Bredella, Miriam; Labis, John; Palmer, William E; Torriani, Martin

    2008-02-01

    Baseball pitcher throwing biomechanics are important to understanding the pathophysiology and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearances of injuries in baseball pitchers. Baseball pitchers experience repetitive excessive valgus forces at the elbow. Typical injuries are secondary to medial joint distraction, lateral joint compression, and rotatory forces at the olecranon. MR imaging is useful for evaluation of the elbow in baseball pitchers.

  2. Pressure loss in elbow pipes of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Ojima, J

    1996-01-01

    In the ductwork of local exhaust systems, 90 degrees elbow pipes (JIS K 6739) are commonly used to alter the direction of airflow; thus, are important components of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ducts. Pressure loss in 90 degrees PVC elbow pipes was investigated by measuring static pressure, and the characteristics of airflow was determined. First, a linear decrease in static pressure was observed at points of the downstream side beyond a distance of 10 times the diameter (10d) from the flanged round opening of the smooth VU ducts (JIS K6741). The linear decrease was also observed at points of the downstream side located at distances of greater than 30d from the elbow pipe. Coefficients of loss in the PVC elbow pipes were found to be constant for the Reynolds numbers ranging from 3.38 x 10(4) to 5.96 x 10(5) for all diameters examined, and a chart of pressure loss was constructed with these coefficients. The coefficients of loss in PVC elbow pipes were not equivalent to those of metal stamped elbows for any R/d. However, the differences in the coefficients between the metal stamped elbow and the PVC elbow were smaller with larger R/d values.

  3. Evaluation and Management of Elbow Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Samuel A.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Elbow tendinopathy is a common cause of pain and disability among patients presenting to orthopaedic surgeons, primary care physicians, physical therapists, and athletic trainers. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of these conditions facilitates a directed treatment regimen. A thorough understanding of the natural history of these injuries and treatment outcomes will enable the appropriate management of patients and their expectations. Evidence Acquisitions: The PubMed database was searched in December 2011 for English-language articles pertaining to elbow tendinopathy. Results: Epidemiologic data as well as multiple subjective and objective outcome measures were investigated to elucidate the incidence of medial epicondylitis, lateral epicondylitis, distal biceps and triceps ruptures, and the efficacy of various treatments. Conclusions: Medial and lateral epicondylitis are overuse injuries that respond well to nonoperative management. Their etiology is degenerative and related to repetitive overuse and underlying tendinopathy. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and localized corticosteroid injections yield moderate symptomatic relief in short term but do not demonstrate benefit on long-term follow-up. Platelet-rich plasma injections may be advantageous in cases of chronic lateral epicondylitis. If 6 to 12 months of nonoperative treatment fails, then surgical intervention can be undertaken. Distal biceps and triceps tendon ruptures, in contrast, have an acute traumatic etiology that may be superimposed on underlying tendinopathy. Prompt diagnosis and treatment improve outcomes. While partial ruptures confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging can be treated nonoperatively with immobilization, complete ruptures should be addressed with primary repair within 3 to 4 weeks of injury. PMID:23016111

  4. Management of an Uncomplicated Posterior Elbow Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Blackard, Douglas; Sampson, Jo-Ann

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To present a case of an uncomplicated posterior elbow dislocation in a US World Cup athlete and discuss her rehabilitation. Background: Traditional protocol for management of this injury has been splint immobilization for several weeks, but research suggests a shortened duration of immobilization and early active motion. Differential Diagnosis: Elbow dislocation with possible fracture. Treatment: The dislocation was reduced and a compression bandage and sling were applied. The sports medicine staff and athlete determined that rehabilitation would involve limited immobilization with a posterior splint. Also, active range-of- motion exercises were to be incorporated early in the range-of- motion program to decrease pain at the articulation. Uniqueness: The athlete was not immobilized and her aggressive five-phase rehabilitation program progressed according to decrease in inflammation and increase in range of motion and strength. Conclusions: Shortened immobilization and return to World Championship competition 6 weeks postinjury had no longterm adverse effects on the athlete. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4.Fig. 5. PMID:16558436

  5. Development Requirements for Spacesuit Elbow Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Functional Requirements for spacesuit elbow joint:1) The system is a conformal, single-axis spacesuit pressurized joint that encloses the elbow joint of the suited user and uses a defined interface to connect to the suit systems on either side of the joint.2) The system shall be designed to bear the loads incurred from the internal pressure of the system, as well as the expected loads induced by the user while enabling the user move the joint through the required range of motion. The joint torque of the system experienced by the user shall remain at or below the required specification for the entire range of motion.3) The design shall be constructed, at a minimum, as a two-layer system. The internal, air-tight layer shall be referred to as the bladder, and the layer on the unpressurized side of the bladder shall be referred to as the restraint. The design of the system may include additional features or layers, such as axial webbing, to meet the overall requirements of the design.

  6. A primer for physical examination of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Zouzias, Ioannis C; Byram, Ian R; Shillingford, Jamal N; Levine, William N

    2012-02-01

    The elbow is a complex joint consisting of 3 separate but important articulations: the ulnohumeral, radiohumeral, and proximal radioulnar joints. The elbow assists in positioning the hand in space through 2 important motions, flexion-extension and pronation-supination. Although the elbow is not a weightbearing joint, it is subjected to significant loads, especially in overhead and throwing athletes. An accurate knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the elbow joint is critical for conducting a focused physical examination and arriving at an accurate diagnosis. The goal of this article is to review general and focused physical examination of the elbow in a systematic manner based on medial, lateral, anterior, and posterior aspects.

  7. Medial collateral ligament reconstruction in the baseball Pitcher's elbow.

    PubMed

    Erne, Holger C; Zouzias, Ioannis C; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2009-08-01

    Pitchers are prone to elbow injuries because of high and repetitive valgus stresses on the elbow. The anterior bundle of the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MCL) of the elbow is the primary restraint and is often attenuated with time, leading to functional incompetence and ultimate failure. Pitchers with a history of medial elbow pain, reduced velocity, and loss of command may have an MCL injury in evolution. Physical examination and imaging can confirm the diagnosis. Treatment begins with rest and activity modification. All medial elbow pain is not MCL injury. Surgery is considered only for talented athletes who wish to return to competitive play and may include elite scholastic and other collegiates and professionals. The technique for MCL reconstruction was first described in 1986. Many variations have been offered since then, which can result in predictable outcomes, allowing many to return to the same level of competitive play.

  8. ELBOW ULNAR NEUROPATHY: TREATMENT BY ANTERIOR TRANSPOSITION OF THE ULNAR NERVE

    PubMed Central

    Neder, Antonio Tufi; Alves, Regina de Azevedo; Pardini, Arlindo Gomes; Riberto, Marcelo; Mazer, Milton

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: Retrospective clinical evaluation of 31 patients who underwent ulnar nerve decompression at the elbow and subcutaneous anterior transposition. Methods: From January 2000 to December 2013, 71 patients underwent subcutaneous anterior transposition of the ulnar nerve. Thirty-one patients returned for evaluation. The mean follow-up period was 60 months. Patients were evaluated for the degree of satisfaction after surgery, paresthesia, pain, Tinel sign, Froment test and sensitivity test by esthesiometer, muscle strength of the intrinsic muscles and deep flexor of the fifth digit, visual analogic pain scale (VAS) and were subjected to the QuickDash questionnaire. Results: Thirty-nine per cent of patients had compression on the right side and 61% on the left side. Sixty-one percent were idiopathic, 35% post traumatic and 3% had Poems syndrome. Forty-eight per cent of patients were very much satisfied after surgery and 52% were satisfied. Forty-eight per cent had paresthesia after surgery and 52% did not. Conclusion: The ulnar neurolysis of the cubital tunnel with anterior subcutaneous transposition is a safe and effective technique for treating idiopathic or post-traumatic compressive neuropathy, with high success rate and excellent function for activities of daily living. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:28243170

  9. Development and use of an animal model to study post-traumatic stiffness and contracture of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Lake, Spencer P; Castile, Ryan M; Borinsky, Stephanie; Dunham, Chelsey L; Havlioglu, Necat; Galatz, Leesa M

    2016-02-01

    Post-traumatic joint stiffness (PTJS) of the elbow is a debilitating condition that poses unique treatment challenges. While previous research has implicated capsular tissue in PTJS, much regarding the development and progression of this condition remains unknown. The objective of this study was to develop an animal model of post-traumatic elbow contracture and evaluate its potential for studying the etiology of PTJS. The Long-Evans rat was identified as the most appropriate species/breed for development due to anatomical and functional similarities to the human elbow joint. Two surgical protocols of varying severity were utilized to replicate soft tissue damage seen in elbow subluxation/dislocation injuries, including anterior capsulotomy and lateral collateral ligament transection, followed by 6 weeks of unilateral joint immobilization. Following sacrifice, flexion-extension mechanical joint testing demonstrated decreased range-of-motion and increased stiffness for injured-immobilized limbs compared to control and sham animals, where functional impact correlated with severity of injury. Histological evaluation showed increased cellularity, adhesion, and thickness of capsule tissue in injured limbs, consistent with clinical evidence. To our knowledge, this is the first animal model capable of examining challenges unique to the anatomically and biomechanically complex elbow joint. Future studies will use this animal model to investigate mechanisms responsible for PTJS. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pediatric open elbow dislocation without fracture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Gökhan; Karademir, Gökhan; Akgül, Turgut; Ceylan, Hasan Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Elbow dislocations in children are rare injuries. These injuries are often in the form of complex injuries that is accompanied by the median nerve damage and medial epicondyle fracture in the pediatric age group. Open elbow dislocation without fracture in the pediatric age group has been reported very rarely in the literature. PRESENTATION OF CASE The purpose of this study is to present an 8-year-old patient who has open elbow dislocation without fracture accompanying with brachial artery injury. In the clinical examination of the patient, there was an open wound in the transverse antecubital region. After repair of brachial artery injury, open reduction was performed under general anesthesia. In the postoperative clinical examination at 6 months, left elbow flexion was 140°, extension was full and there were no deficit in the supination and pronation of the forearm. DISCUSSION Elbow dislocation without fracture in pediatric patients is a very rare injury. Usually the trauma mechanism of elbow dislocation is falling on outstretched hand with elbow in approximately 30° of flexion. However our patient had fallen on outstretched hand with elbow in full extension. Although this type of trauma mechanism is typical for supracondylar humerus fractures in pediatric age group, in our patient an open posterior elbow dislocation without fracture had occurred. CONCLUSION Pediatric elbow dislocations are rare injuries and the management of these injuries can be technically demanding due to concurrent neurovascular injuries. An open dislocation without fracture is very rare and it should be treated with immediate intervention, an effective teamwork and good rehabilitation. PMID:25460475

  11. Results of Total Elbow Arthroplasty with Cementless Implantation of an Alumina Ceramic Elbow Prosthesis for Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Keiichiro; Hashizume, Kenzo; Ozawa, Masatsugu; Takeshita, Ayumu; Kaneda, Daisuke; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Nasu, Yoshihisa; Shimamura, Yasunori; Inoue, Hajime; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the long-term clinical results of total elbow arthroplasty (TEA) by cementless fixation of alumina ceramic unlinked elbow prostheses (J-alumina ceramic elbows: JACE) for the reconstruction of elbow joints with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Seventeen elbows in 17 patients (aged 44-72 years, average 54.8) replaced by JACE TEA without bone cement were investigated. The average follow-up period was 10.7 (range, 1.0-19.3) years. Clinical conditions of each elbow before and after surgery were assessed according to the Mayo Elbow Performance Index (MEPI). Radiographic loosening was defined as a progressive radiolucent line of more than 1 mm that was completely circumferential around the intramedullary stem. The average MEPI significantly improved from 46.8 points preoperatively to 66.8 points at final follow-up (p=0.0226). However, aseptic loosening was noted in 10 of 17 elbows (58.8%) and revision surgery was required in 7 (41.2%). Most loosening was observed on the humeral side. With radiographic loosening and revision surgery defined as the end points, the likelihoods of prosthesis survival were 41.2% and 51.8%, respectively, up to 15 years by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The clinical results of JACE implantation without bone cement were disappointing, with high revision and loosening rates of the humeral component.

  12. Functional latissimus dorsi island pedicle musculocutaneous flap to restore elbow flexion in replantation or revascularisation of above-elbow amputations.

    PubMed

    Parmaksizoglu, F; Beyzadeoglu, T

    2003-01-01

    Two total and one subtotal above-elbow amputations had replantation or revascularization for their severely damaged upper extremities followed by functional latissimus dorsi island pedicle musculocutaneous flap to restore elbow flexion. The mean follow-up was 68 months (range: 14 to 121 months). At final follow-up examinations, the patients had sufficient range-of-motion of their elbows with good strength. Restoring elbow function eliminates one of the most important limiting factors for above-elbow replantations. Functional latissimus dorsi island pedicle musculocutaneous flap is very reliable, has minimal donor-site morbidity and offers a wider choice when deciding about arm replantation in the upper arm region by providing a chance of restoring functions.

  13. Gliding characteristics between flexor tendons and surrounding tissues in the carpal tunnel: a biomechanical cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ettema, Anke M; Osamura, Naoki; Berglund, Lawrence J; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the gliding characteristics of flexor tendons within the carpal tunnel with varied wrist positions and tendon motion styles, which may help us to understand the relationship between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and repetitive hand motion. Eight fresh human cadaveric wrists and hands were used. The peak (PGR) and mean (MGR) gliding resistance of the middle finger flexor digitorum superficialis tendon were measured with the wrist in 0, 30, and 60 degrees of flexion and extension. While moving all three fingers together, the PGR at 60 degrees flexion was significantly higher than that at 0, 30, or 60 degrees extension. While moving the middle finger alone, the PGR at 60 and 30 degrees flexion was significantly higher than the PGR at 60 degrees extension. The PGR moving the middle finger FDS alone was significantly greater than that for all three digits moving together in 0, 30, and 60 degrees flexion. Differential finger motion with wrist flexion elevated the tendon gliding resistance in the carpal tunnel, which may be relevant in considering the possible role of wrist position and activity in the etiology of CTS.

  14. Amplitude transitions of swimmers and flexors in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Robert; Thomases, Becca

    2015-11-01

    In both theoretical and experimental studies of the effect of fluid elasticity on micro-organism swimming, very different behavior has been observed for small and large amplitude strokes. We present simulations of an undulatory swimmer in an Oldroyd-B fluid and show that the resulting viscoelastic stresses are a nonlinear function of the amplitude. Specifically, there appears to be an amplitude dependent transition that is key to obtaining a speed-up over the Newtonian swimming speed. To understand the physical mechanism of the transition, we examine the stresses in a time-symmetric oscillatory bending beam, or flexor. We compare the flow in a neighborhood of the flexor tips with a large-amplitude oscillatory extensional flow, and we see similar amplitude dependent transitions. We relate these transitions to observed speed-ups in viscoelastic swimmers.

  15. Ultrasound of the digital flexor system: Normal and pathological findings☆

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, S.; Martinoli, C.; de Gautard, R.; Gaignot, C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent improvements in ultrasound (US) software and hardware have markedly increased the role of this imaging modality in the evaluation of the musculoskeletal system. US is currently one of the main imaging tools used to diagnose and assess most tendon, muscle, and ligament disorders. Compared with magnetic resonance imaging, US is much less expensive; it has no contraindications and is also widely available. Diseases affecting the digital flexor system (DFS) require early diagnosis if treatment is expected to limit functional impairment of the hand. US scans performed with high-resolution, broad-band transducers allows superb visualization of the flexor tendons of the hand and the annular digital pulleys. In addition, dynamic US can be used to assess movement of the tendon within the pulleys during passive or active joint movements. This article examines the anatomy and US appearance of the normal DFS and reviews the US findings associated with the most common disorders affecting it. PMID:23396583

  16. Bioreactor optimization of tissue engineered rabbit flexor tendons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Thorfinn, J; Angelidis, I K; Gigliello, L; Pham, H M; Lindsey, D; Chang, J

    2012-02-01

    Tissue-engineered rabbit flexor tendons reseeded with cells are stronger in vitro after culture in a bioreactor. It is not known whether this effect persists in vivo. Tenocytes from New Zealand white rabbits were seeded onto rabbit rear paw flexor tendons that were deprived of cells and exposed to cyclic strain in a bioreactor. Reseeded constructs that were kept unloaded in a medium for 5 days were used as controls. The tendons were implanted to bridge a zone II defect in the rabbit. After explantation 4 weeks later, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elastic modulus (EM) were determined. Tendon constructs that were exposed to cyclic strain had significantly improved UTS and EM. Histology showed that cellularity was increased in the bioreactor tendons.

  17. Anatomical study of toe flexion by flexor hallucis longus.

    PubMed

    Edama, Mutsuaki; Kubo, Masayoshi; Onishi, Hideaki; Takabayashi, Tomoya; Yokoyama, Erika; Inai, Takuma; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nashimoto, Satoshi; Kageyama, Ikuo

    2016-03-01

    Because connections exist between the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and flexor digitorum longus (FDL), the FHL is surmised to exert a flexion action on the lesser toes, but this has not been studied quantitatively. The objectives of this study have thus been to clarify the types of FHL and FDL connections and branching, and to deduce the toe flexion actions of the FHL. One hundred legs from 55 cadavers were used for the study, with FHLs and FDLs harvested from the plantar aspect of the foot, and connections and branches classified. Image-analysis software was then used to analyze cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of each tendon, and the proportion of FHL was calculated in relation to flexor tendons of each toe. Type I (single slip from FHL to FDL tendon) was seen in 86 legs (86%), Type II (crossed connection) in 3 legs (3%), and Type III (single slip from FDL to FHL tendon) or Type IV (no connection between muscles) in 0 legs (0%). In addition, Type V (double slip from FHL to FDL tendon) was seen in 11 legs (11%), representing a new type not recorded in previous classifications. In terms of the various flexor tendons, the proportion of FHL showing tendons to toes 2 and 3 was high, at approximately 50-70%. Consequently, considering the branching type and proportion of CSA, the FHL was conjectured to not only act to flex the hallux, but also play a significant role in the flexion of toes 2 and 3. These results offer useful information for future clarification of the functional roles of tendinous slips from the FHL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Elbow Stiffness Secondary to Elbow Joint Osteoid Osteoma, a Diagnostic Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohamad H; Choghadeh, Meysam Fathi; Moradi, Ali; Kalati, Hamid Hejrati; Jafarian, Amir Hossein

    2015-04-01

    We present a 23-year-old man with distal humerus osteoid osteoma referring to our hospital with pain and progressive stiffness. The patient has been suffering from the disease for two years without a certain diagnosis. The radiographies of elbow did not reveal the pathology but further CT scan and MRI studies demonstrated the tumor. The en block resection of the tumor resolved the pain immediately but range of motion remained restricted.

  19. Partial Flexor Tendon Laceration Assessment: Interobserver and Intraobserver Reliability.

    PubMed

    Barker, B Justin; Kolovich, Gregory P; Klinefelter, Ryan D

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of partial-thickness flexor tendon lacerations in the hand is difficult owing to the subjectivity of evaluation. In this study, we created 12 partial-thickness flexor tendon lacerations in a cadaveric hand, evaluated the accuracy of 6 orthopedic residents and 4 fellowship-trained hand surgeons in estimating the percentage thickness of each laceration, and assessed the groups' interobserver and intraobserver agreement. The 10 participants estimated each laceration independently and on 2 separate occasions and indicated whether they would repair it. The actual thickness of each laceration was calculated from measurements made with a pair of digital microcalipers. Overall estimates differed significantly from calibrated measurements. Estimates grouped by residents and fellowship-trained hand surgeons also differed significantly. Third-year residents were the most accurate residents, and fellowship-trained hand surgeons were more accurate than residents. Overall interobserver agreement was poor for both readings. There was moderate overall intraobserver agreement. Fellowship-trained hand surgeons and first-year residents had the highest intraobserver agreement. These results highlight the difficulty in accurately assessing flexor tendon lacerations. Accuracy appears not to improve with surgeon experience.

  20. Reliability of a clinical test for deep cervical flexor endurance.

    PubMed

    Olson, Lee E; Millar, A Lynn; Dunker, Jeremy; Hicks, Jennifer; Glanz, Devin

    2006-02-01

    Endurance deficiencies of the deep cervical flexors are associated with pain, increased lordosis, and headache. A need exists for reliable clinical tests of flexor endurance. This study determined intrarater and interrater reliability of such a test in persons without neck pain. Twenty-seven subjects (aged 20-35 years) without a history of neck pain or injury were tested. Supine subjects were timed in maintaining a position involving two components: (1) craniovertebral flexion (chin tuck) and (2) lower cervical flexion (holding the occiput at a fixed height). Each subject was examined twice by 3 different examiners with 1 to 2 days between trials. When two values were averaged, interrater reliability for the 3 testers was 0.83, 0.85, and 0.88. Intrarater reliability values were 0.78 and 0.85 for tests 1 and 2, respectively. The flexor endurance test showed good intertester and intratester reliability when two values were averaged and, thus, may represent a useful clinical tool for practitioners involved in treating and preventing neck pain.

  1. Intra-articular capacity of the elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Van Den Broek, Mathias; Van Riet, Roger

    2017-09-01

    The intra-articular capacity of the elbow joint is reported to be 23 ± 4 ml on cadaveric elbows. During years, this value was the standard. The aim of this observational study was to reanalyze the volume of the elbow joint on live patients. Measurement of the intra-articular capacity and pressure of the elbow joint was performed on 30 patients (mean age: 43.8 years) undergoing elbow arthroscopy. Intra-articular capacity was recorded when the elbow moved to the maximum lose packed position and/or when there was a sudden drop in pressure, indicating a capsular rupture (maximum capacity). Indications for arthroscopy were loose bodies, osteoarthritis, synovitis, radial head resection, and lateral collateral ligament repair. Mean intra-articular capacity and pressure were 35.8 ml and 557.5 mm Hg, respectively. Mean maximal capacity was 40.5 ml. We conclude that the intra-articular capacity of the elbow joint is substantially greater than reported in previous studies. Clin. Anat. 30:795-798, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Reduction of erosion in elbows due to flow modifications: Final report, Phase 1. [Elbows

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.K.; Means, K.H.; Eyler, R.L.; Holtzworth, J.D.

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the concept of flow-field modification as a method for reducing erosion in bends (elbows) used in pneumatic transport systems. Flow field modifications were primarily accomplished by injecting air at selected locations within the bends. Part I of this project shows the feasibility of the concept. Part II of this project will include further experiments and analysis, leading to a design methodology for incorporating this concept into piping systems. This report represents the final report for Part I of this project. This report contains a survey of the literature dealing with the erosion in bends (elbows) and the fundamental subjects of erosion and two-phase, gas-solids, flow. Based on this literature survey, a pneumatic transport test loop was constructed. Several bend designs were tested, using sand, under a variety of operating conditions. The results of this exploratory effort indicate that modifying the flow field in a bend with jets may: (1) decrease erosion; (2) change the erosion pattern with the same amount of erosion; or (3) significantly increase the erosion process. Data indicate that the erosion rate may be reduced by low-velocity jets for high phase-density flow. Apparently the interaction of jets with dilute phase-density flow tends to accelerate the erosion process. It is recommended that the project be continued in order to more fully understand the process and its capabilities to solve the difficult technical problem of erosion in bends (elbows).

  3. Observations on an evaporative, elbow thermosyphon

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, G.S.H.; Fu, J. )

    1993-05-01

    The performance of the evaporative elbow system was found to be superior to that of the nonevaporative system, but comparable to the performance of the linear system. The parametric role of the evaporator wall temperature, the condenser wall temperature, and the vapor saturation temperature was demonstrated, each revealing a similar monotonic effect. With the evaporator upright, the data were found to be similar to, but displaced from, the upright condenser data. The upright evaporator gave the better performance, but not overwhelmingly so. The limit of performance with the condenser upright was found to be dictated by evaporator dryout. In the upright evaporator configuration, the limit may be attributed to flooding in the poorly draining condenser; this limit was indistinguishable from geyser behavior at low vapor pressures. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Incidence of elbow dislocations in the United States population.

    PubMed

    Stoneback, Jason W; Owens, Brett D; Sykes, Joshua; Athwal, George S; Pointer, Lauren; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2012-02-01

    There is minimal published information regarding the epidemiology of simple elbow dislocations. The purpose of this study was to report the estimated incidence of elbow dislocations in the United States, with use of the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) database. The NEISS database includes 102 hospitals representing a random sampling of all patients presenting to U.S. emergency departments. The database was queried for elbow dislocation events. NEISS data for 2002 through 2006 were used for raw data and weighted injury counts. Incidence rates with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated by age group and sex, with use of U.S. census data. One thousand and sixty-six elbow dislocations were identified, representing a weighted estimate of 36,751 acute dislocations nationwide. A calculated incidence of 5.21 dislocations per 100,000 person-years (95% CI, 4.74 to 5.68) was noted. The highest incidence of elbow dislocations (43.5%) occurred in those who were ten to nineteen years old (6.87 per 100,000 person-years; 95% CI, 5.97 to 7.76). The incidence rate ratio for the comparison of dislocations in males with those in females was 1.02 (5.26 per 100,000 for males and 5.16 per 100,000 for females). In patients ten years or older, 474 injuries (44.5% of total dislocations) were sustained in sports. Males dislocated elbows in football, wrestling, and basketball. Females sustained elbow dislocations most frequently in gymnastics and skating activities. The estimated incidence of elbow dislocations in the U.S. population is 5.21 per 100,000 person-years, with use of a national database. Adolescent males are at highest risk for dislocation. Nearly half of acute elbow dislocations occurred in sports, with males at highest risk with football, and females at risk with gymnastics and skating activities.

  5. 21 CFR 888.3160 - Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an elbow...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3160 - Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an elbow...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3160 - Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained... Elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. An elbow joint metal/polymer semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace an elbow...

  8. Output of human motoneuron pools to corticospinal inputs during voluntary contractions.

    PubMed

    Martin, P G; Gandevia, S C; Taylor, J L

    2006-06-01

    This study investigated transmission of corticospinal output through motoneurons over a wide range of voluntary contraction strengths in humans. During voluntary contraction of biceps brachii, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex grow up to about 50% maximal force and then decrease. To determine whether the decrease reflects events at a cortical or spinal level, responses to stimulation of the cortex and corticospinal tract (cervicomedullary motor evoked potentials, CMEPs) as well as maximal M-waves (M(max)) were recorded during strong contractions at 50 to 100% maximum. In biceps and brachioradialis, MEPs and CMEPs (normalized to M(max)) evoked by strong stimuli decreased during strong elbow flexions. Responses were largest during contractions at 75% maximum and both potentials decreased by about 25% M(max) during maximal efforts (P < 0.001). Reductions were smaller with weaker stimuli, but again similar for MEPs and CMEPs. Thus the reduction in MEPs during strong voluntary contractions can be accounted for by reduced responsiveness of the motoneuron pool to stimulation. During strong contractions of the first dorsal interosseous, a muscle that increases voluntary force largely by frequency modulation, MEPs declined more than in either elbow flexor muscle (35% M(max), P < 0.001). This suggests that motoneuron firing rates are important determinants of evoked output from the motoneuron pool. However, motor cortical output does not appear to be limited at high contraction strengths.

  9. The senses of active and passive forces at the human ankle joint.

    PubMed

    Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2015-07-01

    The traditional view of the neural basis for the sense of muscle force is that it is generated at least in part within the brain. Recently it has been proposed that force sensations do not arise entirely centrally and that there is a contribution from peripheral receptors within the contracting muscle. Evidence comes from experiments on thumb flexor and elbow flexor muscles. Here we have studied the sense of force in plantar flexor muscles of the human ankle, looking for further evidence for such a mechanism. The active angle-torque curve was measured for muscles of both legs, and for each muscle, ankle angles were identified on the ascending and descending limbs of the curve where active forces were similar. In a plantar flexion force matching task, subjects were asked to match the force in one foot, generated on the ascending limb of the curve, with force in the other foot, generated on the descending limb. It was hypothesised that despite active forces being similar, the sensation generated in the more stretched muscle should be greater because of the contribution from its peripheral stretch receptors, leading to an overestimation of the force in the stretched muscle. It was found that provided that the comparison was between active forces, there was no difference in the forces generated by the two legs, supporting the central hypothesis for the sense of force. When total forces were matched, including a component of passive force due to muscle stretch, subjects seemed to ignore the passive component. Yet subjects had an acute sense of passive force, provided that the muscles remained relaxed. It was concluded that subjects had two senses, a sense of active force, generated centrally, and a sense of passive force, or perhaps muscle stretch, generated within the muscle itself.

  10. [Total Elbow Replacement - Implantation of the Latitude Prosthesis (Tornier)].

    PubMed

    Hackl, M; Wegmann, K; Leschinger, T; Ries, C; Burkhart, K J; Müller, L

    2015-10-01

    Due to technical progress, the indication for total elbow arthroplasty could be expanded in recent years. As a result, the demand regarding functionality and mobility of the replaced joint has risen as well. Elbow arthroplasty has to be considered as technically demanding. Only with detailed knowledge of this surgical procedure and its possible intraoperative pitfalls can one provide the best possible results. In this instructional video we explain the implantation of the Latitude elbow prosthesis (Tornier) putting emphasis on the correct approach as well as implantation of the prosthesis and subsequent wound closure.

  11. Iatrogenic radial neck fracture on closed reduction of elbow dislocation.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, Prasad; O'Farrell, Dermot

    2013-11-01

    Traumatic dislocation of the elbow is rare in children and can most often be managed in the emergency department using procedural sedation and closed reduction with good functional outcome. Radiographs must be evaluated for associated avulsions and fractures around the elbow. We present the case of a 14-year-old girl who sustained a fracture of the radial neck subsequent to repeated attempts at closed reduction of a pure posterior elbow dislocation that was missed on postreduction radiographs. Careful use of reduction techniques and avoidance of repeated forceful manipulations is emphasized.

  12. Elbow joint luxation in a 1-month-old foal.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Martínez, L M; Vázquez, F J; Romero, A; Ormazábal, J R

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on luxation of the elbow joint without concomitant fracture in a 1-month-old foal. Conservative treatment, with closed reduction and full-limb bandaging, including caudal and lateral splints, seemed successful initially, however, failed to provide enough stability and luxation recurred, and open reduction and surgical placement of prosthetic collateral ligaments was required. Luxation of the elbow joint should be considered when acute non-weight bearing forelimb lameness occurs associated with pain and swelling in the area of the elbow in young foals. Closed reduction failed to provide sufficient joint stability.

  13. Changes in hip flexor passive compliance do not account for improvement in vertical jump performance after hip flexor static stretching.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, C Brent; Cottrell, G Trevor

    2015-06-01

    To date, there is limited research investigating stretching of antagonist muscles and its effects on agonist muscle function. The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of pre-static stretching (pre-SS) of the hip flexor musculature on passive hip extension range of motion (ROM) and vertical jump height. Fifteen subjects reported to the laboratory on 4 separate days (D1, D2, D3, and D4). D1 was for familiarization, while on D2 to D4, subjects randomly completed 1 of 3 intervention conditions; no stretch (CON), hip flexor stretch (HFS), or hip extensor stretch (HES). Subject's pre- and post-intervention hip extension ROM were measured before performing 3 sets of pre- and post-maximal counter-movement vertical jumps. Vertical jump height was normalized to baseline for data analysis. A repeated-measures ANOVA with post hoc paired sample t-tests revealed a significant increase in vertical jump height in the HFS condition (1.74% ± 0.73; p ≤ 0.05) when compared with CON (-1.34% ± 0.96) or HES (-1.74% ± 0.65) conditions. There was also a significant increase in hip extension ROM after the HFS stretching protocol (6.5 ± 2.75%; p ≤ 0.05) when compared with the CON protocol (-1.73 ± 3.26); however, no significant difference when compared with the HES protocol (1.84 ± 2.79). A correlation analysis showed that the relative hip laxity of each subject had no effect on response to either condition nor did the magnitude of hip ROM change predict improvement in vertical jump. These results suggest that performing SS of the hip flexors may enhance vertical jump performance independent of changes in passive compliance of the hip flexor muscular tendon unit.

  14. Toe Flexor Strength, Flexibility and Function and Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Morphology in Dancers and Non-Dancers.

    PubMed

    Rowley, K Michael; Jarvis, Danielle N; Kurihara, Toshiyuki; Chang, Yu-Jen; Fietzer, Abbigail L; Kulig, Kornelia

    2015-09-01

    Tendinopathy of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL), colloquially referred to as "dancer's tendinitis," is a common condition in dancers and attributed to high demand on this muscle in positions of extreme ankle plantarflexion and metatarsophalangeal (MTP)) flexion and extension. Despite such a high prevalence, there has been little research into preventative or nonsurgical interventions. As a means to identify potential targets for prevention and intervention, this study aimed to characterize toe flexors in dancers by measuring strength, flexibility, function, and FHL tendon morphology. Dancers (n=25) were compared to non-dancers (n=25) in toe flexor isometric strength, first MTP joint range of motion, foot longitudinal arch flexibility, balance ability, endurance during modified heel raises without use of the toes, and FHL tendon thickness, cross-sectional area, and peak spatial frequency. Significant differences were found in functional first MTP joint extension (dancers 101.95°, non-dancers 91.15°, p<0.001), balance ability during single-leg stance on the toes (dancers 11.43 s, non-dancers 5.90 s, p=0.013), and during modified heel raises (dancers 22.20 reps, non-dancers 28.80 reps, p=0.001). Findings indicate that dancers rely on toe flexors more than non-dancers to complete balance and heel raise tasks. Efficacy of using this modified heel raise task with the toes off the edge of a block as a means to train larger plantarflexors and as a nonsurgical intervention should be studied in the future. Improving interventions for FHL tendinopathy will be impactful for dancers, in whom this condition is highly prevalent.

  15. Intratendinous Injection of Hydrogel for Reseeding Decellularized Human Flexor Tendons.

    PubMed

    Long, Chao; Galvez, Michael G; Legrand, Anais; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Wang, Zhen; Chattopadhyay, Arhana; Chang, James; Fox, Paige M

    2017-06-01

    Decellularized cadaveric tendons are a potential source for reconstruction. Reseeding to enhance healing is ideal; however, cells placed on the tendon surface result in inadequate delivery. The authors used an injection technique to evaluate intratendinous cell delivery. Decellularized tendons were reseeded with adipose-derived stem cells in culture, and injected with fetal bovine serum or hydrogel. PKH26-stained cells in cross-section were quantified. To evaluate cell viability, the authors delivered luciferase-labeled cells and performed bioluminescent imaging. To evaluate synthetic ability, the authors performed immunohistochemistry of procollagen. Adipose-derived stem cells' ability to attract tenocytes was assessed using transwell inserts. Cell-to-cell interaction was assessed by co-culturing, measuring proliferation and collagen production, and quantifying synergy. Finally, tensile strength was tested. Both fetal bovine serum (p < 0.001) and hydrogel (p < 0.001) injection led to more cells inside the tendon compared with culturing. Hydrogel injection initially demonstrated greater bioluminescence than culturing (p < 0.005) and fetal bovine serum injection (p < 0.05). Injection groups demonstrated intratendinous procollagen staining correlating with the cells' location. Co-culture led to greater tenocyte migration (p < 0.05). Interaction index of proliferation and collagen production assays were greater than 1 for all co-culture ratios, demonstrating synergistic proliferation and collagen production compared with controls (p < 0.05). There were no differences in tensile strength. Hydrogel injection demonstrated the greatest intratendinous seeding efficiency and consistency, without compromising tensile strength. Intratendinous cells demonstrated synthetic capabilities and can potentially attract tenocytes inside the tendon, where synergy would promote intrinsic tendon healing. Therapeutic, V.

  16. Human Joint Articulation and Motion-Resistive Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    eWantinue Got ,ewrse it nescwery end identify by block number) a .GRoUP sue. to Biomechanics, elbow complex, joint kinematics, joint sinus, joint restoring...necessary and identify by Maock number) Three-dimensional joint kinematics and motion resistive properties were measured for tUse shioulder, hip and elbow ...HUMAN HUMERO- ELBOW COMPLEX... 83 5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 83 5.2 Determination of the Humero- elbow Complex Sinus

  17. A combined variation of Palmaris longus and Flexor digitorum superficialis: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, A; Melo, C; Pinheiro, S

    2016-12-01

    The muscles of the anterior compartment of the forearm often exhibit anatomic variations. During dissection of the upper right limb of a preserved cadaver, morphological variations in the Palmaris longus and Flexor digitorum superficialis muscles were found. The Palmaris longus muscular fibers converged to a tendon that passed beneath the Flexor retinaculum, and inserted at the base of the middle phalanx of the fourth digit, replacing the tendon of Flexor digitorum superficialis. The Flexor digitorum superficialis was divided into two muscular heads: a digastric medial head giving tendons to the second and fifth digits, and a lateral head giving one tendon to the third digit. All these tendons were inserted in the respective digits by two bundles between which were located the tendon of the Flexor digitorum profundus muscle. Variations of flexor muscles must be documented because of their clinical significance and their potential use of these muscles in orthopaedic and reconstructive surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring hip flexor and extensor strengths across various postures using a fixed belt

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Takashi; Higashi, Kentarou; Katou, Tomohiko

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate hip flexor and extensor strength due to differences in posture measurement. [Subjects and Methods] Healthy adults (26 males and 24 females) were enrolled. Using a hand-held dynamometer, hip flexor and extensor strengths were measured in various postures and in a basic posture (sitting posture and hip/knee joint flexed 90°) according to the Manual Muscle Testing procedure. While calculating intraclass correlation coefficients by measurement, hip flexor and extensor strengths were compared in males and females for every posture. [Results] Intraclass correlation coefficients were greater than 0.7 in every measurement. There was no significant difference in hip flexor and extensor strengths in both males and females. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in right and left hip flexor strengths and in left hip extensor strength. [Conclusion] Hip flexor and extensor strengths can be simply and easily measured using a hand-held dynamometer. PMID:28533587

  19. Measuring hip flexor and extensor strengths across various postures using a fixed belt.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Takashi; Higashi, Kentarou; Katou, Tomohiko

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate hip flexor and extensor strength due to differences in posture measurement. [Subjects and Methods] Healthy adults (26 males and 24 females) were enrolled. Using a hand-held dynamometer, hip flexor and extensor strengths were measured in various postures and in a basic posture (sitting posture and hip/knee joint flexed 90°) according to the Manual Muscle Testing procedure. While calculating intraclass correlation coefficients by measurement, hip flexor and extensor strengths were compared in males and females for every posture. [Results] Intraclass correlation coefficients were greater than 0.7 in every measurement. There was no significant difference in hip flexor and extensor strengths in both males and females. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in right and left hip flexor strengths and in left hip extensor strength. [Conclusion] Hip flexor and extensor strengths can be simply and easily measured using a hand-held dynamometer.

  20. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF SECONDARY FLOW IN AN ACCELERATING, RECTANGULAR ELBOW WITH 90 deg OF TURNING

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Secondary flow tests were conducted on an accelerating elbow with 90 deg. of turning designed for prescribed velocities that eliminate boundary-layer...plane walls of the elbow by spoilers upstream of the elbow inlet. The passage vortex associated with secondary flows appears to be near the suction...surface and away from the plane wall of the elbow at the exit and does not have appreciable span-wise motion as it moves downstream from the elbow exit. As

  1. ELBOW, 2-1/2 INCH SIZE WITH HALF CYCLE ALTERNATOR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An elbow 2-1/2 in. size with half cycle alternator was designed and developed for use by very short above elbow , shoulder disarticulation and fore...quarter amputees. The elbow provides the amputee with a means of positively locking the forearm with respect to the arm in 13 separate positions of...system to the elbow unit and terminal device. Forearm rotation is permitted between the top portion of the elbow unit and the turntable to which the

  2. Diagnosis and surgical management of flexor digitorum accessorius longus-induced tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wittmayer, Brian C; Freed, Lewis

    2007-01-01

    The flexor digitorum accessorius longus is a rare muscular occurrence in the lower extremity. It has been reported as an etiology of tarsal tunnel syndrome through prior case reports. By means of individual case study, we revisit flexor digitorum accessorius longus as a cause of tarsal tunnel syndrome. This case study discusses diagnosis along with surgical treatment of tarsal tunnel syndrome induced by the presence of flexor digitorum accessorius longus.

  3. Elbow dislocation secondary to fall during police arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R J; Clark, K; Kelliher, T

    2014-02-01

    A case of total elbow dislocation with significant swelling and loss of distal pulses during police arrest is described. To date, this specific injury in relation to police arrest has not been described in the literature. Whilst attempting to remove the detainee from a public transport vehicle, the patient and the officers involved fell to the ground with his arm slightly flexed. He was handcuffed to the rear and taken to the police office. Whilst there, it was noted that his left elbow was swelling dramatically and he complained of pain. The detainee and officers attended the emergency room and he was found to have a total dislocation of the left elbow and vascular compromise of the limb. The elbow was promptly reduced with sedation and a post reduction angiogram demonstrated injury to the tissues surrounding the brachial artery.

  4. Paediatric biepicondylar elbow fracture dislocation - a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Paediatric elbow biepicondylar fracture dislocations are very rare injuries and have been only published in two independent case reviews. We report a case of 13 years old boy, who sustained this unusual injury after a fall on outstretched hand resulting in an unstable elbow fracture dislocation. Closed reduction was performed followed by delayed ORIF (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation) with K wires. Final follow-up at 14 weeks revealed a stable elbow and satisfactory function with full supination-pronation, range of motion from 0°-120° of flexion and normal muscle strength. This type of injury needs operative treatment and fixation to restore stability and return to normal or near normal elbow function. The method of fixation (screws or K wires) may depend on size and number of fracture fragments. PMID:20950437

  5. Anterior elbow dislocation with potential compartment syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Queipo-de-Llano Temboury, Alfonso; Lara, Jorge Mariscal; Fernadez-de-Rota, Antonio; Queipo-de-Llano, Enrique

    2007-03-01

    Anterior elbow dislocation is an infrequent lesion, usually produced by direct trauma to the proximal ulna after a fall on the elbow in flexion, and is often associated with soft tissue injuries. The authors report a case of a complex injury produced by a high-energy trauma in the right arm of a 65-year-old patient. His limb was trapped inside an industrial spin-dryer, resulting in a closed anterior elbow dislocation, diaphyseal ulnar shaft, radial styloid process fractures, and an associated compartment syndrome. The injury mechanism and its treatment are described to better manage the soft tissue injury and early elbow mobilization using the FEARM hinged external fixator. A good result was achieved, with almost complete restoration of the patient's arm functions, and he has returned to his previous working activities.

  6. Evaluation of the medial elbow in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Creighton, R Alexander; Bach, Bernard R; Bush-Joseph, Charles A

    2006-06-01

    The valgus forces generated by throwing athletes can cause injuries and permanently damage the medial elbow structures. Clinicians must have a clear understanding of the ulnar collateral ligament complex and the associated medial elbow structures at risk in these athletes. Taking a detailed history, conducting a physical examination, and obtaining imaging studies will aid in making the correct diagnosis and giving these injuries the appropriate treatment. Pain around the medial elbow is of concern to throwing athletes, coaches, and medical staff. Valgus forces generated by the throwing motion add considerable stress to the medial elbow structures and thus potentially cause injury. Baseball players, particularly pitchers, are most often affected, but athletes participating in sports such as football, volleyball, water polo, tennis, and javelin throwing can also be affected.

  7. Elbow injuries: getting kids back in the game.

    PubMed

    Southard, Jennifer A; Benson, Eric C

    2011-10-01

    Elbow injuries are increasingly common in children and young adults who participate in team sports nearly year-round. This review--and the tables that accompany it--can help you help them safely return to play.

  8. Stainless-steel elbows formed by spin forging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Large seamless austenitic stainless steel elbows are fabricated by spin forging /rotary shear forming/. A specially designed spin forging tool for mounting on a hydrospin machine has been built for this purpose.

  9. Paediatric biepicondylar elbow fracture dislocation - a case report.

    PubMed

    Meta, Mahendrakumar; Miller, David

    2010-10-15

    Paediatric elbow biepicondylar fracture dislocations are very rare injuries and have been only published in two independent case reviews. We report a case of 13 years old boy, who sustained this unusual injury after a fall on outstretched hand resulting in an unstable elbow fracture dislocation. Closed reduction was performed followed by delayed ORIF (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation) with K wires. Final follow-up at 14 weeks revealed a stable elbow and satisfactory function with full supination-pronation, range of motion from 0°-120° of flexion and normal muscle strength. This type of injury needs operative treatment and fixation to restore stability and return to normal or near normal elbow function. The method of fixation (screws or K wires) may depend on size and number of fracture fragments.

  10. A clinically oriented comprehensive pictorial review of canine elbow anatomy.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Gheorghe M; Constantinescu, Ileana A

    2009-02-01

    The clinically oriented canine elbow anatomy in its complexity earned a high importance in surgery especially after multiple imaging modalities have been used in the benefit of diagnosis and treatment of canine elbow disorders. The bony, joint, and muscular structures, the arteries, the veins and the nerves supplying the elbow are described and illustrated in textbooks and atlases in the context of the comparative anatomy. Nevertheless, there is no publication focused on all of these structures described together from the skin to the bones in a systematic and topographic order, nor through cross and/or sagittal and coronal sections. The figures used in this article are original and drawn after dissection, cross, sagittal, and coronal sections of the elbow structures. The sections are correlated to the multiple imaging modalities shown in the next article.

  11. Prevention of elbow injuries in youth baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, Glenn S; Weber, Adam; Hassell, Nina; Andrews, James R

    2009-01-01

    There is concern among sports medicine practitioners that the number of youth baseball pitchers with elbow injuries appears to be increasing. Research points to overuse as the principle risk factor. The risk of elbow pain in youth pitchers is correlated with the number of pitches thrown in a game and in a season. Adolescents who competitively pitch more than 85 pitches per game, more than 8 months out of a year, or with arm fatigue are several times more likely to require elbow surgery. Poor pitching mechanics also appear to contribute to injury risk. Existing research does not show a significant correlation between curveballs and injury. Adults should help youth pitchers avoid fatigue, overuse, and improper mechanics. If elbow pain develops, the youth pitcher should be evaluated by a sports medicine physician.

  12. Infected total elbow arthroplasty treated by cemented arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-03-22

    A lady had suffered from deep infection of the GSB III prosthesis of her right elbow. The infection could not be controlled by repeated debridement. Finally, cemented arthrodesis was performed and the infection was eradicated.

  13. Early reduction in toe flexor strength is associated with physical activity in elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Suwa, Masataka; Imoto, Takayuki; Kida, Akira; Yokochi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the toe flexor, hand grip and knee extensor strengths of young and elderly men, and to examine the association between toe flexor strength and physical activity or inactivity levels. [Subjects and Methods] Young (n=155, 18–23 years) and elderly (n=60, 65–88 years) men participated in this study. Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength were measured. Physical activity (time spent standing/walking per day) and inactivity (time spent sitting per day) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. [Results] Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength of the elderly men were significantly lower than those of the young men. Standing/walking and sitting times of the elderly men were lower than those of the young men. Toe flexor strength correlated with hand grip and knee extensor strength in both groups. In elderly men, toe flexor strength correlated with standing/walking time. In comparison to the young men’s mean values, toe flexor strength was significantly lower than knee extensor and hand grip strength in the elderly group. [Conclusion] The results suggest that age-related reduction in toe flexor strength is greater than those of hand grip and knee extensor strengths. An early loss of toe flexor strength is likely associated with reduced physical activity in elderly men. PMID:27313353

  14. Arthroscopic debridement of osteoarthritic elbow in professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Cui, Guo-Qing; Wang, Jian-Quan; Yin, Yu; Ao, Ying-Fang

    2011-12-01

    Arthroscopic debridement is an appropriate procedure for osteoarthritic elbow in general populations. However, the results of arthroscopic debridement in the professional athletes, a younger and highly active patient cohort is unclear. The purposes of this study were to assess the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic debridement of osteoarthritic elbow in professional athletes and to evaluate the effect of prognostic factors on the clinical outcomes. From January 1999 to January 2006, 35 professional athletes with osteoarthritc elbow (36 elbows) were treated with arthroscopic debridement, consisted of osteophytes removal, loose bodies removal and fenestration of the olecranon fossa as necessary. Average patient age was (23 ± 5) years (range 7 - 34 years). Average follow-up was (43 ± 23) months (range 16 - 98 months). Athletic activities consisted mainly of wrestling, judo and weightlifting. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively with the modified Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) elbow scoring system. According to the modified HSS elbow scoring system, the result was excellent for 16 elbows, good for 14 and poor for 6. No case had got worse after surgery. All athletes reported an improvement in pain. After athletic training, 15 elbows were not painful, 16 mildly painful, 3 moderately painful and 2 severely painful. The arc of flexion-extension improved from 111° preoperatively to 127° postoperatively. All of the athletes were able to return to their previous level of training. Five athletes won national-level championships. At follow-up, 17 athletes (18 elbows) were greatly satisfied with the results, 12 satisfied and 6 unsatisfied. Postoperatively, one athlete reported ulnar nerve symptoms and two others had residual loose bodies. The fenestration of the olecranon fossa was associated with a significantly increased chance of a poor outcome. The nature of the osteoarthritis, duration of symptoms, osteophytes removal and loose bodies removal

  15. Epidemiology of Elbow Dislocations in High School Athletes.

    PubMed

    Dizdarevic, Ismar; Low, Sara; Currie, Dustin W; Comstock, R Dawn; Hammoud, Sommer; Atanda, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    The elbow is the second most commonly dislocated major joint in the general population. Previous studies that focused on emergency department populations indicate that such injuries occur most frequently among adolescent athletes. To describe the epidemiological rates and patterns of sports-related elbow dislocations in high school athletes. Descriptive epidemiology study. Sports-related injury data for the 2005-2006 through 2013-2014 academic years from a national convenience sample of high schools participating in the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study (High School Reporting Information Online [RIO]) were analyzed. Certified athletic trainers participating in High School RIO reported 115 of 1246 (9.2%) elbow injuries as elbow dislocations. A total of 30,415,179 athlete exposures (AEs) were reported during the study period, resulting in a dislocation rate of 0.38 per 100,000 AEs. The majority of the dislocations resulted from boys' wrestling (46.1%) and football (37.4%). Elbow dislocation rates were higher in competition than in practice. Also, 91.3% of dislocations occurred in boys' sports. Among both boys (60.4%) and girls (88.9%), the majority of injuries occurred during varsity sports activities. Contact with another person was the most common injury mechanism (46.9%), followed by contact with the playing surface (46.0%). Dislocations more commonly resulted in removal from play for more than 3 weeks (23.4% vs 6.9%, respectively) or medical disqualification (36.9% vs 7.0%, respectively) compared with other elbow injuries. Dislocations were also more likely to result in surgical treatment than other elbow injuries (13.6% vs 4.7%, respectively). In high school athletes, elbow dislocations result in longer removal from play and are more likely to require surgical treatment than nondislocation-associated elbow injuries. Rates and patterns of elbow dislocations vary by sport. In high-risk sports, focused sport-specific prevention

  16. Posterolateral rotatory instability of elbow: An uncommon entity

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Md. Quamar; Iraqi, AA; Syed, Anjum; Abbas, M

    2008-01-01

    Posterolateral rotatory instability of elbow is an exceedingly uncommon entity, which results from injury to the lateral ligamentous complex. Failure of adequate healing of lateral collateral ligaments may necessitate its surgical repair or reconstruction. We describe here a boy 12 years of age who was initially treated as soft tissue injury and later presented with instability of the same elbow. He later required repair of lateral ulnar collateral ligament. PMID:19753166

  17. Prevention of elbow injuries in youth baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, Glenn S; Andrews, James R

    2012-09-01

    Although baseball is a relatively safe sport, numerous reports suggest a rapid rise in elbow injury rate among youth baseball pitchers. PUBMED WAS SEARCHED FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC, BIOMECHANICAL, AND CLINICAL STUDIES OF ELBOW INJURIES IN BASEBALL (KEYWORDS: "youth OR adolescent" AND baseball AND pitching AND "ulnar collateral ligament OR elbow"; published January 2000 - April 2012). Studies with relevance to youth baseball pitchers were reviewed. Relevant references from these articles were also retrieved and reviewed. Original data, insight, and recommendations were added. The majority of baseball elbow injuries are noncontact injuries to the dominant arm resulting from repetitive pitching. Five percent of youth pitchers suffer a serious elbow or shoulder injury (requiring surgery or retirement from baseball) within 10 years. The risk factor with the strongest correlation to injury is amount of pitching. Specifically, increased pitches per game, innings pitched per season, and months pitched per year are all associated with increased risk of elbow injury. Pitching while fatigued and pitching for concurrent teams are also associated with increased risk. Pitchers who also play catcher have an increased injury risk, perhaps due to the quantity of throws playing catcher adds to the athlete's arm. Another risk factor is poor pitching biomechanics. Improper biomechanics may increase the torque and force produced about the elbow during each pitch. Although throwing breaking pitches at a young age has been suggested as a risk factor, existing clinical, epidemiologic, and biomechanical data do not support this claim. Some elbow injuries to youth baseball pitchers can be prevented with safety rules, recommendations, education, and common sense. Scientific and medical organizations have published safety rules and recommendations, with emphasis on prevention of overuse and pitching while fatigued. STRENGTH-OF-RECOMMENDATION TAXONOMY (SORT): A.

  18. Elbow range of motion in professional baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rick W; Steger-May, Karen; Wasserlauf, Brett L; O'Neal, Mark E; Weinberg, Barry W; Paletta, George A

    2006-02-01

    Physicians involved with the care of baseball players have noted elbow range of motion changes in pitchers. Objective data regarding the extent of these changes have rarely been documented. Dominant and nondominant elbow range of motion differences are common in baseball pitchers, and these differences are related to player age, amount and length of time professionally pitched, and history of surgical procedures on the dominant extremity. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty-three professional pitchers were evaluated for elbow range of motion during spring training preseason physical examination. Dominant and nondominant elbow range of motion including flexion, extension, supination, and pronation were measured with a goniometer. Range of motion measures from the dominant and nondominant sides were compared. Baseball records were reviewed for arm dominance, age, years of professional pitching, professional innings pitched, and history of elbow surgery. These factors were evaluated for their possible association with range of motion for each side and the difference between sides. Statistically significant differences between dominant and nondominant sides were noted for elbow extension (dominant decreased 7.9 degrees +/- 7.4 degrees, P < .0001), flexion (dominant decreased 5.5 degrees +/- 7.8 degrees, P = .0003), and total flexion-extension arc (dominant decreased 13.3 degrees +/- 13.7 degrees, P < .0001). No significant difference between sides was found for the supination or pronation measures. No correlation was noted for age, pitching history, surgery, or arm dominance and the motion differences. Professional pitchers demonstrate elbow flexion and extension differences between dominant and nondominant elbows. No correlation was found between motion differences and age, pitching history, surgery, or arm dominance.

  19. Elbow joint fatigue and bench-press training.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Po; Chou, You-Li; Chen, Feng-Chun; Wang, Rong-Tyai; Huang, Ming-Jer; Chou, Paul Pei-Hsi

    2014-01-01

    Bench-press exercises are among the most common form of training exercise for the upper extremity because they yield a notable improvement in both muscle strength and muscle endurance. The literature contains various investigations into the effects of different bench-press positions on the degree of muscle activation. However, the effects of fatigue on the muscular performance and kinetics of the elbow joint are not understood fully. To investigate the effects of fatigue on the kinetics and myodynamic performance of the elbow joint in bench-press training. Controlled laboratory study. Motion research laboratory. A total of 18 physically healthy male students (age = 19.6 ± 0.8 years, height = 168.7 ± 5.5 cm, mass = 69.6 ± 8.6 kg) participated in the investigation. All participants were right-hand dominant, and none had a history of upper extremity injuries or disorders. Participants performed bench-press training until fatigued. Maximal possible number of repetitions, cycle time, myodynamic decline rate, elbow-joint force, and elbow-joint moment. We observed a difference in cycle time in the initial (2.1 ± 0.42 seconds) and fatigue (2.58 ± 0.46 seconds) stages of the bench-press exercise (P = .04). As the participants fatigued, we observed an increase in the medial-lateral force (P = .03) and internal-external moment (P ≤ .04) acting on the elbow joint. Moreover, a reduction in the elbow muscle strength was observed in the elbow extension-flexion (P ≤ .003) and forearm supination-pronation (P ≤ .001) conditions. The results suggest that performing bench-press exercises to the point of fatigue increases elbow-joint loading and may further increase the risk of injury. Therefore, when clinicians design bench-press exercise regimens for general athletic training, muscle strengthening, or physical rehabilitation, they should control carefully the maximal number of repetitions.

  20. Impingement of Droplets in 90 deg Elbows with Potential Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Paul T.; Brun, Rinaldo J.; Boyd, Bemrose

    1953-01-01

    Trajectories were determined for droplets in air flowing through 90 deg elbows especially designed for two-dimensional potential motion with low pressure losses. The elbows were established by selecting as walls of each elbow two streamlines of the flow field produced by a complex potential function that establishes a two-dimensional flow around a 90 deg bend. An unlimited number of elbows with slightly different shapes can be established by selecting different pairs of streamlines as walls. The elbows produced by the complex potential function selected are suitable for use in aircraft air-intake ducts. The droplet impingement data derived from the trajectories are presented along with equations in such a manner that the collection efficiency, the area, the rate, and the distribution of droplet impingement can be determined for any elbow defined by any pair of streamlines within a portion of the flow field established by the complex potential function. Coordinates for some typical streamlines of the flow field and velocity components for several points along these streamlines are presented in tabular form.

  1. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF POST-TRAUMATIC ELBOW STIFFNESS

    PubMed Central

    Júnior, Jose Carlos Garcia; Zabeu, Jose Luis Amim; Junior, Ivaldo Angelo Cintra; Mattos, Carlos Augusto; Myrrha, Jesely Pereira

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate patients undergoing arthroscopic release of a stiff elbow, with discussion of the technique, possible difficulties and risks. Methods: Twenty-four elbow arthroscopy procedures were performed. All the patients were evaluated using goniometry before the operation and six months afterwards and were rated using the Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS). Results: Fifteen men and nine women underwent surgery (14 right elbows and ten left elbows). Their mean age was 34.58 years and length of follow-up, 38.41 months. Their mean gain of range of motion was 43.3° and of MEPS, 85.4. Conclusion: Arthroscopic release might enable better intra-articular viewing and enhance the options for changing strategy during surgery, reducing surgical trauma and enabling early rehabilitation. This technique can reach similar or better results than open surgery. The disadvantages of arthroscopy are the long learning curve and higher cost of the procedure. Neurovascular complications are reported with both techniques. To avoid such problems, the protocol for portal construction must be rigorously followed. Arthroscopic release was shown to be a safe and effective option for achieving range-of-motion gains in cases of post-traumatic stiff elbow. PMID:27042641

  2. [Elbow dislocation in childhood. Long-term observational study].

    PubMed

    Frongia, G; Günther, P; Romero, P; Kessler, M; Holland-Cunz, S

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic dislocation of the elbow is rare in children with an incidence of 3-6% of all elbow injuries. In the literature the outcome after elbow dislocation in childhood is rarely discussed. In the present study 33 children treated in our clinic from 2001 to 2008 with an acute traumatic dislocation of the elbow were retrospectively included. All events were unilateral whereby 1 child (3%) showed a recurrence of elbow dislocation after 9 weeks, 30% had a pure dislocation, 70% had a concomitant fracture, 55% showed a fracture of the medial epicondyle, 6% a fracture of the lateral epicondyle and 9% a further fracture. Of the fractures 83% required open reduction with osteosynthesis. After an average of 4.5 years 20 children (61%) were clinically examined. There were no instabilities of the joint and only minor clinical limitations of the range of motion. The established Mayo elbow performance score showed good to excellent results for all children. Despite severe joint trauma with frequently accompanying fractures, post-traumatic functional deficits are rarely limiting, independent of the accompanying fracture. The frequency of recurrence is low and instabilities were not seen.

  3. The study of elbow injury in male adult kendo players

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Shinya; Yoshida, Munehito

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Elbow injury in male adult kendo players was investigated and examined in order to obtain an indicator of prophylaxis of injury. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 22 male adult kendo players aged 25 to 60 years old, and presence or absence of pain, range of motion, and muscle strength in the elbow joints were investigated. In addition, among athletes with limited range of motion (ROM) in the elbow joints, three athletes who had received an explanation and had provided informed consent underwent CT, and the images were examined. [Result] As a result, posterior pain and decreased range of extension motion in the right elbow were noted in 86% of the subjects, and the CT images showed free bone fragments and osteophytes in the olecranon. Also, characteristics were noted that extension muscle strength was stronger than flexion muscle strength in elbow muscle strength. [Conclusion] Based on these results, characteristic disorders in male adult kendo players include an impingement disorder in the posterior region of the right elbow. PMID:28356645

  4. Arthroscopic management of chondromatosis of the elbow: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wzietek, Bogdan; Frańczuk, Bogusław

    2002-06-30

    Background. This article describes a case of chondromatosis of the elbow in a 33-year-old male patient. An arthroscopic method was used to remove multiple loose bodies from the joint.
    Case history. The patient complained of pain in the right elbow. He presented with edema in the elbow joint, pain during movement, occasional slippage, and a 300 functional reduction in elbow extension.
    Procedure. After the arthroscope was introduced into the joint, numerous loose bodies were detected, covered with cartilage, pale pink synovial membrane with hyperthropied villi. The cartilage of the joint surfaces bent slighty under pressure: however, there was no sign of decay, destruction, or deep deficits. Using a punch and Pean forceps we removed ca. 20 loose chondral and condro-osseous bodies ranging in diameter from 0,3 to 2,0 cm.
    Outcome. There were no post-surgical complications. After several days the patient was discharged. Within a week he recovered a full range of motion in the joint and no pain. The patient continues to work in a job demanding physical exertion and plays volleyball.
    Conclusion. Arthroscopy of the elbow is a good solution for the problem of loose bodies in the elbow joint, especially when they occur in both sections of the joint, where classical surgical techniques require two routes of surgical access or two-phase surgery.

  5. Successful closed suction drain management of a canine elbow hygroma.

    PubMed

    Pavletic, M M; Brum, D E

    2015-07-01

    A 1-year-old castrated male St. Bernard dog presented to Angell Animal Medical Center with bilateral elbow hygromas which had been present for several weeks. The largest hygroma involving the left elbow was managed with a closed suction (active) drain system to continuously collapse the hygroma pocket over a 3-week period. Soft bedding was used to protect the elbows from further impact trauma to the olecranon areas. Following drain removal, there was no evidence of hygroma recurrence based on periodic examinations over an 18-month period. The smaller non-operated right elbow hygroma had slightly enlarged during this period. Closed suction drain management of the hygroma proved to be a simple and economical method of collapsing the left elbow hygroma. This closed drainage system eliminated the need for the postoperative bandage care required with the use of the Penrose (passive) drain method of managing elbow hygromas. The external drain tube should be adequately secured in order to minimise the risk of its inadvertent displacement.

  6. Flow Tests of an NACA-designed Supercharger Inlet Elbow and the Effects of Various Components on the Flow Characteristics at the Elbow Outlet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1946-10-01

    ttil~.t,..,,#~ 1a NATIONALADVISORYCOMMIITEE FORAERONAUTICS TECHNICALNOTE No. 1148 FLOWTESTSOFANNACA-DESIGNEDSUPERCHARGERINLET ELBOW ...thecenterlineofthepassageperpendiculartotheplaneofthe bend. Thisvane pointofbending cm.1.dbe removed elbow . A schematic etiendsfrom1$ inchesupstremofthet.ni%ial- totheelbowoutletandwassodestgnedthatit...sipatedbeforeenteringthetestunit. Theair”=s-”exhauste~o thea.@ospherethrougha straightductof thesm. crosssection andareaas theoutletofthe, elbow . Airwassuppliedat 40

  7. Tarsal tunnel syndrome and flexor hallucis longus tendon hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, D; Devos Bevernage, B; Maldague, P; Deleu, P-A; Leemrijse, T

    2010-11-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) defines an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve or one of its branches, within the tarsal tunnel. Numerous etiologies have been described explaining this entrapment, including trauma, space-occupying lesions, foot deformities, etc. We present an unreported cause of a space-occupying lesion in the etiology of TTS, namely the combination of a hypertrophic long distally extended muscle belly of the flexor hallucis longus and repetitive ankle motion. Surgical debulking of the muscle belly in the posterior ankle compartment resolved all symptoms.

  8. Age-related reduction and independent predictors of toe flexor strength in middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Masataka; Imoto, Takayuki; Kida, Akira; Iwase, Mitsunori; Yokochi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Toe flexor muscles play an important role in posture and locomotion, and poor toe flexor strength is a risk factor for falls. In this cross-sectional study, we estimated the age-related change in toe flexor strength and compared it with that of handgrip strength. Independent factors predicting toe flexor and handgrip strength were also determined. A total of 1401 male (aged 35-59 years) study participants were divided into five groups according to their chronological age; 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, and 55-59 years. Toe flexor and handgrip strength, anthropometry, and resting blood pressure were measured. Fasting blood samples were collected to measure blood glucose, triglycerides, high- and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterols, and albumin. A self-administered lifestyle questionnaire was conducted. Decline in absolute toe flexor and handgrip strength began in the age groups 50-55 and 55-59 years, respectively. In comparison to the mean values of the youngest group, relative toe flexor strength (87.0 ± 26.6%) was significantly lower than handgrip strength (94.4 ± 13.1%) for the oldest group. Multiple regression analyses showed that independent factors predicting both toe flexor and handgrip strength were lean body mass, age, serum albumin, drinking habit, and fat mass. Additionally, fasting blood glucose, diastolic blood pressure, sleeping time and exercise habit were predicting factors of toe flexor strength but not of handgrip strength. Age-related reduction in toe flexor strength was earlier and greater than handgrip strength, and toe flexor strength reflects body composition and metabolic status.

  9. Reliability of biomechanical spasticity measurements at the elbow of people poststroke.

    PubMed

    Starsky, Andrew J; Sangani, Samir G; McGuire, John R; Logan, Brent; Schmit, Brian D

    2005-08-01

    To determine the minimum number of measurements required to obtain a reliable estimate of upper-extremity spasticity using biomechanic assessment across multiple testing trials and dates. Single-center, longitudinal study with repeated measurements of spastic upper-extremity torque measures taken 1 week apart. A hospital-based laboratory with an isokinetic testing system. Sixteen subjects more than 6 months poststroke with upper-extremity spasticity. Elbow flexor hypertonia was assessed with a custom-made manipulandum attached to a 6-axis load cell and a Biodex System 3 isokinetic testing machine. Movements into extension were imposed at 4 speeds: 6 degrees /s, 30 degrees /s, 60 degrees /s, and 90 degrees /s. The resistive torque and electromyographic response to these imposed movements were measured. The torque response at the slowest speed (6 degrees /s) was attributed solely to the passive elements of the elbow and was subtracted from the torque response at the higher speeds (30 degrees /s, 60 degrees /s, 90 degrees /s), leaving only reflex torque. The reflex torques at 30 degrees /s, 60 degrees /s, and 90 degrees /s were used for further analysis. Peak torque, peak joint stiffness, and onset angle of reflex torque responses were found; repeatability and daily variability of these measures were statistically examined. The variabilities due to the subject, test day, and trial number were computed. The overall reliability of each parameter at the 3 higher test speeds using different testing schemes was also calculated. Ninety percent reliability in the measurement of all parameters was obtained after at least 2 days of testing during which 3 tests a day were performed. The variability in between-subjects measurements was at least 4 times greater than the intertrial variability when testing at the highest speeds; daily variability that was up to 50% of the intersubject variability was also observed. The biomechanic measures correlated well with the Ashworth Scale

  10. Influence of Combinations of Shoulder, Elbow and Trunk Orientation on Elbow Joint Loads in Youth Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Toyohiko; Inui, Hiroaki; Ninomiya, Hiroki; Muto, Tomoyuki; Nobuhara, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Shoulder and elbow pain in youth baseball pitchers is a well-recognized phenomenon. Common problems in pitching mechanics that can lead to injury begin with stride foot contact. The purpose of this study was to address the relationships between the combinations of shoulder, elbow and trunk orientation at the instant of stride foot contact and elbow joint loads in youth baseball pitchers. Methods: A total of 143 Japanese male youth baseball pitchers participated in this study after providing written informed consents approved by the hospital’s institutional review board. The procedures to be performed were also explained to their parent(s) or legal guardian(s). Each participant was not currently injured or recovering from an injury at time of testing. For data collection of baseball pitching, a set of 14-mm spherical reflective markers was placed on the skin overlying 34 anatomical landmarks determined. Subsequently, a motion capture three-dimensional automatic digitizing system was used to collect 500-Hz from 7 charge-coupled-device synchronized cameras was set up around the regulation pitching mound in an indoor laboratory. After performing a preparation routine of stretching and warm-up pitching, each player pitch to 5 fastball pitches off the pitching mound to a catcher at the regulation distance of 16 m for youth pitchers. The best pitch thrown for a strike was chosen for kinematic and kinetic analysis. The local coordinate systems were used to calculate 3-dimesional rotation at the trunk, shoulder and elbow using the typical Eulerian sequence. Afterward, the standard inverse dynamic equation was used to estimate resultant joint forces and torques at throwing shoulder and elbow. In order to normalize data between subjects, forces and torques were expressed as percent using body weight and height. A multiple regression analysis was carried out to assess the combined effects of shoulder (external rotation, abduction and horizontal adduction), elbow

  11. Modeling of Human Joint Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Radial Lateral " epicondyle Olecranon Radius Ulna Figure 3. Lateral aspect of the right elbow joint. -17- Annular Ligament This strong band encircles... elbow joint, knee joint, human joints, shoulder joint, ankle joint, joint models, hip joint, ligaments. 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side If...ligaments. -A rather extended discussion of the articulations and anatomical descriptions of the elbow , shoulder, hip, knee and ankle joints are

  12. Joint kinetic response during unexpectedly reduced plantar flexor torque provided by a robotic ankle exoskeleton during walking

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Pei-Chun; Lewis, Cara L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    During human walking, plantar flexor activation in late stance helps to generate a stable and economical gait pattern. Because plantar flexor activation is highly mediated by proprioceptive feedback, the nervous system must modulate reflex pathways to meet the mechanical requirements of gait. The purpose of this study was to quantify ankle joint mechanical output of the plantar flexor stretch reflex response during a novel unexpected gait perturbation. We used a robotic ankle exoskeleton to mechanically amplify the ankle torque output resulting from soleus muscle activation. We recorded lower-body kinematics, ground reaction forces, and electromyography during steady-state walking and during randomly perturbed steps when the exoskeleton assistance was unexpectedly turned off. We also measured soleus Hoffmann- (H-) reflexes at late stance during the two conditions. Subjects reacted to the unexpectedly decreased exoskeleton assistance by greatly increasing soleus muscle activity about 60 milliseconds after ankle angle deviated from the control condition (p<0.001). There were large differences in ankle kinematic and electromyography patterns for the perturbed and control steps, but the total ankle moment was almost identical for the two conditions (p=0.13). The ratio of soleus H-reflex amplitude to background electromyography was not significantly different between the two conditions (p=0.4). This is the first study to show that the nervous system chooses reflex responses during human walking such that invariant ankle joint moment patterns are maintained during perturbations. Our findings are particularly useful for the development of neuromusculoskeletal computer simulations of human walking that need to adjust reflex gains appropriately for biomechanical analyses. PMID:20171638

  13. Ultrasonic guided wave propagation in pipes with elbows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breon, Luke J.

    Guided wave inspection of pipelines is an important and growing area of Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE). This technique can be used for remote inspection or monitoring of buried pipelines, or pipelines with insulation. Guided waves are sensitive to flaws such as corrosion pits and cracks. They can be used to locate flaws existing on either the outer or the inner surface of a pipe. Guided wave energy focusing can be performed to concentrate guided wave energy at particular combinations of circumferential and axial locations in straight pipes. When it can be used, this practice enhances the circumferential resolution of defects. Elbows in a piping system are sufficiently disruptive to guided wave energy that the focusing methods used in practical inspections of straight pipe have not been extended to the region beyond an elbow. Counter-intuitively, elbows with a 45 degree bend are more harmful to guided waves than those with a 90 degree bend. A simple and elegant explanation for this phenomenon is provided in this dissertation. Theoretical advancements to guided wave physics propagating around an elbow have tended to be few and slow. This is at least partly due to the complexity of the mathematics involved in the conventional description of guided wave mechanics. Parametric focusing for pipes with bends has not been previously possible as it is for straight sections of pipes. While some techniques such as time-reversal mirrors and blind finite-element-method modeling have existed for focusing beyond elbows, these techniques have been limited and largely of academic value. Also, the understanding of wave behavior in a pipe elbow has in the past been generally unclear. Consequently, signal interpretation has also been very limited for guided waves initiating in, or returning from, the far side of an elbow. A new approach to understanding guided wave propagation is developed in this work. This understanding consists of the idea that the pathway a guided wave will take

  14. Role of the lateral collateral ligament in posteromedial rotatory instability of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Bellato, Enrico; Kim, Youngbok; Fitzsimmons, James S; Hooke, Alexander W; Berglund, Lawrence J; Bachman, Daniel R; O'Driscoll, Shawn W

    2017-09-01

    Posteromedial rotatory instability (PMRI) of the elbow consists of an anteromedial coronoid fracture with lateral collateral ligament (LCL) and posterior bundle of the medial collateral ligament (PMCL) tears. We hypothesized that the LCL tear is required for elbow subluxation/joint incongruity and that an elbow affected by an anteromedial subtype 2 coronoid fracture and a PMCL tear exhibits contact pressures different from both an intact elbow and an elbow affected by PMRI. Six cadaveric elbows were tested under gravity varus stress using a custom-made machine designed to simulate muscle loads and to passively flex the elbow from 0° to 90° and measure joint contact pressures. After testing of the intact specimen (INTACT-elbow), an anteromedial subtype 2 coronoid fracture with a PMCL tear (COR+PMCL-elbow) and a PMRI injury (PMRI-elbow), after adding an LCL tear, were tested. The highest values of mean contact pressure were used for the comparison among the 3 groups. Neither subluxation nor joint incongruity was observed in the COR+PMCL-elbow. The addition of an LCL detachment consistently caused subluxation and joint incongruity. Mean contact pressures were higher in the COR+PMCL-elbow compared with the INTACT-elbow (P < .03) but lower than in the PMRI-elbow (P < .001). The LCL lesion in PMRI is necessary for elbow subluxation and causes marked elevations in contact pressures. Even without subluxation, the COR+PMCL-elbow showed higher contact pressures compared with the INTACT-elbow. Treatment of PMRI should be directed toward prevention of joint incongruity, whether by surgical or nonsurgical means, to prevent high articular contact pressures. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. "Swan neck deformity" of the second toe corrected by flexor digitorum longus to flexor digitorum brevis tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-04-01

    "Swan neck deformity" of the second toe is a rare deformity. It is a hyperextension of the proximal interphalangeal joint. The patient may complain of painful callosity underneath the proximal interphalangeal joint. Surgical correction should be considered if conservative treatment fails to relieve the pressure point. The optimal surgical option for this deformity has not yet been defined. We report a case of swan neck deformity of the second toe that was successfully corrected by flexor digitorum longus to brevis tenodesis. Therapeutic Level IV: Case Report. © 2014 The Author(s).

  16. Inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty for bony ankylosed elbows

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bony ankylosis of elbow is challenging and difficult problem to treat. The options are excision arthroplasty and total elbow replacement. We report our midterm results on nine patients, who underwent inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty in our hospital with good functional results. Materials Our case series includes 9 patients (seven males and two females) with the mean age of 34 years (13-56 years). Five patients had trauma, two had pyogenic arthritis, one had tuberculous arthritis, and one had pyogenic arthritis following surgical fixation. Results The average duration of follow up is 65 months (45 months-80 months). The mean Mayo's elbow performance score (MEPS) preoperatively was 48 (35-70). The MEPS at final follow up was 80 (60-95). With no movement at elbow and fixed in various degrees of either flexion or extension preoperatively, the mean preoperative position of elbow was 64°(30°to 100°). The mean post operative range of motion at final follow up was 27°of extension (20-500), 116°of flexion (1100-1300), and the arc of motion was 88°(800-1000). One patient had ulnar nerve neuropraxia and another patient developed median nerve neuropraxia, and both recovered completely in six weeks. No patient had symptomatic instability of the elbow. All patients were asymptomatic except one patient, who had pain mainly on heavy activities. Conclusion We conclude that inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty is a viable option in the treatment of bony ankylosis of the elbow in young patients. PMID:22142391

  17. Inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty for bony ankylosed elbows.

    PubMed

    Rex, Chadrabose; Periyasamy, Rameshkumar; Balaji, Subbachandra; Premanand, C; Alva, Shreyas; Reddy, Shiva

    2011-12-05

    Bony ankylosis of elbow is challenging and difficult problem to treat. The options are excision arthroplasty and total elbow replacement. We report our midterm results on nine patients, who underwent inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty in our hospital with good functional results. Our case series includes 9 patients (seven males and two females) with the mean age of 34 years (13-56 years). Five patients had trauma, two had pyogenic arthritis, one had tuberculous arthritis, and one had pyogenic arthritis following surgical fixation. The average duration of follow up is 65 months (45 months-80 months). The mean Mayo's elbow performance score (MEPS) preoperatively was 48 (35-70). The MEPS at final follow up was 80 (60-95). With no movement at elbow and fixed in various degrees of either flexion or extension preoperatively, the mean preoperative position of elbow was 64°(30°to 100°). The mean post operative range of motion at final follow up was 27°of extension (20-500), 116°of flexion (1100-1300), and the arc of motion was 88°(800-1000). One patient had ulnar nerve neuropraxia and another patient developed median nerve neuropraxia, and both recovered completely in six weeks. No patient had symptomatic instability of the elbow. All patients were asymptomatic except one patient, who had pain mainly on heavy activities. We conclude that inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty is a viable option in the treatment of bony ankylosis of the elbow in young patients.

  18. Prevention of Elbow Injuries in Youth Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Fleisig, Glenn S.; Andrews, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Although baseball is a relatively safe sport, numerous reports suggest a rapid rise in elbow injury rate among youth baseball pitchers. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed was searched for epidemiologic, biomechanical, and clinical studies of elbow injuries in baseball (keywords: “youth OR adolescent” AND baseball AND pitching AND “ulnar collateral ligament OR elbow”; published January 2000 – April 2012). Studies with relevance to youth baseball pitchers were reviewed. Relevant references from these articles were also retrieved and reviewed. Original data, insight, and recommendations were added. Results: The majority of baseball elbow injuries are noncontact injuries to the dominant arm resulting from repetitive pitching. Five percent of youth pitchers suffer a serious elbow or shoulder injury (requiring surgery or retirement from baseball) within 10 years. The risk factor with the strongest correlation to injury is amount of pitching. Specifically, increased pitches per game, innings pitched per season, and months pitched per year are all associated with increased risk of elbow injury. Pitching while fatigued and pitching for concurrent teams are also associated with increased risk. Pitchers who also play catcher have an increased injury risk, perhaps due to the quantity of throws playing catcher adds to the athlete’s arm. Another risk factor is poor pitching biomechanics. Improper biomechanics may increase the torque and force produced about the elbow during each pitch. Although throwing breaking pitches at a young age has been suggested as a risk factor, existing clinical, epidemiologic, and biomechanical data do not support this claim. Conclusions: Some elbow injuries to youth baseball pitchers can be prevented with safety rules, recommendations, education, and common sense. Scientific and medical organizations have published safety rules and recommendations, with emphasis on prevention of overuse and pitching while fatigued. Strength

  19. Elbow flexion and forearm supination strength in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Kerschbaum, Maximilian; Maziak, Nina; Böhm, Elisabeth; Scheibel, Markus

    2017-09-01

    Despite the lack of representative data of a healthy population, many clinical trials concerning the measurement of postoperative elbow flexion or forearm supination strength use the contralateral side as a control. We hypothesized that there are no differences in elbow flexion and supination strength between the dominant and nondominant sides in healthy volunteers. The study was performed on a cross-sectional cohort of healthy subjects without any prior injuries or surgical interventions of the upper extremities. Isometric elbow flexion strength and supination strength were measured on both the dominant and nondominant sides. The results were analyzed for the entire group and subanalyzed for female vs. male, for different age groups, and according to handedness and regular practice of overhead sports. A total of 150 subjects (75 female and 75 male subjects; mean age, 44 ± 15 years [range, 18-72 years]) were included in this study. Within the entire collective, no significant differences concerning the elbow flexion strength between the dominant and nondominant sides could be detected, whereas the supination strength was 7% higher on the dominant side (P = .010). Women, right-hand-dominant subjects, and subjects who do not regularly practice overhead sports have a significant 8% higher supination strength on the dominant side compared with the nondominant side (P < .05). Left-hand-dominant subjects have an 8% higher elbow flexion strength on the nondominant right side (P < .05). Elbow flexion strength and forearm supination strength differ between the dominant and nondominant sides. The contralateral upper extremity cannot be used as a matched control without some adjustments. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy for chronic elbow tendinosis: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Darryl E; Beckley, James M; Smith, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Elbow tendinopathy is the most common cause of elbow pain affecting active populations. Surgical excision is reserved for patients with refractory symptoms. Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy performed under local anesthesia also removes degenerated tissue and therefore provides an alternative treatment option to surgical excision. This investigation prospectively documented the safety and 1-year efficacy of ultrasonic percutaneous tenotomy performed by a single operator. Nineteen patients, aged 38 to 67 years, in whom >6 months of conservative management for medial (7) or lateral (12) elbow tendinopathy had failed were prospectively studied. All patients were treated with percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy of the elbow by a single operator. Visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the 11-item version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (Quick DASH) index, and the Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) were assessed by an independent observer before treatment and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after treatment. No procedural complications occurred. Total treatment time was <15 minutes, and ultrasonic energy time averaged 38.6 ± 8.8 seconds per procedure. Average VAS scores were significantly improved from 6.4 to 2.6 at 6 weeks and were 0.7 at 12 months (P < .0001). Similar improvement occurred with the Quick DASH (pretreatment, 44.1; 12 months, 8.6, P < .0001) and MEPS (pretreatment, 59.1; 12 months, 83.4; P < .0001). Percutaneous ultrasonic tenotomy performed under local anesthesia appears to be a safe and effective treatment option for chronic, refractory lateral or medial elbow tendinopathy up to 1 year after the procedure. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.